[House Hearing, 110 Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



 
                 PERFORMANCE REVIEW OF EDUCATION, LOAN

                  GUARANTY, VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION


                   AND EMPLOYMENT, AND VETS PROGRAMS

=======================================================================

                                HEARING

                               before the

                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY

                                 of the

                     COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS
                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                       ONE HUNDRED TENTH CONGRESS

                             FIRST SESSION

                               __________

                             MARCH 7, 2007

                               __________

                            Serial No. 110-6

                               __________

       Printed for the use of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs



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                     COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS

                    BOB FILNER, California, Chairman

CORRINE BROWN, Florida               STEVE BUYER, Indiana, Ranking
VIC SNYDER, Arkansas                 CLIFF STEARNS, Florida
MICHAEL H. MICHAUD, Maine            DAN BURTON, Indiana
STEPHANIE HERSETH, South Dakota      JERRY MORAN, Kansas
HARRY E. MITCHELL, Arizona           RICHARD H. BAKER, Louisiana
JOHN J. HALL, New York               HENRY E. BROWN, JR., South 
PHIL HARE, Illinois                  Carolina
MICHAEL F. DOYLE, Pennsylvania       JEFF MILLER, Florida
SHELLEY BERKLEY, Nevada              JOHN BOOZMAN, Arkansas
JOHN T. SALAZAR, Colorado            GINNY BROWN-WAITE, Florida
CIRO D. RODRIGUEZ, Texas             MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
JOE DONNELLY, Indiana                BRIAN P. BILBRAY, California
JERRY McNERNEY, California           DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado
ZACHARY T. SPACE, Ohio               GUS M. BILIRAKIS, Florida
TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota

                   Malcom A. Shorter, Staff Director

                                 ______

                  Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

              STEPHANIE HERSETH, South Dakota, Chairwoman

JOE DONNELLY, Indiana                JOHN BOOZMAN, Arkansas
JERRY McNERNEY, California           RICHARD H. BAKER, Louisiana
JOHN J. HALL, New York               JERRY MORAN, Kansas

Pursuant to clause 2(e)(4) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House, public 
hearing records of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs are also 
published in electronic form. The printed hearing record remains the 
official version. Because electronic submissions are used to prepare 
both printed and electronic versions of the hearing record, the process 
of converting between various electronic formats may introduce 
unintentional errors or omissions. Such occurrences are inherent in the 
current publication process and should diminish as the process is 
further refined.


                            C O N T E N T S

                               __________

                             March 7, 2007

                                                                   Page
Performance Review of Education, Loan Guaranty, Vocational 
  Rehabilitation and Employment, and VETS Programs...............     1

                           OPENING STATEMENTS

Chairwoman Stephanie Herseth,....................................     1
    Prepared statement of Chairwoman Stephanie Herseth...........    32
Hon. John Boozman, Ranking Republican Member,....................     2
    Prepared statement of Congressman Boozman....................    33
Hon. John J. Hall................................................     3
Hon. Jerry McNerney..............................................     4

                               WITNESSES

U.S. Department of Labor, Hon. Charles S. Ciccolella, Assistant 
  Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training Service........     4
    Prepared statement of Mr. Ciccolella.........................    33

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:
Keith M. Wilson, Director, Education Service, Veterans Benefits 
  Administration.................................................     7
    Prepared statement of Mr. Wilson.............................    39
Bill Borom, Deputy Director, Vocational Rehabilitation and 
  Employment, Veterans Benefits Administration...................     9
    Prepared statement of Mr. Borom..............................    41
Keith Pedigo, Director, Loan Guaranty Service, Veterans Benefits 
  Administration.................................................    11
    Prepared statement of Mr. Pedigo.............................    44

                   MATERIAL SUBMITTED FOR THE RECORD

July 23, 2007, letter and attachments, from Hon. Charles S. 
  Ciccolella, responding to several requests for information from 
  Committee Members during the hearing...........................    47
U.S. Department of Labor's description of their Transition 
  Training Academy entitled, ``Wounded & Insured Transition, The 
  Training Academy Model''.......................................    75


                 PERFORMANCE REVIEW OF EDUCATION, LOAN



                  GUARANTY, VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION



                   AND EMPLOYMENT, AND VETS PROGRAMS

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2007

             U.S. House of Representatives,
                    Committee on Veterans' Affairs,
                      Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 2:05 p.m., in 
Room 340, Cannon House Office Building, Hon. Stephanie Herseth 
[Chairwoman of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Present: Representatives Herseth, Hall, Donnelly, McNerney, 
Boozman, Moran.

            OPENING STATEMENT OF CHAIRWOMAN HERSETH

    Ms. Herseth. Good afternoon. The Veterans' Affairs Economic 
Opportunity Subcommittee hearing on the Performance, Staffing, 
and Services provided by the Education, Loan Guaranty, and 
Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Programs of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs and Veterans' Employment and 
Training Service of the Department of Labor will come to order.
    I would like to thank Ranking Member Boozman for his 
leadership as past Chairman of this Subcommittee. I look 
forward to again working with you in this Congress in the same 
bipartisan and cooperative spirit with which you led us in the 
109th Congress.
    I also want to welcome the new Members to the Subcommittee, 
one of whom is here, and that is Mr. John Hall of New York who 
has joined us. We also have representatives Joe Donnelly of 
Indiana, Jerry McNerney of California, and Jerry Moran, 
although not a new Member to the Congress, is a new Member to 
the Subcommittee and he is from Kansas.
    I look forward to working with all of these distinguished 
gentlemen and the returning Members of the Subcommittee on our 
efforts to ensure that our Nation's veterans receive the best 
available services as they seek to access the benefits that 
they have earned.
    Earlier this year, the Subcommittee Membership discussed 
the hearing topics to be covered in the 110th Congress. I am 
proud to say that we have a very ambitious list that includes 
expanding education benefits for the National Guard and 
Reserve, examining the funding levels for State Approving 
Agencies, reviewing the VA's procurement goals with respect to 
veteran-owned and service-disabled small business, and other 
important issues.
    First and foremost, Ranking Member Boozman, I look forward 
to working with you and our colleagues on the Armed Services 
Committee to update the Montgomery GI Bill for National Guard 
and Reserve servicemembers. These brave servicemen and women 
continue to support our military missions in Iraq, Afghanistan, 
and elsewhere around the world. Unfortunately, despite their 
extensive deployments and even with Chapter 1607 programs, 
their education benefits do not reflect their increased service 
to our Nation.
    Again, I look forward to working with all Members of the 
Subcommittee to effectively address this issue and to advance 
legislation that better ensures Guard and Reserve 
servicemembers essential to our total force military policy, 
that they are more equitably treated.
    Like many of my colleagues, I have spent the last few days 
meeting with constituents who are members of various Veteran 
Service Organizations. Those meetings have generated many 
questions and concerns, some of which I hope to address here 
today.
    I am particularly interested in hearing about the VA's 
efforts to address the education claims workload and potential 
problems associated with the centralization of education claims 
service operations, especially if understaffed.
    I would like to thank our panelists for being here to 
participate in a frank dialogue with Members of the 
Subcommittee, and I encourage you to work with us as closely as 
you have been so that we all may properly serve our Armed 
Forces, our veterans, and their families as they transition 
back to civilian life following their honorable service to our 
country.
    Much progress has been made in education benefits, 
vocational rehabilitation services, and VA home loan programs. 
However, we must insist on thorough analyses, accurate numbers, 
and I think everyone would agree that we must remain vigilant 
to protect against any declining benefits or customer service.
    Thank you all again for being here. I look forward to 
hearing your testimony.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Herseth appears on p. 32.]
    Ms. Herseth. And I now recognize our Ranking Member, Mr. 
Boozman, for any opening remarks that he may have.

             OPENING STATEMENT OF HON. JOHN BOOZMAN

    Mr. Boozman. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
    Again, good afternoon. Thanks to each of our witnesses for 
taking the time to be here today. Budget season is certainly 
always a busy time, but these sometimes hectic schedules serve 
a good purpose in allowing us to better understand and get a 
thorough understanding of the budget for the next fiscal year.
    Before I begin my remarks, last year at the end of the 
year, I thought I was joking in the sense that I alluded to the 
fact that Ms. Herseth might be taking over. And sure enough, 
she is.
    And, you know, certainly I very much have enjoyed working 
with you in the past, and, you know, I certainly pledge, as you 
were so gracious to me, that we talk a lot about bipartisanship 
around here, but truly we will do anything we can to be 
supportive and really look forward to a good year.
    The President has sent us a budget. It is a good template. 
It is certainly not perfect, but it is a good start. Both sides 
of the aisle have presented their views and estimates to the 
Budget Committee. Now it is up to them to pass a budget 
resolution that works.
    I believe that we were in agreement with the Majority when 
it came to suggesting a thousand additional FTE for VBA. We 
also suggested additional funding for IT programs and the need 
to conduct significant business process reform because just 
piling more FTE every year will not necessarily solve the 
structural issues preventing rapid processing of claims of all 
types.
    The challenges before VA and VETS is to make programs work. 
It is clear that people expect not just programs but ones that 
actually deliver the goods to the beneficiaries. We need to get 
the processing time down for both VR&E and education.
    The last session, we mandated a report on streamlining 
education processing, and I hope the Department will send us a 
legislative proposal to change the way they do business if that 
is required.
    The Veterans' Employment and Training Service still lacks 
sufficient data in many areas, and I look forward to Mr. 
Ciccolella's testimony on how they propose to do better in that 
area.
    One thing I am disappointed in is the flat budget 
recommendation for the National Veterans Training Institute in 
Denver. As you know, Public Law 109-461 imposed new training 
requirements for DVOPs and LVERs. And when the staff visited 
NVTI last year, they were told that they probably need an 
additional one million to meet the additional throughput. So I 
would appreciate if you might address that shortfall here 
today.
    Thank you very much, Madam Chairman. I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Boozman appears on p. 33.]
    Ms. Herseth. Well, thank you, Mr. Boozman.
    I would now like to recognize Mr. Hall from New York for 
any opening remarks he may have.

             OPENING STATEMENT OF HON. JOHN J. HALL

    Mr. Hall. Thank you, Madam Chairman. Madam Chair, I suppose 
I should say.
    In short, I do not want to make many remarks because the 
hearing, I think, is for us to hear from you. So I will just 
say that I am double-booked with the Water Resources 
Subcommittee meeting. So if I dash out in a little while, it is 
not a sign of disrespect. I did choose to come here first. And 
I am concerned especially in my district with the fact that in 
the most affluent district in the State of New York and in the 
Westchester County, which is the most affluent county in the 
State of New York and one of the five most affluent in the 
United States, we still have 20 percent of the homeless 
population who are veterans.
    And so anything we can do to improve the job training and 
transition for them to give them a better shot at staying on 
their feet and to prevent them and their families from 
teetering over that cliff into bankruptcy and/or homelessness 
is something that I will work very hard to do.
    Thank you.
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you, Mr. Hall.
    Mr. McNerney, welcome to the Subcommittee. We are pleased 
to have you with us working on important issues that we have 
had a chance to discuss more informally, but welcome to the 
first hearing of this Subcommittee.
    I recognize you for any opening remarks you may have.

            OPENING STATEMENT OF HON. JERRY MCNERNEY

    Mr. McNerney. Thank you, Madam Chairwoman. I appreciate 
your remarks and, Ranking Member Boozman, thank you for your 
remarks.
    One thing that I am very interested in after reading your 
testimony is how we can improve the opportunities for veterans. 
And as I look back over what happened in my father's 
generation, the veterans were given a tremendous opportunity 
that allowed them to buy houses, to get education, and really 
help develop our country.
    And nowadays, if we look at what is being offered to 
veterans, it is falling far short of that goal. That really did 
give our country a boost economically. It helped us develop a 
strong middle class and it gave our veterans back some of what 
they sacrificed for this country.
    And so I think it is incumbent upon us to look at what we 
are offering and find a way to increase that so that it does 
measure up in some way to what our prior generations offered.
    And I yield back.
    Ms. Herseth. Well, thank you very much.
    Thanks to all of you. Our distinguished panel of witnesses 
is well-qualified to highlight the programs of interest today.
    Joining us are Mr. Charles Ciccolella, Assistant Secretary 
for Veterans' Employment and Training Service of the U.S. 
Department of Labor; Mr. Keith Wilson, Director of Education 
Service; Mr. Bill Borom--am I pronouncing that correctly?
    Mr. Borom. Correct.
    Ms. Herseth [continuing]. Deputy Director of Vocational 
Rehabilitation and Employment; and Mr. Keith Pedigo, Director 
of Loan Guaranty Service of the U.S. Department of Veterans 
Affairs respectively.
    So, Mr. Ciccolella, let us begin with your testimony if you 
might.

 STATEMENTS OF HON. CHARLES S. CICCOLELLA, ASSISTANT SECRETARY 
FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, U.S. DEPARTMENT 
    OF LABOR; KEITH M. WILSON, DIRECTOR, EDUCATION SERVICE, 
 VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS 
AFFAIRS; BILL BOROM, DEPUTY DIRECTOR, VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 
    AND EMPLOYMENT, VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION, U.S. 
  DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS; AND KEITH PEDIGO, DIRECTOR, 
 LOAN GUARANTY SERVICE, VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION, U.S. 
                 DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

            STATEMENT OF HON. CHARLES S. CICCOLELLA

    Mr. Ciccolella. Thank you, Madam Chair.
    Ranking Member Boozman, Congressman McNerney, Congressman 
Hall, thank you for the opportunity to appear before the 
Committee to testify on the Veterans' Employment and Training 
Service.
    VETS was created in 1980. We have 240 full-time Federal 
staff deployed around the country. The majority of our staff 
are not in Washington. They are in the field in the States.
    We deliver our programs and services to veterans three 
ways, directly to veterans, through the State workforce 
agencies, and through competitive grants. To assist us, we have 
six regional administrators and we have a Federal Director of 
State Veterans' Employment and Training in each one of the 
States.
    VETS has three missions. First, we provide employment 
assistance to veterans in America's publicly-funded workforce 
system. Secondly, we provide employment assistance to 
transitioning military members while they are still in the 
military before they get out. And, finally, we protect 
servicemembers' employment and reemployment rights, which, of 
course, is so much more important today with the activation of 
nearly 600,000 Guard and Reserve since 2001.
    My testimony describes our programs in pretty good detail, 
so what I will do is just talk about some of the highlights of 
our programs.
    Our first mission is to provide employment assistance to 
veterans through America's publicly-funded workforce system. 
The law, as you know, requires that veterans receive priority 
in that system. In addition, there are over 2,100 veteran 
employment representatives, DVOPs and LVERs who provide 
specialized employment services to veterans. Those veteran 
employment representatives are provided through the Jobs For 
Veterans Grant.
    The DVOPs and LVERs, veteran employment representatives are 
critical to the process. The majority of them, 99 plus percent, 
are veterans.
    We have several initiatives including the Key to Career 
Success Initiative and our Hire Vets First Campaign that we use 
to link transitioning servicemembers to the career one-stop 
centers in the public workforce system. As a result of these 
services, 611,000 veterans were employed last year through the 
workforce system.
    I would also like to say that we work closely with the VA 
on their Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program. We 
have a very effective partnership with VA and that is codified 
in a formal agreement.
    Both agencies focus on a team effort to place more Chapter 
31 veterans into employment. We also forward position veteran 
employment specialists at the VETS centers and other VA 
locations. Seventy-one of them are forward positioned.
    Our second mission is to provide employment assistance for 
separating military members. We work in collaboration with the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs, 
and we provide a transition assistance employment workshop for 
members of the military who are separating.
    We focus the TAP Program on helping servicemembers to build 
a plan for making the jump from the military into civilian 
life. That means we teach the TAP participants how to translate 
their skills, education, and experience onto resumes and 
actually have a draft resume when they leave the TAP Program. 
We teach them interviewing skills and also how to use the one-
stop career system.
    We are working very hard with the Department of Defense to 
increase participation in the TAP Program. In 2001, we put 
100,000 servicemembers through TAP. Last year, we put 150,000 
through TAP. As you know, there are about 220,000 who leave the 
military each year.
    We also offer TAP to the National Guard and Reserve when 
they return from their deployments, and we have budgeted 
additional money in the President's 2008 budget to handle 
increased participation in TAP.
    We provide personal face-to-face transition employment 
assistance to our wounded and injured servicemembers through 
our REALifelines Program, our Recovery Employment Assistance 
Lifelines Program.
    The program provides on-site job counseling, referral, 
training, and assistance while they are still in the military 
and then after they leave the military.
    We have three Federal staff members out-stationed at the 
Department of Defense's Military Seriously Injured Center. We 
have six forward positioned staff at the key military major 
medical facilities. We have helped 2,800 participants with 
employment assistance through our REALifelines Program.
    Our third mission is to protect servicemembers' civilian 
job rights under the ``Uniform Services Employment and 
Reemployment Rights Act.'' The USERRA law prevents 
discrimination against veterans or any member of the service, 
and it provides reemployment rights to servicemembers. It is 
especially important today with the activation of so many 
National Guard and Reservists.
    Our Department administers the law. We educate employers 
and we conduct investigations of complaints. We also work very 
closely with the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Justice and the Office of Special Counsel in order to enforce 
that law when employers do not understand it or are not 
compliant. Today employers understand that law much better 
because we have put out very easy to understand rules, and 
regulations, which make the law extremely understandable.
    As an example, during the first Gulf War, we mobilized 
265,000 Guard and Reservists for that war. The 2 years 
following, we had 2,500 formal investigations of USERRA 
complaints. After 9/11, the complaint rate went up about 1,500 
complaints a year. That is about where we are now. I think that 
is going to sort of level off.
    During the first Gulf War, we had one complaint for every 
54 returning Guard and Reservists. Today that is one in 96. 
That is still not good enough, but it goes to show the 
improvement that we have made.
    We also have a responsibility for enforcing veterans' 
preference. We conduct the investigations. Of course, OPM has 
the responsibility for veterans' preference in Federal hiring.
    There are two other programs that I would like to mention. 
The first one is that VETS operates a very, very important 
program under a competitive grant called the Homeless Veterans 
Reintegration Program.
    Congressman Hall spoke briefly about the homeless veterans 
situation in New York. Approximately 10,000 homeless veterans 
will be placed in employment in 2006 and 2007. We plan to put 
11,000 homeless veterans into jobs, and not poor-paying jobs, 
but into good jobs in 2008.
    We also sponsor a highly successful Hire Vets First 
Campaign that promotes the skills of veterans and the public 
workforce system because that is what employers need to know, 
the challenge is to hook up the employer with the veteran.
    We promote, sponsor, and brand veteran job fairs. Last 
year, we promoted and sponsored 17 veteran job fairs, and we 
held a national veterans employment summit right before the end 
of the year. This year, we are going to cosponsor over 120 
veteran job fairs.
    The job fairs are very important. A lot of people do not 
think they work. They do work. About 15 percent of the veterans 
who attend job fairs actually get jobs. But more importantly, 
when you have a veteran-only job fair, what it does is it 
brings the veterans, the employers, the press, and workforce 
system together and it raises the awareness among that 
community or in that community, particularly in the business 
community, about the value that veterans bring to the 
workforce.
    Forty-eight governors to date have signed Hire Vets First 
Proclamations and the Hire Vets First Web site gets 35,000 
unique visitors every month.
    And we look forward to continuing to work with this 
Committee to make these programs more successful. I would be 
happy to respond to your questions.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Ciccolella appears on p. 
33.]
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you very much, Mr. Ciccolella.
    Mr. Wilson, we will take your testimony, please.

                  STATEMENT OF KEITH M. WILSON

    Mr. Wilson. Thank you.
    Good afternoon, Chairwoman Herseth, Ranking Member Boozman, 
and Members of the Subcommittee. I appreciate the opportunity 
to appear before you today to discuss VA's education programs.
    My testimony will highlight workload, staffing, and 
services provided under the Montgomery GI Bill Active Duty, the 
Montgomery GI Bill Selected Reserve, the Reserve Educational 
Assistance Program known as REAP, and the Survivors and 
Dependents Educational Assistance Program. I will also discuss 
outreach efforts related to the education benefits as well as 
automation tools that support our programs.
    Chapter 30 and Chapter 1606 MGIB programs provide veterans, 
servicemembers, and members of the Guard and Selected Reserve 
with educational assistance generally in the form of monthly 
benefits to assist them in reaching their educational and 
vocational goals.
    The Reserve Educational Assistance Program provides an 
enhanced benefit for Reservists and those in the National Guard 
who are activated for more than 90 days due to an emergency or 
contingency operation as defined by the President or Congress.
    Together these programs assist in the readjustment to 
civilian life, support the Armed Services recruitment and 
retention efforts, and enhance the Nation's competitiveness 
through the development of more highly-educated and productive 
workforce.
    The Chapter 35 DEA Program is the only VA educational 
assistance program specifically designed for spouses, surviving 
spouses, and eligible children of certain veterans. This 
program offers up to 45 months of educational benefits.
    The educational workload has been steadily increasing. From 
2000 until 2006, the number of education claims rose by 46 
percent. Total claims for 2007 are expected to be 1.4 million, 
which represents a 2 percent increase over 2006.
    During the first quarter of 2007, original claims for 
educational benefits increased by about 13,000 or almost 20 
percent over the same period in fiscal year 2006. We believe 
this could be an indicator of continuously increasing usage 
rates in our programs.
    We have developed a threefold strategy to manage the 
pending inventory and improve claims processing timeliness 
involving maximization of current resources, increased 
staffing, and information technology enhancements.
    We initiated a Contact Management Support Center in 
September 2006. This has allowed the Education Service to 
allocate 60 additional employees, trained employees, to process 
and decide education claims.
    We have also increased staffing to handle the additional 
work claims from 2000 until 2006 direct FTE increase by 22 
percent from 591 to 726. In fiscal 2006, additional hiring 
resulted in a net increase of 39 additional FTE.
    In the long term, we are pursuing IT enhancements and 
capabilities that will allow us to further automate claims 
processing as well as inquiry resolution.
    We are enhancing our current self-service Internet 
application known as WAVE. This application used by individuals 
to verify attendance and change addresses is being updated to 
allow claimants to view their electronic claims folders and 
confirm VA receipt of submitted documents.
    It is also being expanded to automate changes in direct 
deposit information.
    The Electronic Certification Processing System known as 
ECAP automatically processes enrollment certification submitted 
by schools. In fiscal 2006, 9 percent of our incoming 
supplemental claims, more than 105,000 claims, were processed 
through this electronic method thereby eliminating the need for 
human intervention. We are currently pursuing strategies to 
update ECAP and increase the percentage of claims processed 
automatically.
    This year, we are beginning to make progress toward 
achievement in our performance goals. Our targets for the end 
of fiscal 2006 are to process original claims in 35 days and 
process supplemental claims in 15 days. Timeliness has improved 
for supplemental claims processing.
    Average days to complete has dropped from 20 days in 2006 
to 16 days in the first quarter of 2007. Average days pending 
for those claims that have not been decided yet has dropped 
from 23 days to 15 days. Average days to complete original 
claims has increased from 40 to 46 days from 2006 until the 
first quarter of 2007. This was the result of being able to 
process more older work since we were able to focus more 
resources on claims processing due to the Call Center 
Initiative.
    However, the reduction in average days pending for original 
claims from 39 days in 2006 to 32 days in 2007 reflects 
improvement in timeliness that will be reflected in improved 
average times to complete in our future workload.
    Expanded outreach to separating servicemembers has led to 
increased benefit usage. We distribute a series of 
informational brochures targeting servicemembers at 12 months 
following activation on active duty as well as 24 months after 
entering active duty and then a third time 6 months prior to 
separation.
    These brochures and targeted mailings are specifically 
tailored toward servicemembers who are eligible for the Chapter 
30 MGIB Program. Mailings are sent to approximately 90,000 
active-duty members on a quarterly basis. In 2006, VA has 
conducted more than 8,500 transitional assistance briefings for 
nearly 395,000 attendees.
    For REAP, our newest benefit, we have distributed more than 
300,000 copies of our REAP brochure to activated Guard and 
Reserve units. Soon we will be doing direct mailings to REAP 
participants just as we now do for our Chapter 30 program 
participants.
    Madam Chairman, this concludes my statement. I would be 
pleased to answer any questions you or any other Member of the 
Subcommittee may have.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Wilson appears on p. 39.]
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you very much, Mr. Wilson.
    Mr. Borom.

