[Senate Report 113-113]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


 

113th Congress                                         Calendar No. 218
 1st Session                     SENATE                          Report
                                                                113-113
_______________________________________________________________________
                                                                                                                 



              STRENGTHENING AMERICA'S SCHOOLS ACT OF 2013

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                    COMMITTEE ON HEALTH, EDUCATION,
                          LABOR, AND PENSIONS
                          UNITED STATES SENATE

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                              to accompany

                                S. 1094




                October 11, 2013.--Ordered to be printed


              STRENGTHENING AMERICA'S SCHOOLS ACT OF 2013




113th Congress                                         Calendar No. 218
 1st Session                     SENATE                          Report
                                                                113-113
_______________________________________________________________________

                                                       

              STRENGTHENING AMERICA'S SCHOOLS ACT OF 2013

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                    COMMITTEE ON HEALTH, EDUCATION,

                          LABOR, AND PENSIONS

                          UNITED STATES SENATE

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                              to accompany

                                S. 1094




                October 11, 2013.--Ordered to be printed
                            C O N T E N T S

                                                                   Page
                                                                   Page
  I. Purpose, Need for Legislation, and Goals of Reauthorization......1
 II. Legislative History and Committee Action.........................5
III. Explanation of Bill and Committee Views.........................15
 IV. Regulatory Impact Statement.....................................61
  V. Application of Law to the Legislative Branch....................62
 VI. Cost Estimate...................................................62
VII. Section-by-Section Analysis.....................................71
VIII.Additional Views................................................92

 IX. Changes in Existing Law.........................................99
                                                       Calendar No. 218
113th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                    113-113

======================================================================



 
              STRENGTHENING AMERICA'S SCHOOLS ACT OF 2013

                                _______
                                

                October 11, 2013.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Harkin, from the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
                   Pensions, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                         [To accompany S.1094]

    The Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions to 
which was referred the bill (S.1094) to amend the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act of 1965, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an 
amendment and recommends that the bill (as amended) do pass.

     I. Purpose, Need for Legislation, and Goals of Reauthorization

    The Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013 (SASA) is a 
comprehensive reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965 (ESEA). Its purpose is to once again, 
affirm the Federal focus on preK-12 education policy to ensure 
access and equity of educational opportunities for all 
students. The committee also intends this Act to update, 
improve and streamline programs under the ESEA for the next 5 
years. SASA represents the Federal Government's continued 
commitment to preK-12 education, to students in disadvantaged 
situations, and recommits the Federal Government to the 
fundamental goals of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
as passed in 1965.
    Equity and access to high quality education has been the 
purpose of Federal education law since the passage of ESEA in 
April 1965. ESEA, the first large-scale Federal education act, 
focused resources on schools serving disadvantaged students and 
became the first of three legs in the Federal education 
footprint to address access and equity. Along with the Head 
Start Act of 1965 and the Educating All Handicapped Children 
Act of 1975 (now known as the Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act), ESEA made the promise to prepare all children 
for school and provide educational opportunities for each of 
those children.
    Since the original implementation of those three laws, much 
has improved. We now serve almost 1 million children each year 
through the Head Start and Early Head Start programs, enhancing 
the lives of those children and their families by providing 
services and supports that prepare those children for school. 
IDEA provides the over 6 million students with disabilities 
with access to school, something not guaranteed prior to its 
passage. ESEA, the first leg of Federal education legislation, 
has provided enormous support to schools, teachers, and 
communities aiming to ensure disadvantaged students have access 
to high quality education.
    Despite these landmark efforts, much remains to be 
accomplished. Since the identification of a ``rising tide of 
mediocrity'' by the Reagan era report ``A Nation at Risk,'' we 
have seen a Federal focus on improving education outcomes, 
particularly for those students most at need. With the passage 
of the Improving America's Schools Act (IASA) in 1994, the 
concepts of state-wide standards and setting goals for all 
students were introduced to Federal education policy. In 2001, 
Congress passed the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) which added 
accountability requirements to Federal education policy in 
pursuit of ESEA's historic mission of supporting equitable 
access to education. With NCLB, our Nation said it was 
imperative that all students in every State, including those 
who are poor students, those who are minorities, those with 
disabilities, and those who are English learners, must have 
both the expectation to meet high academic standards and access 
to the teachers, materials, and other resources to have the 
opportunities to achieve those standards. No longer would 
students in one part of a State or even one part of a school 
district be subjected to lower expectations and fewer 
educational supports.
    NCLB brought with it not only high expectations for all 
students but requirements that schools must communicate to 
families and communities about how well, or in some cases, how 
poorly, schools were meeting the goals of preparing students. 
That reporting had to occur not only for a State or a school 
district but for each school and for each group of students 
within a school. No longer would States or districts or schools 
be able to serve most of their students well. With NCLB each 
State education system was held accountable for the outcome for 
all students.
    However, there were challenges with NCLB. The 
accountability goals established by NCLB were one-size-fits-all 
goals and did not take into consideration the needs of local 
districts. Likewise, in many cases the reporting requirements 
that made NCLB such a breakthrough were weakened by exempting 
thousands of schools from those requirements, thus denying 
families and communities crucial information by which to hold 
their local schools accountable. NCLB also contained a loophole 
that allowed valuable resources to be diverted from schools 
most in need of more support and used by schools with access to 
greater resources, thus denying the children most in need the 
high quality education intended by the passage of ESEA in 1965.
    Within this context, the committee set forth to build on 
the strengths of previous Federal education policy and to forge 
new, stronger, more flexible partnerships with States, local 
school districts and the communities where children learn. With 
reporting out the Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013, 
it is the intent of the committee to forge these partnerships 
in order to jointly establish high expectations for all 
students and to provide States and local school districts with 
the resources and flexibility to meet those expectations, 
particularly for disadvantaged students.
    To address the educational needs of the country and to 
create stronger partnerships that enhance the opportunities for 
children throughout the Nation, the Strengthening America's 
Schools Act of 2013 builds on the work of the past 37 years and 
upholds the original intent of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965.
    Specifically, the SASA maintains the Federal commitment to 
equity and access to educational opportunities through 
continued transparency of data and the fair distribution of 
resources. State and local educational agencies will continue 
to be required to teach all students to rigorous standards that 
will prepare them for postsecondary education and for careers. 
Students will continue to be assessed in the areas of 
mathematics and reading, and results of those assessments will 
be reported to families and communities in order to provide 
them with information about the effectiveness of their local 
schools and the data to participate in the improvement of those 
schools. That assessment data will be reported by subgroups so 
that families and communities will also know how well schools 
are instructing all groups of students and will be able to 
target resources to those groups most in need.
    SASA also closes a loophole in the requirement of local 
school districts to ensure schools in the poorest areas receive 
at least as much funding as those in wealthier areas. In the 
past, local educational agencies have been permitted to use 
average teacher salaries to calculate the distribution of funds 
to schools. Under SASA, schools will need to use actual 
salaries to determine the level of resources each school is 
receiving.
    Decades of research have shown that providing high quality 
early education to children enhances their educational 
outcomes. SASA focuses greater attention than previous 
reauthorization bills on children during their early years, at 
the K-3 grades and before entry into school. The Act provides 
for greater access to high-quality literacy instruction in 
early childhood education programs and encourages States to 
provide full-day kindergarten if it is not yet available to 
families. SASA also encourages districts with the lowest 
performing schools to develop or expand early childhood 
education to increase the likelihood of children entering 
school ready to learn.
    SASA sets a goal of ensuring that all students are college- 
and career-ready when they graduate from high school and 
targets Federal intervention to the poorest performing schools 
in each State. The bill aims for a Federal role that is more 
focused, provides States and local educational agencies with 
more flexibility, and strives for more efficiency. It does this 
by focusing on teaching and learning, not unnecessary testing 
and sanctioning. SASA eliminates the Federal one-size-fits-all 
approach and replaces it with State-designed accountability 
systems, and allows States to identify their own performance 
targets and to design their own accountability systems to 
measure the academic growth of each child, and to include 
assessments in other subjects when measuring the performance of 
students.
    SASA recognizes that, day-to-day, it is teachers and 
principals who make the difference in the lives of their 
students. To that end, the committee has crafted SASA in such a 
way as to support teachers as they become as effective as 
possible for the students they serve. SASA requires States to 
craft professional development processes that provide teachers 
and school leaders with feedback about their instruction and 
management. That information comes from multiple sources, 
including student achievement, supervisor or peer observations 
and other sources such as student feedback.
    In addition, SASA would provide resources to improve 
teachers' skills in the STEM subjects and prepare more teachers 
to work with the diverse learners in America's schools, 
including students with disabilities and English learners. SASA 
also provides incentives to ensure that effective teachers and 
leaders are working with those children who are most in need.
    SASA consolidates dozens of small programs into larger, 
more comprehensive grant programs to help leverage better 
teaching and learning. These new programs--such as high school 
reform; literacy; STEM; and successful, safe and healthy 
students--will be more focused to support better results and 
leverage more improvements, while also providing greater 
flexibility to parents, schools, and States to adopt the best 
approach to improving the education of their children. This 
flexibility also allows States and local educational agencies 
to determine which interventions best fit their needs.
    While SASA consolidates many programs, it also maintains 
and improves programs designed to support special populations, 
including English learners, American Indian students, native 
Hawaiian students, native Alaskan students, neglected and 
delinquent children, children in foster care, and homeless 
students. The bill also supports students with disabilities as 
they participate in the general education experience and work 
to attain college- and career-readiness alongside their peers.
    The SASA provides two other important tools for schools and 
for the communities they serve. The first is the expanded 
collection of critical data and a report, the equity report 
card, which will allow families to quickly determine how 
effective the school is at teaching children, the resources 
available to the school, and the school climate for learning. 
This information is a valuable tool for families and school 
personnel. The second is a prohibition on discrimination 
against students based on their sexual orientation, their 
perceived sexual orientation, or their association with another 
student based on their sexual orientation. This new protection 
will further enhance the learning environment of schools and 
allow for better academic outcomes for all students.
    In closing, the committee understands the Federal 
Government provides only a fraction, approximately 10 percent, 
of the overall funding for elementary and secondary education 
in the United States. As such, SASA once again reminds States 
that they are free to choose to no longer participate in or 
accept Federal support for education. If, however, States 
decide to accept Federal resources, they must comply with the 
requirements associated with those funds. This has been the 
approach of Congress since the original passage of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act in 1965. The role of the 
Federal Government in education was clearly articulated in that 
original bill. That role, to promote economic and social 
opportunity through access to high quality education, is what 
drives the programs in SASA.

              II. Legislative History and Committee Action


                    PREVIOUS REAUTHORIZATION EFFORTS

    During the 112th Congress, the Health, Education, Labor, 
and Pensions Committee, under the leadership of Chairman Harkin 
and Ranking Member Enzi, considered the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Reauthorization Act (S.3578). In 
preparation for consideration of S.3578, the committee held 11 
hearings addressing ESEA issues.
    On October 20, 2011, after a 2-day executive session to 
markup the bill, S.3578 was adopted by a roll-call vote of 15 
ayes and 7 nays. The bill was reported out of committee on 
September 20, 2012. The bill was not brought to the Senate 
floor and died with the conclusion of the 112th Congress.

                                HEARINGS

    After S.3578 was adopted by the committee, 7 additional 
hearings were held. Unlike the 11 hearings prior to 
consideration of S.3578, these hearings addressed specific 
issues such as education technology, accelerated learning, and 
bullying in schools. The seven hearings culminated with a 
session examining the flexibility waiver process initiated by 
the Obama administration to address some of the concerns of 
States and districts related to the goals of NCLB. A brief 
description of each hearing, including witnesses, follows.

Beyond NCLB: Views on the Elementary and Secondary Education 
        Reauthorization Act (November 8, 2011)

    This hearing was held at the request of Senator Rand Paul 
and is the one exception to the issue specific approach the 
committee took to examine ESEA prior to the markup of S.1094. 
This hearing was a roundtable with 10 witnesses. Its focus was 
on the overall impact of NCLB and what steps need to be taken 
to strengthen ESEA. Witnesses included:

     Amanda Danks, a lead teacher at Wm. S. Baer School 
in Baltimore City public schools (Baltimore, MD), who shared 
her experiences with assessment of students focusing on 
formative data collection, teacher professional development to 
create highly effective teachers, and the need for high 
expectations for all students.
     Pam Geisselhardt, a gifted and talented 
coordinator for Adair County schools (Columbia, KY), who spoke 
of the negative impact of NCLB on student instruction as it 
related to addressing the needs of students above and below the 
mean, and argued for more State and local control related to 
instruction of students and evaluation of teachers.
     Terry Grier, superintendent of Houston Independent 
School District (Houston, TX), who spoke about the importance 
of using professional development and teacher evaluation 
systems to retain highly effective teachers and replace poorly 
performing teachers.
     Wade Henderson, president and CEO of The 
Leadership Conference (Washington, DC), who described the need 
to reauthorize ESEA while retaining performance targets for 
schools, districts, and States. He also emphasized that the 
role of the Federal Government in education policy is to ensure 
equitable distribution of resources to less well-off students 
and communities.
     Frederick (Fred) Hess, resident scholar and 
director of education policy at the American Enterprise 
Institute (Washington, DC), who emphasized his point of view 
that the Federal Government should be responsible for 
collection of data and research related to education and should 
not be focusing on methods or strategies for improving the 
performance of teachers and schools.
     Tom Luna, Idaho superintendent of Public 
Instruction (Boise, ID), who emphasized the critical need of 
ensuring high quality, effective teachers are available in each 
classroom and using both evaluation and pay for performance as 
methods for attracting, retaining and improving teachers.
     Katherine (Katy) Beh Neas, senior vice president 
for Governmental Relations of Easter Seals (Washington, DC), 
who discussed the importance of including students with 
disabilities in the accountability process and the value of 
collecting and reporting school level data on the outcomes for 
students with disabilities.
     Charles Seaton, a teacher at Sherwood Middle 
School in Memphis City schools (Memphis, TN), who spoke about 
the importance of ensuring all teachers in each classroom are 
effective teachers and the use of a supportive teacher and 
school leader evaluation system to foster the development of 
effective teachers.
     Jon Schnur, co-founder and chairman of the board 
of New Leaders (New York, NY), who spoke about the need for 
high expectations for all students, the need for effective 
school leaders, the importance of performance targets for 
schools and districts, and more effective use of professional 
development funds.
     Elmer Thomas, principal at Madison Central High 
School of Madison County school district (Richmond, KY), who 
spoke about the importance of removing the requirement of 
adequate yearly progress and allowing the use of a growth model 
when determining the proficiency of students and the 
effectiveness of teachers.

The Promise of Accessible Technology: Challenges and Opportunities 
        (February 2, 2012)

    This hearing focused on the use of technology in schools, 
from preschool through postsecondary education, and how 
accessibility of that technology has an impact on student 
achievement. While not solely focused on PK-12 education, the 
witnesses spoke to the accessibility of technology used in 
schools and how technology can make curriculum accessible to 
all students. The hearing was composed of two panels. The 
single witness on the first panel was Eve Hill, the senior 
counselor to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at 
the Department of Justice (Washington, DC). She emphasized the 
quick and vast transformation that is taking place in schools 
related to technology and cautioned that schools, from early 
childhood programs through universities, must take care in 
adopting technology that is accessible to all students, and to 
demand of vendors and manufacturers technology, software, and 
support services that are accessible to all students.
    The second panel was composed of three witnesses, 
including:

     Mark Riccobono, the executive director of the 
Jernigan Institute of the National Federation of the Blind 
(Baltimore, MD), who spoke about the technology in schools 
being both the possible avenue for access to information for 
all students or a barrier to a rigorous education if the 
technology is not accessible.
     John B. Quick, superintendent of the Bartholomew 
Consolidated School Corporation (Columbus, IN), who described 
the importance of universal design for learning and how the 
adoption of accessible technology in his school district for 
all students has had positive outcomes for all students in 
terms of academic achievement as well as school attendance and 
positive social interactions. He reported that academic 
improvements have occurred not only in students with 
disabilities but also students eligible for free or reduced 
meals and students who are English learners.
     Mark Turner, the director of the Center for 
Accessible Media and the Accessible Technology Initiative of 
the California State University System (Long Beach, CA), who 
spoke about the power of schools to influence the accessibility 
of hardware and software through their purchasing decisions.

Effective Strategies for Accelerated Learning (April 18, 2012)

    This full committee hearing focused on accelerated learning 
approaches including competency-based curricula, advanced 
placement courses, dual-credit courses, and early college high 
schools. This full committee hearing consisted of one panel 
composed of the following witnesses:

     Thomas W. Rudin, senior vice president for 
Advocacy in the Government Relations & Development at The 
College Board, reviewed the structure of advance placement 
courses, who takes them, and their impact on student 
achievement. He reviewed the participation rates and outcomes 
for students from low-income families and students of color.
     Carolyn Bacon Dickson, executive director for the 
O'Donnell Foundation, The Texas AP Incentive Program (Dallas, 
TX) and member of the Board of Directors for the National Math 
and Science Initiative focused on the importance of having 
well-trained, qualified, and effective teachers as instructors 
for accelerated learning experiences.
     Peter Winograd, director of the University of New 
Mexico Center for Policy Research (Albuquerque, NM) who focused 
on the impact of accelerated learning, the need for integrated 
data systems across preK-12 and post-secondary systems, and the 
need for collaboration within States between the preK-12 and 
postsecondary systems.
     Marybeth Schubert, executive director for New 
Mexico Advanced Programs Initiative (Santa Fe, NM) who spoke of 
the advantage accelerated learning provided for students 
regarding their ability to complete a college degree.
     Joel Vargas, vice-president for Jobs for the 
Future (Boston, MA) spoke of his organization's efforts to 
increase early college experiences and to improve both the 
enrollment and retention of students from low-income families 
in post-secondary education programs.

Bully-Free Schools: How Local, State and Federal Efforts Can Help (June 
        8, 2012)

    This full committee field hearing was held in the East High 
School Cafeteria in Des Moines, IA, and consisted of three 
panels. The first panel included the following witness:

     Russlynn Ali, assistant secretary for Civil Rights 
for the U.S. Department of Education (Washington, DC)
    The second panel included the following witnesses:

     Linda Calbom, western regional manager for the 
U.S. Government Accountability Office (Sammamish, WA)

    The third panel consisted of the following witnesses:

     Penny Bisignano, consultant for Bullying 
Prevention and Intervention for the Iowa Department of 
Education (Des Moines, IA)
     Emily Domayer, student at Morningside College 
(Sioux City, IA)
     Paul Gausman, superintendent for the Sioux City 
community school district (Sioux City, IA)
     Ellen Reilly, learning support specialist for 
Davenport community schools (Moline, IL)
     Matt Shankles, student at Linn-Mar High School 
(Marion, IA)
     Liz Siederquist, student at Des Moines area 
community college (Ames, IA)

Beyond Restraint and Seclusion: Creating Positive Learning Environments 
        for All Students (July 12, 2012)

    This full committee hearing consisted of one panel that 
included the following witnesses:

     Dr. Daniel Crimmins, director of the Center for 
Leadership in Disability at Georgia State University (Atlanta, 
GA)
     Ms. Cyndi Pitonyak, coordinator of Positive 
Behavioral Interventions and Supports for Montgomery County 
Public Schools (Christiansburg, VA)
     Dr. Michael George, director of the Centennial 
School of Lehigh University (Bethlehem, PA)
     Ms. Deborah (Debbie) Jackson, parent (Easton, PA)

BEST: Building Education Success Together (October 19, 2012)

    This hearing was a full committee field hearing held at the 
Dena'ina Center in Anchorage, AK, organized and chaired by 
Senator Lisa Murkowski, and consisted of one panel that 
included the following witnesses:

     Christopher Simon, rural education coordinator for 
the Alaska Department of Education and Early Development 
(Juneau, AK)
     Peggy Cowan, superintendent of the North Slope 
Borough School District (Barrow, AK)
     Rosita Worl, president of the Sealaska Heritage 
Institute (Juneau, AK)
     Doreen Brown, supervisor of the Title VII Indian 
Education Department for the Anchorage School District 
(Anchorage, AK)
     Carl Rose, executive director for the Association 
of Alaska School Boards (Juneau, AK)
     Sonta Hamilton Roach, teacher at the Innoko River 
School (Shageluk, AK)

NCLB: Early Lessons from State Flexibility Waivers (February 7, 2012)

    This hearing consisted of two panels. The first panel 
included Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. Secretary Duncan 
reported on the status of flexibility waivers for States that 
relieve them of some of the requirements of NCLB while 
requiring them to develop and implement college- and career-
ready standards, develop and implement teacher and school 
leader evaluation systems, and enhance their student 
achievement accountability models.
    The second panel of this hearing included the following 
witnesses:

     Terry K. Holliday, Kentucky commissioner of 
education (Lexington, KY), who testified to the need for 
reauthorization of ESEA and to the value of the NCLB 
flexibility waivers to allow his State to create a new, 
innovative accountability system based on more rigorous 
standards. He urged the committee to use the flexibility waiver 
process to inform the reauthorization of ESEA.
     John B. King, Jr., New York commissioner of 
education (Slingerlands, NY), likewise emphasized the need for 
the reauthorization of ESEA and asked the committee to provide 
a framework and guidelines for setting goals and an 
accountability system.
     Andrew R. Smarick, partner at Bellwether Education 
Partners (Lawrenceville, NJ), argued for a reduced Federal 
footprint in education policy and suggested waiting to 
reauthorize ESEA. He also suggested the role of the Federal 
Government should be to enhance the capacity of States to help 
local school districts set goals, monitor effectiveness and 
provide technical assistance.
     Kati Haycock, president of the Education Trust 
(Washington, DC), who spoke in general support of the NCLB 
flexibility waivers but cautioned that accountability systems 
should focus on growth, proficiency and high school graduation.

                        COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    On June 4, 2013, the Strengthening America's Schools Act 
(SASA) was noticed for markup and a draft was circulated to the 
committee. On June 11 and 12, 2013, the committee met in 
executive session to consider the bill. Forty amendments were 
filed with the committee. The committee took action on 23 
amendments, adopting 10 of them and rejecting the remaining 13. 
One amendment was withdrawn. The bill, as amended, was adopted 
by a roll call vote of 12 ayes to 10 nays on June 12, 2013.

Amendments Voted On During Executive Session

    1. Senator Alexander offered an amendment in the nature of 
a substitute to the Strengthening America's Schools Act of 
2013. The amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 10 ayes 
to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagan
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Senator Harkin offered an amendment to clarify that 
States are free from Federal requirements under part A of title 
I if the States choose to not receive funding under such part. 
The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    3. Senator Enzi offered an amendment to title I-A to 
eliminate Federal guidelines about how States and local 
educational agencies identify and improve low-performing public 
schools. The amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 10 
ayes to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagan
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    4. Senator Murray offered an amendment to title I-A to 
allow for the collection of data about military-connected 
students. The amendment was adopted by a roll call vote of 13 
ayes and 9 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Harkin                                      Alexande
                                             r
                    Mikulski                                    Enzi
                    Murray                                      Burr
                    Sanders                                     Isakson
                    Casey                                       Paul
                    Hagan                                       Hatch
                    Franken                                     Roberts
                    Bennet                                      Murkowsk
                                             i
                    Whitehouse                                  Scott
                    Baldwin
                    Murphy
                    Warren
                    Kirk
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    5. Senator Burr offered an amendment to eliminate programs 
related to early childhood, Promise Neighborhoods, Race to the 
Top, Investing in Innovation, and other programs. The amendment 
was defeated by a roll call vote of 9 ayes and 13 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagan
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Kirk                                        Bennet
                    Scott                                       Whitehou
                                             se
                                                                Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
                                                                Murkowsk
                                             i
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    6. Senators Hagan and Warren offered an amendment to title 
I-A to increase learning time for schools receiving School 
Improvement Grants. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    7. Senator Alexander offered an amendment to eliminate the 
Federal highly qualified teacher requirement and encourage 
State and local educational agencies to develop and implement 
teacher and principal evaluation systems. The amendment was 
defeated by a roll call vote of 10 ayes to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagan
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    8. Senator Franken offered an amendment to titles I, II and 
IV to promote dual enrollment programs and early college high 
schools, and for other purposes. The amendment was adopted by 
voice vote.
    9. Senator Scott offered an amendment to title I, co-
sponsored by Senator Alexander, to restore and protect State 
authority and flexibility in establishing and defining 
challenging student academic standards and assessments. The 
amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 10 ayes and 12 
nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagen
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    10. Senator Burr offered an amendment to title II to change 
the formula funding for title II-A. The amendment was defeated 
by a roll call vote of 8 ayes and 14 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Hagen                                       Harkin
                    Alexander                                   Mikulski
                    Enzi                                        Murray
                    Burr                                        Sanders
                    Isakson                                     Casey
                    Murkowski                                   Franken
                    Kirk                                        Bennet
                    Scott                                       Whitehou
                                             se
                                                                Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
                                                                Paul
                                                                Hatch
                                                                Roberts
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    11. Senator Murray offered an amendment to title I to 
require schools to collect and report data on interscholastic 
sports. The amendment was adopted by a roll call vote of 13 
ayes to 9 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Harkin                                      Alexande
                                             r
                    Mikulski                                    Enzi
                    Murray                                      Burr
                    Sanders                                     Isakson
                    Casey                                       Paul
                    Hagen                                       Hatch
                    Franken                                     Roberts
                    Bennet                                      Kirk
                    Whitehouse                                  Scott
                    Baldwin
                    Murphy
                    Warren
                    Murkowski
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    12. Senator Murphy offered an amendment to title IV to 
provide financial assistance for school construction after a 
violent or traumatic crisis. The amendment was agreed to by 
voice vote.
    13. Senator Isakson offered an amendment to title I to 
allow States to set the criteria for standards and assessments 
including establishing modified assessments for students with 
disabilities. The amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 
9 ayes to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagan
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Kirk                                        Bennet
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
                                                                Murkowsk
                                             i
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    14. Senator Bennet offered an amendment to title XI, co-
sponsored by Senators Hagen, Franken and Baldwin, to create an 
office of Rural Education within the Department of Education. 
The amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 11 ayes and 
11 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Harkin                                      Whitehou
                                             se
                    Mikulski                                    Alexande
                                             r
                    Murray                                      Enzi
                    Sanders                                     Burr
                    Casey                                       Isakson
                    Hagen                                       Paul
                    Franken                                     Hatch
                    Bennet                                      Roberts
                    Baldwin                                     Murkowsk
                                             i
                    Murphy                                      Kirk
                    Warren                                      Scott
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    15. Senator Baldwin offered an amendment to title I to 
require reporting of career and technical education programs. 
The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    16. Senator Alexander offered an amendment to allow States 
the option to distribute title I funds using a per child 
formula. The amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 10 
ayes to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagen
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    17. Senator Baldwin offered an amendment to title IV to 
amend part C to include agricultural education programs as a 
covered subject. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    18. Senator Roberts offered an amendment to title IX, co-
sponsored by Senators Alexander and Enzi, to limit the 
authority of the Secretary to issue waivers to specific State 
and local educational agency requests. The amendment was 
defeated by a roll call vote of 10 ayes to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagen
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    19. Senator Warren offered an amendment to title V, co-
sponsored by Senator Franken, to establish a college 
information demonstration program. The amendment was adopted by 
voice vote.
    20. Senator Paul offered an amendment, co-sponsored by 
Senator Scott, to allow States the option to distribute title I 
funds using a per child formula. The amendment was defeated by 
a roll call vote of 8 ayes and 14 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagen
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Scott                                       Bennet
                                                                Whitehou
                                             se
                                                                Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
                                                                Murkowsk
                                             i
                                                                Kirk
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    21. Senator Roberts offered an amendment to title V to 
repeal the Race to the Top program. The amendment was defeated 
by a roll call vote of 10 ayes to 12 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagen
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Kirk                                        Whitehou
                                             se
                    Scott                                       Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    22. Senator Murkowski offered an amendment to title VII to 
amend the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
relating to Alaska natives. The amendment was adopted by voice 
vote.
    23. Senator Isakson offered an amendment to title I to 
maintain strong State and local reporting on the performance of 
schools and limit increased and burdensome reporting 
requirements. The amendment was defeated by a roll call vote of 
9 ayes to 13 nays.

 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   AYES                                 NAYS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Alexander                                   Harkin
                    Enzi                                        Mikulski
                    Burr                                        Murray
                    Isakson                                     Sanders
                    Paul                                        Casey
                    Hatch                                       Hagen
                    Roberts                                     Franken
                    Murkowski                                   Bennet
                    Scott                                       Whitehou
                                             se
                                                                Baldwin
                                                                Murphy
                                                                Warren
                                                                Kirk
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Amendment Offered and Subsequently Withdrawn

    1. Senator Warren offered and then withdrew an amendment to 
title I regarding the oversight of public charter schools.

              III. Explanation of Bill and Committee Views


    TITLE I, PART A: ENSURING COLLEGE- AND CAREER-READINESS FOR ALL 
                                STUDENTS

    The committee bill updates current law to reflect what has 
been learned in the 12 years since the No Child Left Behind Act 
(NCLB) was enacted, while maintaining the essential 
accountability elements under that iteration of the law.

                           STATE RESERVATIONS

    The committee has changed the amount of funds a State can 
reserve from subpart 2 of part A from 4 percent to 6 percent in 
recognition of the fact that States must build capacity to 
provide local educational agencies with technical assistance to 
improve teaching and learning, and to provide support to LEAs 
to implement the responsibilities described in section 1116.

              STATE PLAN AND STATE AND LOCAL REQUIREMENTS

Requirements for College- and Career-Ready Standards

    The committee bill requires each State to adopt college- 
and career-ready standards. A child's education should lead to 
success in postsecondary education and the workforce. By 2014, 
it is projected that 75 percent of new jobs in America will 
require a postsecondary degree, and a college graduate today is 
projected to make 77 percent more per hour than a worker with a 
high school diploma. While the committee recognizes that not 
every high school graduate will attend a 4-year college, every 
high school graduate should be prepared for entering a post-
secondary education program without the need for remediation 
and be ready to enter an entry level job in a high-need, high-
demand profession.
    The committee bill describes, in section 1111(a)(1)(A)(ii), 
three options for States to use to ensure that academic 
standards are ``college- and career-ready'': alignment with 
credit-bearing coursework at public institutions of higher 
education, alignment with career and technical education 
standards consistent with the State performance measures 
developed in accordance with the Carl D. Perkins Career and 
Technical Education Act of 2006, and appropriate career skills. 
The committee also allows for States to adopt standards that 
have been developed and voluntarily adopted by a significant 
number of States. States must implement content standards in 
reading or language arts and mathematics by December 31, 2014, 
and adopt academic achievement standards by the beginning of 
the 2015-16 school year.
    The committee bill protects States' rights in defining 
academic content and achievement standards while also ensuring 
that States are setting high academic expectations for all 
students. Section 1111(a)(1)(A)(ii) requires the State to 
demonstrate, as part of their title I plans, that their 
academic content and achievement standards are aligned with the 
expectations of college- and career-readiness.
    Section 1111(a)(1)(H) reinforces that the Secretary or any 
other Federal officer or employee may not mandate, direct, or 
control a State's academic content or achievement standards. 
The committee understands that the Secretary of Education will 
continue to review evidence submitted by the States related to 
the quality of their academic standards. The Department of 
Education has released guidance to States that details the 
evidence that can be submitted and the committee intends for 
this practice to continue as States adopt college- and career-
ready standards.
    The committee intends for the term ``appropriate career 
skills'' in section 1111(a)(1)(A)(ii)(III) to encompass higher-
order thinking skills, including but not limited to the ability 
to apply knowledge to new situations, think critically, problem 
solve, communicate orally and in writing, exhibit creativity 
and innovate, as well as digital literacy and the ability to 
use workplace technology effectively. These are essential 
skills for students to develop in order to succeed after 
graduation from high school. These are also the skills that 
will enable graduates to succeed in private-sector training 
environments that account for most post-secondary training in 
the United States.
    In section 1111(a)(1)(A)(ii)(IV) the committee intends for 
standards developed and adopted by a consortium of States to 
meet the requirement for college- and career-ready standards.

Alternate Academic Achievement Standards for Students with the Most 
        Significant Cognitive Disabilities

    It is the intent of the committee to ensure that all 
students are held to the highest possible standards in order to 
be prepared for entry into postsecondary education and careers. 
The committee recognizes, with section 1111(a)(1)(D), that 
general education standards are not appropriate for a very 
small percentage of students with the most significant 
cognitive disabilities. This group of students comprises less 
than 1 percent of the overall student population. The 
committee's intent is to ensure that a parallel, challenging, 
appropriate, and aligned set of standards are available for 
this group of students. The committee also intends for students 
with disabilities who do not have the most significant 
cognitive disabilities to be held to the general education 
standards with the supports, accessibility, and accommodations 
they need to achieve such standards, including multi-tier 
systems of support. This includes students with learning 
disabilities, mild and moderate intellectual disabilities and 
multiple disabilities that include cognitive disabilities.
    Because of the advances in assessment construction and the 
determination of accommodations that do not lessen the 
reliability and validity of assessments, the committee has 
placed an explicit prohibition on the development and use of 
any alternate academic standards other than those to be used 
with students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. 
The committee understands that to create additional alternate 
academic standards would decrease academic expectations for a 
large subset of students and reduce their likelihood of 
graduating with a standard high school diploma.

English Language Proficiency Standards

    The committee bill requires States to adopt high-quality 
English language proficiency (ELP) standards by December 31, 
2015. States must also demonstrate that the standards are 
aligned with the State's academic content standards in reading 
or language arts; ensure proficiency in English for each of the 
domains of speaking, listening, reading, and writing; identify 
at least 4 levels of English proficiency; and ensure that the 
ELP standards are updated not later than 1 year after the State 
adopts any new academic content standards in reading or 
language arts.

Early Learning Guidelines and Early Grade Standards

    The committee recognizes the critical importance of early 
learning and its contribution to the positive long-term 
outcomes for children. If a State chooses to use title I-A 
funds to support the early education of low-income children, a 
State must certify that it has in existing culturally, 
linguistically, and developmentally appropriate guidelines that 
describe what young children from birth to 5 should know and be 
able to do before they enter kindergarten. Such guidelines must 
be informed by research and developed in consultation with 
other relevant departments and agencies in the State that 
support early childhood education programs. Further, the 
committee asks States that use Title I-A to develop, or certify 
the existence of, developmentally appropriate standards for 
students in the early elementary grades to ensure that such 
standards reflect how children develop and learn the requisite 
skills and content from the early grades onward.

Academic Assessments

    As States transition to college- and career-ready 
standards, States are required under section 1111(a)(2) to 
implement assessments aligned to those standards. Current 
assessments are unlikely to accurately measure the knowledge 
and skills needed to succeed in the globally competitive 
economy. To address the need for new assessments aligned to 
college- and career-ready standards, many States have joined 
together to develop higher quality assessments. The committee 
bill requires that statewide assessments continue to be 
administered annually in reading or language arts and math for 
grades 3 through 8, and at least once during grades 10 through 
12. State assessments must also include English language 
proficiency assessments. If a State chooses to use them, these 
assessments must also include alternate assessments for 
students with the most significant cognitive disabilities.
    Statewide assessments must continue to be administered in 
science at least once during grades 3 through 5, 6 through 9, 
and 10 through 12, and States must disaggregate and report on 
student achievement data.
    The next generation of statewide assessments must align 
with college- and career-ready standards and thus measure the 
knowledge, skills, and competencies students need to succeed in 
the 21st century. These assessments should involve multiple 
measures of student academic achievement, including measures 
that assess higher-order thinking skills and understanding, and 
should be capable of measuring student academic growth.
    The committee bill includes language to allow States to use 
multiple assessments over the course of the year to measure 
student knowledge, so long as the scores from these assessments 
culminate in a score equivalent to that of a single summative 
assessment. States are permitted to use portfolios, projects, 
extended performance tasks, and other valid and reliable 
methods as part of the process of assessing student proficiency 
through multiple measures.
    Assessments should be developed and implemented with the 
intent of including all students, including those with 
disabilities and those who are English learners. Assessments 
should be developed, from inception, using the principles of 
universal design. They should also be developed with 
accommodations that result in valid and reliable measure of 
student proficiency while permitting the greatest possible 
access for students with disabilities.
    Computer adaptive assessments that measure, at a minimum, 
whether each student is meeting or exceeding the on-track level 
of performance for the State academic content standards for the 
student's grade level, may be used. A State may measure the 
student's level of performance in the grades above or below the 
student's grade level, which may include a student's growth at 
such levels, so long as grade-level items are used for 
determining if a student is on track for college- and career-
readiness. Computer adapted assessments would still need to 
reliably and validly test all students on the full-range of 
grade-level content and at the same levels of cognitive 
complexity.
    A common and recurring criticism of NCLB is that it has led 
to too much student testing. The committee bill maintains 
current law and continues to require only one annual assessment 
in both reading or English language arts and mathematics, and a 
science assessment in each grade span. To address the criticism 
about over-testing, this bill requires States to regularly 
analyze assessment and accommodations practice and use, and to 
eliminate duplicative assessments identified by such analyses. 
With this data, the committee intends for States and LEAs to 
use this data to accurately determine the source of required 
assessments and to find the opportunities to reduce the testing 
load on schools, teachers and students. In addition, in the 
reporting section of title I (section 1111(d)(3)), the bill 
requires States and LEAs to inform families and communities 
what assessments are required of students and whether that 
requirement is Federal, State or local.
    The committee sees significant value in providing 
additional transparency in reporting. Thus the bill requires 
cross-tabulation of data to be made publicly available 
regarding student academic performance and graduation rates for 
each school, LEA and the State for every combination of two of 
the subgroups described in subsection (a)(2)(B)(x), such that 
data for all permutations of two subgroups will be reported. 
States may, but will not be required to, cross-tabulate 
performance data for permutations of three or more subgroups.

Assessing English Learners

    States must include in the academic assessment of reading 
or language arts (using tests written in English) any student 
who has attended school in the United States (not including 
Puerto Rico) for 3 or more consecutive school years. An LEA 
may, on an individual basis, assess such students identified as 
English learners in a language other than English for no more 
than 2 years, if such student has not yet reached a level of 
English language proficiency sufficient to yield valid and 
reliable information on what such a student knows and can do on 
reading or language arts tests written in English. Continuation 
of these policies will provide the information needed to 
determine if English learners are college- and career-ready.
    Each State must also ensure that, by 2015-16, English 
learners will be assessed for their level of English 
proficiency. English proficiency assessments must be aligned 
with the State's English language proficiency standards and 
reflect academic language necessary for students to graduate 
high school college- and career-ready.

Alternate Assessments for Students With the Most Significant 
        Cognitive Disabilities

    The committee has provided States with the option, in 
section 1111(a)(2)(E), to create alternate assessments to 
measure the academic proficiency of students with the most 
significant cognitive disabilities on alternate academic 
achievement standards. Based on research that indicates 
students with the most significant disabilities comprise less 
than 0.6 percent of the student population, it is the intent of 
the committee that no more than 1 percent of all students in an 
LEA and no more than 1 percent of the students in the State 
would be assessed using alternate assessments. The committee 
recognizes that in some LEAs there are concentrations of 
students with the most significant disabilities and this 1 
percent limitation does not extend to individual schools.

State-designed Accountability Systems

    The committee intends for each State to design and 
implement a single state-wide school, LEA, and State 
accountability system to designate the effectiveness of each 
entity. The accountability system must be able to differentiate 
the effectiveness of all schools and LEAs in the State 
regarding the proficiency of students in English language arts/
reading, mathematics, and English language proficiency, as well 
as student growth. For high schools, the accountability systems 
must also be able to differentiate the effectiveness of schools 
and LEAs regarding graduation rates. The accountability systems 
must be able to report results for the total student population 
within a school, LEA or the State, as well as to disaggregate 
the results for the subgroups of students by each major racial 
and ethnic group, English proficiency status, disability 
status, and economic status. Schools, LEAs and States must 
report academic results for all subgroups with 15 or more 
students in a subgroup.

Academic Growth

    It is the intent of the committee to ensure that assessment 
of student academic skills includes not only grade-level 
proficiency but also student academic growth. State 
accountability systems must be able to report the number and 
percentage of students meeting or exceeding grade-level 
standards, the number and percentage of students below grade-
level academic proficiency and achieving sufficient academic 
growth, and the number and percentage of students below grade-
level proficiency and not achieving sufficient academic growth.
    The committee has defined academic growth in order to 
acknowledge the significant effort and accomplishment of the 
many educators throughout the country who provide high quality 
instruction that significantly advances student academic 
achievement. A State may define sufficient academic growth as 
achievement that will result in the student being grade-level 
proficient within 3 years, being grade-level proficient within 
a grade space (i.e., 3-5, 6-8, 9-12), or a similar rigorous 
definition negotiated between the State and the Secretary.

Performance Targets

    The committee recognizes that the single, one-size goal of 
NCLB and the accompanying penalties were harmful to the ability 
of schools to effectively serve all students. The committee, 
however, is resolute that schools, LEAs and States must set 
ambitious goals that include continuous, aggressive improvement 
in student academic proficiency. The committee knows that 
educators throughout the country are working to instruct 
students so they are academically proficient. An essential part 
of the process of reaching proficiency is setting goals, 
tracking those goals, and adapting strategies and interventions 
from data collected to determine how effective a school, LEA 
and State is at meeting their goals.
    Some educators and policymakers contend that transparency 
of effectiveness is sufficient to ensure continuous improvement 
of effective academic instruction. The committee, however, 
believes that goals for all groups of students, with a 
timeline, in combination with transparency of effectiveness 
results in far better outcomes for students, schools, and 
districts.
    The committee, therefore, has required in this bill that 
all States must set annual performance targets for schools, 
LEAs and the State itself. The performance targets must apply 
to all subgroups of students and must result in the same 
outcome for all students within the same period of time. The 
performance targets must also be ambitious, resulting in 
significant increases in the number and percentage of students 
academically proficient in each subgroup. The performance 
targets must include students' grade-level proficiency, student 
academic growth, English language proficiency and growth, and, 
for high schools, graduation rates. For the purposes of the 
accountability system, no more than 1 percent of the students 
with the most significant cognitive disabilities may be 
assessed and their results considered in the accountability 
system using the State's alternate assessment.
    States may choose to track and report other measures of 
academic effectiveness. The committee recognizes that such 
variables as participation and achievement in Advanced 
Placement courses or college enrollment rates can be useful 
measures of student success, however, the variables of student 
proficiency, growth, graduation, and English proficiency are 
intended to be the primary measures of success of a school with 
students and all subgroups of students.
    States may choose their performance targets from one of 
three categories. They may choose to continue the goals they 
have set in their approved flexibility plans granted by the 
Department of Education to allow relief from some of the 
provisions of NCLB. They also may set performance targets based 
on all students achieving academic proficiency to the level 
that the top 10 percent of their students achieve during the 
first year of implementation of this Act. Alternatively, States 
may choose to set their own performance targets that are as 
ambitious as either of the first two options, and must be 
negotiated with the Secretary.

State Plans

    For any State wishing to receive title I, part A funds, a 
State plan describing how the State and its LEAs will meet the 
requirements of this Act, and how the State will coordinate the 
activities with related Federal programs, is required. The 
committee particularly urges SEAs that provide funding for 
kindergarten to create a plan to expand the availability of 
full-day kindergarten throughout the State. Also as part of the 
plan, SEAs are urged to create a plan to assist LEAs in 
identifying and serving students who are gifted and talented.
    The committee's intent is for the first State plans to be 
submitted 1 year after enactment of this Act and every 4 years 
subsequent.

Equitable Distribution

    Research shows that teachers are the most important in-
school factor driving student achievement. The committee 
believes that LEAs should do all they can to use data to 
address inequities in teacher quality between schools. The 
committee strongly believes that LEAs should be most concerned 
with the distribution of effective teachers across schools in 
order for all children to have access to high quality 
instruction.
    During the first year of the implementation of this Act, 
SEAs must include in their State plans a process for ensuring 
equitable distribution of effective teachers among all schools. 
Recognizing that all SEAs will not have teacher evaluation 
systems in place, SEAs may use other variables to substitute 
for teacher effectiveness. These may include teacher 
qualifications, length of teacher experience, and teacher 
subject certification. By the 2015-16 school year, all SEAs 
must begin to use teacher evaluation data, as described in 
title II, part B, to determine equitable distribution of 
effective teachers.

State Parent and Family Engagement Plan

    The committee believes there is great value in the 
involvement of parents in their children's education. The 
committee bill (section 1111(c)) strengthens current law by 
expanding such involvement to appropriate family members. This 
shift is intended to acknowledge the role that non-custodial 
family members play in the life of a child. States are required 
to develop a statewide parent and family engagement strategy, 
which must prioritize increasing engagement in high-need LEAs 
and schools. States are responsible for ensuring coordination 
of parent and family engagement activities across the State, 
including between the State and the State Advisory Council on 
Early Childhood Education and Care described in the Head Start 
Act and, as applicable, between the State and the Parent and 
Family Information and Resource Center described in title IV, 
as well as among the Federal, State, and local levels. The 
committee is particularly interested in coordination between 
States and State Advisory Councils on Early Childhood Education 
and Care, as alignment of these activities is a key leverage 
point for increasing school readiness among young children. 
Finally, States must provide technical assistance and 
professional development to high-need LEAs regarding parent and 
family engagement.

                       ANNUAL STATE REPORT CARDS

    One of the most important advances in accountability that 
was the result of NCLB was the collection of data regarding 
student academic proficiency and the requirement to report that 
data publicly in a manner consumable by parents, families and 
the general public. The committee whole-heartedly supports the 
continuation of reporting student academic proficiency and 
believes the reporting of other data will help hold States, 
LEAs and schools accountable to their stakeholders and will 
ensure they are held accountable for all students served.
    SASA continues the data collection and reporting 
requirements from NCLB and adds a number of significant 
requirements.

Equity Report Card

    Most significantly, SASA requires SEAs and LEAs to create 
an ``Equity Report Card'' (ERC). This is intended to be an 
easily understandable report of key characteristics of a school 
or LEA that can be compared among schools across a State in 
order to give parents and family members the ability to 
determine which school might be best for their children. The 
ERC must include five pieces of information: student 
proficiency by subgroup, school funding by sources, high school 
graduation rates, educational opportunities available at a 
school (e.g., pre-kindergarten, International Baccalaureate 
programs), and school climate information. SEAs and LEAs may 
choose to include other variables, however, these five 
variables should be clearly identifiable to parents and 
families.

School Athletic Data

    Through an amendment offered by Senator Murray, the 
committee has added the requirement for schools to report the 
resources expended on athletics by gender. The committee's 
intent is that: (1) information on equipment shall include any 
equipment replacement schedule; (2) uniform information shall 
include any uniform replacement schedule; (3) facilities shall 
include medical facilities, locker rooms, fields, and 
gymnasiums; (4) total expenditures for the team from all 
sources shall include school funds and funds provided by any 
other entities, such as booster organizations; (5) the 
employment status of coaches, trainers and medical personnel 
shall include whether such person is assigned to the team full-
time or part-time, and whether such person is a head or 
assistant coach, trainer or medical services provider; and (6) 
the total salary expenditures for coaches, the total number of 
coaches, and for each coach an identification of such coach's 
gender, employment status (including whether such coach is 
assigned to the team full-time or part-time, and whether such 
coach is a head or assistant coach), and duties other than 
coaching, shall be collected. Salary is only to include 
institutional pay.

Military-connected Student Data

    Also by an amendment offered by Senator Murray, the 
committee added collection of information regarding students 
who are military-connected. The committee's opinion is that 
this group of students is often highly mobile and information 
about their enrollment and outcomes is critical to serving them 
well. For the purposes of the data collection and reporting, 
``military-connected students'' are defined as public school 
students with parents or guardians who serve in the Active 
Duty, National Guard or Reserve Forces.

      FEDERAL PARAMETERS FOR STATE-DESIGNED ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS

    The committee recognizes that accountability systems that 
are more tailored to the needs and strengths of States and LEAs 
may be more successful at leveraging improvements in student 
achievement than the one-size-fits-all approach of the No Child 
Left Behind Act. However, it is important that in designing 
these systems certain principles be maintained. The committee 
bill includes Federal parameters for State-designed 
accountability systems that offer flexibility while, at the 
same time, requiring States to set expectations for progress 
towards student college- and career-readiness.
    Included in these requirements are systems that are capable 
of identifying schools not meeting subgroup performance 
targets, schools that are under-performing for more than 3 
years, and schools that are the lowest achieving schools in the 
State in terms of student academic proficiency and, for high 
schools, graduation rate.
    One problem with NCLB was its focus on schools that were 
chronically underperforming at the expense of schools that may 
have been performing well overall but were not serving one 
particular subgroup of students well. The committee intends for 
accountability and consequences to be applied to all schools 
for all subgroups, thus the requirement in section 
1111(a)(3)(C) to create performance targets for every subgroup 
in every school. Beginning in the 2015-16 school year, every 
school not meeting its annual performance target for a subgroup 
for 2 years in a row must, in conjunction with its LEA, create 
a locally designed intervention to improve student achievement 
in that subgroup. If the school continues to not meet 
performance targets in the same subgroup for 3 additional years 
the school must work with the SEA to improve subgroup 
performance. The committee emphasizes that underperformance of 
a subgroup at schools successful with the balance of their 
students is a concern and must be addressed by the school, the 
LEA and, ultimately, the SEA.

Priority Schools

    Beginning in 2015-16, SASA requires SEAs to identify the 
lowest achieving 5 percent of elementary schools in the State, 
the lowest achieving 5 percent of secondary schools in the 
State, each public high school with a graduation rate less than 
60 percent, and each school that has been a focus school for 
the previous 6 years. LEAs must notify parents if their child's 
school is identified as a priority school. States must compile 
the list of priority schools and make it publicly available. 
Schools that are identified as priority have a 5-year period 
for turnaround. States may apply to the Secretary for a waiver 
of the requirements for priority schools if they determine that 
all schools are performing at a satisfactory level based on 
student achievement and, at the high school level, graduation 
rates.
    This bill envisions LEAs playing a critical role in setting 
supporting conditions for priority schools to improve. LEAs 
must conduct a needs analysis for each identified school. LEAs 
must collaborate with parents, the community, teachers and 
other school personnel, and may work with an external partner, 
to determine which school strategies to implement in each 
identified school. LEAs must also implement a series of 
policies and practices to help these schools succeed, such as 
providing school staff with professional development based on 
the needs analysis, conducting regular teacher and principal 
evaluations, and providing time for collaboration among 
instructional staff.
    LEAs are also required to provide instructional staff with 
timely access to student data and to use such data to implement 
a research-based instructional program that analyzes student 
progress and performance and includes appropriate interventions 
for students. Recognizing that some elementary schools may be 
low-performing because students enter kindergarten below grade 
level and may have trouble catching up, the bill requires that, 
in the case of an elementary school with kindergarten entry, 
the needs analysis specifically measure school readiness of 
entering students. If school readiness is an issue, the LEA and 
school must coordinate with appropriate early childhood 
education programs and develop a plan to improve or expand 
early childhood options.

Focus Schools

    SASA also requires SEAs to identify Focus schools, those 
schools that are not priority schools and that are in the 10 
percent of schools with the greatest achievement gaps among 
subgroups. In addition, focus schools will also be identified 
from non-priority schools that are in the 10 percent of high 
schools with the greatest graduation rate gaps among subgroups.
    In order to address these gaps in student achievement and 
graduation rates, the LEA, in accordance with the school, must 
develop and implement a measurable, data-driven plan to improve 
student outcomes.
    The committee believes it is reasonable to expect a 
narrowing of any identified achievement gap within a 3-year 
period. Therefore, this bill puts additional pressure on LEAs 
that have not seen improvements by making any LEA with an 
achievement gap school that has been identified for three 
consecutive years ineligible for any priority, preference or 
special consideration for any grant, subgrant or other ESEA-
funded program.

Multi-Tier Systems of Support

    The committee encourages States and LEAs to develop and 
adopt the use of multi-tier systems of supports (MTSS) for 
students. These are comprehensive systems of differentiated 
supports that include evidenced-based instruction, universal 
screening, progress monitoring, formative assessments, and 
research-based interventions matched to student needs upon 
which educational decisionmaking using student data can occur. 
The committee also encourages the use of the principles of 
universal design for learning (UDL) and school-wide positive 
behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) to create positive 
conditions for learning. The use of these approaches is 
beneficial for priority and focus schools as well as for 
schools not meeting the performance targets for subgroups of 
students.

State Reservation for School Improvement

    To build State and LEA capacity for turning around low-
performing schools, this bill allows the flexibility for States 
to continue to reserve up to 4 percent of their title I, part 
A, funds to carry out State and LEA responsibilities under 
section 1116. Ninety-five percent of the reserved amount must 
be used to carry out school improvement, either through 
subgrants or, with an LEA's agreement, directly by the State.

Public School Choice

    In order to provide families with access to high quality 
education for their children, LEAs must provide students 
enrolled in priority schools with the option to transfer to 
another public school operated by the LEA, unless such an 
option is prohibited by State law. LEAs must provide this 
option not later than 3 months before the first day of the 
school year following identification. LEAs must also give 
transfer priority to the lowest achieving children from low-
income families.
    Transferring students must be enrolled in classes and other 
activities in the same manner as all other children at the 
public school. LEAs must allow a child who transfers to another 
public school to remain in that school until the child has 
completed the highest grade in such school.

School Improvement Strategies

    The committee is sensitive to complaints about the 
prescriptive nature of the accountability provisions in the No 
Child Left Behind law. The committee also recognizes that the 
strict one-size-fits-all approach that was represented by AYP 
provisions has not led to improvement in many identified 
schools, particularly as the number of identified schools 
increase as the 2014 proficiency deadline approaches. To 
address these concerns, the committee bill focuses the 
federally prescribed interventions only for priority schools. 
The committee believes these schools are in need of significant 
change because many of them have been failing to improve 
student achievement for decades. To improve student achievement 
in schools identified as priority schools, the committee bill 
requires LEAs to implement an evidenced-based turnaround 
strategy in each identified school. To address many of the 
concerns the committee has heard about requiring specific 
models, including those models currently in place under 
guidance for the School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, the 
bill provides LEAs multiple models from which to select, 
including flexibility for rural LEAs. It also adds a set of 
LEA-level requirements to make the success of the strategies 
more likely. The six improvement strategies include:

    Transformation Strategy: The transformation strategy 
requires LEAs to replace the principal (if the principal has 
served in that role for more than 2 years) with a principal who 
has a record of success in increasing student achievement, or 
with a principal who is specially trained in turning around 
low-performing schools. This element is shared with the 
strategic-staffing and turnaround models. The committee 
believes that staff working in priority schools must be 
committed to implementation of the transformation strategy. 
Therefore, under this strategy, existing instructional and 
school leadership staff must reapply for their positions, and 
all instructional and school leadership staff hiring must be 
done at the school through mutual consent for at least the 
duration of the 5-year turnaround period. The term ``mutual 
consent'' means a process through which the principal or hiring 
team and the instructional staff member or school leadership 
staff member agree to the placement at a school. The principal 
or hiring team must be permitted to select instructional and 
school leadership staff for the school from an unrestricted 
pool of internal and external candidates based on an assessment 
of the qualifications of the individual candidates.
    Turnaround Strategy: This strategy also recognizes the 
importance of human capital in turning around priority schools. 
As in the transformation and strategic staffing models, it 
requires that the school replace the principal (if the 
principal has served in that role for more than 2 years) with a 
principal who has demonstrated a record of success in 
increasing student achievement or is specially trained in 
turning around low-performing schools. It also requires that 
all of the teachers in the school be determined to be effective 
instructors and that not more than 65 percent be retained.
    Whole School Reform Strategy: The whole school reform 
strategy requires the implementation of an evidence-based 
strategy that ensures whole school reform. It must include a 
partnership with a strategy developer offering a school reform 
program that has demonstrated at least a moderate level of 
evidence, as shown by more than one well-designed or well-
implemented experimental or quasi-experimental study, and 
demonstrated that the program will have a statistically 
significant effect on student outcomes. The committee expects 
the Department of Education to determine which strategies meet 
these requirements, which could include use of the What Works 
Clearinghouse. The committee recognizes that a limited number 
of models have achieved this level of evidence, but hopes that 
strategy developers will begin to undertake the evaluation 
necessary for their reforms to qualify.
    Restart Strategy: Under the restart strategy, priority 
schools must convert to a charter, innovative, or magnet 
school. The committee believes that providing LEAs with the 
opportunity to convert a priority school to a magnet school or 
to create a new, innovative school, particularly in States that 
do not have charter school laws, provides additional 
flexibility to LEAs. In fact, schools in Lansing, MI; 
Cambridge, MA; Fort Meyers, FL; and Clark County, NV have 
improved performance in struggling schools by converting those 
schools into magnet schools. Schools that are converted to 
charter schools must work in partnership with a nonprofit 
charter school operator, a nonprofit charter management 
organization, or a nonprofit education management organization 
that has a demonstrated record of improving student achievement 
for students similar to those served by the school.
    The committee recognizes that restarting a school is 
disruptive for students enrolled in the school that is being 
converted and believes LEAs must prioritize the learning needs 
of the students in these schools. Therefore, LEAs that 
implement the restart strategy must ensure that the new school 
serves the same grade levels as the original school and enrolls 
any former student of the original school who wishes to attend. 
Additional students would be admitted by a random lottery 
system if more students apply for admission than can be 
accommodated.
    School Closure Strategy: The school closure strategy 
requires LEAs to close the priority school and enroll the 
students in other schools, which may include charter schools 
that are within reasonable proximity to the closed school. The 
committee expects LEAs to enroll these students in high-
performing schools not schools slightly better than the closed 
school.
    Department of Education-Approved Strategy: In recognition 
that there may be State level circumstances that influence the 
ability to turnaround school performance, the committee crafted 
SASA to allow States to offer a school improvement strategy for 
priority schools that is both evidence-based and has been 
approved by the Department of Education. The committee expects 
the Department of Education to approve only comprehensive 
evidence-based models that include a combination of key 
elements. The committee's intent is that this model cannot be 
used for the provision of private-school vouchers.

Improvement in Priority Schools

    The committee recognizes that some priority schools will 
improve at a faster rate than others. States may want the 
flexibility to shift resources among schools during the 
identification period. Therefore, SASA provides that, at any 
time during the 5-year period, schools that have improved 
sufficiently would not continue to be identified by the State 
as a priority school. These schools may continue to receive 
such grant funds as are necessary for the full period of the 
grant so that these improvements can be sustained. However, the 
committee believes that schools that continue to be classified 
as a priority school after 3 years must implement the restart 
or school-closure strategy to ensure significant change in 
governance. A waiver can be obtained from the Secretary if the 
community conducts a needs assessment and determines a model 
different from closure or restart is likely to improve academic 
achievements at the school.

Professional Development Activity Reports

    The committee recognizes the vast amount of excellent 
intervention work that is taking place in schools throughout 
the country. In order to collect and disseminate information 
regarding effective school improvement practices, SASA requires 
that LEAs collect information about how title II, part A 
professional development funds are used to improve school 
performance in priority schools that do not receive School 
Improvement Grants, and the outcomes from the practices. SEAs 
are required to disseminate these practices in order for all 
schools to benefit from the investment of professional 
development funds.

School Improvement Funds

    The committee bill continues to support priority schools 
from two different sources--authorization of the School 
Improvement Grant (SIG) program and the required 4-percent set 
aside from title I, part A, funds at the State level for 
technical assistance and support for LEAs. Entities that may 
receive grant funds from the SIG include a State, a LEA that 
receives funds under this part and serves at least one eligible 
school, a consortium of such LEAs, or an educational service 
agency that serves at least one LEA.
    States that receive school improvement funds must use 95 
percent of these funds to carry out school improvement 
activities for eligible schools by either (1) awarding 
subgrants, on a competitive basis, to eligible entities for 
these activities; or (2) if the State chooses and the LEA 
agrees, directly providing the activities to the eligible 
school and LEA, or arranging for other entities to provide such 
activities to the school. Subgrants are awarded for a 5-year 
period.
    LEAs must meet certain key conditions in order to receive 
funds. They must demonstrate that they have:

     adopted human-resource policies that prioritize 
the recruitment, retention, and placement of effective staff in 
eligible schools;
     ensured that eligible schools have access to 
resources to implement the school improvement strategies 
described above;
     identified opportunities to reduce duplication, 
increase efficiency, and assist eligible schools in complying 
with reporting requirements of State and Federal programs;
     facilitated alignment and coordination between 
early childhood education and care programs and services 
serving students who will attend eligible schools that are 
elementary schools; and
     developed an early warning indicator system that 
monitors school-level data, and alerts the eligible school when 
a student indicates slowed progress toward high school 
graduation, so that the school can provide appropriate student 
interventions.

    Regarding the early warning indicator system, research has 
shown that before actually dropping out, most students at risk 
send strong ``signals'' that they are having trouble in school. 
One study found that almost half of dropouts sent ``warning 
signals'' as early as sixth grade. These signals can be found 
in standard data that LEAs keep on their students.
    States may withhold funds from schools for the final 2-year 
period if they have not made progress on ``leading 
indicators.'' This new definition of ``leading indicators'' 
highlights the importance of academic indicators (other than 
test scores) and school climate issues. Tracking leading 
indicators is important because improving student outcomes and 
closing achievement gaps takes time, and these data can 
therefore serve as intermediate measures of school improvement 
before the results show up in indicators like student test 
scores.

Blue Ribbon Schools

    The committee believes that it is important for States to 
have the opportunity to identify and reward schools that are 
top performers. This bill allows States to identify Blue Ribbon 
Schools as the top 5 percent of the State's public elementary 
schools and secondary schools based on the percentage of 
students who are on track to college- and career-readiness for 
English or language arts, and mathematics and, in the case of 
high schools, the school's graduation rate. States must also 
look at the performance of student subgroups and, if the State 
chooses to measure student growth, the percentage of students 
attaining growth, and school gains. Schools identified as 
persistently low-achieving schools and achievement gap schools 
cannot be identified as Blue Ribbon Schools. States may reserve 
up to one-half percent of their title I, part A, funds to 
distribute rewards, on a competitive basis, to LEAs that serve 
one or more Blue Ribbon Schools so that the LEA may provide 
awards to such schools.
    In addition to the possible financial reward, States must 
provide Blue Ribbon Schools with increased autonomy over the 
school's budget, staffing, and time, and allow each blue ribbon 
school to have flexibility in the use of any funds provided to 
the school under this Act for any purpose allowed under this 
Act, consistent with civil rights laws. LEAs must agree to use 
the award funds to improve student achievement and provide 
technical assistance to the lowest-achieving schools in the 
State that have characteristics similar to the Blue Ribbon 
School.

Centers of Excellence for Early Childhood Education

    The committee recognizes the critical importance that high-
quality early childhood education programs can play in the 
healthy cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development 
of children. SASA authorizes a new program, similar to one 
authorized in the Head Start Act, which recognizes and rewards 
early childhood education programs that have a demonstrated 
track record of preparing children for kindergarten. This 
program asks the Nation's governors to nominate outstanding 
early childhood education programs for grants distributed by 
the Secretary that can be used by programs to expand their 
reach in the community, and to provide technical assistance and 
dissemination of best practices to other early childhood 
education programs in its area and the State.

Green Ribbon Schools

    SASA also creates a new category of recognition for 
exemplary schools by allowing the Secretary to set criteria for 
outstanding performance in such areas as reducing environmental 
impact, improving student and personnel health and wellness, 
and providing sustainability education. The Secretary may also 
establish an award program recognizing excellence in classified 
school employees.

