[House Report 113-113]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


   113th Congress                                       Report

     1st Session        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES        113-113
_______________________________________________________________________


                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 2397]

                                     








 June 17, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed





   113th Congress                                       Report

     1st Session        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES        113-113
_______________________________________________________________________

                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 2397]

                                     



                                     






 June 17, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _____

                  U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

81-454                    WASHINGTON : 2013









                            C O N T E N T S

                               __________
                                                                   Page
Bill Totals......................................................     1
Committee Budget Review Process..................................     3
Introduction.....................................................     3
Funding Increases................................................     3
Committee Recommendations by Major Category......................     3
    Active, Reserve and National Guard Military Personnel........     3
    Operation and Maintenance....................................     3
    Procurement..................................................     4
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation...................     5
    Defense Health Program.......................................     5
    Overseas Contingency Operations..............................     6
    Classified Programs..........................................     6
Forces to be Supported...........................................     6
    Department of the Army.......................................     6
    Department of the Navy.......................................     7
    Department of the Air Force..................................     8
TITLE I. MILITARY PERSONNEL......................................    11
    Military Personnel Overview..................................    13
        Summary of End Strength..................................    13
        Overall Active End Strength..............................    13
        Overall Selected Reserve End Strength....................    13
        Full-Time Support Strengths..............................    14
        Operational Reserve......................................    14
        Sexual Assault Prevention and Response...................    15
        Military Personnel Account Funding Reductions............    17
        Obligations of Bonuses...................................    17
        Carryover Authority......................................    18
        Permanent Change of Station Efficiencies.................    18
        Long-Term Temporary Duty Assignments.....................    19
        Foreign Language Training and Education..................    19
        Minority Outreach........................................    20
        Hazing in the Armed Forces...............................    20
    Military Personnel, Army.....................................    20
    Military Personnel, Navy.....................................    25
        Littoral Combat Ship Manning.............................    29
    Military Personnel, Marine Corps.............................    30
    Military Personnel, Air Force................................    34
    Reserve Personnel, Army......................................    38
    Reserve Personnel, Navy......................................    41
    Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps..............................    44
    Reserve Personnel, Air Force.................................    47
    National Guard Personnel, Army...............................    50
        Cyber Security--Dual Use Cyber Incident Response Teams...    53
    National Guard Personnel, Air Force..........................    53
TITLE II. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..............................    57
    Operation and Maintenance Reprogrammings.....................    59
    Operation and Maintenance Budget Execution Data..............    60
    Special Interest Items.......................................    60
    Restoration of Funding for Unrealistic Efficiency Savings....    60
    Tuition Assistance...........................................    60
    Realistic Fuel Pricing.......................................    61
    Military Information Support Operations......................    61
    Defense Personal Property Moves..............................    62
    STEM Education...............................................    62
    Telecommunications Expense Management........................    62
    Military Working Dogs........................................    63
    Report on Overseas Infrastructure............................    63
    Operation and Maintenance, Army..............................    63
        Army Training Aids and Devices...........................    68
        Cemeterial Expenses......................................    68
        High Resolution 3--Dimensional Terrain Data Collection...    68
    Operation and Maintenance, Navy..............................    69
    Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps......................    74
        Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force--Crisis 
          Response...............................................    77
        Marine Corps Embassy Security Programs...................    77
    Operation and Maintenance, Air Force.........................    77
        Cyber Command Funding....................................    83
        U.S. Access to the Azores................................    83
    Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide......................    83
        Suicide Prevention Training and Outreach.................    88
        STARBASE.................................................    89
        Data Research Tools in Security Clearance Investigations.    89
        Meals Ready-To-Eat War Reserve...........................    90
        Office of Community Support for Military Families with 
          Special Needs..........................................    90
        Special Operations Command Readiness.....................    90
        Use of Major Force Program--11 Funds.....................    90
        Special Operations Command Human Psychological 
          Performance and Family Programs........................    91
        Special Operations Command Human Physical Performance 
          Program................................................    92
        Special Operations Command Advanced Education Program....    93
        Special Operations Command National Capital Region.......    93
        Special Operations Command Budget Justification..........    94
    Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve......................    95
    Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve......................    98
    Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve..............   101
    Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve.................   104
    Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard...............   107
        National Guard Civil Support Teams.......................   110
    Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard................   110
    Overseas Contingency Operations Transfer Account.............   113
    United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces..........   113
    Environmental Restoration, Army..............................   113
    Environmental Restoration, Navy..............................   113
        Vieques Island Environmental Restoration.................   113
    Environmental Restoration, Air Force.........................   114
    Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide......................   114
    Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.......   114
        Environmental Restoration Annual Report to Congress......   114
    Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid...............   115
    Cooperative Threat Reduction Account.........................   115
    Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.   115
TITLE III. PROCUREMENT...........................................   117
        Special Interest Items...................................   119
        Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts..........   119
        Reprogramming Reporting Requirements.....................   119
        Funding Increases........................................   119
        Classified Annex.........................................   119
    Aircraft Procurement, Army...................................   120
        UH-60 Helicopters for the Army National Guard............   124
        UH-72A Lakota Light Utility Helicopters..................   124
        Enhanced Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance 
          System.................................................   124
        MQ-1 Gray Eagle..........................................   125
    Missile Procurement, Army....................................   125
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.....   128
        Paladin Integrated Management (Paladin PIM)..............   132
        M-88A2 Hercules Improved Recovery Vehicle................   132
        Integrated Airburst Weapons System.......................   132
        Carbine..................................................   132
        M1 Abrams Tank Production................................   133
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army..............................   133
    Other Procurement, Army......................................   137
        Joint Tactical Radio System Competition..................   146
        Surge Capacity for Domestic Body Armor...................   146
        National Guard HMMWV Modernization Program...............   146
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy...................................   146
        MH-60S and MH-60R Helicopters............................   154
        Marine Corps Unmanned Airborne Electronic Attack.........   154
    Weapons Procurement, Navy....................................   154
    Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps.............   158
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy............................   162
        Shipbuilding.............................................   165
        Joint High Speed Vessel..................................   166
        Ship Decommissionings....................................   166
    Other Procurement, Navy......................................   166
    Procurement, Marine Corps....................................   176
        High Mobility Engineer Excavator.........................   182
        High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle...............   182
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force..............................   182
        MQ-9 Reaper..............................................   189
        B-52 Internal Weapons Bay Upgrade........................   189
    Missile Procurement, Air Force...............................   190
        Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Services Acquisition...   194
    Procurement of Ammunition, Air Force.........................   194
    Other Procurement, Air Force.................................   197
        MQ-1/9 Remote Split Operations...........................   202
    Procurement, Defense-Wide....................................   202
    Defense Production Act Purchases.............................   207
TITLE IV. RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION.............   209
        Special Interest Items...................................   211
        Reprogramming Guidance for Acquisition Accounts..........   211
        Reprogramming Reporting Requirements.....................   211
        Funding Increases........................................   211
        Classified Annex.........................................   211
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army.............   212
        Munitions Standardization Effectiveness and Safety.......   221
        Weapon and Munitions Technology..........................   221
        Weapon and Munitions Advanced Technology.................   221
        Warfighter Information Network--Tactical.................   221
        Malaria Vaccine Development..............................   222
        Systems Engineering Research Center......................   222
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy.............   222
        Ocean Energy Technology..................................   237
        Highly Integrated Photonics..............................   237
        Automated Test and Re-Test...............................   237
        Bone Marrow Registry.....................................   237
        Shipboard Lighting.......................................   238
        Coastal Environment Research.............................   238
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force........   238
        Global Hawk Block 30.....................................   250
        JSTARS Test Aircraft.....................................   250
        Hard Target New Start Efforts............................   250
        Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar/Moving Target Indicator   250
        F-22 Open System Architecture............................   251
        KC-46A...................................................   251
        Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear 
          Survivability..........................................   251
        Strategic and Critical Metals............................   251
        Aircraft Windows.........................................   251
        Laser-Driven X-Ray Technology............................   252
        National Security Space Program Planning and Execution...   252
        Space Modernization Initiative...........................   252
        Space Based Infrared System Ground Enhancements..........   253
        Human Performance Sensing................................   253
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide.....   253
        Historically Black Colleges and Universities and 
          Minority-Serving Institutions..........................   263
        Conventional Prompt Global Strike........................   263
        Corrosion Control........................................   263
        Specialty Metals.........................................   264
        High Performance Computing Modernization Program.........   264
        Manufacturing Experimentation and Outreach...............   264
        Common Kill Vehicle Technology Program...................   265
        Ground-Based Interceptors................................   265
        Embedded Diagnostics.....................................   265
        Semiconductor Industry...................................   265
    Operational Test and Evaluation, Defense.....................   266
TITLE V. REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS..........................   269
    Defense Working Capital Funds................................   269
    National Defense Sealift Fund................................   269
TITLE VI. OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS...................   271
    Defense Health Program.......................................   271
        Reprogramming Guidance for the Defense Health Program....   275
        Carryover................................................   275
        Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort 
          Belvoir Community Hospital.............................   275
        Embedded Mental Health Providers.........................   276
        Integrated Electronic Health Record......................   276
        Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program................   277
        Prescription Drug Abuse..................................   277
        Peer-Reviewed Cancer Research Programs...................   277
        Peer-Reviewed Autism Research Program....................   278
        Pre-Deployment Resiliency Training.......................   278
        Childhood Trauma in Military Dependents..................   279
        Air Force Acuity Model Training Program..................   279
        Cooperation Between Military Medical Facilities, Civilian 
          Healthcare Facilities, and Universities................   279
        Thermal Injury Prevention................................   279
        Mental Health Access for Servicemembers..................   280
        Medical Records of Sexual Victims........................   280
    Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense...........   280
    Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense.......   281
        National Guard State Plans...............................   281
        Support of Counter-Drug Activities in the Caribbean......   282
    Joint Urgent Operational Needs Fund..........................   282
    Office of the Inspector General..............................   282
        Inspector General Vacancy................................   282
TITLE VII. RELATED AGENCIES......................................   285
    National and Military Intelligence Programs..................   285
        Classified Annex.........................................   285
    Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System 
      Fund.......................................................   285
    Intelligence Community Management Account....................   285
TITLE VIII. GENERAL PROVISIONS...................................   287
TITLE IX. OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS........................   297
    Committee Recommendation.....................................   297
    Reporting Requirements.......................................   297
    Military Personnel...........................................   297
    Operation and Maintenance....................................   302
        Limitation on Availability of Funds for Certain 
          Authorities for Afghanistan............................   308
        Equipment Readiness......................................   308
        Women in the Afghanistan National Security Forces........   308
    Procurement..................................................   309
        National Guard and Reserve Equipment.....................   316
        Reserve Component Simulation Training Systems............   316
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation...................   316
    Revolving and Management Funds...............................   318
        Defense Working Capital Funds............................   318
    Other Department of Defense Programs.........................   318
        Defense Health Program...................................   318
        Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense...   318
        Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund............   318
            Detection of Materials Used in Improvised Explosive 
              Devices............................................   319
        Joint Urgent Operational Needs Fund......................   319
        Office of the Inspector General..........................   319
        General Provisions.......................................   319
TITLE X..........................................................   321
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS..................   321
    Changes in the Application of Existing Law...................   321
    Appropriations Not Authorized By Law.........................   332
    Transfer of Funds............................................   333
    Rescissions..................................................   335
    Transfer of Unexpended Balances..............................   336
    Directed Rule Making.........................................   336
    Program Duplication..........................................   336
    Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives........   336
    Compliance with Rule XIII, CL. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)..........   336
    Earmark Disclosure Statement.................................   337
    Comparison with the Budget Resolution........................   337
    Five-Year Outlay Projections.................................   337
    Financial Assistance to State and Local Governments..........   338
    Full Committee Votes.........................................   339
    Additional Views.............................................   361




113th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    113-113

======================================================================



 
            DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2014

                                _______
                                

 June 17, 2013.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Young of Florida, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2397]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of Defense, and for other 
purposes, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2014.

                              BILL TOTALS

    Appropriations for most military functions of the 
Department of Defense are provided for in the accompanying bill 
for fiscal year 2014. This bill does not provide appropriations 
for military construction, military family housing, civil 
defense, and military nuclear warheads, for which requirements 
are considered in connection with other appropriations Acts.
    The President's fiscal year 2014 budget request for 
activities funded in the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act totals $515,911,915,000 in new budget obligational 
authority for the base military bill.






                    COMMITTEE BUDGET REVIEW PROCESS

    During its review of the fiscal year 2014 budget request 
and execution of appropriations for fiscal year 2013, the 
Subcommittee on Defense held a total of ten hearings and four 
formal briefings during the period of February 2013 to May 
2013. Testimony received by the Subcommittee totaled 1,063 
pages of transcript. Hearings were held in open session, except 
when the security classification of the material to be 
discussed presented no alternative but to conduct those 
hearings in executive or closed session.

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee recommendation for the fiscal year 2014 
Department of Defense base budget is $512,521,850,000, which is 
a decrease of $3,390,065,000 below the request. The Committee 
recommendation for overseas contingency operations is 
$85,768,949,000, which is an increase of $5,046,795,000 above 
the request.
    To reach the reduced base allocation, the Subcommittee has 
reviewed in detail the budget request, and found areas and 
programs where reductions are possible without adversely 
impacting the warfighter or modernization and readiness 
efforts. Examples of such reductions include: programs which 
have been terminated or restructured since the budget was 
submitted; savings from favorable contract pricing adjustments; 
contract/schedule delays resulting in fiscal year 2014 savings; 
unjustified cost increases or funding requested ahead of need; 
anticipated/historical underexecution; rescissions of unneeded 
prior year funds; and reductions that are authorized in the 
pending fiscal year 2014 National Defense Authorization Act. 
The Committee recommendation also restores unrealistic 
efficiencies included in the budget request.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in the tables for each appropriation account shall be provided 
only for the specific purposes indicated in the tables.

              COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS BY MAJOR CATEGORY

         ACTIVE, RESERVE, AND NATIONAL GUARD MILITARY PERSONNEL

    In title I of the bill, the Committee recommends a total of 
$129,649,180,000 for active, reserve, and National Guard 
military personnel, a decrease of $750,701,000 below the budget 
request, and an increase of $2,116,107,000 above the fiscal 
year 2013 enacted level. The Committee recommendation provides 
funding to increase basic pay for all military personnel by 1.8 
percent as authorized by current law, effective January 1, 
2014. The Committee recommends full funding to support the 
requested end strength levels for active duty and Selected 
Reserve personnel.

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    In title II of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $174,974,024,000 for operation and maintenance support to 
the military Services and other Department of Defense entities, 
a decrease of $123,917,000 below the budget request, and an 
increase of $1,479,466,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level. The Committee recommendation includes increases in 
funding for operational training and peacetime operations in 
fiscal year 2014 over the level enacted in fiscal year 2013. 
The recommended levels will robustly fund operational training 
programs in fiscal year 2014. Requests for unit and depot level 
maintenance; facility sustainment, restoration and 
modernization; and base operations support program funding have 
been fully supported.

                              PROCUREMENT

    In title III of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $98,356,158,000 for procurement.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $1,192,976,000 for the procurement of 73 UH-60 Blackhawk 
helicopters, an increase of $146,000,000 and eight aircraft 
above the President's request.
    $801,650,000 for the procurement of 28 CH-47 Chinook 
helicopters, the same as the President's request.
    $506,976,000 for the procurement of 15 MQ-1 Unmanned Aerial 
Vehicles, a decrease of $11,484,000 below the President's 
request.
    $740,401,000 for the procurement of 96 MSE missiles for the 
Patriot missile system, an increase of $200,000,000 above the 
President's request.
    $231,327,000 for the procurement of 31 UH-72A Lakota 
helicopters, an increase of $135,100,000 above the President's 
request.
    $374,100,000 for conversion of a third brigade set of 
Strykers to double V-hulls, plus Stryker nuclear, biological, 
chemical reconnaissance vehicle fielding support, the same as 
the President's request.
    $186,031,000 for the procurement of 53 M88A2 Improved 
Recovery Vehicles, an increase of $75,000,000 above the 
President's request.
    $1,870,424,000 for the procurement of 21 EA-18G Growler 
electronic attack aircraft, a decrease of $131,363,000 below 
the President's request.
    $75,000,000 for F/A-18E/F Super Hornet advance procurement 
to preserve the option of buying additional aircraft in fiscal 
year 2015.
    $3,121,365,000 for the procurement of 16 P-8A Poseidon 
Multi-mission aircraft, a decrease of $68,624,000 below the 
President's request.
    $720,634,000 for the procurement of 25 UH-1Y/AH-1Z 
Helicopters, a decrease of $29,328,000 below the President's 
request.
    $5,140,116,000 for the procurement of 29 F-35 Lightning 
Aircraft: six short take-off and vertical landing variants for 
the Marine Corps, four carrier variants for the Navy, and 19 
conventional variants for the Air Force.
    $15,000,704,000 for the procurement of eight Navy ships, 
including one DDG-51 guided missile destroyer, two fully funded 
SSN-774 attack submarines, four Littoral Combat Ships, and one 
Afloat Forward Staging Base.
    $1,503,449,000 for the procurement of 18 C/HC/MC/KC-130J 
aircraft.
    $1,640,371,000 for the procurement of 18 MV-22 and three 
CV-22 Osprey aircraft, a decrease of $23,000,000 below the 
President's request.
    $340,391,000 for the procurement of 20 MQ-9 Reaper unmanned 
aerial vehicles, an increase of $68,174,000 and eight aircraft 
above the President's request.
    $1,842,900,000 for the procurement of five Evolved 
Expendable Launch Vehicles, a decrease of $10,000,000 below the 
President's request.
    $220,309,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Program Iron Dome, 
the same as the President's request.
    $100,000,000 for HMMWV modernization for the Army Guard, an 
increase of $100,000,000 above the President's request.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    In title IV of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $66,409,530,000 for research, development, test and 
evaluation.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    $235,384,000 for the development of the Warfighter 
Information Network--Tactical, a decrease of $37,000,000 below 
the President's request.
    $592,201,000 for the development of the Ground Combat 
Vehicle, the same as the President's request.
    $784,823,000 for the continuation of the development of the 
replacement for the Ohio class ballistic missile submarine.
    $147,041,000 for the continued development of the E-2D 
Advanced Hawkeye aircraft.
    $157,937,000 for the continued development of the Next 
Generation Jammer, a decrease of $99,859,000 below the 
President's request.
    $1,829,007,000 for the continued development of the F-35 
Lightning Joint Strike Fighter aircraft, a decrease of 
$67,146,000 below the President's request.
    $302,358,000 for the continued development of the Multi-
mission Maritime Aircraft, a decrease of $15,000,000 below the 
President's request.
    $379,437,000 for the development of a new penetrating 
bomber, the same as the President's request.
    $1,558,590,000 for the continued development of the Next 
Generation Aerial Refueling Aircraft, the same as the 
President's request.
    $322,832,000 for the continued development of the Space 
Based Infrared Satellite and associated ground support systems, 
the same as the President's request.
    $365,500,000, for the development of the Global Positioning 
System III operational control segment, a decrease of 
$18,000,000 below the President's request.
    $2,867,319,000 for the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency, an increase of $2,232,000 above the President's 
request.
    $268,782,000 for the Israeli Cooperative Programs, an 
increase of $173,000,000 above the President's request.

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends a total of $33,573,582,000 for the 
Defense Health Program to support worldwide medical and dental 
services for active forces and other eligible beneficiaries, an 
increase of $519,054,000 above the budget request and an 
increase of $858,278,000 above the fiscal year 2013 enacted 
level.
    The Committee recommends funding to augment the request for 
enduring Traumatic Brain Injury and Psychological Health and 
Wounded, Ill and Injured requirements. To address these 
challenges of the Defense Health Program, the Committee 
recommends the following:

Traumatic Brain Injury and Psychological Health Research    $125,000,000
Peer-Reviewed Spinal Cord Research......................      30,000,000
Peer-Reviewed Orthopedic Research.......................      30,000,000

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    In title IX of the bill, the Committee recommends a total 
of $85,768,949,000 for overseas contingency operations.
    Major initiatives and modifications include:
    Military Personnel: The Committee recommends a total of 
$9,644,798,000 for military personnel in title IX of the bill.
    Operation and Maintenance: The Committee recommends a total 
of $66,146,211,000 for operation and maintenance in title IX of 
the bill.
    Procurement: The Committee recommends a total of 
$7,187,146,000 for procurement in title IX of the bill.
    Defense Health Program: The Committee recommends a total of 
$904,201,000 for the Defense Health Program in title IX of the 
bill.

                          CLASSIFIED PROGRAMS

    As described elsewhere in this report, the Committee's 
budget review of classified programs is published in a 
separate, detailed, and comprehensive classified annex. 
Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in the 
classified annex accompanying this report.

                         FORCES TO BE SUPPORTED

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request is designed to support 
current budget guidance and the Army's continuing 
transformation of its operating forces to meet defense 
strategy. Current budget guidance directs the Active Component 
(AC) end strength to 490,000 by the end of fiscal year 2017, 
the Army National Guard (ARNG) end strength to 350,200 by the 
end of fiscal year 2017, and the United States Army Reserve 
(USAR) to maintain an end strength of 205,000.
    By the end of fiscal year 2014, the AC will include six 
Army Service Component Command headquarters and one Army 
Component headquarters assigned to U.S. Forces Korea, three 
Corps headquarters, ten Division headquarters, 40 Brigade 
Combat Teams (BCTs), and 37 Multi-Functional Support Brigades. 
The exact number of BCTs to be inactivated in fiscal year 2014 
has not yet been determined and will reflect both decisions on 
whether to re-organize the Army's BCTs and whether to 
accelerate the Army's reduction ramp. By the end of fiscal year 
2014, the Army Force structure in the ARNG and the USAR will 
include eight ARNG division headquarters, 28 BCTs, and 60 
multi-functional Support Brigades (48 ARNG and 12 USAR).
    A summary of the major forces follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Fiscal year
                                           -----------------------------
                                              FY12      FY13      FY14
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Active Component Forces:
    Theater Army HQs......................         6         6         6
    Corps HQs.............................         4         4         3
    Division HQs..........................        10        10        10
    Heavy Brigade Combat Team.............        17        17        16
    Infantry Brigade Combat Team..........        20        20        20
    Stryker Brigade Combat Team...........         6         8         8
    Theater Aviation Group HQ.............         1         1         1
    Combat Aviation Brigade...............        12        12        12
    Sustainment Brigade HQ................        13        13        12
    Fires Brigade.........................         6         6         7
    Transportation Brigade Expeditionary..         0         0         1
    Maneuver Enhancement Brigade HQ.......         2         2         2
    Battlefield Surveillance Brigade......         3         3         3
                                           -----------------------------
        Forces Total......................        94        96        94

Army National Guard Forces:
    Division HQs..........................         8         8         8
    Heavy Brigade Combat Team.............         7         7         7
    Infantry Brigade Combat Team..........        20        20        20
    Stryker Brigade Combat Team...........         1         1         1
    Theater Aviation Brigade HQ...........         4         4         4
    Theater Aviation Group HQ.............         1         1         1
    Sustainment Brigade HQ................        10        10        10
    Fires Brigade.........................         7         7         7
    Maneuver Enhancement Brigade HQ.......        16        16        16
    Battlefield Surveillance Brigade......         7         7         7
                                           -----------------------------
        Forces Total......................        71        71        71

United States Army Reserve Forces:
    Theater Aviation Brigade HQ...........         1         1         1
    Sustainment Brigade HQ................         9         9         9
    Maneuver Enhancement Brigade HQ.......         3         3         3
                                           -----------------------------
        Forces Total......................        13        13        13
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request supports battle forces 
totaling 280 ships at the end of fiscal year 2014, including 14 
fleet ballistic missile submarines, ten aircraft carriers, 26 
support ships, seven reserve ships, 223 other battle forces 
ships, 1,691 Navy/Marine Corps tactical/ASW aircraft, 637 
undergraduate training aircraft, 502 Fleet Air Training 
aircraft, 308 Fleet Air Support aircraft, 257 reserve aircraft, 
and 257 aircraft in the pipeline. A summary of the major forces 
follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                Fiscal year
                                  --------------------------------------
                                       FY12         FY13         FY14
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Strategic Forces.................           14           14           14
    Fleet Ballistic Missile                 14           14           14
     Submarines..................
General Purpose..................          254          246          233
    Aircraft Carriers............           11           10           10
    Surface Combatants...........          110          101           92
    Submarines (attack)..........           54           55           55
    Guided Missile (SSGN)                    4            4            4
     Submarines..................
    Amphibious Warfare Ships.....           30           31           29
    Combat Logistics Ships.......           31           32           31
    Mine Warfare.................           14           13           12
Support Forces...................           21           23           26
    Support Ships................           21           23           26
Mobilization Cat. A (Reserve)....            8            8            7
    Surface Combatants...........            8            8            7
    Mine Warfare.................            0            0            0
                                  --------------------------------------
Total Ships, Battleforce (incl.            297          291          280
 Cat. A Reserve).................
    Auxiliaries/Sea Lift Forces:.          102          100           94
        Coastal Defense (Patrol             10           13           13
         Combatants).............
        Maritime Preposition.....           18           12           14
        MSC Reduced Operating               14           14           14
         Status..................
        Ready Reserve Force Ships           48           46           46
                                  --------------------------------------
Naval Aircraft:
    Primary Authorized (plus             3,563        3,555        3,652
     pipe).......................
        Authorized Pipeline......          266          251          257
    Tactical/ASW Aircraft........        1,668        1,688        1,691
        Fleet Air Training.......          515          514          502
        Fleet Air Support........          222          225          308
        Training (Undergraduate).          624          627          637
        Reserves.................          262          253          257
                                  --------------------------------------
Naval Personnel:
    Active:
        Navy.....................     *318,406      322,700      323,600
        Marine Corps.............      198,193      197,300      190,200
        *Temporary Strength in     ...........       15,200        8,100
         OCO.....................
    Reserves Navy:
        SELRES/Drilling Reserve..       54,325       52,386       48,941
        Fulltime Support.........       10,390       10,114       10,159
            Navy Reserves Total..       64,715       62,500       59,100
                                  --------------------------------------
    Reserves Marine Corps:
        SELRES/Drilling Reserve..       37,323       37,339       37,339
        Fulltime Support.........        2,221        2,261        2,261
            Marine Corps Reserves       39,544       39,600       39,600
             Total...............
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*FY2012 includes 3,836 non-core IA requested for temporary IA OCO
  missions.

                      DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE

    The fiscal year 2014 Air Force budget request is designed 
to support active, guard, and reserve forces, including 55 
combat coded fighter and attack squadrons and nine combat coded 
strategic bomber squadrons. The Inter-Continental Ballistic 
Missile force maintains 495 launch facilities/control centers 
with 450 Minuteman missiles. The budget also supports the 
critical airlift mission, including 21 active duty airlift 
squadrons. To accomplish the Air Force mission, the fiscal year 
2014 budget supports a total force end strength of 503,400 
(includes Active Duty, Air National Guard, and Air Force 
Reserve).
    A summary of the major forces follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Fiscal year
                                           -----------------------------
                                              FY12      FY13      FY14
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Strategic Airlift Squadrons:
    Active................................        16        16        15
    Guard.................................         6         6         4
    Reserve...............................        16        16        15
Tactical Airlift Squadrons:
    Active................................        10        10         6
    Guard.................................        21        21        19
    Reserve...............................         9         9         9

USAF Fighter and Attack Squadrons (Active,        61        61        55
 ANG, AFRC)...............................
    Active................................        32        32        31
    ANG...................................        25        25        21
    AFRC..................................         4         4         3
Strategic Bomber Squadrons (Active).......         9         9         9
Strategic Bomber Squadrons (AFRC).........         0         0         0
Flight Test Units (DT and OT Units with           12        12        11
 Assigned aircraft).......................
    Fighter...............................         9         9         8
    Bomber................................         3         3         3
ICBM Operational Launch Facilities/Control       495       495       495
 Centers..................................
ICBM Missile Inventory....................       450       450       450
USAF Airlift Squadrons (Active)
    Strategic Airlift Squadrons...........        15       15*        15
    Tactical Airlift Squadrons............         8        8*         6
    Total Active Airlift Squadrons........        23        23        21
        Total Air Force Aircraft Inventory     5,587     5,568     5,196
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Numbers of Squadrons above reflect combat coded units only (i.e., no
  training or test info except where noted).


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              FY12      FY13      FY14
------------------------------------------------------------------------
End Strength:
Active Duty...............................   332,800   329,460   327,600
Reserve Component.........................   178,100   176,580   175,800
    ANG...................................   106,700   105,700   105,400
    AFR...................................    71,400    70,880    70,400
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                TITLE I

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request for programs funded in 
title I of the Committee bill, Military Personnel, is 
$130,399,881,000 in new budget authority. These appropriations 
finance basic, incentive, and special pays for active, reserve, 
and National Guard personnel, and Academy cadets and 
Midshipmen; retired pay accrual; housing, subsistence, and 
other allowances; recruitment and retention initiatives; 
permanent change of station costs; and other military personnel 
costs such as survivor, unemployment, and education benefits. 
The table below summarizes the Committee recommendations:



                      MILITARY PERSONNEL OVERVIEW

    The Committee recommendation provides $129,649,180,000 for 
the military personnel accounts. Included is funding for 
military pay and allowances, recruitment and retention 
initiatives, and overall quality of life programs for active 
duty, reserve, and National Guard personnel. The recommendation 
fully supports the resource requirements needed to maintain the 
authorized end strength levels for fiscal year 2014. The 
Committee recommendation provides funding to increase basic pay 
for all military personnel by 1.8 percent as authorized by 
current law, effective January 1, 2014. The Committee continues 
to support and encourage constructive evaluations of 
recruitment and retention programs, bonus and special pay 
incentives, and benefit programs for military personnel for 
fiscal year 2014. The Committee remains supportive of programs 
intended to enhance the morale and quality of life of military 
personnel and their families.

