[Congressional Record Volume 152, Number 133 (Wednesday, December 6, 2006)]
[House]
[Pages H8798-H8800]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]




        HONORING THE CONTRIBUTIONS AND LIFE OF EDWARD R. BRADLEY

  Mr. LaTOURETTE. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to 
the resolution (H. Res. 1084) to honor the contributions and life of 
Edward R. Bradley, as amended.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                              H. Res. 1084

       Whereas Edward R. Bradley was born on June 22, 1941, in 
     Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
       Whereas he graduated in 1964 with a degree in education 
     from Cheyney State College;

[[Page H8799]]

       Whereas he taught during the day at William B. Mann 
     Elementary in Philadelphia and spent his evenings working at 
     local radio station WDAS for free;
       Whereas in 1965, when riots broke out in Philadelphia, Ed 
     Bradley, lacking recording equipment, covered the riots from 
     a neighborhood pay phone;
       Whereas Ed Bradley's coverage of the Philadelphia riots 
     earned him a full-time paid position with WDAS;
       Whereas Ed Bradley was hired in 1967 as a reporter for WCBS 
     radio in New York;
       Whereas in 1968 he was the only African American on air at 
     WCBS, or at any New York City radio station;
       Whereas he joined CBS News in 1971 as a stringer in its 
     Paris bureau, covering the Paris Peace talks, and remained 
     with CBS News for 35 years;
       Whereas he was transferred in 1972 to CBS Saigon bureau to 
     cover the Vietnam War and while covering the War in Cambodia 
     was injured by a mortar round;
       Whereas he covered Jimmy Carter's campaign in 1976 and 
     served as a CBS news floor correspondent for coverage of the 
     Democratic and Republican National Conventions;
       Whereas he became the first African American White House 
     correspondent for CBS news from 1976 to 1978;
       Whereas in 1981 Ed Bradley joined 60 Minutes as an on-air 
     correspondent and remained with 60 Minutes for 26 years;
       Whereas in 2000, Ed Bradley was the only television 
     journalist granted an interview with condemned Oklahoma City 
     Bomber, Timothy McVeigh, which earned him an Emmy award;
       Whereas Ed Bradley received numerous awards of distinction 
     for his in-depth reporting and coverage, including 20 Emmy 
     awards, Lew Klein Excellence in the Media Award (2006), Paul 
     White Award (2000), Damon Runyon Award (2003), Robert F. 
     Kennedy Journalism Award (1995), and a Lifetime Achievement 
     Award from the National Association of Black Journalists 
     (2005); and
       Whereas in addition to invaluable contributions to 
     journalism, Ed Bradley's reporting also spurred social 
     activism and change with his report on AIDS in Africa, 
     ``Death by Denial,'' which helped influence the 
     pharmaceutical industry into discounting and donating AIDS 
     drugs to Africa: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved, That the House of Representatives--
       (1) recognizes and honors the contributions of Edward R. 
     Bradley as an award winning American journalist; and
       (2) expresses its deepest condolences upon his death to his 
     wife, Patricia Blanchet, surviving family members, and 
     friends.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Ohio (Mr. LaTourette) and the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Davis) each 
will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio.


