[Congressional Record Volume 142, Number 97 (Thursday, June 27, 1996)]
[Extensions of Remarks]
[Pages E1202-E1203]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]




         TRIBUTE TO KERRY P. HEIN AMERICAN LEGION POST NO. 1991

                                 ______
                                 

                         HON. MICHAEL P. FORBES

                              of new york

                    in the house of representatives

                        Thursday, June 27, 1996

  Mr. FORBES. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the Kerry P. 
Hein American Legion Post in Rocky Point, Long Island, NY, founded 5 
years ago to honor the memory of CWO Kerry P. Hein, who gave his life 
in service to America on February 27, 1991, while serving in Operation 
Desert Storm. Hein was a resident of Sound Beach, on Suffolk County's 
North Shore, and was the only Long Island resident to die in the 
Persian Gulf war.
  Founded in 1991 as America's first Desert Storm post, the Kerry P. 
Hein American Legion Post No. 1991 honors the Army medivac helicopter 
pilot who was shot down over Kuwait just 1 day before the cease-fire 
was declared in the Persian Gulf war. It was shortly after Hein's death 
that World War II veteran Fred Denninger of Middle Island was inspired 
to establish the new American Legion post to honor Hein while serving 
the many veterans living in the communities surrounding Rocky Point.
  With the help of other veterans, including but not limited to Ron 
Libonati, Mike Cutrone, Harold Cases, Frank Devine, and Tom Peppard, 
the Kerry P. Hein American Legion Post received its permanent charter 
from the National American Legion Command on July 27, 1992. It received 
its New York State charter on August 6 of that same year.
  Beginning with 54 charter founders, the Kerry P. Hein Post now boasts 
137 members from the North Shore communities of Brookhaven and 
Riverhead towns. One of those inaugural members is Hein's grandfather, 
James Coneely, who visits area schools to talk to young students about 
patriotism and the role of the American Legion. Because of its 
distinction as the only Desert Storm post, it has also attracted 
membership from throughout Long Island and America, and from as far 
away as Puerto Rico and Australia.
  The Kerry P. Hein Post was assigned number 1991 to signify three 
historical acts; it was the year Hein died and when the post was 
founded, but also to pay tribute to the 50th anniversary of the bombing 
of Pearl Harbor that drew America into World War II.
  Kerry Hein was born in Queens, NY, and grew up in Sound Beach. In 
1987, he joined the U.S. Army Reserve, completed basic training at Fort 
Jackson, SC, then received a bachelor of science in aeronautical 
studies from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida. He was 
assigned to the 348th Medical Detachment in Daytona, where he served 
until July 1989, and ultimately rose to the rank of sergeant. After 
completing the Rotor Wing Aviator Course at Fort Rucker, AL, Hein was 
commissioned a warrant officer and accepted an opportunity to serve on 
active duty.

  Hein served in Operation Desert Storm with the 507th Medical Company, 
flying air ambulance helicopters that removed wounded soldiers from the 
battlefield under enemy fire. He was killed in action during the waning 
moments of Operation Desert Storm while flying a helicopter rescue into 
the Kuwaiti battlefield. The medivac helicopter pilot was posthumously 
promoted to Chief Warrant Officer 2 and received numerous battlefield 
honors, including the Purple Heart, Conspicuous Service Cross, Kuwait 
Liberation Medal and Army Commendation Medal.
  Hein is survived by his wife, Laura, daughter Melissa, and son 
Christopher, who was born 2 months after his father's death. Hein was 
buried in Calverton National Cemetery on Long Island, near his 
hometown, with full military honors.
  Along with the American Legion post in Rocky Point, the 77th U.S. 
Army Reserve Command [ARCOM] located on route 25A in Rocky Point was 
named in Hein's memory. During Operation Desert Storm, 3,400 soldiers 
from the 77th ARCOM served in the Persian Gulf. Also renamed in Hein's 
memory was New York Avenue, the main thoroughfare in Sound Beach. Other 
memorials include a walkway at Armed Forces Plaza in Hauppauge, Suffolk 
County's seat, and a helipad at Fort Hood in Mexia, TX.
  These eponymous tribes are just a modest recognition of the sacrifice 
and service that Kerry P. Hein offered America, a small measure of the 
gratitude we owe these men and women who gave their lives for this 
country. For generations to come, these tributes will serve to remind 
all Americans that freedom does not come without cost, that the liberty 
we all enjoy was paid for with blood of men and women like Kerry P. 
Hein.

[[Page E1203]]



                 TRIBUTE TO SISTER JANET A. FITZGERALD

                                 ______
                                 

                           HON. PETER T. KING

                              of new york

                    in the house of representatives

                        Thursday, June 27, 1996

  Mr. KING. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to salute one of Long Island's 
most dedicated and accomplished educators, Sister Janet A. Fitzgerald, 
O.P., Ph.D. After serving as president of Molloy College in Rockville 
Centre, NY since 1972, Sister Janet has announced her resignation. 
Sister Janet's tenure of almost 24 years was longer than that of any 
other Molloy president. Nearly 85 percent of Molloy's 8,500 graduates 
earned their degrees during Sister Janet's term in office.
  Coming to Molloy 27 years ago, Sister Janet taught in the philosophy 
department. She became president in 1972 and served in that capacity 
until this year. Following the completion of a well-deserved 
sabbatical, Sister Janet will return to Molloy to once again teach 
philosophy.
  Under Sister Janet's leadership, Molloy College grew dramatically. 
Enrollment has more than doubled and the number of faculty has 
increased from 73 full-time and 27 part-time in 1972 to 136 full-time 
and 142 part-time for the 1995-96 academic year. As president, Sister 
Janet oversaw the construction of three new campus buildings: The 
Wilbur Arts Center, the Chapel of the Sacred Heart, and the William J. 
Casey Center. During her presidency, extensive renovation and 
modernization were done to both Kellenberg and Quealy Halls.
  Molloy College also expanded its academic offerings during Sister 
Janet's administration Twenty-one majors were created and in 1989, 
Molloy offered its first graduate program, the M.S. in Nursing. Molloy 
has also added three additional M.S. programs in nursing.
  On a personal level Sister Janet and I both grew up in the Sunnyside/
Woodside neighborhood in Queens, NY. Sister Janet certainly epitomizes 
the qualities which were prized in our neighborhood--courage and 
strength of purpose.
  Sister Janet Fitzgerald is truly one of Long Island's greatest assets 
and one of our Nation's greatest educators. She compiled an outstanding 
record as president of Molloy College and deserves a debt of gratitude 
from all of us. I wish Sister Janet all the best and hope that she 
enjoys her sabbatical, but I know that she will be eager to get back to 
the classroom.

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