                    STATEMENT OF BILL BOROM

    Mr. Borom. Good afternoon, Madam Chairwoman, Members of the 
Subcommittee. Thank you for inviting me here today to discuss 
the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program (VR&E). My 
testimony will provide an overview of the VR&E services and 
performance.
    The VR&E provides veterans with service-connected 
disabilities the necessary services to assist them in preparing 
for, finding, and maintaining suitable employment or achieving 
maximum independence in their daily living.
    The VR&E is an employment program that offers a wide 
variety of formal education, on-the-job training, 
apprenticeships, and internships to meet veterans' individual 
career goals.
    The VR&E has implemented several programs and initiatives 
to ensure that servicemembers and veterans are informed about 
the program and are provided the services necessary to 
transition from the military to civilian life.
    In 2004, former VA Secretary, Anthony J. Principi, 
established a task force to study the VR&E Program. As a result 
of their recommendations, VR&E implemented the five-track 
employment process. The five-track process standardizes program 
practices and places the emphasis on employment up front and 
early on.
    In 2005, VR&E stationed 72 employment coordinators at 
regional offices across the country. Additionally, we 
established job resources labs at each regional office and an 
online employment Web site called vetssuccess.gov. These 
resources provide vital vocational and employment support 
leading to successful employment outcomes.
    The Disabled Transition Assistance Program is a vital 
component of transition assistance for servicemembers with 
disabilities. DTAP assists potentially eligible servicemembers 
in making an informed decision about VA's Vocational 
Rehabilitation Program. In fiscal year 2006, VA conducted over 
1,400 DTAP briefings with over 28,000 participants.
    VR&E has expanded its outreach to Operation Iraqi Freedom 
and Operation Enduring Freedom servicemembers through an early 
intervention program known as Coming Home To Work. This program 
provides valuable civilian work experience in government 
facilities to servicemembers facing medical separation from the 
military. Currently the program has 121 participants receiving 
these early intervention services.
    Priority outreach and case management services are provided 
to OIF/OEF servicemembers and veterans who apply for the 
program. Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment case 
coordinators ensure that servicemembers and veterans receive 
priority attention through the application, entitlement, and 
five-track employment process.
    VR&E and the Department of Labor's Veterans' Employment and 
Training Service continue to work together and have adopted a 
team approach to job development and placement activities to 
improve vocational outcomes for program participants.
    Currently 38 VA regional offices have 71 DVOPs or Local 
Veterans Employment Representatives collocated at their 
stations. Having these resources on-site is a best practice 
that enhances the efficiency of teamwork between the two 
agencies.
    VR&E has significantly improved services to veterans and 
servicemembers applying for and participating in VR&E programs. 
The rehabilitation rate, which is the number of veterans with 
disabilities that achieve their VR&E goals, as compared to the 
number that discontinue or leave the program before their 
completion, has improved.
    In fiscal year 2006, nearly 70 percent of program 
participants achieved rehabilitation status. Currently in 
fiscal year 2007, that rate has risen to over 74 percent.
    We have also seen improvement in the number of days it 
takes the veterans to enter the program. One way of measuring 
is by the days the veteran spends in applicant status. In 
fiscal year 2006, veterans spent an average of 58 days in 
applicant status. Currently in fiscal year 2007, the average is 
down to 53 days.
    Last fiscal year, approximately 9,000 veterans achieved 
their rehabilitation employment goals through the program. The 
majority of these individuals entered professional, technical, 
and managerial careers.
    VR&E workload is expected to increase as a result of 
individuals returning from OIF/OEF. To meet this need, we plan 
to hire additional staff in fiscal year 2007, increasing our 
on-board strength by over 100 employees. Additional FTE will 
reduce case management workloads by approximately 10 percent 
and will improve the timeliness of services provided to program 
participants.
    Madam Chairwoman, this concludes my statement. I would be 
pleased to answer any questions you or any of the Members of 
the Subcommittee may have.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Borom appears on p. 41.]
    Ms. Herseth. We thank you for your testimony.
    Mr. Pedigo, and I hope I am pronouncing that correctly?
    Mr. Pedigo. Yes, that is correct.
    Ms. Herseth. Okay. Thanks.

                   STATEMENT OF KEITH PEDIGO

    Mr. Pedigo. Madam Chairwoman and Members of the 
Subcommittee, I appreciate the opportunity to appear before you 
today to discuss the VA Home Loan Program. In my testimony, I 
will highlight VA's commitment to meeting the housing needs of 
our Nation's veterans.
    The Loan Guaranty Program serves a clientele that is 
diverse in many ways. The only common denominator of this 
clientele is service in the Armed Forces of our Nation. We make 
it possible for veterans to compete in the marketplace for 
credit with persons who were not obliged to forego the pursuit 
of gainful occupations by reason of military service.
    The Loan Guaranty Program provides a guarantee to private 
lenders making loans to veterans. This guarantee enables 
veterans to purchase a home without the need to make a 
downpayment.
    Other important program benefits include making direct 
loans to Native-American veterans living on trust lands and 
providing specially-adapted housing grants to severely disabled 
veterans.
    Since the inception of the Loan Guaranty Program in 1944, 
VA has guaranteed more than 18 million loans totaling in excess 
of $914 billion. We believe that most of these veterans would 
not have been able to purchase a home at the time they did 
without the assistance of the no downpayment feature of this 
program.
    In the last 5 years, VA has assisted more than 1.4 million 
veterans in obtaining home loan financing totaling almost $197 
billion.
    While there is no maximum VA loan amount set by law, most 
lenders presently limit these loans to $417,000. This limit is 
set by the secondary mortgage market which purchases most VA 
loans once they are made.
    Effective with enactment of Public Law 108-454 in December 
of 2004, the maximum VA guarantee was indexed to the 
conventional conforming loan limit which is adjusted each 
January by the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 
In practical terms, this means that the maximum VA no 
downpayment loan amount will always be the same as the 
conventional conforming loan limit. This amount has been set at 
$417,000 for calendar year 2007.
    Like other homeowners, some veterans experience financial 
hardships that affect their ability to make mortgage payments. 
When this occurs, we help veterans retain their homes through 
supplemental servicing efforts. VA offers financial counseling 
and may intervene directly with a lender on the veteran's 
behalf to set up a repayment plan.
    When VA is successful in establishing a repayment plan that 
results in the delinquency being brought current, we call this 
a successful intervention.
    In fiscal year 2006, VA accomplished more than 8,700 
successful interventions which translated into a savings to the 
government of $175 million in avoided claim payments.
    Madam Chairwoman, we are very honored to be able to 
administer the Specially-Adapted Housing Program. Veterans who 
have certain service-connected disabilities may be entitled to 
a Specially-Adapted Housing Grant or a Special Home Adaptation 
Grant depending on the nature of their disability.
    Both grants can be used to make adaptations to a home being 
constructed or to modify an existing home in order to meet 
their specific needs.
    The Specially-Adapted Housing Grant is limited to $50,000 
and is generally used to create a wheelchair-accessible home. 
The Special Home Adaptation Grant is limited to $10,000 and is 
generally used to assist veterans who are blind or who have 
lost or lost the use of both hands or extremities below the 
elbow.
    The goal of these grant programs is to provide a barrier-
free living environment which affords the veteran a level of 
independent living that he or she may not otherwise enjoy. In 
fiscal year 2006, we served 528 veterans through these grant 
programs, expending $24.6 million.
    Until enactment of Public Law 109-233 in June of 2006, 
grant recipients could only receive their grant benefit from VA 
one time. Now eligible veterans or active-duty servicemembers 
may receive up to a total of three such grants.
    In December of 2006, VA mailed letters to more than 16,000 
living veterans who have received grants since 1948 notifying 
them of the statutory change which might entitle them to 
another Specially-Adapted Housing Grant. Primarily as a result 
of this outreach effort, we have already received over 2,000 
formal inquiries requesting subsequent grant usage.
    Historically VA has completed between 400 and 600 grants a 
year. Because of the labor-intensive nature of the grant 
process, a substantial increase in workload will ensue. 
However, we are reallocating resources and streamlining program 
requirements to ensure that these veterans receive the high-
quality personalized service that they deserve.
    Madam Chairwoman, this concludes my testimony. I greatly 
appreciate the opportunity to be here, and look forward to 
answering any questions that you or the other Members of the 
Committee may have.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Pedigo appears on p. 44.]
    Ms. Herseth. Well, thank you very much to all of you.
    Mr. Wilson, if I may start with you. During a Subcommittee 
hearing last year, February 14th of 2006, this Subcommittee had 
a hearing which Mr. Ron Aument, the VA Deputy Under Secretary 
for Benefits, stated that the average number of days to 
complete original claims for 2005 was 33 days. I believe he 
also predicted this number to go down by the end of 2006 to an 
average of 27 days.
    But today in your testimony, you mentioned that you are 
set- 
ting a target of 35 days to process original claims for fiscal 
year 2007.
    My question is, why is the time that it is taking to 
process the original claims expected to go up this year?
    Mr. Wilson. We saw a higher usage rate in 2006 than we had 
anticipated. So we did see more claims coming in than we 
anticipated and in order to counter that, we hired additional 
staff. We hired about 80 FTE in 2006, claims processors.
    It took a while for those individuals to get up to speed. 
So in some respects, they were more of a burden than a help in 
terms of getting the workload under control. So our pending 
inventory did get higher than we anticipated, which meant the 
processing time exceeded what we expected to see in 2006.
    In order to bring that down to where we wanted to be, one 
of the things that we did in addition to the hiring initiative 
was create the call center, National Call Center. We have been 
able to process in excess of 100,000 additional claims because 
of the resources that we were able to free up during that call 
center.
    And we have seen timeliness improvements. In fact, I just 
yesterday received the numbers for February and our processing 
time for original claims in February was actually 35 days, 
which was a significant improvement.
    Although it does not get us back in line with our original 
projections of 27 days, it is a significant improvement over 
what we saw in 2006. And I believe it positions us to continue 
to see that continued improvement in the processing time 
limits.
    Ms. Herseth. Well, I hope you are right. And I would like 
you to, if you would, provide for the Subcommittee a quarterly 
analysis----
    Mr. Wilson. Sure.
    Ms. Herseth [continuing]. Of the time that it is taking. My 
hope is that the Budget Committee will review favorably our 
request for up to an additional thousand FTEs for VBA which 
hopefully would give you some discretion to add more.
    [The following was subsequently received from Mr. Wilson.]

        Education Service: A quarterly analysis of the time it takes to 
        process an education claim.

          For the first quarter of FY07, overall Education claims 
        processing timeliness is as follows:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
    First Quarter FY07 (average days to
                 complete)                    Original     Supplemental
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 30 (MGIB-AD)                             41.1              15.0
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 1606 (MGIB-SR)                           42.9              18.1
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 1607 (REAP)                              55.4              17.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 35 (DEA)                                 57.8              21.4
------------------------------------------------------------------------
All Benefits                                     46.2              16.4
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Ms. Herseth. You know, back when I first joined the 
Committee working with Mr. Boozman and former Chairman of the 
full Committee, now Ranking Member, Mr. Buyer, I had some 
concerns with the Administration's proposal for fiscal year 
2006, which actually proposed cutting FTEs for the Education 
Service.
    We were able to negotiate no cuts. I was hoping we could 
add, but at least the Administration anticipated the increased 
usage proposed for fiscal year 2007, an increase saying now of, 
I think, 14 FTE for fiscal year 2008. I want to monitor this 
very closely.
    And before I ask you a question about the new customer 
service, the contract, because I have a constituent who had a 
particular experience that was not good, let me just have you 
clarify.
    On page six of your written testimony, in the second full 
paragraph, it says, ``Average days to complete original claims 
increased from 40 days in fiscal year 2006 to 46 for the first 
quarter of 2007. However, the reduction in average days pending 
for original claims from 39 days in fiscal year 2006 to 32 
days.''
    What is the difference in average days to complete original 
claims and average days pending for original claims?
    Mr. Wilson. Sure. When we look at our workload in terms of 
how effectively we are meeting our timeliness goals, we look at 
it from two perspectives. We look at it from the historical 
perspective in terms of how we have been doing and what future 
indicators lend us to believe we will be able to do in the 
future.
    And the two mechanisms we use to measure that are average 
days to complete, which means for those decisions that we have 
completed and the individual has been paid, that is how long it 
took us to process that work.
    Ms. Herseth. Okay.
    Mr. Wilson. Those things are already completed.
    Average days pending is the measurement of the claims that 
we have pending that have not yet had decisions rendered on 
them.
    Ms. Herseth. All right.
    Mr. Wilson. So it gives us an indicator of what our future 
timeliness is going to be. Ultimately what we try to do is 
drive down average days pending as much as possible because 
that is our leading indicator of how we are going to be doing 
in the future.
    Ms. Herseth. Okay. And the average days pending, when does 
the clock start ticking?
    Mr. Wilson. When it is received in the processing office, 
the day it is received in the processing office.
    Ms. Herseth. And the day that it is received in the 
processing office is the same day it gets entered into the 
system? There is no lag time, right, from when----
    Mr. Wilson. Correct.
    Ms. Herseth. Okay. All right. I will come back for a few 
questions during the second round, but I would ask Mr. Boozman 
if he has some questions. I am pretty sure he does.
    Mr. Boozman. Thank you.
    I want to ask all of you. One of our concerns last year, 
one of our ongoing concerns, and this is truly a concern of the 
Committee's, a concern of Congress, is the unemployment rate 
among our veterans. Especially there is a subset in there that 
was pretty high and we were kind of scratching our heads trying 
to figure out what was causing that.
    Can you tell us kind of how that is going and get into some 
of the things that you are doing to try and address that? You 
mentioned the job fairs and some of the other things along with 
the standard things that we have been doing for years.
    But I guess my concern is, you know, we are in a situation 
now where the country economically is doing well. The economy 
is strong. Unemployment is low.
    And I think it is great, Mr. Wilson, you mentioned the 20-
percent increase in whatever. So it sounds like people are 
using, you know, the opportunity to pursue education, which in 
the future is going to help us with those things.
    But if you all could just comment real quick on that, I 
would appreciate it.
    Mr. Ciccolella. The unemployment rate for young veterans 20 
to 24 years old has traditionally been higher than the 
unemployment rate for nonveterans in the same cohort. For the 
past 20 years, the unemployment rate for veterans in general is 
about 1 percentage point below the national average. Right now 
it is about 3.8 percent. The national average is about 4.7.
    It is not a new phenomenon. The unemployment rate for 
nonveterans who are 20 to 24 is also up there, but it is not 
quite as high.
    The difference we think is this. Young people come in the 
military about 18 or 19 years old, so they are going to get out 
when they are 22, 23, 24. When they get out, they are generally 
going to go into their first full-time civilian job.
    Now, when they are in the military, they are not writing 
resumes and interviewing for jobs. And they do not understand 
there is a career workforce system and they are not going to 
college. They may take some college and online courses while 
they are in the military, but generally do not have college 
degrees.
    The kids coming in the military today are very smart. They 
all have high school educations and they all score well on the 
Armed Forces Qualification Test. We have very high-quality 
individual servicemembers in the military.
    So when they come out of the military, they are slightly 
behind their contemporaries in terms of applying for jobs. This 
is why transition assistance is so important when they make the 
jump from the military to civilian life.
    When you look at the barriers for young veterans coming 
into the workforce, the first barrier is that they have trouble 
translating their skills, experience, and education onto their 
resumes. And this is not just true of young veterans who are 20 
to 24 years old. This is true of colonels, generals, and 
sergeant majors.
    And the reason is, and when you look at one of their 
resumes, it says that they were the ``CINC'' of JTF, alpha, or 
something like that. Nobody can understand that. Employers just 
simply do not understand that.
    When you are in the military, you do not interview for 
jobs. You are usually assigned your jobs, so veterans when they 
first come out do not do well on their interviews.
    This is why in the Transition Assistance Program we have to 
focus it on translating the skills that they have onto resumes 
so employers can understand it, and they have to do practice 
interview sessions so that they practice looking people in the 
eye, having the proper posture, and they can respond to 
questions.
    Now, this is what we are doing with the Transition 
Assistance Program.
    There has not been a lot of research done on these young 
veterans. The VA, the Department of Labor, and Defense are 
working together on this.
    VA has got a study now. They are going to look at 2,000 
servicemembers, 1,000 who are active duty, 1,000 who are Guard 
and Reserve, and they are going to ask them some questions 
about when did you get your job, how long did it take, did you 
use your military skills, so that we will have a better insight 
into them.
    I commissioned a study last year with the University of 
Chicago. And we took a look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics' 
national longitudinal study of youth, and that is 9,000 youth 
who were age 12 to 16 in 1997. So they are 22 to 24 years old 
now.
    What we found was that the first week they get out of the 
military, their unemployment rates are very high, about 32 
percent. Every month after that, the rates go down. They go 
down dramatically. So at the third month, they were at about 24 
percent. At the sixth month, they were 11 percent. At the ninth 
month, they were consistent with veterans in general.
    Now, you have to be careful what sort of conclusions you 
draw from that. We have a phase two of that study. We need to 
go back to those veterans. They do a 90 minute interview with 
them every year so we can find out a lot of stuff from them.
    But it suggests to us that veterans take their time, young 
veterans take their time when they get out of the military, and 
they may not take the first job. It suggests, and the Defense 
Department can corroborate this, that they use their 
unemployment compensation for ex-servicemembers while they are 
looking for a job. And that is fine. That is what it is there 
for. It provides a cushion.
    But it also tells us that some of them may go to school and 
go to training or something like that. But it also tells us 
that some may take a break because of post-traumatic stress 
because of the combat that they have been in. And it may 
suggest that some of them do not have the confidence and do not 
think that they are highly skilled and can enter the workforce.
    So those are the individuals that we have to get into the 
career one-stop centers to connect directly with our veteran 
employment representatives because our veteran employment 
representatives can look those folks in the eye, most of them 
are veterans themselves, and they can tell whether they are 
touched by post-traumatic stress and they can refer them to the 
VA or they can help them with their resumes and help them get 
into the workforce that way.
    If you have only a high school education and you are in the 
combat arms, maybe you do not think you have a lot of skills, 
but our veterans today have great skills. They come in. They 
are highly qualified. While they are in, they train, they 
learn. And when they come out, they are exactly what employers 
are looking for.
    And we talk to employers all the time, and employers are 
looking for not only the hard skills like the medics and the 
technical skills, but they are more often looking for people 
who come to work on time, who are drug free, who have 
initiative, they are success oriented, they have got loyalty, 
and they have got integrity. And so employers want to hire 
veterans. The issue is connecting them with veterans.
    We need more research so we have a better window into the 
20- to 24-year-old veterans, but what we really need to do is 
we need to get more troops to go through the transition 
employment workshop and we need to help those troops translate 
their skills on to resumes. We need to practice interviewing 
skills and we need to make them aware that there is a workforce 
system out there and there are VA services out there and those 
services are for them. And we need to connect them to those 
services.
    Now, the unemployment rate for young veterans in 2004 was 
13.6 percent. In 2005, it was nearly 16 percent. Then in 2006, 
it has gone down. It is about 10.4 percent. So we think we are 
addressing it in the right way, but we have got to get more 
troops to the transition employment workshop. We have to make 
sure the transition employment workshop has deliverables so 
they come out with a resume and they come out having done an 
interview so when they go for a job, it is not the first time 
they have written a resume and it is not the first time they 
have interviewed.
    And this is not, you know, rocket science. This is real 
easy to figure out. So that is what we are trying to do.
    Mr. Boozman. Thank you.
    Thank you, Madam Chairman.
    Go ahead if you would like.
    Mr. Borom. Adding from the VR&E side on that, we have had 
some similar experiences. I was a field counselor for many 
years. And as I have worked with many field counselors, the 
experience that Labor has seen with what we refer to as soft 
skills, interview skills, ability to write a resume, it does 
hamper employment initially.
    We do work with the veterans that come into the voc rehab 
program, the servicemembers who work with the Labor Department, 
on trying to improve their soft skills and improve resumes, 
interview skills, do mock interviews, whatever we need to help 
them get through that interview process.
    Though we work with a smaller set of veterans, you know, 
the disabled group as compared to the Labor Department, 
oftentimes due to the disabilities that the veteran 
servicemember has, they may not be able to go back to the kind 
of work they did before. And so we often are looking at 
assisting the individual with getting into more suitable work.
    We want to capitalize where we can on their skills that 
they have had, but oftentimes that may have been of a physical 
nature and they perhaps cannot do that kind of work anymore and 
additional training may be needed. Hence, they are not moving 
into the labor force at that point.
    Mr. Boozman. Thank you.
    Thank you, Madam Chair.
    Ms. Herseth. Mr. McNerney, do you have questions for the 
panel?
    Mr. McNerney. Sure. Thank you, Madam Chairwoman.
    Mr. Borom, listening to your testimony concerning the 
Coming Home to Work Program, you mentioned that in fiscal year 
2007 through January 31st, and I realize that is a fairly short 
timeframe, but the 121 servicemembers participating seemed 
extraordinarily low compared to the number of veterans out 
there that might need this service.
    Is there any explanation why that is such a small number?
    Mr. Borom. At this point, it is a small program. It is only 
located at we will say seven areas, but really eight sites. It 
is a new program, so we are trying to form the partnerships in 
the community with other government agencies who work with the 
individuals who are in the military treatment facilities. We 
see that number is increasing. But at this point, that is as 
many that--I want to say as many as has been in the program.
    Mr. McNerney. In your opinion, that is a successful 
program, it turns out good results?
    Mr. Borom. I think it is a successful program. We want to 
see more individuals get hooked into the work programs that it 
is designed for. As the field counselors are working in that 
direction, they are making new contacts. I was recently in 
Augusta, Georgia, at Fort Gordon, matter of fact, where they 
just opened up a new facility. And while there, what we were 
doing was making those community contacts and working with the 
military in trying to get, you know, transportation needs met 
so we can get individuals to the work sites.
    Sometimes what does occur with trying to work through some 
of the issues with DoD and the individuals, they may have a lot 
of medical appointments and as we try to work through some of 
that, it is sort of a dynamic process.
    I think it is a successful program. I think it is very 
useful for the servicemembers who are on medical hold, 
particularly as they are looking at going perhaps back into 
civilian employment.
    And not all do. Some actually turn back to military 
service, active duty, you know, who are in the program. But it 
does give them real-life work experiences in that capacity. So, 
yes, I do think it is successful.
    Mr. McNerney. Mr. Wilson, on the electronic certification 
processing, you claim 70 percent of the cases were handled 
electronically before human intervention.
    One of the things I am interested in is, have you gotten 
any feedback from the veterans as to how they like the 
interaction with the electronic system and how accurate are 
those claims that are being handled electronically?
    Mr. Wilson. We have had nothing but positive feedback 
concerning the interaction the veterans have had with our IT 
systems. It has in many situations replaced what was previously 
a paper process for them. So it saves a lot of time for them 
and it is certainly a lot easier for them.
    On average right now, for instance, when an individual is 
required to go in and do their monthly certification that they 
actually attended school, it takes less than a minute to 
actually do that now. Instead of manually filling out a form, 
putting it in an envelope, sticking a stamp on it, mailing it 
off to us, they go on line, on to their account, click it, and 
that information is transmitted directly to us. So we have had 
nothing but positive feedback.
    Concerning the accuracy, one of the reasons that we have 
what I would consider a smaller percentage of claims processed 
electronically than we would like is that the mechanisms we use 
to set it up ensured that it had to be 100 percent accuracy. We 
would not accept anything where a computer would potentially 
generate an incorrect payment. And we are comfortable that that 
has not happened. So those payments are 100 percent accurate.
    Mr. McNerney. Thank you.
    Thank you, Madam Chairman.
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you.
    We have also been joined, as you see, by another new Member 
of our Subcommittee, Mr. Donnelly of Indiana. You are 
recognized.
    Mr. Donnelly. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
    Mr. Borom, we have seen an increase in vets coming back 
with mental disabilities who are struggling and need 
counseling. And I was wondering in your particular area what is 
being done to meet that need?
    Mr. Borom. As a servicemember or veteran who has applied to 
the program, and let us say they are in the program just to 
make it easier, as we identify people who have mental health 
issues, be it stress disorders or depression, whatever that may 
be, we would use community resources as available, we would use 
VA hospital referrals as available to that person.
    And counselors, voc rehab counselors themselves, can do, 
you know, counseling. Typically they do it on a more as-needed 
basis, brief counseling as needed. If additional services are 
needed, as someone is identified as needing more long-term 
treatment for stress disorders, then we typically would work 
with the VA hospitals to coordinate those services.
    You know, part of our goal is to make sure, because it is 
important, it is an element that affects their employment or 
potential employment or even the potential sometimes to even 
get through a rehab program, and so usually up front, we want 
to identify that and take proactive measures on it.
    Mr. Donnelly. So they are looking for that when someone is 
coming in, if someone is discussing that?
    Mr. Borom. Yes.
    Mr. Donnelly. And then, Mr. Pedigo, in terms of housing, 
you know, we have seen a lot of articles about subprime loans 
recently and the difficulties that are being encountered in 
that area.
    And I was wondering if you are providing credit counseling 
to veterans to make sure that they do not wind up about 4 
months into this purchase of a home looking up and saying, 
``what have I gotten into.''
    Mr. Pedigo. Congressman, we do not provide individual 
credit counseling to veterans. We do not have the capacity to 
do that. However, we do tell veterans that they should go 
online and take a credit counseling course that was developed 
by the Ginny Mae Corporation, which is a government corporation 
and part of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    However, once a veteran gets a loan, we are very mindful of 
the fact that for various reasons, some of them are not able to 
continue to make their payments at times. Consequently, we have 
a staff at our nine regional loan centers that are very 
personally involved in providing counseling to veterans in an 
effort to try to set up a repayment plan so that they can avoid 
foreclosure.
    In my testimony, I mentioned the successful interventions, 
which is a situation where our intervention is successful in 
helping the veteran bring his or her loan current. Over the 
last 5 years, VA accomplished a little over 50,000 successful 
interventions, saving the government approximately $985 
million.
    So while we cannot provide the counseling in depth up 
front, we are very active once the veteran gets the loan in 
helping that veteran avoid foreclosure.
    Mr. Donnelly. Thank you, Madam Chairman.
    Ms. Herseth. Well, thank you for your questions, Mr. 
Donnelly.
    Mr. Boozman, did you have further questions for the panel?
    Mr. Boozman. I did actually.
    Ms. Herseth. Go ahead. You only got the one in.
    Mr. Boozman. Again, I would just like to visit a little bit 
about the TAP Program because it does go into and I thought the 
discussion that you all had concerning the rate of unemployment 
in that age group that we are concerned, I thought that was 
very, very good, and I appreciate your efforts.
    The TAP Program, and, again, working with Ms. Herseth the 
last couple of years we visited several of those facilities. 
And just in being around troops, and traveling, all over the 
world, I was in Landstuhl a couple of weeks ago, you know, 
visiting there. It is a well-received program. It is very, very 
good. I know you all have worked hard on it.
    Do we have the record-keeping abilities so that we can sit 
down and see what DoD installation is doing, and what it is not 
doing? And then we can take that information and then we can 
decide, you know, what we do with that to see an improvement in 
the installations that are not getting it done.
    Would that be a difficult thing to do? Is that something 
that you could access for us? Does that make sense?
    Mr. Ciccolella. Oh, yeah, absolutely. Absolutely.
    [The Committee received a follow-up letter from the U.S. 
Department of Labor, dated July 23, 2007, from Mr. Ciccolella, 
which appears in the Appendix. The response to this query is 
included in the response to question 5A.]
    Mr. Boozman. And the other side, too, is, I mean, we have--
and we were just visiting--we have got commanders that because 
of their force structure are making decisions. Do people go to 
TAP class or do we function, you know, so I understand that is 
a problem.
    But go ahead. Like I say, is there a way to access that 
information?
    Mr. Ciccolella. We track the participation per transition 
employment workshops, so we can provide the number of 
participants by workshop.
    What we do not do is track the servicemember as they leave 
the military. We capture whether they are employed or not 
through the wage record information record system, but we do 
not take Social Security numbers during transition.
    I understand the question. I applaud the question. The 
services do, I think, a very good job of trying to get as many 
of their servicemembers through the transition employment 
workshop, but it does not always work that way. Sometimes 
operational requirements of the commanders preclude a 
servicemember from attending the TAP Program or they attend on 
the first day and then they are taken off and put on a detail 
on the second day, that kind of thing.
    It is very important in my view, and I made this clear to 
the Defense Department, it is very important that we do 
everything that we can once a servicemember makes the 
determination that they are going to leave the military, not 
before that because then you are competing with DoD for that 
person, once they have made that decision, and they make that 
decision when they do their pre-separation counseling, there is 
a check that they make indicating that they want to go to a 
transition employment workshop, then it is incumbent on 
commanders at all levels to send their servicemembers to TAP.
    If we are going to ask these servicemembers to deploy and 
fight during two or three deployments, then we ought to be able 
to give them a week or three or four days so that they can 
transition properly out of the service.
    I think the services are trying to increase participation. 
It is not moving as fast as it probably should. We are getting 
65 percent of the servicemembers through TAP, but we need to 
get about 85 percent. Some people do not necessarily want to go 
to TAP.
    Mr. Boozman. Right. Exactly. I would appreciate it, though, 
if you could provide us a graph of the areas where so many 
people are rotating out and then, of that group, who received 
the TAP Program versus, you know, kind of in areas. If you 
could do that, that would be helpful.
    Mr. Ciccolella. We can provide to you the number of 
servicemembers, Congressman Boozman, who attend the TAP 
Program.
    [The graphs were previously supplied by the Department of 
Labor, and have been included at the end of the July 23, 2007, 
U.S. Department of Labor follow-up letter, from Mr. 
Ciccollela.]
    Mr. Boozman. Can you tell us if it was in Norfolk versus 
someplace else?
    Mr. Ciccolella. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. What we may not be 
able to tell you is that if a unit comes back and it has got 
800 people in it, we cannot tell you how many of those 
individuals, you know, are leaving the military. What we can 
tell you is, you know, how many servicemembers are going to the 
transition workshops.
    [The Committee received a follow-up letter from the U.S. 
Department of Labor, dated July 23, 2007, from Mr. Ciccolella, 
which appears in the Appendix. The response to this query is 
included in the response to question 5B.]
    Mr. Boozman. I would just be interested in declaring if 
they are----
    Mr. Ciccolella. Yes.
    Mr. Boozman. Can I ask one more thing? Would you mind?
    Ms. Herseth. Sure.
    Mr. Boozman. The only other thing I would like to comment 
on and then ask you--I am really concerned about this--you 
know, Walter Reed is in the newspaper and all right now, as far 
as the facility and stuff. I would really like to see if we 
could have those folks who are over there and you, go over and 
visit. They do their rehab and then they are back watching 
television and stuff.
    Is there an opportunity to go ahead and get the 
occupational therapist in there very quickly to find out what 
they want to do, and then when they are not in rehab, almost 
have a situation where, you know, we are getting them to a 
community college or college or whatever. See what I am saying, 
and start that process right then when they have really got a 
lot of time on their hands and things, but almost start some 
pilot program where it is pretty inclusive because the numbers 
are not that great? I mean, they are great, but they are not 
that great.
    But try and get those folks where at the end of their 
rehab, we are not getting them a job, but we are getting them a 
career that being the end goal. And that is something that, you 
know, like I say, I would be very interested in.
    And I know we will have her comment in a second, but it 
does seem like that, not that we are not doing a bad job. I do 
not mean that. It is just I think in these situations, we kind 
of need to start thinking outside of the box a little bit. It 
has always been done that way.
    And, again, you know, if you will give me some comments and 
feedback, I would be very, you know, very delighted to see if 
we could help you with that.
    Mr. Ciccolella. Exactly right. When servicemembers come 
back and their wounds are taken care of and they are 
stabilized, then they go through the process of either being 
returned to the force or they go through the process of the 
evaluation boards to leave the military.
    Regrettably that process takes a long time. The services to 
their credit do not want to release servicemembers unless they 
are as well as possible. But sometimes it takes 18 months or 24 
months, and you hit the nail on the head. What do they do 
during that 12 to 18 months.
    Here is what we have done at Balboa out in California. We 
have got the CISCO people out there with the Department of 
Veterans Affairs and Department of Labor people, and they are 
offering training, information technology training, so they 
will be able to do some certification type training, 
information training. So that is a good model right there.
    I was in a meeting today and we are looking at what we 
might be able to do out at Walter Reed. I agree with you on the 
point that once you start a program like that, then the other 
medical centers will want to do the same thing.
    I think I would like to leave it on this note. We will get 
back to you with what we come up with out at Walter Reed. But 
we have got a lot of ideas and we have got a lot of good ideas 
about what could be done, because you are exactly right. Troops 
go to formation in the morning. They go to a medical 
appointment and then the rest of the day, they may not have a 
lot to do and they are going to be there for a lengthy period 
of time. And it is a very difficult situation. And you are 
right. It is in the news.
    [The following was subsequently received from the 
Department of Labor:]