                        SUMMARY OF END STRENGTH

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request includes a decrease of 
40,160 in total end strength for the active forces and a 
decrease of 8,180 in end strength for the Selected Reserve as 
compared to the fiscal year 2013 authorized levels. The 
following tables summarize the Committee recommendations for 
end strength levels, both in the aggregate and for each active 
and Selected Reserve component.

                      OVERALL ACTIVE END STRENGTH




Fiscal year 2013 authorized...........................         1,401,560
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................         1,361,400
Fiscal year 2014 recommendation.......................         1,361,400
    Compared with fiscal year 2013....................           -40,160
    Compared with fiscal year 2014 budget request.....             - - -


                 OVERALL SELECTED RESERVE END STRENGTH




Fiscal year 2013 authorized...........................           841,880
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................           833,700
Fiscal year 2014 recommendation.......................           833,700
    Compared with fiscal year 2013....................            -8,180
    Compared with fiscal year 2014 budget request.....             - - -



                                   SUMMARY OF MILITARY PERSONNEL END STRENGTH
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 Fiscal year 2014
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
                                                    Fiscal year                                         Change
                                                        2013       Budget     Committee     Change       from
                                                     authorized    request   recommended     from       fiscal
                                                                                            request    year 2013
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Active Forces (End Strength):
    Army*.........................................      552,100     520,000      520,000       - - -     -32,100
    Navy..........................................      322,700     323,600      323,600       - - -         900
    Marine Corps**................................      197,300     190,200      190,200       - - -      -7,100
    Air Force.....................................      329,460     327,600      327,600       - - -      -1,860
        Total, Active Forces......................    1,401,560   1,361,400    1,361,400       - - -     -40,160
                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------
Guard and Reserve Forces (End Strength):
    Army Reserve..................................      205,000     205,000      205,000       - - -       - - -
    Navy Reserve..................................       62,500      59,100       59,100       - - -      -3,400
    Marine Corps Reserve..........................       39,600      39,600       39,600       - - -       - - -
    Air Force Reserve.............................       70,880      70,400       70,400       - - -        -480
    Army National Guard...........................      358,200     354,200      354,200       - - -      -4,000
    Air National Guard............................      105,700     105,400      105,400       - - -        -300
                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Selected Reserve...................      841,880     833,700      833,700       - - -      -8,180
                                                   =============================================================
Total, Military Personnel.........................    2,243,440   2,195,100    2,195,100       - - -     -48,340
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*For FY14, Army Active Forces end strength includes 30,000 Army end strength requested in the Overseas
  Contingency Operations budget.
**For FY14, Marine Corps Active Forces end strength includes 8,100 Marine Corps end strength requested in the
  Overseas Contingency Operations budget.

                      FULL-TIME SUPPORT STRENGTHS

    There are four categories of full-time support in the Guard 
and reserve components: military technicians (dual status), 
Active Guard and Reserve (AGR), non-technician civilians, and 
active component personnel.
    Full-time support personnel organize, recruit, train, 
maintain, and administer the reserve components. Military 
technicians (dual status) directly support units and are 
critical to helping units maintain readiness and meet the 
wartime missions of the Army and Air Force.
    The following table summarizes Guard and reserve full-time 
support end strengths:

                                 SUMMARY OF GUARD AND RESERVE FULL-TIME SUPPORT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 Fiscal year 2014
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
                                                    Fiscal year                                         Change
                                                        2013       Budget     Committee     Change       from
                                                     authorized    request   recommended     from       fiscal
                                                                                            request    year 2013
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army Reserve:
    AGR...........................................       16,277      16,261       16,261       - - -         -16
    Technicians...................................        8,395       8,395        8,395       - - -       - - -
Navy Reserve:
    AR............................................       10,114      10,159       10,159       - - -          45
Marine Corps Reserve:
    AR............................................        2,261       2,261        2,261       - - -       - - -
Air Force Reserve:
    AGR...........................................        2,888       2,911        2,911       - - -          23
    Technicians...................................       10,400      10,429       10,429       - - -          29
Army National Guard:
    AGR...........................................       32,060      32,060       32,060       - - -       - - -
    Technicians...................................       27,210      27,210       27,210       - - -       - - -
Air National Guard:
    AGR...........................................       14,765      14,734       14,734       - - -         -31
    Technicians...................................       22,180      21,875       21,875       - - -        -305
                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------
Totals:
    AGR/AR........................................       78,365      78,386       78,386       - - -          21
    Technicians...................................       68,185      67,909       67,909       - - -        -276
                                                   =============================================================
        Total, Full-Time Support..................      146,550     146,295      146,295       - - -        -255
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          OPERATIONAL RESERVE

    Over the last ten years, regular deployments and an 
increased operations tempo required the National Guard and 
reserve components to transition from a part-time strategic 
reserve to an operational reserve. The Guard and reserve 
components have used the lessons learned over the past decade 
to identify enduring priorities that will continue to support 
and enhance active component requirements. Significant taxpayer 
investments have been made to enable the Guard and reserve to 
become an integral part of the operational force, and they 
provide great value to the Armed Forces and for the taxpayer. 
The Department of Defense estimates that the reserve components 
comprise approximately 43 percent of the total force but only 
nine percent of the annual budget.
    There are signs that active component support for 
maintaining an operational reserve is diminishing in today's 
challenging budget climate. Specifically, the Committee is 
concerned by the Army's recent decision to deploy active 
component units in place of scheduled reserve component 
deployments whenever possible. The Committee supports the 
enduring vision of an operational reserve and encourages the 
Services to continue to utilize the Guard and reserve 
components as key members of the operational force. The 
Committee also recognizes that new authorities, such as U.S. 
Code title 10, section 12304b Selected Reserve: order to active 
duty for preplanned mission in support of the combatant 
commands, provide continued opportunities for reservists to 
deploy for preplanned missions and to maintain their 
operational skills even after overseas contingency operations 
have concluded and encourages their use where appropriate.

                 SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE

    The Committee is outraged by the pervasive problem of 
sexual assault in the Armed Forces. Sexual assault is not just 
an issue in the military; it is an epidemic. To address it, the 
Committee believes that there must be a culture change at every 
level of the military, from the most senior leadership to the 
most junior ranks.
    The Committee is particularly concerned by the reports of 
sexual assaults committed by those in key positions of 
influence and trust, including sexual assault response 
coordinators (SARCs), victim advocates (VAs), and military 
recruiters. SARCs and VAs are responsible for providing victim 
support and helping victims access medical care, counseling, 
legal assistance, and victim witness assistance. Recent 
allegations that personnel responsible for providing this 
assistance and care to victims are committing sexual offenses 
are shocking and indefensible. Similarly, military recruiters 
serve as the public face of the military and the entry point 
for future servicemembers to enlist; thus, allegations of 
recruiters assaulting young recruits are both disturbing and 
inexcusable.
    Further, recent Department of Defense reports showing the 
persistently high rates of sexual assault at the military 
academies, where military leaders train the best and brightest 
students to become the nation's future military leaders, is 
even more alarming. The Committee believes that more must be 
done to institute best practices at the military academies, 
training bases, recruiting commands, and throughout the force 
to increase prevention efforts as well as to preclude 
perpetrators from serving in such influential and sensitive 
occupations. While the Department of Defense must be aggressive 
in prosecuting and punishing perpetrators of sexual assault, it 
particularly must focus and increase its efforts to protect 
servicemembers from the threat of sexual assault and to prevent 
assaults from occurring in the first place.
    Commanders are responsible for ensuring good order and 
discipline in their units and should be held responsible when 
crimes are committed under their watch. When servicemembers in 
critical positions, such as SARCs, VAs, recruiters, or basic 
training instructors, are committing sexual crimes, commanders 
are also responsible for their failure to establish a command 
climate of dignity and respect in which there is zero tolerance 
for sexual harassment or assault. The Committee believes that 
the Secretary of Defense and Service Chiefs must do more to 
hold commanders accountable.
    The Committee is aware that the Director of National 
Intelligence has issued interim guidance for victims of sexual 
assault who seek to obtain or renew a security clearance, which 
would enable victims to seek counseling for such an assault 
without concern that the counseling must be disclosed and 
considered as part of their security clearance adjudication. 
The Committee supports efforts to ensure victims are informed 
of the guidance as soon as possible, and encourages the Service 
SARCs and VAs to provide information on the interim guidance to 
victims and to include information on the guidance in military 
personnel sexual assault prevention training.
    The pending fiscal year 2014 National Defense Authorization 
Act establishes dismissal or dishonorable discharge as the 
mandatory minimum sentence for a person subject to the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice who is convicted by court-martial of 
rape, sexual assault, forcible sodomy, or an attempt to commit 
those offenses. The Committee supports this action and believes 
that those servicemembers who are convicted of committing such 
crimes should not receive post-retirement benefits. 
Accordingly, the Act includes a provision that would prohibit 
funding from being used in contravention of amendments made to 
the Uniform Code of Military Justice in the pending fiscal year 
2014 National Defense Authorization Act regarding the discharge 
or dismissal of a member of the Armed Forces convicted of 
certain sex-related offenses, the required trial of such 
offenses by general courts-martial, and the limitations imposed 
on convening authority discretion regarding court-martial 
findings and sentence.
    Investigations and prosecutions of sexual assault cases are 
often slow, obtrusive, and difficult processes for victims to 
endure, and the Services have reported that many victims stop 
cooperating before the legal process has been completed. The 
Air Force recently implemented the Special Victims Counsel 
(SVC) pilot program to provide a legal representative to give 
advice and representation to sexual assault victims. The SVC 
navigates the victim through the legal process and intervenes 
on the victim's behalf when appropriate. The Committee 
understands this program has shown success in assisting victims 
throughout the process. The Committee encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to expedite the expansion of a Special Victims 
Counsel or similar program throughout the Services to provide 
all victims of sexual assault with specially trained legal 
assistance throughout the investigation and prosecution 
process.
    To assist in this effort, the Committee provides an 
additional $25,000,000 for the Department of Defense Sexual 
Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) and the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force for the expansion of a 
Special Victims Counsel program to every military Service, 
including the National Guard and reserve components. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Service Chiefs, to review proposals for implementation 
of such programs at the military academies as well.
    In addition, the Committee fully funds the President's 
request for Sexual Assault Prevention and Response programs at 
the Service level and at the Department of Defense SAPRO and 
calls on the Secretary of Defense and the Service Chiefs to 
stop this destructive epidemic in the military.

             MILITARY PERSONNEL ACCOUNT FUNDING REDUCTIONS

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request for title I, Military 
Personnel, was assembled using execution data and trends dating 
from fiscal year 2012 or earlier. During the budget review 
process, the Services provided updated execution data and 
estimates that refined their funding requirements. The 
Committee recommends reductions to certain budget activity and 
sub-activity groups in the military personnel accounts based on 
the more recent execution data. Funding provided reflects the 
Committee's most recent estimated fiscal year 2014 funding 
requirements for programs and activities within the military 
personnel accounts.

                         OBLIGATIONS OF BONUSES

    Government agencies are required to properly record their 
obligations. According to the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO), agencies must obligate funds at the time they enter into 
a contract to cover the government's maximum potential 
liability under the contract when the government's requirement 
to pay the potential maximum amount is beyond its control. 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circular A-11, section 
20.5(b) states that for military personnel compensation and 
benefits, ``amounts generally are recorded as obligations as 
the amounts are earned during the reporting pay period.'' The 
Department of Defense Financial Management Regulation Volume 3, 
Chapter 8, paragraph 080901 states, ``the obligations for the 
amounts payable to military members and civilian employees are 
recorded in the month in which they become payable.''
    The active duty, Guard, and reserve components offer 
bonuses to certain recruits and military personnel who sign 
contracts to serve in the Armed Forces. In the case of bonuses 
which last multiple years, the Department obligates the initial 
payment in the fiscal year in which it is paid, irrespective of 
the date the respective contract was signed, and then obligates 
recurring payments, or anniversary payments, in the subsequent 
years in which they become payable.
    The Committee directs the Comptroller General to issue a 
legal opinion not later than 180 days after the enactment of 
this Act assessing the obligation of military personnel multi-
year bonuses to determine if Department of Defense obligation 
practices comply with fiscal law.

                          CARRYOVER AUTHORITY

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request again proposes the 
inclusion of a new provision that extends the availability of 
up to two percent of amounts appropriated for the military 
personnel accounts under title I for two fiscal years, instead 
of the customary one fiscal year. Since 2001, the Department of 
Defense has had ten violations of the Anti-deficiency Act (ADA) 
in the military personnel accounts. The Committee has 
repeatedly expressed its concern over the Department's failure 
to adequately budget for military personnel, and the Inspector 
General of the Department of Defense and the Government 
Accountability Office have regularly reported deficiencies in 
the Services' military payroll processes and controls.
    The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, included a 
provision directing the Inspector General of the Department of 
Defense to conduct a review of ADA violations in the military 
personnel accounts and submit recommendations for the 
implementation of corrective actions. The report found that 
while the Department of Defense was generally effective in 
implementing and sustaining most of the ADA violation 
corrective actions, the Department had not established 
sufficient controls to ensure that the required corrective 
actions were properly implemented, sustained, and documented. 
The report also found that the Army and Navy did not annually 
assess the adequacy of control procedures established for 
managing the centrally managed accounts to prevent ADA 
violations and therefore had limited assurance that controls 
will prevent future violations. As a result, the report found 
that failure to follow procedures and inadequate cost controls 
means the Department remains vulnerable to future ADA 
violations.
    While the Committee understands the unique budgeting 
challenge that the military personnel accounts present to the 
Department, the Committee believes that implementation of 
improved control procedures, rather than carryover authority, 
is needed to improve management of these accounts. Accordingly, 
the Committee does not provide the carryover authority as 
requested. The Committee also directs the Secretary of Defense 
to implement the recommendations of the Inspector General 
Report, DODIG-2013-027 dated November 30, 2012, regarding ADA 
violations in the military personnel accounts.

                PERMANENT CHANGE OF STATION EFFICIENCIES

    The Consolidated and Full Year Continuing Appropriations 
Act, 2013, recommended a total reduction of $146,792,500 in the 
Permanent Change of Station (PCS) budgets for program 
efficiencies. The explanatory statement accompanying the Act 
recognized that potential cost savings could be found in the 
PCS program and directed the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Personnel and Readiness) to conduct a review of the PCS 
program to identify potential efficiencies and to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees on its findings. 
While the Committee has not yet received a copy of the report, 
many of the Services have stated that they have been unable to 
implement additional efficiencies in fiscal year 2013, 
particularly those related to time on station goals.
    The Committee recommends a total reduction of $151,142,000 
in the base and overseas contingency operations budgets in 
fiscal year 2014 in the PCS program for efficiencies. While it 
recognizes the challenges the Services have faced with meeting 
the increased time on station requirements, the Committee 
believes there are potential cost savings in other areas of the 
PCS program. The Committee directs the Inspector General of the 
Department of Defense to conduct a review of the PCS program 
and to determine if potential cost savings and efficiencies can 
be implemented throughout the program. Based on the findings of 
the review, the Inspector General shall submit a report 
examining the Services' PCS programs, reviewing how the 
Services could implement cost savings and efficiencies within 
the program, and providing recommendations for implementation 
of the review's findings. This report should be provided to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 180 days after 
the enactment of this Act.

                  LONG-TERM TEMPORARY DUTY ASSIGNMENTS

    The Committee is concerned by reports of the military 
Services sending personnel on long-term temporary duty 
assignments (TDY) that do not comply with the regulations as 
stated in the Department of Defense Joint Federal Travel 
Regulations (JFTR). The JFTR states that long-term TDY 
assignments must be temporary in nature; of reasonable time 
duration; lower in cost than round-trip Permanent Change of 
Station expenses; and not exceed 180 consecutive days. The 
Committee believes that the practice of sending personnel on 
extended TDY that violate the JFTR is a tremendous waste of 
taxpayer resources and a violation of Department-wide rules and 
regulations. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
evaluate the use of extended TDY and submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the practice and its 
compliance with the JFTR not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act.

                FOREIGN LANGUAGE TRAINING AND EDUCATION

    The Committee supports efforts to increase linguistic 
skills in the Armed Forces. Foreign language fluency is a 
highly valued skill, but linguists remain a critically 
undermanned specialty across the Services. Specifically, the 
Committee is concerned by the low number of officers and Non-
commissioned officers with foreign language skills. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to study the 
feasibility of requiring and resourcing language and cultural 
education for uniformed officers in all Services and provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees on the findings 
of the study not later than 180 days after the enactment of 
this Act.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to conduct a study on the feasibility of a pilot program 
for Non-commissioned officers (NCOs) assigned to regionally 
aligned units as well as NCOs assigned to positions which 
require foreign area expertise, including a process for 
selecting NCOs to participate; the role of language education 
and required proficiency; the role of cultural education; and 
when in the rotational cycle and NCO's career such training 
should occur. The Committee understands that the Marine Corps 
Foreign Area Staff NCO and Regional Affairs NCO programs could 
provide examples of existing programs that seek to increase 
capacity to produce and maintain foreign area expertise at all 
levels. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
complete the study and report back to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act.
    The Committee also understands that the National Security 
Education Program (NSEP) plays an important role in increasing 
the pool of cultural and linguistic experts in government, and 
it supports Department of Defense and national security 
agencies' efforts to partner with higher education institutions 
to achieve the goals of the NSEP. The Committee also supports 
efforts to expand these partnerships to minority serving 
institutions, including Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities, to improve diversity in the program and to 
increase the number of analysts with proficiency in critical 
languages and cultural studies. The Committee supports 
continued funding for the NSEP.

                           MINORITY OUTREACH

    Minorities are underrepresented in the general officer 
ranks across the Services. To build a more diverse 
organization, disparities in representation need to be 
addressed by effective outreach that will expand the pool of 
well-qualified candidates. The Committee supports efforts to 
conduct effective outreach and recruiting programs in minority 
communities and encourages the Secretary of Defense to support 
efforts to improve diversity in the military, especially in the 
officer ranks.

                       HAZING IN THE ARMED FORCES

    The Committee is extremely concerned by reports of hazing 
in the military. Hazing is inconsistent with the values of the 
military, and such behavior should not be tolerated within the 
military. The Committee understands that the Services are 
taking steps to better report incidents of hazing and to 
discipline servicemembers involved in such incidents. The 
Consolidated and Full Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, 
directed the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the rates of incidence of 
hazing, harassment, and mistreatment of servicemembers, as well 
as a review of the policies to prevent and respond to alleged 
hazing incidents. The report also was directed to include 
recommendations for implementation of a consistent reporting 
system for the Services and recommendations to implement 
prevention and education programs related to hazing and its 
harmful effects. The Committee is currently waiting for the 
completion and release of the report and looks forward to 
reviewing its recommendations.

                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, ARMY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $40,199,263,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    41,037,790,000
Committee recommendation..............................    40,908,919,000
Change from budget request............................      -128,871,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$40,908,919,000 for Military Personnel, Army. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



                        MILITARY PERSONNEL, NAVY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $26,902,346,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    27,824,444,000
Committee recommendation..............................    27,671,555,000
Change from budget request............................      -152,889,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$27,671,555,000 for Military Personnel, Navy. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



                      LITTORAL COMBAT SHIP MANNING

    The Committee remains very concerned with the manning model 
for the Navy's Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). Although the Navy 
originally planned for the ship to be minimally manned by 
small, experienced crews, the Committee has noticed several 
indicators that call into question the validity of this model. 
During the recent deployment of the first LCS, the Navy added 
ten sailors beyond the 40 core crewmembers to the ship's crew 
to help with maintenance, watch-standing, and training issues. 
Additionally, the crew of the deployed mission module 
detachment on board the LCS received a crew augmentation of 
four sailors. The Committee understands the Navy is working to 
permanently increase the size of the mission module crew.
    Most concerning to the Committee is that in addition to the 
increased crew size of Navy personnel, the LCS has deployed 
with two civilian contractors (or technical representatives) on 
board for the duration of the deployment. The Navy has 
described these contractors as ``ship experts'' who are 
constantly available to assist the minimally manned crew with 
problems as they arise. In addition, the Committee is aware 
that civilian riders have been on board the first LCS almost 
continuously since the ship was delivered to the Navy four 
years ago. While technical representatives can provide 
extremely valuable knowledge and expertise about individual 
ship systems, and do so for many ships in the fleet, the 
Committee finds it unusual that the Navy appears to believe 
that contractors have a greater overall knowledge of the ship 
than the ship's own crew. It has always been the Committee's 
understanding that the crew serves as the ``ship experts'' and 
is puzzled by the LCS's modifications to this practice.
    Additionally, the Committee is alarmed by the frequency and 
magnitude of temporary civilian contractors on board. During 
the transit to the western Pacific alone, in addition to the 
full-time technical representatives, the LCS had as many as 
four temporary civilian riders on board at any one time to 
troubleshoot problems with systems such as air conditioning, 
propulsion, and the lube oil system. Navy ships are normally 
deployed in top material condition to ensure the ship can 
remain underway to accomplish its mission. The Committee is 
disturbed by the number of problems this ship has experienced 
on its maiden deployment that appear to be beyond the crew's 
capability to handle, especially given that the LCS should have 
been in an extremely high state of readiness.
    Combined, these incidents imply either that the LCS is 
experiencing more than its share of maintenance problems, thus 
overwhelming the crew, or that the crew is unable to handle 
common problems and has come to rely on the presence and 
expertise of technical representatives to conduct basic 
maintenance. The Committee remains concerned that the LCS 
manning plan as currently designed is unrealistic and 
unsustainable moving forward. In particular, the Committee 
believes that a long-term reliance on industry technical 
representatives to perform regular maintenance requirements 
during deployments that are typically handled by crewmembers is 
inefficient and uneconomical. In addition, relying on temporary 
solutions, including but not limited to assigning additional 
crewmembers to help with basic duties during deployments, 
hiring full-time and part-time technical representatives to 
oversee and conduct maintenance, and utilizing temporary 
berthing modules to accommodate additional crewmembers is both 
impractical and detrimental to the efficient operation of the 
LCS and the quality of life of the entire crew.
    The Consolidated and Full Year Continuing Appropriations 
Act, 2013, directed the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees on future 
manning plans for the LCS. The Secretary of the Navy is further 
directed to incorporate any findings regarding LCS manning 
discovered thus far during the deployment into the report. The 
Committee is currently waiting for the completion and release 
of the report and looks forward to reviewing its 
recommendations.

                    MILITARY PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $12,531,549,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    12,905,216,000
Committee recommendation..............................    12,826,857,000
Change from budget request............................       -78,359,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$12,826,857,000 for Military Personnel, Marine Corps. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



                     MILITARY PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $28,052,826,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    28,519,877,000
Committee recommendation..............................    28,382,963,000
Change from budget request............................      -136,914,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$28,382,963,000 for Military Personnel, Air Force. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, ARMY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $4,456,823,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     4,565,261,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,483,343,000
Change from budget request............................       -81,918,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,483,343,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Army. The total amount recommended in 
the bill will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2014:



                        RESERVE PERSONNEL, NAVY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,874,023,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,891,936,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,875,536,000
Change from budget request............................       -16,400,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,875,536,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Navy. The total amount recommended in 
the bill will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2014:



                    RESERVE PERSONNEL, MARINE CORPS





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $658,251,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       677,499,000
Committee recommendation..............................       665,499,000
Change from budget request............................       -12,000,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $665,499,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Marine Corps. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



                      RESERVE PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,722,425,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,758,629,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,745,579,000
Change from budget request............................       -13,050,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,745,579,000 
for Reserve Personnel, Air Force. The total amount recommended 
in the bill will provide the following program in fiscal year 
2014:



                     NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, ARMY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $7,981,577,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     8,041,268,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,958,568,000
Change from budget request............................       -82,700,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,958,568,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Army. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



         CYBER SECURITY--DUAL USE CYBER INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAMS

    Cyber security is an important and growing mission area, 
and the National Guard has unique access to a wealth of 
information technology talent within its ranks as well as 
unique cyber support capabilities associated with both its 
Federal and State Active Duty statutes. The President's 
executive order dated February 12, 2013, Improving Critical 
Infrastructure Cybersecurity, focuses on enhancing the 
resiliency and security of the Nation's critical 
infrastructure. This will be achieved through a ``partnership 
with the owners and operators of critical infrastructure to 
improve cybersecurity information sharing and collaboratively 
develop and implement risk-based standards.''
    The Committee recognizes that the National Guard can fill 
the roles denoted in the President's executive order. As dual 
use, cyber incident response teams, the Guard would focus on 
forensic analysis and defensive cyber operations, providing all 
purpose ``triage'' of local/state network incidents. The 
Committee recognizes that these Guard teams may provide aid to 
civil authorities in Title 32, Title 10, and State Active Duty 
status and should be regionally located near established key 
infrastructure nodes for the internet to leverage their 
capabilities.

                  NATIONAL GUARD PERSONNEL, AIR FORCE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $3,153,990,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     3,177,961,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,130,361,000
Change from budget request............................       -47,600,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the Sec. 3004 OMB ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,130,361,000 
for National Guard Personnel, Air Force. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



                                TITLE II

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request for programs funded in 
title II of the Committee bill, Operation and Maintenance, is 
$175,097,941,000 in new budget authority. The Committee 
recommendation provides $174,974,024,000 for the operation and 
maintenance accounts. These appropriations finance the costs of 
operating and maintaining the Armed Forces, including the 
reserve components and related support activities of the 
Department of Defense. Included is readiness training, services 
for maintenance of equipment, fuel, supplies, spare parts for 
weapons and equipment, the day-to-day operations of military 
bases, facility sustainment and repair, and civilian pay. 
Financial requirements are influenced by many factors, 
including force levels, such as the number of aircraft 
squadrons, Army and Marine Corps divisions, installations, 
military personnel end strength and deployments, rates of 
operational activity, and the quantity, complexity, and age of 
equipment such as aircraft, ships, missiles, and tanks. The 
Committee does not provide funding for a proposed civilian pay 
raise in fiscal year 2014.
    The table below summarizes the Committee recommendations:
    

    
                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE REPROGRAMMINGS

    The Secretary of Defense is directed to submit the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) for each of the fiscal year 2014 
appropriation accounts not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act. The Secretary of Defense is prohibited 
from executing any reprogramming or transfer of funds for any 
purpose other than originally appropriated until the 
aforementioned report is submitted to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    The Secretary of Defense is directed to use the normal 
prior approval reprogramming procedures to transfer funds in 
the Services' operation and maintenance accounts between O-1 
budget activities in excess of $15,000,000. In addition, the 
Secretary of Defense should follow prior approval reprogramming 
procedures for transfers in excess of $15,000,000 out of the 
following budget sub-activities:

    Army:
    Maneuver units
    Modular support brigades
    Land forces operations support
    Force readiness operations support
    Land forces depot maintenance
    Base operations support
    Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization

    Navy:
    Aircraft depot maintenance
    Ship depot maintenance
    Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization

    Marine Corps:
    Depot maintenance
    Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization

    Air Force:
    Primary combat forces
    Combat enhancement forces
    Combat communications
    Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization
    Operating forces depot maintenance
    Mobilization depot maintenance
    Training and recruiting depot maintenance
    Administration and service-wide depot maintenance

    Air Force Reserve:
    Depot maintenance

    Air National Guard:
    Depot maintenance

    Finally, the Secretary of Defense should follow prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for transfers in excess of 
$15,000,000 into the following budget sub-activity:

    Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard:
    Other personnel support/recruiting and advertising

    With respect to Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, 
proposed transfers of funds to or from the levels specified for 
defense agencies in excess of $15,000,000 shall be subject to 
prior approval reprogramming procedures.

            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE BUDGET EXECUTION DATA

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to provide the congressional defense committees with quarterly 
budget execution data. Such data should be provided not later 
than 45 days after the close of each quarter of the fiscal 
year, and should be provided for each O-1 budget activity, 
activity group, and sub-activity group for each of the active, 
defense-wide, reserve, and National Guard components. For each 
O-1 budget activity, activity group, and sub-activity group, 
these reports should include the budget request and actual 
obligation amount; the distribution of unallocated 
congressional adjustments to the budget request; all 
adjustments made by the Department in establishing the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414) report; all adjustments resulting 
from below threshold reprogrammings; and all adjustments 
resulting from prior approval reprogramming requests.

                         SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional interest items for the purpose of the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must be 
carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount specifically 
addressed in the Committee report. These items remain special 
interest items whether or not they are repeated in a subsequent 
conference report.

       RESTORATION OF FUNDING FOR UNREALISTIC EFFICIENCY SAVINGS

    The report accompanying the House version of the Department 
of Defense Appropriations Act, 2012 included language 
expressing the Committee's concern over many of the Department 
of Defense's proposed efficiency savings. In particular, the 
report stated that ``more troubling were instances in which 
underfunding valid requirements were claimed as efficiencies,'' 
including the decision to underfund base facility sustainment 
requirements and claim the reductions as infrastructure 
savings. In fiscal year 2013 and again in fiscal year 2014, the 
Department requests reduced funding for facility sustainment 
requirements and claims the reduction as infrastructure savings 
rather than deferral of maintenance. In fiscal year 2014, the 
Committee once again restores funding to the Facilities 
Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization programs for the 
individual Services, the Guard and reserve components, and the 
Services' medical facilities.