                             General Leave

  Mr. LaTOURETTE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend their 
remarks and include extraneous material on the resolution under 
consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Ohio?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. LaTOURETTE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself as much time as I might 
consume.
  Known best for his investigative reports on the CBS news program 60 
Minutes, Ed Bradley won 19 Emmy Awards throughout his journalism 
career, including one for lifetime achievement in 2003. Just one year 
after graduating from college, he reported on the Philadelphia riots 
and earned a position with a local radio station. He became a reporter 
for CBS News in 1971, where he remained for 35 years and took on 
projects that were challenging and oftentimes a call for action.
  His June 2000 report, ``Death by Denial,'' for example, helped expose 
the AIDS crisis in Africa and convinced the pharmaceutical industry to 
donate medicine to the region. His report the previous year, called 
``Unsafe Haven,'' prompted Federal investigations into America's 
psychiatric hospitals.
  In addition to his many professional accomplishments, Ed Bradley is 
remembered by his friends for leading a personal life of balance, 
virtue and humor. He loved to jump on stage with his good buddy and 
friend, Jimmy Buffett, who nicknamed Bradley ``Teddy Bear'' and 
referred to him as a great journalist who still knew how to have a good 
time.
  In November of this year, after a long and private struggle with 
leukemia, Ed Bradley passed away. He leaves behind him a legacy of 
journalistic talent and achievements, as well as a personal story of 
courage and determination.
  I urge my Members to join me today in supporting H. Res. 1084, as 
amended.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to yield as 
much time as he might consume to the sponsor of this resolution, the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Brady).
  Mr. BRADY of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman of the 
committee and the ranking member for allowing me to speak and also for 
bringing this bill up so quickly.
  Edward Rudolph Bradley was born on June 22, 1941, in West 
Philadelphia, about 8 blocks from my house. He attended my alma mater, 
St. Thomas More High School. He graduated about 3 years ahead of me. I 
knew him personally, saw him in school, and he always was a gentleman 
and someone who always helped anyone who needed any help in any manner. 
With him being a senior and me being a freshman, I needed a lot of 
help, and he always took the time to do that.
  He taught at William B. Mann Elementary in Philadelphia and spent his 
evenings working at a local Philadelphia radio station, WDAS, for free. 
In 1965, when riots broke out in Philadelphia and Philadelphia was in a 
major turmoil, Bradley, lacking recording equipment, covered the riots 
from a nearby pay phone and did an excellent job reporting back and 
also trying to soothe the problems we were having there.
  Bradley's coverage of the North Philadelphia riots earned him a full-
time paid position with WDAS. Bradley was hired in 1967 as a reporter 
for WCBS radio in New York. In 1968 he was the only African American on 
air at CBS, or at any New York news radio station.
  Ed Bradley joined CBS News in 1971 as a stringer in its Paris bureau, 
covering the Paris peace talks, and remained with CBS News for 35 
years. He was transferred in 1972 to CBS Saigon bureau to cover the 
Vietnam War and, while covering the war in Cambodia, was injured by a 
mortar round.
  Ed Bradley covered Jimmy Carter's campaign in 1976, served as a CBS 
News floor correspondent for coverage of the Democratic and Republican 
National Conventions, which he covered and reported very fairly. 
Bradley became the first African American White House correspondent for 
CBS from 1976 to 1978. In 1981, Bradley joined 60 Minutes as an on-air 
correspondent and remained with 60 Minutes for 26 years.
  In 2000, Bradley was the only television journalist granted an 
interview with condemned Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, which 
earned him another Emmy Award.
  Bradley received numerous awards of distinction for his in-depth 
reporting and coverage, including 20 Emmy Awards, Lew Klein Excellence 
in the Media Award, 2006; Paul White Award, 2000; Damon Runyon Award, 
2003; Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award, 1995; and Lifetime 
Achievement Award from the National Association of Black Journalists in 
2005.
  In addition to valuable contributions to journalism, Bradley's 
reporting also spurred social activism, but also spurred change with 
his reporting on AIDS in Africa, ``Death by Denial,'' which helped 
influence drug companies into discounting and donating AIDS drugs to 
Africa.
  He is survived by his wife, Patricia Blanchet. He will surely be 
missed in the City of Philadelphia, and we in the City of Philadelphia 
are extremely proud and honored to call him one of our own.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to yield 4 
minutes to the gentlewoman from the District of Columbia (Ms. Norton).
  Ms. NORTON. I thank the gentleman for yielding. I thank my good 
friends on both sides for bringing this resolution forward before the 
109th Congress ends.
  Mr. Speaker, Ed Bradley was much honored by his peers, the best honor 
always to receive, from those who judge harshest and judge best. It is 
very appropriate that Ed Bradley would be honored here in the halls of 
the Congress of the United States.
  Perhaps he was destined to be honored in any case, because he was a 
pioneer, a first of his kind. We are still in an era when the first 
blacks are coming forward and we honor them simply for piercing the 
iron veil of race, but we honor Ed Bradley in this Chamber today as a 
leader of his profession.

[[Page H8800]]