        The Department of Labor has provided a description of their 
        ``Transition Training Academy,'' as it outlines the problems 
        servicemembers face during the rehabilitation process, and more 
        importantly, it describes what VETS are doing to tackle these 
        problems. The Transition Training Academy description appears 
        in the Appendix.

    Mr. Boozman. Thank you.
    Thank you, Madam Chair.
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you, Mr. Boozman.
    Let me just pick up from there, Mr. Ciccolella, and ask you 
about Operation War Fighter. I know that the Department of 
Labor is a partner in executing this program that offers 
opportunities for active duty who are wounded or injured to be 
placed in temporary assignments within different Federal 
agencies.
    The question may be specifically to the situation we are 
facing at Walter Reed. How many of the 140 servicemembers that 
have participated in this program have actually been Walter 
Reed outpatients? Do you know?
    Mr. Ciccolella. I can find that out. I think the majority 
have--I think the number is 150. All of them, yeah.
    Ms. Herseth. All of them?
    Mr. Ciccolella. The number should be 157. That should be 
the updated number. Maybe we did not put that in the testimony. 
And 50 of those have already been hired by Federal agencies.
    [The Committee received a follow-up letter from the U.S. 
Department of Labor, dated July 23, 2007, from Mr. Ciccolella, 
which appears on p. 47. The response to this query is included 
in the response to question 2 on p. 48.]
    Mr. Ciccolella. The program, I think, Madam Chair, was 
designed as part of the therapy when they are recovering from 
their wounds and they intern in a sense with the Federal 
agencies. But it has turned out much, much better than that.
    And we have got a person who works at the seriously injured 
center or severely injured center, who briefs the folks out at 
Walter Reed about the opportunities, interviews them, and tries 
to match their skills with the requirements from the Federal 
agencies.
    And it is a pretty good response from the Federal agencies. 
And I think there may be a couple of congressional offices that 
have also come in on this.
    I will tell you it is a very good way to get good 
leadership, you know, people with some leadership skills into 
the Federal workforce at a time when a lot of people in the 
Federal workforce will be leaving just because they will be 
aging out of the Federal workforce.
    Ms. Herseth. I agree with you. I think that it also, as 
some of these young men and women experience some anxiety, at 
least that is what has been told to me about this process of 
trying to medically retire or medically discharge, so they do 
not want that process to proceed so quickly at times, and I 
think that this program has a lot of potential.
    Do you know what the average time has been to assign these 
individuals?
    Mr. Ciccolella. I would have to find that out for you, but 
we would be happy to do that.
    Ms. Herseth. If you would just provide us with some 
additional information on how this program is working from your 
perspective.
    Mr. Ciccolella. Sure. Absolutely.
    [The Committee received a follow-up letter from the U.S. 
Department of Labor, dated July 23, 2007, from Mr. Ciccolella, 
which appears on p. 47. The response to this query is included 
in the response to question 4 on p. 48.]
    Ms. Herseth. I would appreciate it.
    I will have more questions, Mr. Ciccolella, in a minute. 
But I want to go back, if I might, to Mr. Wilson.
    Tell me about the contract customer service for the 800 
number. I see that it was initiated September of 2006, and I am 
wondering how much training and what kind of training the 
individuals that are fulfilling this contract received and what 
types of questions they can and cannot answer when someone 
calls in, because, as I previously mentioned, I have got a two-
page, single-spaced letter from a constituent about a really 
bad experience. And this unfortunately for him was the first 
contact he had with the Education Service, and if you could 
provide me a little more detail on how that is working.
    Mr. Wilson. Absolutely. I would be glad to. I share some of 
the same sort of concerns, I believe, that you have. I would 
like to start, if I could, with just a touch of a background 
concerning why we created the call center in the first place.
    As you have already mentioned, our timeliness was not where 
we wanted it to be last year. The number of pending claims was 
not where we wanted it to be. The impact of standing up the new 
1607 Program was significant for us. There is no question about 
it.
    We wanted to address the pending inventory as aggressively 
as we could with the understanding that we had when we were 
developing this initiative the fall enrollment creeping closer 
and closer to us, and it was our desire to stand the call 
center up as much before the fall enrollment as possible to 
allow what I would refer to as a ramp-up time so that people 
could learn by OJT in addition to the training, et cetera.
    The time line did not match in reality what we were hoping 
to achieve and the training was condensed. The individuals on 
the phones at the call center received about a week's worth of 
training initially.
    The mission of the call center was never to take all calls 
going into the processing offices. The mission of the call 
center was to take what we refer to as tier one calls, which 
are your very simple, you can look at a screen or two screens 
and answer the question, for instance, what is the status of my 
claim, did the school submit my enrollment certification, those 
type of things that are very easy to teach people how to answer 
those type of questions.
    The call center again was designed to allow us to free up 
resources to reduce the pending inventory. I believe it was 
successful, but I also believe that we did pay a pretty steep 
price, quite honestly, concerning the customer service aspect 
of things. The call center attendants were provided with 
refresher training on a regular basis. We did quality 
monitoring as well as the contractor doing quality monitoring.
    We are still not satisfied with what we ended up seeing 
from a quality perspective. It was much more difficult for us 
to manage that than we had anticipated, again taking into 
account this is our first time dealing with this type of 
arrangement and we have learned a lot of lessons from the call 
center experience.
    I can tell you that because of the overall experience and 
the lessons that we have learned, we have made the decision not 
to continue the call center. The call center will be 
terminated. The last day of operation for them will be March 
16th, which I believe is a Friday. From that point, the calls 
will be going back to the regional processing offices.
    Having said that, there are a lot of things that we believe 
we learned that were good as well. The concept of a call center 
served us well in terms of the resources that it made available 
and the impact it had on the pending time limits. It did not 
have a good result in this instance with what we also were 
hoping to do in terms of improving the service we are providing 
on the phones.
    Ms. Herseth. I appreciate that, Mr. Wilson. I am glad to 
hear it is ending March 16th. I understand why you did it.
    But given what happened and not staying on the time line 
that you would have liked the condensed training, it does raise 
the issue of making sure that you have adequate resources, that 
you do not have to compromise on the customer service end to 
meet the issue of the workload side.
    And so I appreciate your testimony and the fact that not 
only you, but in sharing that with us, we can learn some 
lessons from the experience as well and how call centers may or 
may not be the most effective options given what we are faced 
with.
    Let us see. You mention on page three of your testimony 
that we went, from 2000 through 2006, we increased FTEs from 
591 to 726.
    Do you have any idea how many of the 591 of those that are 
still with the Education Service, how many of those individuals 
may be retiring within the next 1 to 2 years, how many are 
eligible for retirement?
    Mr. Wilson. I do not. I would have to research that and 
find out.
    Ms. Herseth. There is a lingering concern with regard to 
the new folks that you are bringing on and how much time they 
have to work with these very seasoned and experienced folks. It 
would maybe be helpful for us to see that if you could get us 
that information.
    Mr. Wilson. Absolutely. Sure.
    [The following was subsequently received from Mr. Wilson:]

        Education Service: Provide approximate number of education 
        service FTEs eligible for retirement.

          We estimate the number of retirees eligible in the overall 
        Education business line to be approximately 200. Historical 
        data shows that about 8 percent of those eligible to retire do 
        so, therefore, we would expect approximately 16 FTE to retire 
        over the course of the current FY. Based on our estimated 
        number of FTE for FY08, and if previous trends continue, we 
        would expect 17-18 employees to retire in FY08.

    Ms. Herseth. I may be testing Mr. Boozman's patience here 
with how long I am taking.
    I agree with you, and I know that Mr. McNerney and I think 
Mr. Donnelly, too, may have probed this. In terms of your IT 
backbone that you want to continue to build on to best serve 
all veterans but this younger generation that is particularly 
savvy in using IT, what is your timetable?
    You say in the future that you plan to add additional 
benefit information like payment information, remaining 
entitlement, the eliminating date. Do you have a timetable for 
when you would like to integrate that and do you have the 
resources identified in which to accomplish it as well?
    Mr. Wilson. We do. We have got a short-term strategy for IT 
as well as a long term. In the short term, what I would refer 
to as the quick hit type things in terms of enhancing our 
existing IT applications, we are hoping to have those rolled 
out before the fall enrollment, because those are relatively 
straightforward things that we believe we can leverage 
relatively quickly.
    Long term, what we are hoping to do, and I will have to 
find out the exact time frame, is refresh our entire base of 
applications and create more of an integrated tool that we 
refer to as TEES, which is simply The Education Expert System, 
and that will really fundamentally leapfrog us into a new level 
of technology.
    Ms. Herseth. I think that will be very helpful because, as 
you know, a number of the higher learning institutions that 
these young men and women are then utilizing their benefits for 
have become very sophisticated in allowing access 
electronically to their information. And so we would not want 
the Education Service in the minds of these young men and women 
to be so far behind, so I am glad we are focused there.
    [The following was subsequently received from Mr. Wilson:]

        Education Service: What is the timetable for full TEES IT 
        integration?

          We anticipate full TEES integration to be completed by 
        October 2011.

    Ms. Herseth. I do want to submit one question for the 
record if you could follow up, because I have a few questions 
for the other panelists. And it relates to something that has 
recently come to my attention. I would prefer additional 
information on how it works. It is regarding the so-called 
rating system that is used to evaluate employees' ability to 
process claims. Is that----
    Mr. Wilson. Rating system?
    Ms. Herseth. A rating system. Is there some rating system 
that exists? And what I will do is--we just heard about this 
from a constituent yesterday--we will provide you some 
information. Maybe we just need some clarity from his end and 
your end as to how that works.
    Mr. Wilson. Sure. I would be glad to provide whatever. I am 
drawing a blank right now.
    Ms. Herseth. Okay.
    Mr. Wilson. But obviously we will provide whatever we have.
    [The following was subsequently received from Mr. Wilson.]

        Education Service: Information regarding a rating system, which 
        addresses an employee's ability to process claims.

          The Education Service utilizes a National Performance 
        Standard to rate an employee's ability to process claims. Each 
        Regional Processing Office retains the discretion to adjust 
        those performance standards higher than what the national 
        average suggests. Elements measured in the performance standard 
        include per month claim production, quality, and customer 
        service.

    Ms. Herseth. Thanks.
    Mr. Ciccolella, I am currently working on legislation that 
would eliminate some of the job training service restrictions 
currently placed on veterans' spouses.
    As you know, a spouse can only receive job training 
assistance from veteran employment specialists if a 
servicemember died of a service-connected disability, is a POW, 
is MIA, or is totally disabled.
    And we heard from some veteran employment specialists at 
our one-stop career centers that they would like to be able to 
offer services to more spouses that are currently restricted 
from doing so.
    Would you support legislation that would open the door for 
more spouses to receive job training services?
    Mr. Ciccolella. You mean from the veteran employment 
representatives?
    Ms. Herseth. From them, yes.
    Mr. Ciccolella. Well, we do it for those who are seriously 
wounded and injured. We provide assistance to the caregivers, 
the families, the parents, and, you know, the spouses. So we do 
that.
    Ms. Herseth. But that is for----
    Mr. Ciccolella. Those are seriously wounded, severely 
wounded and injured. So that is part of our REALifelines 
Program.
    Ms. Herseth. So what is the disability rating requirement, 
a hundred percent?
    Mr. Ciccolella. No. For example, if a servicemember is 
recovering from their wounds or injury, they call the Military 
Seriously Injured Center or the Army or the Marine Corps. We 
have somebody there. And if it is an employment inquiry, we 
will take a look at that.
    A lot of times, the servicemember may still be in the 
service or may be out of the service, but may not be ready to 
go to work. So the caregiver is going to be the spouse. So we 
do that. We help that spouse or the parent into employment.
    Now, on a larger scale, let us take the example of helping 
spouses nationwide or targeting it to spouses of deployed units 
or something like that, I think the Department would have to 
take a look at that and look at the workload. And we would 
probably have to get some feedback from the States.
    Is it doable, yes. Would I support it? I would like to get 
a more coordinated position on it.
    [The Committee received a follow-up letter from the U.S. 
Department of Labor, dated July 23, 2007, from Mr. Ciccolella, 
which appears on p. 47. The response to this query is included 
in the response to question 1.]
    Ms. Herseth. I would appreciate it if you would gather more 
information with regard to workload and getting feedback from 
the States who are partners in your efforts. That would 
certainly be helpful to us at the point where we may choose to 
have a legislative hearing on that and other legislation during 
the 110th Congress.
    Mr. Pedigo, I know you have a plane to catch, so I do not 
have any specific questions for you. I just wanted to let you 
know before you have to leave that I believe, and I need to 
talk to Mr. Boozman to have my memory refreshed about some 
conversations we had on this in the last Congress as well, we 
think that the specially-adapted housing grants have not kept 
pace with the increased cost of the construction of adaptive 
homes. And so we are reintroducing legislation to increase the 
amount of those grants.
    And I am also going to be introducing legislation to 
correct an oversight with regard to what you referred to in 
your testimony about allowing veterans and servicemembers to 
receive up to a total of three grants. In the aggregate, they 
could meet their maximum amount, but there was an oversight 
unfortunately and it was written in a way that excludes the 
active-duty component. I wanted to let you know we plan to 
introduce legislation to correct that oversight.
    Mr. Pedigo. Thank you. And we appreciate that. That is a 
very special program, and we want to make sure that those 
veterans get everything that they should have coming to them.
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you and thank you for your testimony.
    Mr. Pedigo. Thank you.
    Ms. Herseth. Now, if I might, Mr. Ciccolella, just two 
questions regarding some followup from the Subcommittee hearing 
that we had May 12, 2005.
    Members of the Subcommittee expressed concern regarding the 
Department of Labor's lack of a report on VETS' activities as 
required by Chapter 41. And I know that since that time, we did 
receive an annual report and expect to receive another one 
shortly.
    Could you give us the status on when we might be seeing 
that report?
    Mr. Ciccolella. The 2005 report is late. It is done and it 
should be out very shortly. And the 2005 report is late by 
about a year, and the 2006 report is late almost by a month. We 
are working on that now. And I do not have a time line on that. 
We also have a Congressional report on USERRA due, the 
``Uniform Services Employment Reemployment Rights Act,'' and 
that report is in the offing right now.
    Ms. Herseth. I appreciate it. I know that there was sort of 
a lag time and hopefully we will get on track and go forward 
from there as we get ready for the 2007 one, if you can get 
those two off your plate.
    [The response is included in the July 23, 2007, DOL letter, 
from Mr. Ciccollela in response to question number 3, which 
appears on p. 48.]
    Ms. Herseth. And then also at that same hearing, Veteran 
Service Organization representatives raised concerns about 
having DVOPs and LVERs perform duties inconsistent with VETS 
missions. I think it was actually that they were performing 
some nonveteran related work at the one-stop career centers.
    Do you have any information in terms of the status of 
addressing that concern, if that is a concern that is 
lingering, that we might hear the same concern expressed if our 
Veteran Service Organization representatives were testifying 
today?
    Mr. Ciccolella. Madam Chair, the law says that the DVOP and 
LVER serve only veterans. It does happen where they serve 
nonveterans. Hopefully that is inadvertent and, of course, any 
services to nonveterans cannot be charged against the ``Job for 
Veterans Act State Grants.'' So it can be done in that context.
    It can also be done where you have a half-time DVOP or 
LVER. If they are providing a half-time service to veterans, 
four hours each day, and then the other four hours they have 
another workforce function. But, again, the four hours of 
nonveteran service cannot be charged to the grant.
    There are some situations where in a highly-devolved system 
like the workforce system where you have everyone operating 
slightly differently and the boards and the one-stop career 
centers each operate a little bit differently, there are 
situations where the veteran employment representatives are put 
in positions where they serve nonveterans. When we find out 
about that, we try to correct that situation.
    Ms. Herseth. I would appreciate it if you would continue to 
monitor that. And understand that sometimes as the information 
is exchanged, especially if they are part time, that there may 
be some confusion that is caused there.
    One last question. I appreciate the attachment number three 
that you included where it showed the number of cases closed on 
USERRA.
    Do you have an average time that it takes to close a case?
    Mr. Ciccolella. Offhand, I do not. I think it is 54 days 
for the average case. Now, most cases are resolved almost 
immediately. They are within a few days or a week. But the 
average time, I think, is over 50 days. And we report that in 
our annual report, but we can report what it is currently for 
the record.
    Ms. Herseth. Thank you.
    Just a final couple of questions, Mr. Borom, on your area 
of jurisdiction here. I will save that one for last. You 
testified that you have started providing one-on-one DTAP 
briefings at the polytrauma centers. I am curious as to how 
that is going.
    I visited the Minneapolis polytrauma center, and I am 
wondering how many of these one-on-one briefings you provide 
and the timing of them, if they happened within this 90-day 
timeframe that I think the polytrauma centers utilize to try to 
make substantial progress with the seriously brain-injured 
servicemen and women in particular.
    Do you have that information?
    Mr. Borom. I do not have that at this time, but that is 
something we can go back and look forward to getting to you.
    Ms. Herseth. If you could, and then maybe break it down by 
how many have occurred at each of the four polytrauma centers--
and do they occur just a week prior to them being released from 
the polytrauma center or does it occur after they have been 
medically retired or discharged?
    [The following was subsequently received from Mr. Borom:]

          Question: Number of one-on-one DTAP briefings being provided 
        at each of the four polytrauma centers and when do they occur 
        (while the servicemembers are still on active duty, within 90 
        days, or when they are discharged)?

          Response: The field stations reported a combined total of 97 
        individual DTAP presentations at the polytrauma centers so far 
        in FY07. In FY06, a total of 239 individual DTAP briefings were 
        conducted at the polytrauma centers. Due to the nature and 
        severity of their disabilities, not every individual at a 
        polytrauma center is ready for the DTAP briefing.

    And then on page six of your testimony, you state in fiscal 
year 2006, 9,225 veterans achieved their rehabilitation 
employment goals through that time.
    Do you know what percentage that constitutes?
    Mr. Borom. That is another piece of information I can get 
to you.
    [The following was subsequently received from Mr. Borom:]

          Question: What percentage of the 9,200 veterans that VR&E 
        claimed has reached their employment goals does this 
        constitute?

          Response: The 9,200 veterans rehabilitated in FY 2006 after 
        reaching their employment goals is 10.3% of VR&E's total 
        workload. VR&E's total workload is comprised of 6,352 veterans 
        in applicant status, 13,737 veterans in evaluation and planning 
        status, 3,268 veterans participating in extended evaluation 
        programs to determine their feasibility to achieve employment 
        at this time, 3,340 veterans participating in Independent 
        Living plans, 46,667 veterans participating in Rehabilitation 
        Plans, 6,980 veterans participating in Employment Services, and 
        8,782 veterans interrupted from their program due to various 
        issues.