                           TUITION ASSISTANCE

    Military tuition assistance has been an important benefit 
available to servicemembers since the late 1940s. Tuition 
assistance is a benefit paid to eligible members of the Army, 
Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force for college courses to 
support a member's professional and personal self-development 
goals. The courses are to be taken during the member's off-duty 
hours, and the total cost per member is capped at $4,500 per 
year. The Committee believes that tuition assistance is a 
valuable recruiting and retention program and therefore 
designates it as a congressional special interest item. The 
Committee sets a funding floor for fiscal year 2014 
expenditures as follows:





Army..................................................      $195,000,000
Navy..................................................        90,000,000
Marine Corps..........................................        44,000,000
Air Force.............................................       116,000,000
Army Reserve..........................................        40,000,000
Air Force Reserve.....................................         8,000,000
Army National Guard...................................        72,000,000
Air National Guard....................................         5,000,000
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................       570,000,000


                         REALISTIC FUEL PRICING

    The Committee is concerned with the Department's habitual 
underfunding of fuel costs in its budget requests, which causes 
the need for significant reprogramming of funds in the year of 
budget execution. In fiscal year 2012, $1,000,000,000 was 
reprogrammed to correct for understated fuel costs and in 
fiscal year 2013, $1,100,000,000 has been requested for the 
same purpose. It appears that fuel costs are again understated 
in the fiscal year 2014 budget request. The Government 
Accountability Office has estimated that the fiscal year 2014 
fuel costs are understated by $536,000,000. The Committee 
believes the Department should reset the fuel rate charged to 
the customer in fiscal year 2014 in line with expected market 
rates. The Committee has increased funding in the operation and 
maintenance customer accounts to pay for the expected market 
rate recommended by the Government Accountability Office.

                MILITARY INFORMATION SUPPORT OPERATIONS

    The Committee appreciates the significant oversight and 
attention the Department has given to address the Committee's 
concern that funding for Military Information Support 
Operations (MISO), activities only be used to fulfill core 
military activities rather than duplicate programs and 
activities more appropriately conducted by other departments 
and agencies. Therefore, the Committee recommends funding for 
these programs at the levels requested. The allocation of funds 
by combatant command and funding levels for certain programs is 
specifically delineated in the classified annex to this report. 
The delineations shall be considered a congressional special 
interest item, and any deviations from the allocations are 
subject to sections 8005, 8006, and 9002 of this Act.
    The Secretary of Defense is also directed to submit a 
report not later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act, 
to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees detailing the 
proposed execution of the funding provided for these programs. 
This report shall include the program name, activity, a 
description of service, target audience, goals/objectives, 
attribution, measures of effectiveness, prior year obligations 
and expenditures, and the estimated budget for the year of 
execution. This report, and the delineation of each program, 
project, and activity, shall serve as the basis for 
reprogramming in accordance with section 8006 of this Act.

                    DEFENSE PERSONAL PROPERTY MOVES

    The Committee has a long-standing interest in the quality 
of life of military members and their families and understands 
the tremendous challenges associated with completing frequent 
defense personal property moves. The Committee is aware that 
the Department of Defense has successfully shifted from the 
Transportation Operational Personal Property Standard System to 
the Defense Personal Property Program and commends the 
improvements to cost efficiency, to the claims experience, and 
in family satisfaction. Benefits of the Defense Personal 
Property Program include full replacement and repair value for 
damaged or lost household goods at no additional cost; on-line 
claims filing and direct claims settlement between members/
employees and transportation service providers; best value 
acquisition of transportation services; improved communications 
between customers and transportation service providers; and a 
web-based entitlements counseling option. The Committee 
commends the improvements that the Department and its 
transportation service providers have made to reduce costs and 
improve the quality of each military move.

                             STEM EDUCATION

    The Committee is concerned about the future of the Nation's 
workforce, specifically for science, technology, engineering, 
and math (STEM) disciplines. These skills are vital to the 
Department of Defense to maintain United States military 
superiority. While these skills are underrepresented in the 
available workforce, minorities especially are underrepresented 
in these skill sets both in the current workforce and at 
university levels. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to develop a long-term plan to maintain and grow the 
STEM workforce and to support the development of STEM skill 
sets, especially in undergraduate and graduate programs, and to 
focus on increasing the participation and success of minority 
students through engaged mentoring, enriched research 
experiences, and opportunities to publish, present, and 
network. The Committee also encourages the Secretary of Defense 
and the Director of National Intelligence to communicate to the 
congressional defense committees the resources, incentives, and 
legal and regulatory flexibility needed to attract and maintain 
a proficient STEM workforce. These factors, along with peer-to-
peer mentoring, have proven to be a successful model for 
minority education.

                 TELECOMMUNICATIONS EXPENSE MANAGEMENT

    The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, directed the 
Secretary of Defense to complete a study and assess the 
feasibility of using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) 
telecommunication expense management solutions to improve 
enterprise visibility over the Department's telecommunications 
expenses and identify possible efficiencies in this growing 
technological area. Since that study was completed, the 
Department of Defense Chief Information Officer (CIO) 
promulgated guidance regarding the use of these management 
solutions. The Committee is concerned that the military 
Services are not yet in compliance with the CIO's guidance. 
Therefore, the Committee recommends that the Secretary of 
Defense defer new large telecommunications contracts until the 
Department has begun to proactively manage telecommunications 
usage utilizing competitively awarded COTS expense management 
solutions in accordance with the CIO guidance.

                         MILITARY WORKING DOGS

    The use of canines to help locate and clear Improvised 
Explosive Devices has been highly successful, has saved lives, 
and has prevented injuries to deployed servicemembers. While 
military working dog teams have played an important role in 
national security over the past decade, the Committee is 
concerned that no widely accepted standards or protocols have 
been developed to ensure consistency and uniform quality in the 
breeding, training, conditioning, and deployment of military 
working dog teams. The Committee therefore urges the Secretary 
of the Air Force, the executive agent for the military working 
dog program, to work with the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, in conjunction with subject matter experts in 
academia and the private sector, to develop breeding, training, 
conditioning and deployment standards, and protocols for 
military working dog teams.

                   REPORT ON OVERSEAS INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report not later than 365 days after the enactment of this Act 
to the congressional defense committees that inventories United 
States military installations located overseas. The report 
should include an assessment of the requirements for overseas 
military force structure and infrastructure, as well as an 
inventory of potentially excess infrastructure and any 
opportunities for consolidation.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $35,409,260,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    35,073,077,000
Committee recommendation..............................    35,183,796,000
Change from budget request............................     +110,719,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$35,183,796,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Army. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



                     ARMY TRAINING AIDS AND DEVICES

    The Army's fiscal year 2014 budget request reflects 
refinements in its training strategy to incorporate a 24-month 
Army Force Generation cycle which leverages more constructive, 
virtual, and blended training capabilities. The Army has found 
that the use of virtual training has enhanced its ability to 
meet training goals at reduced cost. The Committee believes 
that commercial off-the-shelf simulation training utilizing 
service contracts rather than traditional acquisition programs 
of record could further improve the technological relevance of 
simulation and training devices for a wide range of missions, 
including regular and irregular warfare against conventional 
and hybrid threats. The Committee encourages the Army to 
evaluate the use of these contracts to reduce overall costs for 
virtual training while enhancing training experiences.

                          CEMETERIAL EXPENSES

    The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2014 budget 
request once again proposes $25,000,000 to be provided in the 
Operation and Maintenance, Army account to assist with the 
maintenance backlog at Arlington National Cemetery instead of 
requesting all funds within the Cemeterial Expenses, Army 
account. The Committee does not support the proposal to fund 
Arlington National Cemetery through separate accounts contained 
in two different appropriations bills. Split funding undermines 
the federal budgeting principles requiring expenditures to be 
charged against the same account each year, once an account has 
been identified for such purpose. The Committee rejects the 
proposal to fund cemeterial expenses in the Operation and 
Maintenance, Army account and instead provides all funds for 
the maintenance backlog at Arlington National Cemetery in the 
Cemeterial Expenses, Army account included in the pending 
fiscal year 2014 Military Construction and Veterans Affairs 
Appropriations Act.

         HIGH RESOLUTION 3--DIMENSIONAL TERRAIN DATA COLLECTION

    The Committee is aware of a validated operational 
requirement to provide unclassified, shareable, high resolution 
3-dimensional terrain and elevation data which enables 
commanders to conduct the analysis required for mission 
planning, rehearsal, and execution. This requirement has been 
fulfilled by the Buckeye ISR system since 2004, which produces 
data that can provide commanders with the situational awareness 
for requirements such as helicopter landing zones, optimal 
ingress and egress routes, cover and conceal sniper, counter-
sniper positions, and vertical obstructions. The Committee 
understands this system fulfills a unique requirement by 
producing unclassified data, allowing for data sharing with 
coalition and host nation forces. Additionally, its sensors can 
operate from various platforms, including fixed wing aircraft, 
helicopters, and unmanned aircraft. The Committee understands 
that an error during the formulation of the budget request 
resulted in a $163,000,000 shortfall to this program for fiscal 
year 2014 and therefore directs the Secretary of the Army to 
fully fund this important operational ISR requirement.

                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $41,614,453,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    39,945,237,000
Committee recommendation..............................    40,127,402,000
Change from budget request............................     +182,165,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$40,127,402,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Navy. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $6,034,963,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     6,254,650,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,298,757,000
Change from budget request............................      +44,107,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,298,757,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



     SPECIAL PURPOSE MARINE AIR GROUND TASK FORCE--CRISIS RESPONSE

    The Marine Corps recently activated a new task force, the 
Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force--Crisis Response, 
to serve as a regionally based, expeditionary Marine Air Ground 
Task Force that conducts crisis response and limited 
contingency operations from land-based and maritime platforms 
in response to Commander, United States Africa Command 
requirements. This task force is trained to conduct security, 
serve as a quick reaction force, conduct limited offensive/
defensive operations, provide tactical recovery of aircraft and 
personnel, provide limited humanitarian assistance, and conduct 
limited non-combatant evacuation operations missions. This task 
force was deployed for the first time in April 2013 at the 
request of the Commander, United States Africa Command. The 
Committee has added funds for sustainment and follow-on 
deployments of the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task 
Force--Crisis Response in fiscal year 2014.

                 MARINE CORPS EMBASSY SECURITY PROGRAM

    The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2013 
directed the Secretary of Defense to develop and implement a 
plan to increase the number of members of the Marine Corps 
assigned to the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group at 
Quantico, Virginia, Marine Security Group Regional Commands, 
and Marine Security Group detachments at United States 
embassies, consulates, and other diplomatic facilities by up to 
1,000 Marines. These additional Marines will support enhanced 
Marine Corps security at United States embassies, consulates, 
and other diplomatic facilities, particularly at locations 
identified by the Secretary of State as in need of additional 
security because of threats to United States personnel and 
property. The Department of Defense, in concert with the 
Department of State, is developing plans to add 35 new Marine 
Security Guard detachments over the next few years, beginning 
in fiscal year 2014. The Committee recommendation provides 
increased funding for the additional training, training aids, 
logistical support, and equipment for the additional Marine 
Security Guard detachments beginning in fiscal year 2014.

                  OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $34,780,406,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    37,270,842,000
Committee recommendation..............................    37,438,701,000
Change from budget request............................     +167,859,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$37,438,701,000 for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force. The 
total amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



                         CYBER COMMAND FUNDING

    Funding for the United States Cyber Command, a subordinate 
unified command under the United States Strategic Command, 
currently is not discretely visible in the Air Force's budget 
justification material. With the increased emphasis on cyber 
activities and related resourcing, the Committee directs that 
beginning in fiscal year 2015, the Air Force's budget 
justification material separately report and separately justify 
funds to support Cyber Command in sub-activity group 015A, 
``Combatant Commands Direct Mission Support'' and in sub-
activity group 015B, ``Combatant Command Core Operations''.

                       U.S. ACCESS TO THE AZORES

    The Committee is concerned by the uncertainty of the 
Department of Defense's intentions regarding use of the long-
standing military infrastructure in the Portuguese Azores, as 
well as reports that China's military is seeking access to 
Lajes Air Base, currently host to the Air Force's 65th Air Base 
Wing. The Committee recognizes that Lajes continues to serve an 
important role as part of the critical en route infrastructure 
for multiple areas of operation. The Committee therefore urges 
the Secretary of Defense to ensure that U.S. interests in the 
Azores are not unduly harmed when considering changes to 
overseas military posture.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, DEFENSE-WIDE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $31,862,980,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    32,997,693,000
Committee recommendation..............................    32,301,685,000
Change from budget request............................     -696,008,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$32,301,685,000, for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide. 
The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                SUICIDE PREVENTION TRAINING AND OUTREACH

    Suicide remains an issue of concern to the Committee and 
the Services, especially in the Guard and reserve components. 
While there was a slight drop in the number of reported 
suicides from 2010 to 2011, the number of suicides increased 
significantly from 2011 to 2012. Whereas servicemembers serving 
on active duty return from deployments to military bases which 
provide more structured support networks, returning Guardsmen 
and reservists are frequently geographically isolated from 
their units and may not have the regular interactions with 
their peers and chain of command that their active duty 
counterparts experience.
    The Committee is aware that suicide remains a problem among 
servicemembers who have never deployed as well as those who 
have deployed once or multiple times. The Committee is aware of 
programs for the reserve components, such as the National Guard 
Psychological Health Program, to improve access to mental 
health providers. The National Guard Psychological Health 
Program provides a Director of Psychological Health for the 
Army National Guard in each of the 54 states and territories 
and will fund an additional 24 directors assigned to high-risk 
states. It also funds a Director of Psychological Health for 
the Air National Guard in all 89 wings. The directors advise 
leadership on psychological wellness issues, provide clinical 
assessments, ensure targeted mental health referrals, and 
mitigate problems with access to behavioral health care 
providers in local communities for eligible Guardsmen and their 
families. The Committee understands that the National Defense 
Authorization Act for fiscal year 2013 authorized a pilot 
program to improve access to behavioral health care for 
National Guard and reserve members and their families through a 
collaboration of federal, state, and community partners. The 
Committee is aware that the National Guard Bureau is working to 
utilize existing federal and local partners to provide timely 
access to qualified and trained mental health counselors and 
supports efforts to leverage existing infrastructure to 
facilitate access to mental health care for military 
servicemembers and their families.
    The Committee recommendation provides increased funding for 
the Army National Guard Psychological Health Program to 
increase the number of providers available to Guardsmen and 
their families. The Committee recommendation also provides 
increased funding for suicide prevention in the Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide account. In addition, the Committee 
recognizes the important role that programs such as Yellow 
Ribbon play in helping Guardsmen and reservists transition to 
civilian life upon returning from deployment, and fully funds 
the budget request for Yellow Ribbon.
    The Committee acknowledges the steps the Services have 
taken to implement suicide prevention training and outreach 
efforts and lower the rate of suicide among servicemembers, but 
it believes that more must be done to identify at-risk 
servicemembers and to improve prevention and outreach efforts. 
The Committee urges the Service Secretaries to continue to make 
suicide prevention a key priority and to regularly update the 
Committee on actions being taken.

                                STARBASE

    The Department of Defense STARBASE program is designed to 
raise the interest and improve the knowledge and skills of 
students in kindergarten through twelfth grade in science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The program 
currently operates on Air Force, Air National Guard, Air Force 
Reserve, Navy, Navy Reserve, and Marine Corps military 
installations and facilities at 65 locations. The military 
volunteers who mentor students apply abstract principles to 
real world situations by leading tours and giving lectures on 
the use of STEM in different settings and careers, and they 
engage students through the inquiry-based curriculum with its 
``hands-on, mind-on'' experiential activities in a 
technologically rich military environment. The program has a 
proven record of improving student understanding, interest, and 
ability in math and science and stimulating interest in STEM 
careers while establishing lasting relationships between 
community educators and military installations.
    The STARBASE program seeks to serve students that are 
historically underrepresented in STEM, including students who 
live in inner cities or rural locations, are socio-economically 
disadvantaged, low in academic performance, or disabled. The 
fiscal year 2014 budget request seeks to reorganize STEM 
programs throughout the federal government, and all funding for 
STARBASE was removed from the Department of Defense's fiscal 
year 2014 budget request. The Committee finds that terminating 
the STARBASE program is not advisable. STARBASE provides a 
unique low-cost leveraging of community and military resources 
that another federal agency will not be able to duplicate. The 
intangible benefits of solid cooperative community and military 
relationships stimulate the long-term interest of youth in STEM 
careers. The Committee recommendation therefore restores 
funding so the Department's STARBASE program will continue in 
fiscal year 2014.

        DATA RESEARCH TOOLS IN SECURITY CLEARANCE INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee is concerned about the timeliness of 
completing security clearance investigations. The Committee 
understands the Department of Defense and the Office of the 
Director of National Intelligence have expressed similar 
concerns. Currently, automated data research tools are 
available online through the Defense Personnel Security 
Research Center (PERSEREC). These tools can be used to assist 
security clearance adjudicators, personnel security 
investigators, and security managers in implementing personnel 
security policy. However, military Services and Department of 
Defense agencies may not be aware that the PERSEREC tools are 
available. Therefore, the Committee recommends that the 
Secretary of Defense, through the Office of Defense Human 
Resources Activity and in coordination with the Office of 
Personnel Management, reach out to the military Services and 
Defense agencies to ensure that they are aware of the PERSEREC 
online tools and how these tools could be used to reduce the 
time and cost of investigation and adjudication of security 
clearances.

                     MEALS READY-TO-EAT WAR RESERVE

    The Committee is concerned with the Defense Logistics 
Agency's (DLA) potential reduction to the Meal, Ready-to-Eat 
(MRE) war reserve. The Committee commends the DLA for 
initiating action to study the MRE war reserve but is concerned 
that a reduction in MRE war reserve could harm the industrial 
base and threaten the Department's ``Go to War'' capabilities. 
The Committee has expressed strong interest in the MRE war 
reserve program dating back to 2003 when DLA increased its 
requirement for the war reserve to six million cases. The 
Committee directs the Director of the DLA, in conjunction with 
the military Services and industry, to develop a comprehensive 
plan that addresses the aggregate MRE requirements for each of 
the military Services that considers war time surge 
requirements and timely rotation of the MRE war reserve.

  OFFICE OF COMMUNITY SUPPORT FOR MILITARY FAMILIES WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    The Committee recognizes the stressful conditions and 
financial burdens experienced by servicemembers with 
developmentally disabled children. These conditions are often 
magnified by long separations caused by deployments. The 
Committee encourages the Director of the Office of Community 
Support for Military Families with Special Needs to collaborate 
with non-profit organizations that have expertise in 
developmental disabilities to establish educational and 
assistive programs at military bases.

                  SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND READINESS

    The Committee recommendation provides an increase of 
$269,399,000 above the budget request to restore readiness 
reductions to the Special Operations Command fiscal year 2014 
operation and maintenance base funding. The Committee 
recommendation restores funding for flying hours, training, 
equipment replacement, depot maintenance, and enduring 
operational expenses. The Consolidated and Full Year Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2013 approved a shift of $885,000,000 from 
overseas contingency operations (OCO) funding to base funding 
to begin to transition these enduring readiness requirements 
into the base budget from the OCO accounts. The Committee is 
disappointed that the fiscal year 2014 budget request proposes 
to shift $194,641,000 back to the OCO accounts and proposes an 
additional $74,698,000 in reductions to these readiness 
activities. Therefore, the Committee recommendation restores 
these reductions to ensure Special Operations Forces are fully 
able to meet their long term readiness requirements.

                  USE OF MAJOR FORCE PROGRAM--11 FUNDS

    In an era of increasing fiscal constraint, the Committee 
believes it is incumbent on the Department of Defense and the 
Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to ensure that Major Force 
Program-11 (MFP-11) funds be reserved for its original purpose, 
to provide the incremental funding necessary for Special 
Operations Forces (SOF) unique capabilities and items, rather 
than to supplement or supplant activities that are or should be 
provided by the military Services. The Committee is concerned 
that several funding requests in the fiscal year 2014 budget 
would establish new precedents for the use of MFP-11 funds. In 
some cases, funds were requested to establish new programs and 
activities that duplicated Service-provided or Department of 
Defense programs. In other cases, SOCOM's request would assume 
responsibility for activities that previously, and more 
appropriately, were funded by the Services. The Committee is 
concerned that MFP-11 funds are now perceived as a mechanism to 
insulate SOCOM from Service budget reductions or to create 
separate SOF programs that are the responsibility of the 
Services. It has come to the Committee's attention that at 
least one waiver of the use of MFP-11 operation and maintenance 
funds was granted in fiscal year 2013 in order to establish a 
new SOF program, a process that the Committee was unaware of 
prior to this year. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller), working with the 
Comptroller, Special Operations for Financial Management 
(SOFM), to clearly identify and justify in the fiscal year 2015 
budget request all MFP-11 operation and maintenance funding for 
programs and activities for which: (1) the military Services or 
other Department of Defense elements previously had 
responsibility for funding, including those related to special 
operations; or (2) funds would be transferred between the MFP-
11 budget and other Major Force Program budgets, and the 
justification for such transfers. Further, the Committee 
directs the Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller), working 
with the Comptroller, SOFM, to submit a report not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act to the congressional 
defense committees outlining the guidelines for the use of MFP-
11 operation and maintenance funds, a description of the waiver 
process to use MFP-11 funds for non-MFP-11 activities, and a 
list of all waivers granted in fiscal years 2012 and 2013 and 
the justification for such waivers.

 SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND HUMAN PSYCHOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE AND FAMILY 
                                PROGRAMS

    The Committee understands the tremendous toll exacted on 
all servicemembers and their families, including those in the 
special operations community, after more than a decade of war. 
The Committee has always made the care of servicemembers and 
their families its highest priority, including special 
operators. The Committee appreciates the focus of the 
Commander, Special Operations Command on the psychological 
health and well-being of special operations forces and their 
families. The Committee also recognizes the success of the 
Services' embedded behavioral health programs and fully 
supports their expansion to the special operations community. 
However, the Committee believes that the mental health needs of 
all servicemembers, including special operations 
servicemembers, are most appropriately addressed within the 
Defense Health Program to ensure the highest quality continuity 
of care for all servicemembers. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation transfers $21,300,000 requested within the 
Special Operations Command operation and maintenance budget to 
the Defense Health Program to address the needs of the special 
operations community consistent with Service programs. The 
Committee directs the Service Surgeons General to work with the 
Commander, Special Operations Command to implement an embedded 
behavioral health program for special operations units during 
fiscal year 2014.
    The budget request also includes $8,786,000 to establish 
special operations forces (SOF) unique family resiliency 
programs. The Committee does not recommend funding for this 
unauthorized program. The Committee recognizes that the 
deployment cycles of special operations forces may in some 
limited circumstances make it more difficult for SOF families 
to fully participate in family support programs. However, the 
need for the establishment of separate family support programs 
exclusively for SOF families has not been demonstrated nor is 
it currently authorized. The Committee believes it is important 
for the morale of all servicemembers that there not be 
inequities among families exclusively based on a 
servicemember's assignment. The Committee understands that the 
pending fiscal year 2014 National Defense Authorization Act 
authorizes a limited pilot program to assess the feasibility 
and benefits of SOF family support activities. Therefore, the 
Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the pilot program.

     SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND HUMAN PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation does not include an increase 
of $25,305,000 for the Human Physical Performance Program. This 
request would fund 331 contractors to provide physical training 
and sports conditioning, sports psychology, and sports 
nutrition services for special operations forces (SOF), but 
would not cover the non-salary operational costs or anticipated 
new facilities associated with this initiative. While military 
construction funding was requested for new facilities 
associated with this initiative, the necessary authorization 
and funding was denied in the pending fiscal year 2014 National 
Defense Authorization Act, as well as in the pending fiscal 
year 2014 Military Construction and Veterans Affairs 
Appropriations Act.
    The Committee has long supported physical training programs 
to ensure that special operators are in top condition to 
achieve their mission and to prevent physical injuries. In the 
past, there has often been a reliance on training programs 
designed for collegiate or professional athletes, programs 
which may or may not meet the needs of the special operator. In 
addition, the physical training requirements vary between 
special operators based on their mission set. In an attempt to 
address this challenge, over the last several years at the 
request of the Special Operations Command (SOCOM), the 
Committee has funded the Tactical Athlete Program within the 
Department of Navy to provide the necessary baseline research 
for each individual type of SOF operator in order to design 
appropriate physical training programs to meet those 
specialized needs. This approach was previously used by the 
Department of the Army to successfully develop a training 
program for the 101st Airborne Division. The Committee 
recommendation includes continued funding under the Department 
of the Navy to complete these assessments.
    The Committee believes that the investment and 
corresponding results from this research will enable SOCOM to 
design physical training programs uniquely tailored to the 
needs of special operators in the most productive and cost 
effective manner possible. The Committee is concerned that the 
new program proposed by SOCOM did not utilize the research 
investment that has been made in order to develop a program 
that meets the unique needs of special operators in the most 
cost effective manner possible. Therefore, the Committee does 
not provide the requested increase to expand this new program.

         SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAM

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request includes $8,466,000 for 
a new Advanced Education Program for the Special Operations 
Command. Of this amount, $3,603,000 was requested to fund a 
National Defense University (NDU) satellite Masters Degree 
program at the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and 
School established with funding from the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations/Low-Intensity Conflict. The 
remaining $4,863,000 was requested to establish new programs or 
expand existing programs.
    The Committee supports professional military education 
opportunities for all servicemembers, including those in the 
special operations forces (SOF) community. While the Committee 
appreciates the Commander, Special Operations Command's desire 
to augment the advanced education opportunities for SOF 
students, it is unclear to the Committee that the proposed 
programs represent truly SOF-unique requirements and instead 
may be duplicative of education opportunities provided by the 
Services.
    The Committee understands that SOCOM is in the process of 
working with the Service Secretaries to establish a process to 
formalize SOF-unique education requirements. The Committee 
directs the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, in coordination 
with the Commander, Special Operations Command, to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act, which outlines all 
SOF-unique educational requirements, includes recommendations 
to meet such requirements, and describes how the proposed SOCOM 
educational initiatives compare to Service-offered educational 
opportunities.
    Therefore, the Committee transfers $3,603,000 from SOCOM's 
operation and maintenance budget to NDU's budget to maintain 
appropriate program and budget oversight of all NDU programs. 
Additionally, the Committee recommendation includes a reduction 
of $3,863,000 for new and expanded programs based on concerns 
regarding duplication and requirements. The remaining 
$1,000,000 provided is for existing programs and SOCOM is 
directed to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the use of these funds.

           SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION

    The Committee recommendation does not include $10,000,000 
to establish a Special Operations Command National Capital 
Region (SOCOM-NCR) entity. This funding request was also denied 
in the pending fiscal year 2014 National Defense Authorization 
Act. The budget justification materials indicate that SOCOM 
plans to implement this proposal in phases.
    The Committee has requested, but has not received, a 
detailed plan which lays out the full operating capability and 
end-state envisioned by this proposal and instead has only 
received information on the phase-zero and phase-one plans. The 
Committee remains unclear about the function, purpose, and 
costs associated with the operations, infrastructure, and 
facilities for this entity both in the interim phase and the 
final end-state. Further, the Committee has received 
conflicting information over the course of the last year as to 
the purpose of this entity. At times it has been described as 
an efficiency mechanism to relocate over 300 SOCOM personnel to 
one consolidated location within the NCR. The Committee is 
confused by this explanation given that the vast majority of 
SOCOM personnel assigned to the NCR function as liaison 
officers and Special Operations Support Teams to other federal 
agencies and as such should remain resident at such agencies. 
At other times, some functions of the new SOCOM-NCR appear to 
duplicate functions already resident at SOCOM headquarters. The 
Committee is concerned that in a time of declining budget 
resources, it is incumbent upon SOCOM and the Department to 
fully delineate the functions, responsibilities, facilities 
requirements, infrastructure, and operating costs associated 
with this proposal before moving forward in order to carefully 
assess whether a statutory waiver of the prohibition on 
relocations into and within the more expensive National Capital 
Region area is warranted.
    Should the Secretary of Defense waive the prohibition in 
Section 8018 of this Act, the Committee believes such a 
decision should be based on the full operating capability and 
final end-state agreed to by the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the Commander, Special Operations Command is 
directed not to obligate or expend funds for the proposed 
SOCOM-NCR until 30 days after the congressional defense 
committees receive a copy of the Secretary of Defense's waiver 
of Section 8018 of this Act and a report which fully describes 
the anticipated full operating capability and end-state for 
this entity as follows: (1) a description of the purpose and 
specific activities to be performed by the SOCOM-NCR; (2) an 
explanation of the impact of this proposal on existing 
activities at SOCOM headquarters and components, including the 
cost differential associated with relocating these functions 
from their existing locations to the NCR; and (3) a detailed, 
by fiscal year, breakout of all staffing and costs, including a 
long-term facilities plan, associated with its establishment 
over the future years defense plan (fiscal years 2014-2018) and 
at the full operating capability and planned final end-state. 
The Committee will consider a prior approval reprogramming in 
fiscal year 2014 from within available Special Operations 
Command operation and maintenance funds for the SOCOM-NCR if 
the Secretary of Defense grants the waiver of Section 8018 and 
the congressional defense committees have been provided the 
required comprehensive report.

            SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

    The Committee is concerned regarding the quality of the 
operation and maintenance budget justification submitted by the 
Special Operations Command (SOCOM). As a result, the Committee 
is unable to conduct meaningful oversight of SOCOM's budget 
requirements as the current justification does not include the 
necessary level of detail. Due to the failure of the budget 
justification to provide such information, the Committee is 
unable to analyze changes and trends over time in SOCOM's 
budget requirements, conduct comparative analysis with similar 
Department of Defense budget requirements, or have any 
understanding or visibility into changing requirements in the 
year of execution. The budget structure required by Department 
of Defense Financial Management Regulation (FMR) would provide 
the information needed. However, in fiscal year 2006, the 
Department of Defense took action to exempt SOCOM from these 
requirements and thereby limited congressional visibility and 
oversight. Since that time, the SOCOM base operation and 
maintenance budget has grown by 143 percent. Additionally, due 
to this exemption, SOCOM does not provide meaningful 
information that details the changing requirements among 
activities for overseas contingency operations requests.
    In a time of declining budget resources, the Committee must 
have the same level of visibility into SOCOM's funding as is 
provided by the Services in order to facilitate appropriate 
oversight. Therefore, the Undersecretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) and the Comptroller, Special Operations for 
Financial Management (SOFM) are directed to submit the fiscal 
year 2015 SOCOM base and OCO operation and maintenance budget 
justification in accordance with Volume 2A, Chapter 3 of the 
FMR as such requirements apply to the Services. As required by 
the FMR, the budget justification shall be delineated and 
detailed by budget activity group, activity group, and sub-
activity group with detailed changes within each sub-activity 
reflected on OP-5 and OP-32 exhibits. The Committee directs the 
Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller) and the Comptroller, 
SOFM to consult with the Committee during development of the 
fiscal year 2015 budget on actions being taken to make the 
necessary changes not later than October 1, 2013.

                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY RESERVE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $3,182,923,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     3,095,036,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,199,151,000
Change from budget request............................     +104,115,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,199,151,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



                OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY RESERVE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,256,347,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,197,752,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,200,283,000
Change from budget request............................       +2,531,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,200,283,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Navy Reserve. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



            OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, MARINE CORPS RESERVE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $277,377,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       263,317,000
Committee recommendation..............................       266,561,000
Change from budget request............................       +3,244,000

*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $266,561,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



              OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR FORCE RESERVE





Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $3,261,324,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     3,164,607,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,149,046,000
Change from budget request............................      -15,561,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,149,046,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air Force Reserve. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $7,154,161,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     7,054,196,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,102,113,000
Change from budget request............................      +47,917,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,102,113,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Army National Guard. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



                   NATIONAL GUARD CIVIL SUPPORT TEAMS

    The Army and Air National Guard Weapons of Mass 
Destruction/Civil Support Teams support civil authorities at a 
domestic Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and High 
Yield Explosive Enterprise incident site by identifying 
hazardous agents or substances, assessing current and projected 
consequences, advising on response measures, and assisting with 
appropriate requests for state support. There are a total of 57 
National Guard teams: one in each state, plus one each in the 
District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin 
Islands, and two each in the states of California, New York, 
and Florida, due to the geographic separation and 
concentrations of populations in these three states.
    The Committee is pleased that the fiscal year 2014 budget 
request includes funding for the 57 teams, including the two 
teams in New York and Florida that were proposed for 
elimination in the fiscal year 2013 budget request. The 
Committee fully funds the budget request for Civil Support 
Teams and expects the Secretary of Defense to fully fund the 
two teams in Florida and New York in the fiscal year 2015 
budget request.

             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, AIR NATIONAL GUARD

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $6,494,326,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     6,566,004,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,675,999,000
Change from budget request............................     +109,995,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,675,999,000 
for Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard. The total 
amount recommended in the bill will provide the following 
program in fiscal year 2014:



            OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS TRANSFER ACCOUNT

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................             - - -
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................        $5,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................             - - -
Change from budget request............................       -5,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Overseas 
Contingency Operations Transfer Account.

          UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE ARMED FORCES

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................       $13,516,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................        13,606,000
Committee recommendation..............................        13,606,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $13,606,000 
for the United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, ARMY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $335,921,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       298,815,000
Committee recommendation..............................       298,815,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $298,815,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Army.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, NAVY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $310,594,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       316,103,000
Committee recommendation..............................       316,103,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $316,103,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Navy.

                VIEQUES ISLAND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION

    The Navy is conducting environmental restoration at sites 
on Vieques Island associated with former Navy activities. 
Investigations for cleanup of the western part of the island 
have been planned and carried out with the collaboration and 
approval of the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board, the 
United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Fish and 
Wildlife Service, which currently operates the 400 acre site as 
part of the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge. In response to 
concerns expressed by the public, the Navy is conducting 
additional sampling and will develop additional alternatives 
for the final remedy, which will be included in an addendum to 
the Feasibility Study for remediation of the site. The 
Committee understands that the final remedy for the site will 
be selected by consensus amongst the Navy, the Puerto Rico 
Environmental Quality Board, the United States Environmental 
Protection Agency, and the Fish and Wildlife Service, and that 
it will support public access and use. The Committee is 
encouraged by these efforts and directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to inform the congressional defense committees on the 
progress of the site cleanup.

                  ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, AIR FORCE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $529,263,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       439,820,000
Committee recommendation..............................       439,820,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $439,820,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Air Force.

                ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, DEFENSE-WIDE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................       $11,133,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................        10,757,000
Committee recommendation..............................        10,757,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,757,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Defense-Wide.

         ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION, FORMERLY USED DEFENSE SITES

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $287,543,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       237,443,000
Committee recommendation..............................       262,443,000
Change from budget request............................      +25,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $262,443,000 
for Environmental Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites.

          ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS

    The Committee believes that improved oversight and 
management of the Department of Defense Environmental 
Restoration program will yield continued benefits. Included as 
part of the Defense Environmental Program's Annual Report to 
Congress, the Secretary of Defense is requested to provide the 
following information for all installations and properties 
receiving funding in the current fiscal year: the total site-
level cost-to-complete (CTC) for all restoration actions 
included in the report for the fiscal year prior to the year 
covered by the report; the total amount of environmental 
restoration funds obligated at the site-level during the fiscal 
year covered by the report; a breakdown of adjustments made to 
the CTC, including but not limited to price changes such as 
inflation factors, accounting adjustments for long-term 
cleanups, addition of new sites, projected cost growth, and 
other identified factors; the site-level CTC for all 
restoration actions included in the report for the fiscal year 
covered by the report; and the net reduction in CTC between the 
two fiscal years. If the CTC is not reduced by the 
corresponding amount of monetary investment, a justification 
shall be provided. In addition, at those installations in which 
the cost-to-complete has increased by ten percent or more from 
the previous fiscal year, the report shall provide a detailed 
justification and explanation for the cost increase. This 
should be considered an ongoing annual requirement.

             OVERSEAS HUMANITARIAN, DISASTER, AND CIVIC AID

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $108,759,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       109,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................       109,500,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $109,500,000 
for Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid.

                  COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION ACCOUNT

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $519,111,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       528,455,000
Committee recommendation..............................       528,455,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $528,455,000 
for the Cooperative Threat Reduction Account.

      DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT FUND

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................       $50,198,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       256,031,000
Committee recommendation..............................        51,031,000
Change from budget request............................     -205,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $51,031,000 
for the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
                               TITLE III

                              PROCUREMENT

                  ESTIMATES AND APPROPRIATIONS SUMMARY

    The fiscal year 2014 Department of Defense procurement 
budget request totals $99,106,242,000. The Committee 
recommendation provides $98,356,158,000 for the procurement 
accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:



                         SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional interest items for the purpose of the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must be 
carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount specifically 
addressed in the Committee report. These items remain special 
interest items whether or not they are repeated in a subsequent 
conference report.

            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to follow the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the fiscal year 2008 
Department of Defense Appropriations bill (House Report 110-
279). Specifically, the dollar threshold for reprogramming 
funds will remain at $20,000,000 for procurement and 
$10,000,000 for research, development, test and evaluation.
    The Secretary shall continue to follow the limitation that 
prior approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified 
dollar threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the base for reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                  REPROGRAMMING REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act as required in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in these tables shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, ARMY
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $6,028,754,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     5,024,387,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,236,653,000
Change from budget request............................     +212,266,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
tactical and utility airplanes and helicopters, including 
associated electronics, electronic warfare equipment for in-
service aircraft, ground support equipment, components and 
parts such as spare engines, transmission gear boxes, and 
sensor equipment. It also funds related training devices such 
as combat flight simulators and production base support.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



             UH-60 HELICOPTERS FOR THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

    The Committee is aware that the Army National Guard 
operates a fleet of 849 Black Hawk helicopters. Over half of 
these helicopters are older model, high time UH-60A variants. 
Under the proposed modernization plan for the total Army, the 
National Guard fleet will be older, less capable, and less 
reliable. At the end of fiscal year 2013, it is estimated that 
the National Guard Black Hawk fleet will be composed of 484 UH-
60A models, 289 UH-60L models with the older analog cockpit, 
and only 76 of the newest UH/HH-60M models. The UH-60A aircraft 
need to be modernized or replaced as quickly as possible for 
the Army National Guard Black Hawk fleet to remain viable and 
mission capable. The Committee understands that the Army is 
changing the prioritization and sequence of modernization of 
UH-60A Black Hawks to divest the active component of their last 
approximately 300 A-models faster and to delay modernization 
for the Army National Guard. The Committee recognizes the 
critical role Black Hawk helicopters serve in the Army National 
Guard for their war time and homeland security missions. The 
budget request includes $1,046,976,000 to purchase UH-60M 
helicopters. The Committee recommendation is $1,192,976,000, an 
increase of $146,000,000 above the budget request only for the 
purchase of Black Hawk UH-60M helicopters for the Army National 
Guard.

                 UH-72A LAKOTA LIGHT UTILITY HELICOPTER

    The budget request includes $96,227,000 for the procurement 
of ten Lakota Light Utility helicopters. The Army's helicopter 
program had called for 31 Lakota aircraft to be funded in 
fiscal year 2014. The program has consistently achieved cost, 
schedule, and performance goals. The concept for the Lakota 
program has worked as the Army had envisioned. The less 
expensive Lakota, purchased as a commercial aircraft and non-
deployable, has been assigned to utility missions that 
previously had been accomplished by a Black Hawk, thus freeing 
a Black Hawk for combat duty. The Army still has a Black Hawk 
shortfall and the concept to substitute Lakotas for Black Hawks 
in non-combat duty remains valid. The Committee recommendation 
includes $231,327,000 for the purchase of 31 UH-72A Lakota 
Light Utility helicopters, an increase of $135,100,000 above 
the budget request.

    ENHANCED MEDIUM ALTITUDE RECONNAISSANCE AND SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

    The budget request includes $142,050,000 to purchase four 
low rate initial production units of the Enhanced Medium 
Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System (EMARSS). The 
Committee is aware that fiscal year 2013 Research, Development, 
Test and Evaluation, Army funds were planned for the purchase 
of two developmental aircraft. The division of roles and 
missions for intelligence gathering capability based on the C-
12 type platform has shifted, and the Army will maintain 
intelligence gathering structure rather than the Air Force 
serving as the sole provider. The mission shift based on the 
revised vision for this mission area has resulted in a schedule 
slip of one year. Accordingly, the recommendation provides 
funding of $84,700,000 for EMARSS, a reduction of $57,350,000 
below the budget request.

                            MQ-1 GRAY EAGLE

    The budget request includes $518,460,000 for the 
procurement of MQ-1 Gray Eagles, which includes 15 unmanned 
aerial vehicles and ground equipment. The Committee has 
strongly supported Army control and operation of multi-mission 
unmanned aerial systems with capabilities for attack, 
communications relay, support for reconnaissance and 
surveillance, special operations support, deep fires support, 
and others. The Committee is aware that the MQ-1 Gray Eagle 
will align fielding of Universal Ground Control Stations and 
Satellite Ground Data Terminals with the fielding of Automatic 
Take-off and Landing Systems. The Committee recommends 
$506,976,000, a decrease of $11,484,000 below the budget 
request for Universal Ground Control Stations and Satellite 
Ground Data Terminals that are ahead of need.

                       MISSILE PROCUREMENT, ARMY
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,535,433,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,334,083,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,628,083,000
Change from budget request............................      +294,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
surface-to-air, surface-to-surface, air-to-surface, and anti-
tank/assault missile systems. Also included are major 
components, modifications, targets, test equipment, and 
production base support.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



        PROCUREMENT OF WEAPONS AND TRACKED COMBAT VEHICLES, ARMY
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,857,823,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,597,267,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,545,560,000
Change from budget request............................       -51,707,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
tanks; personnel and cargo carriers; fighting vehicles; tracked 
recovery vehicles; self-propelled and towed howitzers; machine 
guns; mortars; modification of in-service equipment, initial 
spares; and production base support.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



              PALADIN INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT (PALADIN PIM)

    The budget request includes $260,177,000 for the 
procurement of 18 sets of Paladin PIM self-propelled howitzers 
and self-propelled ammunition carriers. However, the Committee 
is aware that milestone C for Paladin PIM is likely to slip 
into fiscal year 2014. The Committee understands that the slip 
is due in part to delays in audit certification of certain 
major suppliers. The contract award currently scheduled for the 
fourth quarter of fiscal year 2013 will likely slip into fiscal 
year 2014, and funds totaling $161,000,000 would not be 
executed in fiscal year 2013. However, the Committee is aware 
of plans to use $97,000,000 of fiscal year 2013 procurement 
funds from the Paladin PIM program as a reprogramming source, 
reducing the amount that the program is expected to carry into 
fiscal year 2014. The Committee recommendation provides 
$217,177,000, a reduction of $43,000,000 below the budget 
request.

               M-88A2 HERCULES IMPROVED RECOVERY VEHICLE

    The budget request includes $111,031,000 for the 
procurement of 32 Improved Recovery Vehicles. The Committee is 
aware of the significant operational and safety advantages of 
the Hercules. The primary improvement is that the heavier and 
more powerful Hercules can tow an Abrams tank without the 
requirement for a brake vehicle. Additionally, the Hercules is 
faster and better armored. The Committee recommendation is 
$186,031,000, an increase of $75,000,000 above the budget 
request which will provide for the procurement of 21 additional 
Improved Recovery Vehicles.

                   INTEGRATED AIRBURST WEAPONS SYSTEM

    The budget request includes $69,147,000 to begin production 
and fielding of the Integrated Air Burst Weapons System Family. 
The weapon is designed to determine the range to the target and 
then fire a 25mm projectile which explodes as it passes above 
the enemy defilade position. However, the weapon system has 
experienced safety issues that will delay Milestone C for eight 
to ten months while the Army and the developer design, 
integrate, and test a solution. Milestone C will slip from the 
fourth quarter of fiscal year 2013 to the fourth quarter of 
fiscal year 2014. The Committee recommendation provides 
$10,000,000 for the program, a reduction of $59,147,000 below 
the budget request.

                                CARBINE

    The budget request includes $70,846,000 for carbines; 
$49,592,000 to purchase 29,897 new model Individual Carbines, 
and $21,254,000 to purchase 12,000 M4A1 carbines. The Committee 
is aware that the Full Rate Production Decision for the 
Individual Carbines program is scheduled for the fourth quarter 
of fiscal year 2014 and will likely slip into fiscal year 2015. 
The Committee recommends funding of $24,885,000 to purchase 
15,000 new Individual Carbines, a reduction of $24,707,000 and 
14,897 carbines below the budget request. The Committee 
supports the purchase of 12,000 M4A1 Carbines as requested.

                       M1 ABRAMS TANK PRODUCTION

    The Committee is aware of the uncertainty facing the M1 
Abrams tank program. Production of M1A2 SEP tanks for the Army 
is scheduled to be completed by December 2014. Beyond that 
date, the Army and the contractor will rely to a great degree 
on foreign military sales to help sustain operation of the tank 
assembly facility until such time as work on Engineering Change 
Proposal One begins. The Committee also understands that the 
results of the Army force structure review will be released in 
the summer of 2013 and may well have fewer requirements for 
heavy Army battalions and heavy brigade combat teams. A 
significant number of M1A2 SEP tanks may be reassigned to Army 
National Guard Units that are currently equipped with M1A1s. 
The request includes no funds for the production of M1A2 tanks; 
however the Committee will continue to monitor Army force 
structure changes and the resulting impact on the required 
number of M1A2 tanks.

                    PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, ARMY
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,641,306,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,540,437,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,465,937,000
Change from budget request............................       -74,500,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
ammunition, modification of in-service stock, and related 
production base support including the maintenance, expansion, 
and modernization of industrial facilities and equipment.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, ARMY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $5,741,664,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     6,465,218,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,467,751,000
Change from budget request............................        +2,533,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
tactical and commercial vehicles, including trucks, semi-
trailers, and trailers of all types to provide mobility and 
utility support to field forces and the worldwide logistical 
system; communications and electronic equipment of all types to 
provide fixed, semi-fixed, and mobile strategic and tactical 
communications; and other support equipment, generators and 
power units, material handling equipment, medical support 
equipment, special equipment for user testing, and non-system 
training devices. In each of these activities, funds are also 
included for the modification of in-service equipment, 
investment spares and repair parts, and production base 
support.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                JOINT TACTICAL RADIO SYSTEM COMPETITION

    The budget request includes $323,730,000 for the 
procurement of 3,123 Joint Tactical Radio System manpack units. 
The Committee agrees with the guidance from the Undersecretary 
of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics) directing 
the Army to conduct a full and open competition, open to non-
program of record vendors, during full-rate production of the 
manpack radio for the remaining inventory. The Committee 
strongly recommends that the Army drives cost savings and 
innovation by considering the full range of available contract 
vehicles at each option point, including the option of re-
competing the work.

                 SURGE CAPACITY FOR DOMESTIC BODY ARMOR

    After twelve years of building domestic capacity, the 
Committee is aware that the ability to surge production for 
domestic hard body armor manufacturing may be in jeopardy. This 
critical capacity should be retained to ensure the Department 
of Defense can rapidly respond to future body armor surge 
requirements, to include female body armor. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act on the current capabilities of domestic body armor 
manufacturers to meet future surge requirements, the war 
reserve objective inventory requirement for body armor, and the 
steps taken by the Department to ensure the availability of 
domestic hard armor manufacturers.

               NATIONAL GUARD HMMWV MODERNIZATION PROGRAM

    The budget request includes no funding for new HMMWVs for 
the Army National Guard. The Committee recommendation includes 
$100,000,000 for that purpose. The committee recognizes that 
the Army National Guard has consistently included new model 
HMMWVs among its top funding priorities. This funding will 
enable new model HMMWVs to be introduced quickly and 
efficiently into the fleet. The HMMWV will remain the backbone 
of the Army National Guard's tactical wheeled vehicle fleet. 
Recent natural disasters such as Hurricane Sandy highlight the 
need for reliable and capable utility vehicles to enable the 
Guard to mobilize rapidly to respond immediately to state and 
national needs.

                       AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, NAVY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $17,382,152,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    17,927,651,000
Committee recommendation..............................    17,092,784,000
Change from budget request............................      -834,867,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement of 
aircraft and related support equipment and programs; flight 
simulators; equipment to modify in-service aircraft to extend 
their service life, eliminate safety hazards and improve 
aircraft operational effectiveness; and spare parts and ground 
support equipment for all end items procured by this 
appropriation.
    The total amount recommended in this bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                     MH-60S AND MH-60R HELICOPTERS

    The Committee understands that the Navy has identified a 
number of airframe upgrades for the MH-60R and MH-60S that are 
not funded in the future years defense program. These upgrades 
could prove to be valuable investments in the future as 
capability is added, likely increasing the weight of the 
aircraft. These helicopters have been in the fleet since 2001 
and 2006, respectively, and are expected to remain in service 
as a critical Battle Group capability until at least 2030. 
Investing in keeping them current and relevant is important to 
future operational effectiveness and success. Therefore, the 
Secretary of the Navy is directed to develop a plan to keep 
these assets current and relevant for their expected lifetimes 
and to submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
that outlines this plan not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this Act.

            MARINE CORPS UNMANNED AIRBORNE ELECTRONIC ATTACK

    The Committee is very encouraged by the addition of EA-18G 
Growler aircraft to the budget request for fiscal year 2014. 
Airborne electronic attack remains a high density/low demand 
asset in the Department of Defense and the Navy and Marine 
Corps are the sole providers of this capability using both the 
EA-6B Prowler and the EA-18G Growler aircraft.
    While the Navy will completely transition to the Growler 
aircraft, the Marine Corps will continue flying the Prowler 
aircraft until these aircraft are retired later this decade. 
The Committee is concerned about the follow-on airborne 
electronic attack capability of the Marine Corps after the 
Prowler aircraft are retired. With the rise in capability of 
unmanned aerial vehicles, the Committee believes these 
versatile platforms can be used for this critical mission. The 
Secretary of the Navy is directed to study the use of unmanned 
systems for organic airborne electronic attack to augment the 
Marine Corps current airborne electronic attack and electronic 
exploitation mission in whole or in part. This study should 
address such items as benefits, drawbacks, acquisition costs, 
estimated operating costs, limitations, crew safety, and 
mission effectiveness of unmanned systems compared to manned 
systems. The Secretary of the Navy is directed to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act on the findings of this 
study.

                       WEAPONS PROCUREMENT, NAVY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $3,036,871,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     3,122,193,000
Committee recommendation..............................     3,017,646,000
Change from budget request............................      -104,547,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement of 
strategic and tactical missiles, target drones, torpedoes, 
guns, associated support equipment, and modification of in-
service missiles, torpedoes, and guns.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



            PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $659,897,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       589,267,000
Committee recommendation..............................       544,116,000
Change from budget request............................       -45,151,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
ammunition, ammunition modernization, and ammunition-related 
material for the Navy and Marine Corps.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                   SHIPBUILDING AND CONVERSION, NAVY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $15,584,212,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    14,077,804,000
Committee recommendation..............................    15,000,704,000
Change from budget request............................      +922,900,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the construction of 
new ships and the purchase and conversion of existing ships, 
including hull, mechanical and electrical equipment, 
electronics, guns, torpedo and missile launching systems, and 
communication systems.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                              SHIPBUILDING

    Despite assurances from the Navy that the shipbuilding 
account is as healthy as it has ever been, the Committee 
remains skeptical. The Navy's new stated required fleet size is 
306 ships, down from the long stated but never achieved fleet 
size of 313 ships. The annual 30 year shipbuilding report 
provided by the Navy shows that the fleet will reach the 
required fleet size of 306 ships in the year 2037, a full 
quarter century from now. The Secretary of the Navy testified 
that the fleet size will reach the 300 ship mark by the end of 
the decade. While this is encouraging, the Committee is 
concerned the fleet size remains at 300 ships for a single 
year, then drops back under 300 until 2024. In fact, of the 30 
years that comprise the plan, the fleet size is under 300 ships 
for 16 of these years. The fleet size is at the required 306 
ships or above for only the final seven years (2037 to 2043) 
that are displayed in the report. The Committee believes a 
truly healthy shipbuilding program should reach and sustain the 
required fleet size sooner than the Navy is projecting.
    Additionally, the Navy requested authority to incrementally 
fund a Virginia Class Submarine in fiscal year 2014. The 
Congress has authorized and appropriated funding for 18 fully 
funded Virginia Class Submarines in the years prior to fiscal 
year 2014. The Committee does not understand why funding 
requested for this particular submarine requires violating the 
Department of Defense's long standing full funding policy. The 
Committee is puzzled by Navy claims of billions of dollars in 
savings for the taxpayers as it is the Committee's 
understanding that these savings come from the fact that the 
program is conducting a multi-year procurement of ten 
submarines and not from the fact that one of the submarines is 
incrementally funded. Quality budget discipline, not funding 
gimmicks, is called for more than ever in these times of 
decreasing budgets and budget uncertainty.
    Contributing to the poor health of the shipbuilding program 
is sequestration. As a direct result of sequestration, a 
minimum of seven destroyers and submarines from fiscal year 
2013 and prior years are no longer fully funded. The cost to 
make the funding for these ships whole is just over 
$1,000,000,000. This funding will be required in the outyears 
to complete the construction of these ships. When this funding 
is added to the funding required to complete the incrementally 
funded submarine, the cost to complete these ships is in excess 
of $2,000,000,000. This represents funding that will not be 
available to purchase new equipment or increase readiness in 
future years, because it will have to pay the debt incurred by 
the Navy in years past. While sequestration is in statute, the 
Committee is extremely concerned about the Navy willfully 
adding to its outyear liabilities by incrementally funding a 
submarine. Therefore, the recommendation provides an additional 
$950,000,000 to the Virginia Class Submarine program to fully 
fund the program. Additionally, the Secretary of the Navy is 
directed to utilize the fiscal year 2015 funding currently 
reserved for the completion of the submarine to fully fund the 
ships and programs that were impacted by the sequestration 
reductions.

                        JOINT HIGH SPEED VESSEL

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to 
continue to explore missions and projects that leverage the 
flexibility of the Joint High Speed Vessel and explore the 
extension of the current mission envelope beyond in-theater 
transport, to include such capabilities as unmanned aerial 
systems and air surveillance.

                         SHIP DECOMMISSIONINGS

    The Committee is extremely disappointed in the Navy's 
inaction with respect to the seven cruisers and two amphibious 
ships that were proposed for decommissioning in the fiscal year 
2013 budget. Despite very clear direction from all four 
congressional defense committees to keep these ships in the 
fleet, the Navy has taken no steps that would indicate it is 
moving toward keeping the ships for the long term. The ships 
have significant life remaining and are less expensive to keep 
when compared to procuring new ships with similar capabilities. 
Last year the Congress provided sufficient funding for the 
operation and modernization of these ships through the end of 
fiscal year 2014 and that funding has gone largely untouched, 
indicating an unwillingness to commit to keep these ships in 
the fleet. The Committee fails to understand why the Navy would 
choose to decommission these ships when it is having such a 
difficult time maintaining the required fleet size through new 
procurements.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation rescinds all 
modernization funding from the fiscal year 2013 Ship 
Modernization, Operations, and Sustainment Fund and re-
appropriates the funding in the Other Procurement, Navy, 
Weapons Procurement, Navy, and Research, Development, Test and 
Evaluation, Navy accounts. The Secretary of the Navy is 
directed to use this funding for the purpose of modernization 
of these seven cruisers and two amphibious ships and to retain 
them in the fleet.

                        OTHER PROCUREMENT, NAVY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $5,955,078,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     6,310,257,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,824,824,000
Change from budget request............................      +514,567,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement of 
major equipment and weapons other than ships, aircraft, 
missiles, and torpedoes. Such equipment ranges from the latest 
electronic sensors for updates of naval forces, to trucks, 
training equipment, and spare parts.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                       PROCUREMENT, MARINE CORPS

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,411,411,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,343,511,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,271,311,000
Change from budget request............................       -72,200,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement, 
production, and modification of equipment, supplies, materials, 
and spare parts.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                    HIGH MOBILITY ENGINEER EXCAVATOR

    The Committee recognizes the continued need for the Marine 
Corps to field engineering equipment for specific missions. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy 
to consider procuring the High Mobility Engineer Excavator, 
currently being used by the Army, to fulfill future engineering 
requirements for the Marine Corps.

               HIGH MOBILITY MULTIPURPOSE WHEELED VEHICLE

    The Committee recommendation includes a reduction of 
$34,980,000 for the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle 
Sustainment Modification Initiative. The Committee recognizes 
the importance of this program and fully supports modifying and 
maintaining these vehicles. However, given changes to the 
acquisition strategy, the Committee understands that the fiscal 
year 2014 funds would not be obligated until the planned fiscal 
year 2015 low rate initial production contract award. 
Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes a reduction of 
the fiscal year 2014 funding because it is ahead of need.

                    AIRCRAFT PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $11,774,019,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    11,398,901,000
Committee recommendation..............................    10,860,606,000
Change from budget request............................      -538,295,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement of 
aircraft, and for modification of in-service aircraft to 
improve safety and enhance operational effectiveness. It also 
provides for initial spares and other support equipment to 
include aerospace ground equipment and industrial facilities. 
In addition, funds are provided for the procurement of flight 
training simulators to increase combat readiness and to provide 
for more economical training.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                              MQ-9 REAPER

    The Committee is deeply concerned by the Air Force's course 
of action on MQ-9 Reaper production in the fiscal year 2014 
budget request. Having previously cut MQ-9 production from an 
annual rate of 48 to 24 in the fiscal year 2013 budget request, 
the Air Force again proposes to reduce the rate to 12 in fiscal 
year 2014, which is below the minimum sustaining rate. The Air 
Force took this action despite no change in the MQ-9 fleet 
requirement. The Air Force's proposal instead relies on an 
additional 12 MQ-9 aircraft authorized and appropriated in 
fiscal year 2013 to backfill its fiscal year 2014 request. This 
decision represents complete and brazen contradiction of 
congressional intent, which was to reduce the MQ-9 production 
rate in a more orderly and less disruptive manner from 48 in 
fiscal year 2012 to 36 in fiscal year 2013 and finally to a 
stable rate of 24 from fiscal year 2014 onward to completion.
    The Committee recommends the addition of eight MQ-9 
aircraft to the fiscal year 2014 request with the understanding 
that non-Department of Defense purchases will help sustain the 
production line. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to procure MQ-9 aircraft funded in fiscal years 2013 and 
2014 at the annual rate authorized and appropriated by the 
Congress.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees with the fiscal year 2015 budget request providing a 
detailed, location-by-location schedule for the basing of MQ-9 
Reapers including, where appropriate, the replacement and 
planned disposition of MQ-1 Predator aircraft to be replaced by 
the MQ-9. The report shall also include the criteria by which 
the Air Force determines the order of priority for MQ-9 beddown 
locations and the impact that MQ-1/MQ-9 transition will have on 
existing MQ-1 flying training units.