                      PARENT AND FAMILY ENGAGEMENT

    The committee bill envisions several key changes to the 
provisions of section 1118, relating to parent and family 
engagement. The lens of current law is expanded to encompass 
family members, in addition to parents and those who act in 
loco parentis. This change is intended to acknowledge the role 
that non-custodial family members play in the life of a child, 
and to encourage LEAs to strategically engage these adults. The 
bill includes requirements for LEAs to collaborate with 
community-based organizations, employers, and other entities in 
the development and implementation of parent and family 
engagement strategies, and for parent and family engagement 
compacts to describe outreach to community stakeholders. These 
changes recognize research on the critical role that non-
custodial family members, mentors, and other caring adults can 
play in the positive development of children, and especially 
children from low-income and minority communities.

                  HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHER DEFINITION

    This bill includes a revised definition of a highly 
qualified teacher which codifies existing flexibility for 
certain types of teachers so that LEAs can effectively staff 
their schools. The definition incorporates existing regulations 
that make clear that a teacher enrolled in an alternate route 
to certification program is considered highly qualified, as 
long as the teacher has passed the State subject matter 
certification or licensure test; is making satisfactory 
progress towards obtaining full certification within 3 years; 
and is participating in a high-quality, State-approved teacher 
preparation program.
    The definition also provides flexibility for teachers in 
rural areas who teach multiple subjects, allowing them to be 
considered highly qualified if they have met the definition for 
at least one core academic subject and become highly qualified 
in the additional subjects within 3 years. The definition 
clarifies that a science teacher who holds a broad field 
science or an individual field science certification or 
licensure can be deemed by the State as highly qualified. The 
definition also aligns the definition of a highly qualified 
special education teacher with the definition included in the 
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
    The committee also provides a special rule for small, 
rural, and remote schools so that teachers in these schools are 
permitted to meet the highly qualified teacher requirement 
through distance learning and team teaching. The off-site 
teacher must be highly qualified in the subject being taught, 
be responsible for 50 percent of direct instruction, monitoring 
student progress, and assigning students' grades. The on-site 
teacher must be highly qualified in at least one other subject, 
must be present in the classroom throughout the period of 
distance learning, and must provide instructional support.
    SASA also recognizes certain very specialized instruction 
and exempts those teachers from meeting the highly qualified 
teacher definition. These exemptions are:

     A teacher of Native American, Alaska Native, or 
Native Hawaiian language or culture, whether the teacher is 
teaching on a permanent, part-time, or occasional basis; and
     A teacher who is a Native elder or other authority 
on American Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian history 
who provides instruction in such subject, whether on a periodic 
or one-time basis.

    A teacher may also be considered highly qualified if the 
teacher is a participant in an exchange visitor program.
    Finally, the committee signals its strong belief that 
teacher effectiveness is paramount by allowing States to deem 
teachers with high ratings under a rigorous teacher evaluation 
system to be considered highly qualified.

                 FISCAL REQUIREMENTS AND COMPARABILITY

    The original intent of title I was to provide additional 
resources to States and LEAs for the education of disadvantaged 
children. In order to meet that intent, the law has required 
State and local funds be spent comparably between title I and 
non-title I schools, so that Federal dollars are supplementary.
    To ensure this comparability of resource expenditure is 
taking place, SASA requires LEAs to use actual teacher salaries 
when calculating the resources expended at a given school. This 
provision of SASA closes a long-time ``loophole'' in the 
comparability requirements where average teacher salaries were 
used instead of actual teacher salaries. The committee 
recognizes that there is research that indicates significant 
disparities in spending between title I and non-title I 
schools. The committee's intent in section 1120 is to ensure 
title I dollars are provided to schools with concentrated 
poverty as a supplement to a comparable allocation of State and 
local funds. This will ensure that taxpayer dollars serve the 
students for whom they are intended. In addition, the 
accounting of real per-pupil expenditures will increase 
transparency about the allocation of resources. The committee 
expects this data to be accessible to parents, taxpayers, LEAs, 
States and policymakers at all levels of government. 
Recognizing that States and LEAs will need time to put the 
appropriate fiscal mechanisms and data systems in place for 
school level expenditures and other data to be reported 
accurately, LEAs will not be required to comply with these 
changes until the 2015-16 school year.
    In closing the so-called comparability loophole, the 
committee's intent is not to require LEAs to transfer school 
personnel in order to comply with the comparability 
requirement. The comparability provisions require that title I 
schools do not have fewer total State and local resources than 
the average of non-title I schools in a LEA. LEAs must consider 
all resources, not just salaries.

                       COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS

    Similar to current law, the committee bill encourages LEAs 
to coordinate with early childhood education and care programs 
and providers, including Head Start agencies and providers of 
services under Part C of IDEA, on a variety of matters. 
Activities identified include transfer of records, with 
parental consent, from early childhood education and care 
programs to local schools; ongoing communication between early 
childhood education and care program staff and school staff for 
the purpose of ensuring developmentally appropriate instruction 
and shared expectations; joint training opportunities for early 
childhood education and care program staff and school staff; 
the development of transition procedures to improve school 
readiness for children; and parent-education efforts that help 
parents of young children understand the expectations of, and 
services offered by, the school in which their child will 
enroll.

                          EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

    It is the committee's view that the development and 
implementation of education technology programs and activities 
continue to be important allowable uses of title I funds. While 
technology can never replace effective teachers, the committee 
believes that educational technology can help provide 
differentiated instruction and personalized learning to meet 
each student's unique needs; engaging and updated content; 
timely information that educators can use to improve 
instruction and decisionmaking; enhanced parental engagement 
through the provision of online information; and access to 
courses often not otherwise available.
    Therefore, the committee supports States, LEAs, and schools 
that choose to use title I program funds for technology and 
digital learning to best meet title I program goals and 
requirements.

Grants for State Assessments

    The committee recognizes that the requirement of the new 
state-wide accountability and assessments systems will be 
significant for States.
    Therefore, a one-time doubling of funds for States to use 
to improve their assessment systems has been provided as 
described in section 1141.

                  TITLE I, PART B: PATHWAYS TO COLLEGE

Subpart 1: Secondary School Reform

    The committee recognizes that in today's increasingly 
global economy, it is critical that students graduate from high 
school prepared and ready to succeed in college and the 
workforce. Unfortunately, many of our Nation's high school 
students do not graduate on time, or do not graduate at all. 
Additionally, low-income and minority students graduate at 
significantly lower rates than their peers. The Pathways to 
College Program supports the implementation of innovative and 
effective secondary school reforms both LEA-wide and in high 
schools with graduation rates below 75 percent that do not 
receive SIG funds. The bill requires grant applicants to 
implement reform strategies in the feeder middle schools 
serving these high schools because the committee recognizes 
that many of the issues facing at-risk youth begin in middle 
school.
    The committee intends the definition of ``Competency-based 
learning model'' be aligned with the following principles of 
competency-based education: (1) Students advance upon mastery; 
(2) Competencies include explicit, measurable, transferable 
learning objectives that empower students; (3) Assessment is 
meaningful and a positive learning experience for students; (4) 
Students receive timely, differentiated support based on their 
individual learning needs; and (5) Learning outcomes emphasize 
competencies that include application and creation of 
knowledge, along with the development of important analytical 
skills. In addition, grantees shall include a plan to ensure 
that the practices implemented meet these principles of 
competency-based learning.
    The committee recognizes that some local educational 
agencies allow all students in a LEA the choice between which 
public high school they wish to attend upon matriculating from 
an elementary or middle school. In the case where a majority of 
the students at an elementary school or middle school do not go 
on to attend any single high school in the LEA, the committee 
intends for the definition of ``feeder middle school'' to be 
interpreted as an elementary or secondary school where a 
cumulative majority of students in the school go on to attend 
any of the eligible secondary schools in the LEA.
    The committee also intends that high schools in receipt of 
Secondary School Reform Grants that offer dual-enrollment 
coursework must offer such coursework free of charge to low-
income students.

Subpart 2: Accelerated Learning

    The committee bill maintains support for Advanced Placement 
(AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses, while also 
providing more options for States and LEAs in achieving the 
goals of access to college-level coursework for low-income 
students. Changes to the definition of an AP or IB examination 
would allow States and localities the option to choose another 
evidence-based program model that increases student access to 
rigorous courses in core academic subjects, is benchmarked to 
college readiness, provides aligned end-of-course assessments, 
and includes educator resources to improve instruction.
    The committee bill incorporates language enacted by 
Congress in the America COMPETES Act of 2007 and maintained in 
the reauthorization of that Act in 2010. With these provisions, 
Congress has already acknowledged much advancement from 
evidence-based program models showing large increases in 
academic success for students who had access to rigorous high 
school core courses benchmarked to college readiness. The 
language in the committee bill is intended to provide more 
students with the opportunity for achieving college-readiness 
through rigorous courses than is provided in current law.

   TITLE II: SUPPORTING TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL EXCELLENCE, CONTINUOUS 
          IMPROVEMENT, AND SUPPORT FOR TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS

Professional Growth and Improvement

    The committee feels strongly that the Federal focus should 
shift from teacher qualifications to teacher effectiveness. 
Teacher and principal evaluation systems are key to improving 
teaching practice and student learning and can be linked back 
to teacher preparation programs so that LEAs can make better 
decisions about which programs they partner with to hire 
teachers. The committee also feels strongly that such systems 
should be grounded in helping educators improve their 
instruction, through improved professional development. As 
such, the bill requires districts to develop professional 
growth and improvement systems that include teacher and 
principal evaluations based on a set of limited, but critical, 
parameters, as well as professional development aimed at 
addressing deficiencies identified through evaluations. These 
evaluation systems must provide meaningful feedback to teachers 
and principals; establish multiple categories of teacher and 
principal performance; evaluate teachers regularly using 
multiple measures; be regularly reviewed to ensure that they 
provide meaningful differentiation; and include training for 
evaluators. Evaluations must be based on academic achievement 
and growth, classroom observations, and other measures that 
inform teacher performance (for teachers) and on academic 
achievement and growth, instructional leadership, and, if 
districts choose, other measures of principal performance (for 
principals). The evaluation systems must be able to provide 
meaningful feedback to teachers and principals in a timely 
manner and provide data to inform decisions about professional 
development activities. These parameters are critical to 
efficient teacher and principal evaluation systems, and the 
committee believes the Federal Government must promote 
alignment to these parameters.
    The committee is aware that many States and LEAs have 
already developed systems either on their own or as a 
requirement of a Federal grant or ESEA flexibility applications 
(aka, ``waivers''). It is important to the committee that, 
where possible, this bill does not alter the hard work already 
conducted by States in this arena. As such, States and LEAs 
with systems approved by the U.S. Department of Education are 
not required to alter the components of their current teacher 
and principal evaluation systems. Additionally, it is the 
committee's intention that the implementation of new systems 
does not alter the rights and remedies secured by educators 
through their local collective bargaining agreements.
    The committee believes strongly that incentivizing States 
and LEAs to implement robust teacher and principal evaluation 
systems tied to professional development is one of the most 
important policies in this bill that will improve teaching and 
school leadership across the country and lead to better student 
outcomes.

Uses of Funds

    The bill makes several important changes to title II, part 
A, which has historically been used by LEAs for professional 
development and to provide schools with additional teachers.
    The bill, for the first time, requires LEAs to use some of 
their title II-A funds for professional development and 
specifically requires LEAs to spend 20 percent of their money 
to provide professional development in the lowest performing 
schools. Additionally, the bill includes a definition of 
professional development that will drive better investments in 
this area. By including a tighter definition, this bill will 
help ensure that Federal funds will be expended on professional 
development that will improve teaching practice and student 
learning. Districts will conduct professional development 
activities that are evidence-based and aligned with the results 
of evaluations in order to improve student academic achievement 
and increase students' abilities to meet college- and career-
ready standards. The committee also intends for LEAs to 
collaborate with local early childhood programs and has allowed 
for early childhood educators to be included in LEA 
professional development activities.
    This bill otherwise streamlines the list of allowable 
activities in title II, part A, intentionally limiting them to 
activities that are likely to have the greatest positive impact 
on teaching and learning. For example, for the first time, 
developing and implementing evaluation systems is included as 
one of the high-impact activities that LEAs may fund using 
title II dollars. In not making this a required use of funds, 
the committee recognizes that LEAs may already be using Federal 
and State resources to conduct this work.
    The bill also sets parameters on how LEAs may use these 
funds for class-size reduction. If LEAs choose to use funds to 
hire additional teachers to reduce class sizes, these teachers 
must teach in the early grades (kindergarten to third) and 
class sizes must be reduced to a size where research has proven 
that students will benefit. The largest and most rigorous class 
size study, the Tennessee Student Teacher Achievement Ratio, or 
STAR experiment, demonstrated that reducing class sizes in 
kindergarten through third grade to between 13 and 17 students 
led to statistically significant student achievement gains, and 
that these gains were more pronounced for minority and 
economically disadvantaged students. Followup studies showed 
that these gains persisted for students who had attended 
smaller classes.
    This committee wishes to emphasize the importance of equity 
and ensuring that students have access to effective teachers. 
States and LEAs are encouraged to use their title II, part A, 
funds to address any inequities that may exist in the 
distribution of teachers based on their qualifications and, 
where information is available, on their effectiveness at 
producing positive academic outcomes for students.
    The committee also recognizes the significance of high-
quality mentoring for new teachers and principals. Title II, 
part A, includes a definition to ensure that funds spent for 
this purpose will support strong mentoring programs and 
practices. Mentoring is essential to retaining teachers as 
their decisions to remain in teaching are often affected by the 
quality of the support teachers receive in their first years. 
And, as teacher evaluation systems continue to develop, LEAs 
can use title II, part A funds to focus their efforts on 
retaining top performers.
    Other allowable activities include establishing beginning 
teacher induction programs, creating career ladders, increasing 
teacher capacity to evaluate student work, and recruiting 
teachers for high-need schools and subject areas.
    The committee also intends that States and LEAs have the 
flexibility to identify their local teaching and learning needs 
and use Federal funds accordingly. In keeping with this intent, 
high-need subjects such as ``mathematics'' and ``science'' may 
be defined to include other STEM-related subjects, such as 
computer science, engineering and other related subjects.

Training Academies

    The bill also allows participating States to set aside 1 
percent of their title II, part A funds to support the creation 
and oversight of teacher and principal training academies. 
These academies must be rigorously selective in who they admit, 
emphasize clinical training methods to prepare teachers and 
principals, and tie graduation to improving student academic 
achievement. In return for accepting this level of 
accountability, academies will be free from burdensome, input-
based regulations. States will be required to establish a 
special entity to oversee teacher and principal training 
academies that has the authority to shut down low-performing 
programs.

Principals

    Extensive research shows that school leadership is second 
only to teacher quality among school-related factors that 
influence student achievement. While teacher quality has the 
greatest impact on achievement, principal quality determines 
whether schools can attract and retain effective teachers. 
Historically, States and LEAs have used very little of their 
title II, part A, funds to support the professional development 
or training of principals. As such, the bill ensures that of 
the 2 percent to 5 percent States set-aside for State-level 
activities, the improvement of principal performance is among 
the few activities in which a State must invest. In recognition 
of the importance of school leadership, the committee also 
includes support for principals as one of the activities that 
LEAs may direct their title II, part A, funds towards. 
Effective principals are critical to attracting and retaining 
effective teachers in schools, particularly those serving the 
most disadvantaged students. LEAs need to do as much as 
possible to get strong leaders into these schools, and Federal 
funds can help in this regard.
    Additionally, the bill creates the Principal Recruitment 
and Training Program as subpart 5 of title II, part A, to 
recruit, train and support principals in schools that are high-
need, persistently low-achieving, achievement gap, or rural 
schools. This program replaces the current school leadership 
program. The Principal Pathways program improves upon current 
law by focusing on recruitment and training practices that have 
been demonstrated to strengthen school leadership.
    The new program improves the rigor of the application 
process for school leadership grants. There is a priority for 
entities that have a record of success in preparing principals 
who go on to improve student outcomes in eligible schools. In 
addition, the program increases the accountability of grantees 
for achieving results. Grantees will compete to renew their 
grants and scale up their efforts based on their record of 
improving student outcomes. Grantees will also use data on the 
performance of their programs for continuous improvement.
    The committee also recognizes that it is essential to build 
the leadership capacity necessary to turn around persistently 
low-achieving schools. The program will establish a school 
turnaround leadership academy with a focus on recruitment, 
training, placement and support of leaders specifically focused 
on turning around persistently low-achieving schools and 
dissemination of research and information on effective school 
turnaround leadership.

Teacher Pathways to the Classroom

    Title II, part B of the committee bill replaces the 
Transitions to Teaching program, which was targeted at programs 
preparing alternate route teachers, with the Teacher Pathways 
to the Classroom program, which no longer focuses on how 
teachers enter the classroom, but rather improving their 
effectiveness in teaching students. The most recent research 
indicates that the pathways to the classroom, whether it is a 
traditional, alternate route or residency model, are not 
predictive of the teachers' success in the classroom. What 
matters is the quality of the preparation program. A 2009 
randomized study by Mathematica Policy Research found no 
statistically significant difference in performance between 
students of teachers prepared through alternate routes compared 
to those prepared through traditional routes to teaching.
    Given this research, the committee believes that Federal 
funding should be provided to teacher preparation programs 
based on the quality of the teaching candidates it produces, as 
opposed to the characteristics of the teaching program itself. 
The competitive grant program in this bill allows high-
performing teacher preparation programs to compete for Federal 
funding to recruit and train new teachers in high-need subjects 
and fields to teach in high-need schools. High-quality 
traditional route programs will be able to compete on equal 
footing with alternate route programs with proven records of 
success, such as Teach for America and the Teaching Fellows 
programs operated by The New Teacher Project, as well as 
teacher residency programs with a strong record of producing 
candidates that increase student achievement.

Teacher of High-need Subjects

    The committee intends, in section 2201(b)(2), that States 
and LEAs have the flexibility to identify their local teaching 
and learning needs and use Federal funds accordingly. In 
defining mathematics and science as high-need subjects, the 
committee intends to include other STEM-related subjects, such 
as computer science, engineering and other related subjects.

Teacher Incentive Fund Program

    The committee bill authorizes the Teacher Incentive Fund 
(TIF), a program that was first authorized in 2006 through 
Title V, Part D of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act. However, the committee makes a number of important changes 
to the program. The TIF program currently provides grants to 
States and LEAs to develop or improve performance-based 
compensation systems for teachers and principals. As an 
authorized program in ESEA, TIF will provide competitive grants 
to States and districts to develop, implement, improve, or 
expand strategies, including performance-based incentives, to 
increase the number of highly-effective teachers and principals 
in high-need schools. Priority will be given to grantees who 
target placing highly-effective teachers and principals in 
priority schools or who have already developed a professional 
growth and improvement system, as described in title II, part 
A. The committee strongly believes that the TIF program, as a 
competitive grant program, can lead the way in driving 
improvements in distributing effective teachers across States 
and LEAs and that using data gleaned from sound evaluation 
systems for the distribution of the most effective educators, 
is the obvious next step in our attempt to close the 
achievement gap and ensure equal educational opportunities for 
all students.

Education Technology

    The committee maintains that professional development about 
and through technology is helpful in meeting the goal of 
college- and career-readiness for students. Therefore, the 
committee encourages States, LEAs, schools, and other entities 
involved in the preparation and professional development of 
educators to ensure teachers and administrators have the 
knowledge and skills to effectively use technology and digital 
resources to improve teaching, learning, and administration.

 TITLE III: LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION AND ACADEMIC CONTENT INSTRUCTION FOR 
                ENGLISH LEARNERS AND IMMIGRANT STUDENTS

    The changes reflected in title III are designed to better 
leverage funds to supplement the use of evidenced-based 
programs and practices, including professional development, to 
support the acquisition of English and the ability for English 
learners to graduate college- and career-ready. Key reforms 
include updating the formula used to allocate resources to more 
accurately provide resources to the school and LEAs serving 
English learners; requiring States to maintain existing 
investments in educational supports for English learners; and 
calling attention to long-term English learners to ensure that 
underserved students receive additional instructional supports. 
In order to allow for better service delivery to students at 
all levels of English proficiency, States and LEAs are 
encouraged to continue to monitor the progress of English 
learners throughout their school careers, including early 
childhood education and care settings, and recognize the 
developmental nature of second language acquisition.
    States are no longer required to assess progress according 
to established annual measurable achievement objectives, but 
they are still responsible for ensuring that English learners 
attain English proficiency and find ways to demonstrate such 
proficiency in core academic subjects.
    This title also authorizes national projects, including 
partnerships to support the pursuit of advanced degrees for 
individuals and in fields that will support improved quality 
and increased access to programs designed to support the 
learning and development of English learners. It is the intent 
of these strategies to support capacity building efforts to 
identify and better disseminate effective strategies for 
supporting the learning and development of English learners.

Local Plans

    The committee bill recognizes the importance of well-
developed local plans for implementing supports for English 
learners. The committee especially emphasizes the importance of 
creating strong community and family engagement to serve 
English learners. Because of limited resources, the committee 
emphasizes that local plans should target funds to schools with 
the highest need. Local plans should also ensure that all 
teachers of English learners are fluent (i.e., written and oral 
communication skills) in the language of instruction.

State Activities

    The committee intends for States to support LEAs and 
therefore, SEAs may use up to 10 percent of their grant 
allotment, to conduct activities that will assist LEAs to 
better serve English learners.

Local Evaluation and Accountability

    The committee bill describes in section 3121, the 
evaluation requirements for eligible entities that receive a 
subgrant from a State educational agency. An entity must 
provide an evaluation to the agency at the conclusion of every 
second fiscal year during the lifetime of a subgrant. The 
evaluation format is prescribed by the agency, and includes a 
description of the following items: programs and activities 
conducted with funds; progress made by English language 
learners as measured by State English language proficiency 
assessments; the number and percentage of children in programs 
and activities who meet the established target; and progress 
made by former English learners in meeting college- and career-
ready academic content standards.
    The evaluation is to be used by the entity and the State 
educational agency to determine program and activity 
effectiveness, to identify and inform potential improvement 
processes, and to ultimately determine award of continuation 
funding for specific programs or activities. The evaluation 
must provide information regarding program and activity 
enrollment, as well as any other required information by the 
State. The report must include the percentage of children with 
respect to the English proficiency progress, transition to 
classrooms not tailored to English learners, attainment of 
college- and career-ready standards, and finally, those not 
exempted from the State reading or language arts academic 
assessment. A State must approve any evaluation measures that 
are designed to assess progress in attaining English 
proficiency, in meeting college- and career-ready student 
academic achievement standards, and progress in meeting the 
annual State performance targets.
    On an annual basis, each entity and State educational 
agency must establish agreed upon performance targets for the 
percentage of English learners who are making progress in 
achieving proficiency not more than 5 years after 
identification as an English learner. In the case of a student 
who will graduate from secondary school in less than 5 years, 
the student would not be counted as a graduating student in the 
local educational agency's graduation rate calculation. If an 
entity fails to meet the local performance targets, the State 
educational agency must require the entity to develop and 
implement an improvement plan. The State educational agency 
must provide technical assistance to the entity during this 
time. If the entity fails to meet the local performance targets 
1 year after identified as being in need of improvement, the 
State educational agency must identify the entity as needing 
State support and require the entity to develop and implement a 
plan to modify the existing curriculum, program and method of 
instruction. The entity must submit this plan for State 
approval. If, 1 year after being identified as needing State 
support, the entity again fails to meet performance targets, 
the State educational agency must identify the entity as in 
need of State action. The State educational agency must then 
manage the subgrant funds and programs for 4 years, or until 
the local performance target is reached. After 4 years--or 
after the goal is reached, if sooner than 4 years--the State 
educational agency institutes a 2-year probationary period. If 
the entity fails to meet the local performance target at any 
time during this period, the State educational agency must 
manage the subgrant funds and programs for the duration of the 
probationary period.

State Accountability

    The committee bill describes in section 3122 the 
accountability measures for States, particularly in regards to 
State performance targets. Each State educational agency must 
establish a State performance target for the percentage of 
English learners served by the State who are making progress in 
achieving English proficiency not more than 5 years after being 
identified as an English learner. State performance targets are 
subject to approval by the Secretary. Each State educational 
agency is responsible for ensuring that local performance 
targets result in overall achievement of the State's 
performance target.
    If a State educational agency fails to meet the performance 
target for 2 consecutive years, the Secretary must require the 
State to develop and implement an improvement plan. The 
Secretary must provide technical assistance to the State 
educational agency during the development and implementation of 
the improvement plan. If a State educational agency fails to 
meet the performance target for 4 consecutive years, the 
Secretary must require modification of the State plan and 
methods of instruction. Additionally, the Secretary must 
require a State educational agency to identify low-performing 
local educational agencies and then develop and implement a 
plan to partner low-performing local educational agencies with 
high-performing local educational agencies. This would entail 
reallocation of any grant funding that would have been 
distributed to the low-performing local educational agency, to 
the high-performing partner local educational agency. In the 
case of a student who will graduate from secondary school in 
less than 5 years, the student would not be counted as a 
graduating student in the local educational agency's graduation 
rate calculation.

Reporting Requirements

    The committee bill describes in section 3123 the reporting 
requirements for State educational agencies, as well as the 
U.S. Department of Education. Each State educational agency 
that receives assistance must provide an annual report to the 
Secretary that includes information on the following four 
areas: progress in the development and implementation of 
English language proficiency standards; student progress in 
achievement of English language proficiency; a description of 
State programs and activities; and the effectiveness of such 
programs and activities as related to improving the education 
provided to English learners.
    Every 2 years, the Secretary must submit a comprehensive 
report to the authorizing committees of Congress. This report 
must contain the types and descriptions of educational and 
instructional programs and activities carried out to serve 
English learners, as well as the effectiveness of these 
programs. It must also include a critical synthesis of data 
reported to States, including the number of programs or 
activities subject to accountability measures due to a failure 
to meet local performance targets (as described in section 
3121(b)(4)). A description of any technical assistance provided 
by States must also be included. This report must also contain 
an estimate of the number of certified or licensed teachers 
working with English learners, as well as an estimate of the 
number of such teachers needed for the succeeding 5 fiscal 
years. Lastly, any major findings of evidence-based research 
carried out under this title and any other pertinent 
information gathered from reports submitted to the Secretary 
shall be included.

Professional Development Grants

    The committee bill describes in section 3131 discretionary 
grant funding to institutions of higher education or nonprofit 
institutions in consortia with State or local educational 
agencies to provide for relevant professional development 
activities in the area of English language instruction. These 
grants are awarded on a competitive basis and are not to exceed 
a period of 5 years. They are to provide for professional 
development activities that will improve classroom instruction 
for English learners and to assist educational personnel 
working with English learners to meet high professional 
standards, including certification and licensure standards.
    Grants awarded under this section may be used to support 
partnerships between State or local educational agencies and 
institutions of higher education, support research on relevant 
promising practices, support strategies that promote school 
readiness and high school graduation, and support strategies 
that strengthen family and community engagement. Additionally, 
grant funds may be used to support the development of 
appropriate curricula, the dissemination of evidence-based best 
practices and technical assistance.

Commission on Assessment of English Learners

    The committee bill describes in section 3132 the 
establishment of an independent commission on the assessment 
and advancement of English learners. The members of the 
commission must be appointed within 6 months of the date of 
enactment of SASA. The commission must be comprised of 
individuals with experience and expertise in the educational 
advancement and development of English learners. The Secretary 
must ensure that selected individuals are deemed competent 
experts. The commission must provide the Secretary with advice 
and recommendations regarding proficiency standards, 
assessments--including early learning assessment strategies--
accommodations, and accountability systems. Additionally, the 
commission must provide guidance related to the formation of 
relevant peer review panels and ensure that research, 
development and dissemination activities of the Department 
address identified gaps. The commission will also help to 
identify ways to address the needs of English learners in 
Departmental program planning, and to support capacity-building 
efforts to assist local educational agencies and schools.

English Language Acquisition Technology Innovation Grants

    The committee recognizes that new innovations are necessary 
to address the needs of SEAs and LEAs when instructing English 
learners. SASA provides for the use of funds for grants in the 
area of English language acquisition technology for purposes of 
pursuing research and development to improve English 
proficiency and academic achievement for English learners. The 
Secretary is authorized to establish processes for the 
development and execution of the English language acquisition 
technology innovation grant projects and the solicitation of 
entities to carry out the projects. The Secretary may award 
grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and cash prizes, as 
well as enter into other approved transactions with entities 
pursuing research and development in this area. Additionally, 
the Secretary may obtain evaluations of the award processes and 
gauge the effectiveness of individual projects funded by the 
grant program. The Secretary may use funds made available for 
the grants to pay for the cost of these evaluations.
    Dissemination of evidence-based, effective practices and 
technologies developed with the support of these English 
language acquisition technology innovation grants is to occur 
through comprehensive centers, the regional educational 
laboratories system, or other appropriate dissemination means. 
To the maximum extent possible, the Secretary shall ensure that 
activities funded through this grant program are not 
duplicative of activities under programs carried out under 
Federal law by the Department or other Federal agencies.

         TITLE IV: SUPPORTING SUCCESSFUL, WELL-ROUNDED STUDENTS

Improving Literacy Instruction and Student Achievement

    The first foundational element of the Improving Literacy 
Instruction and Student Achievement program is to reinforce 
that literacy is a set of skills that build from birth to grade 
12 and must be addressed in a comprehensive and consistent 
manner. Research and best practice over the past 20 years has 
clearly shown the links between oral and written language, 
vocabulary development and reading achievement. Therefore, 
becoming an effective learner requires literacy instruction 
targeting a comprehensive set of skills. Under previous 
systems, if children were on grade level in reading by the 
fourth grade, they were assumed ready to become learners of 
more complex content. However, experience has demonstrated that 
reading and writing instruction only becomes more complex, and 
many children who need additional assistance in the early 
grades will continue to need selective assistance as the 
academic content becomes more complex. Therefore, the bill 
calls for effective literacy instruction from birth through 
grade 12, ensuring that children are appropriately supported at 
each stage in their academic development.
    A second critical element of this program is a strengthened 
comprehensive approach to ensuring that students leave high 
school with advanced reading and writing skills needed to 
succeed in college and a career. In order to accomplish this, 
teachers and school leaders must be trained and confident in 
using evidence-based instruction beginning in the early grades 
through middle and high school. This will assure that more 
students are instructed in higher levels of reading and writing 
that correspond to the full range of State English language 
arts standards that will support the higher literacy skills 
that today's postsecondary education and the advanced, global 
workplace demand.
    A third component of the program creates a comprehensive 
approach to assessment. The committee's bill includes 
requirements for both summative and formative assessments to 
create critical tools for understanding if a program is 
effective (summative) and to inform and improve ongoing 
instruction (formative). These requirements complement other 
aspects of assessment included in the bill.
    A fourth component of the program is for States and school 
districts to develop and implement plans that both make use of 
State and local strengths as well as to reflect the unique 
needs of each community. Needs vary related to improving 
literacy instruction in nearly every State and often needs vary 
within a State. A thoughtful planning process is integral to 
assure all populations of students and the setting in which 
they live and attend school must be taken into consideration. 
The planning requirement directs States to reflect the wide 
range of literacy service providers and literacy expertise 
within the State.
    The bill articulates that federally supported professional 
development programs must include important key components to 
be successful. For example, the program must be specific to an 
area of instruction especially literacy instruction from birth 
to grade 12. Another component is job-embedded professional 
development that reflects what teachers and school leaders 
believe they need to be effective, including a needs 
assessments and implementation of evidence-based instruction.
    The bill targets high-poverty communities. Head Start, 
community childcare block grants and State-supported programs 
for assisting high poverty families have traditionally not 
included a focus on education. To develop effective learners, 
the literacy program must support evidence-based concepts that 
stem from an early learning program. Similarly, a blended and 
integrated reading and writing program is ideal to assure 
students achieve a deeper understanding of more complex 
content.
    Additionally, the committee would like to clarify that 
eligible entities that receive subgrants in support of birth 
through kindergarten entry literacy may utilize funding to 
provide targeted instruction for children whose early literacy 
skills are below the appropriate age or developmental level as 
demonstrated by a screening assessment.

Improving Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Instruction and 
                    Student Achievement

    To ensure future competitiveness in the global economy, 
America requires a workforce highly skilled in science, 
technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Yet, our 
education efforts in these critical areas lag behind those of 
other advanced nations. The committee bill includes a new 
Improving Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math 
Instruction and Student Achievement program as part B of title 
IV that will improve student academic achievement in STEM by:

     Getting students engaged and excited about STEM 
subjects through high-quality instruction, opportunities to 
participate in STEM competitions, and exposure to STEM careers;
     Helping more students access high-quality STEM 
courses and learning opportunities;
     Improving the quality and effectiveness of 
classroom instruction by recruiting, training, and supporting 
excellent STEM teachers and providing robust tools and supports 
for students and teachers; and
     Closing student achievement gaps and preparing 
more students to be on track to college- and career-readiness 
and success in STEM subjects.

    Grants will be distributed to States (alone or in 
partnership with other States, non-profit entities, 
institutions of higher education or educational service 
agencies) by formula if the annual appropriation exceeds $500 
million; below this amount, grants will be awarded to States 
competitively.
    The committee recognizes STEM education as a national 
priority in the country's elementary and secondary education 
system. For the purposes of this title, the committee would 
like to clarify that ``STEM education'' encompasses science, 
technology, engineering and mathematics as well as other 
academic subjects, such as computer science, that build on 
these disciplines, are important to scientific discovery, 
business and industry and that States identify as part of the 
State analysis required by section 4204 (b)(1).
    The committee recognizes the importance of increasing 
access for students who are members of groups underrepresented 
in STEM areas and requires that States describe how grant 
activities will increase access for such students. It is the 
intent of the committee that such efforts include female 
students, minority students, students who are English language 
learners, children with disabilities, and students from low-
income families.
    The committee also recognizes that individuals with strong 
STEM skills have opportunities for much more lucrative careers 
outside of teaching. At the same time, research shows that well 
implemented mentoring programs help provide opportunities for 
teachers to learn from their colleagues and help provide the 
support that new teachers need to remain in teaching. In 
recognition of the need to invest in strategies to retain 
excellent STEM teachers and supporting novice STEM teachers, 
the committee bill includes a set-aside for a STEM Master 
Teacher Corps program. The intent of the STEM Master Teacher 
Corps program is to improve the ability of all teachers to 
teach strong STEM skills to their students by offering career 
advancement opportunities and higher pay to the top 5 percent 
of K-12 STEM teachers in return for their mentorship of and 
sharing best practices with other, less experienced STEM 
teachers.

Improving Access to a Well-Rounded Education

    Current Federal approaches to helping State efforts toward 
enriching the curriculum have been in the form of separate, 
uncoordinated discretionary grant programs for individual 
academic subjects that had significant benefits for a 
relatively small number of LEAs that were able to successfully 
compete for funding. But these single-subject competitive 
programs did not leverage broader change in State and local 
policies and practices in ways that considered all academic 
subjects offered, as a whole. Therefore, the committee 
authorizes the Increasing Access to a Well-Rounded Education 
program as part C of Title IV. This program requires applicants 
to provide access to a well-rounded curriculum by giving grants 
to States, in partnership with LEAs, educational service 
agencies, and non-profit organizations, to increase the access 
of low-income students to a well-rounded education. The grants 
will be distributed by formula when appropriations for the 
program reach $500 million, and will be awarded competitively 
below that. The committee bill eliminates a number of programs 
that promote instruction in a variety of subjects, including 
Arts in Education, Civics, Teaching American History, Economics 
Education, and the Foreign Language Assistance Program. This 
program will allow States to continue to build teacher capacity 
and increase the access of low-income students to a well-
rounded education, including in the arts and music, civics and 
government, economics, environmental education, financial 
literacy, foreign languages, geography, health education, 
history, physical education, and social studies. The committee 
recognizes that arts and music include a range of disciplines 
including, but not limited to, dance, media arts, music, 
theater, and visual arts.

Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students

    The committee believes that all children should attend 
schools that are safe, drug-free and that foster a positive 
learning environment.
    As such, the committee bill authorizes the Successful, 
Safe, and Healthy Students program as part D of title IV, which 
will advance student achievement and positive child and youth 
development by promoting student health and wellness, 
preventing bullying and harassment, violence, and drug use, and 
fostering a positive school climate. States receiving grants 
must have established a statewide physical education 
requirement, and require all LEAs to have in place anti-
bullying and harassment policies to be eligible.
    To support positive conditions for learning, States will 
receive funding to implement programs to promote student 
health, fitness, and mental health, and to prevent drug abuse 
and school violence. To support data-driven prevention and 
foster student success, the committee bill authorizes a minimum 
of $30 million for formula grants to help all States develop or 
enhance systems that will give local leaders the information 
they need to improve the conditions for learning in their 
schools and communities.
    These data systems will provide to each State the support 
necessary to measure the conditions for learning in each 
school. Resources will also be available for grants to LEAs to 
establish policies and activities to improve the conditions for 
learning in each of their schools. This legislation gives State 
and LEAs the resources and opportunities to create safe, 
healthy schools that will enhance the academic achievement of 
students.
    SASA also authorizes the Successful, Safe and Healthy 
Students State Grants program to implement programs to support 
positive conditions for learning by promoting student health 
and fitness, mental health and counseling services, and drug 
and violence prevention. The committee intends that funds for 
this program will be distributed by competitive grants 
procedures if appropriated funds are less than $500 million. 
States receiving funding under this program must distribute 
subgrants competitively to LEAs or partnerships of LEAs and 
non-profit organizations. It is the intent of the committee 
that these partnerships would enhance an LEA's capacity to 
implement health, mental health, and prevention programs. The 
committee intends for States to distribute subgrant funds in 
the following manner: not less than 20 percent for programs to 
promote physical activity, education, and fitness and 
nutrition; not less than 20 percent for drug and violence 
prevention; and not less than 20 percent for programs to 
promote mental health.
    The committee expects that grantees will use data from the 
conditions for learning measurement system to target funding 
and program design. In addition, grantees must annually report 
to the public on data regarding the conditions for learning
    It is the committee's intent that grant funds provided by 
the Successful, Safe and Healthy Students program support the 
creation of the essential conditions for learning in schools, 
including adequate physical activity, positive mental health, 
good nutrition, and safe environments. Those conditions include 
physical and emotional safety for both students and school 
personnel and promote positive character development in our 
youth. Schools with the essential conditions for learning also 
provide for opportunities for good nutrition, and are free of 
violence, harassment, and bullying. These schools are free of 
weapons and prevent the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol. The 
committee understands that students experience violence in many 
forms, including dating violence. It is the intention of the 
committee that funds allocated for violence prevention 
activities could include activities to reduce incidences of 
dating violence between students.

Student Non-Discrimination Act

    The committee bill authorizes the Student Non-
Discrimination Act (SNDA) with the intent to ensure all 
students have access to a public education in a safe 
environment, free from discrimination. This includes freedom 
from harassment, bullying, intimidation and violence on the 
basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. SASA 
establishes a comprehensive Federal prohibition of 
discrimination in public schools based on actual or perceived 
sexual orientation or gender identity. It provides LGBT 
students similar civil rights and protections against bullying 
and harassment as those that currently apply to students based 
on race and gender. It is the committee's intent to ensure 
these protections for LGBT students and ensure that all 
students have access to public education in a safe environment 
free from discrimination, including harassment, bullying, 
intimidation and violence. It is also the committee's intent to 
provide students with meaningful and effective remedies for 
discrimination that occurs in public schools based on actual or 
perceived sexual orientation or gender identity, modeled after 
the guarantees in title IX. Like other civil rights laws, it is 
the intent of this provision of SASA to prompt schools to avoid 
liability by taking proactive steps to prevent the 
discrimination and bullying of students protected by the bill.

21st Century Community Learning Centers

    The committee recognizes that students, particularly those 
who are furthest behind, benefit from more time for learning. 
Programs that significantly increase the total number of hours 
in a regular school schedule can lead to gains in student 
academic achievement. Yet American students spend about 30 
percent less time in school than students in other leading 
nations. Students in China, Japan, and South Korea who attend 
school 40 days more on average than American students 
significantly outperform American students in math and science.
    As such, the committee bill gives eligible applicants the 
authority to apply for grants to fund (1) the activities 
currently allowed under the program (before-school, after-
school, and summer-learning programs); (2) school-based 
extended learning programs that are optional or for targeted 
groups of students; or (3) a redesign and expansion of the 
school day, week or year, for all students across all grades, 
to creatively integrate academic and enrichment strategies. The 
bill expands the current uses of the program to include 
expanded learning time because the committee believes that it 
is a separate, but related concept, in that the goal is to 
extend, rather than supplement learning time.
    Additionally, the committee believes that evaluation data 
will yield valuable information on the models and their 
implementation. The committee has directed the U.S. Department 
of Education from prioritizing one 21st century community 
learning center model over others. The committee does, however, 
emphasize that this should not be construed to prohibit the 
Department from providing best practice information and 
technical assistance under the 21st Century Community Learning 
Centers program.
    The committee believes that strong partnerships between 
schools and communities is an important aspect of this program. 
To make partnerships between community-based organizations and 
LEAs most effective, the committee believes partnerships 
between local education agencies, schools and community-based 
organizations should be marked by active collaboration, 
including the appropriate sharing of relevant student data 
among the schools and organizations, and any partnering 
entities, while complying with applicable laws relating to 
privacy and confidentiality. Additionally, while the committee 
supported Senator Whitehouse's amendment to clarify that either 
the LEA or the community partner could be the lead applicant 
and fiscal agent, the committee believes that public agencies 
are important partners and suitable lead applicants and fiscal 
agents and intends to rectify this omission.
    Finally, it is the committee's intent that funds provided 
under this section can be used for high quality mentoring 
activities. Mentoring programs based on scientifically valid 
research have shown to be a cost-effective strategy for 
improving academic performance, reducing dropout rates, 
preventing substance abuse, and promoting mental health and 
self-esteem.

Promise Neighborhoods

    The committee believes that authorizing the Promise 
Neighborhoods program will allow communities to leverage 
Federal funds to design and implement a comprehensive pipeline 
of existing educational and community supports that fits their 
community's unique strengths and responds to their unique 
needs, with the goal of ensuring college- and career-readiness 
for all children in the neighborhood.
    The committee bill requires grantees to combine high-
quality education with community- and family-based supports, 
coordinating a continuum of services from birth through college 
to career. Research demonstrates that young people are more 
likely to succeed in school when their comprehensive needs are 
met. The committee's Promise Neighborhoods program requires 
grantees to provide high-quality early learning programs, 
effective family and community engagement, and better services 
for special populations; to leverage public and private sector 
support; and to coordinate the services and resources of local 
nonprofits, schools, health centers, universities, and 
foundations. It authorizes 5-year, renewable, grants to ensure 
that communities scale up their services and support a new 
generation of educated workers.

Promise Neighborhoods Partnership Grants

    The Partnership Grants program is intended to support 
grantees as they build continuums of care and is modeled after 
the Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ) in New York City. The HCZ 
began as a single-block pilot in the 1990s and has since 
expanded to 96 blocks, covering most of Harlem. Today HCZ 
operates two charter schools and leverages a wide range of 
public, nonprofit, and philanthropic funds to provide wrap-
around services to over 10,000 youth and about the same number 
of adults each year. The committee recognizes that Federal 
funds and direction were not the cause of HCZ's success. 
Therefore, in order to replicate this work in other eligible 
neighborhoods, it requires local community leaders to combine 
available Federal resources with private, State, and local 
funding. Thus, the program includes a significant matching-
funds requirement.
    As they offer pipeline services, as defined in the 
committee bill, the committee anticipates a wide range of 
working arrangements in the Promise Neighborhoods Partnerships 
Grants in subpart 1, with different roles and responsibilities 
carried out by community-based organizations (CBOs) and LEAs in 
different applications, though all eligible entities must 
include an LEA in partnership with at least one nonprofit. The 
requirement for partnership in application exists because: (1) 
the performance metrics for the program are intended to span 
the full continuum of care; (2) the education-reform aspects of 
the Promise Neighborhoods program can be carried out most 
effectively with local schools as a willing partner.
    The services grantees would coordinate are all directed 
toward giving all children in the neighborhood the skills they 
need to succeed in school, college, and careers. Grantees can 
use funds to coordinate existing services including:

     pre-natal education and support for expectant 
parents;
     high-quality childhood education and care and 
education opportunities, including by strengthening the early 
care workforce in the neighborhood and improving data systems;
     high-quality schools and before- and after-school 
programs;
     support for the transition to elementary school, 
between elementary school and middle school, and from middle 
school to high school;
     family and community supports; and
     college- and career-readiness activities, such as 
help with the college admissions process.

    However, the committee does not intend for grantees to be 
required to track or provide assistance to participants 
throughout their careers.

Promise School Grants

    The Promise School Grants described in subpart 2 are 
intended to support partnerships as they create continuums of 
care revolving around schools in poor communities. As with the 
Partnership Grants, the committee anticipates a wide range of 
working arrangements in the Promise School Grants. These are 
school-centered grants, though the number of schools initially 
included in the applicant's plan will vary consistent with the 
requirement to provide sufficient size and scope to serve the 
entire neighborhood. The extent to which pipeline services will 
be located in or provided at the school may also vary, 
especially in the case of applications led by charter schools 
that are their own LEA. However, the committee intends for 
Promise School grantees to ensure the sustainability of the 
programs they offer and consider ways to expand the area served 
over time. The committee anticipates that LEAs leading Promise 
School applications will have a successful record of 
partnership with CBOs; other Federal, State, and local 
agencies; and local employers or philanthropies. The committee 
encourages LEAs applying for Promise School grants to see them 
as an opportunity for transformation rooted in a distressed 
neighborhood that may catalyze partnerships and systemic reform 
throughout the LEA.

Performance Metrics

    The committee bill requires the Secretary to establish 
performance metrics for both grant programs. The committee 
intends for any such metrics to span the continuum of care, 
from prenatal care and parent education to college entry and 
retention; to hold grantees accountable for successful 
transitions, such as by tracking rates of kindergarten 
readiness or through the use of early warning indicators in the 
middle grades; and to encompass measures of community 
partnership and family engagement, such as the percent of 
parents and family members who participate in school events or 
the number of local businesses engaged by partnerships.
    The committee, in authorizing Promise Neighborhoods, 
recognizes that many communities struggle to align resources to 
create the pipeline services envisioned under this program, but 
believes that successful examples--such as HCZ or the hundreds 
of Community Schools located around the Nation provide guidance 
on successful implementations and can be instructive to other 
communities as they consider applying for these grants. As 
such, great emphasis is placed on applicants seeking and 
securing non-Federal and non-public funds in applying for this 
grant, as well as a full accounting of the services that 
already exist that can be aligned with grantee goals. Once 
again, the Federal investment should not be viewed as the 
driver of the services envisioned under this program, but a 
contributor and catalyst for communities to take stock of their 
existing resources and deploy them in a coherent, comprehensive 
way.

Parent and Family Information and Resource Centers

    SASA renames the Parent and Family Information and Resource 
Centers (PFIRCs) to acknowledge the role that both parents and 
non-custodial family members play in supporting children's 
educational progress. The committee bill narrows the program's 
goals and functions to supporting States. PFIRCs are also 
required to help support the community of practice related to 
effective parent and family engagement strategies, and to work, 
to a lesser extent, with LEAs, schools, parents, family 
members, and community members. The bill requires PFIRCs to 
engage in a selection of high-impact activities, such as 
supporting States as they work with high-need LEAs to improve 
their local parent and family engagement plans, providing 
parent institutes or other leadership training for low-income 
families, and coordinating parent and family engagement 
strategies statewide. Grantees also must now meet performance 
goals to receive continued funding and be eligible for future 
competitions.
    It is the committee's intent that, while applications for 
grants from consortia consisting of nonprofit organizations 
(including statewide organizations) and State or LEAs are 
welcome, the nonprofit organization is to serve as the fiscal 
agent.

Programs of National Significance

    The committee notes that while many programs in this Act 
are targeted at the State level, certain national providers can 
also play a role by employing an infrastructure that reaches 
across State lines. The committee bill authorizes grants to 
States, LEAs, institutions of higher education, or other public 
and private non-profit agencies, organizations, and 
institutions to carry out programs to increase students' 
college- and career-readiness, to improve instruction, and to 
invest in activities that improve student achievement in a 
variety of domains and subjects. The committee notes that, in 
the past, award recipients with similar capabilities as those 
sought under the Programs of National Significance have been 
funded through congressionally-directed, earmarked spending. 
The Programs of National Significance's funds are not an 
opportunity for these traditionally specified groups to 
continue dedicated funding, but an opportunity for those groups 
and other groups of similar missions and capabilities to apply 
and receive funding through the competitive process.

Competency-based Assessment and Accountability Demonstration

    With respect to section 4111, the committee recognizes the 
emergence of competency education in many parts of the country. 
According to a 2012 report by the National Governor's 
Association, 36 States now permit districts to award credits 
based on student mastery instead of seat time. Given this 
important shift, the committee intends for this pilot to a 
small number of States the flexibility to develop 
accountability and assessment policies that align with this 
approach to academic achievement.
    The committee recognizes that States and LEAs that are 
experimenting with or transitioning to competency-based 
accountability systems will require assessment systems that may 
have different characteristics than current systems in order to 
ensure the continuous improvement in academic achievement for 
all students. Competency-based assessments measure student 
learning outcomes that emphasize the application and creation 
of knowledge along with the development of important skills, 
such as critical thinking, problem-solving, and effective 
communication. They also provide multiple opportunities to 
demonstrate learning that provide teachers with the information 
they need to ensure students receive timely, differentiated 
support based on their individual learning needs. Formative and 
interim assessments ensure students make sufficient progress 
throughout the year while summative assessments enable students 
to demonstrate that they are ready to advance to the next 
academic level.
    With respect to the activities described in (c)(2), the 
committee intends that States selected for the pilot be 
permitted to use funds reserved in title I, part A for the 
development of the competency-based assessment systems 
described in subsection (C)(2)(A) of this section. States may 
use these resources to support the development and 
implementation of their system, including activities identified 
in (a)(2)(B) of section 1141, such as the development of the 
competencies and assessments aligned to State college- and 
career-ready standards and post-secondary admissions 
requirements, professional development activities aligned with 
competencies and assessments, and the dissemination of 
information in real-time to stakeholders about student progress 
and performance to ensure all students remain on track or get 
back on track to graduation.
    In developing a process for review of the State assurances 
in (c)(1)(A) and the State's plan under (c)(2)(E) of this 
section, the committee intends for the Secretary to take into 
account the availability of assessments that meet the 
requirements of section 1111(a)(2)(B), in particular 
requirements around comparability. If assessments that meet 
these requirements are not widely available and easily adopted 
by the States as part of the initial implementation of this 
pilot authority, the committee intends for States, while 
working toward the adoption of these assessments, to use 
interim assessments that are the most rigorous in striving to 
meet these requirements, are effective in driving instructional 
practice, and provide reliable evidence of student learning 
across testing contexts and scorers. The committee also intends 
for the State assessment system to incorporate the following 
elements: (1) Scoring rubrics that are task-specific; (2) 
Piloted through task-item analysis; (3) Student learning 
targets that represent mastery of State-approved competencies; 
and (4) Indicators that measure the full range of academic 
content and student achievement standards, including mastery of 
content knowledge and the ability to think critically, solve 
problems, and communicate effectively.
    The committee also intends for States to have the 
flexibility to dedicate funds from the amount reserved in title 
II, part A, section 2111 to prepare the State's education 
workforce to implement a competency-based accountability and 
assessment system. The committee recognizes that competency 
education emphasizes elements of teaching and leading that are 
different from traditional methods. As such, the committee 
intends that States include a plan for high-quality 
professional development that emphasizes collaboration and 
builds educator capacity to do the following: (1) Provide 
timely, differentiated support to students based on individual 
learning needs, moving each student along an individual 
learning trajectory at a sufficient pace to achieve college- 
and career-readiness in time for graduation; (2) Align 
instruction to the explicit, measurable, transferable learning 
objectives; (3) Score formative and summative assessments and 
participate in their development; (4) Use formative assessments 
to regularly assess student progress to mastery; (5) Use data 
on individual student learning in a timely, ongoing manner to 
inform instruction and support student progress to mastery; and 
(6) Use technology, including blended or online learning, to 
support student progress to mastery along individual learning 
trajectories.
    The committee believes this commitment to equity is 
critically important and intends for States participating in 
this demonstration to ensure local education agencies develop 
robust intervention systems that provide all students with the 
extra time and instructional supports they need to master the 
standards and competencies necessary for success. States should 
help local education agencies develop flexible scheduling and 
identify effective early intervention strategies to ensure that 
any student that falls behind his or her peers makes sufficient 
progress to remain on track to graduation including over age 
and under accredited youth.

  TITLE V: PROMOTING INFORMED PARENTAL CHOICE AND INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS

Race to the Top

    The committee believes that the Race to the Top program, 
part A of title V, has shown promising results in bringing 
State and local leaders together to address education reforms. 
To build upon this promise and build toward meaningful reform, 
this Act authorizes a new competitive grant program to 
incentivize comprehensive reforms and innovative strategies 
that are designed to lead to improved academic achievement for 
all students. Each year that funds are available, the Secretary 
will choose at least one priority from among the following 
critical educational goals for each competition:

     increasing the access of children from low-income 
families to highly-rated teachers and school leaders, including 
by developing and implementing a teacher and principal 
evaluation system;
     strengthening the availability and use of high-
quality and timely data to improve instructional practices, 
policies, and student outcomes;
     implementing college- and career-ready academic 
standards and strategies that translate such standards into 
classroom practice;
     turning around the schools served by the lowest-
performing schools;
     support successful conditions for the creation, 
expansion, and replication of high-performing public and 
autonomous charter schools that serve students from low-income 
families;
     providing equitable resources to high-poverty 
schools; and
     improving school readiness by increasing access of 
children from low-income families to high-quality early 
learning programs and creating an integrated system of high-
quality early learning programs and services.

    As with the funding priorities, the Secretary will also 
choose what entities will be eligible for each year's 
competition. Eligible entities may include States, high-need 
LEAs and consortia of either, on the basis of their record of 
innovation and reform, the quality of their plan, and evidence 
of collaboration, among others. The application review and 
selection process must be equitable and transparent, and 
priority will be granted to rural high-need LEAs or consortia, 
as well as any eligible entity that provides a full-day, full-
year kindergarten program to all kindergarten students, or to 
all kindergarten students from low-income families. The 
duration of the grants will be up to 4 years and continued 
funding will be conditional upon the grantees' demonstrated 
progress in implementing their plans for reaching the 
performance targets and their objectives on time.
    The committee believes that Race to the Top applications 
from States and consortia of States must be signed by each 
State's governor, the State's chief school officer, and the 
president of the State board of education (if applicable). For 
any grant competition with the goal of improving early 
childhood education and care , States and consortia of States 
can award subgrants only to public or private nonprofit 
agencies and organizations; however, it is the committee's 
intent that any public or private early childhood education 
program, as defined in the Higher Education Opportunity Act 
(P.L. 110-315), is eligible to receive funds from such 
subgrants for activities consistent with any purpose included 
in the eligible entity's plan described in section 5104(a)(3).

Investing in Innovation

    The Investing in Innovation program, part B of title V, was 
initially authorized under the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act. In codifying and building upon the program, 
the committee recognizes the importance of expanding the 
implementation of, and investment in, innovative practices with 
a demonstrated impact on improving student achievement, closing 
achievement gaps, increasing high school graduation rates, 
improving teacher and school leader effectiveness, or improving 
school readiness. In including a set-aside for rural LEAs the 
committee recognizes the unique needs of such LEAs and intends 
to ensure the development of innovative practices targeted 
toward their needs.
    The committee bill establishes the Advanced Research 
Projects Agency--Education (ARPA-ED). The entity is modeled 
after the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), 
which makes investments in high-risk, high-return research and 
development (R&D). It is the committee's intent to fund ARPA-ED 
through the use of up to 30 percent of I3 funding or a maximum 
of $100,000,000. It is the committee's belief that ARPA-ED will 
have a similar capability to accelerate transformative 
innovation in education and learning.

Public Charter Schools

    The Federal charter schools program, part D of title V, has 
been an instrumental complement to the State and local 
development of innovative and successful public school models 
across the Nation. In this Act, the program is updated to 
reflect lessons learned since the last reauthorization and to 
address the overwhelming demand, as evidenced by growing 
waiting lists, for the expansion and replication of high-
performing charter schools. The program provides 85 percent of 
funding for the charter school grants and 15 percent for 
charter school facilities.
    The committee believes that Federal charter school dollars 
should fund high-performing charter schools, ensuring that 
scarce resources support schools that raise student academic 
achievement. With a focus on improving the quality of the 
sector and investing in proven models of success, the charter 
school grants program will support the creation, expansion, and 
replication of high-performing charter schools through 
competitive grants to States, LEAs, authorizers, and charter 
management organizations.
    The definition of a ``high-performing charter school'' 
requires applicants to have goals that are higher (new schools) 
or results that are significantly higher (existing schools) 
than demographically similar schools in the State for all 
students and for subgroups of students in student academic 
achievement and growth, consistent with section 1111, and in 
the case of a high school, graduation rates and college 
enrollment and persistence. The definition also requires such 
charter schools to have similar or higher student retention 
rates. A minimum of 25 percent of funds available for the 
charter school grants must be awarded to States. It is the 
committee's belief that States are ultimately responsible for 
authorizing charter schools and, as the recipient of the 
Charter Schools Program funds, still provide the innovative 
approaches to chartering that can inform best practices in 
other States. Grants will be awarded for an initial period of 3 
years, and may be renewed for an additional 2 years if the 
grantee is making satisfactory progress in meeting the grant's 
objectives.
    To ensure that limited Federal resources are targeted to 
charter schools with a commitment to, or a record of, strong 
academic results, the reauthorized program requires high goals 
of student academic achievement for all student subgroups and 
meaningful community outreach to parents and families. It also 
incentivizes sound State policies for supporting charter 
schools but also for overseeing, monitoring and holding them 
accountable; promotes strong performance-based authorizing 
policies that are transparent and effective in closing down 
unsuccessful schools, and ensures that charter schools ensure 
equitable access to, and effectively serve the needs of, 
students with disabilities and English learners. Priority will 
be granted to applicants that propose to serve students from 
low-income families.
    The legislation establishes rigorous application 
requirements and selection criteria, with an emphasis on 
authorizing. For example, the selection process must examine 
the applicant's record of closing low-performing charter 
schools and the State's requirements for, and enforcement of, 
high-quality standards for charter school authorizers, 
including standards for rigorous and periodic reviews. Priority 
is given to States that ensure that all charters go thorough 
review at least every 5 years.
    The committee encourages the enrollment of students with 
disabilities and English language learners in charter schools 
and, recognizing the under-enrollment of such students in 
charter schools nationally, seeks to ensure that charter 
schools are accessible to all students on an equitable basis. 
To this end, the legislation includes critical provisions so 
students with disabilities and English learners are served 
effectively by charter schools. In addition to subgroup 
performance contract goals, the legislation requires all 
applicants to describe how they will ensure that each charter 
school provides equitable access and effectively serves the 
needs of all students, including children with disabilities and 
English learners, and implements outreach and recruitment 
practices that include families of such students.
    In addition, the selection process must examine the quality 
of the application for supporting charter schools, through such 
activities as technical assistance, to improve student academic 
achievement and growth for each subgroup and to promote 
effective outreach to, and recruitment of, students with 
disabilities and English learners, and their parents and 
families.
    The legislation also requires that grantees provide support 
and technical assistance in effectively serving the needs of 
students with disabilities and English learners, implement 
outreach and recruitment practices that includes the families 
of students who are children with disabilities and English 
learners, and directly, or through a partnership with a 
nonprofit, develops and implements parent, family, and student 
information, outreach, and recruitment programs to provide 
information and support to parents, families, and students 
about the public school choice options available to them. 
Overall, this legislation reflects the committee's commitment 
that students with disabilities and English language learners 
have equal access to high-performing charter schools.
    The charter school facilities program will support eligible 
entities to improve access to facilities financing high-
performing charter schools and assist them in addressing the 
cost of acquiring, constructing, and renovating facilities. 
Eligible entities include States, LEAs, nonprofit 
organizations, State financing authorities, or a consortium of 
such entities. Competitive grants will be made for innovative 
facilities financing programs, including credit enhancement, 
open-facilities-access programs, making available renovated or 
adapted space, leveraging State and local facilities funding, 
and State per-pupil facilities aid programs. At least 65 
percent of the funds must be expended for credit enhancement 
grants.

            TITLE VI: PROMOTING FLEXIBILITY; RURAL EDUCATION

    The committee recognizes the Federal Government's declining 
capacity to maintain historically high levels of education 
funding. It further recognizes the challenges LEAs face in 
coordinating and using the current Federal funding for their 
own distinct, LEA-specific needs with specific requirements 
under each Federal formula grant program. SASA builds upon the 
current law transferability provisions allowing LEAs to 
transfer as much as 100 percent of funding between SASA formula 
grant programs. The committee maintains current law 
restrictions on moving funding out of certain formula funds, 
but updated to place restrictions on moving funds out of titles 
I, III, VII, or VIII.
    The committee, recognizing the continued unique challenges 
facing rural LEAs reauthorizes the Rural Education Achievement 
Program (REAP), with changes. Since the 2000 Decennial Census, 
improvements have been made to the geocoding technology 
necessary to more accurately determine which areas are rural 
and which areas are urban based upon proximity to metropolitan 
areas, rather than on population figures alone. Technological 
advancements as well as further work in accurately determining 
rural areas of the country by the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) provides greater confidence to the committee that 
rural education program funds will be better targeted and 
focused on truly rural areas, far from urban and metropolitan 
fringes.
    Of significance, the committee added the locale code of 32 
and updated the locale codes to 33 (territory 35 miles away 
from an urban cluster), 41 (Census territory that is less than 
or equal to 5 miles from an urbanized area, as well as rural 
territory that is less than or equal to 2\1/2\ miles from an 
urban cluster), 42 (Census territory that is more than 5 miles 
but less than or equal to 25 miles from an urbanized area, and 
rural territory that is more than 2\1/2\ miles but less than or 
equal to 10 miles from an urban cluster), and 43 (Census rural 
territory that is more than 25 miles from an urbanized area and 
is almost more than 10 miles from an urban cluster).
    Further, the committee provided flexibility for LEAs that 
qualify both for the Rural Low-Income Schools (RLIS) and Small 
Rural School Achievement (SRSA) programs by providing LEAs the 
option of choosing the program for which they would prefer to 
receive funding.

    TITLE VII: INDIAN, NATIVE HAWAIIAN, AND ALASKA NATIVE EDUCATION

    The changes reflected in title VII of the committee bill 
are designed to better focus the use of funds on programs and 
activities that meet the unique cultural, language, and 
educational needs of American Indian students to ensure that 
such students graduate college- and career-ready.
    Key reforms included in this reauthorization include 
additional flexibility to enable tribes and tribal educational 
agencies more authority over the education and development of 
Native students; a focus on the provision of high quality early 
childhood education and care services to ensure that children 
begin school ready to learn and recognition of the critical 
role tribal leaders can play in the education and development 
of Native students.
    This title authorizes the use of funds to support the 
preservation, reclamation and restoration of Native languages, 
acknowledging the role that these practices can have in 
supporting the academic achievement and also directs the 
Secretary of Education and the Director of the Bureau of Indian 
Education to conduct a study to improve collaboration among 
these two entities to better support the provision of 
educational services to tribes and Native students. Recognizing 
the challenges facing Native students and communities, it is 
the committee's intent that these improvements strengthen 
collaboration between the Department of Education and the 
Bureau of Indian Education in ways that recognize and preserve 
tribal sovereignty and that support student achievement and 
development.
    Improvements made to part B are designed to better focus 
the Native Hawaiian Education Council's efforts on addressing 
the education and workforce needs of Native Hawaiian students 
through redesigning the composition of the Native Hawaiian 
Education Council and refocusing its purpose to ensure proper 
coordination of educational and related services and programs 
available to Native Hawaiian students. It is the intent of the 
committee that Council members are responsible for carrying out 
the activities of the Council, not the executive director.
    The committee amended the definition of the Alaska Native 
Organization to highlight the importance of having or 
committing to acquire experience in the education of Native 
Alaskans and to ensure Native Alaskans have substantive 
policymaking positions. The committee also added to part C a 
provision designed to leverage existing assets in Alaska to 
improve academic achievement as well as college- and career-
readiness.