    Ms. Herseth. Okay. Thanks.
    One last question. Yesterday, we had the legislative 
presentation at a joint hearing of the VFW. A concern was 
raised that the VR&E needs to look into the future when it 
comes to training and educating disabled veterans. This along 
the line of where Mr. Boozman has probed previously.
    The VFW would like to see veterans find meaningful careers 
instead of a quick job, just putting them into a job as opposed 
to the longer-term career strategy that I know you and the 
folks who work with you try to develop for our service-
connected disabled veterans.
    Do you have any response to testimony like that from the 
VFW or others who have expressed that concern?
    Mr. Borom. I would probably say this. The process of a 
servicemember or veteran as they enter the program, there is a 
dual relationship between themselves and the counselor that 
they are working with.
    The approach is that we are trying to work with veterans, 
looking at their interests, their aptitudes, abilities, and 
where they are wanting to go in life, and the direction of what 
would be suitable and sustainable employment, you know, for the 
future.
    Some veterans come out and their needs are more immediate 
employment just given their situation in life, and perhaps 
short-term training is what they need at that point. Others may 
come out and at that time in their life, they can go for a 
little bit longer program, and that is appropriate for them at 
the same time.
    So due to the individualized nature of each personal 
program, it is really looked at individually. VR&E does not go 
in with the concept that everyone who walks in the door that we 
are going to try to get you into immediate short-term 
employment. It is an individual program. It is going to be what 
is most appropriate for that veteran at that point in time.
    Ms. Herseth. I appreciate it, and I do appreciate your 
patience in answering all of the questions that we have had for 
you today.
    I do want to thank not only our witnesses but the Members 
of the Majority and Minority staff of the Committee in 
assisting us in preparing for today's hearing and the followup 
that we will be pursuing with you. We appreciate your input.
    Mr. Boozman, thank you again.
    With that, the Subcommittee stands adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 3:40 p.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]



                            A P P E N D I X

                              ----------                              

              Prepared Statement of Hon. Stephanie Herseth
            Chairwoman, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity
    Good afternoon. The Veterans' Affairs Economic Opportunity 
Subcommittee hearing on the performance, staffing, and services 
provided by the Education, Loan Guaranty, and Vocational Rehabilitation 
and Employment (VR&E) programs of the Department of Veterans Affairs, 
and Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS) of the Department 
of Labor will come to order.
    I would like to thank Ranking Member John Boozman for his 
leadership as past Chairman of the Economic Opportunity Subcommittee. I 
look forward to again working with you. In addition, I would like to 
welcome the new Members of the Subcommittee, Representatives Joe 
Donnelly of Indiana, Jerry McNerney of California, and John Hall of New 
York. I look forward to building upon our strong bipartisan 
relationship so that we may provide our Nation's veterans the best 
available services they need and deserve.
    Earlier this year, Ranking Member Boozman, other Members of this 
Subcommittee, and I discussed the hearing topics to be covered during 
the 110th Congress. I am proud to say that we have an ambitious list 
that includes expanding education benefits for National Guard and 
Reservists, examining the funding levels for State Approving Agencies, 
reviewing the VA's procurement goals with respect to veteran and 
service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses and other important 
issues.
    First and foremost, Ranking Member Boozman, I look forward to 
working with you and our colleagues on the Armed Services Committee to 
update the Montgomery G.I. Bill for National Guard and Reserve 
servicemembers. These brave soldiers continue to support military 
missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere around the world. 
Unfortunately, although they are being called to duty and mobilized for 
an average of 18 months, their educational benefits do not reflect 
their increased service to our Nation. When the Montgomery G.I. Bill 
was signed into law in 1984, servicemembers of the Guard and Reserve 
were rarely mobilized, and that simply is not the reality today. Again, 
I look forward to working with you to address this issue, passing 
legislation that will better reflect the reality of today's military 
and ensure that the enormous contribution and sacrifice of Guard and 
Reserve servicemembers are more equitably recognized.
    Like many of my colleagues, I have spent the last few days meeting 
with veterans from across my state. Those meetings have generated many 
questions and concerns that I hope to address here today. I am 
particularly interested in hearing about the VA's efforts to address 
the education claims workload and problems associated with the 
centralization of education claims service operations.
    I would like to thank our panelists for being here with us today to 
participate in a frank dialogue with Members of this Subcommittee. I 
encourage you to continue to work with us, so that we may ensure our 
servicemembers, veterans, and their families are properly cared for and 
receive the best available services to help them transition back to 
civilian life after their honorable service to our country.
    Much progress has been made in education benefits, vocational 
rehabilitation services, and VA home loans programs. However, I think 
everyone would agree that we must remain vigilant to maintain against 
any decline in benefits or customer service.
    Thank you all again for being here. I look forward to hearing from 
you.
    I now recognize our Ranking Member, Mr. Boozman for any opening 
remarks that he may have.

                                 
                Prepared Statement of Hon. John Boozman
    Ranking Republican Member, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity
    Good afternoon and thanks to each of our witnesses for taking time 
to be here today. Budget season is always a busy time around here but 
the sometimes hectic schedule serves a good purpose, and that is a more 
thorough understanding of the President's budget for the next fiscal 
year.
    Before I begin my remarks, at our final Subcommittee hearing of the 
109th Congress, I mentioned the possibility that Ms. Herseth and I 
would be changing roles on the Subcommittee. And darned if that didn't 
happen. So Stephanie, congratulations on assuming the chair and as I 
stated in November, I will give you the same bipartisan support you so 
graciously gave to me. I am confident we will have another productive 
session with you at the helm.
    As a general rule, the President sent us a good VA budget. Not 
perfect, but good and both sides of the aisle have presented our views 
and estimates to the Budget Committee. Now it is up to them to pass a 
Budget Resolution that works.
    I believe that we were in agreement with the Majority when it came 
to suggesting 1,000 additional FTE for VBA. We also suggested 
additional funding for IT programs and the need to conduct significant 
business process reform because just piling more FTE every year will 
not solve the structural issues preventing rapid processing of claims 
of all types.
    The challenge is before VA and VETS to make programs work. It is 
clear that the people expect not just programs, but ones that actually 
deliver the goods to the beneficiaries. We need to get the processing 
times down for both VR&E and education. Last session, we mandated a 
report on streamlining education processing and I hope the Department 
will send us a legislative proposal to change the way they do business 
if that is required.
    The Veterans Employment and Training Service still lacks sufficient 
data in many areas and I look forward to Mr. Ciccolella's testimony on 
how they propose to do better in that area. One thing I am very 
disappointed in is the flat budget recommendation for the National 
Veterans Training Institute in Denver. As you know, P.L. 109-461 
imposed new training requirements for DVOPs and LVERs and when the 
staff visited NVTI last year, they were told that NVTI would probably 
need an additional $1 million to meet the additional throughput, so you 
might want to address that shortfall here today.
    Madam Chairwoman, congratulations once again and I yield back.

                                 
 Statement of Hon. Charles S. Ciccolella, Assistant Secretary of Labor 
    for Veterans' Employment and Training, U.S. Department of Labor
    Madam Chairwoman and distinguished Members of the Subcommittee:
    I am pleased to appear before you today to give you an overview of 
the programs administered by the Veterans' Employment and Training 
Service (VETS).
    VETS has 240 full time Federal staff, the majority of which are 
deployed in the states. We deliver our programs and services to the 
states, including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, through 6 
Regional Administrators and 52 State Directors.
    Our principal programs and services focus on three areas:

      Employment assistance for veterans in America's publicly 
funded Workforce Investment System (One Stop Career Services)
      Employment assistance for separating military members
      Protecting servicemembers' employment rights

    [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.001
    
                    THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM
    Employment assistance for veterans through the workforce investment 
system is accomplished through four programs: One Stop Career Services, 
Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program Grants, Veterans Workforce 
Investment Program Grants, and the HireVetsFirst Campaign.
    One Stop Career Services are provided through the Jobs for Veterans 
Act State Grants. These are formula based grants awarded on an annual 
basis to the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. 
These grants provide funding to support Local Veterans Employment 
Representatives (LVER) and Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) 
specialists located in over 3,200 One Stop Career Centers throughout 
the country.
    These veteran employment specialists help veterans find good jobs, 
they conduct employer outreach, and they facilitate transition 
assistance workshops in the continental United States. The specialists 
also help veterans navigate the public workforce investment system and 
connect veterans to an array of workforce preparation--including 
training--services available at the One Stop Career Centers. In 
accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act of 2002 (JVA), Public Law 
107-288, we ensure that veterans accessing services in the One Stop 
Career Centers receive priority of service.
    The difference between duties of the veteran employment specialists 
is that DVOPs provide outreach services and intensive employment 
services to meet the employment needs of eligible veterans, with 
priority to disabled veterans and special emphasis placed on those 
veterans most in need. LVERs conduct outreach to local employers to 
develop employment opportunities for veterans, and facilitate 
employment, training and placement services to veterans. In particular, 
many LVERs are the facilitators for the Transition Assistance Program 
employment workshops.
    The JVA, as amended, gave the states flexibility to employ full- or 
half-time DVOP and LVER staff as the state determines necessary to 
carry out their veteran services plans. The JVA also changed the 
funding formula. The funding now made available is based upon the total 
number of veterans residing in the state that are seeking employment as 
a ratio of the total number of veterans seeking employment in all 
states, taking into consideration civilian labor force data.
    In support of these DVOP/LVER positions, VETS will continue to 
provide an operational framework to facilitate the optimum delivery of 
services to assist states in their mission of leading veterans toward 
appropriate employment.
    The FY 2008 request for State Grants is $161,894,000. This level of 
funding is expected to support 2,100 DVOP and LVER positions. We 
anticipate that this program will serve nearly 700,000 participants.
    The Jobs for Veterans State Grant program received the second 
highest rating (moderately effective) based on the Administration's 
Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) review in FY 2005. Two of the 
PART recommendations call for performance management improvements, 
which have been implemented for PY 2006 and will continue to be refined 
in future years. The third PART recommendation calls for an independent 
evaluation, which is in progress and will be completed by the end of FY 
2007. Since the program was restructured in FY 2003 by the Jobs for 
Veterans Act, this program has exceeded our national goals.
    During Program Year (PY) 2004, which ended on June 30, 2005, the 
Entered Employment Rate was 60% for veterans (exceeded goal by 2%) and 
56% for disabled veterans (exceeded goal by 2%). At the end of PY 2005, 
outcomes for veterans and disabled veterans showed an increase of 1% 
for all veterans and maintained the same rate for disabled veterans.
    Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E). Since much of the 
interface with the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) Vocational 
Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) service is through the workforce 
investment system, at this point I would like to briefly discuss that 
relationship. VR&E and VETS continue to work in partnership, along with 
State Workforce Agencies (SWAs), on behalf of VR&E job ready veterans 
who are referred to and registered with the State Workforce Agencies 
for intensive employment services.
    Our partnership to increase the employment opportunities and 
placement in suitable employment of service-disabled Chapter 31 
veterans is defined in a formal Memorandum of Agreement (MOA), and the 
results continue to improve. That positive working relationship has 
also carried over into other initiatives and strengthened cooperation 
and coordination with VETS' state partners.
    Of particular note is the establishment of three working groups 
under the MOA. The goal of each work group is to improve the quality of 
employment services and suitable job placements for veterans with 
disabilities enrolled in the VR&E program. Each work group has an 
established list of roles and responsibilities directing their efforts. 
The work groups are:

      Performance Measures for Assessment of Partnership 
Program Results
      National Veterans' Training Institute (NVTI): Curriculum 
Design
      Joint Data Collection, Analysis, and Reports

    Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program (HVRP) is a competitive 
grant program. Grants are awarded to states or other public entities 
and non-profits, including faith-based organizations, to operate 
employment programs that reach out to homeless veterans and help them 
become gainfully employed.
    The purpose of the HVRP is to provide services to assist in 
reintegrating homeless veterans into meaningful employment within the 
labor force and to stimulate the development of effective service 
delivery systems that will address the complex problems facing 
veterans. HVRP is the only nationwide program focused on assisting 
homeless veterans to reintegrate into the workforce.
    VETS is requesting a total of $23,620,000 for this activity in FY 
2008, an increase of $1,840,000 over FY 2007, enabling 15,095 homeless 
veterans to participate.
    The HVRP program is a highly successful grant program. It has 
recently received the second highest rating on the Program Assessment 
Rating Tool (PART) in FY 2006. One recommendation from the PART review 
is to strengthen accountability by applying common measures. In 
response, VETS has begun applying common measures to this program, 
beginning with PY 2006. Another PART recommendation calls for conduct 
of a rigorous evaluation, to begin in 2007. In response, the Department 
has allocated FY 2007 funds for that purpose and VETS currently is 
developing a statement of work for a competitive award to a contractor 
during FY 2007. During FY 2006, HVRP had an entered employment rate of 
72.8%, which exceeded the goal by over 4%.
    Veterans Workforce Investment Program (VWIP) grants support efforts 
to ensure veterans' lifelong learning and skills development in 
programs designed to serve the most-at-risk veterans, especially those 
with service-connected disabilities, those with significant barriers to 
employment, and recently separated veterans. The goal is to provide an 
effective mix of interventions, including training, retraining, and 
support services, that lead to long term, higher wage and career 
potential jobs.
    Services provided by grantees also include employment assistance 
and case management by DVOP and LVER staff. An important emphasis in 
this activity is on recently separated veterans in support of the 
Secretary's goal of a Competitive Workforce. Through the VWIP grants, 
VETS will continue to promote initiatives in high demand occupational 
areas, such as health care.
    VETS requests $7,351,000 in FY 2008 to serve 4,390 veterans. In FY 
2006, VWIP had a 75% entered employment rate.
    HireVetsFirst Campaign (www.hirevetsfirst.gov) began in support of 
the President's National Hire Veterans Committee established by the 
JVA. It has been a successful campaign, and the Web site has been 
averaging 35,000 unique visitors each month. So far, 46 Governors have 
signed proclamations indicating their support for hiring veterans by 
designating Hire Veterans First months. Last year, we hosted the first 
National Veterans Employment Summit and 17 veteran job fairs in 
partnership with media, veteran and military organizations. This year, 
over 120 veteran job fairs will be co-sponsored or co-branded by the 
Hire Vets First Campaign.
                          TRANSITION SERVICES
    Transition services include the Transition Assistance Program 
Employment Workshops, REALifelines program, and Operation War Fighter.
    Transition Assistance Program (TAP) Employment Workshops are 
provided to transitioning servicemembers at most military installations 
in the United States as well as in eight overseas locations. The TAP 
employment workshop is a Department of Labor-facilitated employment 
session which is conducted in partnership with the Department of 
Defense (DoD) and the VA. The two and one-half day employment workshops 
help servicemembers prepare a plan for obtaining meaningful civilian 
employment when they leave the military. The workshop focuses on skills 
assessment, resume writing, job counseling and assistance, interviewing 
and networking skills, labor market information, and familiarization 
with America's workforce investment system.
    Studies have shown that servicemembers who participate in TAP 
employment workshops find their first civilian jobs 3 weeks earlier 
than veterans who do not participate in TAP. VETS estimates that about 
65% of servicemembers leaving active duty do attend a TAP workshop. We 
are working with DoD to increase participation. VETS continually 
updates the TAP workshop curriculum to reflect current hiring 
practices, and to include online content. Agency partners, such as the 
Employment and Training Administration, also provide feedback on TAP 
workshop content. For example, we are working to ensure that every TAP 
participant leaves the session with a draft resume, a practice 
interview session, and having visited their state job board.
    VETS also works with National Guard and Reserve component 
commanders in the states to provide TAP employment workshops for 
Reserve and National Guard members when they return from their 
deployments. In addition, electronic resources and tools to assist 
transitioning servicemembers are being developed in collaboration with 
DoD.
    Attachments 1 and 2 to this statement summarize the TAP 
participation levels and workshops for the past several years.
    REALifelines. Jointly established in 2004 by the Veterans' 
Employment & Training Service and the Department's Office of Disability 
Employment Policy, REALifelines provides severely wounded and injured 
servicemembers and their families with personal, one-on-one employment 
assistance while they are recovering at military medical treatment 
facilities. REALifelines staff operate at the Military Severely Injured 
Center (MSIC) and are forward positioned at Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center; National Naval Medical Center (Bethesda); Brooke Army Medical 
Center; Fort Carson, Colorado; Madigan Army Medical Center, Fort Lewis 
Washington; Naval Medical Center at Balboa; and Tripler Army Hospital, 
Hawaii. We are exploring additional forward positioning of REALifelines 
representatives located with the Army and the Marine Corps. Thus far, 
the REALifelines program has provided employment related assistance to 
over 2,700 severely injured servicemembers. Over 150 servicemembers 
have been employed through the program. We also posted useful 
information regarding the REALifelines program on the Department's Web 
site on ``Employment Laws Assistance for Workers and Small Businesses'' 
(elaws), which can be found at www.dol.gov/elaws/realifelines.htm.
    Operation War Fighter (OWF) is a DoD program that allows active 
duty wounded and injured individuals to be placed in temporary 
assignments with Federal agencies in concert with an agency's needs and 
the individual's interests. DOL is proud to assist with the execution 
of this program.
    Many of the severely wounded and injured have little or no civilian 
labor experience. OWF provides opportunities to these servicemembers 
who may be in medical-hold pending a Physical Evaluation Board (PEB). 
Before a servicemember can enter into such an employment arrangement, 
the treating physician must approve it. The work schedule has to 
revolve around the patients' medical and rehabilitation needs. Over 140 
servicemembers have been able to participate in OWF, with 50 currently 
assigned and 20 awaiting assignments.
                           EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS
    Employment rights programs include the Uniformed Services 
Employment and Reemployment Rights Act, Veterans' Preference, and the 
Disabled Veterans Hiring Initiative.
    The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act 
(USERRA) protects the civilian job rights and benefits of veterans and 
members of the armed forces, including National Guard and Reserve 
members. USERRA also prohibits employer discrimination due to military 
obligations and provides reemployment rights to returning 
servicemembers. VETS administers this law, conducts outreach and 
education, and investigates complaints by servicemembers.
    Since September 11, 2001, nearly 600,000 National Guard and Reserve 
members have been activated for military duty. During this same period, 
DOL/VETS has provided USERRA assistance to over 410,000 employers and 
servicemembers. Since most complaints result from a misunderstanding of 
the USERRA obligations and rights, we have made the law easier to 
understand through clear regulations and an interactive USERRA Advisor 
that includes an online complaint filing capability. The Advisor is 
available any time at www.dol.gov/elaws/userra.htm. We conduct 
continuous USERRA outreach and education. We aggressively investigate 
when employers do not comply with the law and we make every effort to 
bring them into compliance. We are constantly improving our USERRA 
investigative program.
    After 9/11, USERRA complaints rose from approximately 900 per year, 
to over 1,500 per year. Complaints have leveled off at around 1,500 per 
year. However, the rate of complaints, as compared with the last 
significant mobilization (First Gulf War) has been dramatically 
reduced. VETS works closely with DoD's Office of the Assistant 
Secretary for Reserve Affairs and the National Committee for Employer 
Support of the Guard and Reserve to ensure that servicemembers are 
briefed on their USERRA rights before and after they are mobilized. 
Attachment 3 summarizes our USERRA caseload.
    Veterans' Preference is authorized by the Veterans' Preference Act 
of 1944. The Veterans' Employment Opportunity Act (VEOA) of 1998 
extended certain rights and remedies to recently separated veterans. 
VETS was given the responsibility to investigate complaints filed by 
veterans who believe their Veterans' Preference rights have been 
violated.
    VETS is responsible for investigating and attempting to resolve 
Veterans' Preference complaints against Federal agencies filed under 
the VEOA. The VEOA provides that a veteran or other preference eligible 
person who believes that his or her rights under any law or regulation 
related to veterans' preference have been violated, may file a written 
complaint with VETS. We carry out our responsibility under the VEOA 
through the use of trained investigators in each of our state offices.
    In addition to our investigative responsibility, VETS conducts an 
extensive compliance assistance program. This outreach is focused on 
educating potential veterans' preference eligibles and Federal agencies 
with regard to Veterans' Preference rights and responsibilities. VETS 
developed an interactive Veterans' Preference Advisor that allows 
Veterans' Preference claimants to officially submit using an electronic 
version of Forms 1010 (E-1010).
    The Disabled Veterans Hiring Initiative was started in 2002 and is 
designed to educate Federal agency Human Resource and hiring 
authorities on the benefits of hiring veterans and how they can be 
easily brought into Federal jobs for which they qualify using special 
noncompetitive hiring authorities.
    Two specific authorities have been available for many years--the 
Veterans Recruitment Authority (VRA) and the special authority for 
veterans rated 30% disabled or more by their military service branch or 
the VA.
    The VRA allows a Federal agency to appoint noncompetitively an 
eligible veteran to a position to which the veteran is qualified up to 
and including GS-11. Disabled veterans have preference over non-
disabled veterans.
    The 30% or more appointment authority is similar, but is available 
at any grade level including GS-15.
                           PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
    The VETS' Federal staff provides program management and delivery of 
the previously discussed programs and services.
    The field staff of approximately 75 serve as grant officer 
technical representatives for both the formula Jobs for Veterans State 
Grants and the competitive HVRP and VWIP grants. Over 100 of the field 
staff are trained investigators who conducted investigations for USERRA 
and Veterans' Preference cases. In addition, field staff conduct 
extensive compliance assistance outreach services to employers and 
servicemembers.
    For Fiscal Year 2008, a total of $33,282,000 is requested for this 
activity, an increase of about $3.1 million over funding for this 
activity in FY 2007. This includes 244 FTEs, an increase of 4 FTE above 
the FY 2007 level.
    The National Veterans' Employment and Training Services Institute 
(NVTI) was established to ensure a high level of proficiency and 
training for staff who provide veterans employment services.
    NVTI provides training to Federal and state government employment 
service providers in competency based training courses. The primary 
objective is to increase the service providers' productivity through 
increased knowledge. The NVTI effort ensures universality of training 
services for veterans and all direct client service providers.
    The total request for FY 2008 is for $1,949,000. The request 
addresses our requirement to train nearly 2,000 veteran service 
providers.
    Thank you again for the opportunity to appear today before the 
Subcommittee. This concludes my remarks, and I would be happy to 
respond to any questions.
                              ATTACHMENT 1
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.002

                              ATTACHMENT 2
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.003

                              ATTACHMENT 3
                          USERRA CASES CLOSED
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.004


                                 
  Statement of Keith M. Wilson, Director, Education Service, Veterans 
      Benefits Administration, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
    Good afternoon Chairwoman Herseth, Ranking Member Boozman, and 
Members of the Subcommittee. I appreciate the opportunity to appear 
before you today to discuss the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 
education benefit programs. My testimony will highlight workload, 
staffing, and services provided under the Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB)--
Active Duty (chapter 30 of title 38, United States Code), the 
Montgomery GI Bill--Selected Reserve (chapter 1606 of title 10, United 
States Code), the Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP) 
(chapter 1607 of title 10, United States Code), the Post-Vietnam Era 
Veterans' Educational Assistance Program (VEAP) (chapter 32 of title 
38, United States Code), and the Survivors' and Dependents' Educational 
Assistance Program (DEA) (chapter 35 of title 38, United States Code). 
I will also discuss outreach efforts related to the education benefits 
and automation tools that support these programs.
    The Chapter 30 and Chapter 1606 MGIB programs provide veterans, 
servicemembers, and members of the National Guard and Selected Reserve 
with educational assistance, generally in the form of monthly benefits, 
to assist them in reaching their educational or vocational goals. The 
Reserve Educational Assistance Program provides an enhanced benefit for 
reservists and those in the National Guard who are activated for more 
than 90 days due to an emergency or contingency as defined by the 
President or Congress. Chapter 32 VEAP was the first GI Bill program 
that required a contribution by the servicemember. VEAP provides 
matching contributions for educational programs of participating 
veterans who first entered on active duty after December 31, 1976, and 
before July 1, 1985. Together, these programs assist in the 
readjustment to civilian life, support the armed services' recruitment 
and retention efforts, and enhance the Nation's competitiveness through 
the development of a more highly educated and productive workforce.
    The Chapter 35 DEA is the only VA educational assistance program 
designed for spouses, surviving spouses and eligible children of 
certain veterans. The program offers up to 45 months of education 
benefits. These benefits may be used for degree and certificate 
programs, apprenticeship, and on-the-job training. Remedial, 
deficiency, and refresher courses may be approved under certain 
circumstances.
    Through the end of fiscal year 2006, VA has provided education 
benefits to more than three million individuals and paid over $27 
billion in benefits through the programs that are the subject of this 
testimony.
Workload Trends
    The education workload has been steadily increasing. From 2000 
through 2006, the number of education claims rose by 430,549, a 
cumulative increase of 46 percent. Total claims for 2007 are projected 
to be 1.4 million, an increase of over 2 percent from 2006. During the 
first quarter FY 2007, original claims increased by more than 13,000, 
or almost 20 percent, over the same period in FY 2006. We believe this 
could be an indicator of continuingly increasing usage rates.
Workload Strategy
    We have implemented a three-fold strategy to manage the pending 
inventory and improve claims timeliness involving maximization of 
current resources, increased staffing, and information technology 
enhancements.
    We initiated a Contract Management Support Center (CMSC) in 
September 2006. CMSC is staffed with contract customer service 
representatives who handle education calls that are received through 
the toll-free number, 1-888-GIBILL1. This has allowed the Education 
Service to allocate 60 additional FTE to processing and deciding 
education claims.
    We are also increasing staffing levels to handle the additional 
claims work. From 2000 through 2006, direct FTE increased by 22 
percent, from 591 to 726. In FY 2006, additional hiring resulted in a 
net increase of 39 direct FTE. Production has increased substantially 
and will continue to increase as new staff become more experienced. We 
expect the 758 direct FTE for FY 2007 to handle the anticipated 
workload increase and continue to improve performance indicators. We 
expect to process 1,432,447 education claims in 2008, a 2.4-percent 
increase over 2007. We believe that the 772 direct FTE requested in the 
FY 2008 budget can process the workload and also reverse some of the 
timeliness deterioration experienced from 2004 through 2006.
    In the longer term, we are pursuing IT enhancements and 
capabilities that will allow us to further automate claims processing 
and inquiry resolution. We have developed Internet applications to 
provide functional support to claims processing and customer service 
activities. These tools have helped to improve performance and reduce 
the waiting time for many claimants. We are enhancing one of our 
current self-service Internet applications, Web Automated Verification 
of Enrollment (WAVE). The application, used by individuals to verify 
attendance and change addresses, is being updated to allow claimants to 
view their electronic claims folders and confirm VA's receipt of a 
submitted document. It is also being expanded to automate changes in 
direct deposit information. In the future, we plan to add additional 
benefit information, such as payment information, remaining 
entitlement, and delimiting date. Displaying more information for each 
individual should reduce the number of inquiries that we receive each 
year.
    VA also uses the RightNowWeb (RNW) inquiry response system to 
answer general questions submitted electronically without requiring a 
person to intervene. RNW is able to respond to basic questions 
automatically in 95 percent of the inquiries. In cases where RNW is 
unable to automatically respond, a person is available to provide 
assistance in a timely manner.
    VA-ONCE, an application that allows school certifying officials to 
transmit enrollment data electronically to VA, has been in use since FY 
2003 and has been well received. Using data from VA-ONCE, the 
Electronic Certification Processing (ECAP) system automatically 
processes enrollment certifications. In FY 2006, 9 percent of our 
incoming claims, more than 105,000, were processed using these 
electronic methods. Seventy-three percent of cases had some processing 
completed before being worked by a VBA employee. Of the incoming 
chapter 30 claims, 16 percent were processed automatically. We are 
currently pursuing strategies to update ECAP and increase the 
percentage of automatically processed claims.
    The attainment of Education Service's strategic goals is dependent 
upon the successful migration from the Benefits Delivery Network (BDN) 
to the new VBA corporate environment. The Education Expert System 
(TEES) will replace current BDN claim and payment processing support. 
Additionally, when fully deployed, TEES will receive application and 
enrollment information and process that information electronically, 
reducing the need for human intervention.
Performance
    This year we are making progress toward achievement of our 
performance goals. To date in FY 2007, we have reduced the average age 
of pending original claims by 30 percent and the average age of 
supplemental claims by 39 percent from our peak enrollment period in 
October 2006. Our targets for the end of FY2007 are to process original 
claims in 35 days and to process supplemental claims in 15 days.
    Timeliness has improved for supplemental claims processing. Average 
days to complete dropped from 20 days in FY 2006 to 16 days for the 
first quarter of FY 2007. Average days pending dropped from 23 days in 
FY 2006 to 15 days for the first quarter of FY 2007.
    Average days to complete original claims increased from 40 days in 
FY 2006 to 46 days for the first quarter of FY 2007. However, the 
reduction in average days pending for original claims from 39 days in 
FY 2006 to 32 days for the first quarter of FY 2007 reflects 
improvements in timeliness that will be reflected in lower average days 
to complete in the future.
Outreach
    Expanded outreach to separating servicemembers has led to increased 
benefit usage. We distribute a series of informational brochures 
targeting servicemembers after 12 and 24 months of active duty and 
again 6 months prior to separation from service. The brochures are 
specifically tailored toward servicemembers who are eligible for the 
Chapter 30 MGIB, and designed to enhance their awareness and 
understanding of the education benefit. Mailings are sent to 
approximately 90,000 active duty members on a quarterly basis. In 2006, 
VA also conducted more than 8,500 transition assistance briefings for 
nearly 393,000 attendees.
    For REAP, our newest benefit, we have distributed more than 300,000 
copies of our new REAP brochure to activated Guard and Reserve units 
nationwide.
    More than 46,000 REAP informational DVD discs are being produced, 
along with almost 65,000 informational discs on both the Chapter 30 and 
Chapter 1606 MGIB programs. The goal is to have the informational discs 
distributed to all military installations by the end of March 2007. 
Additionally, we will soon begin direct mailing of REAP informational 
material to activated Guard and Reserve members as we now do for 
Chapter 30-eligible servicemembers.
    Education Service will continue to enhance current outreach efforts 
to better serve the informational needs of servicemembers, veterans, 
reservists, and dependents potentially eligible for or currently using 
VA education benefits. We will develop and disseminate informational 
materials and promotional items to both active duty members and 
veterans.
    Madam Chairwoman, this concludes my statement. I would be pleased 
to answer any questions you or any of the other Members of the 
Subcommittee may have.