                   B-52 INTERNAL WEAPONS BAY UPGRADE

    The fiscal year 2014 budget request includes $5,120,000 for 
the first low rate initial production lot of six units for the 
B-52 Internal Weapons Bay Upgrade (IWBU) project. The IWBU will 
provide internal and expanded carrying capacity for such weapon 
systems as Joint Direct Attack Munitions, the Joint Air-to-
Surface Standoff Missile, and the Miniature Air Launched Decoy, 
thereby increasing the B-52's capability to conduct 
conventional strike and close air support missions. The IWBU 
effort recently underwent restructuring due to cost increases, 
and the Air Force now proposes to deliver IWBU capability in 
separate phases and increments. The Air Force's budget request 
and future years defense plan fail to include necessary funding 
for the procurement effort beyond fiscal year 2014 and 
pursuantly fails to include necessary information related to 
the program, such as the total number of units to be procured, 
the projected cost of these units, the exact phasing of 
quantities and funding, the phasing of capability to be 
delivered, and the year of completion--information that is 
required by Department of Defense Financial Management 
Regulations and necessary for congressional budget review. The 
Committee is supportive of the IWBU effort but defers funding 
of the first low rate initial production lot and directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to include a properly scheduled, 
funded, phased, and justified program in its fiscal year 2015 
budget request.

                     MISSILE PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $4,962,376,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     5,343,286,000
Committee recommendation..............................     5,267,119,000
Change from budget request............................       -76,167,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement, 
installation, and checkout of strategic ballistic and other 
missiles, modification of in-service missiles, and initial 
spares for missile systems. It also provides for operational 
space systems, boosters, payloads, drones, associated ground 
equipment, non-recurring maintenance of industrial facilities, 
machine tool modernization, and special program support.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



         EVOLVED EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE SERVICES ACQUISITION

    The Committee understands that the Air Force is 
implementing a revised Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) 
acquisition strategy for launch services and that the Defense 
Acquisition Executive has approved an award of up to 14 launch 
vehicle booster cores over three years through competition if a 
new entrant becomes certified. The Committee strongly supports 
fair competition as a means of obtaining a reliable, quality 
product in a cost-effective way. The Committee notes that 
Congress has invested significant resources into satellites 
that are critical to national security interests; therefore, 
the Committee must have confidence in the proper procurement of 
launch services.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act, which 
addresses the following issues: (1) how the Air Force will 
evaluate performance and reliability of the entrants, including 
statistical means of predicting performance; (2) if other 
contracts with the federal government directly related to 
launch, such as EELV launch capability or space station 
services contracts, will be considered in regard to cost or 
past performance, and, if so, how the cost of such contracts 
will be mitigated and accounted for in the procurement process; 
(3) if all entrants will be required to operate under the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation requirements, including 
compliance with accounting standards; and (4) the means by 
which the Air Force will assure openness and transparency in 
the process.

                  PROCUREMENT OF AMMUNITION, AIR FORCE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $594,694,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       759,442,000
Committee recommendation..............................       743,442,000
Change from budget request............................       -16,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the acquisition of 
ammunition, modifications, spares, weapons, and other 
ammunition-related items for the Air Force.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                      OTHER PROCUREMENT, AIR FORCE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $17,082,508,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    16,760,581,000
Committee recommendation..............................    16,791,497,000
Change from budget request............................       +30,916,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement of 
weapon systems and equipment other than aircraft and missiles. 
Included are vehicles, electronic and telecommunications 
systems for command and control of operational forces, and 
ground support equipment for weapon systems and supporting 
structure.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                     MQ-1/9 REMOTE SPLIT OPERATIONS

    As a result of Air Force force structure actions, six Air 
National Guard locations will transition to MQ-1/9 remote split 
operations by fiscal year 2020. To ensure that these locations 
are properly equipped for a timely and orderly transition to 
this new mission, the Committee recommendation includes an 
additional $50,000,000 for the procurement of equipment 
associated with this mission. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit an execution plan for 
these additional funds not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this Act.

                       PROCUREMENT, DEFENSE-WIDE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $4,878,985,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     4,534,083,000
Committee recommendation..............................     4,522,990,000
Change from budget request............................       -11,093,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the procurement, 
production, and modification of equipment, supplies, materials, 
and spare parts.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:



                    DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT PURCHASES

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $223,531,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................        25,135,000
Committee recommendation..............................        75,135,000
Change from budget request............................       +50,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommendation shall be distributed as 
follows:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                      Budget     Committee     request
                                     request    recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEXT GENERATION STAR TRACKER             4,180        4,180        - - -
 SYSTEM..........................
READ OUT INTEGRATED CIRCUIT              2,200        2,200        - - -
 FOUNDRY IMPROVEMENT AND
 SUSTAINABILITY..................
SPACE QUALIFIED SOLAR CELL SUPPLY          920          920        - - -
 CHAIN...........................
CRITICAL SPACE INDUSTRIAL BASE           7,200        7,200        - - -
 INVESTMENT......................
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL MATERIALS....        5,209        5,209        - - -
ELECTRONIC MATERIALS AND DEVICE          5,426        5,426        - - -
 PRODUCTION......................
PROGRAM INCREASE.................                    50,000       50,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------
        TOTAL, DEFENSE PRODUCTION       25,135       75,135       50,000
         ACT.....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                TITLE IV

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The fiscal year 2014 Department of Defense research, 
development, test and evaluation budget request totals 
$67,520,236,000. The Committee recommendation provides 
$66,409,530,000 for the research, development, test and 
evaluation accounts. The table below summarizes the Committee 
recommendations:



                         SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS

    Items for which additional funds have been provided as 
shown in the project level tables or in paragraphs using the 
phrase ``only for'' or ``only to'' in this report are 
congressional interest items for the purpose of the Base for 
Reprogramming (DD Form 1414). Each of these items must be 
carried on the DD Form 1414 at the stated amount specifically 
addressed in the committee report. These items remain special 
interest items whether or not they are repeated in a subsequent 
conference report.

            REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR ACQUISITION ACCOUNTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to follow the reprogramming guidance as specified in the report 
accompanying the House version of the fiscal year 2008 
Department of Defense Appropriations bill (House Report 110-
279). Specifically, the dollar threshold for reprogramming 
funds will remain at $20,000,000 for procurement and 
$10,000,000 for research, development, test and evaluation.
    The Secretary shall continue to follow the limitation that 
prior approval reprogrammings are set at either the specified 
dollar threshold or 20 percent of the procurement or research, 
development, test and evaluation line, whichever is less. These 
thresholds are cumulative from the base for reprogramming value 
as modified by any adjustments. Therefore, if the combined 
value of transfers into or out of a procurement (P-1) or 
research, development, test and evaluation (R-1) line exceeds 
the identified threshold, the Secretary of Defense must submit 
a prior approval reprogramming to the congressional defense 
committees. In addition, guidelines on the application of prior 
approval reprogramming procedures for congressional special 
interest items are established elsewhere in this report.

                  REPROGRAMMING REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to continue to provide the congressional defense 
committees quarterly, spreadsheet-based DD Form 1416 reports 
for Service and defense-wide accounts in titles III and IV of 
this Act as required in the explanatory statement accompanying 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006.

                           FUNDING INCREASES

    The Committee directs that the funding increases outlined 
in these tables shall be provided only for the specific 
purposes indicated in the tables.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    Adjustments to the classified programs are addressed in a 
classified annex accompanying this report.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, ARMY
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $8,676,627,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     7,989,102,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,961,486,000
Change from budget request............................      -27,616,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the research, 
development, test and evaluation activities of the Department 
of the Army. The total amount recommended in the bill will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2014:



           MUNITIONS STANDARDIZATION EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY

    The budget request includes $53,340,000 in the Munitions 
Standardization Effectiveness and Safety line. The Committee 
recommendation fully funds the request. The Committee is aware 
that multiple programs and projects are funded in this program 
element, including research and development of energetics 
technologies. The Committee recognizes the benefits of these 
technologies to the warfighter by creating munitions with 
greater performance and precision while also reducing adverse 
environmental impacts. The Committee commends the Army for its 
continuing work in energetics technology and strongly 
encourages that funding available in this line be allocated for 
research in energetics technologies.

                    WEAPONS AND MUNITIONS TECHNOLOGY

    The budget request includes $37,798,000 for the Weapons and 
Munitions Technology line. The Committee recommendation 
includes $52,798,000, an increase of $15,000,000 above the 
budget request. Under this program element, the Army invests in 
future technologies while seeking to spiral new technologies to 
warfighters, including light armament, multi-purpose munitions, 
specialty explosives and warheads, insensitive munitions, fire 
control sensors, and seekers for enemy neutralization. The 
Committee notes that the program funding will support a 
dedicated effort to mature and update prototypes and deliver 
armament and munitions technologies that will enhance lethality 
and survivability, as well as expanded manufacturing 
technologies for explosives and dual-use.

               WEAPONS AND MUNITIONS ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY

    The budget request includes $63,919,000 for the Weapons and 
Munitions Advanced Technology line. The Committee 
recommendation provides $73,919,000, an increase of $10,000,000 
above the budget request, to support the demonstration of 
advanced lethal and non-lethal weapons and munitions 
technologies to increase battlefield lethality and security. 
The program supports the maturation and demonstration of 
enabling components and subsystems which provide scalable 
lethal and non-lethal effects, key subsystems that enable an 
electromagnetic gun weapons system demonstrator, and a tactical 
high energy laser weapons system demonstrator.

                WARFIGHTER INFORMATION NETWORK--TACTICAL

    The budget request includes $272,384,000 for the continued 
development of Increment 3 of the Warfighter Information 
Network--Tactical (WIN--T). The Committee recommendation is 
$235,384,000, a decrease of $37,000,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee recommendation will support the 
Increment 3 effort and maintain the necessary pace in the 
overall WIN-T program.

                      MALARIA VACCINE DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recognizes the importance of finding a 
vaccine for preventing malaria and commends the Secretary of 
the Army for continuing to fund this significant research. A 
malaria vaccine will reduce or eliminate the need for anti-
malarial drugs and will protect warfighters in austere, 
malaria-prone environments. Therefore, the Committee fully 
funds the request for $9,600,000 for vaccines for the 
prevention of malaria.

                  SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER

    The Committee supports the funding included in the budget 
request for the Systems Engineering Research Center, a national 
resource that is a university affiliated research center. It is 
comprised of 23 collaborating universities, and provides a 
broad base of talent to conduct vital systems research. By 
doing so, it helps enhance the Department of Defense's 
capability for the successful development, integration, 
testing, and sustainability of completed defense systems, 
services, and enterprises.

            RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, NAVY

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $16,963,398,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    15,974,780,000
Committee recommendation..............................    15,368,352,000
Change from budget request............................     -606,428,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the research, 
development, test and evaluation activities of the Department 
of the Navy, which includes the Marine Corps. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



                        OCEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee commends the Navy for its efforts in 
developing ocean energy technologies as defined in the Energy 
Independence and Security Act of 2007. These efforts will 
ultimately result in reducing the cost of energy and increasing 
energy security at Department of Defense facilities. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to coordinate 
its development efforts with the Department of Energy and 
designated National Marine Renewable Energy Centers for ocean 
renewable energy demonstration activities at or near Department 
of Defense facilities.

                      HIGHLY INTEGRATED PHOTONICS

    The Committee is encouraged by the Navy's development of 
photonic technology to transmit and process information in 
wired and chip-level electronic components. Photonics can 
dramatically reduce platform size, weight, power requirements, 
and sustainment costs. This technology can also be used 
throughout the Department of Defense in various platforms. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to continue the 
development of this technology and looks forward to the 
incorporation of photonics in an operational platform.

                       AUTOMATED TEST AND RE-TEST

    The Automated Test and Re-test (ATRT) project continues to 
achieve results. The reduced labor requirements and cost 
savings for programs that have utilized the tool are 
impressive. The Committee is concerned by reports that the Navy 
may not yet be fully supportive of the effort, may reduce the 
funding applied to the project in execution as well as in 
future budget years, and does not seem to have a plan to take 
full advantage of this tool. Therefore, the Secretary of the 
Navy is directed to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees outlining the plan for the full 
implementation of ATRT. This report should include a funding 
plan and timeline for the continued development and technology 
transition of ATRT. This report shall be submitted not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act.

                          BONE MARROW REGISTRY

    The Committee recommendation includes $31,500,000 for the 
Department of the Navy to be administered by the Bone Marrow 
Registry, also known as and referred to within the Naval 
Medical Research Center as the C.W. Bill Young Marrow Donor 
Recruitment and Research Program. Funds appropriated for the 
Bone Marrow Registry shall remain available only for the 
purposes for which they are appropriated, and may only be 
obligated for the Bone Marrow Registry. This Department of 
Defense donor center has recruited more than 750,000 Department 
of Defense volunteers, and provides more marrow donors per week 
than any other donor center in the Nation. More than 5,600 
servicemembers and other Department volunteers from this donor 
center have provided marrow to save the lives of patients. The 
success of this national and international life-saving program 
for military and civilian patients, which now includes more 
than 11,000,000 potential volunteer donors, is admirable. 
Further, the agencies involved in contingency planning are 
encouraged to continue to include the Bone Marrow Registry in 
the development and testing of their contingency plans. The 
Department of Defense form (DD Form 1414) shall show this as a 
congressional interest item. The Department is further directed 
to release all the funds appropriated for this purpose to the 
Bone Marrow Registry not later than 60 days after the enactment 
of this Act.

                           SHIPBOARD LIGHTING

    The Committee is aware that the Navy is extremely active in 
energy initiatives to reduce the acquisition and operating cost 
of the fleet. With light emitting diode (LED) lighting 
technology rapidly advancing, the replacement of existing 
fluorescent shipboard lighting with LED lights would seem to be 
an idea well suited for the Navy to explore as an energy 
initiative. The Committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to 
study the concept of converting shipboard lighting to LED 
lights.

                      COASTAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH

    The Committee understands the importance of the littoral 
region to the Navy. The Committee believes that additional 
research regarding the characteristics of the magnetic and 
electric fields in the coastal ocean regions and the 
development of predictive techniques to distinguish ships and 
submarines from naturally occurring background ocean features 
would pay dividends as the Navy shifts operations to the 
littoral regions. Therefore, the Committee urges the Secretary 
of the Navy to conduct additional research in this critical 
area.

         RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, AIR FORCE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $25,432,738,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    25,702,946,000
Committee recommendation..............................    24,947,354,000
Change from budget request............................     -755,592,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the research, 
development, test and evaluation activities of the Department 
of the Air Force. The total amount recommended in the bill will 
provide the following program in fiscal year 2014:



                          GLOBAL HAWK BLOCK 30

    The Committee continues to support retention of the Global 
Hawk Block 30 fleet and includes language in the Act directing 
the Air Force to execute funds previously appropriated for the 
procurement of three additional Block 30 aircraft, sensors 
(including the Enhanced Integrated Sensor Suite and Airborne 
Signals Intelligence Payload), and accompanying equipment and 
services. The Air Force recently reported to the Committee that 
the adoption of U-2 sensors to Block 30 aircraft is feasible 
and less costly than improvement of Block 30 sensors to the 
level of ``parity'' with the U-2. The Committee recommendation 
includes $50,000,000 only for the integration, test, and 
demonstration of U-2 imagery sensors on a Block 30 aircraft. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit 
an execution plan for these additional funds to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act.

                          JSTARS TEST AIRCRAFT

    The Committee is concerned by the Air Force's proposal in 
the budget request to place the Joint Surveillance Target 
Attack Radar System (JSTARS) T-3 test aircraft in preservation 
storage. The Committee is concerned by the impact that this 
proposal will have on current integration and test efforts, 
especially those required by the National Guard. The Committee 
therefore recommends an additional $10,000,000 to continue 
normal operations of the JSTARS test aircraft.

                     HARD TARGET NEW START EFFORTS

    The budget request includes $14,000,000 for two new starts 
related to hard targets, including $2,500,000 for the 5,000-
pound Joint Direct Attack Munitions (5K JDAM) demonstration 
under the JDAM program and $11,500,000 for the advanced 2,000-
pound penetrator (A2K) demonstration under Armament/Ordnance 
Development. The Committee notes that an analysis of 
alternatives (AoA) on hard target munitions is underway and is 
scheduled to complete in the first quarter of fiscal year 2014. 
The Committee recommendation includes full funding for these 
new start efforts but directs that no funds shall be obligated 
or expended for 5K JDAM or A2K until 15 days after the 
Secretary of the Air Force reports to the congressional defense 
committees on the results of the approved hard target munitions 
AoA and describes how these new start efforts are consistent 
with those results.

       AIRBORNE SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR/MOVING TARGET INDICATOR

    The Committee is concerned by the lack of funding in the 
budget request for efforts to further the airborne synthetic 
aperture radar/moving target indicator (SAR/MTI) mission, 
despite the completion of the airborne SAR/MTI and Joint STARS 
mission area analysis of alternatives (AoA) in June 2012. The 
Committee urges the Secretary of the Air Force to include all 
necessary funding required to initiate any acquisition effort 
pursuant to a material development decision for airborne SAR/
MTI systems in its fiscal year 2015 budget request. The 
Committee also notes that $10,000,000 was provided in the 
Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013, 
to initiate any such effort, and directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to notify the congressional defense committees not 
later than September 30, 2013 of its intentions regarding the 
use of these funds.

                     F-22 OPEN SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE

    The Committee is supportive of recent efforts by the Air 
Force to pursue an open system architecture for F-22 mission 
systems, which will allow the introduction of greater 
competition in the acquisition of existing and future upgrades 
to the only existing operational fifth-generation fighter 
aircraft possessed by the U.S. Armed Forces. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Air Force to increase its 
exploitation of this open systems architecture and to subject a 
greater number of modernization and modification efforts to 
competitive procurement.

                                 KC-46A

    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
continue to submit quarterly reports on any KC-46A contract 
modifications with a cost greater than or equal to $5,000,000, 
as directed by the explanatory statement accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012.

     CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR SURVIVABILITY

    The Committee continues to direct the Secretary of the Air 
Force to make high priority investments in technologies and 
systems that will ensure the safety of pilots in environments 
contaminated by chemical or biological agents as well as the 
timely decontamination of aircraft and equipment that may be 
affected by exposure to such environments, and to ensure that 
funding for such investments is adequately phased to support 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) 
survivability for all systems designated as CBRN mission 
critical.

                     STRATEGIC AND CRITICAL METALS

    The Committee recognizes the importance of strategic and 
critical metals such as aluminum, beryllium, nickel-based 
superalloys, and titanium. As these metals are used in 
aircraft, jet engines, and other critical weapon systems and 
defense products, the Committee emphasizes the important role 
that the availability and cost-efficiency of these metals play 
in the affordability of weapon systems. The public-private 
partnership between the Air Force Research Laboratory and the 
Metals Affordability Initiative Consortium aims to reduce the 
cost of these metals and the time needed to incorporate such 
metals into systems. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Air Force and the Secretary of Defense to pursue both 
cooperative and competitive efforts to solve challenges related 
to affordability and implementation.

                            AIRCRAFT WINDOWS

    As an alternative to replacing polycarbonate and acrylic 
windows on fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, the Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to explore and utilize new 
technologies, where appropriate, that can improve aircrew and 
passenger survivability while reducing operating costs.

                     LASER-DRIVEN X-RAY TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee continues to place a high priority on 
research that addresses the threats of nuclear proliferation 
and nuclear terrorism, as well as research that addresses 
efficient and cost-effective maintenance of heavy equipment and 
personnel safety. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to conduct research in new, laser-driven x-ray 
technologies with a proven capability to detect nuclear weapons 
and investigate heavy equipment to identify potential equipment 
failures before they happen.

         NATIONAL SECURITY SPACE PROGRAM PLANNING AND EXECUTION

    The Committee continues to monitor the debate within the 
National Security Space community over how to most cost 
effectively design and manage space programs. The Committee is 
concerned that affinity for certain architecture concepts may 
be affecting program execution and putting at risk operations 
of some of the Nation's most important and critical national 
security space capabilities. To help inform the debate and 
assist in putting the nation's space programs on a sustainable 
plan for the future, the Director of Cost Assessment and 
Program Evaluation is directed to update the space industrial 
base study to quantitatively assess the consequences of the 
various acquisition approaches being advocated within the space 
community. The approaches reviewed should include, but not be 
limited to, new architectures of small satellites, evolution of 
legacy systems, and leveraging of commercial systems. The 
report should address the complete system, including the space 
segment, ground segment, and user terminals such that a 
complete cost to implement is understood. The results shall be 
provided to the congressional defense committees not later than 
December 31, 2013.

                     SPACE MODERNIZATION INITIATIVE

    The Committee is concerned by the inability of the Air 
Force to define its Space Modernization Initiative (SMI), 
despite many questions by the Committee. Key to the discussion 
is the relevance of SMI-funded projects to the programs of 
record within which they are funded and the ability of those 
projects to have a significant and cost-effective contribution 
to those programs. The Committee directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 90 days after the enactment of this 
Act, which provides a definition of space modernization 
initiative (or initiatives, if it differs by program). The 
report should describe how projects or concepts are proposed; 
explain how concepts are evaluated for funding, including 
relevance to the program of record and if certain project types 
would be excluded from SMI; define who is responsible for 
decisions, if there is a review board, and if current industry 
participants or other stakeholders outside the Air Force are 
involved in proposing or evaluating concepts; and define how 
effectiveness will be evaluated, both of individual projects 
and of SMI as a whole.

            SPACE BASED INFRARED SYSTEM GROUND ENHANCEMENTS

    In fiscal year 2013, the Air Force was provided $40,000,000 
for acceleration of the Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) 
ground segment automated sensor tasking and an additional 
$40,000,000 for ground enhancements. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide an update to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 60 days after 
the enactment of this Act regarding the progress of these SBIRS 
elements, the status of the funds, and the schedule adjustment 
for automated sensor tasking that resulted from the funding.

                       HUMAN PERFORMANCE SENSING

    The Committee recognizes and supports the Air Force 
Research Laboratory's (AFRL) research into human performance 
sensing, which is a key element of human-machine interface 
technology. Advances in nano-biomaterial technology hold the 
potential to greatly increase human performance sensing 
capability, thereby improving mission performance and personnel 
safety. The Committee encourages the AFRL to continue its 
research into the manufacture of nano-biomaterial sensors 
capable of detecting biomarkers and other substances which 
correlate to conditions such as stress, fatigue, and organ 
damage.

        RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE-WIDE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $18,631,946,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    17,667,108,000
Committee recommendation..............................    17,885,538,000
Change from budget request............................     +218,430,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the research, 
development, test and evaluation activities of the Department 
of Defense for defense-wide activities. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:



   HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES AND MINORITY-SERVING 
                              INSTITUTIONS

    The Committee is encouraged that the Department of Defense 
is firmly committed to vigorous efforts with respect to 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority-
Serving Institutions (HBCU/MI). The Committee is aware that the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Research and Engineering) 
issued guidance on December 2, 2011 calling for the 
reinvigoration of the relationship between the Department of 
Defense and the HBCU/MIs.
    Further, the Committee is concerned about the long-term 
development of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and 
Mathematics (STEM) workforce pipeline for underrepresented 
minorities, and notes the National Academy of Sciences' 
recommendation that the federal government increase funding for 
undergraduate and graduate STEM programs focused on increasing 
the participation and success of minority students through 
engaged mentoring, enriching research experiences, and 
opportunities to publish, present, and network. Consistent with 
the report of the National Academy of Sciences ``Expanding 
Underrepresented Minority Participation: America's Science and 
Technology Talent at the Crossroads,'' the Committee encourages 
the Department to emphasize STEM education improvement within 
the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority 
Institutions program. Accordingly, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to consider these factors when awarding 
competitive funding under this program, as well as ensuring 
that selected programs have a sufficiently large cohort of 
students to allow for effective peer-to-peer mentoring, which 
has proven to be an effective model for ensuring the success of 
underrepresented minority students in the sciences.

                   CONVENTIONAL PROMPT GLOBAL STRIKE

    The Committee recognizes the significance of having a 
Prompt Global Strike capability, and is aware of the successful 
test of the Army's Advanced Hypersonic Weapon conducted on 
November 17, 2011. Further, the Committee is aware that the 
planned use of over $200,000,000 of fiscal year 2013 funding is 
sufficient to conduct an additional test of the Conventional 
Prompt Global Strike capability. While the Committee 
understands the desire to have a possible sea-launched option, 
the Committee is also aware of the growing possibility of near-
term threats. Therefore, the Committee encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to follow through on its stated intent regarding the 
fiscal year 2013 funding by expeditiously scheduling follow-on 
plans for a second flight test of the Army's Advanced 
Hypersonic Weapon.

                           CORROSION CONTROL

    The Committee is encouraged by Department of Defense 
efforts to advance innovative, joint Service approaches to 
corrosion prevention and corrosion control, but remains 
concerned by the continued costs and impact of corrosion on 
military equipment and infrastructure. The Committee believes 
the use of a comprehensive, online repository consisting of 
advanced corrosion technical data, industry findings, and 
professional corrosion studies would strengthen existing 
Department of Defense corrosion efforts, prevent unnecessary 
and duplicative single Service research pursuits, and generate 
significant cost savings across the military Services. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages the Director of the Office 
of Corrosion Policy and Oversight to develop a comprehensive, 
online corrosion analysis database, in collaboration with 
leading professional societies with expertise in the effects of 
corrosion, to support the Department's Corrosion Prevention and 
Control Program.

                            SPECIALTY METALS

    The Committee applauds the Department of Defense for its 
March 2013 Final Rule to revise the definition of ``produce'' 
as it applies to specialty metals. This rule helps maintain a 
strong domestic armor steel plate industry and strengthens the 
defense industrial base, as well as the overall economic 
strength of the United States. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to continue to incentivize investment in 
the manufacturing capacity, process technology, research and 
development necessary to meet the needs of the U.S. military, 
thereby reducing the possibility of supply shortages.

            HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING MODERNIZATION PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes the importance of the Department 
of Defense's ability to apply high performance computing to 
gain military superiority for the warfighter. The Committee 
also recognizes the importance of high performance computing in 
the broader defense scientific and technology community to 
enable faster and more capable processors designed to save 
energy and overcome speed barriers. Therefore, the Committee 
fully funds the fiscal year 2014 request, and recommends a 
sustained modernization program at a level not less than the 
amount enacted for fiscal year 2012.

               MANUFACTURING EXPERIMENTATION AND OUTREACH

    The Committee is encouraged by the progress of the 
Manufacturing Experimentation and Outreach program within the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Tactical 
Technology Office. This program engages high school-age 
students in a series of collaborative design and distributed 
manufacturing experiments by deploying up to a thousand 
computer-numerically-controlled manufacturing machines to high 
schools nationwide. The goal is to encourage students across 
clusters of schools to collaborate via social networking media 
to jointly design and build systems of moderate complexity, 
such as mobile robots, in response to prize challenges. In 
order to allow the greatest number of students to receive 
access to the most advanced manufacturing technology, the 
Committee urges the Director of DARPA to place a greater 
emphasis on technology that allows students to remotely access 
advanced cyber-enabled additive manufacturing equipment.

                 COMMON KILL VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes the importance of the Missile 
Defense Agency's new Common Kill Vehicle Technology program to 
consolidate the development of kill vehicles and to transition 
a discriminating kill vehicle to both Ground-based Interceptors 
and the Standard Missile-3.
    Although the Committee recognizes that the announcement of 
this new initiative occurred shortly before the budget 
submission, it is concerned with the lack of detailed 
justification materials and future plans and budgets for the 
program.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes a transfer 
of $70,000,000, the amount requested for the program, from the 
Ballistic Missile Defense Technology line to create a new line 
specifically for the Common Kill Vehicle Technology program. 
This will allow for greater visibility and oversight of the 
program.
    The Committee also understands the importance of 
capitalizing on existing industrial base innovations, and urges 
the Director, Missile Defense Agency to fund risk reduction 
efforts for components such as the Divert and Attitude Control 
System.

                       GROUND-BASED INTERCEPTORS

    The Committee is concerned by the increasing military 
threat posed by North Korea. Evidence of this threat is present 
in North Korea's three nuclear tests and, most recently, in the 
launch of several short range missiles. The Committee is aware 
that part of the response to this threat is to increase the 
number of Ground-based Interceptors (GBIs) fielded as part of 
the Ground-based Midcourse segment of the missile defense 
architecture.
    Despite the threat, the Committee is also concerned about 
the state of development and potential reliability of the GBI 
missiles. The test record of the GBI and associated sensors has 
been mixed, including a failed test in December 2010, and a 
successful test in January 2013. The Committee supports the 
strategic hedge these missiles provide, but believes that 
fielded equipment needs to be effective. Accordingly, the 
Committee directs the Department of Defense Inspector General 
to provide a report not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act to the congressional defense committees which 
reviews the planned testing of the GBI program from fiscal year 
2014 through fiscal year 2017. The report should comment on the 
adequacy of testing to ensure that the GBI missiles are 
reliable and effective.