                         TITLE VIII: IMPACT AID

    SASA makes significant changes to the Impact Aid program. 
First, the committee removed the overly complicated ``highest 
and best uses'' standard for identifying and then calculating 
the tax assessment classifications of taxable adjacent 
property. In exchange, the committee supports a simplified 
calculation based upon the total taxable value of property 
within the local education agency by then multiplying that 
value by the federally impacted acreage.
    The committee recognizes there is a burden on both the 
local educational agency and the Department of Education in 
determining the number of children relocated off-base during 
the duration of a housing renovation, repair, modernization, or 
demolition project. The SASA establishes a hold harmless 
student count based on the number of on-base children enrolled 
prior to the project start date. In addition, the SASA defines 
what is considered a renovation, repair, and/or modernization 
project. Such terms do not include normal ``sustainment 
projects'' such as painting, carpeting or minor repairs. An 
eligible project must also be one that will last more than 30 
days. Together it is the intent of the committee to lessen the 
time the department now spends in conducting annual audits of 
students claimed as on-base students.
    The committee also added language to support the transition 
of consolidated LEAs related to their eligibility for the 
Impact Aid program.
    Finally, the committee adds language within section 8010 
requiring the Secretary of Education to pay LEAs the full 
amount that the agency is eligible to receive for a fiscal year 
by September 30 of the following fiscal year for which the 
payment is based. Many of these changes were made in the 2012 
National Defense Authorization Act, but with a sunset of 2 
years.

                      TITLE IX: GENERAL PROVISIONS

Definitions

    SASA contains several new definitions, the most notable of 
which are discussed below.
    The committee bill modifies the definition of ``Advanced 
Placement or International Baccalaureate'' to provide 
potentially more options for States and LEAs in achieving the 
goals of college- and career-readiness by allowing them to 
choose another evidence-based program model. The committee bill 
incorporates language enacted by Congress in the America 
COMPETES Act of 2007 and maintained in the reauthorization of 
that Act in 2010 [Sec. 6122(1)(B)]. With these provisions, 
Congress has already acknowledged much advancement from 
evidence-based program models showing large increases in 
academic success for students who had access to rigorous high 
school core courses benchmarked to college readiness.
    The updated definition of a ``Charter School'' requires 
charter schools to have independent governance and significant 
autonomy in the areas of management, personnel, budget, 
schedule, and instructional program; allows charter schools to 
provide early childhood education and care or adult education; 
requires charter schools to comply with Title II of the 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990; provides an exception 
to the lottery requirement under the restart strategy and 
school closure strategy under section 1116(c)(6)(B); requires 
charter schools to comply instead of just agreeing to comply 
with the same Federal and State audit requirements as do other 
elementary schools; and requires a charter school to have a 
performance contract that uses school-wide and subgroup student 
academic achievement and growth, consistent with section 1111, 
as a primary factor in decisions about the renewal or 
revocation of the charter, and describes the obligations and 
responsibilities of the charter school and the charter school 
authorizer, as well as the autonomy granted to the charter 
school.
    The committee has established the new term ``Conditions for 
Learning'', which describes school factors that advance student 
achievement and positive child and youth development. This 
bill-wide definition allows for a more cross-cutting use of the 
term.
    The committee renamed ``Family Literacy Services'', 
``Family Literacy Activities'', and also added a new 
subparagraph that acknowledges the link between parents 
receiving family literacy instruction and their capacity for 
supporting their children's learning needs. The committee also 
added a definition of ``Family Member,'' used in sections 1111 
and 1118 and part G of title IV to acknowledge the important 
role that noncustodial family members and other caring adults 
(whether mentors, tutors, afterschool providers, or other 
community members involved in education) play in the lives of 
children.
    The committee bill creates a new bill-wide definition for 
``High-Need Local Education Agency'' as a number of programs in 
the bill require a focus on students attending schools in these 
LEAs. This definition uses population and poverty as 
determining factors. The term is currently only defined in 
Title II of ESEA in the Teacher and Principal Training program 
(based on poverty and teachers in certain subjects) and in the 
Educational Technology program (based on poverty and need for 
technology.)
    The committee renamed ``Pupil Services Personnel'' 
``Specialized Instructional Support Personnel'' and expanded 
the definition to include school nurses. In doing so, the 
committee wishes to recognize the critical link to school 
success that school nurses play for many students.
    In addition to the above new definitions, the terms 
``professional growth and improvement system,'' ``positive 
behavioral interventions and supports,'' and ``young child'' 
are defined.

Unsafe School Choice Option

    The committee has amended the Unsafe School Choice Policy. 
The previous reauthorization of this Act required each State to 
identify ``persistently dangerous'' schools, as defined by the 
State, and allow students attending such schools to transfer to 
a school determined as ``safe'' by the State. The committee 
holds that, though well-intentioned, the ``persistently 
dangerous'' designation did not result in increases in school 
safety. Rather, in many cases it created disincentives for 
schools to accurately report data on violent criminal 
incidents. The committee has eliminated the ``persistently 
dangerous'' designation, while maintaining a provision allowing 
students who become victims of violent criminal offenses to 
transfer to a ``safe'' school, and including a new provision 
allowing students who are threatened with a violent criminal 
offense to do the same. This change empowers students and 
families to make educational choices based on their own 
experiences of school safety, and removes disincentives for 
schools to accurately report violent incident data.

Evaluation Authority

    The committee intends for the Secretary to reserve not less 
than 1 percent and not more than 3 percent of the amount 
appropriated for each categorical program and demonstration 
project authorized under the Act for the purpose of evaluation. 
The Secretary, acting through the Director of the Institute of 
Education Sciences, must use the funds to conduct high quality 
evaluations, provide technical assistance, evaluate the 
aggregate short- and long-term effects and cost efficiencies 
across Federal programs under the bill and identify and 
disseminate research and best practices. It also requires the 
Secretary to submit an annual plan to Congress.
    The committee intends for all authorized programs under 
this Act to be evaluated in a rigorous manner through the 
Institute of Education Science under the guidance of the 
Director and in consultation with the appropriate programmatic 
staff in the Department of Education. The committee recognizes 
evaluation of programs intended to serve a broad range of 
students as comprehensively as possible is sometimes in 
conflict with the most rigorous methodologies for determining 
program effectiveness. The committee's intent in setting aside 
funds for evaluation, under the evaluation authority in part F 
of title IX, is to create program evaluations designed to allow 
for conclusions to be made regarding the programs' 
effectiveness and whether the investment of limited Federal 
dollars is still merited for programs that have not met program 
expectations. While experimental and quasi-experimental designs 
are preferred, the committee recognizes that those designs are 
sometimes impractical and alternatives need to be used. The 
committee's intent is for the Director of the Institute of 
Education Science to conduct program evaluations with the 
strongest possible design to provide researchers and 
policymakers with reliable and valid information upon which 
future decisions can be made regarding the effectiveness of the 
programs under this Act.

TITLE X: COMMISSION ON EFFECTIVE REGULATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEMS FOR 
                             PUBLIC SCHOOLS

    The committee established a Commission on Effective 
Regulation and Assessment Systems for Public Schools. The 
Commission will: (1) examine the regulatory requirements on 
elementary and secondary education at the Federal, State, and 
local levels, with an aim to identify unnecessary, redundant, 
or conflicting laws, rules, and regulations; (2) investigate 
how Federal, State, and local interpretations of laws and 
regulations create additional or unnecessary burden and are 
used as rationale for imposing requirements that are not 
actually mandated by law; (3) make recommendations on how to 
align and improve requirements in such regulations; (4) examine 
the quality and purpose of current assessment requirements; and 
(5) make recommendations to improve and align assessment 
systems to provide meaningful information and improve student 
achievement, teacher performance, and innovation.

     TITLE XI: AMENDMENTS TO OTHER LAWS & MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

Homeless Education (McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act)

    The committee recognizes the unique challenges to academic 
achievement faced by the growing population of homeless 
students. In the 2010-11 school year, 1,065,794 homeless 
children and youth were enrolled in public schools. This is a 
57 percent increase since the 2006-7 school year. The McKinney-
Vento Homeless Education Reauthorization Act of 2011, Title X 
of SASA, helps these vulnerable children and youth become 
college- and career-ready by removing barriers to their 
identification, enrollment, attendance, and success in school. 
The amendments build on current law to enhance school stability 
and access to educational opportunities. The committee 
acknowledges the special difficulties of unaccompanied homeless 
youth, who struggle to obtain an education without a parent or 
a home. The bill includes provisions to ensure that these youth 
are enrolled in school, able to earn credits, and informed of 
their status as independent students for financial aid. Young 
children who are homeless also face unique barriers to 
accessing early childhood programs; the committee adopted 
provisions to ensure that these children are identified and 
prioritized for enrollment in public preschool programs. 
Further, to ensure uninterrupted education, the committee 
clarified that, in the case of a dispute, homeless children and 
youth must remain enrolled in school until the final resolution 
of the dispute.
    Amendments to title I, part A, make permissible the use of 
title I funds for transportation to assist homeless children 
and youth to stay in their school of origin, thus providing 
greater flexibility to LEAs on how title I reservations for 
homeless students may be spent.

ARPA-ED

    The committee adopted an amendment offered by Senator 
Bennet to establish the Advanced Research Projects Agency--
Education (ARPA-ED). The entity is modeled after the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which makes 
investments in high-risk, high-return research and development 
(R&D). It is the committee's belief that ARPA-ED will have a 
similar capability to accelerate transformative innovation in 
education and learning.

                    IV. Regulatory Impact Statement

    The committee has determined there will be reduced demands 
upon States, local educational agencies, and other recipients 
of ESEA funds, due largely to the more targeted accountability 
features and reduced number of programs contained in the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Reauthorization Act (SASA).
    SASA requires States to adopt college- and career-ready 
academic content standards, and assessments tied to those 
standards. Many States have already undertaken this work. SASA 
maintains the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act's requirement 
that all public school students in grades three through eight 
be tested annually in mathematics and reading. SASA also 
maintains requirements that States participate in annual State 
assessments under the National Assessment of Educational 
Progress (NAEP) in fourth and eighth grade mathematics and 
reading and issue annual report cards that include assessment 
and student achievement information.
    With regard to the title I accountability system, SASA 
limits federally prescribed interventions to the lowest 
performing 5 percent of schools in a State, and an additional 5 
percent of schools with large subgroup achievement gaps. In 
contrast, NCLB required interventions in all schools that were 
not making adequate yearly progress.
    In general, recipients of ESEA funds will be expected to 
use those funds on programs which have proven to be effective 
in improving student achievement and performance and in meeting 
other program objectives. The committee believes that it is 
appropriate to demand results and accountability in exchange 
for Federal investments in programs authorized under the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act. However, in this 
reauthorization the committee has sought to target Federal 
mandates to those areas that the implementation of NCLB has 
shown are effective.
    Finally, SASA cuts the number of programs in ESEA and 
consolidates many into broader program authorities. This 
program consolidation is expected to reduce the administrative 
time and expense involved in developing, processing, and 
awarding separate grants--and to result in funding applicants 
with more capacity to efficiently and effectively carry out 
grant activities. SASA also maintains the authority for small, 
rural school districts to combine funds from several separate 
formula grant programs and apply these funds toward local 
initiatives designed to improve student achievement.

            V. Application of Law to the Legislative Branch

    The committee bill reauthorizes and amends the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act of 1965 to continue programs 
primarily offering assistance to States and local educational 
agencies on behalf of elementary and secondary school students 
and teachers and, as such, has no application to the 
legislative branch.

                           VI. Cost Estimate

                  U.S. Congressional Budget Office,
                                            Washington, DC,
                                                September 13, 2013.
Hon. Tom Harkin, Chairman,
Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions,
U.S. Senate,
Washington, DC 20510.

    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S.1094, the 
Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Justin 
Humphrey, who can be reached at 226-2820.
            Sincerely,
                                      Douglas W. Elmendorf,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.
S.1094--Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013
    Summary: S.1094 would amend and reauthorize most programs 
in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (the 
ESEA, commonly referred to, in its most recently reauthorized 
form, as No Child Left Behind). The underlying authorizations 
for those programs have expired, although most have received 
appropriations since their authorizations have expired. For 
almost all of the programs, the bill would authorize the 
appropriation of such sums as may be necessary for fiscal years 
2014 through 2018. The bill also would amend and reauthorize 
the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and amend the 
Department of Education Organization Act.
    CBO estimates that S.1094 would authorize the appropriation 
of about $24 billion in 2014 and $127 billion over the 2014-18 
period. Implementing the bill would have discretionary costs of 
$93 billion over the 2014-18 period, assuming appropriation of 
the estimated amounts.
    Enacting the bill also would increase direct spending by 
$10 million over the 2014-23 period; therefore, pay-as-you-go 
procedures apply. Enacting the bill would not affect revenues.
    S.1094 contains no intergovernmental mandates as defined in 
the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA).
    S.1094 would impose a private-sector mandate, as defined in 
UMRA, on parents and guardians of unaccompanied youth by 
shielding schools from liability that might result from 
enrolling unaccompanied youth without parental or guardian 
consent. CBO expects that the costs of the mandate would not 
exceed the annual threshold established in UMRA for private-
sector mandates ($150 million in 2013, adjusted annually for 
inflation).
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of the bill is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget 500 
(education, training, employment, and social services).

 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  By fiscal year, in millions of dollars
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
                                                           2014     2015     2016     2017     2018     2014-18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                          CHANGES IN DIRECT SPENDING\1\
Federal Student Loan and TEACH Grant Programs:
  Estimated Budget Authority...........................        3        *        *        1        1           5
  Estimated Outlays....................................        3        *        *        1        1           5
 
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION
 
Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the
 Disadvantaged:........................................
  Estimated Authorization Level........................   15,590   15,881   16,218   16,555   16,908      81,152
  Estimated Outlays....................................      312   12,166   15,200   16,139   16,475      60,291
Title II: Supporting Teacher and Principal Excellence:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................    3,063    3,120    3,187    3,253    3,322      15,946
  Estimated Outlays....................................       92    1,472    2,572    3,144    3,209      10,490
Title III: Language and Academic Content Instruction
 for English Learners and Immigrant Students:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................      705      718      733      748      764       3,669
  Estimated Outlays....................................        7      444      664      699      713       2,527
Title IV: Supporting Successful, Well-Rounded Students:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................    2,271    2,330    2,379    2,429    2,481      11,890
  Estimated Outlays....................................       45    1,364    2,080    2,355    2,405       8,249
Title V: Promoting Innovation:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................    1,074    1,094    1,117    1,140    1,165       5,590
  Estimated Outlays....................................       22      400      889    1,100    1,122       3,532
Title VI: Promoting Flexibility; Rural Education:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................      173      176      180      184      188         900
  Estimated Outlays....................................        3      104      158      178      182         625
Title: VII: Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native
 Education:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................      203      207      212      216      221       1,059
  Estimated Outlays....................................        6       98      171      209      213         697
Title VIII: Impact Aid:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................    1,245    1,268    1,295    1,322    1,350       6,480
  Estimated Outlays....................................    1,106    1,156    1,288    1,317    1,345       6,211
Title X: Committee on Effective Regulation and
 Assessment of Systems for Public Schools:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................        1        1        1        1        1           5
  Estimated Outlays....................................        1        1        1        1        1           5
Title XI: Amendments to Other Laws; Miscellaneous
 Provisions:
  Estimated Authorization Level........................      113      115      118      120      123         589
  Estimated Outlays....................................        3       54       95      116      119         388
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
  Total Increase in Discretionary Spending:
    Estimated Authorization Level......................   24,438   24,911   25,440   25,969   26,522     127,279
    Estimated Outlays..................................    1,598   17,258   23,117   25,257   25,784      93,014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes: Some programs received advance appropriations for fiscal year 2014, but those amounts are not reflected
  in the table.
Components may not sum to totals because of rounding.
* = less than $500,000.
\1\CBO estimates that enacting the bill would increase direct spending by $10 million over the 2014-23 period.

    Basis of estimate: Unless otherwise noted, the bill would 
authorize the appropriation of such sums as may be necessary 
for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018 for programs 
discussed below. (All authorizations in the bill would 
automatically be extended 1 year under the General Education 
Provisions Act.) Estimated authorization levels are based on 
the funding levels for previous fiscal years for the same or 
similar programs or, for some new programs, the level of 
funding proposed in the President's fiscal year 2014 budget 
request. For this estimate, CBO assumes that the bill will be 
enacted near the start of fiscal year 2014, that the Congress 
will appropriate the estimated amounts, and that spending will 
follow historical patterns.
Direct Spending
    S.1094 would amend the definition of a highly qualified 
teacher and the definitions of levels of poverty in school 
districts. The Department of Education uses those definitions 
to determine eligibility for both forgiveness of Federal 
student loan debt for teachers and the TEACH Grant program. The 
amendments to the definitions would increase eligibility for 
both programs.
    CBO estimates that the increase in eligibility would 
increase direct spending for the Federal student loan programs 
by $10 million over the 2014-23 period. In addition, we 
estimate that the proposed changes would increase direct 
spending for the TEACH Grant program by a negligible amount.
Spending Subject to Appropriation
    CBO estimates that fully funding the authorizations in this 
bill would require appropriations of approximately $25 billion 
a year over the 2014-18 period of authorization, for a total of 
$127 billion. Those appropriations would cost $93 billion over 
the 2014-18 period and an additional $34 billion after 2018, 
assuming the appropriation of the estimated amounts. The 
Congress appropriated about $24 billion for similar activities 
authorized in the ESEA and other legislation for fiscal year 
2013. Sequestration under the Budget Control Act of 2011 
reduced that total to about $23 billion.
    Title I--Improving the Academic Achievement of the 
Disadvantaged. Title I of the bill would reauthorize funding 
for most programs in Title I of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act as well as create new grant programs designed to 
support secondary school reform. CBO estimates that 
implementing this title would require $15.6 billion in funding 
for fiscal year 2014 and would lead to discretionary costs of 
$60.3 billion over the 2014-18 period, assuming the 
appropriation of the estimated amounts. The bill would 
authorize the appropriation of the following amounts:

     Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local 
Educational Agencies. Part A would reauthorize funding for 
grants to local educational agencies (LEAs), school improvement 
grants, various assessments of education progress, Centers for 
Excellence in Early Childhood Education, and administrative 
support. CBO estimates the authorization of appropriations for 
all of part A would total $15.1 billion (of which about $14.0 
billion would be for grants to LEAs) in fiscal year 2014 and 
similar amounts (with adjustments for anticipated inflation) in 
subsequent years. Implementing those provisions would cost 
$56.2 billion over the 2014-18 period. The bulk of the 
spending, $54.1 billion, would be for grants to local 
educational agencies. The Congress appropriated about $14.5 
billion for grants to LEAs for fiscal year 2013, and that total 
was reduced to about $13.8 billion by sequestration.
     Pathways to College. Part B would create a new set 
of grant programs to encourage school districts to implement 
strategies in secondary schools to prepare students for 
colleges and careers. The bill also would expand the program 
that currently supports grants to Advanced Placement programs 
to include International Baccalaureate programs. CBO estimates 
that this part would authorize the appropriation of slightly 
more than $100 million for fiscal year 2014. We estimate that 
implementing those provisions would cost about $400 million 
over the 2014-18 period.
     Education of Migratory Children. Part C would 
reauthorize programs that support the education of children of 
migrant workers. CBO estimates that provision would authorize 
the appropriation of almost $400 million in fiscal year 2014, 
leading to estimated discretionary spending of $1.5 billion 
over the 2014-18 period. The Congress appropriated about $400 
million for similar activities in fiscal year 2013, an amount 
that was reduced to about $375 million by sequestration.
     Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children 
and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At Risk. Part D 
would reauthorize programs that support the education of at-
risk children. CBO estimates that provision would authorize the 
appropriation of approximately $50 million in fiscal year 2014. 
Implementing part D would cost about $200 million over the 
2014-18 period. For fiscal year 2013, available funding totaled 
almost $50 million for at-risk children.
     Educational Stability of Children in Foster Care. 
Part E would require that State educational agencies that 
receive funding under this title coordinate with the 
responsible agencies when children in foster care programs move 
to different school attendance areas. CBO estimates that part E 
would have no significant effect on Federal spending.

    Title II--Supporting Teacher and Principal Excellence. 
Title II would modify and reauthorize grant programs designed 
to support teacher training and improvement. CBO estimates that 
the bill would authorize the appropriation of $3.1 billion for 
those activities in fiscal year 2014 and $15.9 billion over the 
2014-18 period. We estimate that fully funding those activities 
would cost $10.5 billion over the 2014-18 period, assuming the 
appropriation of the estimated amounts.

     Continuous Improvement and Support for Teachers 
and Principals. Part A would reauthorize the State grant 
program for improving teacher quality and authorize funding for 
the recruitment and training of principals. CBO estimates the 
bill would authorize the appropriation of $2.5 billion for 
those grants for fiscal year 2014, and that outlays would total 
$8.7 billion over the 2014-18 period. The Congress appropriated 
about $2.5 billion for State grants in 2013, and sequestration 
reduced that amount by about $130 million.
     Teacher Pathways to the Classroom. Under part B, 
the bill would authorize funding for grants to partnerships of 
institutions of higher education and State or local educational 
agencies to support the recruitment and retention of teachers 
in high-need subjects at high-need schools. Those new grants 
would replace an existing program that provides grants 
specifically for mathematics and science partnerships, which 
received about $140 million in funding for fiscal year 2013 
after sequestration. CBO estimates this provision would have 
discretionary costs of about $500 million over the 2014-18 
period.
     Teacher Incentive Fund Program. Part C would 
reauthorize the Teacher Incentive Fund, which supports grants 
to LEAs and other organizations to develop and implement 
performance-based teacher and principal compensation systems in 
high-need schools.\1\ CBO estimates that this provision would 
authorize the appropriation of about $300 million for fiscal 
year 2014 and have discretionary costs of $1.0 billion over the 
2014-18 period. The Congress appropriated about $300 million 
for State grants in 2013, and sequestration reduced this amount 
by about $15 million.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\The Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2006 (Public Law 
109-149) originally authorized the Teacher Incentive Fund under the 
authority granted in the ESEA in Subpart 1, of Part D, of Title V, Fund 
for the Improvement of Education--Programs of National Significance.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Achievement Through Technology and Innovation. 
Additionally, part D would reauthorize and modify the Enhancing 
Education Through Technology Program to improve teaching and 
learning through technology. CBO estimates that implementing 
this provision would cost about $350 million over the 2014-18 
period. No funding was provided for part D in fiscal year 2013. 
(In fiscal year 2010, education technology programs included 
under part D of this legislation received about $100 million.)

    Title III--Language and Academic Content Instruction for 
English Learners and Immigrant Students. Title III of the bill 
provides support for teaching of the English language, 
including to recent immigrants. CBO estimates the bill would 
authorize the appropriation of more than $700 million for 
grants to States and for other activities in 2014 and $3.7 
billion over the 2014-18 period. Implementing this title would 
cost about $2.5 billion over the 2014-18 period, assuming the 
appropriation of the necessary amounts. The Congress 
appropriated about $730 million for similar activities in 
fiscal year 2013, an amount that was reduced to a little less 
than $700 million under sequestration.
    Title IV--Supporting Successful, Well-Rounded Students. 
Title IV would authorize funding for various grant programs 
designed to improve literacy and math and science instruction. 
It also would support measures to improve the health and safety 
of students. CBO estimates this title would authorize the 
appropriation of approximately $2.3 billion in fiscal year 2014 
and $11.9 billion over the 2014-18 period. Implementing Title 
IV would cost about $8.2 billion over the 2014-18 period, 
assuming the appropriation of the necessary amounts.

     Improving Literacy Instruction and Student 
Achievement. Part A would authorize grants to support 
activities designed to increase literacy for individuals from 
birth through the end of high school, and it would authorize 
grants to improve school library programs. CBO estimates that 
spending for these purposes would total about $750 million over 
the 2014-18 period.
     Improving Science, Technology, Engineering, and 
Mathematics Instruction and Student Achievement. Part B would 
authorize grants to States to increase access to science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics, and to provide 
professional development for teachers. CBO estimates that 
implementing part B would have discretionary costs of about 
$1.5 billion over the 2014-18 period.
     Increasing Access to a Well-Rounded Education and 
Financial Literacy. Part C would authorize grants to local 
educational agencies to support access for low-income students 
to education topics such as the arts, civics and government, 
economics, environmental education, and foreign languages. Part 
C also would authorize grants to State educational agencies to 
improve the teaching of financial literacy. CBO estimates that 
spending for those grants would cost almost $300 million over 
the 2014-18 period.
     Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students. Part D 
would authorize a new grant program to promote student physical 
and mental health and well-being and to prevent violence and 
substance abuse, similar to activities funded by State grants 
for safe and drug-free schools under current law. The bill also 
would authorize funding for school districts in which the 
learning environment has been disrupted due to violence or 
another traumatic event to purchase or construct new facilities 
to maintain an appropriate learning environment. CBO estimates 
that those grants would have discretionary costs of about $1.1 
billion over the 2014-18 period.
     Student Non-Discrimination. Part E would require 
any Federal agency that terminates or refuses to provide 
financial assistance to an education program because that 
program discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation or 
gender identity to submit a report to the Congress detailing 
the action. CBO estimates this section would have a negligible 
impact on discretionary spending over the 2014-18 period.
     21st Century Community Learning Centers. Part F 
would reauthorize grants for 21st Century Community Learning 
Centers, which support before- and after-school and summer 
school programs. CBO estimates this provision would authorize 
the appropriation of more than $1.1 billion for fiscal year 
2014 and would lead to discretionary costs of $4.0 billion over 
the 2014-18 period. The Congress appropriated more than $1.1 
billion for this program in fiscal year 2013. Sequestration 
reduced that total by almost $60 million.
     Promise Neighborhoods. Part G would reauthorize 
Promise Neighborhood grants, which go to organizations to 
provide family and community services and to support 
comprehensive education reforms in high-need areas.\2\ CBO 
estimates that spending for part F over the 2014-18 period 
would total about $200 million. About $55 million was available 
for this program in fiscal year 2013.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 (Public Law 111-117) 
authorized Promise Neighborhood grants under the authority granted in 
the ESEA in Subpart I, of Part D, of Title V, Fund for the Improvement 
of Education--Programs of National Significance.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Additional Programs. Parts H, I, and J would 
reauthorize Parent and Family Information and Resource Centers, 
the Ready to Learn program, and Programs of National 
Significance. CBO estimates that the total authorization of 
appropriations for fiscal year 2014 for those programs would be 
about $100 million and total spending for fiscal years 2014 
through 2018 would be almost $400 million. Part K would permit 
the Secretary of Education to grant demonstration authority to 
eligible entities to incorporate competency-based 
accountability into State accountability systems required under 
Title I. The bill also would require the Secretary to 
disseminate a report detailing best practices on the 
implementation of those systems. CBO estimates implementing 
part K would have a negligible effect on discretionary 
spending.

    Title V--Promoting Innovation. CBO estimates that title V 
would authorize the appropriation of about $1.1 billion in 
fiscal year 2014 and $5.6 billion over the 2014-18 period. 
Implementing title V would cost about $3.5 billion over the 
2014-18 period, assuming the appropriation of the estimated 
amounts.
    Race to the Top and Investing in Innovation. Parts A and B 
would authorize funding for the Race to the Top and Investing 
in Innovation programs, both created in the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act (Public Law 111-5). Those competitive 
grants programs are designed to encourage educational 
innovation and reform at the State and local levels. CBO 
estimates that the bill would authorize the appropriation more 
than $500 million for Race to the Top and almost $150 million 
for Investing in Innovation for fiscal year 2014. Implementing 
those two programs would cost $1.7 billion and $0.5 billion, 
respectively, over the 2014-18 period. The Congress 
appropriated about $700 million for these two programs in 
fiscal year 2013, and about $660 million was available after 
sequestration.
    Magnet Schools, Charter Schools, and Public School Choice. 
Parts C, D, and E would reauthorize funding for Magnet Schools 
Assistance, Charter School Grants, and Voluntary Public School 
Choice. CBO estimates that the bill would authorize the 
appropriation of almost $400 million for fiscal year 2014 and 
would have total discretionary costs of about $1.3 billion over 
the 2014-18 
period for those programs. The Congress appropriated about $350 
million for grants for magnet and charter schools in 2013, an 
amount that was reduced by about $20 million by sequestration. 
No funding was provided for public school choice in 2013.
    College Information Demonstration Program. Part F would 
authorize funding for a demonstration program to encourage 
secondary students at high-need schools to apply to and enroll 
in postsecondary education and apply for and receive financial 
aid. CBO estimates implementing this provision would cost about 
$90 million over the 2014-18 period.
    Title VI--Promoting Flexibility; Rural Education. Title VI 
would reauthorize rural education achievement programs, which 
provide grants to assist rural school districts in improving 
teaching and learning outcomes. CBO estimates the bill would 
authorize the appropriation of about $170 million in spending 
for fiscal year 2014 and approximately $900 million over the 
2014-18 period. Implementing this title would have 
discretionary costs of roughly $600 million over the 2014-18 
period, assuming the appropriation of the estimated amounts. 
The Congress appropriated about $180 million for similar 
activities in fiscal year 2013, an amount that was reduced by 
about $10 million by sequestration.
    Title VII--Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native 
Education. Title VII would reauthorize grant programs for 
Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Alaska Natives. 
Programs for Alaska Natives would be authorized through 2019. 
The bill would amend current law to authorize the repair and 
renovation of public schools that serve higher concentrations 
of Native Hawaiian students. CBO estimates the bill would 
authorize the appropriation of about $200 million for fiscal 
year 2014 and $1.1 billion over the 2014-18 period. 
Implementing this title would cost about $700 million over the 
2014-18 period, assuming the appropriation of the necessary 
amounts. The Congress appropriated almost $200 million for 
these programs in 2013, an amount that was reduced by about $10 
million by sequestration.
    Title VIII--Impact Aid. Title VIII would reauthorize impact 
aid programs, which provide funding to assist local educational 
agencies affected by the activities of the Federal Government, 
such as those on a military base or Indian reservation. CBO 
estimates that title VIII would authorize about $1.2 billion in 
fiscal year 2014 and about $6.5 billion over the 2014-18 
period. We estimate that fully funding this title would result 
in discretionary costs of $6.2 billion over the 2014-18 period, 
assuming the appropriation of the estimated amounts. The bulk 
of this spending, about $5.8 billion over the 2014-18 period, 
would be for basic support payments to LEAs to assist in the 
education of certain children residing on Federal property. The 
additional $400 million would be used to construct and maintain 
schools that educate those children. The Congress appropriated 
almost $1.3 billion for impact aid in 2013, and a little more 
than $1.2 billion was available after sequestration.
    Title X--Committee on Effective Regulation and Assessment 
of Systems for Public Schools. Title X would require the 
Secretary of Education to establish a commission to examine 
Federal, State, and local regulations that affect elementary 
and secondary education. CBO estimates that this provision 
would authorize the appropriation of $1 million in each year.
    Title XI--Amendments to Other Laws; Miscellaneous 
Provisions. Subpart I of title XI would reauthorize the 
McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, which authorizes grants 
to States to assist in the education of homeless children. The 
bill would authorize the appropriation of such sums as may be 
necessary for fiscal years 2014 through 2020. CBO estimates 
that this subpart would authorize the appropriation of more 
than $60 million for fiscal year 2014 and have discretionary 
costs of about $200 million for the 2014-18 period. Available 
funding under this Act totaled about $60 million for fiscal 
year 2013.
    Subpart II would amend the Department of Education 
Organization Act to create an agency within the department 
responsible for the research and development of educational 
technology to improve student achievement. Funding from the 
Investing in Innovation program, authorized in title IV, would 
be reserved to support this new agency. CBO estimates that this 
provision would authorize the appropriation of $50 million in 
fiscal year 2014 and would cost almost $200 million over the 
2014-18 period.
    Pay-as-you-go consideration: The Statutory Pay-As-You-Go 
Act of 2010 establishes budget-reporting and enforcement 
procedures for legislation affecting direct spending or 
revenues. The net changes in outlays under S.1094, the 
Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013, that are subject 
to those pay-as-you-go procedures are shown in the following 
table.

    CBO Estimate of Pay-As-You-Go Effects for S.1094, the Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013, as Ordered Reported by the Senate Committee on
                                                 Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions on June 12, 2013
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                       By fiscal year, in millions of dollars
                                                          ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                         2013-    2013-
                                                            2013   2014   2015   2016   2017   2018   2019   2020   2021   2022   2023    2018     2023
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               NET INCREASE IN THE DEFICIT
Impact on the Deficit....................................      0      3      0      0      1      1      1      1      1      1      1        5       10
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Estimated impact on State, local, and tribal governments: 
S.1094 contains no intergovernmental mandates as defined in 
UMRA and would impose no costs on State, local, or tribal 
governments. Those governments would benefit from grants 
authorized in the bill for elementary and secondary education. 
Any costs associated with those grants would be incurred 
voluntarily as a result of complying with conditions of Federal 
assistance.
    Estimated impact on the private sector: S.1094 would shield 
schools from liability that might result from enrolling 
unaccompanied youth without parental or guardian consent. The 
bill would impose a private-sector mandate, as defined in UMRA, 
on parents and guardians ofunaccompanied youth to the extent 
that they would be denied an existing right to compensation. 
However, such claims are very rare, and no damages have been 
awarded for such claims in the past 10 years. Therefore, CBO 
expects that the costs of the mandate would not exceed the 
annual threshold established in UMRA for private-sector 
mandates ($150 million in 2013, adjusted annually for 
inflation).
    Previous CBO estimate: On July 10, 2013, CBO transmitted a 
cost estimate for H.R.5, the Student Success Act, as ordered 
reported by the House Committee on Education and the Workforce 
on June 19, 2013. CBO estimated that the bill, which also would 
reauthorize the ESEA, would authorize the appropriation of 
about $23 billion for fiscal year 2014 and $114 billion over 
the 2014-18 period. Differences in the estimates reflect 
differences in the legislation.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Justin Humphrey; 
Impact on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: J'nell L. 
Blanco; Impact on the Private Sector: Vi Nguyen.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Assistant Director 
for Budget Analysis.

                    VII. Section-by-Section Analysis

         TITLE I--COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS FOR ALL STUDENTS

Part A--Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged

    The committee bill refocuses title I to provide States and 
districts with the flexibility they need to ensure that all 
students, including students with disabilities and English 
learners, are college- and career-ready by the time they 
graduate from high school.
Standards
    College- and Career-Ready Standards: States must adopt 
college- and career-ready standards in reading and mathematics 
that align with relevant career and technical standards, as 
well as credit-bearing, academic coursework at the State's 
public institutions of higher education. Students who meet 
these standards will not need remediation at the State's public 
institutions of higher education. States must also develop 
standards for science, but the Federal Government does not 
require that these be used for accountability purposes.
    English Proficiency Standards: States must adopt English 
proficiency standards aligned with the State's college- and 
career-ready standards.
    Early Learning Guidelines: The bill asks States who use 
title I funds to develop or certify the existence of guidelines 
that are developmentally appropriate for children aged birth 
through entry into kindergarten, which describe what children 
should know and be able to do.
Assessments
    States must develop assessments in reading and math aligned 
with their college- and career-ready standards that are given 
not less than once in grades three through eight, not less than 
once in high school, and in all elementary and secondary 
schools. The assessments must include multiple measures of 
student achievement and measure individual student academic 
growth, which may be accomplished through computer adaptive 
tests. States must also establish assessments for English 
proficiency aligned with the State's English proficiency 
standards. The outcomes of these assessments will be 
incorporated into the State's accountability framework. States 
may develop alternate assessments for students with the most 
significant cognitive disabilities, but such assessments may 
not be given to more than 1 percent of all students in the 
State.
State Accountability
    A State will set ambitious, but achievable, annual 
performance targets for student growth, academic proficiency 
and English proficiency for itself, its districts, and all its 
public elementary and secondary schools for each assessed 
subject and grade level.
    Performance targets may be:

     Those adopted through the waiver agreements with 
the Secretary.
     The percentage of students meeting or exceeding 
grade-level standards at the highest 10 percent of schools in 
the State, subject to approval by the Secretary.
     Equally ambitious targets to the ones above, 
subject to approval by the Secretary.

    To help States transition to this new accountability 
system, States will establish a new baseline for its 
assessments 2 years after the law is enacted. During the 2 year 
transition, States must continue to assess students, 
disaggregate data, and provide interventions for schools that 
were priority and focus schools on the date of enactment of the 
law.
Local Accountability
    States will identify the following types of schools for 
different interventions:

     Priority Schools--5 percent of the bottom-
performing elementary schools and 5 percent of the bottom 
performing high schools in the State. Districts must choose 1 
of 6 interventions for schools in this category, which include 
a State-developed intervention that has a basis in evidence. 
Rural districts are given flexibility in administering the 
interventions.
     Focus Schools--the 10 percent of schools that are 
not priority schools with the greatest achievement gaps among 
student subgroups. States will develop and implement a data-
driven correction plan to improve student performance in these 
schools.

    Districts will identify schools that have missed their 
performance targets for student subgroups for 2 consecutive 
years and will, in collaboration with the school, implement a 
locally designed intervention to improve student performance.
State and Local Report Cards
    Each district and State must provide a report card for each 
public elementary and secondary school in the State. The report 
cards must include, among other things: information relating to 
the State's accountability system; information relating to 
student achievement and graduation rates, disaggregated and 
cross-tabulated across income statute, ethnicity, gender, and 
ability; evaluation results for teachers and principals, when 
appropriate; discipline data; information related to access to, 
and participation in, Advanced Placement and International 
Baccalaureate programs; data related to pregnant and parenting 
students; and the number of military-connected students served 
by public schools in the districts and States.
Equity Report Card
    Each district must provide a parent with the following 
information on each school:

     Student achievement data, disaggregated by 
subgroup;
     Information on the school's funding source 
(Federal , State, local, or donations);
     For each high school, the graduation rate and the 
rate students enroll in college;
     Information on educational opportunities at each 
school, including availability of:
         Preschool and full-day kindergarten; Advanced 
        Placement and International Baccalaureate courses; Dual 
        enrollment and early college opportunities; and Gifted 
        programming; and
     Information on the school's climate, including 
disciplinary data.
Blue Ribbon Schools
    The bill continues to provide States the option of 
recognizing and rewarding schools with the highest student 
achievement and most growth. States must define the criteria 
for recognizing schools based on the percentage of making 
sufficient growth to achieve college- and career-readiness, 
graduation rate, and the performance of each subgroup of 
students. States may set-aside one-half percent of title I to 
reward Blue Ribbon schools. Identified title I schools may use 
reward funds to improve student achievement and to provide 
technical assistance to similar schools in the State. The bill 
gives schools flexibility in the use of these funds.
Centers of Excellence in Early Childhood
    The bill authorizes a new program to designate and reward 
exemplary early childhood education programs that have a 
demonstrated track-record of success in getting low-income 
families ready for school. The governor of each State must 
nominate an early childhood education program that may apply 
for a grant from the Secretary. Centers of Excellence must use 
their grant to disseminate best practices to other early 
childhood education providers in their area. Centers of 
Excellence may also use funding to expand their services and 
increase access to their program. Subject to appropriations, 
the minimum grant for a Center of Excellence is $200,000.
Comparability of Services
    By the 2015-16 school year, local school districts must 
show that their average combined local and State funds per 
pupil for title I schools is equal to or greater than the 
average combined local and State funds per pupil for non-title 
I schools. If all schools in a district are eligible for title 
I funds, the local school district must demonstrate to the SEA 
that the average combined local and State funds expended per 
pupil in high-poverty schools is equal to or greater than the 
average combined local and State funds expended per pupil in 
the district's low-poverty schools.
Equitable Distribution of Teachers
    Beginning with the 2015-16 school year, the State 
educational agency must provide for the equitable distribution 
of teachers within local school districts. Teachers who are new 
to the profession, have not completed a teacher preparation 
program, are not teaching in their certified field of study, 
who are not classified as highly qualified, and who are in the 
lowest or highest rating level of their local teacher 
evaluation system must be equally distributed among schools in 
high poverty areas and schools in lesser or low poverty areas.

Part B--Pathways to College

Subpart 1--Improving Secondary Schools
    The committee bill authorizes a new competitive grant 
program that would award grants to implement innovative and 
effective secondary school reforms. These reforms are directed 
at title I high schools with graduation rates below 75 percent 
that do not receive priority schools resources.
    Each targeted school would be required to implement one of 
the following reform strategies:

     Graduation Promise Academies, which include ninth 
grade academies taught by teams of teachers who work with small 
groups for extended learning periods, etc.;
     Career Academies, which implement a rigorous 
curriculum that integrates academics, career and technical 
education, and experiential learning in high-skill, high-demand 
industries;
     Dual enrollment programs that provide dual 
enrollment opportunities with college credit-bearing courses, 
including accelerated certificate programs with community 
colleges or other recognized postsecondary credentials; or
     Early College Schools, which allow students to 
simultaneously earn credits towards a high school diploma and 
either an associate degree or transferable postsecondary 
education credits toward a postsecondary degree at no cost to 
the student.
    The High School Reform Program would replace the following 
existing programs: Comprehensive School Reform, School Dropout 
Prevention, and Smaller Learning Communities.
    Grant stipulations:

     Duration: 5 years, with conditions after year 3 
based on satisfactory progress.
     Eligible Entity: A high-need local education 
agency who partners with--
         An institution of higher education, an 
        employer, and an outside partner with a demonstrated 
        track record of successful high school reform or an 
        intermediary.
Subpart 2--Accelerated Learning
    The committee bill continues a program that awards grants 
to States to reimburse students for Advanced Placement (AP) 
test fees and expands the program to include reimbursement for 
International Baccalaureate (IB) test fees. The bill also makes 
other minor changes to improve program quality, including 
creating a priority for applications that are part of a state-
wide or district-wide strategy to increase the availability of 
AP or IB courses in high-need schools.

Part C--Education of Migratory Children

    The committee bill continues support for the Migratory 
Education Program, which attempts to address the unique needs 
of mobile migratory children who suffer, among other things, 
disrupted or interrupted education and who need special 
supplemental support. The program provides formula grants to 
States based primarily on their share of migratory children. 
The bill strengthens the program by:

     Ensuring that migratory children and youth are 
expected to meet the same college- and career-ready academic 
content standards that all children are expected to meet and 
requiring the collection of new performance data;
     Updating the grant formula to more accurately 
provide funding based on actual counts of migratory students, 
including students who receive services during the summer;
     Enhancing records transfer requirements to 
minimize the effects of mobility; and
     Prioritizing services towards migratory students 
who have moved within the previous 12 months and those that 
have dropped out of school, as well as those that are at risk 
of failing to meet academic content standards.

Part D--Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, 
                    or At-Risk

    The committee bill continues support for the Neglected & 
Delinquent Program, which is designed to improve educational 
services for children and youth in local and State institutions 
for neglected and delinquent juveniles. This bill strengthens 
the program by:

     Ensuring that these children and youth are 
expected to meet the same college and career-ready academic 
content standards that all children are expected to meet and 
requiring the collection of new performance data;
     Targeting funding to students who are truly ``at-
risk'' by changing the definition of ``at-risk'' to eliminate 
the inclusion of students based solely on academic issues; and
     Requiring the development of a transition plan for 
students entering certain facilities and consultation between 
facilities and local educational agencies upon release to 
ensure the students' continued success.

Part E--Educational Stability of Children in Foster Care

    The committee bill authorizes new provisions to ensure 
educational stability for foster children who experience a 
number of undue burdens in the course of their public school 
career, including having to re-enroll in schools when they 
change foster placements or leave foster care. This part would 
require that States receiving funding under title I must 
coordinate with the responsible agencies to ensure foster 
children--when leaving foster care, changing foster placements, 
or in foster care--remain enrolled in their school of origin to 
the maximum extent possible, are enrolled immediately in 
school, and have their records transferred in a timely fashion.

         TITLE II--SUPPORTING TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL EXCELLENCE

Part A--Continuous Improvement and Support for Teachers and Principals

    The committee bill makes several key changes to the title 
II-A formula program, including:

     Professional Growth and Improvement Systems: 
Districts that receive title II-A funds will develop teacher 
and principal evaluation systems based on academic achievement 
and growth, classroom observations, and other measures that 
inform teacher performance (for teachers) and on academic 
achievement and growth, instructional leadership, and, if 
districts choose, other measures of principal performance (for 
principals). The evaluation systems must be able to provide 
meaningful feedback to teachers and principals in a timely 
manner and provide data to inform decisions about professional 
development activities. The implementation of these systems 
does not alter the rights and remedies enjoyed by educators 
through their local collective bargaining agreements and States 
and districts with evaluation systems approved under ESEA 
waivers do not have to alter the components of their systems.
     Professional Development and Support: Districts 
will conduct professional development activities that are 
evidence-based and aligned with the results of evaluations in 
order to improve student academic achievement and increase 
students' abilities to meet college- and career-ready 
standards. Early childhood educators can also be included in 
professional development activities.
     Early Childhood Transition: States and local 
school districts may develop and implement programs and 
policies to improve the transition of children from early 
childhood education and care programs to elementary schools.
     Recruitment, Preparation and Distribution of Great 
Teachers: Funds from title II may be used to recruit, prepare, 
support, reward, and retain teachers and principals in the 
high-need and low-performing schools where they are needed 
most. The funds can also be used to improve the distribution of 
highly rated teachers to ensure that low-income students are 
not taught by disproportionate shares of low-rated teachers.
     Class Size Reduction: Restricts funds for class 
size reduction to the early grades. Previous class size 
reduction programs failed to produce significant results for 
students because they operated on the margins. The bill will 
ensure that funds are used for class size reduction to the 
early grades where they are most impactful.
     Principal Set-aside: Principals were one of the 
most significant omissions of No Child Left Behind. The bill 
acknowledges the impact of principal leadership in schools and 
ensures that of the 2 percent to 5 percent States set-aside for 
State-level activities, the improvement of principal 
performance is among the few activities in which a State can 
invest.

Part B--Teacher Pathways

    The committee bill authorizes a new program designed to 
support the recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, 
retention, and support of teachers in high-need subjects or 
fields who will improve student academic achievement and 
student outcomes at high-needs schools.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Eligible entities--States or districts in 
partnership with institutions of higher education or a 
nonprofit organization.
     Priority: Programs that have a track record of:

         Recruiting individuals with a demonstrated 
        history of academic achievement;
         Recruiting individuals from underrepresented 
        backgrounds;
         Preparing teachers who improve student 
        achievement in high-need schools.

Part C--Teacher Incentive Fund

    The Teacher Incentive Fund will provide competitive grants 
to develop, implement, improve, or expand strategies, including 
performance-based incentives, to increase the number of highly 
effective teachers and principals in high-need schools. 
Priority will be given to grantees who target placing highly 
effective teachers and principals in priority schools or who 
have already developed a professional growth and improvement 
system, as described in title II-A. Entities eligible for 
grants include: districts, States, or colleges in partnership 
with districts and States.

Part D--Achievement Through Technology and Innovation

    The committee bill continues support for an educational 
technology program that will award formula grants to States 
through the title I formula. States can then award grants to 
districts, through formula and competitiveness, to provide 
professional development to educators on the effective use of 
technology to improve instruction.

   TITLE III--LANGUAGE AND ACADEMIC CONTENT INSTRUCTION FOR ENGLISH 
                    LEARNERS AND IMMIGRANT STUDENTS

    The committee bill continues to fund formula grants to 
ensure that English learners and immigrant children achieve 
English proficiency while they attend public school. The 
committee bill better targets the use of funds to support the 
use of evidence-based instructional programs and practices to 
support the acquisition of English so that English learners 
make sufficient progress to graduate college and become career 
ready.
Subpart 1--Grants & Subgrants for English Language Acquisition & 
        Language Enhancement
    States will receive grants based on their share of the 
percentage of English learners and Immigrant children they have 
relative to the rest of the States. States must then provide 
subgrants in an amount proportional to their share of English 
learners relative to the number of English learners in the 
State. Subgrants will be used to help English learners attain 
English proficiency and meet the State's college- and career-
ready standards. Subgrantees must use approaches that are 
evidence-based and proven to be effective for teaching English 
learners and immigrant children, such as high-quality 
professional development for educators.
    Each subgrantee will set individual targets for English 
learners that will set them on a path to achieve English 
proficiency in no less than 5 years.
    State subgrant stipulations:

     Duration: Determined by the State.
     Eligible subgrantee:

         One or more districts.
         One or more districts in partnership with a 
        college, a community organization, or a SEA.
Subpart 2--Accountability and Administration
    States, with input from subgrantees and subject to approval 
by the Secretary, will set a performance target for the number 
of English learners served by the State who will achieve 
English proficiency not more than 5 years after they are 
identified as English learners. Subgrantees will also set 
performance targets for English proficiency. Also, each second 
year a subgrantee receives funds from the State they will be 
evaluated along several factors, including:

     The number & percentage of English learners 
becoming English proficient in 5 years;
     The number & percentage of children meeting 
college- and career-ready standards 2 years after receiving 
services;
     The progress made by former English learners in 
meeting college- and career-ready standards.

    States will use information from the evaluation to 
determine the effectiveness of programs to decide whether to 
provide technical assistance or discontinue funding to the 
subgrantee.

Subpart 3--National Activities

    The Secretary will reserve 3.5 percent of title III funds 
for activities that include:

     Competitive grants to nonprofits or colleges with 
the expertise and capacity to provide high-quality professional 
development to improve classroom instruction for English 
learners;
     The establishment of an independent commission on 
the assessment of English learners comprised of experts who can 
provide the Secretary with advice regarding the development of 
English learners and their inclusion in State assessments;
     Innovation grants to invest in research and 
development in educational technology to improve English 
proficiency and academic achievement for English learners.

         TITLE IV--SUPPORTING SUCCESSFUL, WELL-ROUNDED STUDENTS

Part A--Improving Literacy Instruction and Achievement

Subpart 1--Improving Literacy Instruction
    The committee bill authorizes a new grant program to 
support high-quality literacy instruction to help States 
strengthen the literacy skills of all students from birth 
through high school.
    The committee bill includes non-renewable planning grants 
(that last for a period of 1 year) and implementation grants to 
States (that last for a period of 5 years with opportunities to 
renew). Grants will be distributed to States by formula if the 
appropriation for this program exceeds $500 million. The 
formula is based on the share of the State's share of children 
from birth to 17 who live at or below the poverty line. If 
appropriations are below $500 million, grants are awarded to 
States competitively. States will competitively distribute 
funds to:

     Enhance State capacity to improve literacy 
instruction.
     Provide high-quality, research-based professional 
development to instructional staff.
     Support evidence-based practices to improve 
literacy and writing.

    Ten percent of funds will be reserved to build the literacy 
skills of children aged birth to 5.
    State subgrant stipulations:

     Eligible Entities: Districts and early childhood 
education providers.
     Priority: Granted to--

         Entities that serve children living at or 
        below poverty; and
         Entities that serve school-aged students 
        reading or writing below grade level.
Subpart 2--Improving Literacy and College and Career Readiness Through 
        Effective School Library Programs
    The committee bill authorizes a competitive program to 
improve students' readiness for college and careers by 
providing students with effective school library programs. The 
program funds effective school library programs, which are: 
staffed with licensed professionals; have up-to-date books, 
materials and technology; includes regular collaboration 
between classroom teachers and school librarians in the 
development of curriculum; and supports the development of 
digital literacy skills. Districts, or a consortium of 
districts, are eligible to compete for these grants.

Part B--Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) 
                    Instruction and Support

Subpart 1--Improving STEM Instruction and Student Achievement
    The committee bill authorizes a new STEM program that would 
award grants to States. Grants will be distributed to States by 
formula if the appropriation for this program exceeds $500 
million. The formula is based primarily on the share of the 
State's share of children from ages 5 to 17 who live at or 
below the poverty line. If appropriations are below $500 
million, grants are awarded to States competitively. States 
will competitively distribute funds to improve student academic 
achievement in STEM by:

     Increasing student access to high-quality STEM 
courses and learning opportunities.
     Improving the quality and effectiveness of 
classroom instruction by recruiting, training, and supporting 
highly effective STEM teachers.
     Preparing more students to be on track to college- 
and career-readiness and success in STEM subjects.

    State subgrant stipulations:

     Eligible Entities: a high-need district, 
consortium of high-need districts, or an outside partner 
(business, nonprofit, or a college) working with a high-need 
district or consortium.
     Matching Requirement: 15 percent.
Subpart 2--STEM Master Teacher Corps
    The committee bill requires the Secretary to set-aside 10 
percent of STEM funding under Subpart 1 for the STEM Master 
Teacher Corps competitive grant program, which would offer 
career advancement and higher pay to the top 5 percent of K-12 
STEM teachers in the United States. Members of the teaching 
corps would, in turn, mentor other STEM teachers and share best 
practices. The Secretary will administer the grants in 
consultation with the Director of the NSF.
    Grant stipulations:

     Duration: Not more than 5 years.
     Eligible Entities:

         Institutions of Higher Education.
         Non-profits that recruit STEM teachers or 
        improve STEM teacher effectiveness.

     Matching Requirement: 50 percent.
     Priority: Grantees that will--

         Serve large numbers of teachers.
         Serve rural areas, particularly high-need 
        rural areas.

Part C--Increasing Access to a Well-Rounded Education and Financial 
                    Literacy

Subpart 1--Increasing Access to a Well-Rounded Education
    The committee bill authorizes a new well-rounded program 
that would award grants to States. Grants will be distributed 
to States by formula if the appropriation for this program 
exceeds $500 million. The formula is based primarily on the 
share of the State's share of children from ages 5 to 17 who 
live at or below the poverty line. If appropriations are below 
$500 million, grants are awarded to States competitively.
    This program will allow States to continue to build teacher 
capacity and allow access for low-income students to a well-
rounded education, including in the arts, physical education, 
financial literacy, health education, foreign languages, 
civics, history, music, and environmental literacy.
    The program requires States to identify and target gaps in 
low-income students' access to a high-quality, well-rounded 
education, including: the selection of courses provided; the 
capacity of teachers to provide excellent instruction in those 
subjects; and the quality of standards, assessments, curricula, 
accommodations, and other supports. States may provide 
subgrants to high-need districts, or a consortium of such 
districts, to improve the skills of teachers or build local 
capacity to provide a well-rounded education to low-income 
students, students with disabilities, or English learners.
    The programs that consolidated into the well-rounded 
Education program include: Excellence in Economic Education; 
Teaching American History; Arts in Education; Foreign Language 
Assistance Program; and Academies for American History and 
Civics.
Subpart 2--Financial Literacy Education
    The committee bill authorizes a new program where the 
Secretary can award grants to States to:

     Support professional development regarding 
financial literacy education to secondary school teachers;
     Integrate financial literacy education into 
elementary and secondary schools that receive support under 
title I.

    A State that receives funds under this subpart must provide 
a match of 25 percent.

Part D--Successful, Safe and Healthy Students

    Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students Program replaces a 
number of programs in current law that have not been as 
effective as they were intended, largely due to their limited 
reach. The consolidated programs are: Safe and Drug Free 
Schools State grants, Elementary School Counseling, Physical 
Education Program, Foundations for Learning, Mental Health 
Integration in Schools, and Alcohol Abuse Reduction.
    The Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students Program will 
advance student achievement and positive child and youth 
development by promoting student health and wellness; 
preventing bullying, violence, and drug use; and fostering a 
positive school climate. The Successful, Safe, and Healthy 
Students Program would establish two State grant programs:

    1. Grants for State and local data systems: The Secretary 
is authorized to reserve 30 percent of funds, or $30 million, 
whichever is greater, for formula grants to States to develop 
or enhance systems that will give local leaders the information 
they need to improve the conditions for learning in their 
schools and communities. The formula will be based on title I. 
During years where the overall appropriation for Successful 
Safe and Healthy is less than $30 million, the Secretary will 
direct all funds to States to develop conditions for learning 
systems. This grant will help build State capacity to develop a 
high-quality plan for the Successful, Safe, and Healthy 
Students State Grants.
    2. Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students State Grants: 
States will receive funding to provide subgrants to implement 
programs to support positive conditions for learning by 
promoting student health and fitness, mental health and well-
being, drug and violence prevention, and safe and supportive 
schools. Funds will be distributed by formula to States 
(through the title I formula) but if the appropriation for this 
program is below $500 million, the grants would be awarded to 
States competitively. To be eligible to apply for funding under 
this program, States must:

     Establish a statewide physical education 
requirement.
     Require all districts to establish policies that 
prohibit bullying & harassment of students.

    State subgrant stipulations:

     Eligible Entities: Districts, a consortium of 
districts, nonprofits working with districts.
     Priority: Entities that serve low-income students 
and demonstrate the greatest need.
     Funding Allocation: States must distribute the 
following percentage of subgrant funds:

         Not less than 20 percent for programs to 
        promote physical activity, education, and fitness and 
        nutrition;
         Not less than 20 percent for drug and violence 
        prevention (including bullying prevention); and
         Not less than 20 percent for programs to 
        promote mental health.

    3. School Construction after a Violent or Traumatic Crisis: 
The Secretary is authorized to provide financial assistance to 
districts that serve a school in which the learning environment 
has been disrupted due to a violent or traumatic crisis. Grants 
would support the acquisition or improvement of property as 
well as construction.

Part E--Student Non-Discrimination

    The committee bill authorizes Senator Franken's Student 
Non-Discrimination Act (SNDA), which ensures that all students 
have access to a public education in a safe environment, free 
from discrimination. This includes freedom from harassment, 
bullying, intimidation and violence on the basis of sexual 
orientation or gender identity.
    SNDA provides a comprehensive Federal prohibition of 
discrimination in public school based on actual, or perceived, 
sexual orientation or gender identity. It also gives the 
Department of Education the authority to combat such 
discrimination through regulation and enforcement, much in the 
same way they did through title IX and other non-discrimination 
laws. SNDA also provides meaningful and effective remedies 
(loss of Federal funding and legal cause of action for victims) 
for discrimination in public schools based on actual or 
perceived sexual orientation or gender identity, modeled after 
title IX. SNDA also provides those students who feel they have 
experienced discrimination in violation of this part with a 
private right of action.

Part F--21st Century Community Learning Centers

    The committee bill continues the authorization for the 21st 
Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) Program, which 
currently funds before-school, after-school, or summer-learning 
programs. The committee bill will expand the program to give 
local communities authority to decide whether to use 21st CCLC 
funds for:

     before, after, or summer learning;
     a significantly increased school day, week or year 
to provide more time for academic and enrichment activities; or
     a redesigned school program with at least 300 
hours of additional school time for academics, additional 
subjects and enrichment activities, and teacher collaboration 
and planning.

    Funds will be distributed by formula to States (through the 
title I formula), which then award subgrants to districts 
competitively.
    State subgrant stipulations:

     Duration: 3 years with a chance to extend for 2 
years if the entity gets positive outcomes.
     Eligible entities include partnerships between one 
or more high-need local educational agencies and one or more 
public entities or nonprofit organizations with a demonstrated 
record of success in designing and implementing before school, 
after school, summer learning, or expanded learning time 
activities.
    Rural districts who cannot find a partner can apply on 
their own.

     Priority: Entities that--
         Provide strong research evidence for their 
        activities;
         Propose to serve high percentages of low-
        income students;
         Have strong partnership agreements; and
         Provide matching funds.

Part G--Promise Neighborhoods

Subpart 1--Promise Neighborhoods Partnership Grants
    The committee bill authorizes the new Promise Neighborhoods 
Partnership program, which is a comprehensive program to 
provide children with all the support they need from birth 
through college. The proposal is based on the Harlem Children's 
Zone (HCZ), program that has been successful in increasing 
college success for students within a neighborhood in Harlem.
    The program will fund national competitive grants to create 

cradle-to-career ``continuums of care'' for all children in 
low-income neighborhoods. The Promise Neighborhoods Program 
requires that community-based organizations partner with local 
institutions as they provide a wide range of services to 
children beginning at birth and continuing through college 
entry. The services provided must include elements that are 
essential to healthy development and, eventually, college and 
career readiness, including training for expectant parents, 
high-quality early care and education, and supportive services 
for children throughout their school years. Grantees must 
monitor data on a range of indicators and share best practices.
    Grant stipulations:

     Duration: 5 years with a chance to extend for 1 
year if the entity can demonstrate significant improvement 
across a number of performance metrics.
     Eligible Entity: A nonprofit that works with at 
least one of the following: a high-need district, a charter 
school, an institution of higher education, the mayor, or an 
Indian tribe.
     Match: 100 percent.
Subpart 2--Promise Neighborhoods Schools Grants
    These are school-centered grants that allow schools to 
provide wrap-around services on-site by leveraging existing 
resources in the community. These grants will support the 
hiring of an on-site coordinator who will help connect students 
and their families to the academic and non-academic resources 
they need to experience success in and outside of the 
classroom.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: 5 years with a chance to extend for 1 
year if the entity can demonstrate significant improvement 
across a number of performance metrics.
     Eligible Entity: a high-need district in 
partnership with a nonprofit or a college.
     Match: 100 percent.
     Priority: Entities that will--

         Direct significant investment to high-quality 
        early childhood education; and
         Provide schools with autonomy over staff, 
        school time, and budget.

Part H--Parent and Family Information Resource Centers

    This committee bill continues support for parent and family 
information resource centers (PFIRCs) but refocuses the centers 
on providing support to SEAs in coordinating parent and family 
engagement policies, in supporting the lowest-performing 
districts as they engage parents and families, and in 
coordinating the activities of other relevant Federal programs 
and community-based organizations with SEAs and LEAs.
    PFIRCs must set aside 30 percent of their funding to 
support parent and family engagement activities for families 
whose children attend early childhood education programs.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: 5 years.
     Eligible Entity: a high-need district in 
partnership with a nonprofit or a college.
     Match: 100 percent.
     Priority: Entities that have a track record of 
increasing and enhancing parent and family engagement for 
children in high-need districts or who attend high-need 
schools.

Part I--Ready-to-Learn Television (RTLT)

    The committee bill continues to fund the Ready-to-Learn 
Television (RTLT) program. RTLT funds grants exclusively to 
public telecommunications entities to develop and distribute 
educational video for preschool- and elementary school-aged 
children and their parents, in an effort to increase student 
academic achievement. The program is unchanged in this bill.

Part J--Programs of National Significance

    The committee bill authorizes a new Programs of National 
Significance grant program. The program will award competitive 
grants to non-profit organizations to carry out certain 
activities previously carried out with earmarks. The following 
types of programs or entities would be able to compete for 
funding under this program: Close Up; Civic education programs; 
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards; Teach for 
America; the National Writing Project; Reach Out and Read; 
Reading Is Fundamental; VSA Arts; Javits Gifted and Talented 
Program; and programs funded through the Women's Educational 
Equity Act.
    This part also allows grants for programs not previously 
funded through earmarks, like programs that provide social, 
emotional, and academic support to students from military 
families.

Part K--Competency-Based Assessment and Accountability Demonstration 
                    Authority

    The Secretary may provide States or a consortium of States 
with the authority to incorporate competency-based 
accountability into the State accountability system. This will 
allow States to create summative assessments that test for 
higher order skills, critical thinking, problem solving, and 
self-directed learning aligned with college- and career-ready 
standards.
    This authority is only available for 3 years and may only 
be awarded to a maximum of three States or a consortium of 
States.