                                 
Statement of Bill Borom, Deputy Director, Vocational Rehabilitation and 
 Employment Service, Veterans Benefits Administration, U.S. Department 
                          of Veterans Affairs
    Good afternoon Madam Chairwoman and Members of the Subcommittee. 
Thank you for inviting me here today to discuss the Vocational 
Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E) Program administered by the 
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). My testimony will provide an 
overview of VR&E program services and performance.
                            Program Overview
    The VR&E program provides veterans with service-connected 
disabilities the necessary services to assist them in preparing for, 
finding, and maintaining suitable employment, or achieving maximum 
independence in their daily living. The VR&E program is an employment-
driven program that utilizes education and apprenticeship training in 
support of a participant's vocational goal. Veterans with disabilities 
participate in a wide variety of formal education, on-the-job training, 
apprenticeships, and internships to meet their individual career goals.
                    Special Programs and Initiatives
    VA's VR&E Service has implemented several programs and initiatives 
to ensure that servicemembers and veterans are informed about the VR&E 
program and are provided the services necessary to transition from 
military service to civilian life.
Five Track Employment Process
    In 2004, former VA Secretary Anthony J. Principi established a Task 
Force to study the VR&E Program. As a result of the Task Force 
recommendations and to advance employment opportunities for veterans 
with service-connected disabilities, VR&E Service implemented the Five 
Track Employment Process. The Five Track Process standardizes program 
orientation practices; integrates veterans, counselors and employment 
professionals through a comprehensive triage (evaluation) phase; and 
places the emphasis on employment up front and early on in the 
rehabilitation process. The Five Track Process empowers veterans with 
informed choice through one of five employment options:

      Re-employment with their previous employer.
      Rapid Access to Employment through job-readiness 
preparation and incidental training opportunities.
      Self-employment for the most seriously disabled veterans.
      Employment Through Long-Term Services that include formal 
training and education programs leading to a suitable employment goal.
      Independent Living Services that maximize independence in 
daily living for veterans who are currently unable to work.

    In 2005, the VR&E Service stationed 72 Employment Coordinators 
(ECs) at regional offices across the country. The primary function of 
the EC is to provide veterans with disabilities any necessary job-
readiness skills in addition to job referral/placement services. The 
ECs also support the Five Track Process.
    Additionally, the VR&E Service established Job Resource Labs within 
each regional office and VetSuccess.gov, an online employment resource. 
These resources provide vital vocational and employment support to 
program participants, enabling them to make positive training and 
employment decisions leading to successful employment outcomes. The 
VR&E Service has developed working partnerships and signed Memoranda of 
Understanding (MOU) with Federal, State, and private-sector employers 
who have agreed to train and hire veterans participating in the VR&E 
Program. The VR&E Service has also expanded its relationship with 
faith-based and community-based organizations for careers in a host of 
not-for-profit employment areas.
Disabled Transition Assistance Program (DTAP)
    DTAP is an integral component of transition assistance for 
servicemembers who may be released because of disability or who believe 
they have a disability qualifying them for vocational rehabilitation 
and employment benefits and services. The goal of DTAP is to encourage 
and assist potentially eligible servicemembers in making an informed 
decision about VA's vocational rehabilitation program. It is also 
intended to facilitate the expeditious delivery of vocational 
rehabilitation services to eligible persons by assisting them in filing 
an application for vocational rehabilitation benefits. To ensure that 
the widest possible military audience receives DTAP briefings, 
responsibility for providing DTAP presentations is the shared 
responsibility of members of the Public Contact Team of the Veterans 
Service Center and members of the Vocational Rehabilitation & 
Employment Division at each VA regional office. Recent improvements to 
the DTAP program include:

      Standardized PowerPoint presentations and a standardized 
video that provide information on the VR&E Program and introduces the 
Five Track Process. The DTAP presentation is available online at 
www.vetsucess.gov.
      QuickSeries booklet on VR&E benefits and services 
distributed during DTAP briefings.
      80,000 DTAP CDs distributed to Military Transition 
Centers in FY 2006.
      DTAP oversight visits for quality assurance and best 
practices.
      One-on-one DTAP briefings provided to servicemembers 
receiving treatment at the Polytrauma SCI Centers.
      An updated MOU signed on September 19, 2006 between VA, 
DOL, DoD and DHS.

    In FY 2006, VA conducted 1,462 DTAP briefings with 28,941 
participants. This fiscal year through the end of January 2007, 493 
DTAP briefings have been conducted with 9,407 participants.
Coming Home to Work (CHTW) Program
    The VR&E Service has expanded its outreach to Operation Iraqi 
Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) servicemembers and 
veterans through early intervention and seamless transition 
initiatives, to include the Coming Home to Work (CHTW) program. CHTW 
provides valuable civilian job skills, exposure to employment 
opportunities, and work experience to servicemembers facing medical 
separation from the military and uncertain futures. Participants work 
with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor to obtain work experience in 
a Government facility that supports their career goals. In FY 2007 
through the end of January:

      16 servicemembers are participating in active work 
experience programs with Federal agencies while awaiting discharge or 
return to duty orders.
      121 servicemembers are receiving early intervention 
services in preparation for work experience programs, including 
vocational counseling, testing, and administrative support necessary 
for successful placement in a work experience program.
      24 servicemembers have returned to active duty following 
early intervention services.
      108 veterans participating in the CHTW program at a 
military treatment facility were referred to their local Regional 
Office for continuation of VR&E services.
      Seven veterans have been hired directly by their work 
experience employers upon discharge from active duty.
Priority OIF/OEF Processing
    Priority outreach and case management services are provided to OIF/
OEF servicemembers and veterans who apply to the VR&E program. Regional 
offices recently designated specific individual(s) to serve as the 
Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Case Coordinators (VRECC). These 
case coordinators ensure that servicemembers and veterans receive 
priority attention through the application, entitlement, and Five Track 
Employment Process. The case coordinators also participate in VR&E 
early intervention and outreach activities, including the Coming Home 
to Work Program.
   Partnership with the Department of Labor Veterans' Employment and 
                      Training Service (DOL-VETS)
    The VR&E Service and the Department of Labor's (DOL) Veterans' 
Employment and Training Service (VETS) continue to work together to 
provide employment services through our MOU signed in October of 2005. 
VETS and VR&E have adopted a team approach to job development and 
placement activities to improve vocational outcomes for program 
participants. All veterans entering a program of vocational 
rehabilitation are informed of the employment assistance available 
through the VETS Program and are encouraged to register with the State 
Workforce Agency.
    Combining the services of DOL's Disabled Veterans Outreach Program 
(DVOP) Specialists and Local Veteran's Employment Representatives 
(LVER), who are part of the public workforce investment system and its 
network of over 3,200 One-Stop Career Centers throughout the country, 
with VA's VR&E staff maximizes the employment services available to 
veterans and increases the opportunities for successful placements. 
Both agencies are committed to working together to improve successful 
employment outcomes to our Nation's veterans. Currently 38 VA Regional 
Offices have a co-located DVOP Specialist or LVER. There are 71 DVOP 
Specialists or LVERs at these 38 stations. Having the DVOP Specialist 
or LVER on-site is a best practice that enhances the efficiency of 
teamwork between the two agencies.
                            VR&E Performance
    The VR&E Service has significantly improved services to 
servicemembers and veterans accessing and participating in VR&E 
programs.
    The rehabilitation rate has improved. The rehabilitation rate is 
the number of veterans with disabilities that achieve their VR&E goals 
and are declared rehabilitated compared to the number that discontinue 
or leave the program before achieving these goals. In FY 2006, nearly 
73% of program participants achieved rehabilitation. In FY 2007 to 
date, the rate has risen to over 74%.
    We have also seen improvement in the number of days it takes 
veterans to begin a program of services leading toward suitable 
employment. This is measured by the days a veteran spends in applicant 
status. In FY 2006, veterans spent an average of 54 days in applicant 
status. Currently in FY 2007 the average is 53 days.
    In FY 2006, 9,225 veterans achieved their rehabilitation employment 
goals through the program. The top five occupational categories were:

      Professional, Technical, and Managerial careers (6,732).
      Clerical careers (660).
      Services careers (439).
      Machine trades (349).
      Building trades (226).

    VR&E workload is expected to increase due to our expanded outreach 
efforts to separating servicemembers and veterans and increasing 
disability claims workload; OIF/OEF, resulting in more seriously 
injured veterans; and the focus on employment and VR&E's Five Track 
Process. To ensure we provide the level of service expected by the 
American people, we plan to hire additional staff in FY 2007, 
increasing our on-board strength by over 100 employees. Additional FTE 
will reduce the number of cases assigned to counseling staff, resulting 
in a reduction of the case management workload by approximately 10%. 
This will also increase the timeliness of services provided to program 
participants.
    Madam Chairwoman, this concludes my statement. I would be pleased 
to answer any questions you or any of the other Members of the 
Subcommittee may have.

                                 
 Statement of Keith Pedigo, Director, Loan Guaranty Service, Veterans 
      Benefits Administration, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
    Madame Chairwoman and Members of the Subcommittee, I appreciate the 
opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the VA Loan Guaranty 
Program. In my testimony, I will highlight VA's commitment to meeting 
the housing needs of our Nation's veterans.
VA Home Loan Program
    The Loan Guaranty Program serves a clientele that is diverse in 
many ways. The only common denominator of this clientele is service in 
the Armed Forces of the Nation. Since the inception of this program, 
the objective has been to assist eligible veterans to become 
homeowners. We make it possible for veterans to compete in the 
marketplace for credit with persons who were not obliged to forego the 
pursuit of gainful occupations by reason of military service.
    The Loan Guaranty Program provides a guaranty to private lenders 
making loans to veterans to purchase homes. This guaranty enables 
veterans to purchase a home without the need to make a downpayment. 
Other important program benefits include making direct loans to Native 
American veterans living on trust lands, and providing Specially 
Adapted Housing (SAH) grants to severely disabled veterans. 
Additionally, services and assistance are provided in coordination with 
the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) Program for 
disabled veterans who are eligible for both Independent Living Services 
and SAH benefits.
Background
    Since the home loan program was enacted as part of the original 
Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (the GI Bill), VA has guaranteed 
more than 18 million home loans totaling nearly $914 billion for 
veterans to purchase or construct a home, or refinance another home 
loan on more favorable terms. We believe that most of these veterans 
would not have been able to purchase a home at the time they did 
without the assistance of the no-downpayment feature of the VA home 
loan program.
    In the last 5 years, VA has assisted more than 1.4 million veterans 
in obtaining home loan financing totaling almost $197 billion. About 
half of these loans, just over 730,000, were to assist veterans to 
obtain a lower interest rate on an existing VA guaranteed home loan 
through VA's Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Program.
Delivery of the Loan Guaranty
    VA guaranteed loans are made by private lenders, such as banks, 
savings and loans, or mortgage companies to eligible veterans for the 
purchase of a home which must be for their own personal occupancy. To 
get a loan, a veteran must apply to a lender. After the lender makes 
the loan, VA issues a guaranty that protects the lender against loss up 
to the amount of the guaranty. The guaranty serves as a substitute for 
the downpayment that a mortgage borrower would typically be required to 
come up with in order to finance the purchase of a home.
    A veteran's basic loan guaranty entitlement is $36,000, or 25 
percent for loans over $144,000 up to a maximum guaranty amount of 
$104,250. For no-downpayment loans, lenders will generally lend up to 
four times a veteran's available entitlement, provided the veteran 
qualifies based on income and credit and the property appraises for the 
asking price.
    While there is no maximum VA loan amount set by law, most lenders 
presently limit these loans to $417,000. This limit is set by the 
secondary mortgage market, which purchases most VA loans once they are 
made. Effective with enactment of P.L. 108-454 in December 2004, the 
maximum VA guaranty was indexed to the conventional conforming loan 
limitations as adjusted each January by the Federal Home Loan Mortgage 
Corporation (Freddie Mac). In practical terms, this means that the 
maximum VA no-downpayment loan amount will always be the same as the 
Freddie Mac conventional conforming loan limit. This amount has been 
set at $417,000 for calendar year 2007. For loans up to this amount, it 
is usually possible for qualified veterans to obtain no-downpayment 
financing.
    Currently, eligible veterans and service personnel may obtain loans 
to:

      buy or build a home
      buy a residential unit in a condominium project
      repair, alter or improve a home
      refinance an existing home loan
      buy a new or used manufactured home and/or lot
      buy and improve a manufactured home lot on which to place 
a unit owned and occupied by the veteran
      improve a home through installation of a solar heating 
and/or cooling system or other energy-efficient improvements
      refinance a loan currently guaranteed, insured or made by 
VA for the purpose of lowering the interest rate
      refinance a manufactured home in order to purchase the 
lot on which the home is or will be placed
      purchase stock or membership in a cooperative housing 
development corporation
Loan Servicing
    Like other homeowners, some veterans experience financial hardships 
that affect their ability to make mortgage payments. When this occurs, 
we help veterans retain their homes through supplemental loan servicing 
efforts. VA offers financial counseling and may intervene directly with 
the lender on behalf of the veteran to negotiate a repayment plan. In 
limited circumstances, we buy the loan from the holder and allow the 
veteran to make payments directly to VA at a reduced interest rate. In 
the event of foreclosure, VA usually acquires the property from the 
mortgage loan holder and the property is then transferred to a private 
contractor to be sold on VA's behalf.
    A ``successful intervention'' occurs when VA's intervention with 
the lender results in the veteran's loan payments being brought 
current. Successful interventions not only help veterans keep their 
homes, but they also save substantial amounts of money by avoiding the 
payment of a guaranty claim. In 2006, VA accomplished more than 8,700 
successful interventions, which translated into a savings to the 
Government of $175 million in claims avoided. In those cases where 
intervention is not possible, loans may end up in foreclosure. While 
this might be unavoidable in certain circumstances, the foreclosure 
rate on VA guaranteed home loans is substantially less than that of 
similar Government lending programs. The Mortgage Bankers Association's 
most recent National Delinquency Survey indicates that, through the 
third quarter of 2006, VA's delinquency rates fell from 6.93% to 6.58%. 
In contrast, FHA and sub-prime delinquency rates rose from 12.23% to 
12.80%, and 10.76% to 12.56% respectively.
    To further automate our program requirements and delegate some of 
their administrative activities to the mortgage banking industry, we 
currently have a contract for services to develop the VA Loan 
Electronic Reporting Interface, or VALERI. When operational, VALERI 
will enable VA to delegate much of its supplemental loan servicing 
efforts to the mortgage servicing industry by using a leading edge 
automated system. This will reduce reporting and record-keeping burdens 
on the servicing industry, as well as costs to the Government, while 
ensuring that our Nation's veterans are afforded the most technically 
advanced supplemental benefits available.
Specially Adapted Housing Grants
    Veterans who have certain service-connected disabilities may be 
entitled to a Special Home Adaptation (SHA) or a Specially Adapted 
Housing (SAH) grant for the purpose of constructing an adapted home or 
modifying an existing home to meet their specific needs. The SHA grant 
is limited to $10,000 and is generally used to assist veterans with 
mobility throughout their homes. The SAH grant is limited to $50,000 
and is generally used to create a wheelchair-accessible home. The goal 
of these grant programs is to provide a barrier-free living 
environment, which affords the veteran a level of independent living 
that he or she may not have otherwise enjoyed. In FY 2006, we served a 
total of 528 veterans through these grant programs, expending $24.6 
million.
    VA offers priority processing of SHA and SAH claims. If eligibility 
has been established, the veteran is contacted within 30 days to 
discuss the benefit. If not yet ready to use the SAH benefit, we 
contact the veteran again within a year to determine if he or she is 
ready to begin the home adaptation process.
    Until the enactment of Public Law 109-233 in June 2006, grant 
recipients could only receive their grant benefit from VA one time, 
regardless of the grant amount used. Now, eligible veterans or active 
duty servicemembers may receive up to a total of three such grants, 
with the aggregate amount limited to the maximum amounts allowable by 
law. The new law also established a new grant program called Temporary 
Residence Adaptation (TRA). Unlike the other grant programs, this grant 
assists veterans in adapting a family member's home to meet the 
veteran's special needs. Veterans eligible for a TRA grant are now 
permitted to use up to $2,000 of the maximum grant amount for an SHA 
grant or up to $14,000 for an SAH grant. In December 2006, we mailed 
individual letters to more than 16,000 veterans who may be eligible for 
additional grants.
    These grant programs provide a critical service to a special group 
of veterans. We provide personalized service to grant recipients 
throughout the process of constructing or modifying their homes. The 
labor-intensive nature of this program, coupled with the law changes, 
has created a growing workload. In the past 2 months, we have received 
formal inquiries for subsequent grant usage from nearly 2,000 veterans. 
Since we have historically completed between 400 and 600 grants per 
year, early indicators suggest a substantial increase in workload. 
However, we are reallocating resources and streamlining our program 
requirements to ensure these veterans continue to receive the high 
quality, personalized service that they deserve.
    Madame Chairwoman, this concludes my testimony. I greatly 
appreciate being here today and look forward to answering any questions 
you and the Subcommittee Members may have.
            RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS IN THE HEARING TRANSCRIPT
July 23, 2007, Letter and Attachments, from Hon. Charles S. Ciccolella,
 Responding to Several Requests for Information from Committee Members
                           During the Hearing

                                           U.S. Department of Labor
                                             Washington, D.C. 20210
                                                      July 23, 2007

The Honorable Stephanie Herseth Sandlin
U.S. House of Representatives
331 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Chairwoman Herseth Sandlin:

    Thank you for the opportunity to appear before the House Veterans' 
Affairs Committee's Economic Opportunity Subcommittee on March 7, 2007 
to testify on the programs and initiatives of the U.S. Department of 
Labor's Veterans' Employment and Training Service (VETS). Subsequent to 
the oversight hearing, the Committee forwarded some questions for the 
record to the Department of Labor, which have been provided to the 
Committee under separate cover.
    In addition to those questions for the record, the questions listed 
below arose during the hearing. Responses to these questions are 
enclosed.

    1.  You asked what would be necessary for VETS-funded programs to 
serve military spouses.
    2.  You requested details on Operation Warfighter.
    3.  You asked us to advise you on the status of required VETS' 
reports to Congress.
    4.  You requested details on Uniformed Services Employment and 
Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA) cases.
    5.  Mr. Boozman requested the following data:

        a.
           Details on number of Transition Assistance Program 
employment workshop participants, by site.
        b.
           Department of Defense data on active duty military 
separations, by site.

    Thank you for the opportunity to appear before the Committee and 
for your continued support of employment services for America's 
veterans.

            Sincerely,

                                              Charles S. Ciccolella
          Assistant Secretary for Veteran's Employment and Training

Enclosures

    1. Would you support legislation that would open the door for more 
spouses to receive job training services [from the veteran employment 
representatives]? [. . .] I would appreciate it if you would gather 
more information with regard to workload and getting feedback from the 
states who are partners in your efforts. (Herseth Sandlin)

    Response: Title 38 establishes the Veterans' Employment and 
Training Service (VETS) and its service structure. The statute and 
related laws allow for VETS-funded staff to provide services not only 
to veterans but also to ``eligible persons.'' However, the definition 
of ``eligible person'' is narrow, encompassing only the spouse of one 
who: died of a service-connected disability; is missing in action, is 
captured or is detained in the line of duty; or has a total and 
permanent service-connected disability or died with such a disability. 
Spouses of separating military personnel may participate in the 
Transition Assistance Program (TAP) under 10 U.S.C. 1144. Spouses of 
individuals not separating are not eligible for TAP services.
    Statutory changes would be necessary in order to expand VETS-funded 
services to spouses of military members. Furthermore, to avoid diluting 
the services provided to veterans, additional resources would be 
required commensurate with the expanded eligible population. VETS would 
be happy to work with the Committee and the Department of Defense (DoD) 
to determine the resource and policy implications of a program 
expansion for military spouses.

    2. How many of the 140 servicemembers that have participated in 
[Operation War Fighter] have actually been Walter Reed outpatients? [. 
. .] Do you know what the average time has been to assign these 
individuals? [. . .] If you would just provide us with some additional 
information on how this program is working from your perspective. 
(Herseth Sandlin)

    Response: Operation War Fighter is a DoD Program through which over 
25 Federal agencies have offered wounded or injured servicemembers 
short-term placement opportunities since November 2005. All 
participants have been Walter Reed outpatients. Once an individual has 
chosen an assignment in which he/she is interested, the assignment 
begins in approximately two weeks. The average assignment is for six 
months. There are no restrictions, and some servicemembers request new 
assignments for various reasons. An assignment cannot last beyond a 
person's active duty status.

    3. Could you give us the status on when we might be seeing [DOL's 
report on VETS' activities as required by Chapter 41]? (Herseth 
Sandlin)

    Response:

      2005 Annual Report to Congress--Transmitted March 27, 
2007
      2006 Annual Report to Congress--Anticipate transmittal by 
September 30, 2007
      2006 Annual USERRA Report to Congress--Anticipate 
transmittal by August 30, 2007

    4. Do you have an average time that it takes to close a [USERRA] 
case?

    Response: Please see attached documents entitled, ``USERRA Fact 
Sheet'' and ``Description of Issues Listed in USERRA Fact Sheet.''