                          EMBEDDED DIAGNOSTICS

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to fund 
joint government, university, and industry efforts to advance 
the technology and use of embedded diagnostics for unmanned 
aircraft. This improves safety by predicting future failures 
while simultaneously saving significant costs by eliminating 
the need for unnecessary overhaul and replacement of 
components.

                         SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY

    The Committee remains concerned about the state of defense 
microelectronics, with regard to both the availability of a 
trusted supply chain, as well as the long-term health and 
vitality of the industrial base. The Committee believes that 
actively engaging all accredited suppliers is important to 
maintaining this industrial base in the Trusted Foundry 
Program, which will be important for ensuring dependable, 
continuous long-term access to trusted mission critical 
semiconductors. The Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to employ measures to ensure competition within the 
Trusted Foundry Program.

                OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION, DEFENSE

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $223,768,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       186,300,000
Committee recommendation..............................       246,800,000
Change from budget request............................      +60,500,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the research, 
development, test and evaluation activities of the Department 
of Defense for defense-wide activities. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:


                                TITLE V

                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS

                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,516,184,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,545,827,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,545,827,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,545,827,000 
for the Defense Working Capital Funds accounts. This funding 
supports the purchase of $25,158,000 for Army war reserve 
material, $61,731,000 for Air Force war reserve material, 
$46,428,000 for Defense Logistics Agency distribution services, 
and $1,412,510,000 for Defense Commissary Agency operations 
costs.

                     NATIONAL DEFENSE SEALIFT FUND
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $697,840,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       730,700,000
Committee recommendation..............................       595,700,000
Change from budget request............................     -135,000,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the lease, operation, 
and supply of pre-positioning ships, operation of the Ready 
Reserve Force, and acquisition of ships for the Military 
Sealift Command, the Ready Reserve Force, and the Marine Corps.

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee         Change from
                                                          Budget  request      recommended          request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
STRATEGIC SEALIFT ACQUISITION..........................            178,321             43,321           -135,000
    Afloat forward staging base--previously                                          -135,000              - - -
     appropriated......................................
DoD MOBILIZATION ASSETS................................            197,296            197,296              - - -
SEALIFT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT.......................             56,058             56,058              - - -
READY RESERVE FORCE OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE.........            299,025            299,025              - - -
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, National Defense Sealift Fund...........             30,700            595,700           -135,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                TITLE VI

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS

                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................   $32,715,304,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................    33,054,528,000
Committee recommendation..............................    33,573,582,000
Change from budget request............................     +519,054,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for the Defense Health 
Program of the Department of Defense. The total amount 
recommended in the bill will provide the following program in 
fiscal year 2014:


         REPROGRAMMING GUIDANCE FOR THE DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee remains concerned regarding the transfer of 
funds from Direct (or In-House) Care to pay for contractor-
provided medical care. To limit such transfers and improve 
oversight within the Defense Health Program operation and 
maintenance account, the Committee includes a provision which 
caps the funds available for Private Sector Care under the 
TRICARE program subject to prior approval reprogramming 
procedures. The provision and accompanying report language 
included by the Committee should not be interpreted as limiting 
the amount of funds that may be transferred to the Direct Care 
System from other budget activities within the Defense Health 
Program. In addition, the Committee continues to designate the 
funding for the Direct Care System as a congressional special 
interest item. Any transfer of funds from the Direct (or In-
house) Care budget activity into the Private Sector Care budget 
activity or any other budget activity will require the 
Secretary of Defense to follow prior approval reprogramming 
procedures.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide 
written notification to the congressional defense committees of 
cumulative transfers in excess of $15,000,000 out of the 
Private Sector Care budget activity. The Committee further 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to 
provide quarterly reports to the congressional defense 
committees on budget execution data for all of the Defense 
Health Program accounts and to adequately reflect changes to 
the budget activities requested by the Services in future 
budget submissions.

                               CARRYOVER

    For fiscal year 2014, the Committee recommends one percent 
carryover authority for the operation and maintenance account 
of the Defense Health Program. The Committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to submit a 
detailed spending plan for any fiscal year 2013 designated 
carryover funds to the congressional defense committees not 
less than 30 days prior to executing the carryover funds.

WALTER REED NATIONAL MILITARY MEDICAL CENTER AND FORT BELVOIR COMMUNITY 
                                HOSPITAL

    The military medical treatment facilities provide our 
servicemembers, retirees, and their families with world class 
healthcare. Nowhere is that more true than at the Walter Reed 
National Military Medical Center and the Fort Belvoir Community 
Hospital. However, the Committee is aware that for the last few 
years, the two hospitals in the National Capital Region have 
been underfunded in the base budget and have only remained 
solvent with mid-year and end-of-year funds that have become 
available from within the Defense Health Program appropriation. 
The Committee believes that the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
(Health Affairs) is fully committed to solving the underlying 
funding shortfall and understands that future funding levels 
will be re-baselined in order to protect the operations of 
these two flagship institutions.

                    EMBEDDED MENTAL HEALTH PROVIDERS

    The Committee understands the tremendous toll exacted on 
all servicemembers and their families, including those in the 
special operations and National Guard and reserve communities, 
after more than a decade of war. The Committee has always made 
the care of forces and their families its highest priority.
    The Committee appreciates the focus that the Commander, 
Special Operations Command, has put on the psychological health 
and well-being of special operations forces and their families 
and recognizes the importance of providing support to this 
vulnerable population.
    Further, the Committee recognizes the success of the 
embedded behavioral health program and fully supports its 
expansion to the special operations community. However, the 
Committee believes that the mental health needs of all 
servicemembers, including special operators, are most 
appropriately addressed within the Defense Health Program by 
the Service Surgeons General to ensure the highest quality 
continuity of care for the servicemember.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation transfers 
$21,300,000 requested within the Special Operations Command 
operation and maintenance budget to the Defense Health Program 
to address the needs of the special operations community. The 
Committee directs the Service Surgeons General to work with the 
Commander, Special Operations Command to implement an embedded 
behavioral health program for special operations units during 
fiscal year 2014.
    The Committee also recognizes that National Guard and 
reserve personnel in states at high risk for suicide and 
dangerous behavioral health conditions need convenient access 
to mental health professionals for proper screening and care. 
Onsite access to embedded mental health specialists during 
training assemblies has proven successful in overcoming 
geographical, stigma, and time barriers that might otherwise 
bar a member from similar services in an underserved community.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to work 
with the Chief, National Guard Bureau and Service Surgeons 
General to implement an embedded behavioral health program for 
National Guard and reserve component servicemembers in order to 
provide reserve component personnel with ready access to 
screening and treatment during unit training assemblies and 
urges the Secretary of Defense to robustly fund these programs.

                  INTEGRATED ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD

    The Committee has grown increasingly frustrated with the 
inability of the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs to 
develop and procure an integrated electronic health record. 
Despite the mandate for full interoperability included in the 
fiscal year 2008 National Defense Authorization Act, it was not 
until 2011 that the Secretaries of Defense and Veterans Affairs 
committed to a plan to create a single integrated health 
record. Since that time, the two agencies have made halfhearted 
efforts to achieve that goal; however, earlier this year, the 
two Secretaries announced that they would no longer seek to 
create a single, common health record, instead falling back to 
the as-of-yet unattainable goal of interoperability. The 
Committee is dismayed at the lack of progress by the two 
Departments to achieve any kind of interoperability. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than 30 days 
after the enactment of this Act which provides the long-term 
way ahead for the program, an explanation of the anticipated 
future role, if any, of the joint Interagency Program Office, 
and the use of the funds spent to date by that office.

               JOINT WARFIGHTER MEDICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation includes $45,000,000 for the 
continuation of the Joint Warfighter Medical Research Program. 
The funding shall be used to augment and accelerate high 
priority Department of Defense and Service medical requirements 
and to continue prior year initiatives that are close to 
achieving their objectives and yielding a benefit to military 
medicine. The funding shall not be used for new projects or for 
basic research, and it shall be awarded at the discretion of 
the Secretary of Defense following a review of medical research 
and development gaps as well as unfinanced medical requirements 
of the Services. Further, the Committee directs the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to provide a report not 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act to the 
congressional defense committees which lists the projects that 
receive funding. The report should include the funding amount 
awarded to each project, a thorough description of each 
project's research, and the benefit the research will provide 
to the Department of Defense.

                        PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE

    The Committee remains concerned with pain management 
prescription medication dependency among servicemembers. It is 
imperative that proper steps are taken to prevent 
overmedication and that treatment options are available for 
those facing possible addiction. The Committee recognizes that 
the Department of Defense currently provides a range of 
Medication Therapy Management services at military treatment 
facilities. These services are designed to optimize therapy or 
the adherence to therapy between providers, pharmacists, and 
patients. The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to provide a report not later than 180 
days after the enactment of this Act to the congressional 
defense committees detailing the progress of including 
pharmacists in the care team provided by the Patient Center 
Medical Home (PCMH), the success rate of patients in properly 
adhering to medicine treatment and prescription levels, and 
whether there have been cases in which the inclusion of a 
pharmacist in the PCMH has contributed to reducing the level of 
medication taken by patients who may have been overmedicating.

                 PEER-REVIEWED CANCER RESEARCH PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $120,000,000 for the 
peer-reviewed breast cancer research program, $80,000,000 for 
the peer-reviewed prostate cancer research program, $20,000,000 
for the peer-reviewed ovarian cancer research program, 
$10,500,000 for the peer-reviewed lung cancer research program, 
and $15,000,000 for the peer-reviewed cancer research program 
that would research cancers not addressed in the aforementioned 
programs currently executed by the Department of Defense.
    The funds provided in the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program are directed to be used to conduct research in the 
following areas: blood cancer, colorectal cancer, genetic 
cancer research, kidney cancer, listeria vaccine for cancer, 
melanoma and other skin cancers, mesothelioma, pancreatic 
cancer, and pediatric brain tumors.
    The funds provided under the peer-reviewed cancer research 
program shall be used only for the purposes listed above. The 
Committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to provide a report not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act to the congressional defense committees 
on the status of the peer-reviewed cancer research program. For 
each research area, the report should include the funding 
amount awarded, the progress of the research, and the relevance 
of the research to servicemembers and their families.
    The Committee also encourages the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense (Health Affairs) to establish a task force to focus on 
research for metastasized cancer of all types, with a focus on 
clinical and translational research aimed at extending the 
lives of advanced stage and recurrent patients.
    Further, the Committee also encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to fund cancer research 
that combines molecular data on cancer and non-cancer tissues 
with information regarding demographic and lifestyle factors 
that could influence treatment response.

                 PEER-REVIEWED AUTISM RESEARCH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation includes $6,000,000 for the 
peer-reviewed autism research program. The Committee is 
concerned that the increasing prevalence of autism could have 
an impact on the pool of potential candidates for military 
service and believes that a sustained research effort is 
necessary to find the causal agents of autism. Therefore, the 
Committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health 
Affairs) to support research within the peer-reviewed autism 
research program that seeks to understand possible 
environmental causes of autism spectrum disorders.

                   PRE-DEPLOYMENT RESILIENCY TRAINING

    The Committee commends the Army, with the support of the 
Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and the Marine 
Corps, with the support of the Office of Naval Research and 
Naval Health Research Center, for studying innovative 
approaches to building mental resiliency and combating post-
traumatic stress in servicemembers. The physiologically proven 
positive effects of skills-based resiliency training before 
deployment are encouraging in the continued effort to combat 
the onslaught of post-traumatic stress. The Committee 
encourages the Secretaries of the Army and the Navy to continue 
pursuing the implementation of skills-based resiliency training 
for all soldiers and Marines who are preparing for deployment.

                CHILDHOOD TRAUMA IN MILITARY DEPENDENTS

    The Committee is concerned with the rise in outpatient 
mental health cases among children of active duty and reserve 
servicemembers. The Committee believes that it is imperative to 
develop efficient means to identify children at risk of 
deployment-related mental health issues and to provide tools, 
education, and guidance to the professionals and families 
caring for these children. It is also important that the proper 
steps are taken to prevent predictable mental health problems 
from manifesting in dependent children. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to make the prevention of 
childhood trauma in military dependents a priority.

                AIR FORCE ACUITY MODEL TRAINING PROGRAM

    The Committee understands that the Air Force Military 
Acuity Model has provided benefits such as more efficient and 
improved access to care. The Committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) to consider expanding use 
of the model throughout the military health system.

 COOPERATION BETWEEN MILITARY MEDICAL FACILITIES, CIVILIAN HEALTHCARE 
                      FACILITIES, AND UNIVERSITIES

    The Committee recognizes the importance of cooperation 
between military medical facilities, universities, and other 
civilian partners to provide valuable medical trauma training 
to sustain the education of military medical providers. This 
training and real-life experience contributes to maintaining 
the capabilities of the National Guard Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological, and Nuclear Explosives Enhanced Response Force 
Packages, the National Guard Homeland Response Forces, and the 
Army Reserve Consequence Management Response Forces.
    The Committee encourages the Chiefs of the National Guard 
Bureau and the Army Reserve to continue to pursue trauma 
training with civilian partners in order to maintain unit 
medical readiness at optimum levels as military healthcare 
providers maintain their individual skills to respond 
effectively to emergency incidents. Additionally, in order to 
minimize civilian-military operational gaps and maximize 
interoperability in the event of a catastrophic incident, the 
Committee encourages the development of enhanced preparedness 
medical training programs focusing on mass casualty triage, 
disaster life support, hazardous material life support, and 
psychological health by maximizing civilian-based advanced 
trauma expertise gained through day-to-day experiences and 
medical research programs.

                       THERMAL INJURY PREVENTION

    The Committee commends the Secretary of Defense for 
establishing standards to prevent thermal injuries caused by 
aviation assets. However, recognizing that thermal injuries can 
also be caused by other equipment, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to establish similar requirements for 
ground platforms. Survivability enhancement efforts such as 
fire prevention, fire suppression, and fuel containment should 
continually be addressed in order to provide the best possible 
protection. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report not later than 180 days after the enactment of 
this Act to the congressional defense committees detailing a 
potential plan for implementation of thermal injury prevention 
requirements and standards on ground platforms.

                MENTAL HEALTH ACCESS FOR SERVICEMEMBERS

    The Committee remains concerned with the ongoing stigma 
associated with servicemembers seeking assistance for mental 
and behavioral health issues. The Committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) and the Service 
Surgeons General to leverage all existing resources, within 
both military and civilian facilities, to provide comprehensive 
mental and behavioral health services to servicemembers and to 
continue efforts to reduce this stigma.

               MEDICAL RECORDS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT VICTIMS

    The Committee supports actions taken by the Secretary of 
Defense to implement a policy for the retention of evidence and 
records relating to sexual assaults. The Committee believes 
that it is important for the Services to implement policies, 
procedures, and processes to ensure detailed evidence and 
records are maintained, as well as transmitted as appropriate, 
to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Record sharing between 
the two Departments should include any medical details of 
sexual assault victims that accurately describe the physical 
and emotional injuries resulting from a sexual trauma that 
occurred during active duty service. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to ensure that these important records 
are appropriately maintained and transferred, as required, to 
the Department of Veterans Affairs.

           CHEMICAL AGENTS AND MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION, DEFENSE
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,301,786,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................     1,057,123,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,057,123,000
Change from budget request............................            - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides for funds the Chemical Agents 
and Munitions Destruction activities of the Department of 
Defense.
    The Committee recommendation includes $1,057,123,000 for 
the Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense program.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                      Budget     Committee      Request
                                     Request    Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE........      451,572      451,572        - - -
PROCUREMENT......................        1,368        1,368        - - -
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND        604,183      604,183        - - -
 EVALUATION......................
                                  --------------------------------------
    TOTAL, CHEMICAL AGENTS AND       1,057,123    1,057,123        - - -
     MUNITIONS DESTRUCTION,
     DEFENSE.....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE
 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................    $1,159,263,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       938,545,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,007,762,000
Change from budget request............................      +69,217,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides funds for military personnel; 
operation and maintenance; procurement; and research, 
development, test and evaluation for drug interdiction and 
counter-drug activities of the Department of Defense to include 
activities related to narcoterrorism.

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                      Budget     Committee      Request
                                     Request    Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-         938,545    1,007,762       69,217
 DRUG ACTIVITIES.................
    National Guard counter-drug        109,597      239,597      130,000
     program.....................
    Young Marines--drug demand                        4,000        - - -
     reduction...................
    HQ Support to COCOMs growth..                    -1,500        - - -
    CN--Admin/Program Travel                         -1,553        - - -
     growth......................
    CN--Commercial Transportation                    -1,766        - - -
     growth......................
    CN--Supplies and Materials                       -3,304        - - -
     growth......................
    Previously funded RDTE                           -6,660        - - -
     projects....................
    Historical underobligation...                   -50,000        - - -
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       NATIONAL GUARD STATE PLANS

    The Committee recommendation includes $130,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2014 request to supplement the National Guard 
Counter-Drug program. The Committee is dismayed that, for the 
second year in a row, the budget request woefully underfunds 
the National Guard Counter-Drug program, which recommends a 
nearly forty percent reduction from the fiscal year 2012 budget 
request and a nearly fifty percent reduction from the fiscal 
year 2012 enacted level. The Committee recognizes the 
importance of the mission of the National Guard Counter-Drug 
program as a support organization to combatant commands and 
federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. 
Additionally, the National Guard Counter-Drug training centers 
provide invaluable training tools to soldiers, airmen, law 
enforcement agencies, and community-based personnel. The 
Committee designates the funding included in the budget request 
and the additional $130,000,000 as a congressional special 
interest item. Further, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to robustly fund the National Guard Counter-Drug 
program in subsequent budget years.

          SUPPORT OF COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES IN THE CARIBBEAN

    The Committee remains concerned over the high level of 
violent crime in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The 
Committee notes that the homicide rate in each territory is 
significantly higher than any other U.S. jurisdiction and that 
many of these homicides are linked to the cross-border trade of 
illegal narcotics. The Committee further notes that data 
collected by federal law enforcement agencies appear to confirm 
that the U.S. territories in the Caribbean have become an 
increasingly attractive trans-shipment route for drug 
traffickers seeking to supply the U.S. mainland. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report not later 
than 90 days after the enactment of this Act to the 
congressional defense committees on detection, monitoring, and 
other counter-drug activities the Department is undertaking, or 
intends to undertake, to support law enforcement operations in 
and around Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

                  JOINT URGENT OPERATIONAL NEEDS FUND

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................             - - -
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       $98,800,000
Committee recommendation..............................             - - -
Change from budget request............................       -98,800,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Joint Urgent 
Operational Needs Fund.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $350,321,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       312,131,000
Committee recommendation..............................       347,000,000
Change from budget request............................       +34,869,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommendation includes $347,000,000 for the 
Office of the Inspector General.
    The total amount recommended in the bill will provide the 
following program in fiscal year 2014:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                      Budget     Committee      request
                                     request    recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE........      311,131      346,000       34,869
    Program increase                                 34,869        - - -
PROCUREMENT......................        1,000        1,000        - - -
                                  --------------------------------------
    TOTAL, OFFICE OF THE               312,131      347,000       34,869
     INSPECTOR GENERAL...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       INSPECTOR GENERAL VACANCY

    The Committee is concerned by the ongoing vacancy of the 
Department of Defense Inspector General position. This position 
has been vacant since December 2011, and while the position is 
being filled temporarily by the Acting Inspector General, no 
successor has been nominated during that time period. The 
Inspector General is responsible for conducting audits and 
investigations, informing Congress and the Secretary of Defense 
on programs and deficiencies, and acting as the principal 
adviser to the Secretary of Defense for matters relating to the 
prevention and detection of fraud, waste, and abuse. As the 
Department faces a climate of reduced budgets and ongoing 
challenges, a Senate-confirmed Inspector General is critical to 
providing the oversight needed to reduce waste and ensure 
taxpayers dollars are spent wisely and efficiently. The 
Committee urges the Secretary of Defense, in conjunction with 
the President, to identify and submit a highly qualified 
nominee to be the Department of Defense Inspector General as 
soon as possible.
                               TITLE VII

                            RELATED AGENCIES

              NATIONAL AND MILITARY INTELLIGENCE PROGRAMS

    The National Intelligence Program and the Military 
Intelligence Program budgets funded in the Department of 
Defense Appropriations Act consist primarily of resources for 
the Director of National Intelligence including the 
Intelligence Community Management Staff, the Central 
Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Defense Intelligence Agency, the 
National Reconnaissance Office, the National Security Agency, 
the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the intelligence 
services of the Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and 
the CIA Retirement and Disability fund.

                            CLASSIFIED ANNEX

    The Committee's budget reviews are published in a separate, 
detailed, and comprehensive classified annex. The intelligence 
community, Department of Defense, and other organizations are 
expected to fully comply with the recommendations and 
directions in the classified annex accompanying the Department 
of Defense Appropriations Act, 2014.

   CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM FUND

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $514,000,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       514,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       514,000,000
Change from budget request............................             - - -*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    This appropriation provides payments of benefits to 
qualified beneficiaries in accordance with the Central 
Intelligence Agency Retirement Act of 1964 for Certain 
Employees (P.L. 88-643), as amended by Public Law 94-522. This 
statute authorized the establishment of the CIA Retirement and 
Disability System for certain employees and authorized the 
establishment and maintenance of a fund from which benefits 
would be paid to those beneficiaries.
    The Committee recommends the budget request of $514,000,000 
for the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability 
System fund. This is a mandatory account.

               INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT

 Fiscal year 2013 appropriation*.......................      $534,421,000
Fiscal year 2014 budget request.......................       568,271,000
Committee recommendation..............................       552,535,000
Change from budget request............................       -15,736,000*FY13 Enacted level does not include the 251A sequester or Sec. 3004 OMB
  ATB.

    The Committee recommendation includes $552,535,000, which 
is a decrease of $15,736,000 below the budget request for the 
Intelligence Community Management Account.
                               TITLE VIII

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The accompanying bill includes 126 general provisions. Most 
of these provisions were included in the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2013 and many have been 
included in the Defense Appropriations Acts for a number of 
years. A description of each provision follows.
    Section 8001 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by Congress.
    Section 8002 provides for conditions and limitations on the 
payment of compensation to, or employment of, foreign 
nationals.
    Section 8003 provides that no funds made available in this 
Act may be obligated beyond the end of the fiscal year unless 
expressly provided for a greater period of availability 
elsewhere in this Act.
    Section 8004 provides a 20 percent limitation on the 
obligation of certain funds provided in this Act during the 
last two months of the fiscal year.
    Section 8005 has been amended and provides for the general 
transfer authority of working capital funds to other military 
functions.
    Section 8006 provides that the tables titled ``Explanation 
of Project Level Adjustments'' in the explanatory statement and 
classified annex shall be carried out in the manner provided by 
the tables to the same extent as if the tables were included in 
the text of this Act.
    Section 8007 provides for the establishment of a baseline 
for application of reprogramming and transfer authorities for 
the current fiscal year.
    Section 8008 provides for limitations on the use of 
transfer authority of working capital fund cash balances.
    Section 8009 provides that none of the funds appropriated 
in this Act may be used to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Section 8010 has been amended and provides limitations and 
conditions on the use of funds made available in this Act to 
initiate multi-year contracts.
    Section 8011 provides for the use and obligation of funds 
for humanitarian and civic assistance costs under chapter 20 of 
title 10, United States Code.
    Section 8012 has been amended and provides that civilian 
personnel of the Department of Defense may not be managed on 
the basis of end strength or be subject to end strength 
limitations.
    Section 8013 prohibits funding from being used to influence 
congressional action on any matters pending before the 
Congress.
    Section 8014 prohibits compensation from being paid to any 
member of the Army who is participating as a full-time student 
and who receives benefits from the Education Benefits Fund when 
time spent as a full-time student is counted toward that 
member's service commitment.
    Section 8015 provides for the transfer of funds 
appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department of 
Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Section 8016 provides for the Department of Defense to 
purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only in the 
United States.
    Section 8017 has been amended and makes permanent the 
prohibition of funds made available to the Department of 
Defense from being used to demilitarize or dispose of certain 
surplus firearms and small arms ammunition or ammunition 
components.
    Section 8018 provides a limitation on funds being used for 
the relocation of any Department of Defense entity into or 
within the National Capital Region.
    Section 8019 provides for incentive payments authorized by 
section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 (25 U.S.C. 
1544).
    Section 8020 provides that no funding for the Defense Media 
Activity may be used for national or international political or 
psychological activities.
    Section 8021 provides for the obligation of funds for 
purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, in anticipation of receipt of contributions from 
the Government of Kuwait.
    Section 8022 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Civil Air Patrol Corporation.
    Section 8023 has been amended and prohibits funding from 
being used to establish new Department of Defense Federally 
Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC), with certain 
limitations and reduces funding provided for FFRDCs.
    Section 8024 provides for the Department of Defense to 
procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted and rolled 
only in the United States and Canada.
    Section 8025 defines the congressional defense committees 
as being the Armed Services Committees of the House and Senate 
and the Subcommittees on Defense of the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8026 provides for competitions between private 
firms and Department of Defense Depot Maintenance Activities 
for modification, depot maintenance, and repair of aircraft, 
vehicles, and vessels as well as the production of components 
and other Defense-related articles.
    Section 8027 has been amended and provides for revocation 
of blanket waivers of the Buy American Act upon a finding that 
a country has violated a reciprocal defense procurement 
memorandum of understanding by discriminating against products 
produced in the United States that are covered by the 
agreement.
    Section 8028 provides for the availability of funds 
contained in the Department of Defense Overseas Military 
Facility Investment Recovery Account for purposes specified in 
section 2921(c)(2) of the 1991 National Defense Authorization 
Act.
    Section 8029 provides for the conveyance, without 
consideration, of relocatable housing units that are excess to 
the needs of the Air Force located at Grand Forks Air Force 
Base, Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mountain Home Air Force Base, 
Ellsworth Air Force Base, and Minot Air Force Base to Indian 
Tribes located in the states of Nevada, Idaho, North Dakota, 
South Dakota, Montana, Oregon, Minnesota, and Washington.
    Section 8030 provides authority to use operation and 
maintenance appropriations to purchase items having an 
investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Section 8031 has been amended and prohibits the use of 
working capital funds to purchase specified investment items.
    Section 8032 has been amended and provides that none of the 
funds appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year 
except for funds appropriated for the Reserve for 
Contingencies, the working capital fund, or other programs as 
specified.
    Section 8033 provides that funds available for the Defense 
Intelligence Agency may be used for the design, development, 
and deployment of General Defense Intelligence Program 
intelligence communications and intelligence information 
systems.
    Section 8034 provides for the availability of funds for the 
mitigation of environmental impacts on Indian lands resulting 
from Department of Defense activities.
    Section 8035 requires the Department of Defense to comply 
with the Buy American Act, chapter 83 of title 41, United 
States Code.
    Section 8036 provides conditions under which contracts for 
studies, analyses, or consulting services may be entered into 
without competition on the basis of an unsolicited proposal.
    Section 8037 places certain limitations on the use of funds 
made available in this Act to establish Field Operating 
Agencies.
    Section 8038 is a new provision and provides grant 
authorities for the Department of Defense acting through the 
Office of Economic Adjustment.
    Section 8039 places restrictions on converting to 
contractor performance an activity or function of the 
Department of Defense unless it meets certain guidelines 
provided.

