[Senate Report 110-331]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



                                                       Calendar No. 718
110th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     110-331

======================================================================



 
                     THE GLOBAL POVERTY ACT OF 2007

                                _______
                                

                 April 24, 2008.--Ordered to be printed




          Mr. Biden, from the Committee on Foreign Relations,
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 2433]

    The Committee on Foreign Relations, having had under 
consideration the bill (S. 2433) to require the President to 
develop and implement a comprehensive strategy to further the 
United States foreign policy objective of promoting the 
reduction of global poverty, the elimination of extreme global 
poverty, and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal 
of reducing by one-half the proportion of people worldwide, 
between 1990 and 2015, who live on less than $1 per day, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommends that the bill, as amended, do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page

  I. Purpose..........................................................1
 II. Committee Action.................................................2
III. Discussion.......................................................2
 IV. Cost Estimate....................................................3
  V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact..................................4
 VI. Changes in Existing Law..........................................4

                               I. PURPOSE

    The purpose of S. 2433 is to require the President to 
develop and implement a comprehensive strategy to further the 
United States foreign policy objective of promoting the 
reduction of global poverty, the elimination of extreme global 
poverty, and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal 
of reducing by one-half the proportion of people worldwide, 
between 1990 and 2015, who live on less than $1 per day.

                          II. COMMITTEE ACTION

    S. 2433 was introduced by Senators Obama, Hagel, and 
Cantwell on December 7, 2007. It is cosponsored by Senators 
Feinstein, Lugar, Durbin, Menendez, Biden, Dodd, Feingold, 
Snowe, Murray, Harkin, Johnson, and Smith. On February 13, 
2008, the committee considered the bill, and approved several 
minor amendments to it. The committee then ordered the bill, as 
amended, reported favorably by voice vote.

                            III. DISCUSSION

    The Global Poverty Act of 2007 (GPA) directs the President 
to develop and implement a comprehensive strategy to further 
the U.S. foreign policy objective of promoting the reduction of 
global poverty, the elimination of extreme global poverty, and 
the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal of reducing 
by one-half the proportion of people, between 1990 and 2015, 
who live on less than $1 per day.
    Currently, over 1 billion people worldwide live on less 
than $1 per day, and another 1.6 billion people struggle to 
survive on less than $2 per day. The United States has 
recognized the need for increased financial and technical 
assistance to countries burdened by extreme poverty, as well as 
the need for strengthened economic and trade opportunities for 
those countries. At the United Nations Millennium Summit in 
2000, the United States joined more than 180 other countries in 
committing to work toward goals to improve life for the world's 
poorest people by 2015. Goal 1 of the Millennium Development 
Goals aims to reduce by one-half the proportion of people, 
between 1990 and 2015, who live on less than $1 per day. The 
U.S. has established several significant initiatives in recent 
years that are consistent with this goal, including the 
Millennium Challenge Act of 2003, the United States Leadership 
Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003, the 
Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, and trade 
preference programs for developing countries, such as the 
African Growth and Opportunity Act.
    Initiatives by the United States to reduce global poverty 
reflect the basic American principle of helping those in need 
to live with dignity and opportunity. They are also consistent 
with our national security priorities. The bipartisan Final 
Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the 
United States (2004) recommends: ``A comprehensive United 
States strategy to counter terrorism should include economic 
policies that encourage development, more open societies, and 
opportunities for people to improve the lives of their families 
and enhance prospects for their children.''
    The Global Poverty Act declares it official U.S. policy to 
promote the reduction of global poverty, the elimination of 
extreme global poverty, and the achievement of the Millennium 
Development Goal of reducing by one-half the proportion of 
people, between 1990 and 2015, who live on less than $1 per 
day. It would require the President to develop and implement a 
comprehensive strategy to advance that policy and includes 
guidelines for what the strategy should include--from foreign 
aid, trade, economic development, and debt relief, to working 
with the international community and leveraging the 
participation of businesses and nongovernmental organizations. 
The bill requires that the President's strategy include 
specific and measurable goals, efforts to be undertaken, 
benchmarks, and timetables. The President would also be 
required to report back to Congress on progress made in the 
implementation of the global poverty reduction strategy.
    The Global Poverty Act does not mandate new spending by the 
United States, nor does it commit the United States to any 
future spending. This bill does not commit the United States to 
advance the other Millennium Development Goals. Similarly, this 
bill does not commit the United States to other United Nations 
policy goals or imply concurrence with any other United Nations 
statements.
    The bill requires the Secretary of State to designate a 
coordinator who will have primary responsibility for drafting 
the global poverty reduction strategy and assisting in its 
implementation. The language allows the Secretary discretion to 
designate a coordinator in the existing bureaucracy or to 
create a new position as the Secretary deems appropriate. It 
does not require the Secretary to create a staff for the 
coordinator; the coordinator should draw upon capabilities and 
resources already present at the Department of State, the 
United States Agency for International Development, and other 
relevant agencies.
    The House version of the bill (H.R. 1302), which was 
sponsored by Representatives Adam Smith and Spencer Bachus, was 
approved by the U.S. House of Representatives last September 
with bipartisan support.

                           IV. COST ESTIMATE

    In accordance with rule XXVI, paragraph 11(a) of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the committee provides this 
estimate of the costs of this legislation prepared by the 
Congressional Budget Office.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                    Washington, DC, March 28, 2008.
Hon. Joseph R. Biden, Jr.,
Chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations,
U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 2433, the Global 
Poverty Act of 2007.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Michelle S. 
Patterson.
            Sincerely,
                                         Robert A. Sunshine
                                   (For Peter R. Orszag, Director).
    Enclosure.

S. 2433--Global Poverty Act of 2007

    S. 2433 would require the President to develop and 
implement a comprehensive strategy to reduce global poverty. 
The strategy should include, among other things, more effective 
forms of development assistance, coordination of efforts with 
other countries and international organizations, and 
continuation of existing initiatives to reduce poverty and 
disease in developing countries. The bill also would require 
the State Department to prepare several reports describing the 
strategy, its implementation, and the progress made on 
achieving the objectives for reducing global poverty.
    Based on information from the State Department, CBO 
estimates that implementing S. 2433 would cost less than $1 
million per year, assuming the availability of appropriated 
funds. Enacting the bill would not affect direct spending or 
receipts.
    S. 2433 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    The CBO staff contact to this estimate is Michelle S. 
Patterson. This estimate was approved by Peter H. Fontaine, 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

                   V. EVALUATION OF REGULATORY IMPACT

    Pursuant to rule XXVI, paragraph 11(b) of the Standing 
Rules of the Senate, the committee has determined that there is 
no regulatory impact as a result of this legislation.

                      VI. CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the committee notes that no 
changes to existing law are made by this bill.