                                                USERRA Fact Sheet
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              2001     2002     2003     2004     2005     2006
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total Cases Opened                                             895    1,195    1,315    1,465    1,241    1,246
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total Cases Closed                                             843    1,135    1,257    1,440    1,246    1,386
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Average Processing Time (Days)                                  45       44       45       53       59       54
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Issues Alleged (Definitions attached. Note that a case may have more than one issue, therefore sum of the issues
 columns will not add up to the total cases closed.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reasonable Accommodations/Retraining for
  Disabled                                                      10       20        9       23       22       23
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Other Non-Seniority Benefits                                    33       54       68       55       54      124
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Military Obligations Discrimination                            372      523      493      509      426      459
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discrimination as Retaliation for any Action                    59       88       86       82       65       79
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Initial Hiring Discrimination                                   39       48       84       52       51       47
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Special Protected Period Discharge                               7        4       22       41       35       34
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Health Benefits                                                 17       33       39       31       42       26
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Layoff                                                          36       65       76       61       57       43
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pay Rate                                                        44       62       70      122      113       85
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Other                                                          112      125      147      161      170      159
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pension                                                         54       80       75       63       67       61
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reinstatement                                                  214      298      356      440      310      331
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Seniority                                                       48       90       74      103       90       73
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Promotion                                                       49       57       72      119      101      100
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vacation                                                        44       50       52       59       46       84
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reasonable Accommodations/Retraining for
  Non-Qualified/Non-Disabled                                     4        3        5        6        8        4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Status                                                          60       84      101      139      103       90
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Data includes VETS' USERRA cases only. Data does not include USERRA Demonstration Project cases for FY
  2005 and FY 2006 opened and closed by the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) USERRA Unit.

           Description of Issues Listed in USERRA Fact Sheet:
    Reasonable Accommodations/Retraining for Disabled Servicemembers: 
Failure to make reasonable efforts by the employer to qualify returning 
disabled servicemembers, or to offer another position in the employ of 
the employer providing the closest approximation possible to the pre-
service position which the disabled servicemember is qualified to 
perform. Violates Sec. 4313(a)(3).
    Other Non-Seniority Benefits: Failure to provide non-seniority 
fringe benefits to which the servicemember may be entitled while on 
military duty to the extent other employees on nonmilitary leaves of 
absence receive these benefits. Violates Sec. 4316(b)(1)(B).
    Military Obligations Discrimination: Discriminating against a 
protected servicemember because of military obligations. Violates Sec. 
4311.
    Discrimination as Retaliation for any Action: Discrimination or 
retaliation against any person who has taken any action to enforce the 
protections of USERRA. Violates Sec. 4311.
    Initial Hiring Discrimination: Discrimination against a protected 
servicemember by failing to hire him or her because of military 
obligations past, present, or future. Violates Sec. 4311.
    Special Protected Period Discharge: Discharging a protected 
servicemember during the period of special protection from discharge 
without cause following reinstatement. USERRA provides that a 
reemployed individual may not be discharged, except for cause: (a) For 
1 year if service is more than 180 days; or (b) For 180 days if service 
is more than 30 days but less than 181 days. Violates Sec. 
4316(c)(1)&(2).
    Health Benefits: Failure to provide health benefits to 
servicemembers in a manner consistent with USERRA. Violates Sec. 
4317(a)(1)(A).
    Layoff: Layoff of a protected servicemember from employment, 
because of military obligations past, present, or future. Violates Sec. 
4313(a).
    Pay Rate: Failure to meet the statutory requirement that the 
servicemember be restored to a position (or a like position) that 
provides the same rate of pay as would have been paid had the 
servicemember not been absent for military service. Violates Sec. 4313.
    Other: Any other violation of USERRA not covered by specified issue 
codes.
    Pension: Failure to provide credit for military service for vesting 
and/or benefit accrual in employee benefit pension plans. Violates Sec. 
4318.
    Reinstatement: Failure to reinstate at all an eligible person to 
his or her job. Violates Sec. 4311, 4312.
    Seniority: Failure to restore the servicemember to the position 
with the seniority, including perquisites of seniority, the 
servicemember would have had if he or she had not been absent for 
military service. Such rank or standing may be defined by a collective 
bargaining agreement or by employer practices, and the escalator 
principle applies. Violates Sec. 4313(a).
    Promotion: Failure to promote the servicemember to a position that 
the servicemember would have been promoted to if he/she had not been 
absent for military service or training duty. Violates Sec. 4313(a).
    Vacation: Failure to treat the rate at which a servicemember earns 
vacation as a perquisite of seniority or failure to extend benefits to 
a servicemember in situations where vacation benefits are not 
considered short-term compensation for services rendered. Additionally, 
requiring the use of vacation for time needed to perform training duty. 
Violates Sec. 4316.
    Reasonable Accommodation/Retraining for Nonqualified/Nondisabled 
Servicemembers: Failure to make reasonable efforts by the employer to 
qualify returning nondisabled servicemembers, or offer another position 
in the employ of the employer which the person is qualified to perform. 
Violates Sec. 4313(a)(4).
    Status: Failure to reinstate in such a manner that certain 
attributes of the former (or escalator, if appropriate) position are 
met, such as working conditions, opportunities for advancement, job 
location, shift assignment, rank or responsibility. Violates Sec. 
4313(a).

    5.[a.] Do we have the record-keeping abilities so that we can sit 
down and see what DoD installation is doing [TAP workshops] and what it 
is not doing? [. . .] Is that something that you could access for us?

    [b.] I would appreciate it if you could provide us with a graph of 
the areas where so many people are rotating out, and then, of that 
group, they received the TAP program [. . .] kind of in areas? [. . .] 
Can you tell us if it was in Norfolk versus someplace else? (Boozman)

    Response:
    a. Please see attached chart entitled, ``TAP Participation by 
Site.''
    b. Please see attached chart entitled, ``Active Duty Separations by 
Site.''
RESPONSE TO QUESTION 5a


                                        TAP Participants by Site--FY 2006
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                          Active
                                                                           Duty    Spouses     NG/RC      Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AK                                                        Eielson AFB        189        2          0        191
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AK                                                      Elmendorf AFB        398       14          0        412
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AK                                                    Fort Richardson        139        0          0        139
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AK                                                    Fort Wainwright        194        6          0        200
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AK                                              Ketchikan Coast Guard         23        0          0         23
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AL                                                 Fort Rucker (ACAP)        433       20         39        492
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AL                                                        Maxwell AFB        431       24          0        455
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AL                                                  Red Stone Arsenal        210       22          0        232
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AR                                                                   Lit     389 AF    14          1        404
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AZ                                                  Davis Monthan AFB        674       11          2        687
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AZ                                                      Fort Huachuca        609        9          0        618
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AZ                                                                   Luk     383        4          0        387
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AZ                                           Marine Corps Air Station        740       13          0        753
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                           29 Palms      2,441       22          0      2,463
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                Alameda Coast Guard         93        1          0         94
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                          Beale AFB        378       18          2        398
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                     Camp Pendleton     10,503       39         13     10,555
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                             China Lak     111        0          0        111
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                        Edwards AFB        259        6          0        265
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                         Fort Irwin      1,080        8          0      1,088
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                                   Los      16s R     1 Base   430        447
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                                   Los     252 AF     7          0        259
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                      Marine Corps Log      23ase     0          0         23
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                       MCAS Miramar      2,053       14          0      2,067
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                               MCRD        285        4          0        289
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                           Monterey         77        5          0         82
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                               NAS Lemo  1,045       16          0      1,061
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                     Naval Air Station North Island      2,271       30          0      2,301
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                             NAVSTA      4,746       22          2      4,770
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                               Petaluma Coast Guard         94        0         21        115
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                            Point Mugu/Port Hueneme        818        7          2        827
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                                Pt Loma  1,442Sub    25 Base     0      1,467
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                              San Diego Coast Guard         35        1          0         36
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                              San Pedro Coast Guard         20        0          0         20
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                         Travis AFB        949       10          2        961
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CA                                                     Vandenberg AFB        422       13          0        435
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CO                                       Aurora CO (Buckley ANG Base)        307        4          0        311
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CO                                                        Fort Carson      2,724        6          0      2,730
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CO                                                       Peterson AFB        473       18          0        491
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CO                                                       Schriver AFB        127        2          0        129
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CO                                                              USAFA        330        5          0        335
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CT                                        Groton Naval Submarine Base        986       29          0      1,015
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DC                                                        Bolling AFB        754       10          0        764
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DC                                        Naval Family Service Center        821       35          0        856
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DC                                         Walter Reed Medical Center        363        5         83        451
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DE                                                          Dover AFB        377       23          0        400
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                          Eglin AFB        669        0          0        669
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                      Hulbert Field        564        7          0        571
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                   Jacksonville NAS      1,284       22          0      1,306
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                         Key West Naval Air Station         25        1          0         26
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                        MacDill AFB        444       21          0        465
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                              Mayport Naval Station      1,259        9          0      1,268
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                        Miami U.S. Southern Command         86        2          0         88
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                        Patrick AFB        291       21          0        312
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                      Pensacola NAS        942        3          0        945
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FL                                                        Tyndall AFB        298        1          0        299
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                          Albany MCLB      105        3          0        108
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                       Fort Benning      2,014       14          0      2,028
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                        Fort Gordon        844        8          0        852
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                     Fort McPherson        633       19          0        652
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                       Fort Stewart      2,446       31          1      2,478
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                         Hunter AFB        409        2          0        411
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                               Kings Bay Naval Base        542        3          0        545
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                          Moody AFB        301        7          0        308
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GA                                                         Robins AFB        497        5          0        502
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI                                           Coast Guard Base, Hawaii         50        1          0         51
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI                                                         Hickam AFB        380       19          3        402
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI                                          Kaneohe Marine Corps Base      1,445        5          0      1,450
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI                                                       Pearl Harbor      1,404       63          0      1,467
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HI                                                 Schofield Barracks        610       12          0        622
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ID                                                  Mountain Home AFB        394        4          0        398
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IL                                                             Great Lak     622       52          1        675
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IL                                                          Scott AFB        745       21          0        766
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KS                                                              Fort Lea     271       12         11        294
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KS                                 Fort Riley (Job Assistance Center)      1,821       16         34      1,871
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KS                                  Fort Riley Kansas (McConnell AFB)        190        9         11        210
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KY                                                 Fort Knox Kentucky        972       21        110      1,103
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LA                                                      Barksdale AFB        469        5          0        474
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LA                                                          Fort Polk        815        9          0        824
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LA                                             Naval Support Activity        232        3          0        235
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MA                                               ACAP/TAP Fort Devens         62       10         38        110
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MA                                                        Hanscom AFB        352       20         26        398
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                            Aberdeen Proving Ground        258       14         23        295
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                                        Andrews AFB        534        2          0        536
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                       Annapolis U.S. Naval Academy        302       12          0        314
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                      Bethesda Naval Medical Center        480        3          0        483
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                                       Fort Detrick        255        5          0        260
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                              Fort Mead ACAP Center        580        4          5        589
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                                   Fort Meade--Navy        691       10          0        701
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MD                                            Patuxent River Navy FSC        343       12          0        355
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ME                                        Brunswick Naval Air Station        613       89          8        710
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MI                                                      Selfridge ANG         55        0          1         56
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MI                                                     STARC Hdqts. (Lan      34       11          0         45
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MN                                                Camp Ripley--NG/Res          0        0         12         12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MN                                              Fort Snelling--NG/Res         14        0         33         47
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MO                                                              Fort Leo     650d A    47se       14        711
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MO                                                Richards GeBaur AFB         51        0          0         51
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MO                                                       Whiteman AFB        285        4          0        289
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MS                                                       Columbus AFB        110        5          0        115
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MS                                                           Gulfport        426        4          0        430
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MS                                                        Keesler AFB        253        3          0        256
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MS                                                       Meridian NAS         66        6          0         72
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MS                                           Pascagoula Naval Station         68        2          0         70
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MT                                                       Malstrom AFB        332       27          0        359
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NC                                      Cherry Point Marine Corp Base      1,679       12          0      1,691
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NC                                    Fort Bragg XVIII Airborne Corps      3,179       19          0      3,198
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NC                                                           Pope AFB        452       17          0        469
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NC                                                Seymore Johnson AFB        353        9          0        362
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NC                                                         USMC Camp Leje  7,410e      76          0      7,486
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NC                                         USMC New River Air Station        969       14          0        983
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ND                                                    Grand Forks AFB        334       19          0        353
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ND                                                          Minot AFB        321        8          0        329
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NE                                                         Offutt AFB        613        0          2        615
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NH                                          Portsmouth Naval Shipyard        161        4          0        165
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NJ                                               Cape May Coast Guard         17        1          0         18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NJ                                     Fort Mommouth Comm/Electronics        200        5          0        205
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NJ                                                        McGuire AFB        632        9          1        642
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NJ                                             Naval Air Engineering/Lak      94        0          0         94
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NJ                                        Naval Weapons Station Earle         67        0          0         67
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NM                                                         Cannon AFB        264        8          0        272
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NM                                                       Holloman AFB        480        6          0        486
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NM                                                       Kirtland AFB        412       15          0        427
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NV                                                         NAS Fallon        189        3          0        192
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NV                                                         Nellis AFB        591       10          0        601
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NY                                    Fort Drum HQ--10th Mountain Div      1,346       12         41      1,399
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NY                                                      Fort Hamilton        172        5         15        192
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NY                                               Saratoga Naval Admin        159       19         19        197
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NY                                            West Point Army Academy        123        2          1        126
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OH                                               Wright Patterson AFB        689        8         13        710
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OK                                                          Altus AFB        168        2          0        170
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OK                                                Fort Sill Army Base      1,165       10          0      1,175
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OK                                                         Tinker AFB        641       29          5        675
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OK                                                          Vance AFB         93        9          0        102
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OR                                      Salem-Anderson Readiness Cntr          4        0          0          4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PA                                          Carlisle Army War College        155       11         35        201
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PA                                                 Willow Grove USNAS        274       15         11        300
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PR                                             Fort Buchanan Guaynabo         61        8         12         81
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RI                                                 Newport Naval Base        366       22          0        388
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SC                                                     Charleston AFB        445        9          0        454
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SC                                           Charleston Naval Weapons        343        9          0        352
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SC                                     Fort Jackson Army Educ. Center        350       13         15        378
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SC                                            Marine Corp Air Station        644        1          0        645
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SC                                                           Shaw AFB        349        2          0        351
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SC                                           USMC Parris Island Depot        256        1          0        257
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SD                                                      Ellsworth AFB        308        4          9        321
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TN                                           Fort Campbell (Kentucky)      1,804       25         23      1,852
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TN                                  Millington Naval Support Activity        329       13          4        346
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                         Brooks AFB         33        0          0         33
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                 Corpus Christi FSC        435        1          0        436
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                          Dyess AFB        355       10          0        365
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                         Fort Bliss      1,672       68          0      1,740
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                          Fort Hood      2,600       18          0      2,618
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                   Fort Sam Houston        845       20          0        865
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                         Fort Worth        347       14          0        361
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                     Goodfellow AFB        171        7          0        178
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                Ingleside Texas FSC        399       12          0        411
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                                   Lac     907B      14          0        921
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                                   Lau      95B       3          0         98
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                            Randolph Air Force Base        411       14          0        425
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TX                                                       Sheppard AFB        309       25          0        334
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
UT                                                           Hill AFB        830        9         18        857
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                                 Dahlgren Navy Base        154        6          0        160
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                          Fort Belvoir, ACAP Center        563        9          0        572
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                                        Fort Eustis        880        9          0        889
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                                              Fort Lee     434        8          0        442
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                                         Fort Meyer        712       10          0        722
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                         Henderson Hall, HQCN, HQMC        600        9          0        609
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                                                   Lan     685        7          0        692
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                          Norfolk Naval Air Station      9,890      442          0     10,332
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                          Portsmouth Naval Hospital        320        0          0        320
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VA                                               Quantico Marine Base      1,022        6          0      1,028
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                                         Bangor NAS      1,038       42          1      1,081
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                              Everett Naval Station        688       29          7        724
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                                      Fairchild AFB        313        3          3        319
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                                              Fort Lewi  2,562       65        104      2,731
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                                        McChord AFB        451       19         12        482
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                          Puget Sound Navy Shipyard        993       32          2      1,027
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                                Seattle Coast Guard         74       11          0         85
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WA                                                 Whidbey Island NAS      1,187       56          0      1,243
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WI                                                         Fort McCoy        137       50         18        205
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WY                                                      FE Warren AFB        305       16         10        331
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total, Continental US                                                    133,452    2,754      1,309    137,515
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                                       TAP Participants Overseas--FY 2006
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                          Active
                                                                           Duty    Spouses     NG/RC      Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Benelux                                                      Brussels         11        2          0         13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Benelux                                                      Schinnen         14        1          0         15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Benelux                                                         Shape         49        9          0         58
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                       Ansbach        192        5          0        197
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                       Bamberg        199        5          4        208
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                    Baumholder        168       12          0        180
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                     Darmstabt        134        2          0        136
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                 Geilenkirchen         57        3          0         60
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                       Giessen         72        4          0         76
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                         Hanau        208        6          0        214
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                    Heidelberg        266       14         11        291
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                     Hohenfels         89        3          0         92
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                Kaiserslautern        337       10          1        348
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                     Kitzingen        271        6          0        277
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                      Mannheim        273        7          0        280
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                      Ramstein        540       15          2        557
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                   Schweinfurt        297        2          0        299
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                   Spangdahlem        247       23          0        270
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                     Stuttgart        106        9          3        118
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                       Vilseck        262        6          0        268
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                     Wiesbaden        259        4          0        263
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Germany                                                     Wuerzburg         34        0          0         34
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Guam                                                     Anderson AFB         79        4          0         83
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Guam                                                        COMNAVMAR        317       10          7        334
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Italy                                                          Aviano        268       27          0        295
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Italy                                                                LaM      30        4          0         34
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Italy                                                          Naples        224       15          0        239
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Italy                                                         Vicenza        183        5          0        188
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                          Atsugi        268        5          0        273
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                       Camp Fuji         19        0          0         19
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                         Iwakuni        282        4          0        286
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                          Misawa        242        7          0        249
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                          Sasebo        271       11          0        282
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                        Yokosuka        732       12          1        745
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Japan                                                          Yokota        203       10          0        213
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                      Camp Henry        233        6          0        239
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                  Camp Humphreys        442        2          1        445
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                     Camp Mobile        716        2          0        718
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                    Camp Stanley         16        0          0         16
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                          Kunsan        154        1          0        155
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                            Osan        269        0          0        269
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Korea                                                         Yongsan        481        3          0        484
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okinawa                                                   Camp Foster        606        5          0        611
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okinawa                                                   Camp Hansen        264        1          0        265
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okinawa                                                   Camp Schwab        165        0          0        165
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okinawa                                                        Kadena        331        8          0        339
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Okinawa                                                        Kinser        197        1          0        198
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                              Alconbury        120        4          0        124
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                              Croughton         11        1          0         12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                                       Lak     148        2          0        150
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                                       Lon      54        6          0         60
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                           Menwith Hill         44        0          0         44
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                             Mildenhall        199        7          0        206
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Kingdom                                              St Mawgan         26        1          0         27
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total, Overseas                                                           11,679      312         30     12,021
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total Continental US & Overseas                                          145,131    3,066      1,339    149,536
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