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    Section 8040 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $3,043,571,000 from the following programs:
 2011 Appropriations:
    National Defense Sealift Fund:
        Strategic sealift acquisition.................       $28,000,000
2012 Appropriations:
    National Defense Sealift Fund:
        Strategic sealift acquisition.................        14,000,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        E-2D..........................................        30,000,000
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force:
        C-27J Joint Cargo aircraft....................       443,000,000
    Missile Procurement, Air Force:
        Classified programs...........................        10,000,000
2013 Appropriations:
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy:
        E-2D..........................................        35,000,000
        MH-60R........................................        50,000,000
    Weapons Procurement, Navy:
        Aerial targets................................         5,000,000
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy:
        Completion of prior year shipbuilding programs        68,000,000
         (CVN-71).....................................
    Other Procurement, Navy:
        LCS MCM mission packages (OASIS termination)..         3,553,000
    Procurement, Marine Corps:
        Follow-on to SMAW.............................        12,650,000
    Missile Procurement, Air Force:
        Classified programs...........................        60,000,000
    Other Procurement, Air Force:
        COMSEC equipment..............................        38,900,000
    Procurement, Defense-Wide:
        Classified programs...........................        10,000,000
        SOF U-28......................................        62,776,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army:
        MEADS.........................................       380,861,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy:
        Airborne mine countermeasures.................        13,028,000
        H-1 series....................................        18,111,000
        Manned reconnaissance systems.................        18,192,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air
     Force:
        Classified programs...........................       115,000,000
    Research, Development, Test and Evaluation,
     Defense-Wide:
        Classified programs...........................        90,000,000
        Precision Tracking Space System...............       123,000,000
    Ship Modernization, Operations, and Sustainment
     Fund:
        Ship Modernization, Operations, and                1,414,500,000
         Sustainment Fund.............................
    Section 8041 prohibits funds made available in this Act 
from being used to reduce authorized positions for military 
technicians (dual status) of the Army National Guard, Air 
National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force Reserve unless such 
reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military force 
structure.
    Section 8042 prohibits funding from being obligated or 
expended for assistance to the Democratic People's Republic of 
Korea unless specifically appropriated for that purpose.
    Section 8043 provides for reimbursement to the National 
Guard and reserve when members of the National Guard and 
reserve provide intelligence or counterintelligence support to 
the combatant commands, Defense agencies, and joint 
intelligence activities.
    Section 8044 prohibits funds from being used to reduce 
civilian medical and medical support personnel assigned to 
military treatment facilities below the September 30, 2003 
level unless the Service Surgeons General certify to the 
congressional defense committees that it is a responsible 
stewardship of resources to do so.
    Section 8045 prohibits the transfer of Department of 
Defense and Central Intelligence Agencies drug interdiction and 
counter-drug activity funds to other agencies except as 
specifically provided in an appropriations law.
    Section 8046 prohibits funding from being used for the 
procurement of ball and roller bearings other than those 
produced by a domestic source and of domestic origin.
    Section 8047 prohibits funding from being used to purchase 
supercomputers which are not manufactured in the United States.
    Section 8048 prohibits funding made available in this or 
any other Act from being used to pay the salary of anyone who 
approves or implements a transfer of administrative 
responsibilities or budgetary resources of any program, 
project, or activity financed by this Act to the jurisdiction 
of another federal agency not financed by this Act without 
express authorization of the Congress.
    Section 8049 provides for prior Congressional notification 
of article or service transfers to international peacekeeping 
organizations.
    Section 8050 prohibits funding from being used for 
contractor bonuses being paid due to business restructuring.
    Section 8051 provides for the transfer of funds to 
appropriations available for pay of military personnel in 
connection with support and services for eligible organizations 
and activities outside the Department of Defense.
    Section 8052 provides for the Department of Defense to 
dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended balances for 
expired or closed accounts.
    Section 8053 provides conditions for the use of equipment 
of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on a space-
available, reimbursable basis.
    Section 8054 provides for the availability of funds to 
implement cost-effective agreements for required heating 
facility modernization in the Kaiserslautern Military 
Community, Landstuhl Army Regional Medical Center, and Ramstein 
Air Base, Germany.
    Section 8055 provides for the limitation on the use of 
funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items for 
delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use or inventory requirements.
    Section 8056 provides for a waiver of ``Buy America'' 
provisions for certain cooperative programs.
    Section 8057 prohibits funding from being used to support 
the training of members of foreign security forces who have 
engaged in gross violations of human rights.
    Section 8058 prohibits funding in this Act from being used 
for repairs or maintenance to military family housing units.
    Section 8059 provides obligation authority for new starts 
for advanced concept technology demonstration projects only 
after notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Section 8060 provides that the Secretary of Defense shall 
provide a classified quarterly report on certain matters as 
directed in the classified annex accompanying this Act.
    Section 8061 prohibits the use of funds made available to 
the Department of Defense to provide support to an agency that 
is more than 90 days in arrears in making payments to the 
Department of Defense for goods or services provided on a 
reimbursable basis.
    Section 8062 provides for the use of National Guard 
personnel to support ground-based elements of the National 
Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Section 8063 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to transfer to any non-governmental entity ammunition 
held by the Department of Defense that has a center-fire 
cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' except for 
demilitarization purposes.
    Section 8064 provides for a waiver by the Chief of the 
National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or part of 
consideration in cases of personal property leases of less than 
one year.
    Section 8065 provides for a limitation on funding from 
being used to support non-appropriated funds that purchase 
alcoholic beverages.
    Section 8066 has been amended and provides for the transfer 
of funds made available in this Act under Operation and 
Maintenance, Army to other activities of the federal government 
for classified purposes.
    Section 8067 has been amended and provides for the forced 
matching of disbursements and obligations made by the 
Department of Defense in the current fiscal year.
    Section 8068 provides for the transfer of funds made 
available in this Act under Operation and Maintenance, Defense-
Wide to the Department of State Global Security Contingency 
Fund.
    Section 8069 provides grant authority for the construction 
and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses to meet the needs of 
military family members when confronted with the illness or 
hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
    Section 8070 has been amended and provides funding and 
transfer authority for the Israeli Cooperative Programs.
    Section 8071 prohibits funding from being obligated to 
modify command and control relationships to give Fleet Forces 
Command operational and administrative control of U.S. Navy 
forces assigned to the Pacific Fleet or to give United States 
Transportation Command operational and administrative control 
of certain aircraft.
    Section 8072 has been amended and provides for the funding 
of prior year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Section 8073 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this Act for intelligence activities are deemed to 
be specifically authorized by Congress for purposes of section 
504 of the National Security Act of 1947 until the enactment of 
the Intelligence Authorization Act for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8074 prohibits funding from being used to initiate 
a new start program without prior written notification.
    Section 8075 provides that the budget of the President for 
the subsequent fiscal year shall include separate budget 
justification documents for costs of the United States Armed 
Forces' participation in contingency operations for the 
military personnel, operation and maintenance, and procurement 
accounts.
    Section 8076 prohibits funding from being used for the 
research, development, test, evaluation, procurement, or 
deployment of nuclear armed interceptors of a missile defense 
system.
    Section 8077 provides the Secretary of Defense with the 
authority to make grants in the amounts specified.
    Section 8078 prohibits funding from being used to reduce or 
disestablish the operation of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance 
Squadron of the Air Force Reserve.
    Section 8079 prohibits funding from being used for the 
integration of foreign intelligence information unless the 
information has been lawfully collected and processed during 
conduct of authorized foreign intelligence activities.
    Section 8080 provides that at the time members of reserve 
components of the Armed Forces are called or ordered to active 
duty, each member shall be notified in writing of the expected 
period during which the member will be mobilized.
    Section 8081 provides that the Secretary of Defense may 
transfer funds from any available Department of the Navy 
appropriation under certain conditions to any available Navy 
ship construction appropriation to liquidate costs caused by 
rate adjustments or other economic factors.
    Section 8082 provides for the use of current and expired 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy subdivisions to reimburse the 
Judgment Fund.
    Section 8083 prohibits funding from being used to transfer 
program authority relating to current tactical unmanned aerial 
vehicles from the Army and requires the Army to retain 
responsibility for and operational control of the MQ-1C 
Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
    Section 8084 provides funding under certain conditions for 
the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative Program for the purpose of 
enabling the Pacific Command to execute certain Theater 
Security Cooperation activities.
    Section 8085 has been amended and limits the availability 
of funding provided for the Office of the Director of National 
Intelligence beyond the current fiscal year, except for funds 
appropriated for research and technology, which shall remain 
available for the current and the following fiscal years.
    Section 8086 provides for the adjustment of obligations 
within the Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy appropriation.
    Section 8087 has been amended and provides for the 
establishment of a baseline for application of reprogramming 
and transfer authorities for the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence for the current fiscal year.
    Section 8088 provides for the transfer of funds by the 
Director of National Intelligence to other departments and 
agencies for the purposes of government-wide information 
sharing activities.
    Section 8089 provides for limitations on funding provided 
for the National Intelligence Program to be available for 
obligation or expenditure through a reprogramming or transfer 
of funds in accordance with section 102A(d) of the National 
Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 403-1(d)).
    Section 8090 directs the Director of National Intelligence 
to submit a future-years intelligence program reflecting 
estimated expenditures and proposed appropriations.
    Section 8091 defines the congressional intelligence 
committees as being the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence of the House, the Select Committee on Intelligence 
of the Senate, and the Subcommittees on Defense of the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Section 8092 has been amended and directs the Department of 
Defense to continue to report incremental contingency 
operations costs for Operation Enduring Freedom or any other 
named operations in the U.S. Central Command area of operation 
on a monthly basis in the Cost of War Execution Report as 
required by Department of Defense Financial Management 
Regulation.
    Section 8093 provides the authority to transfer funding 
from operation and maintenance accounts for the Army, Navy, and 
Air Force to the central fund for Fisher Houses and Suites.
    Section 8094 has been amended and provides that funds 
appropriated in this Act may be available for the purpose of 
making remittances and transfers to the Defense Acquisition 
Workforce Development Fund.
    Section 8095 provides that any agency receiving funds made 
available in this Act shall post on a public website any report 
required to be submitted by Congress with certain exceptions.
    Section 8096 prohibits the use of funds for federal 
contracts in excess of $1,000,000 unless the contractor agrees 
not to require, as a condition of employment, that employees or 
independent contractors agree to resolve through arbitration 
any claim or tort related to, or arising out of, sexual assault 
or harassment, including assault and battery, intentional 
infliction of emotional distress, false imprisonment, or 
negligent hiring, supervision, or retention, and to certify 
that each covered subcontractor agrees to do the same.
    Section 8097 prohibits funding to the Association of 
Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) or its 
subsidiaries.
    Section 8098 has been amended and provides funds for 
transfer to the Joint Department of Defense--Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Section 8099 prohibits the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence from employing more Senior Executive 
employees than are specified in the classified annex.
    Section 8100 prohibits funding from being used to pay a 
retired general or flag officer to serve as a senior mentor 
advising the Department of Defense unless such retired officer 
files a Standard Form 278 or successor form.
    Section 8101 provides for the purchase of heavy and light 
armed vehicles for the physical security of personnel or for 
force protection purposes up to a limit of $250,000 per 
vehicle.
    Section 8102 has been amended and provides grants through 
the Office of Economic Adjustment to support critical existing 
and enduring military installations on Guam, as well as 
Department of Defense growth.
    Section 8103 prohibits the Secretary of Defense from taking 
beneficial occupancy of more than 2,500 parking spaces to be 
provided by the BRAC 133 project unless certain conditions are 
met.
    Section 8104 has been amended and requires monthly 
reporting of the civilian personnel end strength by 
appropriation account to the congressional defense committees.
    Section 8105 has been amended and prohibits funding to 
separate the National Intelligence Program budget from, or to 
consolidate within, the Department of Defense budget.
    Section 8106 has been amended and provides the Director of 
National Intelligence with general transfer authority with 
certain limitations.
    Section 8107 prohibits funding to transfer or release any 
individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba into the United 
States, its territories, or possessions. This language is 
identical to language enacted in Public Law 112-74.
    Section 8108 has been amended and prohibits funding to 
transfer any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to a 
country of origin or other foreign country or entity unless the 
Secretary of Defense makes certain certifications. This 
language is similar to language enacted in Public Law 112-239.
    Section 8109 prohibits funding to modify any United States 
facility (other than the facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba) to 
house any individual detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This 
language is identical to language enacted in Public Law 112-74.
    Section 8110 prohibits funding from being used to enter 
into contracts or agreements with corporations with unpaid tax 
liabilities.
    Section 8111 prohibits funding from being used to enter 
into contracts or agreements with a corporation that was 
convicted of a federal criminal violation in the past 24 
months.
    Section 8112 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.
    Section 8113 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008.
    Section 8114 prohibits funding from being used to violate 
the War Powers Resolution Act.
    Section 8115 has been amended and requires the Secretary of 
the Air Force to obligate and expend funds previously 
appropriated for the procurement of RQ-4B Global Hawk aircraft.
    Section 8116 has been amended and reduces the amount 
available for pay for civilian personnel.
    Section 8117 prohibits funds from being used to purchase or 
lease new light duty vehicles except in accordance with the 
Presidential Memorandum-Federal Fleet Performance.
    Section 8118 prohibits funds from being used to enter into 
a contract with a person or entity listed in the Excluded 
Parties List System/System for Award Management as having been 
convicted of fraud against the Federal Government.
    Section 8119 is a new provision and prohibits funds from 
being used to enter into a contract, memorandum of 
understanding, or cooperative agreement with, make a grant to, 
or provide a loan or loan guarantee to Rosoboronexport, except 
under certain conditions.
    Section 8120 is a new provision and strikes paragraph 7 of 
Section 8159(c) of the Department of Defense Appropriations 
Act, 2001.
    Section 8121 is a new provision and prohibits the use of 
funds for the purchase of manufacture of a United States flag 
unless such flags are treated as covered items under section 
2533a(b) of title 10, United States Code.
    Section 8122 is a new provision and provides $25 million 
for purposes of implementation of a Sexual Assault Special 
Victims Program.
    Section 8123 is a new provision and prohibits the use of 
funds in contravention of the amendments made to the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice in subtitle D of title V of the 
pending National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 
regarding the discharge or dismissal of a member of the Armed 
Forces convicted of certain sex-related offenses, the required 
trial of such offenses by general courts-martial, and the 
limitations imposed on convening authority discretion regarding 
court-martial findings and sentence.
    Section 8124 is a new provision and prohibits the use of 
funds for certain activities in Afghanistan.
    Section 8125 is a new provision and prohibits terminating 
certain programs without prior Congressional approval.
    Section 8126 is a new provision and provides $580,000,000 
to fully fund an increase in basic pay for all military 
personnel by 1.8 percent as authorized by current law, 
effective January 1, 2014.
                                TITLE IX

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In title IX the Committee recommends total new 
appropriations of $85,768,949,000. A detailed review of the 
Committee recommendation for programs funded in this title is 
provided in the following pages.

                         REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
to report incremental contingency operations costs for 
Operation Enduring Freedom on the monthly basis in the Cost of 
War Execution report as required by Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation, Chapter 23, Volume 12. 
Further, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
report the incremental contingency operations costs for any and 
all new named operations that may have commenced in the Central 
Command Area of Responsibility on a monthly basis in the Cost 
of War Execution report as required by Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation, Chapter 23, Volume 12. The 
Committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to continue 
providing Cost of War reports to the congressional defense 
committees that include the following information by 
appropriation account: funding appropriated, funding allocated, 
monthly obligations, monthly disbursements, cumulative fiscal 
year obligations, and cumulative fiscal year disbursements.
    The Committee expects that in order to meet unanticipated 
requirements, funds may need to be transferred within these 
appropriations accounts for purposes other than those specified 
in this report. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to follow normal prior approval reprogramming procedures should 
it be necessary to transfer funding between different 
appropriations accounts in this title.

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$9,644,798,000 for Military Personnel.
    The Committee recommendation for each military personnel 
account is shown below:


                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$66,146,211,000 for Operation and Maintenance.
    The Committee recommendation for each operation and 
maintenance account is shown below:


    LIMITATION ON AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR CERTAIN AUTHORITIES FOR 
                              AFGHANISTAN

    The Committee directs that none of the funds appropriated 
for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund, totaling 
$2,615,000,000 for enablers; funds appropriated for the 
Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund, in whole; and 75 percent of 
the funds appropriated for the Commander's Emergency Response 
Program; may be expended or obligated until 15 days after the 
date on which the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with 
the Secretary of State, certifies to the congressional defense 
committees that a bilateral security agreement has been signed 
and includes the provisions outlined in the pending fiscal year 
2014 National Defense Authorization Act.

                          EQUIPMENT READINESS

    After eleven years of war, in which there has been a steady 
influx of military equipment into Afghanistan without a 
corresponding outflow, the Department of Defense now has 
equipment in Afghanistan valued at $36,000,000,000. When U.S. 
Forces re-deployed from Iraq, much of the equipment was 
transported directly to Afghanistan to support the Afghanistan 
surge. As U.S. Forces re-deploy from Afghanistan, however, 
equipment will be returned to the United States. Years of war 
have placed demands on air and ground force equipment far 
beyond what is typically experienced during training or home 
station operations. The demands on equipment arise from higher 
usage rates and from the rigors of extended combat operations 
in harsh environments. This equipment will be in need of 
significant repair before it can be returned to units to be 
used for full spectrum readiness training. During testimony 
before the Committee, the Army Chief of Staff, General Odierno, 
emphasized the substantial workload requirement for equipment 
retrograde, induction, and repair once equipment returns to the 
United States. General Odierno also noted that sequestration 
has further compounded mounting equipment reset and repair 
requirements as the Services were forced to cancel scheduled 
equipment maintenance and repair in fiscal year 2013 due to 
lack of funds. As the Services redeploy from Afghanistan, the 
Committee recommends that the Department expeditiously reset, 
repair, and return equipment to units for readiness training 
and to support current and future national military and 
homeland defense priorities. The Committee has provided 
increased funding to support the Department's efforts to 
restore equipment readiness as reflected in the project level 
tables.

           WOMEN IN THE AFGHANISTAN NATIONAL SECURITY FORCES

    The Committee understands that there is no restriction on 
the enlistment of women in the Afghanistan National Security 
Forces even though cultural differences remain. The Committee 
encourages the recruitment, training and retention of women in 
the Afghanistan National Security Forces and provides funding 
in this Act for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund for the 
recruitment of both men and women for the Army, Air Force, and 
the Afghanistan National Police, and for updating facilities to 
support both genders.

                              PROCUREMENT

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$7,187,146,000 for Procurement. The Committee recommendation 
for each procurement account is shown below:


                  NATIONAL GUARD AND RESERVE EQUIPMENT

    The recommendation provides $1,500,000,000 for National 
Guard and Reserve Equipment. Of that amount, $400,000,000 is 
for the Army National Guard; $500,000,000 for the Air National 
Guard; $275,000,000 for the Army Reserve; $50,000,000 for the 
Navy Reserve; $125,000,000 for the Marine Corps Reserve; and 
$150,000,000 for the Air Force Reserve to meet urgent equipment 
needs that may arise this fiscal year.
    This funding will allow the Guard and reserve components to 
procure high priority equipment that may be used by these 
components for both combat missions and for missions in support 
of state governors. The conferees direct that the National 
Guard and Reserve Equipment Account shall be executed by the 
Chiefs of the National Guard and reserve components with 
priority consideration given to the following items: Internal 
and external crashworthy, ballistically self-sealing auxiliary 
fuel systems for helicopters; high-density storage cabinets; 
Air National Guard missile warning system; Generation 4 
advanced targeting pods; In-flight propeller balancing system; 
and ultra-light tactical vehicles.

             RESERVE COMPONENT SIMULATION TRAINING SYSTEMS

    The use of simulation training systems has yielded a 
military that is better trained, more capable, and more 
confident as compared to units that do not have access to 
modern simulation training devices. Simulation training is a 
cost-effective means by which reserve units can improve 
tactical decision-making skills and ultimately save lives. It 
is anticipated that a portion of funds provided for National 
Guard and Reserve Equipment will be used to procure a variety 
of simulation training systems. To ensure the most efficient 
and effective training programs, these systems should be a 
combination of both government owned and operated simulators 
and simulation support from a dedicated commercial activity 
capable of providing frequent hardware and software updates.

               RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$116,634,000 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation. 
The Committee recommendation for each research, development, 
test and evaluation account is shown below:


                     REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS


                     DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$264,910,000 for the Defense Working Capital Fund accounts. 
This funding supports purchase of $44,732,000 of Army secondary 
items for war reserves, $10,000,000 to the United States 
Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) for the transportation of 
Fallen Heroes, $78,500,000 for the repair of TRANSCOM C-17 
aircraft, and $46,678,000 for Defense Logistics Agency 
distribution and material disposition services in Afghanistan.

                  OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS


                         DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$904,201,000 for the Defense Health Program.
    The Committee's recommendations for operation and 
maintenance, procurement and research, development, test and 
evaluation are shown below:

                EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Change from
                                      Budget     Committee      request
                                     request    recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE........      904,201      904,201        - - -
    IN-HOUSE CARE................      375,958      375,958        - - -
    PRIVATE SECTOR CARE..........      382,560      382,560        - - -
    CONSOLIDATED HEALTH SUPPORT..      132,749      132,749        - - -
    INFORMATION MANAGEMENT.......        2,238        2,238        - - -
    MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES........          460          460        - - -
    EDUCATION AND TRAINING.......       10,236       10,236        - - -
------------------------------------------------------------------------

         DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$376,305,000 for Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities.

             JOINT IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICE DEFEAT FUND

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$1,000,000,000 for the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat 
Fund. The Committee's recommendations for the Joint Improvised 
Explosive Device Defeat Fund are shown below:

                                    EXPLANATION OF PROJECT LEVEL ADJUSTMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Committee        Change from
                                                              Budget request      recommended         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1  ATTACK THE NETWORK.....................................        417,700,000        417,700,000           - - -
2  DEFEAT THE DEVICE......................................        248,886,000        248,886,000           - - -
3  TRAIN THE FORCE........................................        106,000,000        106,000,000           - - -
4  STAFF AND INFRASTRUCTURE...............................        227,414,000        227,414,000           - - -
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    TOTAL, JOINT IED DEFEAT FUND..........................      1,000,000,000      1,000,000,000           - - -
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      DETECTION OF MATERIALS USED IN IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVE DEVICES

    Raw materials, such as nitrate fertilizers and chlorates, 
are inexpensive, readily available, and easy to manufacture 
into Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). These materials are 
smuggled into Afghanistan in bulk, often hidden in cement, 
flour, or sugar bags. Bulk detection becomes critical in 
countering the IED networks, and can allow for a more proactive 
response, rather than a reactive response after an IED 
detonation. Efforts are currently underway to assist with 
training and equipping the Afghanistan National Security Forces 
(ANSF) to strengthen its ability to identify and counter the 
IED threat. The Committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to work with the Minster of Defense of Afghanistan, and 
leadership of the Coalition Force, to explore the feasibility 
of equipping and training the ANSF with a simple, fast, and 
effective bulk detection capability for nitrate fertilizers and 
chlorates.

                  JOINT URGENT OPERATIONAL NEEDS FUND

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Joint Urgent 
Operational Needs Fund.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends an additional appropriation of 
$10,766,000 for the Office of the Inspector General.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Title IX contains several general provisions, many of which 
extend or modify war-related authorities included in previous 
Acts. A brief description of the recommended provisions 
follows:
    Section 9001 has been amended and provides that funds made 
available in this title are in addition to funds appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
the current fiscal year.
    Section 9002 has been amended and provides for general 
transfer authority within Title IX.
    Section 9003 has been amended and provides that supervision 
and administration costs associated with a construction project 
funded with appropriations available for operation and 
maintenance, Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund or the Afghanistan 
Security Forces Fund may be obligated at the time a 
construction contract is awarded.
    Section 9004 provides for the procurement of passenger 
motor vehicles and heavy and light armored vehicles for use by 
military and civilian employees of the Department of Defense in 
the U.S. Central Command area.
    Section 9005 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Commander's Emergency Response Program, within certain 
limitations.
    Section 9006 provides lift and sustainment to coalition 
forces supporting military and stability operations in Iraq and 
Afghanistan.
    Section 9007 prohibits the establishment of permanent bases 
in Iraq or Afghanistan or United States control over Iraq oil 
resources.
    Section 9008 prohibits the use of funding in contravention 
of the United Nations Convention Against Torture and Other 
Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.
    Section 9009 limits the obligation of funding for the 
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund until certain conditions have 
been met.
    Section 9010 provides for the purchase of items of a 
particular investment unit cost from funding made available for 
operation and maintenance.
    Section 9011 has been amended and provides funding for the 
Task Force for Business and Stability Operations in 
Afghanistan.
    Section 9012 has been amended and provides funding for the 
operations and activities of the Office of Security Cooperation 
in Iraq and security assistance teams.
    Section 9013 has been amended and provides for the 
rescission of $46,022,000 from the following programs:
 2009 Appropriations:
    General Provisions:
        Retroactive Stop Loss Special Pay Program.....       $46,022,000
    Section 9014 has been amended and restricts funds provided 
under the heading Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide for 
payments under Coalition Support Funds for reimbursement to the 
Government of Pakistan until certain conditions are met.
                                TITLE X

    Title X contains one new general provision. A brief 
description of the recommended provision follows:
    Section 10001 is a new provision stating that the 
applicable allocation of new budget authority made by the 
Committee on Appropriations does not exceed the amount of 
proposed new budget authority.