                     TITLE V--PROMOTING INNOVATION

Part A--Race to the Top

    The committee bill authorizes the Race to the Top 
competitive grant program to provide incentives for 
comprehensive reforms designed to lead to improved academic 
achievement for all students.
    The Secretary will design a competition that advances one 
or more of the following critical priorities:

     Increasing the access of children from low-income 
families to highly rated teachers and school leaders;
     Strengthening the availability and use of data to 
improve instruction;
     Implementing college- and career-ready academic 
standards;
     Turning around the priority and focus schools;
     Creating successful conditions for the creation, 
expansion, and replication of high-performing public charter 
schools and autonomous schools that serve students from low-
income families;
     Providing equitable resources to high-poverty 
schools; and
     Improving school readiness by increasing access to 
high-quality early childhood education programs for children 
from low-income families or creating an integrated system of 
programs and services.
    Grant stipulations:

     Duration: No more than 4 years.
     Eligible Entities: States, high-need districts, or 
a consortium of either will be eligible to compete for funds.
     Priority: Granted to:

         Rural high-need school districts or a 
        consortium.
         Grantees that offer full-day kindergarten, for 
        those grantees who offer early childhood education 
        programs and services.

Part B--Investing in Innovation

    The committee bill authorizes the Investing in Innovation 
Program (I3), which is designed to develop and replicate 
promising programs in education. The program will expand the 
implementation of, and investment in innovative practices with 
a demonstrated impact on improving student achievement, closing 
achievement gaps, increasing high school graduation rates, 
improving teacher and school leader effectiveness, or improving 
school readiness.
    The Secretary may choose to reserve 30 percent of the funds 
appropriated for I3 to fund ARPA-ED, modeled on the success of 
the Advanced Research Projects Agency at the Department of 
Defense. ARPA-ED will fund projects run by industry, 
universities, or other innovative organizations. Projects will 
be selected based on their potential to transform teaching and 
learning.
    Grant stipulations for I3 (not ARPA-ED):

     Duration: No more than 3 years with a chance to 
extend for another 2 if it can demonstrate progress in 
improving student outcomes.
     Standard of Evidence: Applicants must show that 
their projects have a basis in evidence.
     Eligible entities include:
         School districts.
         Non-profit in partnership with a district or a 
        consortium of districts.
     Set-aside: There will be a 22 percent set-aside 
for rural applicants.
     Priority: Applicants who plan to--
         Address the needs of high-need districts.
         Improve school readiness through early 
        childhood education.
         Address the learning needs of students with 
        disabilities.

Part C--Magnet Schools Assistance Program

    The committee bill maintains the magnet schools program as 
a competitive grant program with more emphasis on funding 
whole-school magnet programs or models that have demonstrated 
success in improving student academic achievement and reducing 
minority group isolation.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: No more than 3 years with a chance to 
extend for another 2 if it can demonstrate progress in 
improving student outcomes.
     Eligible Entities include: Districts.
     Priority: Applicants who:

         Demonstrate the greatest need based on 
        expense/difficulty in running a program.
         Support programs that have improved 
        achievement or a strong research basis.
         Open their programs to students on the basis 
        of lottery instead of examination.
         Serve the entire student population of a 
        school.

Part D--Public Charter Schools

Subpart 1--Successful Charter Schools Program
    The committee bill continues the charter schools program 
with a focus on improving the quality of the sector and 
investing in proven models of success. The charter school 
grants program will provide competitive grants to support the 
creation, expansion, and replication of high-performing charter 
schools. To ensure that limited Federal resources are targeted 
to charter schools with a commitment to strong academic 
results, the program requires high goals of student academic 
achievement for all student subgroups, and meaningful community 
outreach to parents and families. In addition, the redesigned 
program:

     Promotes strong performance-based authorizing 
policies that are transparent and effective in closing down 
unsuccessful schools;
     Ensures quality control through performance-based 
accountability; and
     Ensures charter schools recruit and meet the needs 
of students with disabilities and English learners.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: No more than 3 years with a chance to 
extend for another 2 if it can demonstrate progress in 
improving student outcomes.
     Eligible Entities include: States, districts, 
charter school authorizers and nonprofit charter management 
organizations.
     Set-Aside: The program sets aside 15 percent for 
charter school facilities.
     Reservation: 25 percent of the charter school 
grant funding will be distributed to States.
     Priority: Applicants who will create, expand, or 
replicate charters that serve low-income students.
Subpart 2--Charter School Facility Acquisition, Construction, and 
        Renovation
    The committee bill continues support for the charter school 
facilities program, which will support eligible entities to 
improve access to facilities and facilities financing for high-
performing charter schools and assist them in addressing the 
cost of acquiring, constructing, and renovating facilities.
    Competitive grants will be made for innovative facilities 
financing programs, including credit enhancement, open-
facilities-access programs, making available renovated or 
adapted space, leveraging State and local facilities funding, 
and State per-pupil facilities aid programs.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: 5 years.
     Eligible entities include: States, districts, 
nonprofit organizations, State financing authorities, or a 
consortium of such entities.
     Reservation: At least 65 percent of the funds must 
be expended for credit enhancement grants.

Part E--Voluntary Public School Choice

    The Voluntary Public School Choice program currently 
provides competitive grants to support the establishment or 
expansion of inter- and intra-district public school choice. In 
the committee bill, we continue the competitive program with 
minor changes to improve quality, including expanding the 
application requirements to ask grantees how activities 
supported through the grant will lead to increased student 
achievement and access to high-quality schools for students 
attending the lowest-performing schools.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: No more than 3 years with a chance to 
extend for another 2 if it can demonstrate progress in 
improving student outcomes.
     Eligible Entities include: High-need districts 
applying in partnership with a State or another district.
     Priority: Applicants who will:
         Expand or establish inter-district choice 
        programs for low-income students.
         Establish or expand a program that will 
        increase diversity.

Part F--College Information Demonstration Program

    This committee bill authorizes the Secretary to establish a 
demonstration program that provides funding to high-need 
schools to assess the effectiveness of providing college 
awareness and application services and programs that will 
increase the chances that students will: apply to college, 
apply for financial aid, enroll in college, or receive 
financial aid.
    At a minimum the Secretary will provide school districts 
that agree to participate in the demonstration with certain 
information for their students, including: guidance on how to 
apply to college and for financial aid, including availability 
of different types of Federal and State aid and application 
deadlines; information on the likely net cost of attending a 
local college or a State flagship; information about college 
application fee waivers.

            TITLE VI--PROMOTING FLEXIBILITY; RURAL EDUCATION

Part A--Transferability

    Current law allows up to 50 percent of non-administrative 
funds for State-level activities under several programs in 
titles II, IV, and V to be transferred to other programs in 
those same titles. This bill provides increased flexibility by 
allowing States to transfer their funds among all of the 
formula grant programs in the bill and increases this 
percentage to up to 100 percent; though, they cannot transfer 
funds out of titles I or III because of the robust State 
activities required under those formulas, such as implementing 
accountability systems under each respective title.
    This provision also allows districts to transfer up to 100 
percent of the funds they receive through formula for 
activities authorized under other formula programs. However, no 
funds may be transferred out of formula programs designated for 
particular student populations, which include titles I 
(Disadvantaged), III (English learners), VII (Native Hawaiian/
Alaskan, Indian students), or VIII (Federally Impacted).

Part B--Rural Education Achievement Program

    The committee bill continues support for the Rural 
Education Achievement Program (REAP), which is designed to 
address the unique challenges of rural schools. The program 
provides supplemental funds and flexibility with uses of funds, 
recognizing that formula grant amounts are often too small to 
make a major impact in rural districts. REAP currently awards 
two types of formula grants:

    (1) The Small, Rural Schools Achievement (SRSA) Program, 
which provides grants directly to eligible districts. Under 
SRSA, there is a minimum and maximum grant amount that LEAs can 
receive; the grant award amount is offset by the amount of 
funds the LEA receives under other ESEA title funding.
    (2) The Rural and Low Income Schools (RLIS) Program, which 
provides grants to States, which then award subgrants to 
districts.
    The committee bill will continue REAP, with several key 
changes.

     The bill will update the locale codes used to 
classify rural district to be consistent with those developed 
by the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Education 
Statistics. The locale codes for REAP will be: 32, 33, 41, 42, 
and 43.
     Currently, if a district is eligible for both the 
SRSA and RLIS programs, it must participate in only the SRSA 
program. In this bill, dual-eligible districts will be able to 
choose which program they would rather participate in.
     Increase the minimum (from $20,000 to $25,000) and 
maximum (from $60,000 to $80,000) grant sizes for SRSA.

    TITLE VII--INDIAN, NATIVE HAWAIIAN, AND ALASKA NATIVE EDUCATION

Part A--Indian Education

Subpart 1--Formula Grants to Local Educational Agencies
    Ninety-three percent of American Indians attend public 
schools not affiliated with the schools run by the Bureau of 
Indian Education (BIE) at the Department of the Interior. The 
committee bill continues support for formula grants directly to 
districts to help them improve the academic achievement of 
Indian students by meeting their unique cultural, language, and 
educational needs. The formula is based primarily on the number 
of Indian children the district serves.
    The bill changes eligibility criteria for the program to 
allow for different organizations--specifically, community 
organizations made-up of tribal leaders--to apply for grants in 
the event that districts decide not to pursue formula grants 
under this part. The bill also encourages activities that--

     Support the restoration of Native American 
languages.
     Prevent violence, suicide, and substances abuse.
     Incorporate culturally and linguistically 
appropriate content into classroom instruction.
     Provide access to high-quality early childhood 
education programs.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Eligible Entities:

         Districts who serve at least 10 Indian 
        students.
         Indian Tribes (if districts do not apply).
         Indian Community-Based Organizations (if 
        districts and tribes do not apply).
         A consortium of the above.
Subpart 2--Special Programs and Projects to Improve Educational 
        Opportunities for Indian Children and Youth
    The committee bill continues support for projects to 
develop, test, and demonstrate effectiveness of programs and 
services to improve the educational opportunities and 
achievement of Indian students.
    The bill enhances an existing focus on early childhood by 
allowing grantees to support high-quality early childhood 
education programs that are effective in preparing children to 
be achieving at grade level by the end of elementary school.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration: 3 years with an opportunity to extend 
for 2 additional years if the grantee meets objectives set by 
the Secretary.
     Eligible Entities: States, districts, tribes, 
tribal organizations, tribal colleges, and BIE schools.
Subpart 3--National Activities
    The committee bill establishes a new program requiring the 
Secretary to award grants to States, districts, and Indian 
entities to support Native American language programs and 
Native American language restoration programs.
    The bill also directs the Secretary to conduct a study to 
improve the collaboration between States and districts, other 
relevant State and local agencies, and Indian tribes in the 
provision of services to Indian students.

Part B--Native Hawaiian Education; Alaska Native Education

Subpart 1--Native Hawaiian Education
    The committee bill continues support for a consolidated 
program of competitive grants to Native Hawaiian educational or 
community-based organizations, or other public or private 
nonprofit organizations with experience in operating Native 
Hawaiian programs. Changes in the bill expand the allowable 
uses of the grant to include the development of a statewide 
system of early childhood education programs to support the 
healthy development of Native Hawaiian children.
    The committee bill also continues support for a Native 
Hawaiian Education Council. Changes in the bill focus the 
Native Hawaiian Education Council's efforts on addressing the 
educational and workforce needs of Native Hawaiian students by 
redesigning the composition of the Native Hawaiian Education 
Council and refocusing its purpose to ensure proper 
coordination of educational and related services and programs 
available to Native Hawaiian students. The council will also 
ensure that organizations that receive competitive grants under 
this part are regularly evaluated based on objective, 
quantifiable measures to determine effectiveness.
Subpart 2--Alaska Native Education
    The committee bill continues support for programs to 
support educational opportunity for Alaska Native students. The 
bill adds maximizing Alaska Native participation in the 
planning and management of Native Alaskan programs to the 
purposes of Alaska Native Education grants. The bill 
prioritizes Alaska Native organizations in the awarding of 
grants and contracts. The bill also expands the list of 
permissive activities under the grant to include a focus on 
improving outcomes for at-risk students attending schools 
operated by tribes. Further, application requirements have been 
updated to promote accountable and meaningful partnerships with 
Alaska Native organizations.
    Grant Stipulations:

     Duration:
     Eligible Entities:

         Alaska native organizations.
         Entities with experience in development or 
        operating Alaska Native programs.
         Cultural and community-based organizations.
         A consortium of the above.

                         TITLE VIII--IMPACT AID

    The committee bill continues to provide support for the 
Impact Aid program. The Impact Aid program currently provides 
payments to local educational agencies that are financially 
disadvantaged by Federal land ownership (e.g. school districts 
where large numbers of students live in non-taxable housing on 
a military base). For local educational agencies impacted by 
the Federal property in their districts, this program ensures 
an equitable allocation of dollars by eliminating the 
subjectivity caused by the requirement to determine the 
``highest and best use'' of land. For local educational 
agencies impacted by the federally connected children in their 
districts, the bill addresses issues caused by the 
privatization of military housing. The bill also makes changes 
to foundation payments and the formula used when the program 
cannot be fully funded. This program has historically been 
behind in providing payments; this bill incorporates language 
from a bill introduced by Senator Murray requiring the 
Department of Education to pay the full amount due in a timely 
fashion. Many of these changes were made in the 2012 National 
Defense Authorization Act, but with a sunset of 2 years. This 
bill makes the changes permanent.

                      TITLE IX--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Evaluation of Programs
    In current law, the Secretary's evaluation authority for 
programs, and the amount he could reserve for such evaluation, 
was restricted either by title or by program. We have 
consolidated the evaluation authority for each program into one 
section giving the Secretary the authority to carry out high-
quality evaluations of all programs and related policies, with 
a focus on rigorous impact evaluations where feasible and 
appropriate. For this purpose, the bill reserves not less than 
1, and not more than 3 percent, from all other programs (only 1 
percent from title I).
Definitions
    This title includes the general definitions for the Act. 
Definitions of particular importance include: professional 
growth and improvement system (teacher and principal evaluation 
systems), young child (children aged birth to kindergarten), 
professional development, expanded learning time, graduation 
rate, highly qualified teacher, positive behavioral 
interventions and supports, high-need school, and early 
childhood education program.
Other Relevant Provisions
    Other provisions include the authorization for the 
Secretary to issue waivers, school prayer guidance, and the 
unsafe school choice option. The unsafe school option allows 
the family of a child who has been a victim of a crime in or on 
the grounds of the school to choose to attend another school in 
the same LEA.

TITLE X: COMMISSION ON EFFECTIVE REGULATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEMS FOR 
                             PUBLIC SCHOOLS

    This bill establishes a Commission on Effective Regulation 
and Assessment Systems for Public Schools. The Commission will: 
(1) examine the regulatory requirements on elementary and 
secondary education at the Federal, State, and local levels; 
(2) make recommendations on how to align and improve 
requirements in such regulations; (3) examine the quality and 
purpose of current requirements; and (4) make recommendations 
to improve and align assessment systems to provide meaningful 
information and improve student achievement, teacher 
performance, and innovation.

                 TITLE XI--AMENDMENTS TO OTHER STATUTES

McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Program

    The McKinney-Vento Act's Education for Homeless Children 
and Youth (EHCY) program was created to remove the barriers to 
education caused by homelessness. This bill improves the 
program by reinforcing and expanding key provisions, including 
school stability, enrollment, and support for academic 
achievement. Specifically, this reauthorization:

     Maintains the requirement for schools to keep 
homeless children and youth in their original schools, unless 
the parent, guardian, or unaccompanied youth wishes to change 
schools, or unless an individualized, best-interest 
determination by the school supports a change of schools;
     Addresses credit-accrual problems, increases 
access to credit-recovery opportunities, and supports the 
provision of high-quality early care and education programs and 
services to young homeless children;
     Clarifies the law to help defray costs associated 
with transporting homeless students to the school of origin;
     Describes a clear and accessible dispute 
resolution process for parents;
     Ensures homeless students access the full range of 
academic support opportunities offered by schools; and
     Enhances school districts' ability to identify and 
serve homeless children and youth by requiring professional 
development, training, resources and time for homeless liaisons 
so they can carry out the duties required by the Act.

                         VIII. Additional Views

Additional Views of Senators Alexander, Enzi, Burr, Isakson, Paul, 
        Hatch, Roberts, Murkowski, Kirk, and Scott

                              INTRODUCTION

    Over the last decade, the U.S. Department of Education has 
become so congested with Federal mandates that it has become, 
in effect, a National school board. This congestion of mandates 
is caused by three things: No Child Left Behind, Race to the 
Top, and the Obama administration's unprecedented use of 
waivers to impose on States new requirements not authorized in 
law.
    In 2001, Republicans and Democrats in Congress and 
President George W. Bush worked together to enact a 
reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
(ESEA) to improve our Nation's schools. They called it No Child 
Left Behind (NCLB). The law responded to concerns that our 
schools were not adequately preparing our young people for the 
future, that many students were being ignored, and that 
billions' of American taxpayer dollars were not producing good 
results. Among many things, it imposed a complicated system for 
deciding whether schools were succeeding or failing based on 
State test results, sanctions for schools missing their 
performance targets, and a requirement that each of our 
Nation's 3.2 million teachers be ``highly qualified'' as 
defined by Washington. The goal was laudable enough: All 50 
million students in nearly 100,000 public schools were to be 
proficient in reading and math by the end of the 2013-14 school 
year. Unfortunately, NCLB inserted too many Washington rules 
and regulations into matters that should have been left to 
communities, parents, and classroom teachers.
    No Child Left Behind has had some positive results. It has 
helped create an environment in which many States have put in 
place challenging standards in reading and math and are 
conducting annual tests aligned with those standards. All 
States are participating in the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress--``the Nation's report card''--providing a 
reliable audit of the rigor of States' standards and tests. The 
law encouraged school choice and the growth of charter schools, 
giving more parents the opportunity to choose the best school 
for their child. Most importantly, States, local districts, and 
schools are now reporting annually on student achievement 
overall and for each subgroup of students based on race, 
ethnicity, family income, English proficiency, and disability 
status. As a result of this so-called ``disaggregation'' of 
data, parents, State legislators, and governors are better able 
to identify struggling schools and populations and are holding 
their districts, schools, principals, and teachers accountable.
    However, data from the last 10 years confirm that the 
Federal mandates and regulations NCLB imposed upon local 
schools have not worked as well as the law's authors had hoped. 
Federal funding for programs under the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act increased by 64 percent between 2000 and 2012, 
but insufficient progress was made toward the goal of universal 
student proficiency in core academic subjects. NCLB armed 
parents and policymakers with better data on which to base 
their decisions, but its prescriptive Federal mandates have too 
often hamstrung their ability to make the right decisions for 
their schools. This experience makes it clear that local 
schools cannot be fixed from Washington--only principals, 
teachers, parents, and communities can improve their schools.
    In 2009, President Obama and congressional Democrats 
created the competitive grant program known as Race to the Top. 
This program provided grants to States to pursue aggressive 
education reforms such as raising standards, improving tests, 
evaluating and rewarding outstanding teaching, and expanding 
charter schools. Unfortunately, the Administration used the 
program to essentially mandate that the 46 applicant States, 
along with the District of Columbia, adopt the Common Core 
State Standards in reading and math, federally defined 
turnaround models for failing schools, and prescriptive teacher 
and principal evaluation systems.
    Congress's failure to fix NCLB has now allowed the 
Administration to turn its waiver authority under Title IX of 
ESEA--under which States may request relief from unworkable 
Federal mandates--into a conditional process in which the U.S. 
Secretary of Education dictates what States must do in order to 
obtain that relief. To obtain a waiver today, States must 
either adopt the Common Core standards in reading and math or 
prove to the U.S. Department of Education's satisfaction that 
their standards would prepare a high school graduate for 
college or careers, accept new Federal definitions of how the 
State should measure a school's performance, and develop 
statewide teacher and principal evaluation systems that conform 
to Federal regulations. The law does not give the Secretary the 
authority to impose on States requirements that were developed 
in the executive branch without congressional approval. Yet the 
mandates in NCLB have become so dysfunctional that States are 
effectively forced into the waiver process: 47 States plus the 
District of Columbia have applied.
    The latest developments in the Administration's waiver 
policy are even more troubling. In August 2013, the Secretary 
granted waivers to eight California school districts after 
previously denying a waiver application from the State of 
California itself, despite the fact that the law clearly States 
that school districts seeking waivers must apply to the 
Secretary through their States. This new policy threatens to 
undermine the ability of States to pursue a coherent reform 
agenda and is only the latest evidence of the Department of 
Education having assumed for itself the role of national school 
board.

              STRENGTHENING AMERICA'S SCHOOLS ACT OF 2013

    Instead of reversing the congestion of Federal mandates 
that has built up over the past decade, the 1,150-page 
Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013 would not only 
freeze these mandates in place, it would expand the Federal 
role in elementary and secondary education. The committee-
passed bill suggests Congress and the Federal Government do not 
trust parents, classroom teachers, school administrators, and 
States to care about and educate their children. It reinforces 
NCLB's mistaken notion that Washington must do it for them.
    Although this bill eliminates NCLB's onerous Adequate 
Yearly Progress mandate, it replaces it with an equally 
unworkable regime requiring States to set prescriptive 
performance goals that meet Federal requirements and must be 
negotiated with Washington. It also would force States to 
identify and fix more than 20 percent of public schools based 
on federally defined measures of student performance and 
growth, achievement gaps, and high school graduation rates. 
Furthermore, this bill doubles down on the inflexible school 
turnaround strategies that are mandated under Race to the Top 
and the Administration's waiver program despite the absence of 
research to support their effectiveness. We believe school 
turnaround models cannot be so thoughtfully constructed from 
Washington to respond to the unique circumstances facing 
thousands of schools across the country. Any attempt to do so 
will either be overly prescriptive or produce a lowest-common-
denominator compromise that forces local districts to engage in 
a meaningless exercise in complying with Federal regulations.
    This bill further micromanages States by requiring them to 
receive Washington approval of their standards and measures of 
student growth, prove to the U.S. Department of Education the 
adequacy of their assessments, and force students with 
disabilities to take tests that may be inappropriate. We 
believe that these steps will only exacerbate concerns about 
the federalization of what was initially a voluntary, State-led 
effort to adopt common standards and assessments.
    Under this bill, every one of our approximately 15,000 
local school districts in the United States would be required 
to implement the same federally defined approach to evaluating 
teachers and principals, based in significant part on student 
test scores and other prescribed elements. While we believe 
that strong evaluation systems are an essential component of 
education reform, the Federal Government should not mandate 
these systems or define how they are to be developed and 
implemented at the State or local level.
    This bill purports to elevate the importance of teacher 
effectiveness over the paper credentials that are the basis of 
the current Federal definition of a ``Highly Qualified 
Teacher.'' Yet it retains the Highly Qualified Teacher 
requirements from NCLB for almost all new teachers, providing 
only limited flexibility for teachers in rural schools. Under 
this bill, even if a teacher is found to be highly effective 
under a State or district evaluation system, that teacher would 
still have to go through a complicated bureaucratic process in 
order to demonstrate that they are ``highly qualified'' based 
on State licensure requirements, education credentials, and 
test results. There was no research evidence to support these 
Federal requirements when they were first put in place under 
NCLB, and there is none now. By continuing to include the 
Highly Qualified Teacher provision in Federal law, this bill 
would continue to keep many talented individuals from entering 
the teaching profession.
    While NCLB demonstrated that focused data collection and 
reporting are important accountability tools, this bill adds 
more than 150 new reporting elements, including, but not 
limited to, school-level information on student pregnancy, 
college remediation rates, incidents of student drug use, 
detentions, suspensions, class size, and the salaries of inter-
scholastic athletic coaches. The Council of Chief State School 
Officers estimates that the new reporting requirements in title 
I of this bill alone would require States to collect, analyze, 
and report almost 46,000 data elements annually. Aside from the 
burden this would place on our Nation's schools, it is doubtful 
that the U.S. Department of Education has the capacity to 
analyze all this data or to use it constructively.
    This bill recognizes a legitimate concern about the 
inequitable distribution of Federal school funding, 
particularly the formula under title I-A, which is intended to 
distribute funds to the neediest students in low-income 
schools. Due to a flaw known as the ``comparability loophole,'' 
the current formula often results in the money going to schools 
serving less disadvantaged students. However, this bill seeks 
to address this problem in the wrong way. Rather than improving 
the flawed Federal title I-A formula to ensure that Federal 
funds follow the poorest students to the schools they attend, 
this bill seeks to micromanage how States and local districts 
allocate their own State and local funds.
    By requiring that ``comparability'' be demonstrated based 
on district expenditures, this bill would cause dramatic 
upheaval in our Nation's school finances and place a 
substantial burden on States and local school districts. 
According to the Council of Great City Schools, complying with 
this provision would cost 63 of our Nation's large urban 
districts $2 billion of their own dollars. This amounts to a 
direct tax on our Nation's poorest communities and is one of 
the starkest examples of how this bill moves towards 
establishing a national school board. It seeks to leverage the 
Federal Government's limited investment, which represents 
approximately 10 percent of public school funding, to tell 
local districts how they must allocate the 90 percent of 
funding that comes from State and local sources. As the U.S. 
Supreme Court explained in its 2012 decision, National 
Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, which struck 
down the expansion of Medicaid under the Patient Protection and 
Affordable Care Act, such Federal policies amount to a ``gun to 
the head'' that crosses the line between encouragement and 
coercion and represents ``economic dragooning that leaves the 
States with no real option but to acquiesce.''
    In addition to further expanding the role and power of the 
U.S. Department of Education, the Strengthening America's 
Schools Act of 2013 fails to address the lack of return on the 
American taxpayer's education investment and the dire condition 
of the Federal purse. Rather than eliminating duplicative or 
ineffective programs and providing more flexibility to States 
and local school districts through program consolidation, this 
bill creates 28 new programs and dedicates nearly 500 pages to 
new competitive grant programs. Based on the President's budget 
proposal and bills that other members have introduced to 
authorize funding for these programs, these additions could 
increase Federal spending under ESEA by $3 billion annually. 
This would only divert limited Federal resources away from the 
States, school districts, and schools that need it most.
    Finally, this bill leaves the Secretary's waiver authority 
virtually untouched. If enacted into law, it would provide no 
relief to the 41 States and the District of Columbia with 
waivers until those waivers expire. And the nine States without 
waivers would have to implement most of the same Federal 
mandates. While disguised as offering flexibility from the 
requirements of NCLB, in reality this bill requires that all 
States submit to the subjective judgments of unelected 
bureaucrats and unaccountable peer review panels in Washington, 
DC.

                         A BETTER SCHOOLS PLAN

    Republican members of this committee offered and 
unanimously supported a 220-page alternative proposal that 
moves in a different direction--toward helping children learn 
what they need to know by restoring responsibility to States 
and communities and giving teachers and parents freedom, 
flexibility, and choice. It is called the ``Every Child Ready 
for College or Career Act.''
    The Every Child Ready for College or Career Act emphasizes 
State and local decisionmaking. It takes Washington out of the 
business of deciding whether local schools are succeeding or 
failing, freeing all schools from NCLB's Adequate Yearly 
Progress mandate. Rather than Federal rules on how States and 
local districts identify and fix public schools based on 
performance measures and turnaround strategies defined by 
Washington, this alternative proposal asks States to develop 
their own systems to identify schools that need assistance in 
meeting State-developed standards, as well as any other 
performance measures determined by States, and asks local 
districts to develop their own strategies for improving these 
schools.
    Instead of mandating that States adopt standards that 
conform to a new Federal definition of ``college and career 
ready,'' this proposal maintains the current requirement that 
States have challenging academic standards and annual 
assessments in reading, math, and science, including 
alternative and modified standards and assessments for students 
with disabilities. It prohibits the U.S. Secretary of Education 
from specifying, defining, or prescribing the standards or 
measures that States or school districts use to establish, 
implement, or improve their standards and assessments. The 
Secretary also may not require or coerce States or local 
districts to adopt common standards, assessments, or 
accountability systems.
    This proposal recognizes that funding to local school 
districts under Title I of ESEA has drifted from its intended 
purpose of helping the poorest students and gives States the 
option to let title I funds follow low-income children to the 
public school they attend. In doing so it provides an 
opportunity for States to address the formula flaw that often 
diverts these funds to schools serving wealthier families. It 
does not, however, impose a new mandate that would either force 
involuntary teacher transfers or cause a dramatic upheaval in 
how local schools are funded, as would occur under the 
majority's bill. It also makes it easier for States to offer 
low-income parents more choice in finding the right public 
school for their children.
    The Every Child Ready for College or Career Act eliminates 
the Federal ``Highly Qualified Teacher'' requirement 
altogether, restoring States' control over who is allowed to 
teach in their schools. It encourages, but does not require, 
States and local school districts to create teacher and 
principal evaluation systems that relate teacher performance to 
student achievement and other factors determined by the State, 
by allowing them to use funds under Title II of ESEA for that 
purpose. The Federal Teacher Incentive Fund grant program would 
continue to support innovative teacher and principal 
performance-based compensation programs.
    Rather than allowing decisionmakers in Washington, DC, to 
determine funding priorities, the Every Child Ready for College 
or Career Act consolidates 62 existing programs authorized by 
NCLB or funded by subsequent appropriations bills. It gives 
those funds back to States and local school districts in the 
form of two flexible and streamlined block grants to better 
meet the unique and specific needs of students, as determined 
at the local level. It also eliminates the current 
``maintenance of effort'' requirement, giving States more 
flexibility to decide where and when to make targeted 
investments in education.
    Finally, this alternative proposal preserves the original 
intent of the waiver authority under title IX of the law. The 
Secretary is authorized to waive portions of the law that 
stifle State and local innovation, but that authority is 
limited. The Every Child Ready for College or Career Act 
specifies that States and local districts may submit 
applications that will enable them to improve student academic 
achievement. The Secretary may review those applications and 
shall approve them with deference to State and local judgments 
on the best way to do this. The Secretary may not, however, use 
the waiver authority to become a national school board and 
mandate performance targets, standards and assessments, growth 
models, teacher and principal evaluations, or any other 
conditions not already specified in the law. Furthermore, while 
local school districts may individually or collectively apply 
for waivers with the support of their State, the Secretary is 
prohibited from circumventing the legal authority of States and 
their governors when granting waiver requests.

                               CONCLUSION

    The accumulation of Federal mandates over the past decade 
has turned the U.S. Department of Education into a national 
school board for our 100,000 public schools. Today, States must 
come to Washington to get approval for their plans to improve 
their schools, and unelected bureaucrats make decisions that 
determine how 50 million students will be educated. This 
unfortunate situation is partly attributable to the failure of 
Congress to fix the problems with No Child Left Behind. It also 
reflects this Administration's use of competitive grants and 
waivers to coerce and impose restrictive mandates on States and 
local districts.
    The Democrats on this committee have offered a 1,150-page 
plan that would not only maintain these mandates, but expand 
them, by setting Federal performance targets, mandating common 
standards and assessments, requiring federally defined teacher 
and principal evaluation systems, creating 28 new programs and 
150 new reporting requirements, and maintaining the Secretary 
of Education's unchecked power to grant waivers based on 
conditions not specified in the law. Their Strengthening 
America's Schools Act of 2013 seeks to codify a range of 
policies that have supplanted the judgment of governors, 
legislators, school boards, teachers, and parents.
    Committee Republicans offered instead a 220-page proposal 
that emphasizes State and local decisionmaking. It gets 
Washington out of the business of deciding whether local 
schools are succeeding or failing, prohibits the U.S. Secretary 
of Education from prescribing standards or accountability 
systems for States, makes it easier for States to offer low-
income parents more choice in finding the right public school 
for their children, encourages States and local districts to 
create teacher and principal evaluation programs free of 
Federal mandates, and offers more flexibility in spending 
Federal education dollars, while cutting waste.
    This is not a proposal just for Republicans. We believe 
this proposal represents the views of governors leading the 
charge for education reform, State legislators who are working 
to improve their local schools, teachers who value the freedom 
to teach, and parents who want the best education possible for 
their children.
    While the process and product of this committee markup was 
decidedly partisan, with majority and minority members offering 
fundamentally different views about the role of the Federal 
Government in elementary and secondary education, Senate 
Republicans are committed to moving forward on reauthorizing 
ESEA and fixing NCLB.
    We welcome an opportunity to have a full and vigorous 
debate through regular order that enables the entire Senate to 
participate in shaping this legislation. We look forward to 
such a debate and hope that it leads to a product that frees 
States, local school districts, teachers, parents, and students 
from the outdated and unwarranted mandates of NCLB.

                                   Lamar Alexander.
                                   Michael B. Enzi.
                                      Richard Burr.
                                    Johnny Isakson.
                                         Rand Paul.
                                       Orrin Hatch.
                                       Pat Roberts.
                                    Lisa Murkowski.
                                         Mark Kirk.
                                         Tim Scott.

                      IX. Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
the bill as reported are shown as follows: Existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in [black brackets], new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965''.

[SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    [The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

[Sec. 1. Short title.
[Sec. 2. Table of contents.

    [TITLE I--IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED

[Sec. 1001. Statement of purpose.
[Sec. 1002. Authorization of appropriations.
[Sec. 1003. School improvement.
[Sec. 1004. State administration.

[Part A--Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies

                 [Subpart 1--Basic Program Requirements

[Sec. 1111. State plans.
[Sec. 1112. Local educational agency plans.
[Sec. 1113. Eligible school attendance areas.
[Sec. 1114. Schoolwide programs.
[Sec. 1115. Targeted assistance schools.
[Sec. 1116. Academic assessment and local educational agency and school 
          improvement.
[Sec. 1117. School support and recognition.
[Sec. 1118. Parental involvement.
[Sec. 1119. Qualifications for teachers and paraprofessionals.
[Sec. 1120. Participation of children enrolled in private schools.
[Sec. 1120A. Fiscal requirements.
[Sec. 1120B. Coordination requirements.

                         [Subpart 2--Allocations

[Sec. 1121. Grants for the outlying areas and the Secretary of the 
          Interior.
[Sec. 1122. Allocations to States.
[Sec. 1124. Basic grants to local educational agencies.
[Sec. 1124A. Concentration grants to local educational agencies.
[Sec. 1125. Targeted grants to local educational agencies.
[Sec. 1125AA. Adequacy of funding of targeted grants to local 
          educational agencies in fiscal years after fiscal year 2001.
[Sec. 1125A. Education finance incentive grant program.
[Sec. 1126. Special allocation procedures.
[Sec. 1127. Carryover and waiver.

           [Part B--Student Reading Skills Improvement Grants

                        [Subpart 1--Reading First

[Sec. 1201. Purposes.
[Sec. 1202. Formula grants to State educational agencies.
[Sec. 1203. State formula grant applications.
[Sec. 1204. Targeted assistance grants.
[Sec. 1205. External evaluation.
[Sec. 1206. National activities.
[Sec. 1207. Information dissemination.
[Sec. 1208. Definitions.

                     [Subpart 2--Early Reading First

[Sec. 1221. Purposes; definitions.
[Sec. 1222. Local Early Reading First grants.
[Sec. 1223. Federal administration.
[Sec. 1224. Information dissemination.
[Sec. 1225. Reporting requirements.
[Sec. 1226. Evaluation.

   [Subpart 3--William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Programs

[Sec. 1231. Statement of purpose.
[Sec. 1232. Program authorized.
[Sec. 1233. State educational agency programs.
[Sec. 1234. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 1235. Program elements.
[Sec. 1236. Eligible participants.
[Sec. 1237. Applications.
[Sec. 1238. Award of subgrants.
[Sec. 1239. Evaluation.
[Sec. 1240. Indicators of program quality.
[Sec. 1241. Research.
[Sec. 1242. Construction.

         [Subpart 4--Improving Literacy Through School Libraries

[Sec. 1251. Improving literacy through school libraries.

                [Part C--Education of Migratory Children

[Sec. 1301. Program purpose.
[Sec. 1302. Program authorized.
[Sec. 1303. State allocations.
[Sec. 1304. State applications; services.
[Sec. 1305. Secretarial approval; peer review.
[Sec. 1306. Comprehensive needs assessment and service-delivery plan; 
          authorized activities.
[Sec. 1307. Bypass.
[Sec. 1308. Coordination of migrant education activities.
[Sec. 1309. Definitions.

[Part D--Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth who 
                  are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-risk

[Sec. 1401. Purpose and program authorization.
[Sec. 1402. Payments for programs under this part.

                    [Subpart 1--State Agency Programs

[Sec. 1411. Eligibility.
[Sec. 1412. Allocation of funds.
[Sec. 1413. State reallocation of funds.
[Sec. 1414. State plan and State agency applications.
[Sec. 1415. Use of funds.
[Sec. 1416. Institution-wide projects.
[Sec. 1417. Three-year programs or projects.
[Sec. 1418. Transition services.
[Sec. 1419. Evaluation; technical assistance; annual model program.

                    [Subpart 2--Local Agency Programs

[Sec. 1421. Purpose.
[Sec. 1422. Programs operated by local educational agencies.
[Sec. 1423. Local educational agency applications.
[Sec. 1424. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 1425. Program requirements for correctional facilities receiving 
          funds under this section.
[Sec. 1426. Accountability.

                     [Subpart 3--General Provisions

[Sec. 1431. Program evaluations.
[Sec. 1432. Definitions.

                 [Part E--National Assessment of Title I

[Sec. 1501. Evaluations.
[Sec. 1502. Demonstrations of innovative practices.
[Sec. 1503. Assessment evaluation.
[Sec. 1504. Close Up fellowship program.

                  [Part F--Comprehensive School Reform

[Sec. 1601. Purpose.
[Sec. 1602. Program authorization.
[Sec. 1603. State applications.
[Sec. 1604. State use of funds.
[Sec. 1605. Local applications.
[Sec. 1606. Local use of funds.
[Sec. 1607. Evaluation and reports.
[Sec. 1608. Quality initiatives.

                  [Part G--Advanced Placement Programs

[Sec. 1701. Short title.
[Sec. 1702. Purposes.
[Sec. 1703. Funding distribution rule.
[Sec. 1704. Advanced placement test fee program.
[Sec. 1705. Advanced placement incentive program grants.
[Sec. 1706. Supplement, not supplant.
[Sec. 1707. Definitions.

                   [Part H--School Dropout Prevention

[Sec. 1801. Short title.
[Sec. 1802. Purpose.
[Sec. 1803. Authorization of appropriations.

                [Subpart 1--Coordinated National Strategy

[Sec. 1811. National activities.

            [Subpart 2--School Dropout Prevention Initiative

[Sec. 1821. Definitions.
[Sec. 1822. Program authorized.
[Sec. 1823. Applications.
[Sec. 1824. State reservation.
[Sec. 1825. Strategies and capacity building.
[Sec. 1826. Selection of local educational agencies for subgrants.
[Sec. 1827. Community based organizations.
[Sec. 1828. Technical assistance.
[Sec. 1829. School dropout rate calculation.
[Sec. 1830. Reporting and accountability.

                       [Part I--General Provisions

[Sec. 1901. Federal regulations.
[Sec. 1902. Agreements and records.
[Sec. 1903. State administration.
[Sec. 1904. Local educational agency spending audits.
[Sec. 1905. Prohibition against Federal mandates, direction, or control.
[Sec. 1906. Rule of construction on equalized spending.
[Sec. 1907. State report on dropout data.
[Sec. 1908. Regulations for sections 1111 and 1116.

[TITLE II--PREPARING, TRAINING, AND RECRUITING HIGH QUALITY TEACHERS AND 
                               PRINCIPALS

       [Part A--Teacher and Principal Training and Recruiting Fund

[Sec. 2101. Purpose.
[Sec. 2102. Definitions.
[Sec. 2103. Authorizations of appropriations.

                      [Subpart 1--Grants to States

[Sec. 2111. Allotments to States.
[Sec. 2112. State applications.
[Sec. 2113. State use of funds.

           [Subpart 2--Subgrants to Local Educational Agencies

[Sec. 2121. Allocations to local educational agencies.
[Sec. 2122. Local applications and needs assessment.
[Sec. 2123. Local use of funds.

             [Subpart 3--Subgrants to Eligible Partnerships

[Sec. 2131. Definitions.
[Sec. 2132. Subgrants.
[Sec. 2133. Applications.
[Sec. 2134. Use of funds.

                       [Subpart 4--Accountability

[Sec. 2141. Technical assistance and accountability.

                     [Subpart 5--National Activities

[Sec. 2151. National activities of demonstrated effectiveness.

              [Part B--Mathematics and Science Partnerships

[Sec. 2201. Purpose; definitions.
[Sec. 2202. Grants for mathematics and science partnerships.
[Sec. 2203. Authorization of appropriations.

                 [Part C--Innovation for Teacher Quality

                   [Subpart 1--Transitions to Teaching

  [[Chapter A (relating to Troops-To-Teachers Program) was repealed by 
          section 541(d) of division A of Public Law 112-239.]

               [CHAPTER B--TRANSITION TO TEACHING PROGRAM

[Sec. 2311. Purposes.
[Sec. 2312. Definitions.
[Sec. 2313. Grant program.
[Sec. 2314. Evaluation and accountability for recruiting and retaining 
          teachers.
                     [CHAPTER C--GENERAL PROVISIONS

[Sec. 2321. Authorization of appropriations.

                  [Subpart 2--National Writing Project

[Sec. 2331. Purposes.
[Sec. 2332. National Writing Project.

                       [Subpart 3--Civic Education

[Sec. 2341. Short title.
[Sec. 2342. Purpose.
[Sec. 2343. General authority.
[Sec. 2344. We the People program.
[Sec. 2345. Cooperative civic education and economic education exchange 
          programs.
[Sec. 2346. Authorization of appropriations.

          [Subpart 4--Teaching of Traditional American History

[Sec. 2351. Establishment of program.
[Sec. 2352. Authorization of appropriations.

                [Subpart 5--Teacher Liability Protection

[Sec. 2361. Short title.
[Sec. 2362. Purpose.
[Sec. 2363. Definitions.
[Sec. 2364. Applicability.
[Sec. 2365. Preemption and election of State nonapplicability.
[Sec. 2366. Limitation on liability for teachers.
[Sec. 2367. Allocation of responsibility for noneconomic loss.
[Sec. 2368. Effective date.

             [Part D--Enhancing Education Through Technology

[Sec. 2401. Short title.
[Sec. 2402. Purposes and goals.
[Sec. 2403. Definitions.
[Sec. 2404. Authorization of appropriations.

              [Subpart 1--State and Local Technology Grants

[Sec. 2411. Allotment and reallotment.
[Sec. 2412. Use of allotment by State.
[Sec. 2413. State applications.
[Sec. 2414. Local applications.
[Sec. 2415. State activities.
[Sec. 2416. Local activities.

               [Subpart 2--National Technology Activities

[Sec. 2421. National activities.
[Sec. 2422. National education technology plan.

                  [Subpart 3--Ready-to-Learn Television

[Sec. 2431. Ready-to-Learn Television.

   [Subpart 4--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds for Schools

[Sec. 2441. Internet safety.

  [TITLE III--LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION FOR LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT AND 
                           IMMIGRANT STUDENTS

[Sec. 3001. Authorizations of appropriations; condition on effectiveness 
          of parts.

    [Part A--English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and 
                        Academic Achievement Act

[Sec. 3101. Short title.
[Sec. 3102. Purposes.

 [Subpart 1--Grants and Subgrants for English Language Acquisition and 
                          Language Enhancement

[Sec. 3111. Formula grants to States.
[Sec. 3112. Native American and Alaska Native children in school.
[Sec. 3113. State and specially qualified agency plans.
[Sec. 3114. Within-State allocations.
[Sec. 3115. Subgrants to eligible entities.
[Sec. 3116. Local plans.

              [Subpart 2--Accountability and Administration

[Sec. 3121. Evaluations.
[Sec. 3122. Achievement objectives and accountability.
[Sec. 3123. Reporting requirements.
[Sec. 3124. Coordination with related programs.
[Sec. 3125. Rules of construction.
[Sec. 3126. Legal authority under State law.
[Sec. 3127. Civil rights.
[Sec. 3128. Programs for Native Americans and Puerto Rico.
[Sec. 3129. Prohibition.

                     [Subpart 3--National Activities

[Sec. 3131. National professional development project.

                         [Subpart 4--Definitions

[Sec. 3141. Eligible entity.

      [Part B--Improving Language Instruction Educational Programs

[Sec. 3201. Short title.
[Sec. 3202. Purpose.
[Sec. 3203. Native American children in school.
[Sec. 3204. Residents of the territories and freely associated states.

             [Subpart 1--Program Development and Enhancement

[Sec. 3211. Financial assistance for language instruction educational 
          programs.
[Sec. 3212. Program enhancement activities.
[Sec. 3213. Comprehensive school and systemwide improvement activities.
[Sec. 3214. Applications.
[Sec. 3215. Capacity building.
[Sec. 3216. Programs for Native Americans and Puerto Rico.
[Sec. 3217. Evaluations.
[Sec. 3218. Construction.

           [Subpart 2--Research, Evaluation, and Dissemination

[Sec. 3221. Authority.
[Sec. 3222. Research.
[Sec. 3223. Academic excellence awards.
[Sec. 3224. State grant program.
[Sec. 3225. Instruction materials development.

                  [Subpart 3--Professional Development

[Sec. 3231. Professional development grants.

            [Subpart 4--Emergency Immigrant Education Program

[Sec. 3241. Purpose.
[Sec. 3242. State administrative costs.
[Sec. 3243. Withholding.
[Sec. 3244. State allotments.
[Sec. 3245. State applications.
[Sec. 3246. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 3247. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 3248. Reports.

                       [Subpart 5--Administration

[Sec. 3251. Release time.
[Sec. 3252. Notification.
[Sec. 3253. Coordination and reporting requirements.

                       [Part C--General Provisions

[Sec. 3301. Definitions.
[Sec. 3302. Parental notification.
[Sec. 3303. National Clearinghouse.
[Sec. 3304. Regulations.

                     [TITLE IV--21ST CENTURY SCHOOLS

           [Part A--Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities

[Sec. 4001. Short title.
[Sec. 4002. Purpose.
[Sec. 4003. Authorization of appropriations.

                        [Subpart 1--State Grants

[Sec. 4111. Reservations and allotments.
[Sec. 4112. Reservation of State funds for safe and drug-free schools.
[Sec. 4113. State application.
[Sec. 4114. Local educational agency program.
[Sec. 4115. Authorized activities.
[Sec. 4116. Reporting.
[Sec. 4117. Programs for Native Hawaiians.

                      [Subpart 2--National Programs

[Sec. 4121. Federal activities.
[Sec. 4122. Impact evaluation.
[Sec. 4123. Hate crime prevention.
[Sec. 4124. Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Advisory 
          Committee.
[Sec. 4125. National coordinator program.
[Sec. 4126. Community service grant program.
[Sec. 4127. School Security Technology and Resource Center.
[Sec. 4128. National Center for School and Youth Safety.
[Sec. 4129. Grants to reduce alcohol abuse.
[Sec. 4130. Mentoring programs.

                       [Subpart 3--Gun Possession

[Sec. 4141. Gun-free requirements.

                     [Subpart 4--General Provisions

[Sec. 4151. Definitions.
[Sec. 4152. Message and materials.
[Sec. 4153. Parental consent.
[Sec. 4154. Prohibited uses of funds.
[Sec. 4155. Transfer of school disciplinary records.

            [Part B--21st Century Community Learning Centers

[Sec. 4201. Purpose; definitions.
[Sec. 4202. Allotments to States.
[Sec. 4203. State application.
[Sec. 4204. Local competitive grant program.
[Sec. 4205. Local activities.
[Sec. 4206. Authorization of appropriations.

                  [Part C--Environmental Tobacco Smoke

[Sec. 4301. Short title.
[Sec. 4302. Definitions.
[Sec. 4303. Nonsmoking policy for children's services.
[Sec. 4304. Preemption.

  [TITLE V--PROMOTING INFORMED PARENTAL CHOICE AND INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS

                      [Part A--Innovative Programs

[Sec. 5101. Purposes, State and local responsibility.

                  [Subpart 1--State and Local Programs

[Sec. 5111. Allotment to States.
[Sec. 5112. Allocation to local educational agencies.

                       [Subpart 2--State Programs

[Sec. 5121. State uses of funds.
[Sec. 5122. State applications.

             [Subpart 3--Local Innovative Education Programs

[Sec. 5131. Local uses of funds.
[Sec. 5132. Administrative authority.
[Sec. 5133. Local applications.

                     [Subpart 4--General Provisions

[Sec. 5141. Maintenance of effort.
[Sec. 5142. Participation of children enrolled in private schools.
[Sec. 5143. Federal administration.
[Sec. 5144. Supplement, not supplant.
[Sec. 5145. Definitions.
[Sec. 5146. Authorization of appropriations.

                     [Part B--Public Charter Schools

                   [Subpart 1--Charter School Programs

[Sec. 5201. Purpose.
[Sec. 5202. Program authorized.
[Sec. 5203. Applications.
[Sec. 5204. Administration.
[Sec. 5205. National activities.
[Sec. 5206. Federal formula allocation during first year and for 
          successive enrollment expansions.
[Sec. 5207. Solicitation of input from charter school operators.
[Sec. 5208. Records transfer.
[Sec. 5209. Paperwork reduction.
[Sec. 5210. Definitions.
[Sec. 5211. Authorization of appropriations.

  [Subpart 2--Credit Enhancement Initiatives To Assist Charter School 
           Facility Acquisition, Construction, and Renovation

[Sec. 5221. Purpose.
[Sec. 5222. Grants to eligible entities.
[Sec. 5223. Applications.
[Sec. 5224. Charter school objectives.
[Sec. 5225. Reserve account.
[Sec. 5226. Limitation on administrative costs.
[Sec. 5227. Audits and reports.
[Sec. 5228. No full faith and credit for grantee obligations.
[Sec. 5229. Recovery of funds.
[Sec. 5230. Definitions.
[Sec. 5231. Authorization of appropriations.

           [Subpart 3--Voluntary Public School Choice Programs

[Sec. 5241. Grants.
[Sec. 5242. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 5243. Applications.
[Sec. 5244. Priorities.
[Sec. 5245. Requirements and voluntary participation.
[Sec. 5246. Evaluations.
[Sec. 5247. Definitions.
[Sec. 5248. Authorization of appropriations.

                   [Part C--Magnet Schools Assistance

[Sec. 5301. Findings and purpose.
[Sec. 5302. Definition.
[Sec. 5303. Program authorized.
[Sec. 5304. Eligibility.
[Sec. 5305. Applications and requirements.
[Sec. 5306. Priority.
[Sec. 5307. Use of funds.
[Sec. 5308. Prohibition.
[Sec. 5309. Limitations.
[Sec. 5310. Evaluations.
[Sec. 5311. Authorization of appropriations; reservation.

             [Part D--Fund for the Improvement of Education

[Sec. 5401. Authorization of appropriations.

            [Subpart 1--Fund for the Improvement of Education

[Sec. 5411. Programs authorized.
[Sec. 5412. Applications.
[Sec. 5413. Program requirements.
[Sec. 5414. Studies of national significance.

     [Subpart 2--Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Programs

[Sec. 5421. Elementary and secondary school counseling programs.

             [Subpart 3--Partnerships in Character Education

[Sec. 5431. Partnerships in Character Education program.

                [Subpart 4--Smaller Learning Communities

[Sec. 5441. Smaller learning communities.

   [Subpart 5--Reading Is Fundamental--Inexpensive Book Distribution 
                                 Program

[Sec. 5451. Inexpensive book distribution program for reading 
          motivation.

                [Subpart 6--Gifted and Talented Students

[Sec. 5461. Short title.
[Sec. 5462. Purpose.
[Sec. 5463. Rule of construction.
[Sec. 5464. Authorized programs.
[Sec. 5465. Program priorities.
[Sec. 5466. General provisions.

                    [Subpart 7--Star Schools Program

[Sec. 5471. Short title.
[Sec. 5472. Purposes.
[Sec. 5473. Grant program authorized.
[Sec. 5474. Applications.
[Sec. 5475. Other grant assistance.
[Sec. 5476. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 5477. Definitions.

                       [Subpart 8--Ready to Teach

[Sec. 5481. Grants.
[Sec. 5482. Application required.
[Sec. 5483. Reports and evaluation.
[Sec. 5484. Digital educational programming grants.
[Sec. 5485. Administrative costs.

             [Subpart 9--Foreign Language Assistance Program

[Sec. 5491. Short title.
[Sec. 5492. Program authorized.
[Sec. 5493. Applications.
[Sec. 5494. Elementary school foreign language incentive program.

                     [Subpart 10--Physical Education

[Sec. 5501. Short title.
[Sec. 5502. Purpose.
[Sec. 5503. Program authorized.
[Sec. 5504. Applications.
[Sec. 5505. Requirements.
[Sec. 5506. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 5507. Supplement, not supplant.

                [Subpart 11--Community Technology Centers

[Sec. 5511. Purpose and program authorization.
[Sec. 5512. Eligibility and application requirements.
[Sec. 5513. Uses of funds.

    [Subpart 12--Educational, Cultural, Apprenticeship, and Exchange 
  Programs for Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Their Historical 
              Whaling and Trading Partners in Massachusetts

[Sec. 5521. Short title.
[Sec. 5522. Findings and purposes.
[Sec. 5523. Program authorization.
[Sec. 5524. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 5525. Availability of funds.
[Sec. 5526. Definitions.

              [Subpart 13--Excellence in Economic Education

[Sec. 5531. Short title.
[Sec. 5532. Purpose and goals.
[Sec. 5533. Grant program authorized.
[Sec. 5534. Applications.
[Sec. 5535. Requirements.
[Sec. 5536. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 5537. Supplement, not supplant.

      [Subpart 14--Grants to Improve the Mental Health of Children

[Sec. 5541. Grants for the integration of schools and mental health 
          systems.
[Sec. 5542. Promotion of school readiness through early childhood 
          emotional and social development.

                     [Subpart 15--Arts in Education

[Sec. 5551. Assistance for arts education.

  [Subpart 16--Parental Assistance and Local Family Information Centers

[Sec. 5561. Purposes.
[Sec. 5562. Grants authorized.
[Sec. 5563. Applications.
[Sec. 5564. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 5565. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 5566. Local family information centers.

                [Subpart 17--Combatting Domestic Violence

[Sec. 5571. Grants to combat the impact of experiencing or witnessing 
          domestic violence on elementary and secondary school children.

             [Subpart 18--Healthy, High-Performance Schools

[Sec. 5581. Grant program authorized.
[Sec. 5582. State uses of funds.
[Sec. 5583. Local uses of funds.
[Sec. 5584. Report to Congress.
[Sec. 5585. Limitations.
[Sec. 5586. Healthy, high-performance school building defined.

[Subpart 19--Grants for Capital Expenses of Providing Equitable Services 
                       for Private School Students

[Sec. 5591. Grant program authorized.
[Sec. 5592. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 5593. Allotments to States.
[Sec. 5594. Subgrants to local educational agencies.
[Sec. 5595. Capital expenses defined.
[Sec. 5596. Termination.

    [Subpart 20--Additional Assistance for Certain Local Educational 
            Agencies Impacted by Federal Property Acquisition

[Sec. 5601. Reservation.
[Sec. 5602. Eligibility.
[Sec. 5603. Maximum amount.

               [Subpart 21--Women's Educational Equity Act

[Sec. 5611. Short title and findings.
[Sec. 5612. Statement of purpose.
[Sec. 5613. Programs authorized.
[Sec. 5614. Applications.
[Sec. 5615. Criteria and priorities.
[Sec. 5616. Report.
[Sec. 5617. Administration.
[Sec. 5618. Amount.

                [TITLE VI--FLEXIBILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY

                 [Part A--Improving Academic Achievement

                       [Subpart 1--Accountability

[Sec. 6111. Grants for State assessments and related activities.
[Sec. 6112. Grants for enhanced assessment instruments.
[Sec. 6113. Funding.

  [Subpart 2--Funding Transferability for State and Local Educational 
                                Agencies

[Sec. 6121. Short title.
[Sec. 6122. Purpose.
[Sec. 6123. Transferability of funds.

          [Subpart 3--State and Local Flexibility Demonstration

[Sec. 6131. Short title.
[Sec. 6132. Purpose.
[Sec. 6133. General provision.
                 [CHAPTER A--STATE FLEXIBILITY AUTHORITY

[Sec. 6141. State flexibility.
[Sec. 6142. Consolidation and use of funds.
[Sec. 6143. Performance review and penalties.
[Sec. 6144. Renewal of grant of flexibility authority.
               [CHAPTER B--LOCAL FLEXIBILITY DEMONSTRATION

[Sec. 6151. Local flexibility demonstration agreements.
[Sec. 6152. Consolidation and use of funds.
[Sec. 6153. Limitations on administrative expenditures.
[Sec. 6154. Performance review and penalties.
[Sec. 6155. Renewal of local flexibility demonstration agreement.
[Sec. 6156. Reports.

      [Subpart 4--State Accountability for Adequate Yearly Progress

[Sec. 6161. Accountability for adequate yearly progress.
[Sec. 6162. Peer review.
[Sec. 6163. Technical assistance.
[Sec. 6164. Report to Congress.

                   [Part B--Rural Education Initiative

[Sec. 6201. Short title.
[Sec. 6202. Purpose.

           [Subpart 1--Small, Rural School Achievement Program

[Sec. 6211. Use of applicable funding.
[Sec. 6212. Grant program authorized.
[Sec. 6213. Accountability.

             [Subpart 2--Rural and Low-Income School Program

[Sec. 6221. Program authorized.
[Sec. 6222. Uses of funds.
[Sec. 6223. Applications.
[Sec. 6224. Accountability.

                     [Subpart 3--General Provisions

[Sec. 6231. Annual average daily attendance determination.
[Sec. 6232. Supplement, not supplant.
[Sec. 6233. Rule of construction.
[Sec. 6234. orization of appropriations.

                       [Part C--General Provisions

[Sec. 6301. Prohibition against Federal mandates, direction, or control.
[Sec. 6302. Rule of construction on equalized spending.

    [TITLE VII--INDIAN, NATIVE HAWAIIAN, AND ALASKA NATIVE EDUCATION

                        [Part A--Indian Education

[Sec. 7101. Statement of policy.
[Sec. 7102. Purpose.

        [Subpart 1--Formula Grants to Local Educational Agencies

[Sec. 7111. Purpose.
[Sec. 7112. Grants to local educational agencies and tribes.
[Sec. 7113. Amount of grants.
[Sec. 7114. Applications.
[Sec. 7115. Authorized services and activities.
[Sec. 7116. Integration of services authorized.
[Sec. 7117. Student eligibility forms.
[Sec. 7118. Payments.
[Sec. 7119. State educational agency review.

    [Subpart 2--Special Programs and Projects To Improve Educational 
                    Opportunities for Indian Children

[Sec. 7121. Improvement of educational opportunities for Indian 
          children.
[Sec. 7122. Professional development for teachers and education 
          professionals.

                     [Subpart 3--National Activities

[Sec. 7131. National research activities.
[Sec. 7132. In-service training for teachers of Indian children.
[Sec. 7133. Fellowships for Indian students.
[Sec. 7134. Gifted and talented Indian students.
[Sec. 7135. Grants to tribes for education administrative planning and 
          development.
[Sec. 7136. Improvement of educational opportunities for adult Indians.

                   [Subpart 4--Federal Administration

[Sec. 7141. National Advisory Council on Indian Education.
[Sec. 7142. Peer review.
[Sec. 7143. Preference for Indian applicants.
[Sec. 7144. Minimum grant criteria.

        [Subpart 5--Definitions; Authorizations of Appropriations

[Sec. 7151. Definitions.
[Sec. 7152. Authorizations of appropriations.

                   [Part B--Native Hawaiian Education

[Sec. 7201. Short title.
[Sec. 7202. Findings.
[Sec. 7203. Purposes.
[Sec. 7204. Native Hawaiian Education Council and island councils.
[Sec. 7205. Program authorized.
[Sec. 7206. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 7207. Definitions.

                    [Part C--Aalaska Native Education

[Sec. 7301. Short title.
[Sec. 7302. Findings.
[Sec. 7303. Purposes.
[Sec. 7304. Program authorized.
[Sec. 7305. Administrative provisions.
[Sec. 7306. Definitions.

                         [TITLE VIII--IMPACT AID

[Sec. 8001. Purpose.
[Sec. 8002. Payments relating to Federal acquisition of real property.
[Sec. 8003. Payments for eligible federally connected children.
[Sec. 8004. Policies and procedures relating to children residing on 
          Indian lands.
[Sec. 8005. Application for payments under sections 8002 and 8003.
[Sec. 8007. Construction.
[Sec. 8008. Facilities.
[Sec. 8009. State consideration of payments in providing State aid.
[Sec. 8010. Federal administration.
[Sec. 8011. Administrative hearings and judicial review.
[Sec. 8012. Forgiveness of overpayments.
[Sec. 8013. Definitions.
[Sec. 8014. Authorization of appropriations.

                      [TITLE IX--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                          [Part A--Definitions

[Sec. 9101. Definitions.
[Sec. 9102. Applicability of title.
[Sec. 9103. Applicability to Bureau of Indian Affairs operated schools.

    [Part B--Flexibility in the use of Administrative and Other Funds

[Sec. 9201. Consolidation of State administrative funds for elementary 
          and secondary education programs.
[Sec. 9202. Single local educational agency States.
[Sec. 9203. Consolidation of funds for local administration.
[Sec. 9204. Consolidated set-aside for Department of the Interior funds.

 [Part C--Coordination of Programs; Consolidated State and Local Plans 
                            and Applications

[Sec. 9301. Purpose.
[Sec. 9302. Optional consolidated State plans or applications.
[Sec. 9303. Consolidated reporting.
[Sec. 9304. General applicability of State educational agency 
          assurances.
[Sec. 9305. Consolidated local plans or applications.
[Sec. 9306. Other general assurances.

                            [Part D--Waivers

[Sec. 9401. Waivers of statutory and regulatory requirements.

                       [Part E--Uniform Provisions

                       [Subpart 1--Private Schools

[Sec. 9501. Participation by private school children and teachers.
[Sec. 9502. Standards for by-pass.
[Sec. 9503. Complaint process for participation of private school 
          children.
[Sec. 9504. By-pass determination process.
[Sec. 9505. Prohibition against funds for religious worship or 
          instruction.
[Sec. 9506. Private, religious, and home schools.

                      [Subpart 2--Other Provisions

[Sec. 9521. Maintenance of effort.
[Sec. 9522. Prohibition regarding State aid.
[Sec. 9523. Privacy of assessment results.
[Sec. 9524. School prayer.
[Sec. 9525. Equal access to public school facilities.
[Sec. 9526. General prohibitions.
[Sec. 9527. Prohibitions on Federal Government and use of Federal funds.
[Sec. 9528. Armed Forces recruiter access to students and student 
          recruiting information.
[Sec. 9529. Prohibition on federally sponsored testing.
[Sec. 9530. Limitations on national testing or certification for 
          teachers.
[Sec. 9531. Prohibition on nationwide database.
[Sec. 9532. Unsafe school choice option.
[Sec. 9533. Prohibition on discrimination.
[Sec. 9534. Civil rights.
[Sec. 9535. Rulemaking.
[Sec. 9536. Severability.

                          [Part F--Evaluations

[Sec. 9601. Evaluations.]
     * * * * * * *

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. Authorization of appropriations.

    TITLE I--IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED

Sec. 1001. Purpose.
Sec. 1002. State administration and State accountability and support.

Part A--Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies

                 subpart 1--basic program requirements

Sec. 1111. State and local requirements.
Sec. 1112. Local educational agency plans.
Sec. 1113. Eligible school attendance areas.
Sec. 1114. Schoolwide programs.
Sec. 1115. Targeted assistance schools.
Sec. 1116. School performance.
Sec. 1117. Qualifications for teachers and paraprofessionals.
Sec. 1118. Parent and family engagement.
Sec. 1119. Participation of children enrolled in private schools.
Sec. 1120. Fiscal requirements.
Sec. 1120A. Coordination requirements.