RESPONSE TO QUESTION 5b--SEPARATIONS BY SITE


 Active Duty Retirements and Separations by State/Country and Base (Includes Homeported Ships and Coast Guard)--
                                                     FY 2006
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Enlisted                    Officer                     Total
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Rets     Seps      Total    Rets     Seps    Total     Rets     Seps      Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ALABAMA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ANNISTON ARMY DEPOT               0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOTHAN AG                         1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT RUCKER                      89       794       883      87       80      167      176       874     1,050
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MAXWELL AFB (INCL. GUNTER)      135       388       523      79       48      127      214       436       650
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVMARCORESCEN MOBILE             1         4         5       0        0        0        1         4         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  REDSTONE ARSENAL                 52        53       105      36        4       40       88        57       145
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             42        87       129       7        6       13       49        93       142
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG DAUPHINE ISLAND              0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         320     1,330     1,650     209      138      347      529     1,468     1,997
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ALASKA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALASKA COAST GUARD                2         1         3       1        2        3        3         3         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EIELSON AFB                      41       171       212       6       24       30       47       195       242
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ELMENDORF AFB                   118       352       470      32       50       82      150       402       552
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT JONATHAN WAINWRIGHT         34       277       311       8       18       26       42       295       337
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT RICHARDSON                  27       276       303       7        4       11       34       280       314
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              3        10        13       3        1        4        6        11        17
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         225     1,087     1,312      57       99      156      282     1,186     1,468
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ARIZONA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DAVIS-MONTHAN AFB               210       440       650      48       61      109      258       501       759
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT HUACHUCA                   186       627       813      47       34       81      233       661       894
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LUKE AFB                        165       436       601      19       46       65      184       482       666
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PHOENIX AGS                       0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TUCSON IAP AGS                    0         0         0       4        0        4        4         0         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             22       161       183       4       12       16       26       173       199
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  YUMA MCAS                        48       538       586      11       16       27       59       554       613
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  YUMA PROVING GROUND               2         0         2       0        0        0        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         633     2,202     2,835     133      170      303      766     2,372     3,138
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ARKANSAS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST LITTLE ROCK AR             2         0         2       0        0        0        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LITTLE ROCK AFB                 152       329       481      10       42       52      162       371       533
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MTA CAMP ROBINSON                 1         4         5       0        1        1        1         5         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PINE BLUFF ARSENAL                0         7         7       0        2        2        0         9         9
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              8        17        25       1        1        2        9        18        27
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         163       357       520      11       46       57      174       403       577
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CALIFORNIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALAMEDA NAS                       4         2         6       1        4        5        5         6        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BARSTOW MCLB                      6        26        32       5        5       10       11        31        42
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BEALE AFB                        93       285       378      24       40       64      117       325       442
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP PARKS                        0         1         1       2        1        3        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP PENDLETON MCAS             486     6,361     6,847      87      158      245      573     6,519     7,092
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP ROBERTS                      0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHINA LAKE NAVWEAPCEN            34        89       123      12        5       17       46        94       140
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CONCORD NAVWEAPSTA                0         1         1       1        1        2        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CORONADO NAV AMPHIB BASE        275     1,271     1,546      52       58      110      327     1,329     1,656
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EDWARDS AFB                     102       249       351      25       39       64      127       288       415
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EL CENTRO NAF                     8        39        47       1        1        2        9        40        49
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EL TORO MCAS                      1         1         2       0        0        0        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FLEET ASW TRNG CTR PACIFIC       51        97       148      19       12       31       70       109       179
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FLT CMBT TRNG CTR PACIFIC         4         0         4       2        2        4        6         2         8
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT IRWIN                      102       955     1,057      11       63       74      113     1,018     1,131
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT MACARTHUR                    0         3         3       0        0        0        0         3         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT ORD/DOD CENTER               2         0         2       0        0        0        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FRESNO AIR TERM AGS               0         2         2       1        0        1        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GEORGE AFB (INCL. NORTON)         0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HAMILTON FIELD                    0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LEMOORE NAS                     119       466       585      16       30       46      135       496       631
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LOS ALAMITOS AFRC                 3         2         5       0        0        0        3         2         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LOS ANGELES AFB                  37        58        95      49      132      181       86       190       276
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MARCH AFB                         5         4         9       1        0        1        6         4        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCAS MIRAMAR                    137     1,414     1,551      27       58       85      164     1,472     1,636
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCCLELLAN AFB                     2         0         2       1        0        1        3         0         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MOFFETT FIELD NAS/ANG             5         4         9       2        2        4        7         6        13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL MEDICAL CTR SAN            75       350       425      46       51       97      121       401       522
 DIEGO
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCH           11        20        31      20       23       43       31        43        74
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL STATION, LONG BEACH         0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NORTH ISLAND NAS                289       851     1,140      34       33       67      323       884     1,207
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NORTH ISLAND NV AVIATION          1         3         4       1        2        3        2         5         7
 DEP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ONIZUKA AFB                       4         2         6       3        3        6        7         5        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PORT HUENEME NCBC                64       205       269       8        9       17       72       214       286
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY             28       220       248      11        7       18       39       227       266
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PT MUGU NAS                      50       128       178       7       10       17       57       138       195
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAN DIEGO MC RECRUIT DEPOT       54     1,470     1,524       7       18       25       61     1,488     1,549
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAN DIEGO NAVSTA                724     3,565     4,289      64      123      187      788     3,688     4,476
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAN DIEGO NAVSUBBASE             68       205       273      23       12       35       91       217       308
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAN DIEGO NSC                    12        56        68       7        2        9       19        58        77
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAN PEDRO COAST GUARD             0        13        13       0        1        1        0        14        14
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SEAL BEACH NAVWEAPSTA             9        20        29       2        1        3       11        21        32
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SHARPE ARMY DEPOT                 1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TRAVIS AFB                      194       507       701      29      110      139      223       617       840
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TREASURE ISLAND NAVSTA            0         5         5       0        1        1        0         6         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            208     1,616     1,824      34       70      104      242     1,686     1,928
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG TRACEN PETALUMA              0        11        11       1        3        4        1        14        15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USMC MOUNTAIN WARFARE
    TRNG C                          4        16        20       0        1        1        4        17        21
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  VANDENBERG AFB                   89       191       280       9       49       58       98       240       338
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  29 PALMS MC AIR/GRD CMBT         81     1,146     1,227      17       29       46       98     1,175     1,273
 CTR
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       3,442    21,936    25,378     662    1,169    1,831    4,104    23,105    27,209
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COLORADO
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BUCKLEY AGB                      59       124       183       1       16       17       60       140       200
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT CARSON                     268     2,806     3,074      40      127      167      308     2,933     3,241
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LOWRY AFB                        18        22        40       4        7       11       22        29        51
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PETERSON AFB                    181       177       358     107       78      185      288       255       543
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHRIEVER AFB                    74       122       196      16       32       48       90       154       244
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             45       176       221       8       12       20       53       188       241
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USAF ACADEMY                     46       270       316      72       60      132      118       330       448
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         691     3,697     4,388     248      332      580      939     4,029     4,968
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONNECTICUT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  COAST GUARD ACADEMY               0        22        22       0        0        0        0        22        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT NATHAN HALE                  1         5         6       0        1        1        1         6         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEW LONDON NAVSUBBASE           181       635       816      21       52       73      202       687       889
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             27       222       249       1        4        5       28       226       254
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         209       884     1,093      22       57       79      231       941     1,172
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DELAWARE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOVER AFB                       135       342       477      12       30       42      147       372       519
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              4         7        11       1        1        2        5         8        13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         139       349       488      13       31       44      152       380       532
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ARMY ATTACHE DEPT OF STATE        3         4         7      24        3       27       27         7        34
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BOLLING AFB                      90       129       219      37       34       71      127       163       290
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT LESLIE J MCNAIR              6         6        12      18        3       21       24         9        33
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MARINE BARRACKS, WASH D.C.       48       114       162      73       19       92      121       133       254
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL SECURITY STATION           39        64       103      92       77      169      131       141       272
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             23        32        55      20       22       42       43        54        97
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WALTER REED ARMY MED CTR        151       275       426      58       62      120      209       337       546
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WASHINGTON NAVDIST HQ           131     1,532     1,663     129       99      228      260     1,631     1,891
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         491     2,156     2,647     451      319      770      942     2,475     3,417
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FLORIDA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP BLANDING                    10         1        11       0        2        2       10         3        13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CECIL FIELD NAS                   1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CORRY STATION NTTC               39        76       115       2        1        3       41        77       118
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EGLIN AFB                       309       500       809      84       90      174      393       590       983
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HOMESTEAD AFB                     9         5        14       0        1        1        9         6        15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HQ STRICOM, ORLANDO               4         0         4       2        0        2        6         0         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HURLBURT FIELD                  290       471       761      62       56      118      352       527       879
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  JACKSONVILLE AFS                  1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  JACKSONVILLE NAS                331       810     1,141      64       55      119      395       865     1,260
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  JACKSONVILLE NAV AVIATION         3         1         4       1        0        1        4         1         5
 DE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KEY WEST COAST GUARD              1         2         3       0        1        1        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KEY WEST NAS                     36        82       118      11       10       21       47        92       139
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MACDILL AFB                     216       290       506     112       50      162      328       340       668
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MAYPORT NAVSTA                  346     1,138     1,484      38       34       72      384     1,172     1,556
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MIAMI COAST GUARD                 0         2         2       0        2        2        0         4         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAV COASTAL SYSTEMS CTR          21        33        54       2        0        2       23        33        56
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAV ED & TRN PGM MGMT SPT        26         1        27       0        2        2       26         3        29
 AC
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL HOSPITAL PENSACOLA         25        60        85      18       21       39       43        81       124
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL TRAINING CTR ORLANDO       19        20        39       8        4       12       27        24        51
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PATRICK AFB                      98        79       177      30       28       58      128       107       235
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PENSACOLA NAS                   188       472       660      65      110      175      253       582       835
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SOUTHERN COMMAND                 10        20        30      17        8       25       27        28        55
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TYNDALL AFB                     140       261       401      28       37       65      168       298       466
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            131       389       520      38       22       60      169       411       580
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WHITING FIELD NAS                17        30        47      11       44       55       28        74       102
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       2,271     4,743     7,014     593      578    1,171    2,864     5,321     8,185
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GEORGIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALBANY MCLB                      26        68        94       4        9       13       30        77       107
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ATLANTA NAS                      21        66        87       1        7        8       22        73        95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DOBBINS ARB                       5         4         9       1        1        2        6         5        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT BENNING                    329     3,761     4,090      34      111      145      363     3,872     4,235
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT GILLEM                      33        16        49      19        4       23       52        20        72
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT GORDON                     300       976     1,276      47       59      106      347     1,035     1,382
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT MCPHERSON                   95        97       192      93       26      119      188       123       311
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT STEWART                    447     3,359     3,806      60      198      258      507     3,557     4,064
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KINGS BAY NAVSUBBASE            160       314       474      19       20       39      179       334       513
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MOODY AFB                        98       250       348      12       54       66      110       304       414
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVY RECRUITING AREA THREE        2         0         2       0        3        3        2         3         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NV SUPPLY CORPS SCHOOL            1         8         9       4        7       11        5        15        20
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ROBINS AFB                      229       338       567      48       53      101      277       391       668
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAVANNAH AFS                      0         2         2       0        1        1        0         3         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             50       119       169       9       10       19       59       129       188
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       1,796     9,378    11,174     351      563      914    2,147     9,941    12,088
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
HAWAII
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BARBERS POINT NAS                 1         1         2       0        1        1        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP H. M. SMITH                 29        40        69      47        8       55       76        48       124
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT SHAFTER                     23        82       105      16       12       28       39        94       133
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HICKAM AFB                       89       210       299      63       52      115      152       262       414
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KUMA DEF COMM CTR                 1        21        22       0        0        0        1        21        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCBH KANEOHE BAY                 70       708       778       7       21       28       77       729       806
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL BASE, PEARL HARBOR         86       502       588      34       32       66      120       534       654
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVCAMS E. PACIFIC               20        43        63       2        1        3       22        44        66
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PEARL HARBOR NAVAL              122       448       570      24       31       55      146       479       625
 SHIPYARD
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAND ISLAND COAST GUARD           0         9         9       0        3        3        0        12        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHOFIELD BARRACKS              162     1,606     1,768      23       68       91      185     1,674     1,859
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TRIPLER ARMY MEDICAL             23        73        96      30       37       67       53       110       163
 CENTER
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             42       165       207       5       11       16       47       176       223
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         668     3,908     4,576     251      277      528      919     4,185     5,104
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
IDAHO
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GOWEN FIELD                       0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MOUNTAIN HOME AFB               111       375       486      13       27       40      124       402       526
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              8        52        60       2        5        7       10        57        67
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         119       429       548      15       32       47      134       461       595
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
ILLINOIS
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT SHERIDAN                    15        30        45       0        1        1       15        31        46
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GREAT LAKES NTC                 219     4,642     4,861      22       44       66      241     4,686     4,927
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  JOLIET AAP/AFRC                   1         2         3       0        0        0        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL HOSPITAL, GREAT            34        95       129      12       18       30       46       113       159
 LAKES
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OHARE IAP ARS                     3         0         3       4        0        4        7         0         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ROCK ISLAND ARSENAL               0         3         3       3        0        3        3         3         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCOTT AFB                       277       197       474     127       79      206      404       276       680
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             26       182       208       8       11       19       34       193       227
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         575     5,151     5,726     176      153      329      751     5,304     6,055
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
INDIANA
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CRANE NAVWEAPSUPPCEN              4         3         7       1        0        1        5         3         8
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DFAS INDIANAPOLIS CENTER         26        18        44       2        0        2       28        18        46
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON            7         1         8       2        4        6        9         5        14
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GRISSOM AFB                       0         4         4       0        0        0        0         4         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HULMAN REG ARPT-AGS               1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             27        91       118       4        7       11       31        98       129
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          65       117       182       9       11       20       74       128       202
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IOWA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT DES MOINES                   3         4         7       0        0        0        3         4         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT DODGE                        1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             10        41        51       0        3        3       10        44        54
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          14        45        59       0        3        3       14        48        62
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KANSAS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT LEAVENWORTH                 67        95       162      94       15      109      161       110       271
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT RILEY                      225     1,734     1,959      15       98      113      240     1,832     2,072
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCCONNELL AFB                    72       218       290       5       30       35       77       248       325
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            657     1,480     2,137     411       80      491    1,068     1,560     2,628
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  9TH MARINE CORPS DISTRICT         1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       1,022     3,527     4,549     525      223      748    1,547     3,750     5,297
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KENTUCKY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT CAMPBELL                   318     2,025     2,343      67       62      129      385     2,087     2,472
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT KNOX                       314     1,786     2,100      72       46      118      386     1,832     2,218
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LEXINGTON BLUE GRASS DEPOT        1         1         2       0        0        0        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LOUISVILLE ARMY RES KY            0         0         0       0        2        2        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             40       138       178       3        3        6       43       141       184
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         673     3,950     4,623     142      113      255      815     4,063     4,878
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LOUISIANA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BARKSDALE AFB                   138       472       610      36       49       85      174       521       695
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT POLK                       173     1,000     1,173      17       49       66      190     1,049     1,239
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HAMMOND AGS                       1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEW ORLEANS MIL OC.               1         3         4       0        0        0        1         3         4
 TERMINAL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEW ORLEANS NAS JRB              31        90       121      13        8       21       44        98       142
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEW ORLEANS NSA                  18        32        50       7        7       14       25        39        64
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SLIDELL RADAR SITE                0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             10        74        84       7        7       14       17        81        98
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         372     1,671     2,043      81      120      201      453     1,791     2,244
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MAINE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BRUNSWICK NAS                    65       163       228       9       17       26       74       180       254
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  S. PORTLAND AGS                   0         7         7       0        0        0        0         7         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             32       141       173       2       11       13       34       152       186
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          97       311       408      11       28       39      108       339       447
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MARYLAND
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND          99       427       526      26        6       32      125       433       558
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ADELPHI LAB CENTER                0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ANDREWS AFB                     196       267       463      82       91      173      278       358       636
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ANNAPOLIS NS (INCL. USNA)        28       299       327      27       45       72       55       344       399
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BALTIMORE ENDIST/CIV              0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
 PERSONN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CURTIS BAY COAST GUARD            0         7         7       0        0        0        0         7         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT DETRICK                     21       107       128      12        9       21       33       116       149
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT GEORGE G. MEADE            312       735     1,047      98       64      162      410       799     1,209
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT RITCHIE                      1         0         1       0        1        1        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  INDIAN HEAD NAV ORD STA          21        96       117       6        5       11       27       101       128
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NESEC ST. INGOES                  1         3         4       0        0        0        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NNMC BETHESDA                    84       252       336      68       54      122      152       306       458
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PATUXENT RIVER NAS              146       158       304      73       19       92      219       177       396
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             45       122       167      21       23       44       66       145       211
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WHITE OAK NSWC DAHLGREN          12        10        22       7        3       10       19        13        32
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         966     2,483     3,449     422      320      742    1,388     2,803     4,191
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MASSACHUSETTS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP EDWARDS--NG                  0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT DEVENS                       1         7         8       3        1        4        4         8        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HANSCOM AFB                      27        51        78      27       91      118       54       142       196
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAV WPNS INDUS RSV PLANT          0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVMAR RESCEN WORCHESTER
    MA                              1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVPRO STRAT SYS,                 1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
 PITTSFIELD
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OTIS AGB                          0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SOUTH WEYMOUTH NAS               12        14        26       1        2        3       13        16        29
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              9        90        99       9       12       21       18       102       120
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USA NATICK RSCH & DEV CTR         5         9        14       2        3        5        7        12        19
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WESTOVER ARB AFB                  3         4         7       0        0        0        3         4         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          59       176       235      43      110      153      102       286       388
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MICHIGAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DETROIT ARSENAL                   0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL AIR FACILITY,               4         4         8       1        1        2        5         5        10
 DETROIT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SELFRIDGE ANG BASE                0         2         2       2        0        2        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             35       169       204       6        9       15       41       178       219
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  W.K. KELLOGG REG ARPT AGS         1         2         3       0        0        0        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          40       177       217      10       10       20       50       187       237
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MINNESOTA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT SNELLING                     3         6         9       1        1        2        4         7        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MINN/ST PAUL IAP ARS             11         6        17       1        0        1       12         6        18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              8        58        66       2        4        6       10        62        72
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          22        70        92       4        5        9       26        75       101
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MISSISSIPPI
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALLEN C THOMPSON FIELD-AGS        2         0         2       0        1        1        2         1         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP SHELBY                      18        37        55       2        3        5       20        40        60
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  COLUMBUS AFB                     18        61        79       8       64       72       26       125       151
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GULFPORT NCBC                    70       171       241       1        1        2       71       172       243
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KEESLER AFB                     134       398       532      28       48       76      162       446       608
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MERIDIAN NAS                     18        97       115       9       22       31       27       119       146
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PASCAGOULA NAVSTA                45       115       160       9        3       12       54       118       172
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             18       109       127       2        3        5       20       112       132
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  VICKSBURG ENDIST                  0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         323       988     1,311      60      145      205      383     1,133     1,516
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MISSOURI
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DFAS KANSAS CITY CENTER           1         2         3       0        1        1        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT LEONARD WOOD               230     1,196     1,426      25       57       82      255     1,253     1,508
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCSA KANSAS CITY MO              11        26        37       2        2        4       13        28        41
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVRESCEN ST LOUIS MO            23        25        48       1        1        2       24        26        50
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ST LOUIS ARMY RESERVE             2         4         6       1        0        1        3         4         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ST LOUIS COAST GUARD              2         8        10       0        0        0        2         8        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ST LOUIS ENDIST                   0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             26       101       127       4        7       11       30       108       138
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WHITEMAN AFB                     97       246       343      11       25       36      108       271       379
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         392     1,608     2,000      45       93      138      437     1,701     2,138
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MONTANA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MALMSTROM AFB                    89       339       428       3       50       53       92       389       481
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              8        26        34       3        2        5       11        28        39
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          97       365       462       6       52       58      103       417       520
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEBRASKA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST OMAHA NE                   2         0         2       0        0        0        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OFFUTT AFB                      238       435       673      92       60      152      330       495       825
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              7        32        39       1        4        5        8        36        44
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG ELIZABETH CITY NC            2         2         4       0        0        0        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         249       469       718      93       64      157      342       533       875
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEVADA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FALLON NAS                       44        95       139      11        9       20       55       104       159
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HAWTHORNE ARMY AMMO PLANT         0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NELLIS AFB                      288       657       945      42       87      129      330       744     1,074
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              9        45        54       1        3        4       10        48        58
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         341       797     1,138      55       99      154      396       896     1,292
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEW HAMPSHIRE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PEASE AFB/AGB                     1         0         1       0        1        1        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PEASE AGB                         0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PORTSMOUTH NAV SHIPYD            14        59        73       7        2        9       21        61        82
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              4        26        30       2        2        4        6        28        34
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          19        85       104      10        5       15       29        90       119
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEW JERSEY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EARLE NAVWEAPSTA                 13        32        45       1        0        1       14        32        46
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT DIX                         30        71       101       8       11       19       38        82       120
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT HAMILTON                     1        17        18       2        2        4        3        19        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT MONMOUTH                    57        47       104      23        5       28       80        52       132
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LAKEHURST NAV AIR ENGR CTR       13        39        52       2        2        4       15        41        56
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCGUIRE AFB                     163       351       514      23       55       78      186       406       592
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PICATINNY ARSENAL                 0         4         4       1        0        1        1         4         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TETERBORO MAP                     0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             14       100       114       2        8       10       16       108       124
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         291       661       952      63       83      146      354       744     1,098
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEW MEXICO
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CANNON AFB                      117       284       401       8       21       29      125       305       430
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DEF NUCLEAR AGCY                  0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HOLLOMAN AFB                    113       337       450       6       33       39      119       370       489
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KIRTLAND AFB                    132       219       351      79       70      149      211       289       500
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              5        38        43       2        3        5        7        41        48
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE         8        38        46       3        0        3       11        38        49
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         375       916     1,291      98      128      226      473     1,044     1,517
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEW YORK
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST BUFFALO NY                 0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT DRUM                       154     1,563     1,717      26       73       99      180     1,636     1,816
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GRIFFISS NOAD ANG                 3         0         3       2        5        7        5         5        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HANCOCK FIELD AGS                 2         4         6       0        0        0        2         4         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LOCKPORT AFS                      1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL STATION STATEN              0        33        33       0        2        2        0        35        35
 ISLAND
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PFC ROBERT J. MANVILLE            0         1         1       2        1        3        2         2         4
 USARC
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PLATTSBURGH AFB                   2        14        16       1        0        1        3        14        17
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHENECTADY ARPT-AGS              0         3         3       1        0        1        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCOTIA NAVAL ADM BALLSTON         6        39        45       1        5        6        7        44        51
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  STEWART NEWBURGH USARC            1        52        53       3        0        3        4        52        56
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             54       263       317      10       18       28       64       281       345
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG NIAGARA NY                   0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WATERVLIET ARSENAL                1         4         5       0        1        1        1         5         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WEST POINT MILRES                28        70        98      46       27       73       74        97       171
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  1ST MARINE CORPS DISTRICT         7        21        28       1        4        5        8        25        33
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         259     2,068     2,327      94      136      230      353     2,204     2,557
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NORTH CAROLINA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP LEJEUNE MCB                473     6,615     7,088     103      162      265      576     6,777     7,353
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHERRY POINT MCAS                92       733       825      33       20       53      125       753       878
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHERRY POINT NAVAL               10        30        40       0        4        4       10        34        44
 AVIATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT BRAGG                      810     4,778     5,588     134      215      349      944     4,993     5,937
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEW RIVER MCAS                   80       837       917      19       16       35       99       853       952
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  POPE AFB                        159       375       534       8       63       71      167       438       605
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SEYMOUR JOHNSON AFB             156       322       478      15       39       54      171       361       532
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TARHEEL ARMY MISSILE PLANT        0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             66       478       544      14       23       37       80       501       581
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       1,846    14,169    16,015     326      542      868    2,172    14,711    16,883
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NORTH DAKOTA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FARGO/HECTOR FIELD                1         0         1       1        0        1        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GRAND FORKS AFB                  95       203       298       4       23       27       99       226       325
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MINOT AFB                       138       414       552      10       44       54      148       458       606
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              4        11        15       1        0        1        5        11        16
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         238       628       866      16       67       83      254       695       949
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OHIO
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BROOKLYN USARC                    1         6         7       0        0        0        1         6         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  COLUMBUS DEF DEPOT               10        13        23       3        0        3       13        13        26
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DFAS COLUMBUS CENTER              1         0         1       1        0        1        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LIMA ARMY TANK CTR                0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVMAR RESCEN YOUNGSTOWN
    OH                              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVY FINANCE CENTER               1         1         2       1        2        3        2         3         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVY RECRUITING AREA 4,
    COLUMB                          3         5         8       0        1        1        3         6         9
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PORT CLINTON IND PARK             0         3         3       0        2        2        0         5         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RICKENBACKER IAP                  2         2         4       0        0        0        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SP FLD-BECKLEY MAP AGS            2         2         4       0        0        0        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             53       163       216      15        6       21       68       169       237
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB            189       176       365     141      152      293      330       328       658
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         262       372       634     162      163      325      424       535       959
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OKLAHOMA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALTUS AFB                        46       127       173       6       24       30       52       151       203
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST TULSA OK                   0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT SILL                       188     1,837     2,025      30       73      103      218     1,910     2,128
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCALESTER ARMY AMMO PLANT         1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TINKER AFB                      226       546       772      43       86      129      269       632       901
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             11        65        76       3        2        5       14        67        81
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  VANCE AFB                        15        29        44      11       31       42       26        60        86
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         487     2,604     3,091      93      217      310      580     2,821     3,401
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OREGON
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PORTLAND IAP AGS                 16        10        26       0        1        1       16        11        27
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UMATILLA DEPOT                    1         3         4       0        0        0        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             17        99       116       3        6        9       20       105       125
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          34       112       146       3        7       10       37       119       156
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PENNSYLVANIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CARLISLE BARRACKS                16        13        29      34        7       41       50        20        70
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHARLES KELLY SPT FACILITY        0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DEFENSE DIST DEPOT
    SUSQUEHAN                      29        18        47       5        4        9       34        22        56
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DEFENSE SUPPLY CTR PHILA         16        15        31       8        0        8       24        15        39
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GR. PITTS IAP-AGS                 0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LETTERKENNY ARMY DEPOT            0         2         2       1        0        1        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAV SHIPS PARTS CTRL CTR          9         3        12       5        1        6       14         4        18
 ICP
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL BASE, PHILADELPHIA          8         1         9       1        0        1        9         1        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PITTSBURGH MEPS/ENDIST           22        29        51       3        3        6       25        32        57
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             34       248       282       8       33       41       42       281       323
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WILLOW GROVE NAS                 18        52        70       3        8       11       21        60        81
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WYOMING VALLEY ANG CTR            0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         152       385       537      68       56      124      220       441       661
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RHODE ISLAND
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEWPORT NAVEDTRACEN              48       123       171      45       40       85       93       163       256
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PROVIDENCE PRT                    0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              3        19        22       0        0        0        3        19        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          51       142       193      45       41       86       96       183       279
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOUTH CAROLINA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BEAUFORT MCAS                    61       548       609      26       21       47       87       569       656
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHARLESTON AFB                  130       285       415      10       30       40      140       315       455
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHARLESTON NAVSTA                15        67        82       1        1        2       16        68        84
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT JACKSON                    197     1,529     1,726      38       43       81      235     1,572     1,807
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL HOSPITAL, CHARLESTON       14        30        44      12        6       18       26        36        62
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NV WEAPONS STATION               50       184       234      11       40       51       61       224       285
 CHARLEST
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PARRIS ISLAND MCRD               19     1,700     1,719       6       10       16       25     1,710     1,735
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SHAW AFB                        173       371       544      29       62       91      202       433       635
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  THE CITADEL                       0        23        23       0        2        2        0        25        25
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             19        82       101       8        4       12       27        86       113
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         678     4,819     5,497     141      219      360      819     5,038     5,857
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOUTH DAKOTA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ELLSWORTH AFB                    81       268       349       6       21       27       87       289       376
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SIOUX FALLS CTR                   3         0         3       0        0        0        3         0         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1        12        13       0        1        1        1        13        14
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          85       280       365       6       22       28       91       302       393
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TENNESSEE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ARNOLD AFB                        4         2         6       3        1        4        7         3        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MEMPHIS IAP AGS                   1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MEMPHIS NAS                      52        27        79       9        6       15       61        33        94
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            102       108       210      30       23       53      132       131       263
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         159       137       296      42       30       72      201       167       368
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TEXAS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BROOKS AFB                       37        27        64      27       29       56       64        56       120
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CARSWELL AFB                      1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CORPUS CHRISTI COAST GUARD        0         7         7       0        0        0        0         7         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CORPUS CHRISTI NAS               71       155       226      20       80      100       91       235       326
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DYESS AFB                       139       410       549      15       30       45      154       440       594
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST FORT WORTH TX              0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST GALVESTON TX               0         0         0       0        2        2        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT BLISS                      284     1,470     1,754      45       96      141      329     1,566     1,895
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT HOOD                       895     4,736     5,631     110      253      363    1,005     4,989     5,994
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT SAM HOUSTON                221       649       870     120       64      184      341       713     1,054
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT WORTH USARC                  2         0         2       1        0        1        3         0         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GALVESTON COAST GUARD             0         5         5       0        0        0        0         5         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GOODFELLOW AFB                   53       197       250       3       10       13       56       207       263
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KELLY AFB                         1         0         1       2        0        2        3         0         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KINGSVILLE NAS                   68       116       184       9       13       22       77       129       206
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LACKLAND AFB                    400     3,459     3,859     119      166      285      519     3,625     4,144
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LAUGHLIN AFB                     22        49        71       5       24       29       27        73       100
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LYNDON B. JOHNSON SPACE           0         1         1       5        1        6        5         2         7
 CTR
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAS JRB FT WORTH TX              35        86       121       7        4       11       42        90       132
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVY RECRUITING AREA 7,           1         1         2       1        1        2        2         2         4
 DALLA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RANDOLPH AFB                    192        64       256     128       85      213      320       149       469
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RED RIVER DEPOT                   0         3         3       1        0        1        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SHEPPARD AFB                    120       416       536      20       49       69      140       465       605
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            135       491       626      22       30       52      157       521       678
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       2,677    12,342    15,019     661      937    1,598    3,338    13,279    16,617
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
UTAH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DUGWAY PROVING GROUND             1         2         3       0        0        0        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HILL AFB                        188       421       609      18       50       68      206       471       677
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TOOELE ARMY DEPOT                 0         5         5       0        0        0        0         5         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             10        55        65       2        4        6       12        59        71
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         199       483       682      20       54       74      219       537       756
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VERMONT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BURLINGTON IAP-AGS                0         2         2       1        0        1        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1        13        14       2        0        2        3        13        16
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1        15        16       3        0        3        4        15        19
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VIRGINIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMERON STATION                   1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DAM NECK TRNG CTR ATLANTIC       93       196       289      23       10       33      116       206       322
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT A.P. HILL                    0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT BELVOIR                    115       188       303     120       34      154      235       222       457
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT EUSTIS                     170       552       722      40       34       74      210       586       796
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT LEE                        119       438       557      47       20       67      166       458       624
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT MONROE                      39        27        66      48        1       49       87        28       115
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT MYER                       172       354       526     207       33      240      379       387       766
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT STORY                       20       120       140       2        3        5       22       123       145
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HQTRS MARCORPS                   58       971     1,029      93       18      111      151       989     1,140
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LANGLEY AFB                     398       491       889     138      108      246      536       599     1,135
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LITTLE CREEK NAV AMPHIB         309       677       986      70       32      102      379       709     1,088
 BASE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCCDC QUANTICO VA               121       916     1,037     115       72      187      236       988     1,224
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL MEDICAL CTR
    PORTSMOUTH                     80       239       319      44       64      108      124       303       427
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVSURFWEAPCEN DAHLGREN          25        46        71      12        6       18       37        52        89
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NORFOLK ENDIST                    0         5         5       0        2        2        0         7         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NORFOLK NAV SHIPYD                4         1         5       3        0        3        7         1         8
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NORFOLK NAVAL BASE            1,713     7,473     9,186     279      256      535    1,992     7,729     9,721
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NORFOLK NSC                       1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NSGA NORTHWEST                   10        32        42       1        2        3       11        34        45
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OCEANA NAS                      141       423       564      12       14       26      153       437       590
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PENTAGON--AIR FORCE              96        21       117     205       28      233      301        49       350
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PENTAGON--ARMY                   25        31        56     133       11      144      158        42       200
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PENTAGON--NAVY                   17        16        33      74       25       99       91        41       132
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RICHMOND DEF DEPOT                8         3        11       9        1       10       17         4        21
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            210       386       596     115       62      177      325       448       773
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG ALEXANDRIA VA                0         4         4       0        0        0        0         4         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG HAMPTON ROADS VA             0         8         8       2        2        4        2        10        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  USCG YORKTOWN VA                  0         4         4       0        0        0        0         4         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  YORKTOWN NAVWEAPSTA              46       106       152      10        6       16       56       112       168
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       3,991    13,729    17,720   1,802      844    2,646    5,793    14,573    20,366
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WASHINGTON
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BANGOR NAVSUBBASE               162       261       423      11       29       40      173       290       463
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST SEATTLE WA                 0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ENDIST WALLA WALLA WA             1         0         1       1        0        1        2         0         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FAIRCHILD AFB                   111       230       341      15       31       46      126       261       387
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT LAWTON                       1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT LEWIS                      423     3,263     3,686      81      193      274      504     3,456     3,960
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MCCHORD AFB                     120       258       378       9       30       39      129       288       417
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL HOSPITAL BREMERTON         29        97       126      12       28       40       41       125       166
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL STATION EVERETT           113       516       629      10       18       28      123       534       657
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NS BREMERTON                    327     2,075     2,402      42       44       86      369     2,119     2,488
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SPOKANE IAP AGS                   1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             86       570       656       6       17       23       92       587       679
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WHIDBEY ISLAND NAS              153       514       667      18       22       40      171       536       707
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                       1,527     7,784     9,311     205      413      618    1,732     8,197     9,929
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WEST VIRGINIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAV SEC GROUP DET, SUGAR
    GROV                           12        28        40       0        0        0       12        28        40
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             13        25        38       0        1        1       13        26        39
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          25        53        78       0        1        1       25        54        79
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WISCONSIN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FORT MCCOY                        0         3         3       0        3        3        0         6         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GEN BILLY MITCHELL FIELD          0         3         3       1        1        2        1         4         5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TRUAX FIELD ANG STA               0         3         3       0        1        1        0         4         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             16        63        79       4        5        9       20        68        88
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          16        72        88       5       10       15       21        82       103
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WYOMING
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FRANCIS E WARREN AFB             91       289       380       6       32       38       97       321       418
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              2        14        16       1        0        1        3        14        17
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          93       303       396       7       32       39      100       335       435
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Conus Total                    29,939   136,520   166,459   8,568    9,367   17,935   38,507   145,887   184,394
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