            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

               CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities which require annual authorization 
or additional legislation, which to date has not been enacted.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and which might, under some circumstances, be 
construed as changing the application of law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years that are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill provides that appropriations shall remain 
available for more than one year for some programs for which 
the basic authorizing legislation does not presently authorize 
each extended availability.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has allocated 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
programs.
    Changes in the application of existing law found within 
appropriations headings:
    Language is included in various accounts placing a 
limitation on funds for emergencies and extraordinary expenses.
    Language is included that provides not more than 
$25,000,000 for the Combatant Commander Initiative Fund.
    Language is included that provides not more than 
$36,000,000 for emergencies and extraordinary expenses.
    Language is included that provides not less than 
$36,262,000 for the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Cooperative Agreement Program, of which not less than 
$3,600,000 shall be available for centers.
    Language is included that makes available $8,721,000 for 
certain classified activities, allows such funds to be 
transferred between certain accounts, and exempts such funds 
from the investment item unit cost of items ceiling.
    Language is included that provides that any transfer 
authority provided under the heading ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' shall be in addition to any other 
transfer authority provided in this Act.
    Language is included under the various Environmental 
Restoration accounts that provides that the Service Secretaries 
may transfer such funds for the purposes of the funds provided 
under such appropriations headings.
    Language is included that provides for specific 
construction, acquisition, or conversion of vessels under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy''.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy'' that provides funds 
for certain activities.
    Language is included under the heading ``Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' that provides 
$250,000,000 for the Defense Rapid Innovation Program and 
provides for the transfer of funds.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds within the ``National Defense Sealift Fund''.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
provided under ``National Defense Sealift Fund'' to award new 
contracts that provide for the acquisition of major components 
unless such components are made in the United States.
    Language is included that provides that the exercise of an 
option in a contract award through the obligation of previously 
appropriated funds shall not be considered to be the award of a 
new contract.
    Language is included that provides waiver authority of the 
Buy America provisions under ``National Defense Sealift Fund'' 
under certain circumstances.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$8,000,000 of funds provided under ``Defense Health Program'' 
shall be available for HIV/AIDS prevention education 
activities.
    Language is included that provides for the carry-over of 
one percent of the Operation and Maintenance account under the 
``Defense Health Program''.
    Language is included that limits obligation of funds 
provided under the ``Defense Health Program'' for the 
development or procurement of an electronic health record to a 
health record as set forth in the Joint Strategic Plan for 
Fiscal Years 2013-2015.
    Language is included that specifics the use of certain 
funds provided under ``Chemical Agents and Munitions 
Destruction''.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds under ``Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities''. 
Such transfer authority shall be in addition to other transfer 
authority provided elsewhere in the Act.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be used for publicity or propaganda 
purposes not authorized by Congress.
    Language is included that provides for conditions and 
limitations on the payment of compensation to, or employment 
of, foreign nationals.
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act may be obligated beyond the end of the 
fiscal year unless express provision for a greater period of 
availability is provided elsewhere in this Act.
    Language is included that provides a 20 percent limitation 
on the obligation of funds provided in this Act during the last 
two months of the fiscal year with certain exceptions.
    Language is included that provides for general transfer 
authority.
    Language is included that provides for incorporation of 
project level tables.
    Language is included that provides for the establishment of 
a baseline for application of reprogramming and transfer 
authorities for fiscal year 2014 and prohibits certain 
reprogrammings until after submission of a report.
    Language is included that provides for limitations on the 
use and transfer authority of working capital fund cash 
balances.
    Language is included that provides that prohibits funds 
appropriated in this Act to initiate a special access program 
without prior notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides limitations and 
conditions on the use of funds made available in this Act to 
initiate multi-year contracts.
    Language is included that provides for the use and 
obligation of funds for humanitarian and civic assistance costs 
under Chapter 20 of title 10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides that civilian personnel 
of the Department may not be managed on the basis of end 
strength or be subject to end strength limitations.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to influence congressional action on 
any matters pending before the Congress.
    Language is included that prohibits compensation from being 
paid to any member of the Army who is participating as a full-
time student and who receives benefits from the Education 
Benefits Fund when time spent as a full-time student is counted 
toward that member's service commitment.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds appropriated in title III of this Act for the Department 
of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase anchor and mooring chains manufactured only 
in the United States.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available to 
the Department of Defense from being used to demilitarize or 
dispose of surplus firearms.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on funds 
being used for the relocation of any Department of Defense 
entity into or within the National Capital Region.
    Language is included that provides for incentive payments 
authorized by section 504 of the Indian Financing Act of 1974 
(25 U.S.C. 1544).
    Language is included that provides that no funds made 
available in this Act for the Defense Media Activity may be 
used for national or international political or psychological 
activities.
    Language is included that provides for the obligation of 
funds for purposes specified in section 2350j(c) of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Language is included that provides funding for the Civil 
Air Patrol Corporation.
    Language is included that provides for the number of staff 
years of technical effort that may be funded for defense 
Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to procure carbon, alloy, or armor steel plate melted 
and rolled only in the United States and Canada.
    Language is included that defines congressional defense 
committees as being the Armed Services Committees and the 
Subcommittees on Defense of the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House and Senate.
    Language is included that provides for competitions between 
private firms and Department of Defense Depot Maintenance 
Activities for modification, depot maintenance, and repair of 
aircraft, vehicles, and vessels, as well as the production of 
components and other Defense-related articles.
    Language is included that provides for revocation of 
blanket waivers of the Buy America Act upon a finding that a 
country has violated a reciprocal trade agreement by 
discriminating against products produced in the United States 
that are covered by the agreement.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds for purposes specified in section 2921(c)(2) of the 1991 
National Defense Authorization Act, namely facility maintenance 
and repair and environmental restoration at military 
installations in the United States.
    Language is included that provides for the conveyance, 
without consideration, of relocatable housing units located at 
Grand Forks, Malmstrom, Mountain Home, Ellsworth, and Minot Air 
Force Bases to Indian Tribes that are excess to Air Force 
needs.
    Language is included that provides authority to use 
operation and maintenance appropriations to purchase items 
having an investment item unit cost of not more than $250,000.
    Language is included that prohibits the purchase of 
specified investment items within Working Capital Fund.
    Language is included that provides that none of the funds 
appropriated for the Central Intelligence Agency shall remain 
available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year except 
for funds appropriated for the Reserve for Contingencies, the 
Working Capital Fund, or other certain programs authorized 
under section 503 of the National Security Act.
    Language is included that provides that funds available for 
the Defense Intelligence Agency may be used for intelligence 
communications and intelligence information systems for the 
Services, the Unified and Specified Commands, and the component 
commends.
    Language is included that provides that not less than 
$12,000,000 within ``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' 
shall be for mitigation of environmental impacts on Indian 
lands.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to comply with the Buy American Act (chapter 83 of 
title 41, United States Code).
    Language is included that provides conditions under which 
contracts for studies, analyses, or consulting services may be 
entered into without competition on the basis of an unsolicited 
proposal.
    Language is included that provides for the limitations of 
funds made available in this Act to establish Field Operating 
Agencies.
    Language is included that provides grant authorities for 
the Department of Defense acting through the Office of Economic 
Adjustment.
    Language is included that provides for the limitations on 
the conversion of an activity or function of the Department of 
Defense to contractor performance.
    Language is included that provides for the rescission of 
previously appropriated funds.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to reduce authorized positions for 
military technicians (dual status) of the Army National Guard, 
Air National Guard, Army Reserve, and Air Force Reserve unless 
such reductions are a direct result of a reduction in military 
force structure.
    Language is included that provides that none of the funds 
made available in this Act may be obligated or expended for 
assistance to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea unless 
appropriated for that purpose.
    Language is included that provides for reimbursement to the 
National Guard and reserve when members of the National Guard 
and reserve provide intelligence or counterintelligence support 
to the Combatant Commands, Defense Agencies, and Joint 
Intelligence Activities.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to reduce civilian medical and medical 
support personnel assigned to military treatment facilities 
below the September 30, 2003, level unless the Service Surgeons 
General certify to the congressional defense committees that it 
is a responsible stewardship of resources to do so.
    Language is included that provides that Defense and Central 
Intelligence Agencies' drug interdiction and counter-drug 
activity funds may not be transferred to other agencies unless 
specifically provided in an appropriations law.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds 
appropriated by this Act for the procurement of ball and roller 
bearings other than those produced by a domestic source and of 
domestic origin.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to purchase supercomputers manufactured only in the 
United States unless the Secretary certifies such acquisition 
must be made for national security purposes.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this or any other Act to transfer administrative 
responsibilities or budgetary resources of any program, 
project, or activity financed by this Act to the jurisdiction 
of another Federal agency not financed by this Act without 
expressed authorization of the Congress.
    Language is included that provides for prior congressional 
notification of article transfers to international peacekeeping 
organizations.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for contractor bonuses from being paid 
due to business restructuring.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to be used to support personnel supporting approved non-
traditional defense activities.
    Language is included that provides for the Department of 
Defense to dispose of negative unliquidated or unexpended 
balances for expired or closed accounts.
    Language is included that provides conditions for the use 
of equipment of the National Guard Distance Learning Project on 
a space-available, reimbursable basis.
    Language is included that provides for the availability of 
funds provided by this Act to implement cost-effective 
agreements for required heating facility modernization in the 
Kaiserslautern Military Community, Germany.
    Language is included that provides for the limitation on 
the use of funds appropriated in title IV to procure end-items 
for delivery to military forces for operational training, 
operational use, or inventory requirements.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver of the 
``Buy America'' provisions for certain cooperative programs.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to support the training of members of 
foreign security forces who have engaged in gross violations of 
human rights.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act for repairs or maintenance to military 
family housing units.
    Language is included that provides obligation authority for 
new starts for advanced concept technology demonstration 
projects only after notification to the congressional defense 
committees.
    Language is included that provides that the Secretary of 
Defense shall provide a classified quarterly report on certain 
matters as directed in the classified annex accompanying this 
Act.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available to the Department of Defense to provide support to an 
agency that is more than 90 days in arrears in making payments 
to the Department of Defense for goods or services provided on 
a reimbursable basis.
    Language is included that provides for the use of National 
Guard personnel to support ground-based elements of the 
National Ballistic Missile Defense System.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to transfer to any nongovernmental entity 
ammunition held by the Department of Defense that has a 
center--fire cartridge and is designated as ``armor piercing'' 
except for demilitarization purposes.
    Language is included that provides for a waiver by the 
Chief, National Guard Bureau or his designee for all or part of 
consideration in cases of personal property leases of less than 
one year.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to purchase alcoholic beverages.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds made available in this Act under ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the Federal 
Government for classified purposes.
    Language is included that provides for the forced matching 
of disbursement and obligations made by the Department of 
Defense in fiscal year 2014.
    Language is included that provides a limitation of 
$200,000,000 for transfer to the Department of State Global 
Security Contingency Fund, and set forth certain reporting 
requirements prior to such transfer.
    Language is included that provides grant authority for the 
construction and furnishing of additional Fisher Houses to meet 
the needs of military family members when confronted with the 
illness or hospitalization of an eligible military beneficiary.
    Language is included that provides funding and transfer 
authority for the Israeli Cooperative missile defense programs.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to be obligated to modify the command and 
control relationship to give the Fleet Forces Command 
administration and operations control of U.S. Naval Forces 
assigned to the Pacific Fleet.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to properly complete prior year shipbuilding programs.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available in this Act are deemed to be specifically authorized 
by Congress for purposes of section 504 of the National 
Security Act of 1947.
    Language is included that prohibits the use of funds made 
available in this Act to initiate a new start program without 
prior written notification.
    Language is included that provides that the budget of the 
President for fiscal year 2014 shall include separate budget 
justification documents for costs of the United States Armed 
Forces' participation in contingency operations that contain 
certain budget exhibits as defined in the Department of Defense 
Financial Management Regulation.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used for the research, development, test, 
evaluation, procurement, or deployment of nuclear armed 
interceptors of a missile defense system.
    Language is included that provides the Secretary of Defense 
discretionary authority to make grants to the United Service 
Organizations and the Red Cross if he determines it to be in 
the national interest.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used to reduce or disestablish the 
operation of the 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron of the 
Air Force Reserve.
    Language is included that prohibits funds made available in 
this Act from being used for the integration of foreign 
intelligence information unless the information has been 
lawfully collected and processed during conduct of authorized 
foreign intelligence activities.
    Language is included that provides that at the time members 
of reserve components of the Armed Forces are called or ordered 
to active duty, each member shall be notified in writing of the 
expected period during which the member will be mobilized.
    Language is included that provides that the Secretary of 
Defense may transfer funds from any available Department of the 
Navy appropriation to any available Navy ship construction 
appropriation to liquidate costs caused by rate adjustments or 
other economic factors.
    Language is included that provides for the use of current 
and expired ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' subdivisions 
to reimburse the Judgment Fund.
    Language is included that prohibits the transfer of program 
authorities related to tactical unmanned aerial vehicles from 
the Army.
    Language is included that provides funding and authority 
for the Asia Pacific Regional Initiative program.
    Language is included that limits the obligation authority 
of funds provided for the Director of National Intelligence to 
the current fiscal year except for research and technology 
which shall remain available for the current and the following 
fiscal years.
    Language is included that provides for the adjustment of 
obligations within the ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' 
appropriation.
    Language is included that prohibits transfers of funds 
until the Director of National Intelligence submits a baseline 
for application of reprogramming and transfer authorities.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of up 
to $20,000,000 of funds available for the Program Manager for 
Information Sharing Environment to be transferred to other 
departments and agencies for certain purposes.
    Language is included that sets forth reprogramming and 
transfer procedures for the National Intelligence Program.
    Language is included that provides that the Director of 
National Intelligence shall provide budget exhibits identifying 
the five year future-years intelligence program.
    Language is included that defines the congressional 
intelligence committees.
    Language is included that directs the Department of Defense 
to report on the Cost of War Execution Report on a monthly 
basis.
    Language is included that provides that funds from certain 
operation and maintenance accounts may be transferred to a 
central fund established pursuant to section 2493(d) of title 
10, United States Code.
    Language is included that provides that funds may be used 
for the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
    Language is included that provides that agencies post 
congressionally directed reports on a public website.
    Language is included that provides limitations on the award 
of contracts to contractors that require mandatory arbitration 
for certain claims as a condition of employment or a 
contractual relationship. The Secretary is authorized to waive 
the applicability of these limitations for national security 
interests.
    Language is included that provides funds and transfer 
authority for the Joint Department of Defense-Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on the 
number of senior executives employed by the Office of the 
Director of National Intelligence.
    Language is included that provides a limitation on certain 
senior mentors unless such mentors make certain financial 
disclosures.
    Language is included that provides authority to purchase 
heavy and light armored vehicles notwithstanding price or other 
limitations on the purchase of passenger carrying vehicles.
    Language is included that provides availability of funds 
appropriated under ``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' 
for activities related to the military buildup of Guam.
    Language is included that places limitations on the number 
of parking spaces provided by the BRAC 133 project, with 
certain waiver authorities.
    Language is included that requires the Secretary of Defense 
to provide quarterly reports on civilian personnel end 
strength.
    Language is included that provides transfer authority for 
the Director of National Intelligence for the National 
Intelligence Program.
    Language is included that provides funding for 
construction, renovation, repair, and expansion of public 
schools on military installations.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to transfer or 
release certain individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba 
into the United States, its territories, or possessions.
    Language is included that places limitations on the 
transfer or release of certain individuals detained at 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to the custody or control of a foreign 
country unless certain certifications are provided.
    Language is included that prohibits funds to construct, 
acquire, or modify any facility in the United States, its 
territories, or possessions to house individuals detained at 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Language is included that places limitations on the 
provision of funds to any corporation with an unpaid Federal 
tax liability.
    Language is included that places limitations on the 
provision of funds to any corporation convicted of a felony 
criminal violation within the preceding 24 months.
    Language is included that directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to obligate and expend funds previously appropriated for 
the purposes for which such funds were originally provided.
    Language is included that prohibits the Department of 
Defense from entering into certain agreements with 
Rosoboronexport with certain waiver authorities.
    Language is included that repeals a reporting requirement 
in division A of Public Law 107-117.
    Language is included that prohibits the purchase or 
manufacture of a United States flag uncles such flag is treated 
as a covered item under section 2533a(b).
    Language is included that provides an additional 
appropriation and transfer authority to the Services for 
purposes of implementing a Sexual Assault Special Victims 
Program.
    Language is included that prohibits reduction or 
elimination in funding for a program, project, or activity 
until such reduction or elimination is enacted in an 
appropriations Act, or pursuant to the reprogramming or 
transfer provisions in this Act.
    Language is included that provides an additional 
appropriation and transfer authority for pay for military 
personnel.
    Language is included that provides for the transfer of 
funds to the Coast Guard.
    Language is included that places limitations and 
requirements on the use of funds for reimbursements to key 
cooperating nations for logistical, military, and other 
support.
    Language is included that requires $35,000,000 to be made 
available for support for foreign forces participation in 
Counter Lord's Resistance Army efforts.
    Language is included that provides funds and transfer 
authority for overseas contingency operations.
    Language is included that provides authority for 
infrastructure projects in Afghanistan subject to certain 
conditions and reporting requirements.
    Language is included that provides authority for the 
provision of assistance to Afghanistan Security Forces subject 
to certain notification requirements.
    Language is included that requires the Chiefs of National 
Guard and Reserve components to submit the modernization 
priority assessment for their respective components to the 
congressional defense committees.
    Language is included that allows the Director of the Joint 
Improvised Explosive Defeat Organization to undertake certain 
activities, and allows funds to be transferred to other 
appropriations accounts elsewhere in this Act subject to prior 
written notification to the congressional defense committees.
    Language is included that provides that funds made 
available in title IX are in addition to amounts appropriated 
or otherwise made available for the Department of Defense for 
fiscal year 2014.
    Language is included that provides for transfer authority 
between appropriations made available in title IX.
    Language is included that provides for supervision and 
administration costs associated with overseas contingency 
operations.
    Language is included that provides authority to purchase 
passenger, heavy, and light armored vehicles notwithstanding 
price or other limitations on the purchase of passenger 
carrying vehicles for use in the U.S. Central Command area of 
responsibility.
    Language is included that provides funds and authority for 
the Commander's Emergency Response Program and establishes 
certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that authorizes the use of funds to 
provide certain assistance to coalition forces supporting 
military and stability operations in Afghanistan and 
establishes certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Afghanistan Security Forces Funds and requires certain 
certifications.
    Language is included that authorizes funds in title IX for 
the purchase of items having an investment unit cost of up to 
$500,000, subject to certain conditions.
    Language is included that authorizes up to $63,800,000 
under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, Army'' for the 
Task Force for Business and Stability Operations in 
Afghanistan, subject to certain reporting requirements.
    Language is included that authorizes up to $209,000,000 
under the heading ``Operation and Maintenance, Air Force'' for 
the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq and security 
assistance teams, and operations and activities authorized in 
the fiscal year 2014 National Defense Authorization, subject to 
written notice requirements.
    Language is included that provides for the rescission of 
previously appropriated funds.
    Language is included that places limitations on the use of 
Coalition Support Funds for the Government of Pakistan.


                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying bill.
    Language has been included under ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for certain classified activities.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Army'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Navy'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Air Force'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Defense-Wide'' which provides for the transfer of 
funds for environmental restoration, reduction and recycling of 
hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings and debris, or for 
similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Environmental 
Restoration, Formerly Used Defense Sites'' which provides for 
the transfer of funds for environmental restoration, reduction 
and recycling of hazardous waste, removal of unsafe buildings 
and debris, or for similar purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Research, Development, 
Test and Evaluation, Defense Wide'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds for the Defense Rapid Innovation Program to 
appropriations for research, development, test and evaluation 
for specific purposes.
    Language has been included under ``Drug Interdiction and 
Counter-Drug Activities, Defense'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds to appropriations available to the Department 
of Defense for military personnel of the reserve components; 
for operation and maintenance; for procurement; and for 
research, development, test and evaluation.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8005'' which provides for the transfer of working capital funds 
to other appropriations accounts of the Department of Defense 
for military functions.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8008'' which provides for the transfer of funds between working 
capital funds and the ``Foreign Currency Fluctuations, 
Defense'' appropriation and the ``Operation and Maintenance'' 
appropriation accounts.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8015'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense Pilot Mentor-Protege Program to any other 
appropriation for the purposes of implementing a Mentor-Protege 
Program development assistance agreement.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8051'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to appropriations 
available for the pay of military personnel in connection with 
support and services of eligible organizations and activities 
outside the Department of Defense.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8066'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'' to other activities of the 
federal government.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8068'' which provides for the transfer of funds available under 
``Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide'' to the Department 
of State ``Global Security Contingency Fund''.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8070'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Procurement, Defense-Wide'' and ``Research, Development, Test 
and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'' for the Israeli Cooperative 
Programs.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8072'' which provides for the transfer of funds under the 
heading ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'' to fund prior 
year shipbuilding cost increases.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8081'' which provides for the transfer of funds from any 
available Department of the Navy appropriations to any 
available Navy ship construction appropriation for the purpose 
of liquidating necessary changes resulting from inflation, 
market fluctuations, or rate adjustments.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8088'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated in 
the Intelligence Community Management Account for the Program 
Manager for the Information Sharing Environment to other 
departments and agencies for the purposes of Government-wide 
information sharing activities.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8093'' which provides for the transfer of funds from 
``Operation and Maintenance, Army'', ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'', and ``Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force'' to the central fund established for Fisher Houses and 
Suites.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8094'' which provides that funds appropriated by this Act may 
be made available for the purpose of making remittances to the 
Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8098'' which provides for the transfer of funds appropriated 
for operation and maintenance for the Defense Health Program to 
the Joint Department of Defense--Department of Veterans Affairs 
Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8106'' which provides for the transfer of funds for the 
National Intelligence Program.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8122'' which provides for the transfer of funds from the 
Department of Defense to the Army, Air Force, Navy and Marine 
Corps, for purposes of implementation of a Sexual Assault 
Special Victims Program.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
8126'' which provides for the transfer of funds for pay for 
military personnel for purposes of fully funding the authorized 
military pay raise.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy'' which provides for the transfer of funds to 
the Coast Guard ``Operating Expenses'' account.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Overseas 
Contingency Operations Transfer Fund'' which provides for the 
transfer of funds to military personnel accounts; operation and 
maintenance accounts; procurement accounts; and working capital 
fund accounts for expenses directly related to overseas 
contingency operations by United States military forces.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Afghanistan 
Infrastructure Fund'' which provides for the transfer of funds 
to the Department of State for purposes of undertaking 
infrastructure projects in Afghanistan.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Afghanistan 
Security Forces Fund'' for the purposes of allowing the 
Commander, Combined Security Transition Command--Afghanistan, 
or the Secretary's designee, to provide assistance, with the 
concurrence of the Secretary of State, to the security forces 
of Afghanistan.
    Language has been included under title IX ``Joint 
Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Fund'' which provides for 
the transfer of funds to appropriations for military personnel; 
operation and maintenance; procurement; research, development, 
test and evaluation; and defense working capital funds to 
assist United States forces in the defeat of improvised 
explosive devices.
    Language has been included under ``General Provisions, Sec. 
9002'' which provides for the authority to transfer funds 
between the appropriations or funds made available to the 
Department of Defense in title IX, subject to certain 
conditions.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House or Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

General Provisions, 2009................................     $46,022,000
National Defense Sealift Fund, 2011/XXXX................      28,000,000
National Defense Sealift Fund, 2012/XXXX................      14,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2012/2014...................      30,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 2012/2014..............     443,000,000
Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2012/2014...............      10,000,000
Aircraft Procurement, Navy, 2013/2015...................      85,000,000
Weapons Procurement, Navy, 2013/2015....................       5,000,000
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, 2013/2017............      68,000,000
Other Procurement, Navy, 2013/2015......................       3,553,000
Procurement, Marine Corps, 2013/2015....................      12,650,000
Missile Procurement, Air Force, 2013/2015...............      60,000,000
Other Procurement, Air Force, 2013/2015.................      38,900,000
Procurement, Defense-Wide, 2013/2015....................      72,776,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Army, 2013/
    2014................................................     380,861,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy, 2013/
    2014................................................      49,331,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force, 
    2013/2014...........................................     115,000,000
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-
    Wide, 2013/2014.....................................     213,000,000
Ship Modernization, Operations, and Sustainment Fund, 
    2013/2014...........................................   1,414,500,000

                    TRANSFER OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the bill contains a general provision 
which allows for the transfer of unexpended balances from the 
Operation and Maintenance and Military Personnel accounts to 
the ``Foreign Currency Fluctuation, Defense'' account to 
address shortfalls due to foreign currency fluctuation.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    This bill does not contain any provision that specifically 
directs the promulgation or completion of a rule.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

          COMPLIANCE WITH RULE XIII, CL. 3(E) (RAMSEYER RULE)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets and 
existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

   SECTION 8159 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2002


                   (Division A of Public Law 107-117)

SEC. 8159. MULTI-YEAR AIRCRAFT LEASE PILOT PROGRAM.

    (a) * * *
    (c) Under the aircraft lease Pilot Program authorized by 
this section:
          (1)* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(7) Not later than 1 year after the date on which the 
first aircraft is delivered under this Pilot Program, and 
yearly thereafter on the anniversary of the first delivery, the 
Secretary shall submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees describing the status of the Pilot Program. The 
Report will be based on at least 6 months of experience in 
operating the Pilot Program.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                      EARMARK DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in Clause 9 of rule XXI.

                 COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, which requires that the report accompanying a bill 
providing new budget authority contain a statement detailing 
how that authority compares with the reports submitted under 
section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from 
the Committee's section 302(a) allocation. This information 
follows:

                                             (in millions of dollar)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  302(b) Allocation             This bill
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Budget                    Budget
                                                               authority     Outlays     authority     Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees: Subcommittee on Defense
    Discretionary:
        General Purpose.....................................      512,522      543,698      512,522   \1\543,685
        Overseas Contingency Operations\2\..................       85,769       46,707       85,769       42.994
    Mandatory...............................................          514          514          514          514
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill.

                        (In millions of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  Non-OCO        OCO
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Projection of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2014......................................   \1\333,314    \1\42,994
    2015......................................      106,060       27,195
    2016......................................       38,197        9,871
    2017......................................       17,580        3,534
    2018 and future years.....................       12,477        1,311
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
Note: OCO is Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism.

          FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Act of 1974 (Public Law 
93-344), as amended, no new budget or outlays are provided by 
the accompanying bill for financial assistance to State and 
local governments.



  ADDITIONAL VIEWS--FY 2014 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS BILL

    With this bill, the Committee has carried out its 
Constitutional responsibility to recommend the appropriations 
necessary to provide for the common defense of our Nation. The 
Committee carried out its work in a collegial and bipartisan 
fashion consistent with longstanding traditions of the 
Committee.
    The bill provides $512.5 billion in new budget authority 
covering all Department of Defense and Intelligence Community 
functions except for Military Construction and Family Housing. 
This is $3.4 billion below the President's request, and $5.2 
billion below last year's enacted level.
    This level of funding is sufficient for the security of the 
Nation and is responsive to the needs of the troops. However, 
this funding level is inconsistent with the underlying 
assumption behind the overall appropriations 302(b) allocation. 
The majority allocated only $967 billion, instead of $1.058 
trillion, for all the Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 appropriation 
bills; under the Budget Control Act (BCA), the lower level 
assumes the sequester remains in place. Yet this bill ignores 
the BCA's sequester cap on defense funding, exceeding that 
firewall by almost $50 billion. Even if we enacted the $512.5 
billion level in this bill, it would be cut back down to the 
cap level absent an agreement to end the sequester.
    The bill makes the best resource decisions allowable under 
the given allocation necessary to address the readiness of U.S. 
forces and minimize the problems that began due to late 
enactment of the FY 2013 bill, shortfalls that emerged in 
Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), and the initial effects 
of sequestration. This is evident in Committee recommended 
increases related to shortfalls in facility maintenance, 
equipment reset, and due to the price of fuel.
    The bill also begins to address the epidemic of sexual 
assault in the military. In addition to the budget request, the 
bill adds $25 million for a Sexual Assault Special Victims 
Advocate program and reinforces the recommendations included in 
the FY 2014 House-passed National Defense Authorization Act.
    While the need for prevention is recognized by the Defense 
Department's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office's 
(SAPRO) focus on training, results to date, including an 
estimated 26,000 unwanted sexual contacts in FY 2012, clearly 
show that more must be done. The prevalence of sexual assaults 
at the military academies indicates the SAPRO's training 
regimen has not influenced a culture that must be changed.
    The Department of Defense must reach beyond internal 
resources and better screen both personnel who recruit and 
train service members and those charged with preventing and 
responding to sexual assault. This bill includes language and 
funding to respond to sexual assault in the military. While 
essential, these words and dollars must be matched by the 
leadership of our military officials to change the culture that 
is enabling such outrageous behavior.
    Another shortcoming in this bill, especially in light of 
the President's speech at the National Defense University on 
May 23, 2013, is the absence of a new approach for the 
detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. It is increasingly 
clear that the Committee and the Congress in general must find 
a way to break the stalemate that keeps the facility operating 
in its present capacity.
    The status quo has produced an untenable result: a form of 
purgatory where these individuals may be detained indefinitely. 
The original premise for opening Guantanamo, that detainees 
would not be able to challenge their detention, was found 
unconstitutional five years ago. In the meantime, the 
Guantanamo detention facility has stained U.S. standing around 
the globe and become a symbol that America selectively observes 
the rule of law. In addition, it is a recruitment tool for 
extremists and hurts cooperation with other nations.
    Today, the facility still holds 166 detainees without 
charge. Some have been held for as long as a decade. Over half 
of the detainee population has been cleared for release, but 
remain in custody due to the constraints imposed by current 
law. In contrast, transfers were once a regular occurrence. 
During the previous administration, 530 detainees were 
transferred from Guantanamo with congressional support.
    In addition to transfers, both the current and previous 
administrations have relied on U.S. courts to convict hundreds 
of people for terrorism or terrorism-related offenses. This 
record of success, together with the prospect for military 
tribunals in the most egregious cases, as suggested in the 
Attorney General's Northwestern University speech in 2012, 
clearly indicate the U.S. has the means to handle detainees in 
a manner that is not contradictory to our fundamental legal 
principles. It is possible, in this bill, to take a significant 
step toward this objective.
    This bill also lacks an end to the sequester. According to 
the June 2013 DoD Report on the Joint Committee Sequestration 
for FY 2013, during the remainder of FY 2013, $36.2 billion 
will be sequestered from the accounts in the DoD Appropriations 
bill and an additional $1 billion will be sequestered from 
Military Construction and Family Housing. The majority of the 
reduction, $20.3 billion, will come from the operation and 
maintenance accounts. These reductions will continue to 
diminish the readiness of U.S. forces.
    Should sequestration apply in FY 2014, approximately $52 
billion would be cut from the Defense Department. Based on the 
practice adopted in FY 2013, it seems likely that OCO will be 
spared from sequestration to ensure full support of deployed 
forces. As a result, the full burden of sequestration will fall 
on the DoD's base budget of $512.5 billion. Two fundamental 
problems stem from this. First, for the remainder of FY 2013, 
DoD will have to defer and curtail other activities such as 
readiness related training that, in time, will hurt the forces 
next to deploy. Second, in FY 2014, DoD will be further 
constrained with opportunities to defer activities being 
exhausted, leading to greater impacts on readiness and 
modernization programs. Sequestration in FY 2014 will 
counteract the many beneficial resourcing decisions included in 
this bill.
    With respect to the appropriations process, these wounds 
are self-inflicted and correctable. On each FY 2014 
Appropriations bill reported out of Full Committee to date, 
amendments have been proposed, but rejected, to replace 
sequestration. Since the passage of the BCA in August 2011, 
sequestration has been universally regarded as destructive and 
poor public policy. It hurts the effective operations of 
government including military training and readiness as well as 
the modernization programs that support both current operations 
and maintain the industrial base needed to respond to future 
contingencies. Given the opportunities at hand, the Committee 
should take the corrective action needed to address this 
problem.
    Although the bill leaves several significant, long-term 
issues waiting for solutions, it is necessary and timely. The 
recommendations in this bill, viewed in isolation from the 
allocation issues noted above, were prepared in a thoughtful 
manner that represents the best traditions of the Committee.

                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Peter J. Visclosky.

           Additional Views of the Honorable Rosa L. DeLauro

    I want to acknowledge the work Chairmen Rogers and Young 
and Ranking Members Lowey and Visclosky have put in to produce 
a bipartisan defense appropriations bill. I support a defense 
bill, but we are operating in an environment where what is done 
on the defense bill has a direct effect on programs that 
benefit children, families and the sick. I believe the 
committee missed the chance to show real leadership for 
American families when it rejected my amendment to add the 
bipartisan-backed Labor-HHS appropriation measure enacted for 
FY 2012 to the defense appropriations bill.
    When this Labor-H measure was enacted in 2011, an 
overwhelming majority of this Committee--41 of 51 Members, 
including 23 Republicans and 18 Democrats--voted for it. The 
deficit then was almost $1.1 trillion. Now, it is projected to 
be $642 billion. In other words, if we could afford this 
bipartisan-agreed-upon funding level then, we can definitely 
afford it now that the deficit has been reduced by over 40%.
    There is a clear precedent for this action under the 
current Majority. When the Labor-H bill was enacted for FY 
2012, the defense bill was coupled with it as part of a larger 
omnibus appropriations package. The amendment I offered in 
Committee would have simply repeated that process up front, in 
order to ensure that the fundamental education, health and 
labor priorities get a vote. Otherwise, I am not assured they 
will ever be brought before this committee. They never have 
under this Majority, and the Chairman has deftly avoided my 
questions on his intentions for this year.
    Some in the House Majority argued that this amendment 
violates the 302(b)s. It did. But these caps set by the House 
Majority can easily be changed. And it seems beside the point 
to argue about the 302(b)s when the Defense bill reported by 
the committee is in violation of the Budget Control Act (BCA), 
which is the law of the land.
    The BCA, after sequestration, caps defense spending at $498 
billion and non-defense spending at $469 billion. This defense 
bill provides $14.2 billion above the defense cap on this bill 
alone--and is almost $26 billion over if you count defense 
spending already approved in the MilCon/VA and Homeland 
Security bills passed by the House. That is before we even 
consider Energy and Water, which includes substantial defense 
funding.
    Now I am a supporter of defense funding and of the funding 
levels in this particular defense appropriations bill. However, 
I am not a supporter of making defense whole, so to speak, 
while shredding our domestic programs. I think we should work 
together to repeal the indiscriminate across-the-board 
sequester cuts and pass a budget that funds all of our 
fundamental priorities adequately.
    Some also made the argument that my amendment would have 
killed the defense bill. But my amendment did nothing to the 
defense bill. Instead, it provided an opportunity to put a 
Labor-HHS bill on the floor again.
    The amendment I offered made no changes to what Congress 
passed for Labor-HHS-Education, in an overwhelming bipartisan 
fashion in 2011. If I had my way, I would change some funding 
levels and riders in the Labor-HHS bill for FY2012, but I put 
forward this amendment because it represented a previously-
agreed-to bipartisan compromise on spending for Labor, Health, 
and Education programs, all of which are too important to 
continue being ignored by this Committee.
    We do not live in a world of defense and security only. We 
need to fund the critical programs that protect the public 
health and safety, promote and develop our workforce, and 
educate the next generation of Americans just as much as we 
need to provide sufficient funding for defense. And we should 
debate them with the same vigor that we debate defense funding. 
Indeed, it is our responsibility as members of Congress to do 
so.
    My amendment represented a bipartisan agreement that the 
Majority already agreed to for funding of labor, health and 
education programs. It seems that these days we cannot even 
agree to do today what we had agreed to do yesterday.