                         subpart 2--allocations

Sec. 1121. Grants for the outlying areas and the Secretary of the 
                            Interior.
Sec. 1122. Allocations to States.
Sec. 1124. Basic grants to local educational agencies.
Sec. 1124A. Concentration grants to local educational agencies.
Sec. 1125. Targeted grants to local educational agencies.
Sec. 1125AA. Adequacy of funding of targeted grants to local 
                            educational agencies in fiscal years after 
                            fiscal year 2001.
Sec. 1125A. Education finance incentive grant program.
Sec. 1126. Special allocation procedures.

    subpart 3--blue ribbon schools; centers of excellence in early 
                    childhood; green ribbon schools

Sec. 1131. Blue ribbon schools.
Sec. 1132. Centers of excellence in early childhood.
Sec. 1133. Green ribbon schools.

     subpart 4--grants for state assessments and related activities

Sec. 1141. Grants for State assessments and related activities.

                      Part B--Pathways to College

                 subpart 1--improving secondary schools

Sec. 1201. Secondary school reform.

                    subpart 2--accelerated learning

Sec. 1221. Purposes.
Sec. 1222. Funding distribution rule.
Sec. 1223. Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate 
                            examination fee program.
Sec. 1224. Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate incentive 
                            program grants.
Sec. 1225. Supplement, not supplant.
Sec. 1226. Definitions.

                Part C--Education of Migratory Children

Sec. 1301. Program purpose.
Sec. 1302. Program authorized.
Sec. 1303. State allocations.
Sec. 1304. State applications; services.
Sec. 1305. Secretarial approval; peer review.
Sec. 1306. Comprehensive needs assessment and service-delivery plan; 
                            authorized activities.
Sec. 1307. Bypass.
Sec. 1308. National activities.
Sec. 1309. Performance data.
Sec. 1310. Evaluation and study.
Sec. 1311. State assistance in determining number of migratory 
                            children.
Sec. 1312. Definitions.

Part D--Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who 
                 Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-risk

Sec. 1401. Purpose and program authorization.
Sec. 1402. Payments for programs under this part.

                    subpart 1--state agency programs

Sec. 1411. Eligibility.
Sec. 1412. Allocation of funds.
Sec. 1413. State reallocation of funds.
Sec. 1414. State plan and State agency applications.
Sec. 1415. Use of funds.
Sec. 1416. Institution-wide projects.
Sec. 1417. Three-year programs or projects.
Sec. 1418. Transition services.
Sec. 1419. Program evaluation.

                    subpart 2--local agency programs

Sec. 1421. Purpose.
Sec. 1422. Programs operated by local educational agencies.
Sec. 1423. Local educational agency applications.
Sec. 1424. Uses of funds.
Sec. 1425. Program requirements for correctional facilities receiving 
                            funds under this section.
Sec. 1426. Accountability.

                     subpart 3--general provisions

Sec. 1431. Program evaluations.
Sec. 1432. Definitions.

        Part E--Educational Stability of Children in Foster Care

Sec. 1501. Educational stability of children in foster care.
Sec. 1502. Definitions.

                       Part F--General Provisions

Sec. 1601. Federal regulations.
Sec. 1602. Agreements and records.
Sec. 1603. State administration.
Sec. 1604. Local educational agency spending audits.
Sec. 1605. Prohibition against Federal mandates, direction, or control.
Sec. 1606. Rule of construction on equalized spending.
Sec. 1607. State report on dropout data.
Sec. 1608. Regulations for sections 1111 and 1116.

         TITLE II--SUPPORTING TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL EXCELLENCE

 Part A--Continuous Improvement and Support for Teachers and Principals

Sec. 2101. Purpose.
Sec. 2102. Definitions.

                      subpart 1--grants to states

Sec. 2111. Allotments to States.
Sec. 2112. State applications.
Sec. 2113. State use of funds.

           subpart 2--subgrants to local educational agencies

Sec. 2121. Allocations to local educational agencies.
Sec. 2122. Local applications and needs assessment.
Sec. 2123. Local use of funds.

               subpart 3--national leadership activities

Sec. 2131. National leadership activities.
Sec. 2132. Gifted and talented students.

                       subpart 4--accountability

Sec. 2141. Accountability.

             subpart 5--principal recruitment and training

Sec. 2151. Principal recruitment and training grant program.

               Part B--Teacher Pathways to the Classroom

Sec. 2201. Teacher Pathways.

                 Part C--Teacher Incentive Fund Program

Sec. 2301. Purposes; definitions.
Sec. 2302. Teacher incentive fund grants.

         Part D--Achievement Through Technology and Innovation

Sec. 2401. Short title.
Sec. 2402. Purposes and goals.
Sec. 2403. Definitions.
Sec. 2404. Allocation of funds; limitation.
Sec. 2405. E-rate restriction.
Sec. 2406. Rule of construction regarding purchasing.

                   subpart 1--state and local grants

Sec. 2411. Allotment and reallotment.
Sec. 2412. Use of allotment by State.
Sec. 2413. State applications.
Sec. 2414. State activities.
Sec. 2415. Local applications.
Sec. 2416. Local activities.
Sec. 2417. Reporting.

                       subpart 2--internet safety

Sec. 2421. Internet safety.

   TITLE III--LANGUAGE AND ACADEMIC CONTENT INSTRUCTION FOR ENGLISH 
                    LEARNERS AND IMMIGRANT STUDENTS

    Part A--English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and 
                        Academic Achievement Act

Sec. 3101. Short title.
Sec. 3102. Purposes.

 subpart 1--grants and subgrants for english language acquisition and 
                          language enhancement

Sec. 3111. Formula grants to States.
Sec. 3112. Native American and Alaska Native children in school.
Sec. 3113. State educational agency plans.
Sec. 3114. Within-State allocations.
Sec. 3115. Subgrants to eligible entities.
Sec. 3116. Local plans.

              subpart 2--accountability and administration

Sec. 3121. Local evaluation and accountability.
Sec. 3122. State accountability.
Sec. 3123. Reporting requirements.
Sec. 3124. Coordination with related programs.
Sec. 3125. Rules of construction.
Sec. 3126. Legal authority under State law.
Sec. 3127. Civil rights.
Sec. 3128. Programs for Native Americans and Puerto Rico.
Sec. 3129. Prohibition.

                     subpart 3--national activities

Sec. 3131. Professional development grants.
Sec. 3132. Commission on the Assessment and Advancement of English 
                            Learners.
Sec. 3133. English language acquisition technology innovation grants.

                       Part B--General Provisions

Sec. 3201. Definitions.
Sec. 3202. Parental notification.
Sec. 3203. National Clearinghouse.
Sec. 3204. Regulations.

         TITLE IV--SUPPORTING SUCCESSFUL, WELL-ROUNDED STUDENTS

     Part A--Improving Literacy Instruction and Student Achievement

               subpart 1--improving literacy instruction

Sec. 4101. Short title.
Sec. 4102. Purposes.
Sec. 4103. Definitions.
Sec. 4104. Program authorized.
Sec. 4105. State planning grants.
Sec. 4106. State implementation grants.
Sec. 4107. State activities.
Sec. 4108. Subgrants to eligible entities in support of birth through 
                            kindergarten entry literacy.
Sec. 4109. Subgrants to eligible entities in support of kindergarten 
                            through grade 12 literacy.
Sec. 4110. National evaluation, information dissemination, and 
                            technical assistance.
Sec. 4111. Rules of construction.

subpart 2--improving literacy and college and career readiness through 
                   effective school library programs

Sec. 4113. Purpose.
Sec. 4114. Definitions.
Sec. 4115. Improving literacy and college and career readiness through 
                            effective school library program grants.

  Part B--Improving Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
                  Instruction and Student Achievement

     subpart 1--improving stem instruction and student achievement

Sec. 4201. Purpose.
Sec. 4202. Definitions.
Sec. 4203. Grants; allotments.
Sec. 4204. Applications.
Sec. 4205. Authorized activities.
Sec. 4206. Performance metrics; report.
Sec. 4207. Evaluation.
Sec. 4208. Supplement not supplant.
Sec. 4209. Maintenance of effort.

              subpart 2--stem master teacher corps program

4221. Purpose.
4222. Definitions.
4223. STEM Master Teacher Corps program.
4224. Application.
4225. Required use of funds.
4226. Performance metrics; reports.
4227. Supplement not supplant.
4228. Evaluation.

  Part C--Increasing Access to a Well-rounded Education and Financial 
                                Literacy

        subpart 1--increasing access to a well-rounded education

Sec. 4301. Purpose.
Sec. 4302. Definitions.
Sec. 4303. Grant program.

                subpart 2--financial literacy education

Sec. 4311. Short title.
Sec. 4312. Statewide incentive grants for financial literacy education.

             Part D--Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students

Sec. 4401. Purpose.
Sec. 4402. Definitions.
Sec. 4403. Allocation of funds.
Sec. 4404. Successful, safe, and healthy students State grants.
Sec. 4405. Technical assistance.
Sec. 4406. School construction after a violent or traumatic crisis.
Sec. 4407. Prohibited uses of funds.
Sec. 4408. Federal and State nondiscrimination laws.

                   Part E--Student Non-discrimination

Sec. 4501. Short title.
Sec. 4502. Findings and purposes.
Sec. 4503. Definitions and rule.
Sec. 4504. Prohibition against discrimination.
Sec. 4505. Federal administrative enforcement; report to congressional 
                            committees.
Sec. 4506. Private cause of action.
Sec. 4507. Cause of action by the Attorney General.
Sec. 4508. State immunity.
Sec. 4509. Attorney's fees.
Sec. 4510. Effect on other laws.
Sec. 4511. Severability.
Sec. 4512. Effective date.

            Part F--21st Century Community Learning Centers

Sec. 4601. Purpose; definitions.
Sec. 4602. Allotments to States.
Sec. 4603. State application.
Sec. 4604. Local competitive grant program.
Sec. 4605. Local activities.

                     Part G--Promise Neighborhoods

Sec. 4701. Short title.
Sec. 4702. Purpose.
Sec. 4703. Definitions.

           subpart 1--promise neighborhood partnership grants

Sec. 4711. Program authorized.
Sec. 4712. Eligible entities.
Sec. 4713. Application requirements.
Sec. 4714. Use of funds.
Sec. 4715. Report and publicly available data.
Sec. 4716. Performance accountability and evaluation.

                    subpart 2--promise school grants

Sec. 4721. Program authorized.
Sec. 4722. Definition of eligible entity.
Sec. 4723. Application requirements; priority.
Sec. 4724. Use of funds.
Sec. 4725. Report and publicly available data.
Sec. 4726. Performance accountability and evaluation.

                     subpart 3--general provisions

Sec. 4731. National activities.

       Part H--Parent and Family Information and Resource Centers

Sec. 4801. Purpose.
Sec. 4802. Definition of eligible entity.
Sec. 4803. Grants authorized.
Sec. 4804. Applications.
Sec. 4805. Uses of funds.
Sec. 4806. Administrative provisions.

                         Part I--Ready To Learn

Sec. 4901. Ready To Learn.

               Part J--Programs of National Significance

Sec. 4905. Programs authorized.
Sec. 4906. Applications.
Sec. 4907. Program requirements.

 Part K--Competency-based Assessment and Accountability Demonstration 
                               Authority

Sec. 4909. Competency-based assessment and accountability 
                            demonstration.

                     TITLE V--PROMOTING INNOVATION

                        Part A--Race to the Top

Sec. 5101. Purposes.
Sec. 5102. Reservation of funds.
Sec. 5103. Race to the Top program.
Sec. 5104. Application process.
Sec. 5105. Performance measures.
Sec. 5106. Uses of funds.
Sec. 5107. Reporting.

                    Part B--Investing in Innovation

Sec. 5201. Purposes.
Sec. 5202. Reservations.
Sec. 5203. Program authorized; length of grants; priorities.
Sec. 5204. Applications.
Sec. 5205. Uses of funds.
Sec. 5206. Performance measures.
Sec. 5207. Reporting.

                   Part C--Magnet Schools Assistance

Sec. 5301. Findings and purpose.
Sec. 5302. Definition.
Sec. 5303. Program authorized.
Sec. 5304. Eligibility.
Sec. 5305. Applications and requirements.
Sec. 5306. Priority.
Sec. 5307. Use of funds.
Sec. 5308. Prohibition.
Sec. 5309. Limitations.
Sec. 5310. Evaluations.
Sec. 5311. Availability of funds for grants to agencies not previously 
                            assisted.

                     Part D--Public Charter Schools

Sec. 5401. Purpose.
Sec. 5402. Distribution of funds.

             subpart 1--successful charter schools program

Sec. 5411. Definitions.
Sec. 5412. Program authorized.
Sec. 5413. Applications.
Sec. 5414. Selection criteria; priority.
Sec. 5415. Uses of funds.
Sec. 5416. Subgrants.
Sec. 5417. Performance measures; reports.
Sec. 5418. Federal formula allocation during first year and for 
                            successive enrollment expansions.
Sec. 5419. Records transfer.
Sec. 5420. National activities.

   subpart 2--charter school facility acquisition, construction, and 
                               renovation

Sec. 5431. Purpose.
Sec. 5432. Definitions.
Sec. 5433. Grants to eligible entities.
Sec. 5434. Charter school objectives.
Sec. 5435. Applications; selection criteria.
Sec. 5436. Reserve account.
Sec. 5437. Limitation on administrative costs.
Sec. 5438. Audits and reports.
Sec. 5439. No full faith and credit for grantee obligations.
Sec. 5440. Recovery of funds.

            Part E--Voluntary Public School Choice Programs

Sec. 5501. Grants.
Sec. 5502. Uses of funds.
Sec. 5503. Applications.
Sec. 5504. Priorities.
Sec. 5505. Requirements and voluntary participation.
Sec. 5506. Evaluations.
Sec. 5507. Definitions.

           Part F--College Information Demonstration Program

Sec. 5601. College information demonstration program.

            TITLE VI--PROMOTING FLEXIBILITY; RURAL EDUCATION

                        Part A--Transferability

Sec. 6101. Transferability of funds.

                   Part B--Rural Education Initiative

Sec. 6201. Short title.
Sec. 6202. Purpose.

           subpart 1--small, rural school achievement program

Sec. 6211. Program authorized.
Sec. 6212. Academic achievement assessments.

             subpart 2--rural and low-income school program

Sec. 6221. Program authorized.
Sec. 6222. Uses of funds.
Sec. 6223. Applications.
Sec. 6224. Accountability.

                     subpart 3--general provisions

Sec. 6231. Choice of participation.
Sec. 6232. Annual average daily attendance determination.
Sec. 6233. Supplement, not supplant.
Sec. 6234. Rule of construction.

    TITLE VII--INDIAN, NATIVE HAWAIIAN, AND ALASKA NATIVE EDUCATION

                        Part A--Indian Education

Sec. 7101. Statement of policy.
Sec. 7102. Purpose.

        subpart 1--formula grants to local educational agencies

Sec. 7111. Purpose.
Sec. 7112. Grants to local educational agencies and tribes.
Sec. 7113. Amount of grants.
Sec. 7114. Applications.
Sec. 7115. Authorized services and activities.
Sec. 7116. Integration of services authorized.
Sec. 7117. Student eligibility forms.
Sec. 7118. Payments.
Sec. 7119. State educational agency review.

    subpart 2--special programs and projects to improve educational 
              opportunities for indian children and youth

Sec. 7121. Improvement of educational opportunities for Indian children 
                            and youth.
Sec. 7122. Professional development for teachers and education 
                            professionals.

                     subpart 3--national activities

Sec. 7131. National research activities.
Sec. 7132. Improvement of academic success for students through Native 
                            American language.
Sec. 7133. Improving State and tribal educational agency collaboration.

                   subpart 4--federal administration

Sec. 7141. National Advisory Council on Indian Education.
Sec. 7142. Peer review.
Sec. 7143. Preference for Indian applicants.
Sec. 7144. Minimum grant criteria.

                         subpart 5--definitions

Sec. 7151. Definitions.

       Part B--Native Hawaiian Education; Alaska Native Education

                  subpart 1--native hawaiian education

Sec. 7201. Short title.
Sec. 7202. Findings.
Sec. 7203. Purposes.
Sec. 7204. Native Hawaiian Education Council.
Sec. 7205. Program authorized.
Sec. 7206. Administrative provisions.
Sec. 7207. Definitions.

                   subpart 2--alaska native education

Sec. 7301. Short title.
Sec. 7302. Findings.
Sec. 7303. Purposes.
Sec. 7304. Program authorized.
Sec. 7305. Administrative provisions.
Sec. 7306. Definitions.

                         TITLE VIII--IMPACT AID

Sec. 8001. Purpose.
Sec. 8002. Payments relating to Federal acquisition of real property.
Sec. 8003. Payments for eligible federally connected children.
Sec. 8004. Policies and procedures relating to children residing on 
                            Indian lands.
Sec. 8005. Application for payments under sections 8002 and 8003.
Sec. 8007. Construction.
Sec. 8008. Facilities.
Sec. 8009. State consideration of payments in providing State aid.
Sec. 8010. Federal administration.
Sec. 8011. Administrative hearings and judicial review.
Sec. 8012. Forgiveness of overpayments.
Sec. 8013. Definitions.

                      TITLE IX--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                          Part A--Definitions

Sec. 9101. Definitions.
Sec. 9102. Applicability of title.
Sec. 9103. Applicability to Bureau of Indian Affairs operated schools.

    Part B--Flexibility in the Use of Administrative and Other Funds

Sec. 9201. Consolidation of State administrative funds for elementary 
                            and secondary education programs.
Sec. 9202. Single local educational agency States.
Sec. 9203. Consolidation of funds for local administration.
Sec. 9204. Consolidated set-aside for Department of the Interior funds.

 Part C--Coordination of Programs; Consolidated State and Local Plans 
                            and Applications

Sec. 9301. Purposes.
Sec. 9302. Optional consolidated State plans or applications.
Sec. 9303. Consolidated reporting.
Sec. 9304. General applicability of State educational agency 
                            assurances.
Sec. 9305. Consolidated local plans or applications.
Sec. 9306. Other general assurances.

                            Part D--Waivers

Sec. 9401. Waivers of statutory and regulatory requirements.

                       Part E--Uniform Provisions

                       subpart 1--private schools

Sec. 9501. Participation by private school children and teachers.
Sec. 9502. Standards for by-pass.
Sec. 9503. Complaint process for participation of private school 
                            children.
Sec. 9504. By-pass determination process.
Sec. 9505. Prohibition against funds for religious worship or 
                            instruction.
Sec. 9506. Private, religious, and home schools.

                      subpart 2--other provisions

Sec. 9521. Maintenance of effort.
Sec. 9522. Prohibition regarding State aid.
Sec. 9523. Privacy of assessment results.
Sec. 9524. School prayer.
Sec. 9525. Equal access to public school facilities.
Sec. 9526. General prohibitions.
Sec. 9527. Prohibitions on Federal Government and use of Federal funds.
Sec. 9528. Armed Forces recruiter access to students and student 
                            recruiting information.
Sec. 9529. Prohibition on federally sponsored testing.
Sec. 9530. Limitations on national testing or certification for 
                            teachers.
Sec. 9531. Prohibition on nationwide database.
Sec. 9532. Unsafe school choice option.
Sec. 9533. Prohibition on discrimination.
Sec. 9534. Civil rights.
Sec. 9535. Rulemaking.
Sec. 9536. Severability.
Sec. 9537. Geographic diversity.

                subpart 3--teacher liability protection

Sec. 9541. Short title.
Sec. 9542. Purpose.
Sec. 9543. Definitions.
Sec. 9544. Applicability.
Sec. 9545. Preemption and election of State nonapplicability.
Sec. 9546. Limitation on liability for teachers.
Sec. 9547. Allocation of responsibility for noneconomic loss.
Sec. 9548. Effective date.

                          Part F--Evaluations

Sec. 9601. Evaluation authority.

                    Part G--Miscellaneous Provisions

                       subpart 1--gun possession

Sec. 9701. Gun-free requirements.

                 subpart 2--environmental tobacco smoke

Sec. 9721. Short title.
Sec. 9722. Definitions.
Sec. 9723. Nonsmoking policy for children's services.
Sec. 9724. Preemption.

SEC. 3. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) Local Educational Agency Grants.--
            (1) In general.--There are authorized to be 
        appropriated to carry out part A of title I (except for 
        sections 1116(f), 1125A, and 1132, and subpart 4 of 
        part A of such title) such sums as may be necessary for 
        fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal 
        years.
            (2) School improvement grants, national activities, 
        and evaluation.--
                    (A) In general.--There are authorized to be 
                appropriated to carry out section 1116(f) such 
                sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 
                and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
                    (B) Reservation for national activities.--
                Of the amounts appropriated under subparagraph 
                (A) for a fiscal year, the Secretary shall 
                reserve not more than 2 percent for the 
                national activities described in section 
                1116(f)(6).
            (3) Education finance incentive grant program.--
        There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
        section 1125A such sums as may be necessary for fiscal 
        year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
            (4) Centers of excellence in early childhood.--
        There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
        section 1132 such sums as may be necessary for fiscal 
        year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (b) Grants for State Assessments and the National 
Assessment of Educational Progress.--
            (1) National assessment of educational progress.--
        For the purpose of administering the State assessments 
        under the National Assessment of Educational Progress, 
        there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
        may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
            (2) State assessments and related activities.--For 
        the purpose of carrying out assessment and related 
        activities under subpart 4 of part A of title I, there 
        are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
    (c) Pathways to College.--For the purposes of carrying out 
part B of title I, Pathways to College, there are authorized to 
be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 
2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (d) Education of Migratory Children.--For the purposes of 
carrying out part C of title I, Education of Migratory 
Children, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
succeeding fiscal years.
    (e) Neglected and Delinquent.--For the purposes of carrying 
out part D of title I, Prevention and Intervention Programs for 
Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk, 
there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding 
fiscal years.
    (f) Continuous Improvement and Support for Teachers and 
Principals.--
            (1) In general.--For the purposes of carrying out 
        subparts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of part A of title II, there 
        are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
            (2) Principal recruitment and training.--For the 
        purposes of carrying out subpart 5 of part A of title 
        II, Principal Recruitment and Training, there are 
        authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
    (g) Teacher Pathways to the Classroom.--For the purposes of 
carrying out part B of title II, Teacher Pathways to the 
Classroom, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
succeeding fiscal years.
    (h) Teacher Incentive Fund.--For the purposes of carrying 
out part C of title II, Teacher Incentive Fund, there are 
authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for 
fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (i) Achievement Through Technology and Innovation.--For the 
purposes of carrying out part D of title II, Achievement 
through Technology and Innovation, there are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 
and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (j) English Learners and Immigrant Students.--For the 
purposes of carrying out title III, Language and Academic 
Content Instruction for English Learners and Immigrant 
Students, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
succeeding fiscal years.
    (k) Improving Literacy and Student Achievement.--
            (1) Improving literacy.--For the purposes of 
        carrying out subpart 1 of part A of title IV, Improving 
        Literacy Instruction, there are authorized to be 
        appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal 
        year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
            (2) Effective school library programs.--For the 
        purposes of carrying out subpart 2 of part A of title 
        IV, Improving Literacy and College and Career Readiness 
        Through Effective School Library Programs, there are 
        authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
    (l) Improving Science, Technology, Engineering, and 
Mathematics Instruction and Student Achievement.--For the 
purposes of carrying out part B of title IV, Improving Science, 
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Instruction and 
Student Achievement, there are authorized to be appropriated 
such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of 
the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (m) Increasing Access to a Well-Rounded Education and 
Financial Literacy.--For the purposes of carrying out part C of 
title IV, Increasing Access to a Well-Rounded Education and 
Financial Literacy, there are authorized to be appropriated 
such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of 
the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (n) Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students.--
            (1) In general.--For the purposes of carrying out 
        part D of title IV (except for section 4406), 
        Successful, Safe, and Healthy Students, there are 
        authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
            (2) School construction after a violent or 
        traumatic crisis.--For purposes of carrying out section 
        4406, School Construction After a Violent or Traumatic 
        Crisis, there are authorized to be appropriated such 
        sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each 
        of the 4 succeeding fiscal years. Funds made available 
        under this paragraph shall remain available until 
        expended.
    (o) 21st Century Community Learning Centers.--For the 
purposes of carrying out part F of title IV, 21st Century 
Community Learning Centers, there are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 
and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (p) Promise Neighborhoods.--For the purposes of carrying 
out part G of title IV, Promise Neighborhoods, there are 
authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for 
fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (q) Parent and Family Information and Resource Centers.--
For the purposes of carrying out part H of title IV, Parent and 
Family Information and Resource Centers, there are authorized 
to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal 
year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (r) Ready To Learn.--For the purposes of carrying out part 
I of title IV, Ready To Learn, there are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 
and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (s) Programs of National Significance.--For the purposes of 
carrying out part I of title IV, Programs of National 
Significance, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums 
as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
succeeding fiscal years.
    (t) Race to the Top.--For the purposes of carrying out part 
A of title V, Race to the Top, there are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 
and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (u) Investing in Innovation.--For the purposes of carrying 
out part B of title V, Investing in Innovation, there are 
authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for 
fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (v) Magnet Schools Assistance.--For the purposes of 
carrying out part C of title V, Magnet Schools Assistance, 
there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding 
fiscal years.
    (w) Public Charter Schools.--For the purposes of carrying 
out part D of title V, Public Charter Schools, there are 
authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for 
fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (x) Voluntary Public School Choice.--For the purposes of 
carrying out part E of title V, Voluntary Public School Choice, 
there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding 
fiscal years.
    (y) College Information Demonstration Program.--For the 
purposes of carrying out part F of title V, College Information 
Demonstration Program, there are authorized to be appropriated 
such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of 
the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
    (z) Rural Education Achievement Program.--For the purposes 
of carrying out part B of title VI, Rural Education Achievement 
Program, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
succeeding fiscal years.
    (aa) Indian, Native Hawaiian, and Alaska Native 
Education.--
            (1) Indian education and native hawaiian 
        education.--For the purposes of carrying out part A and 
        subpart 1 of part B of title VII, Indian Education and 
        Native Hawaiian Education, there are authorized to be 
        appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal 
        year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
            (2) Alaska native education.--There are authorized 
        to be appropriated to carry out subpart 2 of part B of 
        title VII, Alaska Native Education, such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 5 
        succeeding fiscal years.
    (bb) Impact Aid.--For the purposes of carrying out title 
VIII, Impact Aid, there are authorized to be appropriated such 
sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
succeeding fiscal years, in accordance with the following:
            (1) Payments for federal acquisition of real 
        property.--For the purpose of making payments under 
        section 8002, there are authorized to be appropriated 
        such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and 
        each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
            (2) Basic payments; payments for heavily impacted 
        local educational agencies.--For the purpose of making 
        payments under section 8003(b), there are authorized to 
        be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for 
        fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal 
        years.
            (3) Payments for children with disabilities.--For 
        the purpose of making payments under section 8003(d), 
        there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as 
        may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and each of the 4 
        succeeding fiscal years.
            (4) Construction.--For the purpose of carrying out 
        section 8007, there are authorized to be appropriated 
        such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2014 and 
        each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
            (5) Facilities maintenance.--For the purpose of 
        carrying out section 8008, there are authorized to be 
        appropriated such sums as may be necessary for fiscal 
        year 2014 and each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.

         TITLE I--COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS FOR ALL STUDENTS

[SEC. 1001. [20 U.S.C. 6301] STATEMENT OF PURPOSE.

    [The purpose of this title is to ensure that all children 
have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a 
high-quality education and reach, at a minimum, proficiency on 
challenging State academic achievement standards and state 
academic assessments. This purpose can be accomplished by--
            [(1) ensuring that high-quality academic 
        assessments, accountability systems, teacher 
        preparation and training, curriculum, and instructional 
        materials are aligned with challenging State academic 
        standards so that students, teachers, parents, and 
        administrators can measure progress against common 
        expectations for student academic achievement;
            [(2) meeting the educational needs of low-achieving 
        children in our Nation's highest-poverty schools, 
        limited English proficient children, migratory 
        children, children with disabilities, Indian children, 
        neglected or delinquent children, and young children in 
        need of reading assistance;
            [(3) closing the achievement gap between high- and 
        low-performing children, especially the achievement 
        gaps between minority and nonminority students, and 
        between disadvantaged children and their more 
        advantaged peers;
            [(4) holding schools, local educational agencies, 
        and States accountable for improving the academic 
        achievement of all students, and identifying and 
        turning around low-performing schools that have failed 
        to provide a high-quality education to their students, 
        while providing alternatives to students in such 
        schools to enable the students to receive a high-
        quality education;
            [(5) distributing and targeting resources 
        sufficiently to make a difference to local educational 
        agencies and schools where needs are greatest;
            [(6) improving and strengthening accountability, 
        teaching, and learning by using State assessment 
        systems designed to ensure that students are meeting 
        challenging State academic achievement and content 
        standards and increasing achievement overall, but 
        especially for the disadvantaged;
            [(7) providing greater decisionmaking authority and 
        flexibility to schools and teachers in exchange for 
        greater responsibility for student performance;
            [(8) providing children an enriched and accelerated 
        educational program, including the use of schoolwide 
        programs or additional services that increase the 
        amount and quality of instructional time;
            [(9) promoting schoolwide reform and ensuring the 
        access of children to effective, scientifically based 
        instructional strategies and challenging academic 
        content;
            [(10) significantly elevating the quality of 
        instruction by providing staff in participating schools 
        with substantial opportunities for professional 
        development;
            [(11) coordinating services under all parts of this 
        title with each other, with other educational services, 
        and, to the extent feasible, with other agencies 
        providing services to youth, children, and families; 
        and
            [(12) affording parents substantial and meaningful 
        opportunities to participate in the education of their 
        children.]

SEC. 1001. PURPOSE.

    The purpose of this title is to ensure every child has a 
fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-
quality education and graduate from high school ready for 
college, career, and citizenship. This purpose can be 
accomplished by--
            (1) setting high expectations for children to 
        develop deep content knowledge and the ability to use 
        knowledge to think critically, solve problems, 
        communicate effectively, and collaborate with others, 
        in order to graduate, from high school, college and 
        career ready;
            (2) supporting high-quality teaching to 
        continuously improve instruction and encourage new 
        models of teaching and learning;
            (3) focusing on increasing student achievement and 
        closing achievement gaps;
            (4) providing additional resources and supports to 
        meet the needs of disadvantaged students, including 
        children from low-income families and those attending 
        high-poverty schools, English learners, migratory 
        children, children with disabilities, Indian children, 
        and neglected or delinquent children;
            (5) providing young children with greater access to 
        high-quality early learning experiences to ensure they 
        enter school ready to learn;
            (6) removing barriers to, and encouraging State and 
        local innovation and leadership in, education based on 
        the evaluation of success and continuous improvement;
            (7) removing barriers and promoting integration 
        across all levels of education, and across Federal 
        education programs;
            (8) streamlining Federal requirements to reduce 
        burdens on States, local educational agencies, schools, 
        and educators; and
            (9) strengthening parental engagement and 
        coordination of student, family, and community supports 
        to promote student success.

[SEC. 1002. [20 U.S.C. 6302] AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    [(a) Local Educational Agency Grants.--For the purpose of 
carrying out part A, there are authorized to be appropriated--
            [(1) $13,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2002;
            [(2) $16,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2003;
            [(3) $18,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2004;
            [(4) $20,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2005;
            [(5) $22,750,000,000 for fiscal year 2006; and
            [(6) $25,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2007.
    [(b) Reading First.--
            [(1) Reading first.--For the purpose of carrying 
        out subpart 1 of part B, there are authorized to be 
        appropriated $900,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and such 
        sums as may be necessary for each of the 5 succeeding 
        fiscal years.
            [(2) Early reading first.--For the purpose of 
        carrying out subpart 2 of part B, there are authorized 
        to be appropriated $75,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and 
        such sums as may be necessary for each of the 5 
        succeeding fiscal years.
            [(3) Even start.--For the purpose of carrying out 
        subpart 3 of part B, there are authorized to be 
        appropriated $260,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and such 
        sums as may be necessary for each of the 5 succeeding 
        fiscal years.
            [(4) Improving literacy through school libraries.--
        For the purpose of carrying out subpart 4 of part B, 
        there are authorized to be appropriated $250,000,000 
        for fiscal year 2002 and such sums as may be necessary 
        for each of the 5 succeeding fiscal years.
    [(c) Education of Migratory Children.--For the purpose of 
carrying out part C, there are authorized to be appropriated 
$410,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and such sums as may be 
necessary for each of the 5 succeeding fiscal years.
    [(d) Prevention and Intervention Programs for Youth Who Are 
Neglected, Delinquent, or at Risk.--For the purpose of carrying 
out part D, there are authorized to be appropriated $50,000,000 
for fiscal year 2002 and such sums as may be necessary for each 
of the 5 succeeding fiscal years.
    [(e) Federal Activities.--
            [(1) Sections 1501 and 1502.--For the purpose of 
        carrying out sections 1501 and 1502, there are 
        authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal year 2002 and each of the 5 
        succeeding fiscal years.
            [(2) Section 1504.--
                    [(A) In general.--For the purpose of 
                carrying out section 1504, there are authorized 
                to be appropriated such sums as may be 
                necessary for fiscal year 2002 and for each of 
                the 5 succeeding fiscal years.
                    [(B) Special rule.--Of the funds 
                appropriated pursuant to subparagraph (A), not 
                more than 30 percent may be used for teachers 
                associated with students participating in the 
                programs described in subsections (a)(1), 
                (b)(1), and (c)(1).
    [(f) Comprehensive School Reform.--For the purpose of 
carrying out part F, there are authorized to be appropriated 
such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2002 and each of 
the 5 succeeding fiscal years.
    [(g) Advanced Placement.--For the purposes of carrying out 
part G, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums for 
fiscal year 2002 and each 5 succeeding fiscal year.
    [(h) School Dropout Prevention.--For the purpose of 
carrying out part H, there are authorized to be appropriated 
$125,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and such sums as may be 
necessary for each of the 5 succeeding fiscal years, of which--
            [(1) up to 10 percent shall be available to carry 
        out subpart 1 of part H for each fiscal year; and
            [(2) the remainder shall be available to carry out 
        subpart 2 of part H for each fiscal year.
    [(i) School Improvement.--For the purpose of carrying out 
section 1003(g), there are authorized to be appropriated 
$500,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and such sums as may be 
necessary for each of the 5 succeeding fiscal years.

[SEC. 1003. [20 U.S.C. 6303] SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT.

    [(a) State Reservations.--Each State shall reserve 2 
percent of the amount the State receives under subpart 2 of 
part A for fiscal years 2002 and 2003, and 4 percent of the 
amount received under such subpart for fiscal years 2004 
through 2007, to carry out subsection (b) and to carry out the 
State's responsibilities under sections 1116 and 1117, 
including carrying out the State educational agency's statewide 
system of technical assistance and support for local 
educational agencies.
    [(b) Uses.--Of the amount reserved under subsection (a) for 
any fiscal year, the State educational agency--
            [(1) shall allocate not less than 95 percent of 
        that amount directly to local educational agencies for 
        schools identified for school improvement, corrective 
        action, and restructuring, for activities under section 
        1116(b); or
            [(2) may, with the approval of the local 
        educational agency, directly provide for these 
        activities or arrange for their provision through other 
        entities such as school support teams or educational 
        service agencies.
    [(c) Priority.--The State educational agency, in allocating 
funds to local educational agencies under this section, shall 
give priority to local educational agencies that--
            [(1) serve the lowest-achieving schools;
            [(2) demonstrate the greatest need for such funds; 
        and
            [(3) demonstrate the strongest commitment to 
        ensuring that such funds are used to enable the lowest-
        achieving schools to meet the progress goals in school 
        improvement plans under section 1116 (b)(3)(A)(v).
    [(d) Unused Funds.--If, after consultation with local 
educational agencies in the State, the State educational agency 
determines that the amount of funds reserved to carry out 
subsection (b) is greater than the amount needed to provide the 
assistance described in that subsection, the State educational 
agency shall allocate the excess amount to local educational 
agencies in accordance with--
            [(1) the relative allocations the State educational 
        agency made to those agencies for that fiscal year 
        under subpart 2 of part A; or
            [(2) section 1126(c).
    [(e) Special Rule.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
this section, the amount of funds reserved by the State 
educational agency under subsection (a) in any fiscal year 
shall not decrease the amount of funds each local educational 
agency receives under subpart 2 below the amount received by 
such local educational agency under such subpart for the 
preceding fiscal year.
    [(f) Reporting.--The State educational agency shall make 
publicly available a list of those schools that have received 
funds or services pursuant to subsection (b) and the percentage 
of students from each school from families with incomes below 
the poverty line.
    [(g) Assistance for Local School Improvement.--
            [(1) Program authorized.--The Secretary shall award 
        grants to States to enable the States to provide 
        subgrants to local educational agencies for the purpose 
        of providing assistance for school improvement 
        consistent with section 1116.
            [(2) State allotments.--Such grants shall be 
        allotted among States, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
        and the outlying areas, in proportion to the funds 
        received by the States, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
        and the outlying areas, respectively, for the fiscal 
        year under parts A, C, and D of this title. The 
        Secretary shall expeditiously allot a portion of such 
        funds to States for the purpose of assisting local 
        educational agencies and schools that were in school 
        improvement status on the date preceding the date of 
        enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.
            [(3) Reallocations.--If a State does not receive 
        funds under this subsection, the Secretary shall 
        reallocate such funds to other States in the same 
        proportion funds are allocated under paragraph (2).
            [(4) State applications.--Each State educational 
        agency that desires to receive funds under this 
        subsection shall submit an application to the Secretary 
        at such time, and containing such information, as the 
        Secretary shall reasonably require, except that such 
        requirement shall be waived if a State educational 
        agency submitted such information as part of its State 
        plan under this part. Each State application shall 
        describe how the State educational agency will allocate 
        such funds in order to assist the State educational 
        agency and local educational agencies in complying with 
        school improvement, corrective action, and 
        restructuring requirements of section 1116.
            [(5) Local educational agency grants.--A grant to a 
        local educational agency under this subsection shall 
        be--
                    [(A) of sufficient size and scope to 
                support the activities required under sections 
                1116 and 1117, but not less than $50,000 and 
                not more than $500,000 for each participating 
                school;
                    [(B) integrated with other funds awarded by 
                the State under this Act; and
                    [(C) renewable for two additional 1-year 
                periods if schools are meeting the goals in 
                their school improvement plans developed under 
                section 1116.
            [(6) Priority.--The State, in awarding such grants, 
        shall give priority to local educational agencies with 
        the lowest-achieving schools that demonstrate--
                    [(A) the greatest need for such funds; and
                    [(B) the strongest commitment to ensuring 
                that such funds are used to provide adequate 
                resources to enable the lowest-achieving 
                schools to meet the goals under school and 
                local educational agency improvement, 
                corrective action, and restructuring plans 
                under section 1116.
            [(7) Allocation.--A State educational agency that 
        receives a grant under this subsection shall allocate 
        at least 95 percent of the grant funds directly to 
        local educational agencies for schools identified for 
        school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring 
        to carry out activities under section 1116(b), or may, 
        with the approval of the local educational agency, 
        directly provide for these activities or arrange for 
        their provision through other entities such as school 
        support teams or educational service agencies.
            [(8) Administrative costs.--A State educational 
        agency that receives a grant award under this 
        subsection may reserve not more than 5 percent of such 
        grant funds for administration, evaluation, and 
        technical assistance expenses.
            [(9) Local awards.--Each local educational agency 
        that applies for assistance under this subsection shall 
        describe how it will provide the lowest-achieving 
        schools the resources necessary to meet goals under 
        school and local educational agency improvement, 
        corrective action, and restructuring plans under 
        section 1116.]

[SEC. 1004]SEC. 1002. STATE ADMINISTRATION AND STATE ACCOUNTABILITY AND 
                    SUPPORT.

    (a) [In General.--Except as provided in subsection 
(b)]State Administration.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph 
        (2), to carry out administrative duties assigned under 
        parts A, C, and D of this title, each State may reserve 
        the greater of--
                    [(1)](A) 1 percent of the amounts received 
                under such parts; or
                    [(2)](B) $400,000 ($50,000 in the case of 
                each outlying area).
            [(b)](2) Exception.--If the sum of the amounts 
        appropriated for parts A, C, and D of this title is 
        equal to or greater than $14,000,000,000, then the 
        reservation described in [subsection (a)(1)]paragraph 
        (1)(A) shall not exceed 1 percent of the amount the 
        State would receive, if $14,000,000,000 were allocated 
        among the States for parts A, C, and D of this title.
    (b) Accountability and Support.--
            (1) In general.--Each State may reserve not more 
        than 6 percent of the amount the State receives under 
        subpart 2 of part A to carry out paragraph (2) and to 
        carry out the State and local educational agency 
        responsibilities under section 1116, which may include 
        carrying out a statewide system of technical assistance 
        and support for local educational agencies and 
        identifying and disseminating evidence-based practices.
            (2) Uses.--
                    (A) In general.--Of the amount reserved 
                under paragraph (1) for any fiscal year, the 
                State educational agency shall use not less 
                than 90 percent of that amount by allocating 
                such sums directly to local educational 
                agencies for activities required under section 
                1116.
                    (B) Option.--Notwithstanding subparagraph 
                (A), the State educational agency may, with the 
                approval of the local educational agency, 
                directly provide for the activities required 
                under section 1116 or arrange for their 
                provision through other entities such as 
                educational service agencies and external 
                providers with expertise in using strategies 
                based on scientifically valid research to 
                improve teaching, learning, and schools.
            (3) Priority.--The State educational agency, in 
        allocating funds to local educational agencies under 
        this subsection, shall give priority to local 
        educational agencies that--
                    (A) serve the lowest-performing schools, 
                including schools identified as focus schools 
                or priority schools under subsection (c) or (d) 
                of section 1116;
                    (B) demonstrate the greatest need for such 
                funds; and
                    (C) demonstrate the strongest commitment to 
                use the funds to enable the lowest-achieving 
                schools to improve student achievement and 
                outcomes through the use of evidence-based 
                practices that are consistent with the evidence 
                standards described in section 5203(e).
            (4) Unused funds.--If, after consultation with 
        local educational agencies, the State educational 
        agency determines the amount of funds reserved to carry 
        out this subsection is greater than the amount needed 
        to provide the assistance described in this subsection, 
        the State educational agency shall allocate the excess 
        amount to local educational agencies in accordance 
        with--
                    (A) the relative allocations the State 
                educational agency made to those agencies for 
                that fiscal year under subpart 2 of part A; or
                    (B) section 1126(c).
            (5) Special rule.--Notwithstanding any other 
        provision of this subsection, the amount of funds 
        reserved by the State educational agency under this 
        subsection in any fiscal year shall not decrease the 
        amount of funds each local educational agency receives 
        under subpart 2 of part A below the amount received by 
        such local educational agency under such subpart for 
        the preceding fiscal year.
            (6) Reporting.--Each State educational agency shall 
        make publicly available a list of those schools that 
        have received funds or services pursuant to this 
        subsection and the percentage of students from each 
        such school from families with incomes below the 
        poverty line.

PART A--IMPROVING BASIC PROGRAMS OPERATED BY LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCIES

                 Subpart 1--Basic Program Requirements

[SEC. 1111. [20 U.S.C. 6311] STATE PLANS.