 Active Duty Retirements and Separations by State/Country and Base (Includes Homeported Ships and Coast Guard)--
                                                     FY 2006
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Enlisted                    Officer                     Total
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Rets     Seps      Total    Rets     Seps    Total     Rets     Seps      Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AFGHANISTAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         5         6       1        0        1        2         5         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1         5         6       1        0        1        2         5         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AMERICAN SAMOA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              2         1         3       1        0        1        3         1         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           2         1         3       1        0        1        3         1         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AUSTRALIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CANBERRA A.C.T.                   1         2         3       1        0        1        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE                0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1         4         5       1        0        1        2         4         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AUSTRIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BAHRAIN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              2         4         6       1        0        1        3         4         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           2         4         6       1        0        1        3         4         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BELGIUM
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BRUSSELS, NATO                    2         3         5       8        0        8       10         3        13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHIEVRES AS BELGIUM               6        11        17       0        0        0        6        11        17
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KLEINE BORGEL                    20        37        57      15        2       17       35        39        74
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         3         3       1        0        1        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          28        54        82      24        2       26       52        56       108
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BERMUDA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAS BERMUDA                       0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BOSNIA/HERZEGOVINA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BURUNDI
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CANADA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ARGENTIA NEWFOUNDLAND             0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       1        0        1        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CHINA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CUBA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GUANTANAMO BAY NS                 1        10        11       0        0        0        1        10        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         5         6       0        1        1        1         6         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           2        15        17       0        1        1        2        16        18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DJIBOUTI
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         6         6       0        2        2        0         8         8
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         6         6       0        2        2        0         8         8
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EGYPT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAIRO MED UNIT                    3         0         3       0        0        0        3         0         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  EL GORAH, EGYPT                   3        23        26       0        0        0        3        23        26
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         3         3       0        0        0        0         3         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           6        26        32       0        0        0        6        26        32
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
EL SALVADOR
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GEORGIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GERMANY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ANSBACH, BARTON BARRACKS          0        22        22       0        0        0        0        22        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BABENBAUSEN KASERNE               3        92        95       0        0        0        3        92        95
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BAD AIBLING FIELD STATION         0         3         3       0        0        0        0         3         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BAD GODESBERG, AMER.              1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
 EMBASSY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BAD KREUZNACH GERMANY             5        10        15       1        0        1        6        10        16
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BAD KREUZNACH, ROSE               0        25        25       0        0        0        0        25        25
 BARRACKS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BAMBERG WARNER BARRACKS          29       280       309       1       12       13       30       292       322
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BAUMHOLDER, H.D. SMITH            7       281       288       2       17       19        9       298       307
 BRCKS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BITBURG AB F                      0         5         5       0        8        8        0        13        13
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BOBLINGEN PANZER KASERNE          6        16        22       1        2        3        7        18        25
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BUCHEL AB                         1         9        10       0        0        0        1         9        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BUEDINGEN ARMSTRONG
    BARRACKS                        1        83        84       0        3        3        1        86        87
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DARMSTADT GERMANY                15       188       203       6        8       14       21       196       217
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DEXHEIM MILITARY COMMUNITY        1        42        43       0        1        1        1        43        44
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FRANKFURT, GERMANY                3         4         7       0        3        3        3         7        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FRIEDBERG                         7       174       181       1        1        2        8       175       183
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GARMISCH                          0         0         0       1        1        2        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GEILENKIRCHEN                     7        19        26       2        4        6        9        23        32
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GIEBELSTADT                       7       133       140       3       13       16       10       146       156
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GIESSEN GERMANY                   2        23        25       0        0        0        2        23        25
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GRAFENWOHR GERMANY               14        81        95       3       13       16       17        94       111
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HANAU GERMANY                    21       279       300       7       15       22       28       294       322
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HEIDELBERG                        0         4         4       0        0        0        0         4         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HEIDELBERG PATTON BARRACKS       24       111       135       9       11       20       33       122       155
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HEIDELBERG, CAMPBELL
    BARRACK                         9        26        35      14        8       22       23        34        57
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  HOHENFELS GERMANY                19       120       139       3        7       10       22       127       149
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ILLESHEIM GERMANY                 6        66        72       2        5        7        8        71        79
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KAAPAUN AS                        1         1         2       0        0        0        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KAEFERTAL GERMANY                 9       141       150       3       13       16       12       154       166
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KAISERSLAUTERN                   20       136       156       4        7       11       24       143       167
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KATTERBACH KASERNE
    (ANSBACH)                      15       113       128       0        7        7       15       120       135
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KIRCHGOENS                        6        40        46       0        1        1        6        41        47
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KITZINGEN, HARVEY BARRACKS        8        52        60       4       10       14       12        62        74
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KITZINGEN, LARSON BARRACKS        8       257       265       0       11       11        8       268       276
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LANDSTUHL MEDICAL CENTER         15       111       126      10       21       31       25       132       157
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MAIN-KASTEL                       0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MAINZ/MCCULLY BARRACKS GM         4        32        36       0        1        1        4        33        37
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MANNHEIM                         12       168       180       0        2        2       12       170       182
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MIESAU ARMY DEPOT                 4        61        65       1        4        5        5        65        70
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MOHRINGEN, KELLEY BARRACKS        1         8         9       2        0        2        3         8        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MUNICH                            1         4         5       3        3        6        4         7        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  PIRMASENS                         1         2         3       0        0        0        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RAMSTEIN, FRG                   102       327       429      39       43       82      141       370       511
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RHEIN MAIN AB                     2         8        10       0        0        0        2         8        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SANDHOFEN                         5        18        23       0        1        1        5        19        24
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHWEINFURT CONN
    BARRACKS                        8       109       117       2        2        4       10       111       121
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHWEINFURT LEDWARD
    BARRACKS                       10       211       221       1       13       14       11       224       235
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHWETZINGEN                      4        19        23       1        0        1        5        19        24
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHWETZINGEN, TOMPKIN
    BARRACK                         1         7         8       1        0        1        2         7         9
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SECKENHEIM                        2         1         3       1        0        1        3         1         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SEMBACH, FRG                      9        27        36       1        7        8       10        34        44
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SHIPTON KASERNE, ANSBACH          6        49        55       0        0        0        6        49        55
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SPANGDAHLEM AB                   41       199       240       2       17       19       43       216       259
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  STUTTGART GERMANY                14        15        29      17        5       22       31        20        51
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         3         4       0        0        0        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  VAIHINGEN--PATCH BARRACKS         9        43        52       1        0        1       10        43        53
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  VISECK                           27       406       433       2       11       13       29       417       446
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WIESBADEN GERMANY                13       143       156       5       27       32       18       170       188
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WORMS                            12        58        70       3        2        5       15        60        75
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WUERZBERG                        35       216       251       6       13       19       41       229       270
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         594     5,082     5,676     165      353      518      759     5,435     6,194
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GIBRALTAR
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GREECE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SOUDA BAY, CRETE                  0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GREENLAND
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  THULE AFB                         2         2         4       1        1        2        3         3         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           2         2         4       1        1        2        3         3         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GUAM
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ANDERSON AFB GUAM                24        99       123       3       18       21       27       117       144
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL HOSPITAL GUAM               3        22        25       1       10       11        4        32        36
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL STATION GUAM               17        40        57       0        6        6       17        46        63
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              5         4         9       0        0        0        5         4         9
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          49       165       214       4       34       38       53       199       252
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GUATEMALA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ICELAND
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KEFLAVIK ICELAND                  9        28        37       1        3        4       10        31        41
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KEFLAVIL NAS, ICELAND             1         1         2       0        2        2        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          10        29        39       1        5        6       11        34        45
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IRAQ
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              4       248       252       5        8       13        9       256       265
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           4       248       252       5        8       13        9       256       265
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ISRAEL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TEL AVIV                          0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ITALY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  AVIANO AB                        32       169       201       6       24       30       38       193       231
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP DARBY LIVORNO                5        36        41       0        2        2        5        38        43
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  GAETA NAVAL SUPPORT               0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
 ACTVITY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LA MADDALENA SARDINIA             0         3         3       0        0        0        0         3         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAPLES FMC                        0         1         1       2        1        3        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAPLES U.S. NAVCAMSMED            0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAPLES, NAVAL SUPP ACT            6         6        12       6        0        6       12         6        18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAS SIGONELLA, SICILY             5        15        20       0        1        1        5        16        21
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  VICENZA ITALY                    23       475       498       5       14       19       28       489       517
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          71       710       781      19       42       61       90       752       842
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
JAPAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP ZAMA TOKYO                   3        65        68       2       11       13        5        76        81
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FLEET ACTIVITIES, SASEBO         11        24        35       0        3        3       11        27        38
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  IWAKUNI MCAS                      6        16        22       0        0        0        6        16        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KADENA AB                        62       280       342       4       34       38       66       314       380
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KADENA FLEET ACTIVITY             2         3         5       1        0        1        3         3         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KAMI SEYA                         1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MAKIMINATO, OKINAWA CP
    BUTLER                          9        29        38       1        1        2       10        30        40
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MISAWA AB                        35       145       180       3       21       24       38       166       204
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MUTUAL DEF ASST OFF, TOKYO        0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL AIR FACILITY, ATSUGI        9        10        19       0        0        0        9        10        19
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL HOSPITAL OKINAWA            2         6         8       0        1        1        2         7         9
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NSD YOKOSUKA, JAPAN              32        55        87       9        9       18       41        64       105
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OKINAWA TORII STATION            10        34        44       0        1        1       10        35        45
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             15        66        81       0        1        1       15        67        82
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  YOKOTA AB                        47       118       165      14       28       42       61       146       207
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         244       851     1,095      35      110      145      279       961     1,240
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KOREA (SOUTH)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  BUPYEONG CAMP MARKET              0        12        12       0        0        0        0        12        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP CASEY TONGDUCHON            43       387       430      10       19       29       53       406       459
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CAMP RED CLOUD UIJONBU,          47       244       291       3       14       17       50       258       308
 KOR
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CHINHAE FLEET ACTIVITY            2         1         3       0        1        1        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KUNSAN AB                        26        82       108       2       15       17       28        97       125
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OSAN AIR BASE                    57       153       210       7       30       37       64       183       247
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  OSAN, KOREA                       8        37        45       0        0        0        8        37        45
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SEOUL, KOREA                     12        59        71       1        9       10       13        68        81
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SUWON                             1         6         7       0        0        0        1         6         7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TAEGU, CAMP HENRY, 19 SPT        16        24        40       0        2        2       16        26        42
 CM
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         1         2       0        0        0        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  WONGJU KANGWON-BO CAMP
    LONG                            2        13        15       0        1        1        2        14        16
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  YONGSAN, KOREA                  107       320       427      26       45       71      133       365       498
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  20TH ASG TAEGU, KOREA            16        63        79       4        6       10       20        69        89
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  23D ASG CAMP HUMPHREYS           37       209       246       5        7       12       42       216       258
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  34TH ASG PUSAN, KOREA             3        16        19       0        0        0        3        16        19
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         378     1,627     2,005      58      149      207      436     1,776     2,212
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
KUWAIT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  KUWAIT CITY, COMBAT               1         6         7       3        1        4        4         7        11
 SUPPORT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1         7         8       3        1        4        4         8        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MALAYSIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MEXICO
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NETHERLANDS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SCHINNEN NETHERLANDS              9        51        60       4        2        6       13        53        66
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           9        52        61       4        2        6       13        54        67
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NORWAY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  STAVANGER                         4         6        10       1        0        1        5         6        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           4         6        10       1        0        1        5         6        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PANAMA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALBROOK AFS                       0         0         0      10        0       10       10         0        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         0         0      10        0       10       10         0        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PHILIPPINES
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PORTUGAL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LISBON AMERICAN EMBASSY           0         0         0       1        0        1        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  TERCEIRA AZORES                   7        26        33       1        7        8        8        33        41
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           7        26        33       2        7        9        9        33        42
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PUERTO RICO
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL STATION, ROOSEVELT          4         2         6       0        0        0        4         2         6
 ROA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  SAN JUAN, FORT BUCHANAN           5        11        16       9        3       12       14        14        28
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              2        10        12       0        3        3        2        13        15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          11        23        34       9        6       15       20        29        49
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
QATAR
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ROMANIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RUSSIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         1         2       0        0        0        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1         1         2       0        0        0        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SAUDI ARABIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  DHAHRAN, DET. 1, 9 AIRPS          1        10        11       0        0        0        1        10        11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RIYADH SAUDI ARABIA               2         2         4       2        0        2        4         2         6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           3        13        16       2        0        2        5        13        18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SHIPS AFLOAT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE            385     2,404     2,789      45       95      140      430     2,499     2,929
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                         385     2,404     2,789      45       95      140      430     2,499     2,929
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOUTH AFRICA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SPAIN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MADRID AMERICAN EMBASSY           0         1         1       1        2        3        1         3         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MORON AB                          4         6        10       0        0        0        4         6        10
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NAVAL STATION, ROTA, SPAIN        5        26        31       0        2        2        5        28        33
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ROTA NS                           3         5         8       0        0        0        3         5         8
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          12        38        50       1        4        5       13        42        55
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
THAILAND
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TURKEY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ANKARA AS                         1         2         3       1        0        1        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  INCURLIK AB ADANA, TURKEY        14        50        64       3       16       19       17        66        83
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ISTANBUL AMT                      1         2         3       0        0        0        1         2         3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          16        55        71       4       16       20       20        71        91
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TURKMENISTAN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
UNITED KINGDOM
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ALCONBURY, UK RAF
    MOLESWORTH                      9        40        49       2        6        8       11        46        57
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CROUGTON RAF CROUGHTON            1        10        11       0        1        1        1        11        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  FAIRFORD, RAF FAIRFORD            7        10        17       1        2        3        8        12        20
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  JMF ST. MAWGAN, UK                2         2         4       0        0        0        2         2         4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LAKENHEATH, UK RAF               37       149       186       3       41       44       40       190       230
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  LONDON, ENGLAND                   1         6         7       3        2        5        4         8        12
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  MENWITH HILL RAF                  4        13        17       1        2        3        5        15        20
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  NEWBURY                           0         1         1       0        0        0        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  RAF MILDENHALL                   38       149       187       6       24       30       44       173       217
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         0         0       0        1        1        0         1         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          99       380       479      16       79       95      115       459       574
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VENEZUELA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  CARACAS, AM. EMBASSY              0         1         1       1        0        1        1         1         2
 VENZUEL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         1         1       1        0        1        1         1         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
VIRGIN ISLANDS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           1         0         1       0        0        0        1         0         1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YUGOSLAVIA
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE              0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                           0         2         2       0        0        0        0         2         2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
UNKNOWN
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  UNKNOWN/RESERVE BASE             85     1,602     1,687     264      336      600      349     1,938     2,287
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total                          85     1,602     1,687     264      336      600      349     1,938     2,287
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Overseas Total          2,029    13,454    15,483     683    1,254    1,937    2,712    14,708    17,420
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total              31,968   149,974   181,942   9,251   10,621   19,872   41,219   160,595   201,814
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                               __________

After the hearing, the U.S. Department of Labor subsequently provided 
charts showing the number of TAP classes offered, the average number of 
attendees, and the average class size. They provided these charts 
before the July 23rd letter.

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.005


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.006


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] 34308A.007


                                 
                      Wounded & Injured Transition
                 The Transition Training Academy Model

Overview
    While serving in the armed forces of the United States, many 
wounded and injured servicemembers must confront new and difficult 
challenges during their rehabilitation in military treatment facilities 
(MTF) before they are able to transition back to civilian lives and 
families. Some of these servicemembers will encounter significant 
challenges as they enter or reenter the workforce. A key part of the 
rehabilitation process relates directly to their jobs and long term 
career aspirations. In other words, there is a need to assist these 
wounded and injured servicemembers in obtaining new skills or enhancing 
current skills so that they find suitable and rewarding employment upon 
leaving the medical facility and exiting active duty service in the 
armed forces.
    This career and skill transition can be a powerful win-win for 
rehabilitating servicemembers, their family, and prospective employers. 
By identifying desired and needed skills in the civilian workforce, and 
tailoring rehabilitation and training programs to meet those needs, 
employers gain access to a pool of skilled employees and the 
transitioning servicemembers are empowered to pursue their American 
dream.
    Department of Labor's (DOL) Veterans Employment Training Service 
(VETS) is doing this by working with servicemembers to help them 
improve their skills and by reaching out to employers to find out the 
types of jobs they are looking to fill.
Present Status
    Presently, a number of programs exist to support the transition to 
employment of wounded & injured servicemembers, including tuition 
assistance, distance learning opportunities, and work experience 
programs. At some locations, such as at Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
(WRAMC), servicemembers have access to a wide range of education and 
degree programs, and can access these services in specialized and 
accommodated settings provided by Department of Defense's (DoD) 
Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP).
    Since the launch of DOL's Recovery & Employment Assistance 
Lifelines (REALifelines) program in 2004, VETS focused specific 
attention on wounded and injured transition as it relates to the 
following:

    1.  Wounded & Injured Servicemember employment, reemployment, and 
transition.
    2.  Servicemember access to pre-discharge career-focused learning 
opportunities.
    3.  Servicemember usage of skill-development opportunities.
    4.  Barriers to employment or reemployment for wounded & injured 
servicemembers.
    5.  Employment needs of primary caregivers. VETS launched an 
initial demonstration program called REALifelines at Walter Reed and 
the National Naval Medical Center (Bethesda, MD) in conjunction with 
DOL's Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), and the Job 
Accommodation Network. The demonstration project ran from October 2004 
to June 2005, and was succeeded by the implementation and rapid 
expansion of personalized services to wounded & injured servicemembers 
and their families under the unified REALifelines program.

    These initial efforts focused on three areas of service delivery: 
Pre-discharge services (training, assessment, internships, etc.); 
Transition Services (Referral, reemployment, accommodation, placement, 
etc.); and Follow-up.
    Several additional demonstration programs were launched throughout 
2005 
and 2006, culminating in the National Summit on Wounded & Injured 
Veterans: Recovery, Rehabilitation, and Employment. Further information 
on the findings of the summit, as well as full Summit content videos 
can be found online at www.HireVetsFirst.gov/realifelines.
    Among the programs and initiatives developed under the REALifelines 
program were efforts that now exist in different forms. For instance, 
REALifelines initially launched a call-center operation through the Job 
Accommodation Network to address referral issues and act as a central 
point of operations. That effort was phased out as DoD started the 
Military Severely Injured Center (MSIC), and DOL staff were placed on 
site at the MSIC to continue the coordination function in concert with 
other efforts and agencies. Additionally, an early Federal work 
opportunity program launched as part of REALifelines was combined with 
DoD's Operation War Fighter. A third program targeting the delivery of 
occupation-specific training is scheduled for formal launch in April 
2007 after 2 years of development. This project, the Transition 
Training Academy, is described below:
Project Summary
    The Transition Training Academy will provide introductory 
technology training for rehabilitating servicemembers as part of their 
rehabilitation plan prior to medical discharge from the armed services. 
Courses will be conducted in a modified classroom setting, with 
individual accommodations provided for class participants. These 
introductory courses include networking, computer and software support, 
and Small Office Home Office (SOHO) support. The purpose of the project 
is to provide individuals with an opportunity to determine if they have 
a further interest in pursuing a career in one of these fields, with 
particular emphasis on the Cisco Networking Academy programs.
    A demonstration project is being launched at the Naval Medical 
Center in San Diego, California as a joint effort of Cisco Foundation, 
Teachers Without Borders, the Naval Medical Center San Diego, the 
California Education and Development Department, the Job Accommodation 
Network, and DOL's VETS and ODEP.
    Servicemembers, and their primary caregivers, who are being 
processed for medical discharge from the armed services due to wounds 
or injuries sustained on active duty, will be provided with the 
opportunity to take a series of 3 hour sessions in a variety of topics 
in the networking, computer and software support and SOHO support 
fields. On-site instruction, as well as access to online extended 
instruction, will be provided. The instruction will be geared to 
individual levels of experience with technology from beginners to more 
advanced users.
    The schedule of classes will be flexible to accommodate a patient's 
medical and work schedules. The follow-up to classroom instruction will 
include Web-based exercises for continued learning and online support 
via e-mail and chat rooms. Additional support beyond the sessions will 
be provided to assist the disabled vet in obtaining the training needed 
to pursue a career in one of these fields.
    The long-range objective of the pilot project is to develop a 
replicable model which could be implemented in multiple facilities 
across the United States.
Project Benefits
      Increased patient morale
      Enhance their ability to perform military duties
      Reduced transition time after medical recovery by 
matching veterans to available jobs in IT more rapidly and effectively
      Reduced costs for post recovery training and agency-
related manpower involvement and costs
      Build a pipeline of skilled, motivated employees
      Increased ability to serve a growing MTF population with 
quality employment services at no projected increase in current MTF 
management and service staff
Project Deliverables
      Creation of a replicable, scalable program that can be 
implemented at low cost in multiple facilities across the nation.
      Development of a modular content format, which will 
accommodate each veteran's medical and work schedule.
      Individual portfolio of materials reviewed, course 
content completed, suggested professional development plan and referral 
to appropriate sites, including the closest Networking Academy, for 
certification training completion. This will be available to them in a 
specially adapted version of the TWB tool set.
      A detailed template for replication in other sites.
Current Status
      A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) has been developed 
and agreed to by VETS and the Naval Medical Center San Diego (Balboa) 
to establish a career-training and outreach center onsite.
      VETS has assigned 2 full time employees to development of 
the program, and contracted through the Job Accommodation Network to 
assure a full analysis and review of the demonstration.
      Cisco Public Benefit Giving staff have identified 
potential partners to assist in the development of training platforms 
and the redevelopment of underutilized materials.
      Due to the demands of rehabilitation, medical protocols 
and variations of each wounded serviceperson's needs and abilities 
while in the facility, a ``traditional'' Networking Academy format was 
not feasible. Portions of the Cisco Academy curricula are being 
excerpted for use in ``sampler'' course modules that better fit the 
skill level and time constraints of servicemembers attached to the 
Medical Holding Companies and undergoing treatment and other 
rehabilitative services.
Course Rationale/Description
      Patients in the medical holding facility are subject to 
duty assignments in addition to medical appointments and procedures 
relating to their recovery and readiness for transition to civilian 
life and careers. Some patients may be permitted to attend classes as a 
component of their duty assignment, however, the vast majority of them 
require significant flexibility in the course delivery timeframes to 
accommodate their medical appointments. These factors require that the 
courses and course content be fully customized in order to meet the 
requirements of the participants.
      Courses will be designed to be delivered in 3 hour 
sessions with Web-based follow-up exercises and online support via 
email and chat. The online exercises and assessments will be a required 
component of the course for the participant to receive a certificate of 
completion. Total required time for course completion including 
classroom time and online will average 6 to 7 hours.
      Each of the courses will consist of three 1-hour segments 
that are inclusive of single or multiple topics and reflect increasing 
levels of knowledge (beginner, intermediate, and advanced). This design 
will allow participants to attend 1 or 2 hours of a session and pick up 
the remaining hours at an alternate session thereby accommodating the 
majority of potential scheduling conflicts. Initial plans call for 
classes to be held on alternating Thursdays at 0900 to 1200, 1300-1600, 
and Friday 0800-1100.