  Indeed, we honor Ed Bradley because he became, in his profession, an 
admired American figure. That is very hard to do in the field of 
journalism today. Journalism is almost down there with Members of 
Congress, but there are journalists who are universally admired, and Ed 
Bradley was one of those journalists.
  He was in, perhaps, the most difficult aspect of journalism, at least 
that for which he became best known, investigative journalism, and, 
indeed, he was part of the premier investigative journalism program, 60 
Minutes.
  What Ed Bradley did is really difficult to do. You have got to be 
fair, but you have got to ask very hard, uncomfortable questions. 
Somehow he was able to do that without having people dislike him, and 
without having the television audience believe he had overreached. Here 
is a man who began as an elementary school teacher and went to the top 
of the journalism profession at a time when blacks were not supposed to 
be in the journalism profession at all.
  Bradley excelled in his profession in ways that you have just heard 
from the sponsor of this resolution, 20 Emmys and all the rest. I also 
want to say that here is a man who had many friends who loved him 
despite his fame and fortune. Would that Members of Congress could be 
loved in spite of their profession, not because of it. Two of those who 
loved him most, are also dear friends of mine, Charlayne and Ron Gault. 
Charlayne Gault is the functional equivalent of Ed Bradley in 
journalism as a woman who entered this field at a time when there were 
very few blacks at the New York Times and in television.
  Some of us may have seen the memorial service to Ed Bradley that was 
televised. It was a real testament to the fact that Ed Bradley loved 
life. All of us workaholics here in the Congress who are about to go 
home need to have looked at that memorial service, because Ed was 
remembered as much for his love of jazz, a jazz aficionado, as he was 
for his extraordinary reputation as a journalist.
  Now, most of us are likely not to be remembered for being in Congress 
at all, but the notion of being remembered for loving life and living 
life and yet going to the top of your profession, there is no better 
life than that. Thus, it is with great pride that I rise to thank the 
sponsors of this resolution for honoring a man who did honor to his 
profession. We give honor to his family by reminding them that he is 
still remembered and will not be forgotten in his profession and in the 
life of our country.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
might consume to conclude for our side.
  I rise today in strong support of House Resolution 1084, as amended, 
a resolution that honors the life of Ed Bradley. Most of us know Ed 
Bradley from his 25 years of work on the CBS news magazine 60 Minutes, 
and his many interviews with world figures, celebrities and cultural 
icons.
  The men and the women who sat in the chair across from Bradley doing 
his 60 Minutes interviews were figures of importance, people to whom we 
should pay attention, and we could rely on Bradley to make sure that no 
skeleton in the darkest corner of his subject's closet was safe from 
the tenacious journalists.
  Bradley got his break by covering the 1965 riots while working part-
time for free at a Philadelphia radio station. His talent did not go 
unnoticed for long. Bradley caught the ear of New York, and CBS radio 
hired him in 1967. He became the lone African American to report the 
news on the airways in New York.
  Bradley went on to work in international television news in 1971. He 
worked for CBS news in Paris, Vietnam and Cambodia, where he proved 
himself as the quintessential journalist in sometimes dangerous 
situations.

                              {time}  1400

  During his coverage of the Vietnam War, Bradley was injured by 
shrapnel from a mortar shell, a true testament to his devotion to 
getting a story. Bradley began working on the 60 Minutes news show in 
1981, and he remained there until his death last month from leukemia.
  I had the opportunity to be sitting close to the mayor of the City of 
Chicago at the Democratic Convention when he and Ed Bradley got into a 
serious exchange, one that everybody in our city always remembers.
  A tenacious style and hard-hitting coverage earned Bradley many 
accolades and awards over the years. He won 19 Emmys and countless 
other awards by bringing us some of the most memorable television news 
moments over the past 25 years. Whether he was standing on the floor of 
a Presidential convention, sitting across the table from a world 
leader, teaching us about the AIDS epidemic from a remote region of 
Africa, reporting about war and humanitarian crises in Vietnam or 
Cambodia, or calling from a public phone booth in Philadelphia to 
report on the 1965 riots, Bradley was a welcome guest in our homes and 
hearts for almost 40 years.
  I again express my strong support for this resolution that honors Ed 
Bradley.
  Ms. LEE. Mr. Speaker, For nearly forty years, Ed Bradley dedicated 
his life to journalism and uncovered some of history's greatest 
stories. His legacy, his life's work, is a story for all of us to 
admire.
  Ed was a man of journalistic integrity, he not only set a high 
standard for his fellow journalists; he also helped to break down 
barriers in a field that traditionally has not reflected the true 
diversity of our Nation.
  For most of his life, Ed sought the truth in matters that affected 
the American public. From his initial coverage of the Vietnam War to 
his award-winning report on AIDS, his contribution to history will not 
go unnoticed or forgotten.
  Throughout his career, Ed took interest in the role of African-
Americans in journalism and politics. He always found time to talk to 
minority youth and helped inspire new generations to enter both of 
these professions. When we last spoke, he expressed interest in the 
work of the Congressional Black Caucus.
  Ed Bradley was only 65. He had so much left to give, but let us not 
forget his story, his commitment to enriching American lives, and his 
belief in a better world.
  Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. LaTOURETTE. Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time, and 
I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Ohio (Mr. LaTourette) that the House suspend the rules 
and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 1084, as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds of those voting having 
responded in the affirmative) the rules were suspended and the 
resolution, as amended, was agreed to.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________