    [(a) Plans Required.--
            [(1) In general.--For any State desiring to receive 
        a grant under this part, the State educational agency 
        shall submit to the Secretary a plan, developed by the 
        State educational agency, in consultation with local 
        educational agencies, teachers, principals, pupil 
        services personnel, administrators (including 
        administrators of programs described in other parts of 
        this title), other staff, and parents, that satisfies 
        the requirements of this section and that is 
        coordinated with other programs under this Act, the 
        Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Carl 
        D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, 
        the Head Start Act, the Adult Education and Family 
        Literacy Act, and the McKinney-Vento Homeless 
        Assistance Act.
            [(2) Consolidated plan.--A State plan submitted 
        under paragraph (1) may be submitted as part of a 
        consolidated plan under section 9302.
    [(b) Academic Standards, Academic Assessments, and 
Accountability.--
            [(1) Challenging academic standards.--
                    [(A) In general.--Each State plan shall 
                demonstrate that the State has adopted 
                challenging academic content standards and 
                challenging student academic achievement 
                standards that will be used by the State, its 
                local educational agencies, and its schools to 
                carry out this part, except that a State shall 
                not be required to submit such standards to the 
                Secretary.
                    [(B) Same standards.--The academic 
                standards required by subparagraph (A) shall be 
                the same academic standards that the State 
                applies to all schools and children in the 
                State.
                    [(C) Subjects.--The State shall have such 
                academic standards for all public elementary 
                school and secondary school children, including 
                children served under this part, in subjects 
                determined by the State, but including at least 
                mathematics, reading or language arts, and 
                (beginning in the 2005-2006 school year) 
                science, which shall include the same 
                knowledge, skills, and levels of achievement 
                expected of all children.
                    [(D) Challenging academic standards.--
                Standards under this paragraph shall include--
                            [(i) challenging academic content 
                        standards in academic subjects that--
                                    [(I) specify what children 
                                are expected to know and be 
                                able to do;
                                    [(II) contain coherent and 
                                rigorous content; and
                                    [(III) encourage the 
                                teaching of advanced skills; 
                                and
                            [(ii) challenging student academic 
                        achievement standards that--
                                    [(I) are aligned with the 
                                State's academic content 
                                standards;
                                    [(II) describe two levels 
                                of high achievement (proficient 
                                and advanced) that determine 
                                how well children are mastering 
                                the material in the State 
                                academic content standards; and
                                    [(III) describe a third 
                                level of achievement (basic) to 
                                provide complete information 
                                about the progress of the 
                                lower-achieving children toward 
                                mastering the proficient and 
                                advanced levels of achievement.
                    [(E) Information.--For the subjects in 
                which students will be served under this part, 
                but for which a State is not required by 
                subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) to develop, and 
                has not otherwise developed, such academic 
                standards, the State plan shall describe a 
                strategy for ensuring that students are taught 
                the same knowledge and skills in such subjects 
                and held to the same expectations as are all 
                children.
                    [(F) Existing standards.--Nothing in this 
                part shall prohibit a State from revising, 
                consistent with this section, any standard 
                adopted under this part before or after the 
                date of enactment of the No Child Left Behind 
                Act of 2001.
            [(2) Accountability.--
                    [(A) In general.--Each State plan shall 
                demonstrate that the State has developed and is 
                implementing a single, statewide State 
                accountability system that will be effective in 
                ensuring that all local educational agencies, 
                public elementary schools, and public secondary 
                schools make adequate yearly progress as 
                defined under this paragraph. Each State 
                accountability system shall--
                            [(i) be based on the academic 
                        standards and academic assessments 
                        adopted under paragraphs (1) and (3), 
                        and other academic indicators 
                        consistent with subparagraph (C)(vi) 
                        and (vii), and shall take into account 
                        the achievement of all public 
                        elementary school and secondary school 
                        students;
                            [(ii) be the same accountability 
                        system the State uses for all public 
                        elementary schools and secondary 
                        schools or all local educational 
                        agencies in the State, except that 
                        public elementary schools, secondary 
                        schools, and local educational agencies 
                        not participating under this part are 
                        not subject to the requirements of 
                        section 1116; and
                            [(iii) include sanctions and 
                        rewards, such as bonuses and 
                        recognition, the State will use to hold 
                        local educational agencies and public 
                        elementary schools and secondary 
                        schools accountable for student 
                        achievement and for ensuring that they 
                        make adequate yearly progress in 
                        accordance with the State's definition 
                        under subparagraphs (B) and (C).
                    [(B) Adequate yearly progress.--Each State 
                plan shall demonstrate, based on academic 
                assessments described in paragraph (3), and in 
                accordance with this paragraph, what 
                constitutes adequate yearly progress of the 
                State, and of all public elementary schools, 
                secondary schools, and local educational 
                agencies in the State, toward enabling all 
                public elementary school and secondary school 
                students to meet the State's student academic 
                achievement standards, while working toward the 
                goal of narrowing the achievement gaps in the 
                State, local educational agencies, and schools.
                    [(C) Definition.--``Adequate yearly 
                progress'' shall be defined by the State in a 
                manner that--
                            [(i) applies the same high 
                        standards of academic achievement to 
                        all public elementary school and 
                        secondary school students in the State;
                            [(ii) is statistically valid and 
                        reliable;
                            [(iii) results in continuous and 
                        substantial academic improvement for 
                        all students;
                            [(iv) measures the progress of 
                        public elementary schools, secondary 
                        schools and local educational agencies 
                        and the State based primarily on the 
                        academic assessments described in 
                        paragraph (3);
                            [(v) includes separate measurable 
                        annual objectives for continuous and 
                        substantial improvement for each of the 
                        following:
                                    [(I) The achievement of all 
                                public elementary school and 
                                secondary school students.
                                    [(II) The achievement of--
                                            [(aa) economically 
                                        disadvantaged students;
                                            [(bb) students from 
                                        major racial and ethnic 
                                        groups;
                                            [(cc) students with 
                                        disabilities; and
                                            [(dd) students with 
                                        limited English 
                                        proficiency;
                                except that disaggregation of 
                                data under subclause (II) shall 
                                not be required in a case in 
                                which the number of students in 
                                a category is insufficient to 
                                yield statistically reliable 
                                information or the results 
                                would reveal personally 
                                identifiable information about 
                                an individual student;
                            [(vi) in accordance with 
                        subparagraph (D), includes graduation 
                        rates for public secondary school 
                        students (defined as the percentage of 
                        students who graduate from secondary 
                        school with a regular diploma in the 
                        standard number of years) and at least 
                        one other academic indicator, as 
                        determined by the State for all public 
                        elementary school students; and
                            [(vii) in accordance with 
                        subparagraph (D), at the State's 
                        discretion, may also include other 
                        academic indicators, as determined by 
                        the State for all public school 
                        students, measured separately for each 
                        group described in clause (v), such as 
                        achievement on additional State or 
                        locally administered assessments, 
                        decreases in grade-to-grade retention 
                        rates, attendance rates, and changes in 
                        the percentages of students completing 
                        gifted and talented, advanced 
                        placement, and college preparatory 
                        courses.
                    [(D) Requirements for other indicators.--In 
                carrying out subparagraph (C)(vi) and (vii), 
                the State--
                            [(i) shall ensure that the 
                        indicators described in those 
                        provisions are valid and reliable, and 
                        are consistent with relevant, 
                        nationally recognized professional and 
                        technical standards, if any; and
                            [(ii) except as provided in 
                        subparagraph (I)(i), may not use those 
                        indicators to reduce the number of, or 
                        change, the schools that would 
                        otherwise be subject to school 
                        improvement, corrective action, or 
                        restructuring under section 1116 if 
                        those additional indicators were not 
                        used, but may use them to identify 
                        additional schools for school 
                        improvement or in need of corrective 
                        action or restructuring.
                    [(E) Starting point.--Each State, using 
                data for the 2001-2002 school year, shall 
                establish the starting point for measuring, 
                under subparagraphs (G) and (H), the percentage 
                of students meeting or exceeding the State's 
                proficient level of academic achievement on the 
                State assessments under paragraph (3) and 
                pursuant to the timeline described in 
                subparagraph (F). The starting point shall be, 
                at a minimum, based on the higher of the 
                percentage of students at the proficient level 
                who are in--
                            [(i) the State's lowest achieving 
                        group of students described in 
                        subparagraph (C)(v)(II); or
                            [(ii) the school at the 20th 
                        percentile in the State, based on 
                        enrollment, among all schools ranked by 
                        the percentage of students at the 
                        proficient level.
                    [(F) Timeline.--Each State shall establish 
                a timeline for adequate yearly progress. The 
                timeline shall ensure that not later than 12 
                years after the end of the 2001-2002 school 
                year, all students in each group described in 
                subparagraph (C)(v) will meet or exceed the 
                State's proficient level of academic 
                achievement on the State assessments under 
                paragraph (3).
                    [(G) Measurable objectives.--Each State 
                shall establish statewide annual measurable 
                objectives, pursuant to subparagraph (C)(v), 
                for meeting the requirements of this paragraph, 
                and which--
                            [(i) shall be set separately for 
                        the assessments of mathematics and 
                        reading or language arts under 
                        subsection (a)(3);
                            [(ii) shall be the same for all 
                        schools and local educational agencies 
                        in the State;
                            [(iii) shall identify a single 
                        minimum percentage of students who are 
                        required to meet or exceed the 
                        proficient level on the academic 
                        assessments that applies separately to 
                        each group of students described in 
                        subparagraph (C)(v);
                            [(iv) shall ensure that all 
                        students will meet or exceed the 
                        State's proficient level of academic 
                        achievement on the State assessments 
                        within the State's timeline under 
                        subparagraph (F); and
                            [(v) may be the same for more than 
                        1 year, subject to the requirements of 
                        subparagraph (H).
                    [(H) Intermediate goals for annual yearly 
                progress.--Each State shall establish 
                intermediate goals for meeting the 
                requirements, including the measurable 
                objectives in subparagraph (G), of this 
                paragraph and that shall--
                            [(i) increase in equal increments 
                        over the period covered by the State's 
                        timeline under subparagraph (F);
                            [(ii) provide for the first 
                        increase to occur in not more than 2 
                        years; and
                            [(iii) provide for each following 
                        increase to occur in not more than 3 
                        years.
                    [(I) Annual improvement for schools.--Each 
                year, for a school to make adequate yearly 
                progress under this paragraph--
                            [(i) each group of students 
                        described in subparagraph (C)(v) must 
                        meet or exceed the objectives set by 
                        the State under subparagraph (G), 
                        except that if any group described in 
                        subparagraph (C)(v) does not meet those 
                        objectives in any particular year, the 
                        school shall be considered to have made 
                        adequate yearly progress if the 
                        percentage of students in that group 
                        who did not meet or exceed the 
                        proficient level of academic 
                        achievement on the State assessments 
                        under paragraph (3) for that year 
                        decreased by 10 percent of that 
                        percentage from the preceding school 
                        year and that group made progress on 
                        one or more of the academic indicators 
                        described in subparagraph (C)(vi) or 
                        (vii); and
                            [(ii) not less than 95 percent of 
                        each group of students described in 
                        subparagraph (C)(v) who are enrolled in 
                        the school are required to take the 
                        assessments, consistent with paragraph 
                        (3)(C)(xi) and with accommodations, 
                        guidelines, and alternative assessments 
                        provided in the same manner as those 
                        provided under section 612(a)(16)(A) of 
                        the Individuals with Disabilities 
                        Education Act and paragraph (3), on 
                        which adequate yearly progress is based 
                        (except that the 95 percent requirement 
                        described in this clause shall not 
                        apply in a case in which the number of 
                        students in a category is insufficient 
                        to yield statistically reliable 
                        information or the results would reveal 
                        personally identifiable information 
                        about an individual student).
                    [(J) Uniform averaging procedure.--For the 
                purpose of determining whether schools are 
                making adequate yearly progress, the State may 
                establish a uniform procedure for averaging 
                data which includes one or more of the 
                following:
                            [(i) The State may average data 
                        from the school year for which the 
                        determination is made with data from 
                        one or two school years immediately 
                        preceding that school year.
                            [(ii) Until the assessments 
                        described in paragraph (3) are 
                        administered in such manner and time to 
                        allow for the implementation of the 
                        uniform procedure for averaging data 
                        described in clause (i), the State may 
                        use the academic assessments that were 
                        required under paragraph (3) as that 
                        paragraph was in effect on the day 
                        preceding the date of enactment of the 
                        No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, 
                        provided that nothing in this clause 
                        shall be construed to undermine or 
                        delay the determination of adequate 
                        yearly progress, the requirements of 
                        section 1116, or the implementation of 
                        assessments under this section.
                            [(iii) The State may use data 
                        across grades in a school.
                    [(K) Accountability for charter schools.--
                The accountability provisions under this Act 
                shall be overseen for charter schools in 
                accordance with State charter school law.
            [(3) Academic assessments.--
                    [(A) In general.--Each State plan shall 
                demonstrate that the State educational agency, 
                in consultation with local educational 
                agencies, has implemented a set of high-
                quality, yearly student academic assessments 
                that include, at a minimum, academic 
                assessments in mathematics, reading or language 
                arts, and science that will be used as the 
                primary means of determining the yearly 
                performance of the State and of each local 
                educational agency and school in the State in 
                enabling all children to meet the State's 
                challenging student academic achievement 
                standards, except that no State shall be 
                required to meet the requirements of this part 
                relating to science assessments until the 
                beginning of the 2007-2008 school year.
                    [(B) Use of assessments.--Each State 
                educational agency may incorporate the data 
                from the assessments under this paragraph into 
                a State-developed longitudinal data system that 
                links student test scores, length of 
                enrollment, and graduation records over time.
                    [(C) Requirements.--Such assessments 
                shall--
                            [(i) be the same academic 
                        assessments used to measure the 
                        achievement of all children;
                            [(ii) be aligned with the State's 
                        challenging academic content and 
                        student academic achievement standards, 
                        and provide coherent information about 
                        student attainment of such standards;
                            [(iii) be used for purposes for 
                        which such assessments are valid and 
                        reliable, and be consistent with 
                        relevant, nationally recognized 
                        professional and technical standards;
                            [(iv) be used only if the State 
                        educational agency provides to the 
                        Secretary evidence from the test 
                        publisher or other relevant sources 
                        that the assessments used are of 
                        adequate technical quality for each 
                        purpose required under this Act and are 
                        consistent with the requirements of 
                        this section, and such evidence is made 
                        public by the Secretary upon request;
                            [(v)(I) except as otherwise 
                        provided for grades 3 through 8 under 
                        clause vii, measure the proficiency of 
                        students in, at a minimum, mathematics 
                        and reading or language arts, and be 
                        administered not less than once 
                        during--
                                    [(aa) grades 3 through 5;
                                    [(bb) grades 6 through 9; 
                                and
                                    [(cc) grades 10 through 12;
                            [(II) beginning not later than 
                        school year 2007-2008, measure the 
                        proficiency of all students in science 
                        and be administered not less than one 
                        time during--
                                    [(aa) grades 3 through 5;
                                    [(bb) grades 6 through 9; 
                                and
                                    [(cc) grades 10 through 12;
                            [(vi) involve multiple up-to-date 
                        measures of student academic 
                        achievement, including measures that 
                        assess higher-order thinking skills and 
                        understanding;
                            [(vii) beginning not later than 
                        school year 2005-2006, measure the 
                        achievement of students against the 
                        challenging State academic content and 
                        student academic achievement standards 
                        in each of grades 3 through 8 in, at a 
                        minimum, mathematics, and reading or 
                        language arts, except that the 
                        Secretary may provide the State 1 
                        additional year if the State 
                        demonstrates that exceptional or 
                        uncontrollable circumstances, such as a 
                        natural disaster or a precipitous and 
                        unforeseen decline in the financial 
                        resources of the State, prevented full 
                        implementation of the academic 
                        assessments by that deadline and that 
                        the State will complete implementation 
                        within the additional 1-year period;
                            [(viii) at the discretion of the 
                        State, measure the proficiency of 
                        students in academic subjects not 
                        described in clauses (v), (vi), (vii) 
                        in which the State has adopted 
                        challenging academic content and 
                        academic achievement standards;
                            [(ix) provide for--
                                    [(I) the participation in 
                                such assessments of all 
                                students;
                                    [(II) the reasonable 
                                adaptations and accommodations 
                                for students with disabilities 
                                (as defined under section 
                                602(3) of the Individuals with 
                                Disabilities Education Act) 
                                necessary to measure the 
                                academic achievement of such 
                                students relative to State 
                                academic content and State 
                                student academic achievement 
                                standards; and
                                    [(III) the inclusion of 
                                limited English proficient 
                                students, who shall be assessed 
                                in a valid and reliable manner 
                                and provided reasonable 
                                accommodations on assessments 
                                administered to such students 
                                under this paragraph, 
                                including, to the extent 
                                practicable, assessments in the 
                                language and form most likely 
                                to yield accurate data on what 
                                such students know and can do 
                                in academic content areas, 
                                until such students have 
                                achieved English language 
                                proficiency as determined under 
                                paragraph (7);
                            [(x) notwithstanding subclause 
                        (III), the academic assessment (using 
                        tests written in English) of reading or 
                        language arts of any student who has 
                        attended school in the United States 
                        (not including Puerto Rico) for three 
                        or more consecutive school years, 
                        except that if the local educational 
                        agency determines, on a case-by-case 
                        individual basis, that academic 
                        assessments in another language or form 
                        would likely yield more accurate and 
                        reliable information on what such 
                        student knows and can do, the local 
                        educational agency may make a 
                        determination to assess such student in 
                        the appropriate language other than 
                        English for a period that does not 
                        exceed two additional consecutive 
                        years, provided that such student has 
                        not yet reached a level of English 
                        language proficiency sufficient to 
                        yield valid and reliable information on 
                        what such student knows and can do on 
                        tests (written in English) of reading 
                        or language arts;
                            [(xi) include students who have 
                        attended schools in a local educational 
                        agency for a full academic year but 
                        have not attended a single school for a 
                        full academic year, except that the 
                        performance of students who have 
                        attended more than 1 school in the 
                        local educational agency in any 
                        academic year shall be used only in 
                        determining the progress of the local 
                        educational agency;
                            [(xii) produce individual student 
                        interpretive, descriptive, and 
                        diagnostic reports, consistent with 
                        clause (iii) that allow parents, 
                        teachers, and principals to understand 
                        and address the specific academic needs 
                        of students, and include information 
                        regarding achievement on academic 
                        assessments aligned with State academic 
                        achievement standards, and that are 
                        provided to parents, teachers, and 
                        principals, as soon as is practicably 
                        possible after the assessment is given, 
                        in an understandable and uniform 
                        format, and to the extent practicable, 
                        in a language that parents can 
                        understand;
                            [(xiii) enable results to be 
                        disaggregated within each State, local 
                        educational agency, and school by 
                        gender, by each major racial and ethnic 
                        group, by English proficiency status, 
                        by migrant status, by students with 
                        disabilities as compared to nondisabled 
                        students, and by economically 
                        disadvantaged students as compared to 
                        students who are not economically 
                        disadvantaged, except that, in the case 
                        of a local educational agency or a 
                        school, such disaggregation shall not 
                        be required in a case in which the 
                        number of students in a category is 
                        insufficient to yield statistically 
                        reliable information or the results 
                        would reveal personally identifiable 
                        information about an individual 
                        student;
                            [(xiv) be consistent with widely 
                        accepted professional testing 
                        standards, objectively measure academic 
                        achievement, knowledge, and skills, and 
                        be tests that do not evaluate or assess 
                        personal or family beliefs and 
                        attitudes, or publicly disclose 
                        personally identifiable information; 
                        and
                            [(xv) enable itemized score 
                        analyses to be produced and reported, 
                        consistent with clause (iii), to local 
                        educational agencies and schools, so 
                        that parents, teachers, principals, and 
                        administrators can interpret and 
                        address the specific academic needs of 
                        students as indicated by the students' 
                        achievement on assessment items.
                    [(D) Deferral.--A State may defer the 
                commencement, or suspend the administration, 
                but not cease the development, of the 
                assessments described in this paragraph, that 
                were not required prior to the date of 
                enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 
                2001, for 1 year for each year for which the 
                amount appropriated for grants under section 
                6113(a)(2) is less than--
                            [(i) $370,000,000 for fiscal year 
                        2002;
                            [(ii) $380,000,000 for fiscal year 
                        2003;
                            [(iii) $390,000,000 for fiscal year 
                        2004; and
                            [(iv) $400,000,000 for fiscal years 
                        2005 through 2007.
            [(4) Special rule.--Academic assessment measures in 
        addition to those in paragraph (3) that do not meet the 
        requirements of such paragraph may be included in the 
        assessment under paragraph (3) as additional measures, 
        but may not be used in lieu of the academic assessments 
        required under paragraph (3). Such additional 
        assessment measures may not be used to reduce the 
        number of or change, the schools that would otherwise 
        be subject to school improvement, corrective action, or 
        restructuring under section 1116 if such additional 
        indicators were not used, but may be used to identify 
        additional schools for school improvement or in need of 
        corrective action or restructuring except as provided 
        in paragraph (2)(I)(i).
            [(5) State authority.--If a State educational 
        agency provides evidence, which is satisfactory to the 
        Secretary, that neither the State educational agency 
        nor any other State government official, agency, or 
        entity has sufficient authority, under State law, to 
        adopt curriculum content and student academic 
        achievement standards, and academic assessments aligned 
        with such academic standards, which will be applicable 
        to all students enrolled in the State's public 
        elementary schools and secondary schools, then the 
        State educational agency may meet the requirements of 
        this subsection by--
                    [(A) adopting academic standards and 
                academic assessments that meet the requirements 
                of this subsection, on a statewide basis, and 
                limiting their applicability to students served 
                under this part; or
                    [(B) adopting and implementing policies 
                that ensure that each local educational agency 
                in the State that receives grants under this 
                part will adopt curriculum content and student 
                academic achievement standards, and academic 
                assessments aligned with such standards, 
                which--
                            [(i) meet all of the criteria in 
                        this subsection and any regulations 
                        regarding such standards and 
                        assessments that the Secretary may 
                        publish; and
                            [(ii) are applicable to all 
                        students served by each such local 
                        educational agency.
            [(6) Language assessments.--Each State plan shall 
        identify the languages other than English that are 
        present in the participating student population and 
        indicate the languages for which yearly student 
        academic assessments are not available and are needed. 
        The State shall make every effort to develop such 
        assessments and may request assistance from the 
        Secretary if linguistically accessible academic 
        assessment measures are needed. Upon request, the 
        Secretary shall assist with the identification of 
        appropriate academic assessment measures in the needed 
        languages, but shall not mandate a specific academic 
        assessment or mode of instruction.
            [(7) Academic assessments of english language 
        proficiency.--Each State plan shall demonstrate that 
        local educational agencies in the State will, beginning 
        not later than school year 2002-2003, provide for an 
        annual assessment of English proficiency (measuring 
        students' oral language, reading, and writing skills in 
        English) of all students with limited English 
        proficiency in the schools served by the State 
        educational agency, except that the Secretary may 
        provide the State 1 additional year if the State 
        demonstrates that exceptional or uncontrollable 
        circumstances, such as a natural disaster or a 
        precipitous and unforeseen decline in the financial 
        resources of the State, prevented full implementation 
        of this paragraph by that deadline and that the State 
        will complete implementation within the additional 1-
        year period.
            [(8) Requirement.--Each State plan shall describe--
                    [(A) how the State educational agency will 
                assist each local educational agency and school 
                affected by the State plan to develop the 
                capacity to comply with each of the 
                requirements of sections 1112(c)(1)(D), 
                1114(b), and 1115(c) that is applicable to such 
                agency or school;
                    [(B) how the State educational agency will 
                assist each local educational agency and school 
                affected by the State plan to provide 
                additional educational assistance to individual 
                students assessed as needing help to achieve 
                the State's challenging academic achievement 
                standards;
                    [(C) the specific steps the State 
                educational agency will take to ensure that 
                both schoolwide programs and targeted 
                assistance schools provide instruction by 
                highly qualified instructional staff as 
                required by sections 1114(b)(1)(C) and 
                1115(c)(1)(E), including steps that the State 
                educational agency will take to ensure that 
                poor and minority children are not taught at 
                higher rates than other children by 
                inexperienced, unqualified, or out-of-field 
                teachers, and the measures that the State 
                educational agency will use to evaluate and 
                publicly report the progress of the State 
                educational agency with respect to such steps;
                    [(D) an assurance that the State 
                educational agency will assist local 
                educational agencies in developing or 
                identifying high-quality effective curricula 
                aligned with State academic achievement 
                standards and how the State educational agency 
                will disseminate such curricula to each local 
                educational agency and school within the State; 
                and
                    [(E) such other factors the State 
                educational agency determines appropriate to 
                provide students an opportunity to achieve the 
                knowledge and skills described in the 
                challenging academic content standards adopted 
                by the State.
            [(9) Factors affecting student achievement.--Each 
        State plan shall include an assurance that the State 
        educational agency will coordinate and collaborate, to 
        the extent feasible and necessary as determined by the 
        State educational agency, with agencies providing 
        services to children, youth, and families, with respect 
        to local educational agencies within the State that are 
        identified under section 1116 and that request 
        assistance with addressing major factors that have 
        significantly affected the academic achievement of 
        students in the local educational agency or schools 
        served by such agency.
            [(10) Use of academic assessment results to improve 
        student academic achievement.--Each State plan shall 
        describe how the State educational agency will ensure 
        that the results of the State assessments described in 
        paragraph (3)--
                    [(A) will be promptly provided to local 
                educational agencies, schools, and teachers in 
                a manner that is clear and easy to understand, 
                but not later than before the beginning of the 
                next school year; and
                    [(B) be used by those local educational 
                agencies, schools, and teachers to improve the 
                educational achievement of individual students.
    [(c) Other Provisions To Support Teaching and Learning.--
Each State plan shall contain assurances that--
            [(1) the State educational agency will meet the 
        requirements of subsection (h)(1) and, beginning with 
        the 2002-2003 school year, will produce the annual 
        State report cards described in such subsection, except 
        that the Secretary may provide the State educational 
        agency 1 additional year if the State educational 
        agency demonstrates that exceptional or uncontrollable 
        circumstances, such as a natural disaster or a 
        precipitous and unforeseen decline in the financial 
        resources of the State, prevented full implementation 
        of this paragraph by that deadline and that the State 
        will complete implementation within the additional 1-
        year period;
            [(2) the State will, beginning in school year 2002-
        2003, participate in biennial State academic 
        assessments of 4th and 8th grade reading and 
        mathematics under the National Assessment of 
        Educational Progress carried out under section 
        303(b)(2) of the National Assessment of Educational 
        Progress Authorization Act if the Secretary pays the 
        costs of administering such assessments;
            [(3) the State educational agency, in consultation 
        with the Governor, will include, as a component of the 
        State plan, a plan to carry out the responsibilities of 
        the State under sections 1116 and 1117, including 
        carrying out the State educational agency's statewide 
        system of technical assistance and support for local 
        educational agencies;
            [(4) the State educational agency will work with 
        other agencies, including educational service agencies 
        or other local consortia, and institutions to provide 
        technical assistance to local educational agencies and 
        schools, including technical assistance in providing 
        professional development under section 1119, technical 
        assistance under section 1117, and technical assistance 
        relating to parental involvement under section 1118;
            [(5)(A) where educational service agencies exist, 
        the State educational agency will consider providing 
        professional development and technical assistance 
        through such agencies; and
            [(B) where educational service agencies do not 
        exist, the State educational agency will consider 
        providing professional development and technical 
        assistance through other cooperative agreements such as 
        through a consortium of local educational agencies;
            [(6) the State educational agency will notify local 
        educational agencies and the public of the content and 
        student academic achievement standards and academic 
        assessments developed under this section, and of the 
        authority to operate schoolwide programs, and will 
        fulfill the State educational agency's responsibilities 
        regarding local educational agency improvement and 
        school improvement under section 1116, including such 
        corrective actions as are necessary;
            [(7) the State educational agency will provide the 
        least restrictive and burdensome regulations for local 
        educational agencies and individual schools 
        participating in a program assisted under this part;
            [(8) the State educational agency will inform the 
        Secretary and the public of how Federal laws, if at 
        all, hinder the ability of States to hold local 
        educational agencies and schools accountable for 
        student academic achievement;
            [(9) the State educational agency will encourage 
        schools to consolidate funds from other Federal, State, 
        and local sources for schoolwide reform in schoolwide 
        programs under section 1114;
            [(10) the State educational agency will modify or 
        eliminate State fiscal and accounting barriers so that 
        schools can easily consolidate funds from other 
        Federal, State, and local sources for schoolwide 
        programs under section 1114;
            [(11) the State educational agency has involved the 
        committee of practitioners established under section 
        1903(b) in developing the plan and monitoring its 
        implementation;
            [(12) the State educational agency will inform 
        local educational agencies in the State of the local 
        educational agency's authority to transfer funds under 
        title VI, to obtain waivers under part D of title IX, 
        and, if the State is an Ed-Flex Partnership State, to 
        obtain waivers under the Education Flexibility 
        Partnership Act of 1999;
            [(13) the State educational agency will coordinate 
        activities funded under this part with other Federal 
        activities as appropriate; and
            [(14) the State educational agency will encourage 
        local educational agencies and individual schools 
        participating in a program assisted under this part to 
        offer family literacy services (using funds under this 
        part), if the agency or school determines that a 
        substantial number of students served under this part 
        by the agency or school have parents who do not have a 
        secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent 
        or who have low levels of literacy.
    [(d) Parental Involvement.--Each State plan shall describe 
how the State educational agency will support the collection 
and dissemination to local educational agencies and schools of 
effective parental involvement practices. Such practices 
shall--
            [(1) be based on the most current research that 
        meets the highest professional and technical standards, 
        on effective parental involvement that fosters 
        achievement to high standards for all children; and
            [(2) be geared toward lowering barriers to greater 
        participation by parents in school planning, review, 
        and improvement experienced.
    [(e) Peer Review and Secretarial Approval.--
            [(1) Secretarial duties.--The Secretary shall--
                    [(A) establish a peer-review process to 
                assist in the review of State plans;
                    [(B) appoint individuals to the peer-review 
                process who are representative of parents, 
                teachers, State educational agencies, and local 
                educational agencies, and who are familiar with 
                educational standards, assessments, 
                accountability, the needs of low-performing 
                schools, and other educational needs of 
                students;
                    [(C) approve a State plan within 120 days 
                of its submission unless the Secretary 
                determines that the plan does not meet the 
                requirements of this section;
                    [(D) if the Secretary determines that the 
                State plan does not meet the requirements of 
                subsection (a), (b), or (c), immediately notify 
                the State of such determination and the reasons 
                for such determination;
                    [(E) not decline to approve a State's plan 
                before--
                            [(i) offering the State an 
                        opportunity to revise its plan;
                            [(ii) providing technical 
                        assistance in order to assist the State 
                        to meet the requirements of subsections 
                        (a), (b), and (c); and
                            [(iii) providing a hearing; and
                    [(F) have the authority to disapprove a 
                State plan for not meeting the requirements of 
                this part, but shall not have the authority to 
                require a State, as a condition of approval of 
                the State plan, to include in, or delete from, 
                such plan one or more specific elements of the 
                State's academic content standards or to use 
                specific academic assessment instruments or 
                items.
            [(2) State revisions.--A State plan shall be 
        revised by the State educational agency if it is 
        necessary to satisfy the requirements of this section.
    [(f) Duration of the Plan.--
            [(1) In general.--Each State plan shall--
                    [(A) remain in effect for the duration of 
                the State's participation under this part; and
                    [(B) be periodically reviewed and revised 
                as necessary by the State educational agency to 
                reflect changes in the State's strategies and 
                programs under this part.
            [(2) Additional information.--If significant 
        changes are made to a State's plan, such as the 
        adoption of new State academic content standards and 
        State student achievement standards, new academic 
        assessments, or a new definition of adequate yearly 
        progress, such information shall be submitted to the 
        Secretary.
    [(g) Penalties.--
            [(1) Failure to meet deadlines enacted in 1994.--
                    [(A) In general.--If a State fails to meet 
                the deadlines established by the Improving 
                America's Schools Act of 1994 (or under any 
                waiver granted by the Secretary or under any 
                compliance agreement with the Secretary) for 
                demonstrating that the State has in place 
                challenging academic content standards and 
                student achievement standards, and a system for 
                measuring and monitoring adequate yearly 
                progress, the Secretary shall withhold 25 
                percent of the funds that would otherwise be 
                available to the State for State administration 
                and activities under this part in each year 
                until the Secretary determines that the State 
                meets those requirements.
                    [(B) No extension.--Notwithstanding any 
                other provision of law, 90 days after the date 
                of enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 
                2001 the Secretary shall not grant any 
                additional waivers of, or enter into any 
                additional compliance agreements to extend, the 
                deadlines described in subparagraph (A) for any 
                State.
            [(2) Failure to meet requirements enacted in 
        2001.--If a State fails to meet any of the requirements 
        of this section, other than the requirements described 
        in paragraph (1), then the Secretary may withhold funds 
        for State administration under this part until the 
        Secretary determines that the State has fulfilled those 
        requirements.
    [(h) Reports.--
            [(1) Annual state report card.--
                    [(A) In general.--Not later than the 
                beginning of the 2002-2003 school year, unless 
                the State has received a 1-year extension 
                pursuant to subsection (c)(1), a State that 
                receives assistance under this part shall 
                prepare and disseminate an annual State report 
                card.
                    [(B) Implementation.--The State report card 
                shall be--
                            [(i) concise; and
                            [(ii) presented in an 
                        understandable and uniform format and, 
                        to the extent practicable, provided in 
                        a language that the parents can 
                        understand.
                    [(C) Required information.--The State shall 
                include in its annual State report card--
                            [(i) information, in the aggregate, 
                        on student achievement at each 
                        proficiency level on the State academic 
                        assessments described in subsection 
                        (b)(3) (disaggregated by race, 
                        ethnicity, gender, disability status, 
                        migrant status, English proficiency, 
                        and status as economically 
                        disadvantaged, except that such 
                        disaggregation shall not be required in 
                        a case in which the number of students 
                        in a category is insufficient to yield 
                        statistically reliable information or 
                        the results would reveal personally 
                        identifiable information about an 
                        individual student);
                            [(ii) information that provides a 
                        comparison between the actual 
                        achievement levels of each group of 
                        students described in subsection 
                        (b)(2)(C)(v) and the State's annual 
                        measurable objectives for each such 
                        group of students on each of the 
                        academic assessments required under 
                        this part;
                            [(iii) the percentage of students 
                        not tested (disaggregated by the same 
                        categories and subject to the same 
                        exception described in clause (i));
                            [(iv) the most recent 2-year trend 
                        in student achievement in each subject 
                        area, and for each grade level, for 
                        which assessments under this section 
                        are required;
                            [(v) aggregate information on any 
                        other indicators used by the State to 
                        determine the adequate yearly progress 
                        of students in achieving State academic 
                        achievement standards;
                            [(vi) graduation rates for 
                        secondary school students consistent 
                        with subsection (b)(2)(C)(vi);
                            [(vii) information on the 
                        performance of local educational 
                        agencies in the State regarding making 
                        adequate yearly progress, including the 
                        number and names of each school 
                        identified for school improvement under 
                        section 1116; and
                            [(viii) the professional 
                        qualifications of teachers in the 
                        State, the percentage of such teachers 
                        teaching with emergency or provisional 
                        credentials, and the percentage of 
                        classes in the State not taught by 
                        highly qualified teachers, in the 
                        aggregate and disaggregated by high-
                        poverty compared to low-poverty schools 
                        which, for the purpose of this clause, 
                        means schools in the top quartile of 
                        poverty and the bottom quartile of 
                        poverty in the State.
                    [(D) Optional information.--The State may 
                include in its annual State report card such 
                other information as the State believes will 
                best provide parents, students, and other 
                members of the public with information 
                regarding the progress of each of the State's 
                public elementary schools and public secondary 
                schools. Such information may include 
                information regarding--
                            [(i) school attendance rates;
                            [(ii) average class size in each 
                        grade;
                            [(iii) academic achievement and 
                        gains in English proficiency of limited 
                        English proficient students;
                            [(iv) the incidence of school 
                        violence, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, 
                        student suspensions, and student 
                        expulsions;
                            [(v) the extent and type of 
                        parental involvement in the schools;
                            [(vi) the percentage of students 
                        completing advanced placement courses, 
                        and the rate of passing of advanced 
                        placement tests; and
                            [(vii) a clear and concise 
                        description of the State's 
                        accountability system, including a 
                        description of the criteria by which 
                        the State evaluates school performance, 
                        and the criteria that the State has 
                        established, consistent with subsection 
                        (b)(2), to determine the status of 
                        schools regarding school improvement, 
                        corrective action, and restructuring.
            [(2) Annual local educational agency report 
        cards.--
                    [(A) Report cards.--
                            [(i) In general.--Not later than 
                        the beginning of the 2002-2003 school 
                        year, a local educational agency that 
                        receives assistance under this part 
                        shall prepare and disseminate an annual 
                        local educational agency report card, 
                        except that the State educational 
                        agency may provide the local 
                        educational agency 1 additional year if 
                        the local educational agency 
                        demonstrates that exceptional or 
                        uncontrollable circumstances, such as a 
                        natural disaster or a precipitous and 
                        unforeseen decline in the financial 
                        resources of the local educational 
                        agency, prevented full implementation 
                        of this paragraph by that deadline and 
                        that the local educational agency will 
                        complete implementation within the 
                        additional 1-year period.
                            [(ii) Special rule.--If a State 
                        educational agency has received an 
                        extension pursuant to subsection 
                        (c)(1), then a local educational agency 
                        within that State shall not be required 
                        to include the information required 
                        under paragraph (1)(C) in such report 
                        card during such extension.
                    [(B) Minimum requirements.--The State 
                educational agency shall ensure that each local 
                educational agency collects appropriate data 
                and includes in the local educational agency's 
                annual report the information described in 
                paragraph (1)(C) as applied to the local 
                educational agency and each school served by 
                the local educational agency, and--
                            [(i) in the case of a local 
                        educational agency--
                                    [(I) the number and 
                                percentage of schools 
                                identified for school 
                                improvement under section 
                                1116(c) and how long the 
                                schools have been so 
                                identified; and
                                    [(II) information that 
                                shows how students served by 
                                the local educational agency 
                                achieved on the statewide 
                                academic assessment compared to 
                                students in the State as a 
                                whole; and
                            [(ii) in the case of a school--
                                    [(I) whether the school has 
                                been identified for school 
                                improvement; and
                                    [(II) information that 
                                shows how the school's students 
                                achievement on the statewide 
                                academic assessments and other 
                                indicators of adequate yearly 
                                progress compared to students 
                                in the local educational agency 
                                and the State as a whole.
                    [(C) Other information.--A local 
                educational agency may include in its annual 
                local educational agency report card any other 
                appropriate information, whether or not such 
                information is included in the annual State 
                report card.
                    [(D) Data.--A local educational agency or 
                school shall only include in its annual local 
                educational agency report card data that are 
                sufficient to yield statistically reliable 
                information, as determined by the State, and 
                that do not reveal personally identifiable 
                information about an individual student.
                    [(E) Public dissemination.--The local 
                educational agency shall, not later than the 
                beginning of the 2002-2003 school year, unless 
                the local educational agency has received a 1-
                year extension pursuant to subparagraph (A), 
                publicly disseminate the information described 
                in this paragraph to all schools in the school 
                district served by the local educational agency 
                and to all parents of students attending those 
                schools in an understandable and uniform format 
                and, to the extent practicable, provided in a 
                language that the parents can understand, and 
                make the information widely available through 
                public means, such as posting on the Internet, 
                distribution to the media, and distribution 
                through public agencies, except that if a local 
                educational agency issues a report card for all 
                students, the local educational agency may 
                include the information under this section as 
                part of such report.
            [(3) Preexisting report cards.--A State educational 
        agency or local educational agency that was providing 
        public report cards on the performance of students, 
        schools, local educational agencies, or the State prior 
        to the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 
        2001 may use those report cards for the purpose of this 
        subsection, so long as any such report card is 
        modified, as may be needed, to contain the information 
        required by this subsection.
            [(4) Annual state report to the secretary.--Each 
        State educational agency receiving assistance under 
        this part shall report annually to the Secretary, and 
        make widely available within the State--
                    [(A) beginning with school year 2002-2003, 
                information on the State's progress in 
                developing and implementing the academic 
                assessments described in subsection (b)(3);
                    [(B) beginning not later than school year 
                2002-2003, information on the achievement of 
                students on the academic assessments required 
                by subsection (b)(3), including the 
                disaggregated results for the categories of 
                students identified in subsection (b)(2)(C)(v);
                    [(C) in any year before the State begins to 
                provide the information described in 
                subparagraph (B), information on the results of 
                student academic assessments (including 
                disaggregated results) required under this 
                section;
                    [(D) beginning not later than school year 
                2002-2003, unless the State has received an 
                extension pursuant to subsection (c)(1), 
                information on the acquisition of English 
                proficiency by children with limited English 
                proficiency;
                    [(E) the number and names of each school 
                identified for school improvement under section 
                1116(c), the reason why each school was so 
                identified, and the measures taken to address 
                the achievement problems of such schools;
                    [(F) the number of students and schools 
                that participated in public school choice and 
                supplemental service programs and activities 
                under this title; and
                    [(G) beginning not later than the 2002-2003 
                school year, information on the quality of 
                teachers and the percentage of classes being 
                taught by highly qualified teachers in the 
                State, local educational agency, and school.
            [(5) Report to congress.--The Secretary shall 
        transmit annually to the Committee on Education and the 
        Workforce of the House of Representatives and the 
        Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of 
        the Senate a report that provides national and State-
        level data on the information collected under paragraph 
        (4).
            [(6) Parents right-to-know.--
                    [(A) Qualifications.--At the beginning of 
                each school year, a local educational agency 
                that receives funds under this part shall 
                notify the parents of each student attending 
                any school receiving funds under this part that 
                the parents may request, and the agency will 
                provide the parents on request (and in a timely 
                manner), information regarding the professional 
                qualifications of the student's classroom 
                teachers, including, at a minimum, the 
                following:
                            [(i) Whether the teacher has met 
                        State qualification and licensing 
                        criteria for the grade levels and 
                        subject areas in which the teacher 
                        provides instruction.
                            [(ii) Whether the teacher is 
                        teaching under emergency or other 
                        provisional status through which State 
                        qualification or licensing criteria 
                        have been waived.
                            [(iii) The baccalaureate degree 
                        major of the teacher and any other 
                        graduate certification or degree held 
                        by the teacher, and the field of 
                        discipline of the certification or 
                        degree.
                            [(iv) Whether the child is provided 
                        services by paraprofessionals and, if 
                        so, their qualifications.
                    [(B) Additional information.--In addition 
                to the information that parents may request 
                under subparagraph (A), a school that receives 
                funds under this part shall provide to each 
                individual parent--
                            [(i) information on the level of 
                        achievement of the parent's child in 
                        each of the State academic assessments 
                        as required under this part; and
                            [(ii) timely notice that the 
                        parent's child has been assigned, or 
                        has been taught for four or more 
                        consecutive weeks by, a teacher who is 
                        not highly qualified.
                    [(C) Format.--The notice and information 
                provided to parents under this paragraph shall 
                be in an understandable and uniform format and, 
                to the extent practicable, provided in a 
                language that the parents can understand.
    [(i) Privacy.--Information collected under this section 
shall be collected and disseminated in a manner that protects 
the privacy of individuals.
    [(j) Technical Assistance.--The Secretary shall provide a 
State educational agency, at the State educational agency's 
request, technical assistance in meeting the requirements of 
this section, including the provision of advice by experts in 
the development of high-quality academic assessments, the 
setting of State standards, the development of measures of 
adequate yearly progress that are valid and reliable, and other 
relevant areas.
    [(k) Voluntary Partnerships.--A State may enter into a 
voluntary partnership with another State to develop and 
implement the academic assessments and standards required under 
this section.
    [(l) Construction.--Nothing in this part shall be construed 
to prescribe the use of the academic assessments described in 
this part for student promotion or graduation purposes.
    [(m) Special Rule With Respect to Bureau-Funded Schools.--
In determining the assessments to be used by each operated or 
funded by BIA school receiving funds under this part, the 
following shall apply:
            [(1) Each such school that is accredited by the 
        State in which it is operating shall use the 
        assessments the State has developed and implemented to 
        meet the requirements of this section, or such other 
        appropriate assessment as approved by the Secretary of 
        the Interior.
            [(2) Each such school that is accredited by a 
        regional accrediting organization shall adopt an 
        appropriate assessment, in consultation with and with 
        the approval of, the Secretary of the Interior and 
        consistent with assessments adopted by other schools in 
        the same State or region, that meets the requirements 
        of this section.
            [(3) Each such school that is accredited by a 
        tribal accrediting agency or tribal division of 
        education shall use an assessment developed by such 
        agency or division, except that the Secretary of the 
        Interior shall ensure that such assessment meets the 
        requirements of this section.]

SEC. 1111. STATE AND LOCAL REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Academic Standards, Academic Assessments, and 
Accountability Requirements.--
            (1) Requirements for college and career ready state 
        standards.--In order to receive a grant for the program 
        under this subpart and subpart 2, each State shall 
        demonstrate the State meets the following requirements:
                    (A) College and career ready aligned 
                standards for reading or language arts and 
                mathematics.--
                            (i) In general.--The State shall--
                                    (I) not later than December 
                                31, 2014, adopt college and 
                                career ready academic content 
                                standards in reading or 
                                language arts and mathematics 
                                that meet the requirements of 
                                clauses (ii) and (iii); and
                                    (II) not later than the 
                                beginning of the 2015-2016 
                                school year, adopt college and 
                                career ready student academic 
                                achievement standards in 
                                reading or language arts and 
                                mathematics that meet the 
                                requirements of clauses (ii) 
                                and (iv).
                            (ii) Alignment of college and 
                        career ready standards.--Each State 
                        plan shall demonstrate the State has 
                        adopted college and career ready 
                        academic content standards and college 
                        and career ready student academic 
                        achievement standards aligned with--
                                    (I)(aa) credit-bearing 
                                academic coursework, without 
                                the need for remediation, at 
                                public institutions of higher 
                                education in the State;
                                    (bb) relevant State career 
                                and technical education 
                                standards and the State 
                                performance measures identified 
                                in the State plan under section 
                                113(b) of the Carl D. Perkins 
                                Career and Technical Education 
                                Act of 2006; and
                                    (cc) appropriate career 
                                skills; or
                                    (II) standards that are 
                                State-developed and voluntarily 
                                adopted by a significant number 
                                of States.
                            (iii) Requirements for academic 
                        content standards.--College and career 
                        ready academic content standards 
                        shall--
                                    (I) be used by the State, 
                                and by local educational 
                                agencies, public elementary 
                                schools, and public secondary 
                                schools in the State, to carry 
                                out the requirements of this 
                                part;
                                    (II) be the same standards 
                                that the State applies to all 
                                public elementary and secondary 
                                schools and students in the 
                                State;
                                    (III) include the same 
                                knowledge, skills, and levels 
                                of achievement expected of all 
                                elementary and secondary school 
                                students in the State; and
                                    (IV) be evidence-based and 
                                include rigorous content and 
                                skills, such as critical 
                                thinking, problem solving, and 
                                communication skills.
                            (iv) Requirements for student 
                        academic achievement standards.--
                        College and career ready student 
                        academic achievement standards for a 
                        subject shall--
                                    (I) be aligned with the 
                                State's academic content 
                                standards described in clause 
                                (iii); and
                                    (II) establish the level of 
                                performance expected for each 
                                grade level that demonstrates 
                                the student has mastered the 
                                material in the State academic 
                                content standards for that 
                                grade.
                    (B) Science standards.--A State--
                            (i) shall demonstrate that the 
                        State has adopted, by not later than 
                        December 31, 2014, statewide academic 
                        content standards and student academic 
                        achievement standards in science that 
                        are aligned with the knowledge and 
                        skills needed to be college and career 
                        ready, as described in subparagraph 
                        (A)(ii); and
                            (ii) may choose to use such 
                        standards as part of the State's 
                        accountability system under paragraph 
                        (3), if such standards meet the 
                        requirements of clauses (ii) through 
                        (iv) of subparagraph (A).
                    (C) Standards for other subjects.--If a 
                State adopts high-quality academic content 
                standards and student academic achievement 
                standards in subjects other than reading or 
                language arts, mathematics, and science, such 
                State may choose to use such standards as part 
                of the State's accountability system, 
                consistent with section 1116.
                    (D) Alternate academic achievement 
                standards for students with the most 
                significant cognitive disabilities.--
                            (i) In general.--The State may, 
                        through a documented and validated 
                        standards-setting process, adopt 
                        alternate academic achievement 
                        standards in any subject included in 
                        the State's accountability system under 
                        paragraph (3) for students with the 
                        most significant cognitive 
                        disabilities, if--
                                    (I) the determination about 
                                whether the achievement of an 
                                individual student should be 
                                measured against such standards 
                                is made separately for each 
                                student in each subject being 
                                assessed;
                                    (II) all students who use 
                                such alternate academic 
                                achievement standards in a 
                                subject are assessed using the 
                                alternate assessments for such 
                                subject described in paragraph 
                                (2)(E); and
                                    (III) such alternate 
                                academic achievement 
                                standards--
                                            (aa) are aligned 
                                        with the State college 
                                        and career ready 
                                        academic content 
                                        standards;
                                            (bb) provide access 
                                        to the general 
                                        curriculum and the 
                                        student academic 
                                        achievement standards; 
                                        and
                                            (cc) reflect 
                                        professional judgment 
                                        as to the highest 
                                        possible standards 
                                        achievable by such 
                                        student.
                            (ii) Prohibition on any other 
                        alternate or modified standards.--A 
                        State shall not develop, or implement 
                        for use, under this part any alternate 
                        or modified academic achievement 
                        standards for students who are children 
                        with disabilities that are not 
                        alternate academic achievement 
                        standards that meet the requirements of 
                        clause (i).
                    (E) English language proficiency 
                standards.--A State shall, not later than 
                December 31, 2015, adopt high-quality English 
                language proficiency standards that--
                            (i) are aligned with the State's 
                        academic content standards in reading 
                        or language arts under subparagraph (A) 
                        so that achieving English language 
                        proficiency, as measured by the State's 
                        English language proficiency standards, 
                        indicates a sufficient knowledge of 
                        English to allow the State to validly 
                        and reliably measure the student's 
                        achievement on the State's reading or 
                        language arts student academic 
                        achievement standards with no 
                        interventions designed to support 
                        English learners specifically;
                            (ii) ensure proficiency in English 
                        for each of the domains of speaking, 
                        listening, reading, and writing;
                            (iii) identify not less than 4 
                        levels of English proficiency;
                            (iv) address the different 
                        proficiency levels of English learners 
                        and set high expectations regarding 
                        academic achievement and linguistic 
                        proficiency for English learners at all 
                        levels of proficiency;
                            (v) are updated, not later than 1 
                        year after the State adopts any new 
                        academic content standards in reading 
                        or language arts under this paragraph, 
                        in order to align the English language 
                        proficiency standards with the new 
                        content standards; and
                            (vi) support teachers as teachers 
                        enhance instruction to support English 
                        learners.
                    (F) Early learning guidelines and early 
                grade standards.--A State that uses funds 
                provided under this subpart or subpart 2 to 
                support early childhood education shall provide 
                an assurance that, not later than December 31, 
                2015, the State will establish, or certify the 
                existence of, early learning guidelines and 
                early grade standards in accordance with the 
                following:
                            (i) Early learning guidelines.--In 
                        consultation with the State Advisory 
                        Council on Early Childhood Education 
                        and Care, the lead agency designated 
                        under section 658D of the Child Care 
                        and Development Block Grant Act of 1990 
                        (42 U.S.C. 9858 et seq.), and the State 
                        educational agency, the State shall 
                        complete a review, and revise or 
                        create, as necessary, the State's early 
                        learning guidelines for young children 
                        in order to promote developmentally 
                        appropriate, high-quality programs. 
                        Such guidelines shall--
                                    (I) address each of the age 
                                groups of infants, toddlers, 
                                and preschool-aged children;
                                    (II) be developed, as 
                                appropriate, in all domains of 
                                child development and learning 
                                (including language, literacy, 
                                mathematics, creative arts, 
                                science, social studies, social 
                                and emotional development, 
                                approaches to learning, and 
                                physical and health 
                                development) for each age 
                                group;
                                    (III) reflect research and 
                                evidence-based developmental 
                                and learning expectations, 
                                including the foundation for 
                                and progression in how children 
                                develop and learn the requisite 
                                skills and content from one 
                                stage into the next, including 
                                what young children should know 
                                and be able to do;
                                    (IV) address the cultural 
                                and linguistic diversity and 
                                the diverse abilities of young 
                                children, including infants, 
                                toddlers, and preschoolers with 
                                disabilities;
                                    (V) inform teaching 
                                practices, improve professional 
                                development, and support high-
                                quality services in early 
                                childhood education programs;
                                    (VI) be made publicly 
                                available, including through 
                                electronic means; and
                                    (VII) for pre-school age 
                                children, appropriately assist 
                                in the transition of such 
                                children to kindergarten.
                            (ii) Early grade standards.--In 
                        consultation with the State Advisory 
                        Council on Early Childhood Education 
                        and Care, the lead agency designated 
                        under section 658D of the Child Care 
                        and Development Block Grant of 1990 (42 
                        U.S.C. 9858 et seq.), and the State 
                        educational agency, the State shall 
                        establish or review and revise, as 
                        needed, standards for kindergarten 
                        through grade 3 aligned with the 
                        college and career ready academic 
                        content and student academic 
                        achievement standards described in 
                        subsection (a)(1)(A) to ensure that 
                        such standards--
                                    (I) are developed in all 
                                domains of child development 
                                and learning (including 
                                cognitive, language, literacy, 
                                mathematics, creative arts, 
                                science, social studies, social 
                                and emotional development, 
                                physical development and 
                                health, and approaches to 
                                learning);
                                    (II) reflect research and 
                                evidence-based development and 
                                learning expectations for each 
                                level and address cultural, 
                                linguistic, and ability-level 
                                diversity; and
                                    (III) across grade levels, 
                                reflect progression in how 
                                children develop and learn the 
                                requisite skills and content 
                                from earlier grades forward, 
                                including preschool.
                    (G) Existing standards.--Nothing in this 
                part shall prohibit a State from revising, 
                consistent with this section, any standard 
                adopted under this part before, on, or after 
                the date of enactment of the Strengthening 
                America's Schools Act of 2013.
                    (H) Construction.--Nothing in this section 
                shall be construed to authorize the Secretary 
                or other officer or employee of the Federal 
                Government to mandate, direct, or control a 
                State's college and career ready academic 
                content or student academic achievement 
                standards under this paragraph.
            (2) Academic assessments.--
                    (A) State assessments.--The State shall, 
                beginning not later than the beginning of the 
                2015-2016 school year, adopt and implement a 
                set of statewide assessments that--
                            (i) includes statewide assessments 
                        in reading or language arts, and 
                        mathematics, annually for grades 3 
                        through 8 and not less frequently than 
                        once during grades 10 through 12, 
                        that--
                                    (I) are aligned with the 
                                State's academic content 
                                standards in such subjects 
                                under paragraph (1)(A);
                                    (II) are administered to 
                                all public elementary and 
                                secondary school students in 
                                the State;
                                    (III) measure the 
                                individual academic achievement 
                                of a student;
                                    (IV) assess the student's 
                                academic achievement based on 
                                the State's student academic 
                                achievement standards in the 
                                subject in order to measure--
                                            (aa) whether the 
                                        student is performing 
                                        at the student's grade 
                                        level; and
                                            (bb) the specific 
                                        grade level at which 
                                        the student is 
                                        performing in the 
                                        subject;
                                    (V) measure individual 
                                student academic growth, 
                                including a measurement of the 
                                number of years of academic 
                                growth each student attains 
                                each year; and
                                    (VI) may, at the State's 
                                choosing--
                                            (aa) be 
                                        administered through a 
                                        single summative 
                                        assessment each year; 
                                        or
                                            (bb) be 
                                        administered through 
                                        multiple statewide 
                                        assessments during the 
                                        course of the year if 
                                        the State can 
                                        demonstrate to the 
                                        Secretary's 
                                        satisfaction the 
                                        results of these 
                                        multiple assessments, 
                                        taken in their 
                                        totality, provide a 
                                        summative score that 
                                        provides valid and 
                                        reliable information on 
                                        individual student 
                                        academic growth, as 
                                        described in subclause 
                                        (V);
                            (ii) includes statewide assessments 
                        in science, not less than once during 
                        each of the grade spans of grades 3 
                        through 5, 6 through 9, and 10 through 
                        12, that--
                                    (I) assess the student's 
                                academic achievement based on 
                                the State's student academic 
                                achievement standards in 
                                science in order to measure--
                                            (aa) whether the 
                                        student is performing 
                                        at the student's grade 
                                        level; and
                                            (bb) the specific 
                                        grade level at which 
                                        the student is 
                                        performing in the 
                                        subject; and
                                    (II) measure individual 
                                student academic growth, 
                                including a measurement of the 
                                number of years of academic 
                                growth each student attains 
                                each year;
                            (iii) includes the English language 
                        proficiency assessments described in 
                        subparagraph (D) and any alternate 
                        assessment described in subparagraph 
                        (E); and
                            (iv) at the discretion of the 
                        State, measure the proficiency of 
                        students in the other academic subjects 
                        for which the State has adopted 
                        academic content standards and student 
                        academic achievement standards under 
                        paragraph (1)(C).
                    (B) Requirements for assessments.--The 
                assessments administered under this paragraph 
                shall--
                            (i) be the same academic 
                        assessments used to measure the 
                        achievement of all students, although 
                        the individual assessment items 
                        administered to a student in order to 
                        determine the specific grade level at 
                        which a student is performing may vary;
                            (ii) be used only for purposes for 
                        which such assessments are valid and 
                        reliable, and be consistent with 
                        relevant, nationally recognized 
                        professional and technical standards;
                            (iii) be used only if the State 
                        educational agency provides to the 
                        Secretary evidence that the assessments 
                        used are of adequate technical quality 
                        for each purpose required under this 
                        Act and are consistent with the 
                        requirements of this section, which 
                        evidence the Secretary may make public;
                            (iv) involve multiple up-to-date 
                        measures of student academic 
                        achievement, including measures that--
                                    (I) assess the full range 
                                of academic content and student 
                                academic achievement standards 
                                under subsection (a)(1) that 
                                students are expected to 
                                master;
                                    (II) measure students' 
                                mastery of content knowledge 
                                and their ability to use 
                                knowledge to think critically 
                                and solve problems, and to 
                                communicate effectively; and
                                    (III) may be partially 
                                delivered in the form of 
                                portfolios, projects, or 
                                extended performance tasks;
                            (v) provide for--
                                    (I) the participation in 
                                such assessments of all 
                                students; and
                                    (II) the inclusion of 
                                English learners, who shall be 
                                assessed in a valid and 
                                reliable manner and provided 
                                reasonable accommodations on 
                                assessments administered to 
                                such students under this 
                                paragraph, including, to the 
                                extent practicable, assessments 
                                in the language and form most 
                                likely to yield accurate data 
                                on what such students know and 
                                can do in academic content 
                                areas, until such students have 
                                achieved English language 
                                proficiency as determined under 
                                subparagraph (D), except that 
                                the State may exempt any 
                                English learner at the lowest 
                                levels of English language 
                                proficiency from the reading or 
                                language arts assessment for 
                                not more than 2 years following 
                                the date of the student being 
                                identified as an English 
                                learner;
                            (vi)(I) incorporate the principles 
                        of universal design, as defined in 
                        section 3 of the Assistive Technology 
                        Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 3002), to allow 
                        for the greatest possible access for 
                        all students;
                            (II) provide for the reasonable 
                        adaptations for children with 
                        disabilities necessary to measure the 
                        academic achievement of such children 
                        in a subject, relative to the State 
                        academic content standards and State 
                        student academic achievement standards 
                        under paragraph (1) for such subject;
                            (III) provide for the valid and 
                        reliable accommodations for children 
                        with disabilities necessary to measure 
                        the academic achievement of such 
                        children in a subject, relative to the 
                        State academic content standards and 
                        State student academic achievement 
                        standards under paragraph (1) for such 
                        subject; and
                            (IV) assess children with 
                        disabilities using the same, unmodified 
                        academic content standards used to 
                        measure children without disabilities 
                        in the same grade level, except in the 
                        case of alternate assessments 
                        administered in accordance with 
                        subparagraph (E);
                            (vii) notwithstanding clause 
                        (v)(II), include the academic 
                        assessment (using tests written in 
                        English) of reading or language arts of 
                        any student who has attended school in 
                        the United States (not including Puerto 
                        Rico) for 3 or more consecutive school 
                        years, except that, if the local 
                        educational agency determines, on a 
                        case-by-case individual basis, that 
                        academic assessments in another 
                        language or form would likely yield 
                        more accurate and reliable information 
                        on what such student knows and can do, 
                        the local educational agency may make a 
                        determination to assess such student in 
                        the appropriate language other than 
                        English for a period that does not 
                        exceed 2 additional consecutive years, 
                        if such student has not yet reached a 
                        level of English language proficiency 
                        sufficient to yield valid and reliable 
                        information on what such student knows 
                        and can do on tests (written in 
                        English) of reading or language arts;
                            (viii) include students who have 
                        attended schools in a local educational 
                        agency for a full academic year but 
                        have not attended a single school for a 
                        full academic year, except the 
                        performance of students who have 
                        attended more than 1 school in the 
                        local educational agency in any 
                        academic year shall be used only in 
                        determining the progress of the local 
                        educational agency;
                            (ix) produce individual student 
                        interpretive, descriptive, and 
                        diagnostic reports that--
                                    (I) allow parents, 
                                teachers, and principals to 
                                understand and address the 
                                specific academic needs of 
                                students and include 
                                information regarding 
                                achievement on the academic 
                                assessments aligned with State 
                                academic achievement standards; 
                                and
                                    (II) are provided to 
                                parents, teachers, and 
                                principals as soon as is 
                                practicably possible after the 
                                assessment is given, in an 
                                understandable and uniform 
                                format, and to the extent 
                                practicable, in a language that 
                                parents can understand;
                            (x) enable results to be 
                        disaggregated within the State, local 
                        educational agency, and school by 
                        gender, each major racial and ethnic 
                        group, English proficiency status, 
                        migrant status, status as a student 
                        with a disability, and economically 
                        disadvantaged status, except that 
                        disaggregation shall not be required 
                        for any subgroup that would include 15 
                        or less students, so as to not reveal 
                        personally identifiable information 
                        about an individual student;
                            (xi) be consistent with widely 
                        accepted professional testing standards 
                        and objectively measure academic 
                        achievement, knowledge, and skills;
                            (xii) enable itemized score 
                        analyses to be produced and reported, 
                        consistent with clause (ii), to local 
                        educational agencies and schools, so 
                        that parents, teachers, principals, and 
                        administrators can interpret and 
                        address the specific academic needs of 
                        students as indicated by the students' 
                        achievement on assessment items;
                            (xiii) produce student achievement 
                        and other student data that can be used 
                        to inform determinations of individual 
                        principal and teacher effectiveness for 
                        purposes of evaluation and for 
                        determining the needs of principals and 
                        teachers for professional development 
                        and support;
                            (xiv) be administered to not less 
                        than 95 percent of all students, and 
                        not less than 95 percent of each 
                        subgroup of students described in 
                        clause (x), who are enrolled in the 
                        school; and
                            (xv) in the case of digital 
                        assessments or any digital assessment 
                        content that is adopted, procured, 
                        purchased, or developed for the 
                        assessments, incorporate the principles 
                        of universal design, as defined in 
                        section 3 of the Assistive Technology 
                        Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 3002) and be 
                        interoperable and accessible for all 
                        students, including students who are 
                        children with disabilities.
                    (C) Languages of assessments.--The State 
                shall identify the languages other than English 
                that are present in the participating student 
                population in the State and indicate, in the 
                State's plan under subsection (b), the 
                languages for which yearly student academic 
                assessments included in the State's 
                accountability system under paragraph (3) are 
                not available and are needed. The State shall 
                make every effort to develop assessments in 
                such languages and may request assistance from 
                the Secretary if linguistically accessible 
                academic assessments are needed. Upon request, 
                the Secretary shall assist with the 
                identification of appropriate academic 
                assessments in such languages, but shall not 
                mandate a specific academic assessment or mode 
                of instruction.
                    (D) Assessments of english language 
                proficiency.--
                            (i) In general.--Each State plan 
                        shall demonstrate that local 
                        educational agencies in the State will, 
                        not later than the beginning of the 
                        2015-2016 school year, provide for the 
                        annual assessment of English language 
                        proficiency of all English learners in 
                        the schools served by the State 
                        educational agency.
                            (ii) Requirements.--The English 
                        language proficiency assessment 
                        described in clause (i) shall--
                                    (I) be aligned with the 
                                State's English language 
                                proficiency standards under 
                                paragraph (1)(E);
                                    (II) be designed to 
                                measure, in a valid and 
                                reliable manner, student 
                                progress toward, and attainment 
                                of, English language 
                                proficiency;
                                    (III) reflect the academic 
                                language that is required for 
                                success on the State's academic 
                                assessments, consistent with 
                                paragraph (1)(E)(v); and
                                    (IV) measure each student's 
                                progress in achieving the 
                                levels of English proficiency 
                                established under the State 
                                English language proficiency 
                                standards, as described in 
                                paragraph (1)(E)(iii).
                    (E) Alternate assessments for students with 
                the most significant cognitive disabilities.--A 
                State may provide alternate assessments that 
                are aligned with alternate academic achievement 
                standards described in paragraph (1)(D) for 
                students with the most significant cognitive 
                disabilities, if the State--
                            (i) ensures that for each subject, 
                        the total number of students in each 
                        grade level assessed in such subject 
                        using the alternate assessments does 
                        not exceed 1 percent of the total 
                        number of all students in such grade 
                        level in the State who are assessed in 
                        such subject;
                            (ii) establishes and monitors 
                        implementation of clear and appropriate 
                        guidelines for individualized education 
                        program teams (as defined in section 
                        614(d)(1)(B) of the Individuals with 
                        Disabilities Education Act) to apply in 
                        determining, on a subject-by-subject 
                        basis, when a child's significant 
                        cognitive disability justifies 
                        assessment based on alternate academic 
                        achievement standards;
                            (iii) ensures that parents of the 
                        students whom the State plans to assess 
                        using alternate assessments are 
                        involved in the decision that their 
                        child's academic achievement will be 
                        measured against alternate academic 
                        achievement standards, consistent with 
                        section 614(d)(1)(A)(i)(VI)(bb) of the 
                        Individuals with Disabilities Education 
                        Act, and are informed whether 
                        participation in such assessment may 
                        preclude the student from completing 
                        the requirements for a regular 
                        secondary school diploma, as determined 
                        by the State;
                            (iv) provides evidence that 
                        students with the most significant 
                        cognitive disabilities are, to the 
                        maximum extent practicable, included in 
                        the general curriculum and in 
                        assessments aligned with such 
                        curriculum, as described in section 
                        601(c)(5)(A) of the Individuals with 
                        Disabilities Education Act;
                            (v) certifies, consistent with 
                        section 612(a)(16)(A) of such Act, the 
                        State's regular academic assessments 
                        described in subparagraphs (A), (C), 
                        and (D) are universally designed to be 
                        accessible to students, including 
                        students with sensory, physical, and 
                        intellectual disabilities, through the 
                        provision of reasonable adaptations and 
                        valid and reliable accommodations that 
                        produce valid results;
                            (vi) develops, disseminates 
                        information about, makes available, and 
                        promotes the use of reasonable 
                        adaptations and valid and reliable 
                        accommodations to increase the number 
                        of students with the most significant 
                        cognitive disabilities participating in 
                        grade-level academic instruction and 
                        assessments aligned with grade-level 
                        academic standards, and promotes the 
                        use of appropriate accommodations to 
                        increase the number of students with 
                        the most significant cognitive 
                        disabilities who are tested against 
                        grade-level academic achievement 
                        standards;
                            (vii) takes steps to ensure regular 
                        and special education teachers and 
                        other appropriate staff know how to 
                        administer assessments, including how 
                        to make appropriate use of reasonable 
                        adaptations and valid and reliable 
                        accommodations for such assessments, 
                        for students with the most significant 
                        cognitive disabilities; and
                            (viii) requires separate 
                        determinations about whether a student 
                        should be assessed using an alternate 
                        assessment for each subject assessed.
                    (F) Computer adaptive assessment.--A State 
                may develop and administer computer adaptive 
                assessments as the assessments required under 
                subparagraph (A). If a State develops and 
                administers a computer adaptive assessment for 
                such purposes, the assessment shall meet the 
                requirements of this paragraph.
                    (G) Reducing duplicative assessment.--The 
                State shall--
                            (i) include, in the State plan 
                        under subsection (b), a description of 
                        how the State will regularly analyze 
                        assessment and accommodations practice 
                        and use, and reduce duplicative 
                        assessment where appropriate; and
                            (ii) ensure that the local 
                        educational agencies report, as 
                        required under subsection (d)(5)(C), 
                        regarding all assessments required by 
                        Federal, State, or local laws, 
                        regulations, or policies.
            (3) State-designed accountability systems.--
                    (A) Accountability system.--Each State 
                shall, not later than the beginning of the 
                2014-2015 school year, demonstrate the State 
                educational agency has developed and is 
                implementing a single, statewide accountability 
                system that--
                            (i) annually measures and reports 
                        on the achievement and academic growth 
                        of students in all public elementary 
                        schools and secondary schools and local 
                        educational agencies in the State, in 
                        accordance with subparagraph (B);
                            (ii) differentiates all local 
                        educational agencies and all schools in 
                        the State according to academic 
                        achievement and student academic 
                        growth, English language proficiency 
                        and growth for English learners, and, 
                        for high schools, graduation rates, for 
                        all students and for each subgroup 
                        described in paragraph (2)(B)(x);
                            (iii) expects the continuous 
                        improvement of all public schools in 
                        the State in the academic achievement 
                        and academic growth of all students, 
                        including the subgroups of students 
                        described in subparagraph (D), and 
                        establishes ambitious and achievable 
                        annual performance targets in 
                        accordance with subparagraph (C);
                            (iv) annually identifies schools 
                        that need supports and interventions to 
                        prepare college and career ready 
                        students;
                            (v) provides for the improvement, 
                        through supports and interventions that 
                        address student needs, of all local 
                        educational agencies with schools not 
                        identified under section 1116(d) that 
                        are not meeting performance targets for 
                        subgroups described in subparagraph 
                        (D);
                            (vi) develops the capacity of local 
                        educational agencies and schools to 
                        effectively educate their students and 
                        continuously improve;
                            (vii) recognizes, and encourages 
                        other local educational agencies to 
                        replicate, the practices of local 
                        educational agencies and schools that 
                        are successful in effecting significant 
                        student achievement or student academic 
                        growth; and
                            (viii) meets the requirements of 
                        section 1116.
                    (B) Measurement of achievement and academic 
                growth.--
                            (i) In general.--The State 
                        accountability system shall measure 
                        student achievement and academic growth 
                        toward the college and career ready 
                        academic content and student academic 
                        achievement standards under paragraph 
                        (1) by annually measuring and reporting 
                        on, in the aggregate and for each 
                        subgroup described in subparagraph 
                        (D)--
                                    (I) the number and 
                                percentage of students who are 
                                in each category described in 
                                clause (ii), for each grade and 
                                subject covered by an academic 
                                assessment included in the 
                                accountability system, based on 
                                the State academic assessments 
                                for the subject; and
                                    (II) for each such category 
                                of students--
                                            (aa) the number and 
                                        percentage of students 
                                        for each grade and 
                                        subject who are meeting 
                                        or exceeding the State 
                                        student academic 
                                        achievement standards 
                                        or are achieving 
                                        sufficient academic 
                                        growth, as described in 
                                        clause (iii); and
                                            (bb) the number and 
                                        percentage of students 
                                        for each grade and 
                                        subject who have not 
                                        achieved sufficient 
                                        academic growth, as 
                                        described in such 
                                        clause.
                            (ii) Categories of students.--The 
                        State educational agency shall 
                        establish not less than 3 categories of 
                        students, which shall include the 
                        following:
                                    (I) A category consisting 
                                of students who are meeting or 
                                exceeding the State student 
                                academic achievement standards 
                                under paragraph (1) in a 
                                subject for the students' grade 
                                level, as determined based on 
                                the State academic assessments 
                                under paragraph (2).
                                    (II) A category consisting 
                                of students whose proficiency 
                                in a subject is below grade 
                                level and who are achieving 
                                sufficient academic growth, as 
                                described in clause (iii).
                                    (III) A category consisting 
                                of students whose proficiency 
                                in a subject is below grade 
                                level and who are not achieving 
                                sufficient academic growth, as 
                                described in clause (iii).
                            (iii) Sufficient academic growth.--
                        For purposes of this section, 
                        sufficient academic growth for a 
                        student means--
                                    (I) a rate of academic 
                                growth, based on a comparison 
                                of the student's performance on 
                                the most recent State academic 
                                assessment with the preceding 
                                State academic assessment or 
                                combination of preceding State 
                                academic assessments, is such 
                                that the student will be 
                                performing at or above grade 
                                level within 3 years;
                                    (II) a rate of academic 
                                growth, based on a comparison 
                                of the student's performance on 
                                the most recent State academic 
                                assessment with the preceding 
                                State academic assessment or 
                                combination of preceding State 
                                academic assessments, is such 
                                that the student will be 
                                performing at or above grade 
                                level by the end of the grade 
                                span of which, for purposes of 
                                this section, shall be the 
                                grade spans of grades 3 through 
                                5, 6 through 8, and 9 through 
                                12; or
                                    (III) another aggressive 
                                academic growth model approved 
                                by the Secretary that supports 
                                the State performance targets 
                                under subparagraph (C).
                    (C) Performance targets.--
                            (i) In general.--Each State shall 
                        establish, after requesting and 
                        receiving input from the local 
                        educational agencies of the State, 
                        ambitious and achievable annual 
                        performance targets for the State, for 
                        local educational agencies in the 
                        State, and for public elementary 
                        schools and secondary schools, for each 
                        subject and grade level assessed under 
                        paragraph (2), that--
                                    (I) are adopted from the 
                                waiver agreement entered into 
                                with the Secretary through the 
                                authority under section 9401 
                                before the date of enactment of 
                                the Strengthening America's 
                                Schools Act of 2013;
                                    (II) subject to approval by 
                                the Secretary--
                                            (aa) set a goal for 
                                        every public school to 
                                        meet the achievement 
                                        level of the highest-
                                        performing 10 percent 
                                        of schools in the State 
                                        as of the date of the 
                                        application submission, 
                                        based on the percentage 
                                        of students meeting or 
                                        exceeding the State 
                                        academic content and 
                                        student academic 
                                        achievement standards;
                                            (bb) require annual 
                                        progress toward that 
                                        goal for all students, 
                                        including all subgroups 
                                        of students consistent 
                                        with subparagraph (D), 
                                        within a specified 
                                        reasonable time period; 
                                        and
                                            (cc) ensure 
                                        accelerated progress 
                                        for the subgroups of 
                                        students described in 
                                        item (bb) that start 
                                        with the lowest levels 
                                        of student achievement; 
                                        or
                                    (III) are equally ambitious 
                                to the performance targets 
                                described in subclauses (I) and 
                                (II) and are approved by the 
                                Secretary.
                            (ii) Performance areas.--The 
                        performance targets required under this 
                        subparagraph shall include targets 
                        for--
                                    (I) student proficiency, as 
                                described in subparagraph 
                                (B)(ii)(I);
                                    (II) student academic 
                                growth, as determined in 
                                accordance with subparagraph 
                                (B);
                                    (III) English language 
                                proficiency for English 
                                learners, as measured by the 
                                number of students who are on 
                                track to achieving English 
                                proficiency, as described in 
                                paragraph (1)(E)(i), by not 
                                later than 5 years after being 
                                identified as English learners; 
                                and
                                    (IV) for high schools, 
                                graduation rates.
                            (iii) Baselines.--Each State shall 
                        use student performance on the State's 
                        academic assessments used for purposes 
                        of receiving funds under the program 
                        under this subpart and subpart 2 for 
                        the 2014-2015 school year as the 
                        baseline for the performance targets, 
                        subject to paragraph (5)(B)(iv) and 
                        subsection (b)(3)(C).
                            (iv) Additional measures and 
                        performance targets.--A State may 
                        develop other measures and performance 
                        targets to provide school personnel, 
                        parents, and community members with 
                        information about the effectiveness of 
                        schools in closing performance gaps 
                        among subgroups and bringing all 
                        students to proficiency, except that 
                        any such measure shall not classify 
                        individuals who have not attained a 
                        high school diploma but have earned a 
                        recognized equivalent of such diploma 
                        as graduating from high school.
                    (D) Subgroups of students.--The subgroups 
                described in this subparagraph shall be 
                obtained by disaggregating students enrolled in 
                a school by each major racial and ethnic group, 
                English proficiency status, status as a child 
                with a disability, and economically 
                disadvantaged status, except that a school 
                shall not be required to disaggregate for any 
                subgroup that includes 15 or less students if 
                such disaggregation would result in the 
                disclosure of personally identifiable 
                information.
                    (E) Subjects covered.--The State shall 
                include in the accountability system the 
                subjects of reading or language arts and 
                mathematics, and may include science and any 
                other subject that the State chooses through 
                its State plan, if the State has adopted 
                academic content standards and student academic 
                achievement standards under paragraph (1)(C) 
                and assessments under subparagraphs (A)(iv) and 
                (B) of paragraph (2) for the subject.
                    (F) Accountability for charter schools.--
                The accountability provisions under this Act 
                shall be overseen for public charter schools in 
                accordance with State charter school law.
                    (G) Students with the most significant 
                cognitive disabilities.--In determining the 
                percentage of students who are meeting or 
                exceeding the State student academic 
                achievement standards or are achieving 
                sufficient academic growth as described in 
                subparagraph (B)(iii), for a subject for any 
                purpose under this section or section 1116 or 
                1131, a State educational agency may include, 
                for all schools in the State, the performance 
                of the State's students with the most 
                significant cognitive disabilities on alternate 
                assessments as described in paragraph (2)(E) in 
                the subjects included in the State's 
                accountability system, consistent with the 1 
                percent limitation of paragraph (2)(E)(i).
            (4) Voluntary partnerships.--A State may enter into 
        a voluntary partnership with another State to develop 
        and implement the academic assessments, academic 
        content standards, and student academic achievement 
        standards required under this section.
            (5) Transition provisions.--
                    (A) In general.--The Secretary shall take 
                such steps as are necessary to provide for the 
                orderly transition between the accountability 
                systems required under subsection (b)(2), as 
                such section was in effect on the day before 
                the date of enactment of the Strengthening 
                America's Schools Act of 2013, and the new 
                accountability systems required under this 
                subsection, including the transition steps 
                described in subparagraph (B).
                    (B) Transition steps.--To enable the 
                successful transition to the provisions of this 
                part, as amended by the Strengthening America's 
                Schools Act of 2013, each State educational 
                agency receiving funds under this part shall--
                            (i) beginning on the date of 
                        enactment of the Strengthening 
                        America's Schools Act of 2013--
                                    (I) administer assessments, 
                                as required under paragraph 
                                (2), as amended by such Act, 
                                that measure and assess the 
                                college and career ready 
                                academic content standards and 
                                student academic achievement 
                                standards described in 
                                paragraph (1), as amended by 
                                such Act; and
                                    (II) with respect to any 
                                reporting provision under this 
                                part that requires the 
                                disaggregation of students, 
                                carry out such requirement 
                                unless the number of students 
                                in such subgroup is less than 
                                15;
                            (ii) during the transition period, 
                        continue all interventions, services, 
                        and activities required under section 
                        1116(b), as in effect on the day before 
                        the date of enactment of such Act, for 
                        schools identified for corrective 
                        action under such section 1116(b)(7);
                            (iii) after 2 years of using the 
                        assessments described in clause (i)(I), 
                        establish a new baseline, as described 
                        in paragraph (3)(C)(iii), using the new 
                        assessment data; and
                            (iv) implement this section and 
                        section 1116, as amended by such Act, 
                        except that the State shall not be 
                        required to identify focus schools or 
                        priority schools under subsection (c) 
                        or (d) of section 1116 until 2 full 
                        school years after the date of 
                        enactment of such Act.
                    (C) End of transition.--The transition to 
                the requirements of this part, as amended by 
                the Strengthening America's Schools Act of 
                2013, shall be completed by not later than 2 
                years after the date of enactment of such Act.
    (b) State Plans.--
            (1) In general.--For any State desiring to receive 
        a grant under the program under this subpart and 
        subpart 2, the State educational agency shall submit to 
        the Secretary a plan, developed by the State 
        educational agency in consultation with local 
        educational agencies, teachers, principals, specialized 
        instructional support personnel, administrators, other 
        staff, representatives of Indian tribes located in the 
        State, and parents, that--
                    (A) demonstrates the State's compliance 
                with this section;
                    (B) is coordinated with the State plans 
                required by other programs under this Act, the 
                Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 
                the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 701 
                et seq.), the Carl D. Perkins Career and 
                Technical Education Act of 2006, the Head Start 
                Act, the Child Care and Development Block Grant 
                Act of 1990, and the Adult Education and Family 
                Literacy Act, and activities under title IX of 
                the Educational Amendments of 1972;
                    (C) provides an assurance the State will 
                continue to administer the academic assessments 
                required under paragraphs (3)(A) and (7) of 
                this subsection, as such paragraphs were in 
                effect on the day before the date of enactment 
                of the Strengthening America's Schools Act of 
                2013, and to include the results of such 
                assessments in the State's accountability 
                system, until the State has implemented the 
                assessments required under subsection (a)(2);
                    (D) provides an assurance the State will 
                participate in the biennial State academic 
                assessments of grade 4 and grade 8 reading and 
                mathematics under the National Assessment of 
                Educational Progress carried out under section 
                303(b)(2) of the National Assessment of 
                Educational Progress Authorization Act (20 
                U.S.C. 9622(b)(2)) if the Secretary pays the 
                costs of administering such assessments;
                    (E) describes the State accountability 
                system under subsection (a)(3) and the State's 
                plan for blue ribbon schools under section 1131 
                (if the State chooses to carry out such 
                section), including how the plan will promote 
                postsecondary and career readiness;
                    (F) describes the process the State will 
                utilize to review local educational agency 
                plans submitted pursuant to section 1112, 
                including the parent and family engagement plan 
                described in section 1118 and other provisions 
                related to parent and family engagement;
                    (G) describes the support the State will 
                provide to local educational agencies for the 
                education of homeless children and youths, and 
                how the State will comply with the requirements 
                of subtitle B of title VII of the McKinney-
                Vento Homeless Assistance Act;
                    (H) describes how the State educational 
                agency has involved the committee of 
                practitioners established under section 1603(b) 
                in developing the plan and monitoring its 
                implementation;
                    (I) describes how the State educational 
                agency will coordinate with the State Advisory 
                Council on Early Childhood Education and Care, 
                as appropriate;
                    (J)(i) if the State funds full-day 
                kindergarten programs but does not provide 
                access to such programs for all children 
                eligible to attend kindergarten in the State, 
                describes how the State plans to increase the 
                number of students in the State who are 
                enrolled in full-day kindergarten and a 
                strategy to implement such a plan; and
                    (ii) if the State provides funding for 
                kindergarten programs but does not fund full-
                day kindergarten programs, describes how the 
                State plans to establish such programs to 
                extend and strengthen the educational continuum 
                for children entering elementary school;
                    (K) provides an assurance that the State--
                            (i) has established a longitudinal 
                        data system that includes all elements 
                        described in section 6401(e)(2)(D) of 
                        the America COMPETES Act (20 U.S.C. 
                        9871 (e)(2)(D)), by the date required 
                        under the terms for the allocation 
                        received by the State through the State 
                        Fiscal Stabilization Fund under section 
                        14001 of the American Recovery and 
                        Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 
                        111-5, 123 Stat. 279); or
                            (ii) if the State was not subject 
                        to any such requirement, will establish 
                        such a system by a date approved the 
                        Secretary;
                    (L) describes how the State and State 
                educational agency will comply with the 
                requirements of section 1501, and the State's 
                plan to ensure such compliance;
                    (M) in the case of a State that proposes to 
                use funds under this subpart or subpart 2 to 
                support positive behavioral interventions and 
                supports, describes how the State educational 
                agency will--
                            (i) assist local educational 
                        agencies in implementing positive 
                        behavioral interventions and supports 
                        in schools served by the local 
                        educational agency throughout the whole 
                        school;
                            (ii) provide technical assistance 
                        and training to local educational 
                        agencies to improve and support the 
                        development, implementation, and 
                        coordination of comprehensive positive 
                        behavioral interventions and supports 
                        carried out under this Act with 
                        activities carried out under the 
                        Individuals with Disabilities Education 
                        Act;
                            (iii) in coordination with local 
                        educational agencies and schools, 
                        implement positive, preventative 
                        approaches to school discipline to 
                        promote a positive school climate for 
                        all students and reduce recidivism of 
                        re-entering youth offenders and 
                        disconnected youth; and
                            (iv) evaluate the effects of 
                        providing positive behavioral 
                        interventions and supports for all 
                        students, including improvement of the 
                        learning environment, academic 
                        achievement, disciplinary problems such 
                        as incidents of suspensions, 
                        expulsions, referrals to law 
                        enforcement, and other actions that 
                        remove students from instruction, and 
                        any other effects the State chooses to 
                        evaluate;
                    (N) in the case of a State that proposes to 
                use funds under this subpart or subpart 2 to 
                support early intervening services, describes 
                how the State educational agency will--
                            (i) assist local educational 
                        agencies in implementing early 
                        intervening services in schools served 
                        by the local educational agency to 
                        reduce the need to label children as 
                        children with disabilities in order to 
                        address the learning and behavioral 
                        needs of such children;
                            (ii) provide technical assistance 
                        and training to local educational 
                        agencies to improve coordination of 
                        early intervening services provided 
                        under this Act with early intervening 
                        services carried out under the 
                        Individuals with Disabilities Education 
                        Act; and
                            (iii) evaluate the effects of 
                        providing early intervening services;
                    (O) describes how the State will assist 
                local educational agencies in identifying 
                gifted and talented students, including high-
                ability students who have not previously been 
                formally identified for gifted education 
                services, and implement educational approaches 
                at the elementary school and secondary school 
                levels to support the learning needs of gifted 
                and talented students to ensure that such 
                students make appropriate learning gains, such 
                as early entrance to kindergarten, enrichment, 
                acceleration, curriculum compacting, and dual 
                enrollment in secondary school and 
                postsecondary education;
                    (P) describes how the State educational 
                agency will--
                            (i) reduce suspensions, expulsions, 
                        referrals to law enforcement, and other 
                        disciplinary actions that remove 
                        students from instruction;
                            (ii) facilitate, to the extent 
                        practicable, the re-entry of juvenile 
                        offenders and disconnected youth into 
                        their local educational agencies;
                            (iii) in coordination with the 
                        State department of corrections or 
                        similar agency, ensure re-entering 
                        juvenile offenders receive referrals to 
                        a local educational agency and provide 
                        that, for any juvenile who commits an 
                        offense subject to school expulsion and 
                        is subsequently committed to a 
                        detention center, secure facility, or 
                        any other residential placement within 
                        the juvenile or adult criminal justice 
                        system for such offense, the period of 
                        expulsion shall run concurrently with 
                        the period of commitment to the 
                        detention center, secure facility, or 
                        other residential placement; and
                            (iv) in coordination with local 
                        educational agencies and schools, 
                        provide annual and public reporting on, 
                        in the aggregate, in-school 
                        suspensions, out-of-school suspensions, 
                        expulsions, referrals to law 
                        enforcement, school-based arrests, and 
                        disciplinary transfers (including 
                        placements in alternative schools) in 
                        the State;
                    (Q) describes how the State educational 
                agency will plan for pregnant and parenting 
                students to be enrolled, attend, and succeed in 
                school;
                    (R) describes how--
                            (i) for the first year following 
                        the date of enactment of the 
                        Strengthening America's Schools Act of 
                        2013, the State educational agency will 
                        provide for the equitable distribution 
                        of elementary school teachers, and 
                        secondary school teachers, within local 
                        educational agencies and the State 
                        using data on the percentage and 
                        distribution of the categories of 
                        teachers described in subparagraph (S) 
                        as transitional measures of teacher 
                        quality;
                            (ii) for each school year following 
                        the first year after such date of 
                        enactment, the State educational agency 
                        will provide for the equitable 
                        distribution of teachers within local 
                        educational agencies and the State so 
                        that low-income and minority children 
                        are not taught at higher rates than 
                        other children by teachers with the 
                        lowest ratings in the State 
                        professional growth and improvement 
                        system; and
                            (iii) beginning not later than 1 
                        year after such date of enactment, and 
                        for each subsequent year, the State 
                        will report to the Secretary the 
                        percentage and distribution of teachers 
                        in the State, based on the measures 
                        used in the State, for each quartile of 
                        schools based on school poverty level, 
                        for high-minority schools, and for low-
                        minority schools; and
                    (S) describes how the State will annually 
                submit to the Secretary, for each quartile of 
                schools in the State based on school poverty 
                level and for high-minority schools and low-
                minority schools in the State, data regarding 
                the percentage and distribution of the 
                following categories of teachers:
                            (i) Teachers who are not classified 
                        as highly qualified teachers.
                            (ii) Teachers who are new.
                            (iii) Teachers who have not 
                        completed a teacher preparation 
                        program.
                            (iv) Teachers who are not teaching 
                        in the subject or field for which the 
                        teacher is certified or licensed.
                            (v) Beginning in any year for which 
                        data are available from a professional 
                        growth and improvement system, and not 
                        later than the 2015-2016 school year, 
                        teachers with the highest or lowest 
                        ratings in the professional growth and 
                        improvement system, as data from such 
                        system become available, and in no case 
                        later than the 2015-2016 school year.
            (2) Comprehensive plan.--A State plan submitted 
        under paragraph (1) may be submitted as part of the 
        comprehensive plan under section 9302.
            (3) Duration of the plan.--
                    (A) In general.--Each State plan shall--
                            (i) remain in effect for the 
                        duration of the State's participation 
                        under this part or 4 years, whichever 
                        is shorter; and
                            (ii) be periodically reviewed and 
                        revised as necessary by the State 
                        educational agency to reflect changes 
                        in the State's strategies and programs 
                        under this part.
                    (B) Additional information.--
                            (i) Revised plans.--If a State 
                        makes significant changes to its plan, 
                        such as adopting new State academic 
                        content standards, new State student 
                        achievement standards, new academic 
                        assessments, or improved performance 
                        targets under subsection (a), the State 
                        shall submit a revised plan to the 
                        Secretary.
                            (ii) Review of revised plans.--The 
                        Secretary shall review the information 
                        submitted under clause (i) and may, 
                        notwithstanding paragraph (4), approve 
                        or disapprove changes to the State plan 
                        without undertaking the peer-review or 
                        hearing process described in such 
                        paragraph.
                    (C) Renewal.--A State educational agency 
                that desires to continue participating in the 
                program under this subpart and subpart 2 shall 
                submit a renewed plan every 4 years with 
                improved performance targets.
            (4) Peer review and secretarial approval.--
                    (A) Secretarial duties.--The Secretary 
                shall--
                            (i) establish a peer-review process 
                        that maximizes collaboration with each 
                        State to assist in the review of State 
                        plans;
                            (ii) appoint expert individuals to 
                        the peer-review process who--
                                    (I) represent a regionally 
                                diverse cross-section of 
                                States;
                                    (II) are representative of 
                                parents, teachers, State 
                                educational agencies, and local 
                                educational agencies; and
                                    (III) are familiar with 
                                educational standards, 
                                assessments, accountability, 
                                the needs of focus and priority 
                                schools as described in 
                                subsections (c) and (d) of 
                                section 1116 and the needs of 
                                disadvantaged students, 
                                students who are children with 
                                disabilities, and other 
                                educational needs of students;
                            (iii) ensure the peer-review 
                        process provides timely feedback from 
                        the peer-review panel to the States, 
                        and that such feedback shall be made 
                        publicly available, including through 
                        electronic means;
                            (iv) not decline approval of a 
                        State plan before--
                                    (I) offering the State an 
                                opportunity to revise the State 
                                plan;
                                    (II) providing technical 
                                assistance to the State to meet 
                                the requirements of this 
                                subsection and subsections (a) 
                                and (c); and
                                    (III) upon the request of a 
                                State, providing a hearing;
                            (v) have the authority to 
                        disapprove a State plan for not meeting 
                        the requirements of this subpart or 
                        subpart 2, and may deny approval to a 
                        State plan under this subsection that 
                        was recommended by the peer-review 
                        panel by making available written 
                        findings of the cause for such 
                        disapproval;
                            (vi) approve a State plan not later 
                        than 120 days after its submission 
                        unless the Secretary determines that 
                        the plan does not meet the requirements 
                        of this section;
                            (vii) if the Secretary determines 
                        that the State plan does not meet the 
                        requirements of this subsection and 
                        subsection (c), immediately notify the 
                        State in writing of such determination 
                        and the reasons for such determination; 
                        and
                            (viii) not have the authority to 
                        require a State, as a condition of 
                        approval of the State plan, to include 
                        in, or delete from, such plan 1 or more 
                        specific elements of the State's 
                        academic content standards or to use 
                        specific academic assessment 
                        instruments or items.
                    (B) State revisions.--A State plan shall be 
                revised by the State educational agency if 
                necessary to satisfy the requirements of this 
                section.
    (c) Parent and Family Engagement.--Each State plan shall 
include a description of how the State will strengthen 
engagement of the parents and families in education (referred 
to in this subsection as the ``parent and family engagement 
plan'') in accordance with the following:
            (1) Statewide parent and family engagement 
        strategy.--The parent and family engagement plan shall 
        demonstrate how the State plans to increase and enhance 
        the engagement of parents and family members in 
        education throughout the State, through the 
        implementation and replication of evidence-based or 
        promising practices, in order to--
                    (A) increase student academic growth and 
                achievement, and college and career readiness;
                    (B) provide parents and family members with 
                the skills and opportunities necessary to 
                become full partners in their child's 
                education;
                    (C) improve child development;
                    (D) strengthen relationships and 
                partnerships among school personnel and parents 
                and family members, to support student academic 
                growth and achievement, and college and career 
                readiness;
                    (E) improve the ability of local 
                educational agencies and schools to increase 
                the participation of parents and family members 
                in school improvement strategies, create 
                opportunities for co-location and provision of 
                services for parents and family members, and 
                foster conditions for learning; and
                    (F) focus the activities described in 
                subparagraphs (A) through (E) in high-need 
                local educational agencies and high-need 
                schools.
            (2) Coordination; collection; dissemination.--The 
        parent and family engagement plan shall describe how 
        the State will--
                    (A) ensure maximum coordination and minimum 
                duplication of efforts (which may include the 
                designation of a parent and family engagement 
                coordinator) among, at a minimum--
                            (i) Federal, State, and local 
                        programs;
                            (ii) the State Advisory Councils on 
                        Early Childhood Education and Care;
                            (iii) the parent and family 
                        information and resource centers 
                        established under part H of title IV; 
                        and
                            (iv) appropriate non-Federal 
                        entities (including community-based and 
                        philanthropic organizations and court-
                        appointed special advocates);
                    (B) collect and disseminate best practices 
                and research on parent and family engagement 
                strategies to--
                            (i) local educational agencies, 
                        including high-need local educational 
                        agencies, and high-need schools in the 
                        State, such as through parent and 
                        family engagement academies and other 
                        leadership development strategies; and
                            (ii) institutions of higher 
                        education and other organizations with 
                        a demonstrated record of success in 
                        increasing the engagement of parents 
                        and family members in education; and
                    (C) ensure that the process for reviewing 
                local educational agency plans pursuant to 
                section 1112 includes an assessment and 
                response to each local educational agency 
                regarding the extent to which such plans 
                incorporate the best practices identified in 
                subparagraph (B).
            (3) Technical assistance, training, and capacity-
        building.--The State parent and family engagement plan 
        shall describe the evidence-based technical assistance, 
        professional development, or other capacity-building 
        strategies that the State will provide to, at a 
        minimum, high-need local educational agencies and high-
        need schools, which--
                    (A) shall include the provision of 
                technical assistance to local educational 
                agencies that serve schools identified as focus 
                or priority schools under subsection (c) or (d) 
                of section 1116;
                    (B) shall include partnering with the 
                appropriate parent and family information and 
                resource centers;
                    (C) may include assistance in developing, 
                revising, or implementing the local educational 
                agency plans submitted pursuant to section 1112 
                as such plans relate to supporting parent and 
                family engagement, in conjunction with 
                paragraph (2)(C);
                    (D) may include assistance related to 
                implementing evidence-based parent and family 
                engagement strategies to providers of early 
                care and education; and
                    (E) may include assistance related to 
                implementing evidence-based parent and family 
                engagement strategies for English learner 
                families, such as those described in section 
                3115(c)(5).
            (4) Leveraging resources.--Each State plan shall 
        include a description of how the State will leverage 
        resources of employers, business leaders, philanthropic 
        and nonprofit organizations, and other community 
        members to increase and strengthen parent and family 
        engagement.
    (d) Annual State Report Cards.--
            (1) In general.--A State that receives a grant for 
        the program under this subpart and subpart 2 shall 
        prepare and disseminate an annual report card for each 
        public elementary school and secondary school in the 
        State, each local educational agency in the State, and 
        the State as a whole.
            (2) Requirements for all report cards.--The State 
        shall ensure the school, local educational agency, and 
        State report cards required under this subsection are--
                    (A) uniform across the State;
                    (B) concise;
                    (C) presented in a format that is easily 
                understandable and, to the extent practicable, 
                provided in a language that parents can 
                understand; and
                    (D) accessible to the public, which shall 
                include--
                            (i) making the State report card 
                        and all local educational agency and 
                        school report cards available on a 
                        single webpage of the State's website; 
                        and
                            (ii) providing a copy of a school's 
                        report card to the parents of each 
                        student enrolled in the school each 
                        year.
            (3) Required student information for school report 
        cards.--Each school report card required under 
        paragraph (1) shall include the following:
                    (A) A clear and concise description of the 
                State's accountability system under subsection 
                (a)(3), including a description of the criteria 
                by which the State evaluates school 
                performance, and the criteria that the State 
                has established to determine the status of 
                schools.
                    (B) Information on each of the following 
                for the school, in the aggregate and 
                disaggregated and cross-tabulated by the 
                subgroups described in subsection (a)(2)(B)(x) 
                (except that such disaggregation or cross-
                tabulation shall not be required in a case in 
                which the results would reveal personally 
                identifiable information about an individual 
                student):
                            (i) Student achievement at each 
                        performance level on the State academic 
                        assessments that are included in the 
                        State's accountability system under 
                        subsection (a)(3).
                            (ii) The percentage of students who 
                        do not take the State academic 
                        assessments.
                            (iii) The most recent 3-year trend 
                        in student achievement in each subject 
                        area, and for each grade level, for 
                        such assessments.
                            (iv) A comparison of the school's 
                        student academic assessment data to the 
                        State average for each tested subject.
                            (v)(I) The number and percentage of 
                        students who are meeting or exceeding 
                        the State student academic achievement 
                        standards or are achieving sufficient 
                        academic growth, as determined in 
                        accordance with subsection 
                        (a)(3)(B)(iii), for each subject area 
                        and grade level.
                            (II) The most recent 3-year trend 
                        in student academic growth in each 
                        subject area, and for each grade level, 
                        for the State academic assessments.
                            (vi) The number and percentage of 
                        students with the most significant 
                        cognitive disabilities who take an 
                        alternate assessment under subsection 
                        (a)(2)(E), by grade and subject.
                            (vii) The number of students who 
                        are English learners, and the 
                        performance of such students, on the 
                        State's English language proficiency 
                        assessments under subsection (a)(2)(D), 
                        including the students' attainment of, 
                        and progress toward, higher levels of 
                        English language proficiency.
                            (viii) For each high school--
                                    (I) student graduation 
                                rates, including--
                                            (aa) the 4-year 
                                        adjusted cohort 
                                        graduation rate, as 
                                        defined in section 
                                        9101(32)(A); and
                                            (bb) the cumulative 
                                        graduation rate, as 
                                        defined in section 
                                        9101(32)(B);
                                    (II) the number of students 
                                attaining career and technical 
                                proficiencies, as defined by 
                                section 113(b)(2)(A) of the 
                                Carl D. Perkins Career and 
                                Technical Education Act of 
                                2006, and reported by States 
                                only in a manner consistent 
                                with section 113(c) of such 
                                Act;
                                    (III) not later than the 
                                beginning of the 2013-2014 
                                school year, the rate at which 
                                students who graduated from the 
                                high school in the preceding 
                                year enrolled in institutions 
                                of higher education by the 
                                beginning of the next school 
                                year; and
                                    (IV) not later than the 
                                beginning of the 2014-2015 
                                school year, the rate of 
                                student remediation, in the 
                                aggregate, for high school 
                                graduates who enroll in public 
                                institutions of higher 
                                education in the State or in 
                                other institutions of higher 
                                education (to the extent 
                                obtaining the data regarding 
                                remediation from other 
                                institutions is practicable).
                            (ix) Beginning not later than the 
                        2015-2016 school year, the evaluation 
                        results of teachers and principals as 
                        measured by the State's professional 
                        growth and improvement system, except 
                        that such information shall not provide 
                        individually identifiable information 
                        on individual teachers and principals.
                            (x) Discipline data with respect to 
                        all students in the school for the 
                        disciplinary exclusionary categories 
                        described in subparagraphs (A)(v), (D), 
                        and (E) of section 618(a)(1) of the 
                        Individuals with Disabilities Education 
                        Act.
                            (xi)(I) The percentage of students 
                        passing examinations related to 
                        coursework acceptable for postsecondary 
                        credit at institutions of higher 
                        education, such as Advanced Placement 
                        or International Baccalaureate 
                        examinations, or technical assessments, 
                        as defined by section 113(b)(2)(A)(ii) 
                        of Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
                        Education Act of 2006 and reported by 
                        States only in a manner consistent with 
                        section 113(c) of such Act.
                            (II) The percentage of students 
                        participating in early college high 
                        schools and dual enrollment programs.
                            (xii) Data regarding pregnant and 
                        parenting students in the State, 
                        including--
                                    (I) the number of pregnant 
                                and parenting students enrolled 
                                in secondary schools;
                                    (II) rates, and data 
                                regarding participation, of 
                                pregnant and parenting students 
                                in mainstream schools or in the 
                                schools in which the students 
                                originated;
                                    (III) rates, and data 
                                regarding participation, of 
                                pregnant and parenting students 
                                in alternative programs;
                                    (IV) the number and 
                                percentage of pregnant and 
                                parenting students who have 
                                achieved proficiency, as 
                                determined for purposes of 
                                subsection (a)(3)(B)(ii), in 
                                each grade and subject 
                                assessed; and
                                    (V) graduation rates for 
                                pregnant and parenting 
                                students.
                            (xiii) The incidence of school 
                        violence, bullying, drug abuse, alcohol 
                        abuse, in-school student suspensions, 
                        out-of-school student suspensions, 
                        expulsions, referrals to law 
                        enforcement, school-based arrests, 
                        disciplinary transfers (including 
                        placements in alternative schools), and 
                        student detentions, for each category.
                    (C) The average class size, by grade.
                    (D) The school's categorization, if 
                applicable, in the State school accountability 
                and improvement system under section 1116.
                    (E) In the case of a coeducational school 
                that receives assistance under this subpart--
                            (i) a listing of the school's 
                        interscholastic sports teams that 
                        participated in athletic competition;
                            (ii) for each such team--
                                    (I) the total number of 
                                male and female participants, 
                                disaggregated and cross-
                                tabulated by gender and race;
                                    (II) the season in which 
                                the team competed, whether the 
                                team participated in postseason 
                                competition, and the total 
                                number of competitive events 
                                scheduled;
                                    (III) the total 
                                expenditures from all sources, 
                                including expenditures for 
                                travel, uniforms, facilities, 
                                and publicity for competitions; 
                                and
                                    (IV) the total number of 
                                coaches, trainers, and medical 
                                personnel, and for each such 
                                individual an identification of 
                                such individual's gender, 
                                employment status, and duties 
                                other than providing coaching, 
                                training, or medical services; 
                                and
                            (iii) the average annual salary of 
                        the head coaches of boys' 
                        interscholastic sports teams, across 
                        all offered sports, and the average 
                        annual salary of the head coaches of 
                        girls' interscholastic sports teams, 
                        across all offered sports.
                    (F) The number of students--
                            (i) who are served through the use 
                        of early intervening services; and
                            (ii) who, in the preceding 2-year 
                        period, received early intervening 
                        services and who, after receiving such 
                        services, have been identified as 
                        eligible for, and receive, special 
                        education and related services under 
                        part B of the Individuals with 
                        Disabilities Education Act.
            (4) Optional information.--A State may include in 
        each school report card such other information as the 
        State believes will best provide parents, students, and 
        other members of the public with information regarding 
        the progress of each of the State's public elementary 
        and secondary schools. Such information may include--
                    (A) indicators of school climate;
                    (B) student attendance;
                    (C) school readiness of students in 
                kindergarten; and
                    (D) measures of career readiness focused on 
                the attainment of technical or employability 
                skills.
            (5) Local educational agency and state report 
        cards.--Each local educational agency report card and 
        State report card required under paragraph (1)--
                    (A) shall include the data described in 
                clauses (i) through (xiii) of paragraph (3)(B) 
                for the local educational agency or State, 
                respectively, as a whole and disaggregated by 
                the subgroups described in subsection 
                (a)(2)(B)(x);
                    (B) in the case of a State report card, 
                shall include--
                            (i) the data described in paragraph 
                        (3)(B)(viii) disaggregated by status as 
                        a child in foster care, except that 
                        such disaggregation shall not be 
                        required in a case in which the number 
                        of students in the category would 
                        reveal personally identifiable 
                        information about an individual 
                        student;
                            (ii) the most recently available 
                        academic achievement results in grades 
                        4 and 8 of the State's students on the 
                        National Assessment of Educational 
                        Progress in reading and mathematics, 
                        including the percentage of students at 
                        each achievement level in the aggregate 
                        and by the groups described in section 
                        303(b)(2)(G) of the National Assessment 
                        of Educational Progress Authorization 
                        Act (20 U.S.C. 9622(b)(2)(G));
                            (iii) the number of local 
                        educational agencies in the State that 
                        implement positive behavioral 
                        interventions and supports; and
                            (iv) the number of local 
                        educational agencies in the State that 
                        implement school-based mental health 
                        programs;
                    (C) in the case of a local educational 
                agency report card, shall include information 
                regarding the assessments administered 
                annually, by grade level and subject, and, for 
                each assessment, whether the assessment is 
                required by Federal, State, or local statute, 
                regulation, or policy;
                    (D) shall include information regarding the 
                number of military-connected students which, 
                for the purposes of this subparagraph, shall 
                mean students with parents who serve in the 
                Armed Forces, including the National Guard and 
                Reserve Forces, for each local educational 
                agency or State, respectively, and information 
                regarding academic achievement for such 
                students, except that such information shall 
                not be used for school or local educational 
                agency accountability purposes under section 
                1116; and
                    (E) may include any optional information 
                described in paragraph (4) for the local 
                educational agency or State, respectively.
            (6) Data.--A State shall only include in a school 
        report card or local educational agency report card, 
        data that do not reveal personally identifiable 
        information about an individual student or teacher.
            (7) Preexisting report cards.--A State educational 
        agency or local educational agency that was providing 
        public report cards on the performance of students, 
        schools, local educational agencies, or the State prior 
        to the date of enactment of the Strengthening America's 
        Schools Act of 2013, may use those report cards for the 
        purpose of this subsection as long as any such report 
        card is modified, as may be needed, to contain the 
        information required by this subsection.
            (8) Cost reduction.--Each State educational agency 
        and local educational agency receiving assistance under 
        the program under this subpart and subpart 2 shall, 
        wherever possible, take steps to reduce data collection 
        costs and duplication of effort by obtaining the 
        information required under this subsection through 
        existing data collection efforts.
            (9) Cross-tabulated data not used for 
        accountability.--Groups of students obtained by cross-
        tabulating data under this subsection shall not be 
        considered to be subgroups under section 1116. Such 
        cross-tabulated data shall not be used to determine 
        whether a school is a focus or priority school under 
        subsection (c) or (d) of section 1116.
    (e) Reporting.--
            (1) Annual state report.--Each State educational 
        agency that receives assistance under the program under 
        this subpart and subpart 2 shall report annually to the 
        Secretary, and make widely available within the State--
                    (A) information on the State's progress in 
                developing and implementing the academic 
                assessments described in subsection (a)(2);
                    (B) information on the achievement and 
                academic growth of students, including results 
                disaggregated (except in a case in which the 
                number of students in a category is 
                insufficient to yield statistically reliable 
                information or the results would reveal 
                personally identifiable information about an 
                individual student) by the subgroups described 
                in subsection (a)(2)(B)(x) and by status as a 
                child in foster care;
                    (C) information on any changes in status 
                for all public schools in the State, in 
                accordance with the State's system of 
                differentiation described in subsection 
                (a)(3)(A)(ii) and the categories required under 
                section 1116;
                    (D) in any year before the State begins to 
                provide the information described in 
                subparagraph (B), information on the results of 
                student academic assessments (including results 
                disaggregated by the subgroups described in 
                subsection (a)(2)(B)(x)) required under this 
                section;
                    (E) information on the acquisition of 
                English language proficiency by students who 
                are English learners;
                    (F) the number of schools, and the name of 
                each school, identified as a focus or priority 
                school under subsection (c) or (d) of section 
                1116; and
                    (G) the number of schools identified as 
                blue ribbon schools under section 1131 and the 
                name of each such school.
            (2) Secretary's report card and biennial evaluation 
        report.--
                    (A) Secretary's report card.--Not later 
                than July 1, 2014, and annually thereafter, the 
                Secretary shall prepare and submit to the 
                authorizing committees a national report card 
                on the status of elementary and secondary 
                education in the United States. Such report 
                shall--
                            (i) analyze existing data from 
                        State reports required under this Act, 
                        the Individuals with Disabilities 
                        Education Act, and the Carl D. Perkins 
                        Career and Technical Education Act of 
                        2006, and summarize major findings from 
                        such reports;
                            (ii) analyze data from the National 
                        Assessment of Educational Progress and 
                        international assessments, including 
                        the Third International Mathematics and 
                        Science Survey;
                            (iii) identify trends in student 
                        achievement, student academic growth, 
                        student performance, and high school 
                        graduation rates, by analyzing and 
                        reporting on the status and performance 
                        of subgroups of students, including 
                        subgroups based on race, ethnicity, and 
                        socioeconomic status and the subgroups 
                        of children with disabilities and 
                        English learners;
                            (iv) compare the performance of 
                        students, including the subgroups 
                        described in clause (iii), across 
                        States and local educational agencies 
                        across the United States;
                            (v) identify and report on 
                        promising practices, areas of greatest 
                        improvement in student achievement and 
                        educational attainment, and other 
                        examples worthy of national attention;
                            (vi) identify and report on areas 
                        of educational concern that warrant 
                        national attention; and
                            (vii)(I) analyze existing data, as 
                        of the time of the report, on Federal, 
                        State, and local expenditures on 
                        education, including per pupil 
                        spending, teacher salaries and pension 
                        obligations, school level spending, and 
                        other financial data publicly 
                        available; and
                            (II) report on current trends and 
                        major findings resulting from the 
                        analysis.
                    (B) Special rule.--The information used to 
                prepare the report described in subparagraph 
                (A) shall be derived from existing State and 
                local reporting requirements and data sources. 
                Nothing in this paragraph shall be construed as 
                authorizing, requiring, or allowing any 
                additional reporting requirements, data 
                elements, or information to be reported to the 
                Secretary not otherwise explicitly authorized 
                by any other Federal law.
                    (C) Biennial report.--The Secretary shall 
                transmit biennially to the authorizing 
                committees a report that provides national and 
                State-level data on the information collected 
                under paragraph (1).
    (f) Penalties.--If a State that receives a grant under the 
program under this subpart and subpart 2 fails to meet any 
requirement of such subparts, the Secretary may withhold funds 
for State administration under this part until the Secretary 
determines that the State has fulfilled those requirements.
    (g) Parents' Right-To-Know.--
            (1) Qualifications.--At the beginning of each 
        school year, a local educational agency that receives 
        funds under the program under this subpart and subpart 
        2 shall notify the parents of each student attending 
        any school receiving such funds that the parents may 
        request, and the agency will provide the parents on 
        request (and in a timely manner), information regarding 
        the professional qualifications of the student's 
        classroom teachers, including, at a minimum, the 
        following:
                    (A) Whether the teacher has met State 
                qualification and licensing criteria for the 
                grade levels and subject areas in which the 
                teacher provides instruction.
                    (B) Whether the teacher is teaching under 
                emergency or other provisional status through 
                which State qualification or licensing criteria 
                have been waived.
                    (C) The baccalaureate degree major of the 
                teacher and any other graduate certification or 
                degree held by the teacher, and the field of 
                discipline of the certification or degree.
                    (D) Whether the student is provided 
                services by paraprofessionals and, if so, their 
                qualifications.
            (2) Equity report card.--A local educational agency 
        that receives funds under the program under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 shall make available to parents, 
        separately or as a clearly identified part of the 
        school report card, and through easily accessible 
        means, including electronic means, the following 
        information for each school:
                    (A) Student achievement data at each 
                performance level, for each category of 
                students described in subsection (a)(3)(B)(ii), 
                on the State academic assessments included in 
                the State accountability system under 
                subsection (a)(3), disaggregated by the 
                subgroups described in subsection (a)(2)(B)(x).
                    (B) Individual school funding by source, 
                including Federal, State, and local funding and 
                grants.
                    (C) For each high school, the 4-year 
                adjusted cohort graduation rate, as described 
                in section 9101(32)(A), and the rate at which 
                students graduating from the high school in the 
                preceding year enrolled in institutions of 
                higher education by the beginning of the next 
                school year.
                    (D) Data regarding educational opportunity 
                participation, which data--
                            (i) shall include, at a minimum, 
                        prekindergarten and full-day 
                        kindergarten opportunities for children 
                        and opportunities for Advanced 
                        Placement or International 
                        Baccalaureate course work; and
                            (ii) may include such opportunities 
                        as--
                                    (I) dual enrollment and 
                                early college high schools;
                                    (II) gifted programming;
                                    (III) other educational 
                                programming; and
                                    (IV) opportunities to 
                                complete career and technical 
                                education programs of study, 
                                reported in a manner consistent 
                                with section 122(c)(1) of the 
                                Carl D. Perkins Career and 
                                Technical Education Act of 
                                2006.
                    (E) Information regarding each school's 
                school climate, including student survey 
                results and school discipline data, which may 
                include information such as the incidence of 
                school violence, bullying, in-school student 
                suspensions, out-of-school student suspensions, 
                expulsions, referrals to law enforcement, 
                school-based arrests, disciplinary transfers 
                (including placements in alternative schools), 
                and student detentions.
                    (F) Other data that, in conjunction with 
                the local educational agency report card 
                described in subsection (d), is determined, by 
                the State or local educational agency in 
                consultation with parents, families, and 
                educators, to be necessary to allow parents, 
                families, and community members to understand, 
                and compare with other schools in the local 
                educational agency and across the State, the 
                resources available to the school that 
                influence the outcomes for students.
            (3) Additional information.--In addition to the 
        information that parents of students may request under 
        paragraph (1), a school that receives funds under this 
        subpart shall provide to each individual parent, with 
        respect to the student--
                    (A) information on the level of achievement 
                and academic growth of the student on each of 
                the State academic assessments as required 
                under this subpart; and
                    (B) timely notice that the student has been 
                assigned, or has been taught for 4 or more 
                consecutive weeks by, a teacher who does not 
                hold a State qualification or license to teach 
                at the grade level and subject area in which 
                the teacher has been assigned.
            (4) Format.--The notice and information provided to 
        parents under this subsection shall be in an 
        understandable and uniform format and, to the extent 
        practicable, provided in a language that the parents 
        can understand.
    (h) Privacy.--Information collected under this section 
shall be collected and disseminated in a manner that protects 
the privacy of individuals.
    (i) Technical Assistance.--The Secretary shall provide a 
State educational agency, at the State educational agency's 
request, with technical assistance in meeting the requirements 
of this section.
    (j) Construction.--Nothing in this part shall be construed 
to prescribe the use of the academic assessments described in 
this part for student promotion or graduation purposes.
    (k) Special Rule With Respect to Bureau-Funded Schools.--In 
determining the assessments to be used by each school operated 
or funded by the Bureau of Indian Education of the Department 
of Interior that receives funds under this part, the following 
shall apply:
            (1) State accredited schools.--Each such school 
        accredited by the State in which it is operating shall 
        use the assessments the State has developed and 
        implemented to meet the requirements of this section, 
        or such other appropriate assessment as approved by the 
        Secretary of the Interior.
            (2) Regionally accredited schools.--Each such 
        school accredited by a regional accrediting 
        organization shall adopt appropriate assessments, in 
        consultation with and with the approval of, the 
        Secretary of the Interior and consistent with 
        assessments adopted by other schools in the same State 
        or region, that meets the requirements of this section.
            (3) Tribally accredited schools.--Each such school 
        accredited by a tribal accrediting agency or tribal 
        division of education shall use assessments developed 
        by such agency or division, except that the Secretary 
        of the Interior shall ensure that such assessments meet 
        the requirements of this section.

[SEC. 1112. LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY PLANS.

    [(a) Plans Required.--
            [(1) Subgrants.--A local educational agency may 
        receive a subgrant under this part for any fiscal year 
        only if such agency has on file with the State 
        educational agency a plan, approved by the State 
        educational agency, that is coordinated with other 
        programs under this Act, the Individuals with 
        Disabilities Education Act, the Carl D. Perkins Career 
        and Technical Education Act of 2006, the McKinney-Vento 
        Homeless Assistance Act, and other Acts, as 
        appropriate.
            [(2) Consolidated application.--The plan may be 
        submitted as part of a consolidated application under 
        section 9305.
    [(b) Plan Provisions.--
            [(1) In general.--In order to help low-achieving 
        children meet challenging achievement academic 
        standards, each local educational agency plan shall 
        include--
                    [(A) a description of high-quality student 
                academic assessments, if any, that are in 
                addition to the academic assessments described 
                in the State plan under section 1111(b)(3), 
                that the local educational agency and schools 
                served under this part will use--
                            [(i) to determine the success of 
                        children served under this part in 
                        meeting the State student academic 
                        achievement standards, and to provide 
                        information to teachers, parents, and 
                        students on the progress being made 
                        toward meeting the State student 
                        academic achievement standards 
                        described in section 1111(b)(1)(D)(ii);
                            [(ii) to assist in diagnosis, 
                        teaching, and learning in the classroom 
                        in ways that best enable low-achieving 
                        children served under this part to meet 
                        State student achievement academic 
                        standards and do well in the local 
                        curriculum;
                            [(iii) to determine what revisions 
                        are needed to projects under this part 
                        so that such children meet the State 
                        student academic achievement standards; 
                        and
                            [(iv) to identify effectively 
                        students who may be at risk for reading 
                        failure or who are having difficulty 
                        reading, through the use of screening, 
                        diagnostic, and classroom-based 
                        instructional reading assessments, as 
                        defined under section 1208;
                    [(B) at the local educational agency's 
                discretion, a description of any other 
                indicators that will be used in addition to the 
                academic indicators described in section 1111 
                for the uses described in such section;
                    [(C) a description of how the local 
                educational agency will provide additional 
                educational assistance to individual students 
                assessed as needing help in meeting the State's 
                challenging student academic achievement 
                standards;
                    [(D) a description of the strategy the 
                local educational agency will use to coordinate 
                programs under this part with programs under 
                title II to provide professional development 
                for teachers and principals, and, if 
                appropriate, pupil services personnel, 
                administrators, parents and other staff, 
                including local educational agency level staff 
                in accordance with sections 1118 and 1119;
                    [(E) a description of how the local 
                educational agency will coordinate and 
                integrate services provided under this part 
                with other educational services at the local 
                educational agency or individual school level, 
                such as--
                            [(i) Even Start, Head Start, 
                        Reading First, Early Reading First, and 
                        other preschool programs, including 
                        plans for the transition of 
                        participants in such programs to local 
                        elementary school programs; and
                            [(ii) services for children with 
                        limited English proficiency, children 
                        with disabilities, migratory children, 
                        neglected or delinquent youth, Indian 
                        children served under part A of title 
                        VII, homeless children, and immigrant 
                        children in order to increase program 
                        effectiveness, eliminate duplication, 
                        and reduce fragmentation of the 
                        instructional program;
                    [(F) an assurance that the local 
                educational agency will participate, if 
                selected, in the State National Assessment of 
                Educational Progress in 4th and 8th grade 
                reading and mathematics carried out under 
                section 303(b)(2) of the National Assessment of 
                Educational Progress Authorization Act;
                    [(G) a description of the poverty criteria 
                that will be used to select school attendance 
                areas under section 1113;
                    [(H) a description of how teachers, in 
                consultation with parents, administrators, and 
                pupil services personnel, in targeted 
                assistance schools under section 1115, will 
                identify the eligible children most in need of 
                services under this part;
                    [(I) a general description of the nature of 
                the programs to be conducted by such agency's 
                schools under sections 1114 and 1115 and, where 
                appropriate, educational services outside such 
                schools for children living in local 
                institutions for neglected or delinquent 
                children, and for neglected and delinquent 
                children in community day school programs;
                    [(J) a description of how the local 
                educational agency will ensure that migratory 
                children and formerly migratory children who 
                are eligible to receive services under this 
                part are selected to receive such services on 
                the same basis as other children who are 
                selected to receive services under this part;
                    [(K) if appropriate, a description of how 
                the local educational agency will use funds 
                under this part to support preschool programs 
                for children, particularly children 
                participating in Early Reading First, or in a 
                Head Start or Even Start program, which 
                services may be provided directly by the local 
                educational agency or through a subcontract 
                with the local Head Start agency designated by 
                the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
                under section 641 of the Head Start Act, or an 
                agency operating an Even Start program, an 
                Early Reading First program, or another 
                comparable public early childhood development 
                program;
                    [(L) a description of the actions the local 
                educational agency will take to assist its low-
                achieving schools identified under section 1116 
                as in need of improvement;
                    [(M) a description of the actions the local 
                educational agency will take to implement 
                public school choice and supplemental services, 
                consistent with the requirements of section 
                1116;
                    [(N) a description of how the local 
                educational agency will meet the requirements 
                of section 1119;
                    [(O) a description of the services the 
                local educational agency will provide homeless 
                children, including services provided with 
                funds reserved under section 1113(c)(3)(A);
                    [(P) a description of the strategy the 
                local educational agency will use to implement 
                effective parental involvement under section 
                1118; and
                    [(Q) where appropriate, a description of 
                how the local educational agency will use funds 
                under this part to support after school 
                (including before school and summer school) and 
                school-year extension programs.
            [(2) Exception.--The academic assessments and 
        indicators described in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of 
        paragraph (1) shall not be used--
                    [(A) in lieu of the academic assessments 
                required under section 1111(b)(3) and other 
                State academic indicators under section 
                1111(b)(2); or
                    [(B) to reduce the number of, or change 
                which, schools would otherwise be subject to 
                school improvement, corrective action, or 
                restructuring under section 1116, if such 
                additional assessments or indicators described 
                in such subparagraphs were not used, but such 
                assessments and indicators may be used to 
                identify additional schools for school 
                improvement or in need of corrective action or 
                restructuring.
    [(c) Assurances.--
            [(1) In general.--Each local educational agency 
        plan shall provide assurances that the local 
        educational agency will--
                    [(A) inform eligible schools and parents of 
                schoolwide program authority and the ability of 
                such schools to consolidate funds from Federal, 
                State, and local sources;
                    [(B) provide technical assistance and 
                support to schoolwide programs;
                    [(C) work in consultation with schools as 
                the schools develop the schools' plans pursuant 
                to section 1114 and assist schools as the 
                schools implement such plans or undertake 
                activities pursuant to section 1115 so that 
                each school can make adequate yearly progress 
                toward meeting the State student academic 
                achievement standards;
                    [(D) fulfill such agency's school 
                improvement responsibilities under section 
                1116, including taking actions under paragraphs 
                (7) and (8) of section 1116(b);
                    [(E) provide services to eligible children 
                attending private elementary schools and 
                secondary schools in accordance with section 
                1120, and timely and meaningful consultation 
                with private school officials regarding such 
                services;
                    [(F) take into account the experience of 
                model programs for the educationally 
                disadvantaged, and the findings of relevant 
                scientifically based research indicating that 
                services may be most effective if focused on 
                students in the earliest grades at schools that 
                receive funds under this part;
                    [(G) in the case of a local educational 
                agency that chooses to use funds under this 
                part to provide early childhood development 
                services to low-income children below the age 
                of compulsory school attendance, ensure that 
                such services comply with the education 
                performance standards in effect under section 
                641A(a)(1)(B) of the Head Start Act;
                    [(H) work in consultation with schools as 
                the schools develop and implement their plans 
                or activities under sections 1118 and 1119;
                    [(I) comply with the requirements of 
                section 1119 regarding the qualifications of 
                teachers and paraprofessionals and professional 
                development;
                    [(J) inform eligible schools of the local 
                educational agency's authority to obtain 
                waivers on the school's behalf under title IX 
                and, if the State is an Ed-Flex Partnership 
                State, to obtain waivers under the Education 
                Flexibility Partnership Act of 1999;
                    [(K) coordinate and collaborate, to the 
                extent feasible and necessary as determined by 
                the local educational agency, with the State 
                educational agency and other agencies providing 
                services to children, youth, and families with 
                respect to a school in school improvement, 
                corrective action, or restructuring under 
                section 1116 if such a school requests 
                assistance from the local educational agency in 
                addressing major factors that have 
                significantly affected student achievement at 
                the school;
                    [(L) ensure, through incentives for 
                voluntary transfers, the provision of 
                professional development, recruitment programs, 
                or other effective strategies, that low-income 
                students and minority students are not taught 
                at higher rates than other students by 
                unqualified, out-of-field, or inexperienced 
                teachers;
                    [(M) use the results of the student 
                academic assessments required under section 
                1111(b)(3), and other measures or indicators 
                available to the agency, to review annually the 
                progress of each school served by the agency 
                and receiving funds under this part to 
                determine whether all of the schools are making 
                the progress necessary to ensure that all 
                students will meet the State's proficient level 
                of achievement on the State academic 
                assessments described in section 1111(b)(3) 
                within 12 years from the end of the 2001-2002 
                school year;
                    [(N) ensure that the results from the 
                academic assessments required under section 
                1111(b)(3) will be provided to parents and 
                teachers as soon as is practicably possible 
                after the test is taken, in an understandable 
                and uniform format and, to the extent 
                practicable, provided in a language that the 
                parents can understand; and
                    [(O) assist each school served by the 
                agency and assisted under this part in 
                developing or identifying examples of high-
                quality, effective curricula consistent with 
                section 1111(b)(8)(D).
            [(2) Special rule.--In carrying out subparagraph 
        (G) of paragraph (1), the Secretary--
                    [(A) shall consult with the Secretary of 
                Health and Human Services and shall establish 
                procedures (taking into consideration existing 
                State and local laws, and local teacher 
                contracts) to assist local educational agencies 
                to comply with such subparagraph; and
                    [(B) shall disseminate to local educational 
                agencies the education performance standards in 
                effect under section 641A(a)(1)(B) of the Head 
                Start Act, and such agencies affected by such 
                subparagraph shall plan for the implementation 
                of such subparagraph (taking into consideration 
                existing State and local laws, and local 
                teacher contracts), including pursuing the 
                availability of other Federal, State, and local 
                funding sources to assist in compliance with 
                such subparagraph.
            [(3) Inapplicability.--Paragraph (1)(G) of this 
        subsection shall not apply to preschool programs using 
        the Even Start model or to Even Start programs that are 
        expanded through the use of funds under this part.
    [(d) Plan Development and Duration.--
            [(1) Consultation.--Each local educational agency 
        plan shall be developed in consultation with teachers, 
        principals, administrators (including administrators of 
        programs described in other parts of this title), and 
        other appropriate school personnel, and with parents of 
        children in schools served under this part.
            [(2) Duration.--Each such plan shall be submitted 
        for the first year for which this part is in effect 
        following the date of enactment of the No Child Left 
        Behind Act of 2001 and shall remain in effect for the 
        duration of the agency's participation under this part.
            [(3) Review.--Each local educational agency shall 
        periodically review and, as necessary, revise its plan.
    [(e) State Approval.--
            [(1) In general.--Each local educational agency 
        plan shall be filed according to a schedule established 
        by the State educational agency.
            [(2) Approval.--The State educational agency shall 
        approve a local educational agency's plan only if the 
        State educational agency determines that the local 
        educational agency's plan--
                    [(A) enables schools served under this part 
                to substantially help children served under 
                this part meet the academic standards expected 
                of all children described in section 
                1111(b)(1); and
                    [(B) meets the requirements of this 
                section.
            [(3) Review.--The State educational agency shall 
        review the local educational agency's plan to determine 
        if such agencies activities are in accordance with 
        sections 1118 and 1119.
    [(f) Program Responsibility.--The local educational agency 
plan shall reflect the shared responsibility of schools, 
teachers, and the local educational agency in making decisions 
regarding activities under sections 1114 and 1115.
    [(g) Parental Notification.--
            [(1) In general.--
                    [(A) Notice.--Each local educational agency 
                using funds under this part to provide a 
                language instruction educational program as 
                determined in part C of title III shall, not 
                later than 30 days after the beginning of the 
                school year, inform a parent or parents of a 
                limited English proficient child identified for 
                participation or participating in, such a 
                program of--
                            [(i) the reasons for the 
                        identification of their child as 
                        limited English proficient and in need 
                        of placement in a language instruction 
                        educational program;
                            [(ii) the child's level of English 
                        proficiency, how such level was 
                        assessed, and the status of the child's 
                        academic achievement;
                            [(iii) the methods of instruction 
                        used in the program in which their 
                        child is, or will be participating, and 
                        the methods of instruction used in 
                        other available programs, including how 
                        such programs differ in content, 
                        instructional goals, and the use of 
                        English and a native language in 
                        instruction;
                            [(iv) how the program in which 
                        their child is, or will be 
                        participating, will meet the 
                        educational strengths and needs of 
                        their child;
                            [(v) how such program will 
                        specifically help their child learn 
                        English, and meet age-appropriate 
                        academic achievement standards for 
                        grade promotion and graduation;
                            [(vi) the specific exit 
                        requirements for the program, including 
                        the expected rate of transition from 
                        such program into classrooms that are 
                        not tailored for limited English 
                        proficient children, and the expected 
                        rate of graduation from secondary 
                        school for such program if funds under 
                        this part are used for children in 
                        secondary schools;
                            [(vii) in the case of a child with 
                        a disability, how such program meets 
                        the objectives of the individualized 
                        education program of the child;
                            [(viii) information pertaining to 
                        parental rights that includes written 
                        guidance--
                                    [(I) detailing--
                                            [(aa) the right 
                                        that parents have to 
                                        have their child 
                                        immediately removed 
                                        from such program upon 
                                        their request; and
                                            [(bb) the options 
                                        that parents have to 
                                        decline to enroll their 
                                        child in such program 
                                        or to choose another 
                                        program or method of 
                                        instruction, if 
                                        available; and
                                    [(II) assisting parents in 
                                selecting among various 
                                programs and methods of 
                                instruction, if more than one 
                                program or method is offered by 
                                the eligible entity.
                    [(B) Separate notification.--In addition to 
                providing the information required to be 
                provided under paragraph (1), each eligible 
                entity that is using funds provided under this 
                part to provide a language instruction 
                educational program, and that has failed to 
                make progress on the annual measurable 
                achievement objectives described in section 
                3122 for any fiscal year for which part A is in 
                effect, shall separately inform a parent or the 
                parents of a child identified for participation 
                in such program, or participating in such 
                program, of such failure not later than 30 days 
                after such failure occurs.
            [(2) Notice.--The notice and information provided 
        in paragraph (1) to a parent or parents of a child 
        identified for participation in a language instruction 
        educational program for limited English proficient 
        children shall be in an understandable and uniform 
        format and, to the extent practicable, provided in a 
        language that the parents can understand.
            [(3) Special rule applicable during the school 
        year.--For those children who have not been identified 
        as limited English proficient prior to the beginning of 
        the school year the local educational agency shall 
        notify parents within the first 2 weeks of the child 
        being placed in a language instruction educational 
        program consistent with paragraphs (1) and (2).
            [(4) Parental participation.--Each local 
        educational agency receiving funds under this part 
        shall implement an effective means of outreach to 
        parents of limited English proficient students to 
        inform the parents regarding how the parents can be 
        involved in the education of their children, and be 
        active participants in assisting their children to 
        attain English proficiency, achieve at high levels in 
        core academic subjects, and meet challenging State 
        academic achievement standards and State academic 
        content standards expected of all students, including 
        holding, and sending notice of opportunities for, 
        regular meetings for the purpose of formulating and 
        responding to recommendations from parents of students 
        assisted under this part.
            [(5) Basis for admission or exclusion.--A student 
        shall not be admitted to, or excluded from, any 
        federally assisted education program on the basis of a 
        surname or language-minority status.]

SEC. 1112. LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY PLANS.

    (a) Plans Required.--
            (1) Subgrants.--A local educational agency may 
        receive a subgrant under the program under this subpart 
        and subpart 2 for any fiscal year only if such agency 
        has on file with the State educational agency a plan, 
        approved by the State educational agency, that is 
        coordinated with other programs under this Act, the 
        Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Carl 
        D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, 
        the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, and other 
        Acts, as appropriate, and activities under title IX of 
        the Education Amendments of 1972.
            (2) Consolidated application.--The plan may be 
        submitted as part of a consolidated application under 
        section 9305.
    (b) Plan Development and Duration.--
            (1) Consultation.--Each local educational agency 
        plan shall be developed in consultation with--
                    (A) teachers, principals, administrators, 
                and other appropriate school personnel;
                    (B) representatives of early childhood 
                education programs in the geographic area 
                served by the local educational agency, as 
                appropriate; and
                    (C) parents and family members of children 
                in schools served under this subpart.
            (2) Duration.--Each local educational agency plan 
        shall be submitted pursuant to this section for the 
        first year for which this part is in effect following 
        the date of enactment of the Strengthening America's 
        Schools Act of 2013, and such plan shall remain in 
        effect until the date of renewal as determined under 
        paragraph (4) by the State.
            (3) Review.--Each local educational agency shall 
        periodically review and, as necessary, revise its plan 
        to reflect changes in the local educational agency's 
        strategies and programs under this part, and changes in 
        the State performance targets under section 
        1111(a)(3)(C).
            (4) Renewal.--A local educational agency that 
        desires to continue participating in the program under 
        this subpart and subpart 2 shall submit a renewed plan 
        on a periodic basis, as determined by the State.
    (c) State Approval.--
            (1) In general.--Each local educational agency plan 
        shall be filed according to a schedule established by 
        the State educational agency.
            (2) Approval.--The State educational agency shall 
        approve a local educational agency's plan only if the 
        State educational agency determines that the local 
        educational agency's plan--
                    (A) enables schools served under this 
                subpart to substantially help children served 
                under this part meet the academic content and 
                student academic achievement standards expected 
                of all children described in section 1111(a)(1) 
                and the performance targets described in 
                section 1111(a)(3)(C); and
                    (B) meets the requirements of this part.
    (d) Plan Provisions.--In order to help low-achieving 
children meet college and career ready student academic 
achievement standards, and to close the achievement gap between 
high- and low-achieving children each local educational agency 
plan shall describe each of the following:
            (1) How the local educational agency will work with 
        each of the schools served by the agency to--
                    (A) develop and implement a comprehensive 
                program of instruction to meet the academic 
                needs of all students;
                    (B) identify quickly and effectively 
                students who may be at risk for academic 
                failure;
                    (C) provide additional educational 
                assistance to individual students assessed as 
                needing help in meeting the State's college and 
                career ready student academic achievement 
                standards;
                    (D) identify significant gaps in student 
                achievement among subgroups of students 
                identified under section 1111(a)(2)(B)(x) and 
                develop strategies to reduce such gaps in 
                achievement; and
                    (E) identify and implement effective 
                methods and instructional strategies that are 
                based on scientifically valid research intended 
                to strengthen the core academic programs of the 
                schools, including using multi-tiered systems 
                of support, universal design for learning, and 
                positive behavioral interventions and supports.
            (2) How the local educational agency will monitor 
        and evaluate the effectiveness of school programs in 
        improving student academic achievement and academic 
        growth, especially for students described in section 
        1111(a)(3)(B)(ii)(III).
            (3) The strategy the local educational agency will 
        use to implement effective parent and family engagement 
        under section 1118.
            (4) How the local educational agency will 
        coordinate and integrate services provided under this 
        part with other high-quality early childhood education 
        programs at the local educational agency or individual 
        school level (including programs under section 619 of 
        the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) that 
        include plans for the transition of participants in 
        such programs to local elementary school programs and, 
        if appropriate, a description of how the local 
        educational agency will use funds provided under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 to support preschool programs for 
        children, particularly children participating in a Head 
        Start program, which may be provided directly by the 
        local educational agency or through a subcontract with 
        the Head Start agency designated by the Secretary of 
        Health and Human Services under section 641 of the Head 
        Start Act, or another comparable public early childhood 
        education program.
            (5) How activities under this part will be 
        coordinated and integrated with Federal, State, and 
        local services and programs, including programs 
        supported under this Act, the Carl D. Perkins Career 
        and Technical Education Act of 2006, the Individuals 
        with Disabilities Education Act, the Rehabilitation Act 
        of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 701 et seq.), the Head Start Act (42 
        U.S.C. 9831 et seq.), the Child Care and Development 
        Block Grant Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 9858 et seq.), and 
        the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2801 et 
        seq.), violence prevention programs, nutrition 
        programs, and housing programs.
            (6) How the local educational agency will 
        coordinate and integrate services provided under the 
        program under this subpart and subpart 2 with local 
        workforce development programs that serve disadvantaged 
        or out-of-school youth, such as those providing 
        workforce investment activities under chapter 4 of 
        subtitle B of title I of the Workforce Investment Act 
        of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2851 et seq.), including a 
        description of how the local educational agency will 
        use funds provided under this subpart and subpart 2 to 
        support such activities.
            (7) The poverty criteria that will be used to 
        select school attendance areas under section 1113.
            (8) How teachers, in consultation with parents and 
        family members, administrators, and specialized 
        instructional support personnel, in targeted assistance 
        schools under section 1115, will identify the eligible 
        children most in need of services under this part.
            (9) How the local educational agency will identify 
        and address any disparities in the equitable 
        distribution of teachers, consistent with the 
        requirements of section 1111(b)(1)(R).
            (10) How the local educational agency will provide 
        for the equitable distribution of elementary school 
        teachers, and of secondary school teachers, within 
        local educational agencies and the State using data on 
        the percentage and distribution of the categories of 
        teachers described in subsection (e)(13).
            (11) A general description of the nature of the 
        programs to be conducted by such agency's schools under 
        sections 1114 and 1115 and, where appropriate, 
        educational services outside such schools for children 
        living in local institutions for neglected or 
        delinquent children, and for neglected and delinquent 
        children in community day school programs.
            (12) A description of--
                    (A) how the local educational agency will 
                provide opportunities for the enrollment, 
                attendance, and success of homeless children 
                and youths; and
                    (B) the services the local educational 
                agency will provide homeless children and 
                youths, including services provided with funds 
                reserved under section 1113(c)(3), and how 
                those services may differ from those provided 
                in prior years.
            (13) A description of the support the local 
        educational agency will provide for homeless children 
        and youths, consistent with the requirements of the 
        McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act.
            (14) For each quartile of schools in the local 
        educational agency based on school poverty level and 
        for high-minority schools and low-minority schools in 
        the local educational agency, data regarding access at 
        the high school level to rigorous coursework, 
        including--
                    (A) access to opportunities to earn 
                postsecondary credit while in high school, such 
                as through Advanced Placement and International 
                Baccalaureate courses and examinations, dual 
                enrollment, and early college high schools; and
                    (B) student performance on Advanced 
                Placement and International Baccalaureate 
                course examinations.
            (15) How the local educational agency will identify 
        and address any disparity within the student subgroups 
        described in section 1111(a)(3)(D) in equitable access 
        to rigorous coursework, including access to 
        opportunities described in paragraph (14)(A).
            (16) How the local educational agency will engage 
        in timely, on-going, and meaningful consultation with 
        representatives of Indian tribes in the area served by 
        such local educational agency to improve the 
        coordination of activities under this Act and to meet 
        the unique cultural, language, and academic needs of 
        Indian and Native Hawaiian students.
            (17) How the local educational agency will 
        implement strategies to facilitate effective 
        transitions for students from middle school to high 
        school and from high school to postsecondary education, 
        including access to dual enrollment and early college 
        high schools.
            (18) If the local educational agency proposes to 
        use subgrant funds under the program under this subpart 
        and subpart 2 for positive behavioral interventions and 
        supports, a description of the actions the local 
        educational agency will take to provide positive 
        behavioral interventions and supports and coordinate 
        those activities with activities carried out under the 
        Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
            (19) If the local educational agency proposes to 
        use such subgrant funds for early intervening services, 
        a description of the actions the local educational 
        agency will take to provide early intervening services 
        and coordinate those services with early intervening 
        services carried out under the Individuals with 
        Disabilities Education Act.
            (20) If the local educational agency proposes to 
        use such subgrant funds for school-based mental health 
        programs, a description of the actions the local 
        educational agency will take to provide school-based 
        mental health programs and coordinate those activities 
        with activities carried out under the Individuals with 
        Disabilities Education Act.
            (21) If the local educational agency proposes to 
        use such subgrant funds for periodically updating the 
        crisis management plan of the local educational agency, 
        as described in section 4202(5)(B)(iv), a description 
        of the actions the local educational agency will take 
        to develop and implement an updated crisis management 
        plan.
            (22) A description of how the local educational 
        agency will plan for pregnant and parenting students to 
        be enrolled, attend, and succeed in school.
    (e) Assurances.--Each local educational agency plan shall 
provide assurances that the local educational agency will--
            (1) use the results of the academic assessments 
        required under section 1111(a)(2), and other measures 
        or indicators available to the agency, to review 
        annually the progress of each school served by the 
        agency and receiving funds under the program under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 to determine whether all of the 
        schools are making the progress necessary to ensure all 
        students will be performing at or above grade level on 
        the State academic assessments required under such 
        section, in accordance with the ambitious targets 
        described in the State plan under section 
        1111(a)(3)(C);
            (2) provide to parents and teachers the results 
        from the academic assessments required under section 
        1111(a)(2) as soon as is practicably possible after the 
        test is taken in an understandable and uniform format 
        and, to the extent possible, provided in a language 
        that the parents and, to the greatest extent 
        practicable, family members, can understand;
            (3) participate, if selected, in State academic 
        assessments of student achievement in reading and 
        mathematics in grades 4 and 8 carried out under section 
        303(b)(3) of the National Assessment of Educational 
        Progress Authorization Act;
            (4) fulfill such agency's school improvement 
        responsibilities under section 1116;
            (5) ensure that migratory children who are eligible 
        to receive services under this part are selected to 
        receive such services on the same basis as other 
        children who are selected to receive services under 
        this part;
            (6) engage in timely and meaningful consultation 
        with representatives of Indian tribes located in the 
        area served by the local educational agency;
            (7) provide services to eligible children attending 
        private elementary schools and secondary schools in 
        accordance with section 1119, and timely and meaningful 
        consultation with private school officials regarding 
        such services;
            (8) inform eligible schools of the local 
        educational agency's authority to obtain waivers on the 
        school's behalf under applicable Federal flexibility 
        provisions;
            (9) in the case of a local educational agency that 
        chooses to use funds under the program under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 to provide early childhood 
        education services to low-income children below the age 
        of compulsory school attendance, ensure that such 
        services comply with the education performance 
        standards in effect under section 641A(a)(1)(B) of the 
        Head Start Act (42 U.S.C. 9836a(a)(1)(B));
            (10) comply with the requirements of section 1501 
        that relate to the local educational agency and 
        describe the local educational agency's plan to ensure 
        such compliance;
            (11) comply with the requirements of subtitle B of 
        title VII of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act 
        that relate to the local educational agency;
            (12) annually submit to the State educational 
        agency the information contained in each school equity 
        report card described in section 1111(g)(2); and
            (13) annually submit to the State educational 
        agency, for each quartile of schools in the local 
        educational agency based on school poverty level and 
        for high-minority schools and low-minority schools in 
        the local educational agency, data regarding the 
        percentage and distribution of the following categories 
        of teachers:
                    (A) Teachers who are new.
                    (B) Teachers who have not completed a 
                teacher preparation program.
                    (C) Teachers who are not teaching in the 
                subject or field for which the teacher is 
                certified or licensed.
                    (D) Where applicable, teachers who have the 
                highest or lowest ratings in a professional 
                growth and improvement system.
    (f) Parental Notification Regarding Language Instruction 
Programs.--
            (1) In general.--Each local educational agency 
        using funds under the program under this subpart and 
        subpart 2 to provide a language instruction educational 
        program as defined in section 3201 shall, not later 
        than 30 days after the beginning of the school year, 
        inform a parent or parents of an English learner 
        identified for participation or participating in, such 
        a program of--
                    (A) the reasons for the identification of 
                their child as an English learner and in need 
                of placement in a language instruction 
                educational program;
                    (B) the child's level of English 
                proficiency, how such level was assessed, and 
                the status of the child's academic achievement;
                    (C) the methods of instruction used in the 
                program in which their child is, or will be, 
                participating, and the methods of instruction 
                used in other available programs, including how 
                such programs differ in content, instructional 
                goals, and the use of English and a native 
                language in instruction;
                    (D) how the program in which their child 
                is, or will be, participating, will meet the 
                educational strengths and needs of their child;
                    (E) how such program will specifically help 
                their child learn English, and meet age-
                appropriate academic achievement standards for 
                grade promotion and graduation;
                    (F) the specific exit requirements for the 
                program, including the expected rate of 
                transition from such program into classrooms 
                that are not tailored for English learners, and 
                the expected rate of graduation from secondary 
                school for such program if funds provided under 
                this subpart or subpart 2 are used for children 
                in secondary schools;
                    (G) in the case of a child with a 
                disability, how such program meets the 
                objectives of the individualized education 
                program of the child; and
                    (H) information pertaining to parental 
                rights that includes written guidance--
                            (i) detailing--
                                    (I) the right that parents 
                                have to have their child 
                                immediately removed from such 
                                program upon their request; and
                                    (II) the options that 
                                parents have to decline to 
                                enroll their child in such 
                                program or to choose another 
                                program or method of 
                                instruction, if available; and
                            (ii) assisting parents in selecting 
                        among various programs and methods of 
                        instruction, if more than 1 program or 
                        method is offered by the eligible 
                        entity.
            (2) Notice.--The notice and information provided in 
        paragraph (1) to a parent or parents of a child 
        identified for participation in a language instruction 
        educational program for English learners shall be in an 
        understandable and uniform format and, to the extent 
        practicable, provided in a language that the parents 
        can understand.
            (3) Special rule applicable during the school 
        year.--For those children who have not been identified 
        as English learners prior to the beginning of the 
        school year and who are subsequently so identified, the 
        local educational agency shall notify the parents of 
        such children within the first 2 weeks of the child 
        being placed in a language instruction educational 
        program consistent with paragraphs (1) and (2).
            (4) Parental participation.--Each local educational 
        agency receiving funds under the program under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 shall implement an effective 
        means of outreach to parents and, to the extent 
        practicable, family members, of English learner 
        students to inform the parents and family members 
        regarding how the parents and family members can be 
        involved in the education of their children, and be 
        active participants in assisting their children to 
        attain English proficiency, achieve at high levels in 
        core academic subjects, and meet college and career 
        ready State student academic achievement standards and 
        State academic content standards expected of all 
        students, including holding, and sending notice of 
        opportunities for, regular meetings for the purpose of 
        formulating and responding to recommendations from 
        parents and family members of students assisted under 
        this subpart or subpart 2.
            (5) Basis for admission or exclusion.--A student 
        shall not be admitted to, or excluded from, any 
        federally assisted education program on the basis of a 
        surname or language-minority status.

SEC. 1113. ELIGIBLE SCHOOL ATTENDANCE AREAS.

    (a) Determination.--
            (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(3) Ranking order.--If funds allocated in 
        accordance with subsection (c) are insufficient to 
        serve all eligible school attendance areas, a local 
        educational agency shall--
                    [(A) annually rank, without regard to grade 
                spans, such agency's eligible school attendance 
                areas in which the concentration of children 
                from low-income families exceeds 75 percent 
                from highest to lowest according to the 
                percentage of children from low-income 
                families; and
                    [(B) serve such eligible school attendance 
                areas in rank order.]
            (3) Ranking order.--
                    (A) In general.--Except as provided in 
                subparagraph (B), if funds allocated in 
                accordance with subsection (c) are insufficient 
                to serve all eligible school attendance areas, 
                a local educational agency shall--
                            (i) annually rank, without regard 
                        to grade spans, such agency's eligible 
                        school attendance areas in which the 
                        concentration of children from low-
                        income families exceeds 75 percent, or 
                        exceeds 50 percent in the case of the 
                        high schools served by such agency, 
                        from highest to lowest according to the 
                        percentage of children from low-income 
                        families; and
                            (ii) serve such eligible school 
                        attendance areas in rank order.
                    (B) Applicability.--A local educational 
                agency shall not be required to reduce, in 
                order to comply with subparagraph (A), the 
                amount of funding provided under the program 
                under this subpart and subpart 2 to elementary 
                schools and middle schools from the amount of 
                funding provided under this part to such 
                schools for the fiscal year preceding the date 
                of enactment of the Strengthening America's 
                Schools Act of 2013 in order to provide funding 
                under such subparts to high schools pursuant to 
                subparagraph (A).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(5) Measures.--The local educational agency shall 
        use the same measure of poverty, which measure shall be 
        the number of children ages 5 through 17 in poverty 
        counted in the most recent census data approved by the 
        Secretary, the number of children eligible for free and 
        reduced priced lunches under the Richard B. Russell 
        National School Lunch Act, the number of children in 
        families receiving assistance under the State program 
        funded under part A of title IV of the Social Security 
        Act, or the number of children eligible to receive 
        medical assistance under the Medicaid program, or a 
        composite of such indicators, with respect to all 
        school attendance areas in the local educational 
        agency--
                    [(A) to identify eligible school attendance 
                areas;
                    [(B) to determine the ranking of each area; 
                and
                    [(C) to determine allocations under 
                subsection (c).]
            (5) Measures.--
                    (A) In general.--Except as provided in 
                subparagraph (B), the local educational agency 
                shall use the same measure of poverty, which 
                measure shall be the number of children ages 5 
                through 17 in poverty counted in the most 
                recent census data approved by the Secretary, 
                the number of children eligible for free and 
                reduced priced lunches under the Richard B. 
                Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 
                1751 et seq.), the number of children in 
                families receiving assistance under the State 
                program funded under part A of title IV of the 
                Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.), or 
                the number of children eligible to receive 
                medical assistance under the Medicaid program, 
                or a composite of such indicators, with respect 
                to all school attendance areas in the local 
                educational agency--
                            (i) to identify eligible school 
                        attendance areas;
                            (ii) to determine the ranking of 
                        each area; and
                            (iii) to determine allocations 
                        under subsection (c).
                    (B) Low-income families in secondary 
                schools.--For measuring the number of students 
                in low-income families in secondary schools, 
                the local educational agency shall use the same 
                measure of poverty, which shall be the 
                calculation producing the greater of the 
                results from among the following 2 
                calculations:
                            (i) The calculation described under 
                        subparagraph (A).
                            (ii) A feeder pattern described in 
                        subparagraph (C).
                    (C) Feeder pattern.--In this paragraph, the 
                term ``feeder pattern'' means an accurate 
                estimate of the number of students in low-
                income families in a secondary school that is 
                calculated by applying the average percentage 
                of students in low-income families of the 
                elementary school attendance areas as 
                calculated under subparagraph (A) that feed 
                into the secondary school to the number of 
                students enrolled in such school.
            (7) Waiver for desegregation plans.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (8) Reservation for early childhood education.--A 
        local educational agency may reserve funds made 
        available to carry out this section for early childhood 
        education in eligible school attendance areas before 
        making allocations to high schools in eligible school 
        attendance areas pursuant to this section.
    (b) Local Educational Agency Discretion.--
            (1) In general.--Notwithstanding subsection (a)(2), 
        a local educational agency may--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (D) elect not to serve an eligible school 
                attendance area or eligible school that has a 
                higher percentage of children from low-income 
                families if--
                            (i) the school meets the 
                        comparability requirements of [section 
                        1120A(c)]section 1120(c);

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Allocations.--
            (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(3) Reservation.--A local educational agency shall 
        reserve such funds as are necessary under this part to 
        provide services comparable to those provided to 
        children in schools funded under this part to serve--
                    [(A) homeless children who do not attend 
                participating schools, including providing 
                educationally related support services to 
                children in shelters and other locations where 
                children may live;
                    [(B) children in local institutions for 
                neglected children; and
                    [(C) if appropriate, children in local 
                institutions for delinquent children, and 
                neglected or delinquent children in community 
                day school programs.]
            (3) Reservation for homeless children and youth and 
        other at-risk children.--
                    (A) Funds for homeless children and youth 
                and other at-risk children.--A local 
                educational agency shall reserve such funds as 
                are necessary under the program under this 
                subpart and subpart 2 to serve--
                            (i) homeless children who are 
                        attending any public school served by 
                        the local educational agency, including 
                        providing educationally related support 
                        services to children in shelters and 
                        other locations where children may 
                        live;
                            (ii) children in local institutions 
                        for neglected children;
                            (iii) if appropriate, children in 
                        local institutions for delinquent 
                        children, and neglected or delinquent 
                        children in community day programs; and
                            (iv) children in foster care (as 
                        defined in section 1502), including 
                        providing points of contact (as 
                        described in section 1501(d)) in local 
                        educational agencies for child welfare 
                        agencies and children in foster care.
                    (B) Reservation of funds.--Notwithstanding 
                the requirements of subsections (b) and (c) of 
                section 1120, funds reserved under subparagraph 
                (A) may be used to provide homeless children 
                and youths with services not ordinarily 
                provided to other students under this part, 
                including--
                            (i) providing funding for the 
                        liaison designated pursuant to section 
                        722(g)(1)(J)(ii) of the McKinney-Vento 
                        Homeless Assistance Act;
                            (ii) providing transportation 
                        pursuant to section 722(g)(1)(J)(iii) 
                        of such Act;
                            (iii) providing services to 
                        preschool-aged homeless children and 
                        homeless secondary school students;
                            (iv) providing support services to 
                        homeless children and youths in 
                        shelters and other locations where they 
                        may live; and
                            (v) removing barriers to homeless 
                        children and youths' enrollment, 
                        attendance, retention, and success in 
                        school.
                    (C) Amount reserved.--The amount of funds 
                reserved in accordance with subparagraph (A)(i) 
                shall be determined by an assessment of the 
                needs of homeless children and youths in the 
                local educational agency. Such needs assessment 
                shall include the following:
                            (i) Information related to child, 
                        youth, and family homelessness in the 
                        local educational agency obtained 
                        through the coordination and 
                        collaboration required under 
                        subsections (f)(4) and (g)(6) of 
                        section 722 of the McKinney-Vento 
                        Homeless Assistance Act.
                            (ii) The number of homeless 
                        children and youths reported by the 
                        local educational agency to the State 
                        educational agency under section 
                        722(f)(3) of the McKinney-Vento 
                        Homeless Assistance Act for the 
                        previous school year.
            (4) Financial incentives and rewards reservation.--
        A local educational agency may reserve such funds as 
        are necessary from those funds received by the local 
        educational agency under title II, and not more than 5 
        percent of those funds received by the local 
        educational agency under subpart 2, to provide 
        financial incentives and rewards to teachers who serve 
        in schools [eligible under this section and identified 
        for school improvement, corrective action, and 
        restructuring under section 1116(b)]identified as a 
        priority school under section 1116(d) for the purpose 
        of attracting and retaining qualified and effective 
        teachers.

SEC. 1114. SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAMS.

    (a) Use of Funds for Schoolwide Programs.--
            (1) In general.--A local educational agency may 
        consolidate and use funds under this part, together 
        with other Federal, State, and local funds, in order to 
        upgrade the entire educational program of a school that 
        serves an eligible school attendance area in which not 
        less than 40 percent of the children are from low-
        income families, or not less than 40 percent of the 
        children enrolled in the school are from such families. 
        Funds provided under the program under this subpart and 
        subpart 2 may be used to support evidence-based 
        activities that address needs identified through the 
        comprehensive needs assessment under subsection 
        (b)(1)(A) and consistent with the schoolwide program.
            (2) Identification of students not required.--
                    (A) In general.--* * *
                            (i) * * *
                            (ii) to [provide services to such 
                        children that are supplementary, as 
                        otherwise required by section 
                        1120A(b).]identify particular services 
                        as supplemental.
                    [(B) Supplemental funds.--A school 
                participating in a schoolwide program shall use 
                funds available to carry out this section only 
                to supplement the amount of funds that would, 
                in the absence of funds under this part, be 
                made available from non-Federal sources for the 
                school, including funds needed to provide 
                services that are required by law for children 
                with disabilities and children with limited 
                English proficiency.]
                    (B) Supplemental funds.--
                            (i) In general.--A local 
                        educational agency serving a school 
                        participating in a schoolwide program 
                        shall use funds available to carry out 
                        this section only to supplement the 
                        aggregate amount of funds that would, 
                        in the absence of funds provided under 
                        the program under this subpart and 
                        subpart 2, be made available from State 
                        and local sources for the school, 
                        including funds needed to provide 
                        services that are required by law for 
                        children with disabilities and children 
                        who are English learners.
                            (ii) Compliance.--To demonstrate 
                        compliance with clause (i), a local 
                        educational agency shall demonstrate 
                        that the methodology it uses to 
                        allocate State and local funds to each 
                        school receiving funds under the 
                        program under this subpart and subpart 
                        2 ensures the school receives all of 
                        the State and local funds the school 
                        would otherwise receive if it were not 
                        receiving funds under this part.
                            (iii) Nonapplicability.--Section 
                        1120(b) shall not apply to schools 
                        operating schoolwide programs under 
                        this section.
            (3) Exemption from statutory and regulatory 
        requirements.--
                    (A) Exemption.--* * *
                    (B) Requirements.--A school that chooses to 
                use funds from such other programs shall not be 
                relieved of the requirements relating to 
                health, safety, civil rights, or student and 
                parental participation and involvement[, 
                services to private school children, 
                maintenance of effort, comparability of 
                services, uses of Federal funds to supplement, 
                not supplant non-Federal funds, or the 
                distribution of funds to State educational 
                agencies or local educational agencies] that 
                apply to the receipt of funds from such 
                programs.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(4) Professional development.--Each school 
        receiving funds under this part for any fiscal year 
        shall devote sufficient resources to effectively carry 
        out the activities described in subsection (b)(1)(D) in 
        accordance with section 1119 for such fiscal year, 
        except that a school may enter into a consortium with 
        another school to carry out such activities.]
            (4) External providers.--A school may carry out a 
        schoolwide program under this subsection through an 
        external provider if the school demonstrates, in the 
        plan required under subsection (b)(2), that the 
        external provider has expertise in using strategies and 
        programs that are based on scientifically valid 
        research to improve teaching, learning, and schools.
    (b) Components of a Schoolwide Program.--
            (1) In general.--A schoolwide program shall include 
        the following components:
                    (A) A comprehensive needs assessment of the 
                entire school (including taking into account 
                the needs of migratory children as defined in 
                [section 1309(2)]section 1312) that is based on 
                information which includes the achievement of 
                children in relation to the State academic 
                content standards and the State student 
                academic achievement standards described in 
                [section 1111(b)(1)]section 1111(a)(1).
                    (B) Schoolwide reform strategies that--
                            (i) provide opportunities for all 
                        children [to meet the State's 
                        proficient and advanced levels of 
                        student academic achievement described 
                        in section 1111(b)(1)(D)]to be 
                        proficient or advanced students, as 
                        described in section 
                        1111(a)(3)(B)(ii)(I);
                            (ii) use effective methods and 
                        instructional strategies that are based 
                        on [scientifically based 
                        research]scientifically valid research 
                        that--
                                    (I) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iii)(I) * * *
                                    (aa) counseling, [pupil 
                                services]specialized 
                                instructional support services, 
                                and mentoring services;
                                    (bb) college and career 
                                awareness and preparation, such 
                                as college and career guidance, 
                                personal finance education, and 
                                innovative teaching methods, 
                                which may include applied 
                                learning and team-teaching 
                                strategies; [and]
                                    (cc) the integration of 
                                [vocational and technical 
                                education programs; and]career 
                                and technical education 
                                programs;
                                    (dd) implementation of 
                                schoolwide positive behavioral 
                                interventions and supports, 
                                including through coordination 
                                with activities carried out 
                                under the Individuals with 
                                Disabilities Education Act, in 
                                order to improve academic 
                                outcomes for students and 
                                reduce the need for 
                                suspensions, expulsions, and 
                                other actions that remove 
                                students from instruction; and
                                    (ee) implementation of 
                                early intervening services, 
                                including through coordination 
                                with early intervening services 
                                carried out under the 
                                Individuals with Disabilities 
                                Education Act;
                            (II) address how the school will 
                        determine if such needs have been met; 
                        [and]
                            (III) provide a multi-tier system 
                        of supports and positive behavioral 
                        interventions and supports; and
                            (IV) provide programs, activities, 
                        courses, and professional development 
                        in the core academic subjects that are 
                        targeted toward assisting children 
                        described in subclause (I) in meeting 
                        the academic content and student 
                        academic achievement standards 
                        described in section 1111(a)(1); and
                            (iv) * * *
                    (C) Instruction by highly qualified and 
                highly rated teachers.
                    [(D) In accordance with section 1119 and 
                subsection (a)(4), high-quality and ongoing 
                professional development for teachers, 
                principals, and paraprofessionals and, if 
                appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, 
                and other staff to enable all children in the 
                school to meet the State's student academic 
                achievement standards.]
                    [(E)](D) Strategies to attract high-quality 
                highly qualified and highly rated teachers to 
                high-need schools.
                    [(F) Strategies to increase parental 
                involvement in accordance with section 1118, 
                such as family literary services.]
                    [(G)](E) Plans for assisting preschool 
                children in the transition from early childhood 
                programs, such as Head Start[, Even Start, 
                Early Reading First,], programs under part A of 
                title IV, or a State-run preschool program, to 
                local elementary school programs.
                    [(H)](F) Measures to include teachers in 
                the decisions regarding the use of academic 
                assessments described in [section 
                1111(b)(3)]section 1111(a)(2) in order to 
                provide information on, and to improve, the 
                achievement of individual students and the 
                overall instructional program.
                    [(I)](G) Activities to ensure that 
                [students who experience difficulty mastering 
                the proficient or advanced levels of academic 
                achievement standards required by section 
                1111(b)(1)]students described in subclause (II) 
                or (III) of section 1111(a)(3)(B)(ii) shall be 
                provided with effective, timely additional 
                assistance which shall include measures to 
                ensure that students' difficulties are 
                identified on a timely basis and to provide 
                sufficient information on which to base 
                effective assistance.
                    [(J)](H) Coordination and integration of 
                Federal, State, and local services and 
                programs, including programs supported under 
                this Act, violence prevention programs, 
                nutrition programs, housing programs, Head 
                Start, adult education, vocational and 
                technical education, and job training.
            (2) Plan.--
                    (A) In general.--Any eligible school that 
                desires to operate a schoolwide program shall 
                first develop (or amend a plan for such a 
                program that was in existence on the day before 
                the date of enactment of the [No Child Left 
                Behind Act of 2001), in consultation with the 
                local educational agency and its school support 
                team or other technical assistance provider 
                under section 1117,]Strengthening America's 
                Schools Act of 2013), in consultation with the 
                local educational agency, a comprehensive plan 
                for reforming the total instructional program 
                in the school that--
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iv) describes how the school will 
                        provide individual student academic 
                        assessment results in a language the 
                        parents can understand, including an 
                        interpretation of those results, to the 
                        parents of a child who participates in 
                        the academic assessments required by 
                        [section 1111(b)(3)]section 1111(a)(2).
                    (B) Plan development.--The comprehensive 
                plan shall be--
                            (i) * * *
                                    (I) the local educational 
                                agency[, after considering the 
                                recommendation of the technical 
                                assistance providers under 
                                section 1117,] determines that 
                                less time is needed to develop 
                                and implement the schoolwide 
                                program; or
                                    (II) the school is 
                                operating a schoolwide program 
                                on the day preceding the date 
                                of enactment of [the No Child 
                                Left Behind Act of 2001]the 
                                Strengthening America's Schools 
                                Act of 2013, in which case such 
                                school may continue to operate 
                                such program, but shall develop 
                                amendments to its existing plan 
                                during the first year of 
                                assistance after that date to 
                                reflect the provisions of this 
                                section;
                            (ii) developed with the involvement 
                        of parents and other members of the 
                        community to be served and individuals 
                        who will carry out such plan, including 
                        teachers, principals, and 
                        administrators (including 
                        administrators of programs described in 
                        other parts of this title), and, if 
                        appropriate, [pupil services 
                        personnel]specialized instructional 
                        support personnel, technical assistance 
                        providers, school staff, and, if the 
                        plan relates to a secondary school, 
                        students from such school;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (v) if appropriate, developed in 
                        coordination with programs under 
                        [Reading First, Early Reading First, 
                        Even Start,]part A of title IV, the 
                        Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
                        Education Act of 2006, and the Head 
                        Start Act.
    (c) Prekindergarten Program.--A school that is eligible for 
a schoolwide program under this section may use funds made 
available under this part to establish or enhance 
prekindergarten programs for children below the age of 6, such 
as [Even Start programs or Early Reading First 
programs]programs under part A of title IV.

SEC. 1115. TARGETED ASSISTANCE SCHOOLS.

    (a) In General.--* * *
    (b) Eligible Children.--
            (1) Eligible population.--
                    (A) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (B) Eligible children from eligible 
                population.--From the population described in 
                subparagraph (A), eligible children are 
                children identified by the school as failing, 
                or most at risk of failing, to meet the State's 
                [challenging]college and career ready student 
                academic achievement standards on the basis of 
                multiple, educationally related, objective 
                criteria established by the local educational 
                agency and supplemented by the school, [except 
                that children from preschool through grade 2 
                shall be selected solely on the basis of such 
                criteria as teacher judgment, interviews with 
                parents, and developmentally appropriate 
                measures.]including children who are at risk of 
                failing to be ready for elementary school.
            (2) Children included.--
                    (A) In general.--Children who are 
                economically disadvantaged, children with 
                disabilities, migrant children [or limited 
                English proficient children], or English 
                learners, are eligible for services under this 
                part on the same basis as other children 
                selected to receive services under this part.
                    [(B) Head start, even start, or early 
                reading first children.--A child who, at any 
                time in the 2 years preceding the year for 
                which the determination is made, participated 
                in a Head Start, Even Start, or Early Reading 
                First program, or in preschool services under 
                this title, is eligible for services under this 
                part.]
                    (B) Head start or literacy programs.--A 
                child who, at any time in the 2 years preceding 
                the year for which the determination is made, 
                participated in a Head Start program, a program 
                under part A of title IV, or in preschool 
                services under this title, is eligible for 
                services under this part.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Components of a Targeted Assistance School Program.--
            (1) In general.--To assist targeted assistance 
        schools and local educational agencies to meet their 
        responsibility to provide for all their students served 
        under this part the opportunity to meet the State's 
        [challenging]college and career ready student academic 
        achievement standards in subjects as determined by the 
        State, each targeted assistance program under this 
        section shall--
                    (A) use such program's resources under this 
                part to help participating children meet such 
                State's [challenging]college and career ready 
                student academic achievement standards expected 
                for all children;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (C) use effective methods and instructional 
                strategies that are based on [scientifically 
                based research]scientifically valid research 
                that strengthens the core academic program of 
                the school and that--
                            (i) * * *
                            (ii) help provide an accelerated, 
                        high-quality curriculum, including 
                        applied learning; [and]
                            (iii) minimize removing children 
                        from the regular classroom during 
                        regular school hours for instruction 
                        provided under this part;
                            (iv) may include a multi-tier 
                        system of supports and positive 
                        behavioral interventions and supports; 
                        and
                            (v) may include support for 
                        programs, activities, courses, and 
                        professional development in the core 
                        academic subjects that are targeted 
                        toward participating children selected 
                        in accordance with subsection (b) to 
                        enable such children to meet the 
                        academic content and student academic 
                        achievement standards described in 
                        section 1111(a);
                    (D) coordinate with and support the regular 
                education program, which may include services 
                to assist preschool children in the transition 
                from early childhood programs such as Head 
                Start, [Even Start, Early Reading 
                First]programs under part A of title IV, or 
                State-run preschool programs to elementary 
                school programs;
                    (E) provide instruction by highly qualified 
                and highly rated teachers;
                    (F) in accordance with [subsection (e)(3) 
                and section 1119]section 1117, provide 
                opportunities for professional development with 
                resources provided under this part, and, to the 
                extent practicable, from other sources, for 
                teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals, 
                including, if appropriate, [pupil services 
                personnel]specialized instructional support 
                personnel, parents, and other staff, who work 
                with participating children in programs under 
                this section or in the regular education 
                program;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) Requirements.--Each school conducting a program 
        under this section shall assist participating children 
        selected in accordance with subsection (b) to [meet the 
        State's proficient and advanced levels of 
        achievement]be proficient or advanced students, as 
        determined under section 1111(a)(3)(B)(ii)(I) by--
                    (A) * * *
                    (B) reviewing, on an ongoing basis, the 
                progress of participating children and revising 
                the targeted assistance program, if necessary, 
                to provide additional assistance to enable such 
                children to meet the State's 
                [challenging]college and career ready student 
                academic achievement standards, such as an 
                extended school year, before- and after-school, 
                and summer programs and opportunities, training 
                for teachers regarding how to identify students 
                who need additional assistance, and training 
                for teachers regarding how to implement student 
                academic achievement standards in the 
                classroom.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) Special Rules.--
            (1) Simultaneous service.--* * *
            (2) Comprehensive services.--If--
                    (A) * * *
                    (B) * * *
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iii) professional development 
                        necessary to assist teachers, [pupil 
                        services personnel]specialized 
                        instructional support personnel, other 
                        staff, and parents in identifying and 
                        meeting the comprehensive needs of 
                        eligible children.
            (3) Professional development.--Each school 
        receiving funds under this part for any fiscal year 
        shall devote sufficient resources to carry out 
        effectively the professional development activities 
        described in subparagraph (F) of subsection (c)(1) in 
        accordance with [section 1119]section 1117 for such 
        fiscal year, and a school may enter into a consortium 
        with another school to carry out such activities.

[SEC. 1116. ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT AND LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY AND SCHOOL 
                    IMPROVEMENT.

    [(a) Local Review.--
            [(1) In general.--Each local educational agency 
        receiving funds under this part shall--
                    [(A) use the State academic assessments and 
                other indicators described in the State plan to 
                review annually the progress of each school 
                served under this part to determine whether the 
                school is making adequate yearly progress as 
                defined in section 1111(b)(2);
                    [(B) at the local educational agency's 
                discretion, use any academic assessments or any 
                other academic indicators described in the 
                local educational agency's plan under section 
                1112(b)(1)(A) and (B) to review annually the 
                progress of each school served under this part 
                to determine whether the school is making 
                adequate yearly progress as defined in section 
                1111(b)(2), except that the local educational 
                agency may not use such indicators (other than 
                as provided for in section 1111(b)(2)(I)) if 
                the indicators reduce the number or change the 
                schools that would otherwise be subject to 
                school improvement, corrective action, or 
                restructuring under section 1116 if such 
                additional indicators were not used, but may 
                identify additional schools for school 
                improvement or in need of corrective action or 
                restructuring;
                    [(C) publicize and disseminate the results 
                of the local annual review described in 
                paragraph (1) to parents, teachers, principals, 
                schools, and the community so that the 
                teachers, principals, other staff, and schools 
                can continually refine, in an instructionally 
                useful manner, the program of instruction to 
                help all children served under this part meet 
                the challenging State student academic 
                achievement standards established under section 
                1111(b)(1); and
                    [(D) review the effectiveness of the 
                actions and activities the schools are carrying 
                out under this part with respect to parental 
                involvement, professional development, and 
                other activities assisted under this part.
            [(2) Available results.--The State educational 
        agency shall ensure that the results of State academic 
        assessments administered in that school year are 
        available to the local educational agency before the 
        beginning of the next school year.
    [(b) School Improvement.--
            [(1) General requirements.--
                    [(A) Identification.--Subject to 
                subparagraph (C), a local educational agency 
                shall identify for school improvement any 
                elementary school or secondary school served 
                under this part that fails, for 2 consecutive 
                years, to make adequate yearly progress as 
                defined in the State's plan under section 
                1111(b)(2).
                    [(B) Deadline.--The identification 
                described in subparagraph (A) shall take place 
                before the beginning of the school year 
                following such failure to make adequate yearly 
                progress.
                    [(C) Application.--Subparagraph (A) shall 
                not apply to a school if almost every student 
                in each group specified in section 
                1111(b)(2)(C)(v) enrolled in such school is 
                meeting or exceeding the State's proficient 
                level of academic achievement.
                    [(D) Targeted assistance schools.--To 
                determine if an elementary school or a 
                secondary school that is conducting a targeted 
                assistance program under section 1115 should be 
                identified for school improvement, corrective 
                action, or restructuring under this section, a 
                local educational agency may choose to review 
                the progress of only the students in the school 
                who are served, or are eligible for services, 
                under this part.
                    [(E) Public school choice.--
                            [(i) In general.--In the case of a 
                        school identified for school 
                        improvement under this paragraph, the 
                        local educational agency shall, not 
                        later than the first day of the school 
                        year following such identification, 
                        provide all students enrolled in the 
                        school with the option to transfer to 
                        another public school served by the 
                        local educational agency, which may 
                        include a public charter school, that 
                        has not been identified for school 
                        improvement under this paragraph, 
                        unless such an option is prohibited by 
                        State law.
                            [(ii) Rule.--In providing students 
                        the option to transfer to another 
                        public school, the local educational 
                        agency shall give priority to the 
                        lowest achieving children from low-
                        income families, as determined by the 
                        local educational agency for purposes 
                        of allocating funds to schools under 
                        section 1113(c)(1).
                    [(F) Transfer.--Students who use the option 
                to transfer under subparagraph (E) and 
                paragraph (5)(A), (7)(C)(i), or (8)(A)(i) or 
                subsection (c)(10)(C)(vii) shall be enrolled in 
                classes and other activities in the public 
                school to which the students transfer in the 
                same manner as all other children at the public 
                school.
            [(2) Opportunity to review and present evidence; 
        time limit.--
                    [(A) Identification.--Before identifying an 
                elementary school or a secondary school for 
                school improvement under paragraphs (1) or 
                (5)(A), for corrective action under paragraph 
                (7), or for restructuring under paragraph (8), 
                the local educational agency shall provide the 
                school with an opportunity to review the 
                school-level data, including academic 
                assessment data, on which the proposed 
                identification is based.
                    [(B) Evidence.--If the principal of a 
                school proposed for identification under 
                paragraph (1), (5)(A), (7), or (8) believes, or 
                a majority of the parents of the students 
                enrolled in such school believe, that the 
                proposed identification is in error for 
                statistical or other substantive reasons, the 
                principal may provide supporting evidence to 
                the local educational agency, which shall 
                consider that evidence before making a final 
                determination.
                    [(C) Final determination.--Not later than 
                30 days after a local educational agency 
                provides the school with the opportunity to 
                review such school-level data, the local 
                educational agency shall make public a final 
                determination on the status of the school with 
                respect to the identification.
            [(3) School plan.--
                    [(A) Revised plan.--After the resolution of 
                a review under paragraph (2), each school 
                identified under paragraph (1) for school 
                improvement shall, not later than 3 months 
                after being so identified, develop or revise a 
                school plan, in consultation with parents, 
                school staff, the local educational agency 
                serving the school, and outside experts, for 
                approval by such local educational agency. The 
                school plan shall cover a 2-year period and--
                            [(i) incorporate strategies based 
                        on scientifically based research that 
                        will strengthen the core academic 
                        subjects in the school and address the 
                        specific academic issues that caused 
                        the school to be identified for school 
                        improvement, and may include a strategy 
                        for the implementation of a 
                        comprehensive school reform model that 
                        includes each of the components 
                        described in part F;
                            [(ii) adopt policies and practices 
                        concerning the school's core academic 
                        subjects that have the greatest 
                        likelihood of ensuring that all groups 
                        of students specified in section 
                        1111(b)(2)(C)(v) and enrolled in the 
                        school will meet the State's proficient 
                        level of achievement on the State 
                        academic assessment described in 
                        section 1111(b)(3) not later than 12 
                        years after the end of the 2001-2002 
                        school year;
                            [(iii) provide an assurance that 
                        the school will spend not less than 10 
                        percent of the funds made available to 
                        the school under section 1113 for each 
                        fiscal year that the school is in 
                        school improvement status, for the 
                        purpose of providing to the school's 
                        teachers and principal high-quality 
                        professional development that--
                                    [(I) directly addresses the 
                                academic achievement problem 
                                that caused the school to be 
                                identified for school 
                                improvement;
                                    [(II) meets the 
                                requirements for professional 
                                development activities under 
                                section 1119; and
                                    [(III) is provided in a 
                                manner that affords increased 
                                opportunity for participating 
                                in that professional 
                                development;
                            [(iv) specify how the funds 
                        described in clause (iii) will be used 
                        to remove the school from school 
                        improvement status;
                            [(v) establish specific annual, 
                        measurable objectives for continuous 
                        and substantial progress by each group 
                        of students specified in section 
                        1111(b)(2)(C)(v) and enrolled in the 
                        school that will ensure that all such 
                        groups of students will, in accordance 
                        with adequate yearly progress as 
                        defined in section 1111(b)(2), meet the 
                        State's proficient level of achievement 
                        on the State academic assessment 
                        described in section 1111(b)(3) not 
                        later than 12 years after the end of 
                        the 2001-2002 school year;
                            [(vi) describe how the school will 
                        provide written notice about the 
                        identification to parents of each 
                        student enrolled in such school, in a 
                        format and, to the extent practicable, 
                        in a language that the parents can 
                        understand;
                            [(vii) specify the responsibilities 
                        of the school, the local educational 
                        agency, and the State educational 
                        agency serving the school under the 
                        plan, including the technical 
                        assistance to be provided by the local 
                        educational agency under paragraph (4) 
                        and the local educational agency's 
                        responsibilities under section 1120A;
                            [(viii) include strategies to 
                        promote effective parental involvement 
                        in the school;
                            [(ix) incorporate, as appropriate, 
                        activities before school, after school, 
                        during the summer, and during any 
                        extension of the school year; and
                            [(x) incorporate a teacher 
                        mentoring program.
                    [(B) Conditional approval.--The local 
                educational agency may condition approval of a 
                school plan under this paragraph on--
                            [(i) inclusion of one or more of 
                        the corrective actions specified in 
                        paragraph (7)(C)(iv); or
                            [(ii) feedback on the school 
                        improvement plan from parents and 
                        community leaders.
                    [(C) Plan implementation.--Except as 
                provided in subparagraph (D), a school shall 
                implement the school plan (including a revised 
                plan) expeditiously, but not later than the 
                beginning of the next full school year 
                following the identification under paragraph 
                (1).
                    [(D) Plan approved during school year.--
                Notwithstanding subparagraph (C), if a plan is 
                not approved prior to the beginning of a school 
                year, such plan shall be implemented 
                immediately upon approval.
                    [(E) Local educational agency approval.--
                The local educational agency, within 45 days of 
                receiving a school plan, shall--
                            [(i) establish a peer review 
                        process to assist with review of the 
                        school plan; and
                            [(ii) promptly review the school 
                        plan, work with the school as 
                        necessary, and approve the school plan 
                        if the plan meets the requirements of 
                        this paragraph.
            [(4) Technical assistance.--
                    [(A) In general.--For each school 
                identified for school improvement under 
                paragraph (1), the local educational agency 
                serving the school shall ensure the provision 
                of technical assistance as the school develops 
                and implements the school plan under paragraph 
                (3) throughout the plan's duration.
                    [(B) Specific assistance.--Such technical 
                assistance--
                            [(i) shall include assistance in 
                        analyzing data from the assessments 
                        required under section 1111(b)(3), and 
                        other examples of student work, to 
                        identify and address problems in 
                        instruction, and problems if any, in 
                        implementing the parental involvement 
                        requirements described in section 1118, 
                        the professional development 
                        requirements described in section 1119, 
                        and the responsibilities of the school 
                        and local educational agency under the 
                        school plan, and to identify and 
                        address solutions to such problems;
                            [(ii) shall include assistance in 
                        identifying and implementing 
                        professional development, instructional 
                        strategies, and methods of instruction 
                        that are based on scientifically based 
                        research and that have proven effective 
                        in addressing the specific 
                        instructional issues that caused the 
                        school to be identified for school 
                        improvement;
                            [(iii) shall include assistance in 
                        analyzing and revising the school's 
                        budget so that the school's resources 
                        are more effectively allocated to the 
                        activities most likely to increase 
                        student academic achievement and to 
                        remove the school from school 
                        improvement status; and
                            [(iv) may be provided--
                                    [(I) by the local 
                                educational agency, through 
                                mechanisms authorized under 
                                section 1117; or
                                    [(II) by the State 
                                educational agency, an 
                                institution of higher education 
                                (that is in full compliance 
                                with all the reporting 
                                provisions of title II of the 
                                Higher Education Act of 1965), 
                                a private not-for-profit 
                                organization or for-profit 
                                organization, an educational 
                                service agency, or another 
                                entity with experience in 
                                helping schools improve 
                                academic achievement.
                    [(C) Scientifically based research.--
                Technical assistance provided under this 
                section by a local educational agency or an 
                entity approved by that agency shall be based 
                on scientifically based research.
            [(5) Failure to make adequate yearly progress after 
        identification.--In the case of any school served under 
        this part that fails to make adequate yearly progress, 
        as set out in the State's plan under section 
        1111(b)(2), by the end of the first full school year 
        after identification under paragraph (1), the local 
        educational agency serving such school--
                    [(A) shall continue to provide all students 
                enrolled in the school with the option to 
                transfer to another public school served by the 
                local educational agency in accordance with 
                subparagraphs (E) and (F);
                    [(B) shall make supplemental educational 
                services available consistent with subsection 
                (e)(1); and
                    [(C) shall continue to provide technical 
                assistance.
            [(6) Notice to parents.--A local educational agency 
        shall promptly provide to a parent or parents (in an 
        understandable and uniform format and, to the extent 
        practicable, in a language the parents can understand) 
        of each student enrolled in an elementary school or a 
        secondary school identified for school improvement 
        under paragraph (1), for corrective action under 
        paragraph (7), or for restructuring under paragraph 
        (8)--
                    [(A) an explanation of what the 
                identification means, and how the school 
                compares in terms of academic achievement to 
                other elementary schools or secondary schools 
                served by the local educational agency and the 
                State educational agency involved;
                    [(B) the reasons for the identification;
                    [(C) an explanation of what the school 
                identified for school improvement is doing to 
                address the problem of low achievement;
                    [(D) an explanation of what the local 
                educational agency or State educational agency 
                is doing to help the school address the 
                achievement problem;
                    [(E) an explanation of how the parents can 
                become involved in addressing the academic 
                issues that caused the school to be identified 
                for school improvement; and
                    [(F) an explanation of the parents' option 
                to transfer their child to another public 
                school under paragraphs (1)(E), (5)(A), 
                (7)(C)(i), (8)(A)(i), and subsection 
                (c)(10)(C)(vii) (with transportation provided 
                by the agency when required by paragraph (9)) 
                or to obtain supplemental educational services 
                for the child, in accordance with subsection 
                (e).
            [(7) Corrective action.--
                    [(A) In general.--In this subsection, the 
                term ``corrective action'' means action, 
                consistent with State law, that--
                            [(i) substantially and directly 
                        responds to--
                                    [(I) the consistent 
                                academic failure of a school 
                                that caused the local 
                                educational agency to take such 
                                action; and
                                    [(II) any underlying 
                                staffing, curriculum, or other 
                                problems in the school; and
                            [(ii) is designed to increase 
                        substantially the likelihood that each 
                        group of students described in 
                        1111(b)(2)(C) enrolled in the school 
                        identified for corrective action will 
                        meet or exceed the State's proficient 
                        levels of achievement on the State 
                        academic assessments described in 
                        section 1111(b)(3).
                    [(B) System.--In order to help students 
                served under this part meet challenging State 
                student academic achievement standards, each 
                local educational agency shall implement a 
                system of corrective action in accordance with 
                subparagraphs (C) through (E).
                    [(C) Role of local educational agency.--In 
                the case of any school served by a local 
                educational agency under this part that fails 
                to make adequate yearly progress, as defined by 
                the State under section 1111(b)(2), by the end 
                of the second full school year after the 
                identification under paragraph (1), the local 
                educational agency shall--
                            [(i) continue to provide all 
                        students enrolled in the school with 
                        the option to transfer to another 
                        public school served by the local 
                        educational agency, in accordance with 
                        paragraph (1)(E) and (F);
                            [(ii) continue to provide technical 
                        assistance consistent with paragraph 
                        (4) while instituting any corrective 
                        action under clause (iv);
                            [(iii) continue to make 
                        supplemental educational services 
                        available, in accordance with 
                        subsection (e), to children who remain 
                        in the school; and
                            [(iv) identify the school for 
                        corrective action and take at least one 
                        of the following corrective actions:
                                    [(I) Replace the school 
                                staff who are relevant to the 
                                failure to make adequate yearly 
                                progress.
                                    [(II) Institute and fully 
                                implement a new curriculum, 
                                including providing appropriate 
                                professional development for 
                                all relevant staff, that is 
                                based on scientifically based 
                                research and offers substantial 
                                promise of improving 
                                educational achievement for 
                                low-achieving students and 
                                enabling the school to make 
                                adequate yearly progress.
                                    [(III) Significantly 
                                decrease management authority 
                                at the school level.
                                    [(IV) Appoint an outside 
                                expert to advise the school on 
                                its progress toward making 
                                adequate yearly progress, based 
                                on its school plan under 
                                paragraph (3).
                                    [(V) Extend the school year 
                                or school day for the school.
                                    [(VI) Restructure the 
                                internal organizational 
                                structure of the school.
                    [(D) Delay.--Notwithstanding any other 
                provision of this paragraph, the local 
                educational agency may delay, for a period not 
                to exceed 1 year, implementation of the 
                requirements under paragraph (5), corrective 
                action under this paragraph, or restructuring 
                under paragraph (8) if the school makes 
                adequate yearly progress for 1 year or if its 
                failure to make adequate yearly progress is due 
                to exceptional or uncontrollable circumstances, 
                such as a natural disaster or a precipitous and 
                unforeseen decline in the financial resources 
                of the local educational agency or school. No 
                such period shall be taken into account in 
                determining the number of consecutive years of 
                failure to make adequate yearly progress.
                    [(E) Publication and dissemination.--The 
                local educational agency shall publish and 
                disseminate information regarding any 
                corrective action the local educational agency 
                takes under this paragraph at a school--
                            [(i) to the public and to the 
                        parents of each student enrolled in the 
                        school subject to corrective action;
                            [(ii) in an understandable and 
                        uniform format and, to the extent 
                        practicable, provided in a language 
                        that the parents can understand; and
                            [(iii) through such means as the 
                        Internet, the media, and public 
                        agencies.
            [(8) Restructuring.--
                    [(A) Failure to make adequate yearly 
                progress.--If, after 1 full school year of 
                corrective action under paragraph (7), a school 
                subject to such corrective action continues to 
                fail to make adequate yearly progress, then the 
                local educational agency shall--
                            [(i) continue to provide all 
                        students enrolled in the school with 
                        the option to transfer to another 
                        public school served by the local 
                        educational agency, in accordance with 
                        paragraph (1)(E) and (F);
                            [(ii) continue to make supplemental 
                        educational services available, in 
                        accordance with subsection (e), to 
                        children who remain in the school; and
                            [(iii) prepare a plan and make 
                        necessary arrangements to carry out 
                        subparagraph (B).
                    [(B) Alternative governance.--Not later 
                than the beginning of the school year following 
                the year in which the local educational agency 
                implements subparagraph (A), the local 
                educational agency shall implement one of the 
                following alternative governance arrangements 
                for the school consistent with State law:
                            [(i) Reopening the school as a 
                        public charter school.
                            [(ii) Replacing all or most of the 
                        school staff (which may include the 
                        principal) who are relevant to the 
                        failure to make adequate yearly 
                        progress.
                            [(iii) Entering into a contract 
                        with an entity, such as a private 
                        management company, with a demonstrated 
                        record of effectiveness, to operate the 
                        public school.
                            [(iv) Turning the operation of the 
                        school over to the State educational 
                        agency, if permitted under State law 
                        and agreed to by the State.
                            [(v) Any other major restructuring 
                        of the school's governance arrangement 
                        that makes fundamental reforms, such as 
                        significant changes in the school's 
                        staffing and governance, to improve 
                        student academic achievement in the 
                        school and that has substantial promise 
                        of enabling the school to make adequate 
                        yearly progress as defined in the State 
                        plan under section 1111(b)(2). In the 
                        case of a rural local educational 
                        agency with a total of less than 600 
                        students in average daily attendance at 
                        the schools that are served by the 
                        agency and all of whose schools have a 
                        School Locale Code of 7 or 8, as 
                        determined by the Secretary, the 
                        Secretary shall, at such agency's 
                        request, provide technical assistance 
                        to such agency for the purpose of 
                        implementing this clause.
                    [(C) Prompt notice.--The local educational 
                agency shall--
                            [(i) provide prompt notice to 
                        teachers and parents whenever 
                        subparagraph (A) or (B) applies; and
                            [(ii) provide the teachers and 
                        parents with an adequate opportunity 
                        to--
                                    [(I) comment before taking 
                                any action under those 
                                subparagraphs; and
                                    [(II) participate in 
                                developing any plan under 
                                subparagraph (A)(iii).
            [(9) Transportation.--In any case described in 
        paragraph (1)(E) for schools described in paragraphs 
        (1)(A), (5), (7)(C)(i), and (8)(A), and subsection 
        (c)(10)(C)(vii), the local educational agency shall 
        provide, or shall pay for the provision of, 
        transportation for the student to the public school the 
        student attends.
            [(10) Funds for transportation and supplemental 
        educational services.--
                    [(A) In general.--Unless a lesser amount is 
                needed to comply with paragraph (9) and to 
                satisfy all requests for supplemental 
                educational services under subsection (e), a 
                local educational agency shall spend an amount 
                equal to 20 percent of its allocation under 
                subpart 2, from which the agency shall spend--
                            [(i) an amount equal to 5 percent 
                        of its allocation under subpart 2 to 
                        provide, or pay for, transportation 
                        under paragraph (9);
                            [(ii) an amount equal to 5 percent 
                        of its allocation under subpart 2 to 
                        provide supplemental educational 
                        services under subsection (e); and
                            [(iii) an amount equal to the 
                        remaining 10 percent of its allocation 
                        under subpart 2 for transportation 
                        under paragraph (9), supplemental 
                        educational services under subsection 
                        (e), or both, as the agency determines.
                    [(B) Total amount.--The total amount 
                described in subparagraph (A)(ii) is the 
                maximum amount the local educational agency 
                shall be required to spend under this part on 
                supplemental educational services described in 
                subsection (e).
                    [(C) Insufficient funds.--If the amount of 
                funds described in subparagraph (A)(ii) or 
                (iii) and available to provide services under 
                this subsection is insufficient to provide 
                supplemental educational services to each child 
                whose parents request the services, the local 
                educational agency shall give priority to 
                providing the services to the lowest-achieving 
                children.
                    [(D) Prohibition.--A local educational 
                agency shall not, as a result of the 
                application of this paragraph, reduce by more 
                than 15 percent the total amount made available 
                under section 1113(c) to a school described in 
                paragraph (7)(C) or (8)(A) of subsection (b).
            [(11) Cooperative agreement.--In any case described 
        in paragraph (1)(E), (5)(A), (7)(C)(i), or (8)(A)(i), 
        or subsection (c)(10)(C)(vii) if all public schools 
        served by the local educational agency to which a child 
        may transfer are identified for school improvement, 
        corrective action or restructuring, the agency shall, 
        to the extent practicable, establish a cooperative 
        agreement with other local educational agencies in the 
        area for a transfer.
            [(12) Duration.--If any school identified for 
        school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring 
        makes adequate yearly progress for two consecutive 
        school years, the local educational agency shall no 
        longer subject the school to the requirements of school 
        improvement, corrective action, or restructuring or 
        identify the school for school improvement for the 
        succeeding school year.
            [(13) Special rule.--A local educational agency 
        shall permit a child who transferred to another school 
        under this subsection to remain in that school until 
        the child has completed the highest grade in that 
        school. The obligation of the local educational agency 
        to provide, or to provide for, transportation for the 
        child ends at the end of a school year if the local 
        educational agency determines that the school from 
        which the child transferred is no longer identified for 
        school improvement or subject to corrective action or 
        restructuring.
            [(14) State educational agency responsibilities.--
        The State educational agency shall--
                    [(A) make technical assistance under 
                section 1117 available to schools identified 
                for school improvement, corrective action, or 
                restructuring under this subsection consistent 
                with section 1117(a)(2);
                    [(B) if the State educational agency 
                determines that a local educational agency 
                failed to carry out its responsibilities under 
                this subsection, take such corrective actions 
                as the State educational agency determines to 
                be appropriate and in compliance with State 
                law;
                    [(C) ensure that academic assessment 
                results under this part are provided to schools 
                before any identification of a school may take 
                place under this subsection; and
                    [(D) for local educational agencies or 
                schools identified for improvement under this 
                subsection, notify the Secretary of major 
                factors that were brought to the attention of 
                the State educational agency under section 
                1111(b)(9) that have significantly affected 
                student academic achievement.
    [(c) State Review and Local Educational Agency 
Improvement.--
            [(1) In general.--A State shall--
                    [(A) annually review the progress of each 
                local educational agency receiving funds under 
                this part to determine whether schools 
                receiving assistance under this part are making 
                adequate yearly progress as defined in section 
                1111(b)(2) toward meeting the State's student 
                academic achievement standards and to determine 
                if each local educational agency is carrying 
                out its responsibilities under this section and 
                sections 1117, 1118, and 1119; and
                    [(B) publicize and disseminate to local 
                educational agencies, teachers and other staff, 
                parents, students, and the community the 
                results of the State review, including 
                statistically sound disaggregated results, as 
                required by section 1111(b)(2).
            [(2) Rewards.--In the case of a local educational 
        agency that, for 2 consecutive years, has exceeded 
        adequate yearly progress as defined in the State plan 
        under section 1111(b)(2), the State may make rewards of 
        the kinds described under section 1117 to the agency.
            [(3) Identification of local educational agency for 
        improvement.--A State shall identify for improvement 
        any local educational agency that, for 2 consecutive 
        years, including the period immediately prior to the 
        date of enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 
        2001, failed to make adequate yearly progress as 
        defined in the State's plan under section 1111(b)(2).
            [(4) Targeted assistance schools.--When reviewing 
        targeted assistance schools served by a local 
        educational agency, a State educational agency may 
        choose to review the progress of only the students in 
        such schools who are served, or are eligible for 
        services, under this part.
            [(5) Opportunity to review and present evidence.--
                    [(A) Review.--Before identifying a local 
                educational agency for improvement under 
                paragraph (3) or corrective action under 
                paragraph (10), a State educational agency 
                shall provide the local educational agency with 
                an opportunity to review the data, including 
                academic assessment data, on which the proposed 
                identification is based.
                    [(B) Evidence.--If the local educational 
                agency believes that the proposed 
                identification is in error for statistical or 
                other substantive reasons, the agency may 
                provide supporting evidence to the State 
                educational agency, which shall consider the 
                evidence before making a final determination 
                not later than 30 days after the State 
                educational agency provides the local 
                educational agency with the opportunity to 
                review such data under subparagraph (A).
            [(6) Notification to parents.--The State 
        educational agency shall promptly provide to the 
        parents (in a format and, to the extent practicable, in 
        a language the parents can understand) of each student 
        enrolled in a school served by a local educational 
        agency identified for improvement, the results of the 
        review under paragraph (1) and, if the agency is 
        identified for improvement, the reasons for that 
        identification and how parents can participate in 
        upgrading the quality of the local educational agency.
            [(7) Local educational agency revisions.--
                    [(A) Plan.--Each local educational agency 
                identified under paragraph (3) shall, not later 
                than 3 months after being so identified, 
                develop or revise a local educational agency 
                plan, in consultation with parents, school 
                staff, and others. Such plan shall--
                            [(i) incorporate scientifically 
                        based research strategies that 
                        strengthen the core academic program in 
                        schools served by the local educational 
                        agency;
                            [(ii) identify actions that have 
                        the greatest likelihood of improving 
                        the achievement of participating 
                        children in meeting the State's student 
                        academic achievement standards;
                            [(iii) address the professional 
                        development needs of the instructional 
                        staff serving the agency by committing 
                        to spend not less than 10 percent of 
                        the funds received by the local 
                        educational agency under subpart 2 for 
                        each fiscal year in which the agency is 
                        identified for improvement for 
                        professional development (including 
                        funds reserved for professional 
                        development under subsection 
                        (b)(3)(A)(iii)), but excluding funds 
                        reserved for professional development 
                        under section 1119;
                            [(iv) include specific measurable 
                        achievement goals and targets for each 
                        of the groups of students identified in 
                        the disaggregated data pursuant to 
                        section 1111(b)(2)(C)(v), consistent 
                        with adequate yearly progress as 
                        defined under section 1111(b)(2);
                            [(v) address the fundamental 
                        teaching and learning needs in the 
                        schools of that agency, and the 
                        specific academic problems of low-
                        achieving students, including a 
                        determination of why the local 
                        educational agency's prior plan failed 
                        to bring about increased student 
                        academic achievement;
                            [(vi) incorporate, as appropriate, 
                        activities before school, after school, 
                        during the summer, and during an 
                        extension of the school year;
                            [(vii) specify the responsibilities 
                        of the State educational agency and the 
                        local educational agency under the 
                        plan, including specifying the 
                        technical assistance to be provided by 
                        the State educational agency under 
                        paragraph (9) and the local educational 
                        agency's responsibilities under section 
                        1120A; and
                            [(viii) include strategies to 
                        promote effective parental involvement 
                        in the school.
                    [(B) Implementation.--The local educational 
                agency shall implement the plan (including a 
                revised plan) expeditiously, but not later than 
                the beginning of the next school year after the 
                school year in which the agency was identified 
                for improvement.
            [(9) State educational agency responsibility.--
                    [(A) Technical or other assistance.--For 
                each local educational agency identified under 
                paragraph (3), the State educational agency 
                shall provide technical or other assistance if 
                requested, as authorized under section 1117, to 
                better enable the local educational agency to--
                            [(i) develop and implement the 
                        local educational agency's plan; and
                            [(ii) work with schools needing 
                        improvement.
                    [(B) Methods and strategies.--Technical 
                assistance provided under this section by the 
                State educational agency or an entity 
                authorized by such agency shall be supported by 
                effective methods and instructional strategies 
                based on scientifically based research. Such 
                technical assistance shall address problems, if 
                any, in implementing the parental involvement 
                activities described in section 1118 and the 
                professional development activities described 
                in section 1119.
            [(10) Corrective action.--In order to help students 
        served under this part meet challenging State student 
        academic achievement standards, each State shall 
        implement a system of corrective action in accordance 
        with the following:
                    [(A) Definition.--As used in this 
                paragraph, the term ``corrective action'' means 
                action, consistent with State law, that--
                            [(i) substantially and directly 
                        responds to the consistent academic 
                        failure that caused the State to take 
                        such action and to any underlying 
                        staffing, curricular, or other problems 
                        in the agency; and
                            [(ii) is designed to meet the goal 
                        of having all students served under 
                        this part achieve at the proficient and 
                        advanced student academic achievement 
                        levels.
                    [(B) General requirements.--After providing 
                technical assistance under paragraph (9) and 
                subject to subparagraph (E), the State--
                            [(i) may take corrective action at 
                        any time with respect to a local 
                        educational agency that has been 
                        identified under paragraph (3);
                            [(ii) shall take corrective action 
                        with respect to any local educational 
                        agency that fails to make adequate 
                        yearly progress, as defined by the 
                        State, by the end of the second full 
                        school year after the identification of 
                        the agency under paragraph (3); and
                            [(iii) shall continue to provide 
                        technical assistance while instituting 
                        any corrective action under clause (i) 
                        or (ii).
                    [(C) Certain corrective actions required.--
                In the case of a local educational agency 
                identified for corrective action, the State 
                educational agency shall take at least one of 
                the following corrective actions:
                            [(i) Deferring programmatic funds 
                        or reducing administrative funds.
                            [(ii) Instituting and fully 
                        implementing a new curriculum that is 
                        based on State and local academic 
                        content and achievement standards, 
                        including providing appropriate 
                        professional development based on 
                        scientifically based research for all 
                        relevant staff, that offers substantial 
                        promise of improving educational 
                        achievement for low-achieving students.
                            [(iii) Replacing the local 
                        educational agency personnel who are 
                        relevant to the failure to make 
                        adequate yearly progress.
                            [(iv) Removing particular schools 
                        from the jurisdiction of the local 
                        educational agency and establishing 
                        alternative arrangements for public 
                        governance and supervision of such 
                        schools.
                            [(v) Appointing, through the State 
                        educational agency, a receiver or 
                        trustee to administer the affairs of 
                        the local educational agency in place 
                        of the superintendent and school board.
                            [(vi) Abolishing or restructuring 
                        the local educational agency.
                            [(vii) Authorizing students to 
                        transfer from a school operated by the 
                        local educational agency to a higher-
                        performing public school operated by 
                        another local educational agency in 
                        accordance with subsections (b)(1)(E) 
                        and (F), and providing to such students 
                        transportation (or the costs of 
                        transportation) to such schools 
                        consistent with subsection (b)(9), in 
                        conjunction with carrying out not less 
                        than one additional action described 
                        under this subparagraph.
                    [(D) Hearing.--Prior to implementing any 
                corrective action under this paragraph, the 
                State educational agency shall provide notice 
                and a hearing to the affected local educational 
                agency, if State law provides for such notice 
                and hearing. The hearing shall take place not 
                later than 45 days following the decision to 
                implement corrective action.
                    [(E) Notice to parents.--The State 
                educational agency shall publish, and 
                disseminate to parents and the public, 
                information on any corrective action the State 
                educational agency takes under this paragraph 
                through such means as the Internet, the media, 
                and public agencies.
                    [(F) Delay.--Notwithstanding subparagraph 
                (B)(ii), a State educational agency may delay, 
                for a period not to exceed 1 year, 
                implementation of corrective action under this 
                paragraph if the local educational agency makes 
                adequate yearly progress for 1 year or its 
                failure to make adequate yearly progress is due 
                to exceptional or uncontrollable circumstances, 
                such as a natural disaster or a precipitous and 
                unforeseen decline in the financial resources 
                of the local educational agency. No such period 
                shall be taken into account in determining the 
                number of consecutive years of failure to make 
                adequate yearly progress.
            [(11) Special rule.--If a local educational agency 
        makes adequate yearly progress for two consecutive 
        school years beginning after the date of identification 
        of the agency under paragraph (3), the State 
        educational agency need no longer identify the local 
        educational agency for improvement or subject the local 
        educational agency to corrective action for the 
        succeeding school year.
    [(d) Construction.--Nothing in this section shall be 
construed to alter or otherwise affect the rights, remedies, 
and procedures afforded school or school district employees 
under Federal, State, or local laws (including applicable 
regulations or court orders) or under the terms of collective 
bargaining agreements, memoranda of understanding, or other 
agreements between such employees and their employers.
    [(e) Supplemental Educational Services.--
            [(1) Supplemental educational services.--In the 
        case of any school described in paragraph (5), (7), or 
        (8) of subsection (b), the local educational agency 
        serving such school shall, subject to this subsection, 
        arrange for the provision of supplemental educational 
        services to eligible children in the school from a 
        provider with a demonstrated record of effectiveness, 
        that is selected by the parents and approved for that 
        purpose by the State educational agency in accordance 
        with reasonable criteria, consistent with paragraph 
        (5), that the State educational agency shall adopt.
            [(2) Local educational agency responsibilities.--
        Each local educational agency subject to this 
        subsection shall--
                    [(A) provide, at a minimum, annual notice 
                to parents (in an understandable and uniform 
                format and, to the extent practicable, in a 
                language the parents can understand) of--
                            [(i) the availability of services 
                        under this subsection;
                            [(ii) the identity of approved 
                        providers of those services that are 
                        within the local educational agency or 
                        whose services are reasonably available 
                        in neighboring local educational 
                        agencies; and
                            [(iii) a brief description of the 
                        services, qualifications, and 
                        demonstrated effectiveness of each such 
                        provider;
                    [(B) if requested, assist parents in 
                choosing a provider from the list of approved 
                providers maintained by the State;
                    [(C) apply fair and equitable procedures 
                for serving students if the number of spaces at 
                approved providers is not sufficient to serve 
                all students; and
                    [(D) not disclose to the public the 
                identity of any student who is eligible for, or 
                receiving, supplemental educational services 
                under this subsection without the written 
                permission of the parents of the student.
            [(3) Agreement.--In the case of the selection of an 
        approved provider by a parent, the local educational 
        agency shall enter into an agreement with such 
        provider. Such agreement shall--
                    [(A) require the local educational agency 
                to develop, in consultation with parents (and 
                the provider chosen by the parents), a 
                statement of specific achievement goals for the 
                student, how the student's progress will be 
                measured, and a timetable for improving 
                achievement that, in the case of a student with 
                disabilities, is consistent with the student's 
                individualized education program under section 
                614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities 
                Education Act;
                    [(B) describe how the student's parents and 
                the student's teacher or teachers will be 
                regularly informed of the student's progress;
                    [(C) provide for the termination of such 
                agreement if the provider is unable to meet 
                such goals and timetables;
                    [(D) contain provisions with respect to the 
                making of payments to the provider by the local 
                educational agency; and
                    [(E) prohibit the provider from disclosing 
                to the public the identity of any student 
                eligible for, or receiving, supplemental 
                educational services under this subsection 
                without the written permission of the parents 
                of such student.
            [(4) State educational agency responsibilities.--A 
        State educational agency shall--
                    [(A) in consultation with local educational 
                agencies, parents, teachers, and other 
                interested members of the public, promote 
                maximum participation by providers to ensure, 
                to the extent practicable, that parents have as 
                many choices as possible;
                    [(B) develop and apply objective criteria, 
                consistent with paragraph (5), to potential 
                providers that are based on a demonstrated 
                record of effectiveness in increasing the 
                academic proficiency of students in subjects 
                relevant to meeting the State academic content 
                and student achievement standards adopted under 
                section 1111(b)(1);
                    [(C) maintain an updated list of approved 
                providers across the State, by school district, 
                from which parents may select;
                    [(D) develop, implement, and publicly 
                report on standards and techniques for 
                monitoring the quality and effectiveness of the 
                services offered by approved providers under 
                this subsection, and for withdrawing approval 
                from providers that fail, for 2 consecutive 
                years, to contribute to increasing the academic 
                proficiency of students served under this 
                subsection as described in subparagraph (B); 
                and
                    [(E) provide annual notice to potential 
                providers of supplemental educational services 
                of the opportunity to provide services under 
                this subsection and of the applicable 
                procedures for obtaining approval from the 
                State educational agency to be an approved 
                provider of those services.
            [(5) Criteria for providers.--In order for a 
        provider to be included on the State list under 
        paragraph (4)(C), a provider shall agree to carry out 
        the following:
                    [(A) Provide parents of children receiving 
                supplemental educational services under this 
                subsection and the appropriate local 
                educational agency with information on the 
                progress of the children in increasing 
                achievement, in a format and, to the extent 
                practicable, a language that such parents can 
                understand.
                    [(B) Ensure that instruction provided and 
                content used by the provider are consistent 
                with the instruction provided and content used 
                by the local educational agency and State, and 
                are aligned with State student academic 
                achievement standards.
                    [(C) Meet all applicable Federal, State, 
                and local health, safety, and civil rights 
                laws.
                    [(D) Ensure that all instruction and 
                content under this subsection are secular, 
                neutral, and nonideological.
            [(6) Amounts for supplemental educational 
        services.--The amount that a local educational agency 
        shall make available for supplemental educational 
        services for each child receiving those services under 
        this subsection shall be the lesser of--
                    [(A) the amount of the agency's allocation 
                under subpart 2, divided by the number of 
                children from families below the poverty level 
                counted under section 1124(c)(1)(A); or
                    [(B) the actual costs of the supplemental 
                educational services received by the child.
            [(7) Funds provided by state educational agency.--
        Each State educational agency may use funds that the 
        agency reserves under this part, and part A of title V, 
        to assist local educational agencies that do not have 
        sufficient funds to provide services under this 
        subsection for all eligible students requesting such 
        services.
            [(8) Duration.--The local educational agency shall 
        continue to provide supplemental educational services 
        to a child receiving such services under this 
        subsection until the end of the school year in which 
        such services were first received.
            [(9) Prohibition.--Nothing contained in this 
        subsection shall permit the making of any payment for 
        religious worship or instruction.
            [(10) Waiver.--
                    [(A) Requirement.--At the request of a 
                local educational agency, a State educational 
                agency may waive, in whole or in part, the 
                requirement of this subsection to provide 
                supplemental educational services if the State 
                educational agency determines that--
                            [(i) none of the providers of those 
                        services on the list approved by the 
                        State educational agency under 
                        paragraph (4)(C) makes those services 
                        available in the area served by the 
                        local educational agency or within a 
                        reasonable distance of that area; and
                            [(ii) the local educational agency 
                        provides evidence that it is not able 
                        to provide those services.
                    [(B) Notification.--The State educational 
                agency shall notify the local educational 
                agency, within 30 days of receiving the local 
                educational agency's request for a waiver under 
                subparagraph (A), whether the request is 
                approved or disapproved and, if disapproved, 
                the reasons for the disapproval, in writing.
            [(11) Special rule.--If State law prohibits a State 
        educational agency from carrying out one or more of its 
        responsibilities under paragraph (4) with respect to 
        those who provide, or seek approval to provide, 
        supplemental educational services, each local 
        educational agency in the State shall carry out those 
        responsibilities with respect to its students who are 
        eligible for those services.
            [(12) Definitions.--In this subsection--
                    [(A) the term ``eligible child'' means a 
                child from a low-income family, as determined 
                by the local educational agency for purposes of 
                allocating funds to schools under section 
                1113(c)(1);
                    [(B) the term ``provider'' means a non-
                profit entity, a for-profit entity, or a local 
                educational agency that--
                            [(i) has a demonstrated record of 
                        effectiveness in increasing student 
                        academic achievement;
                            [(ii) is capable of providing 
                        supplemental educational services that 
                        are consistent with the instructional 
                        program of the local educational agency 
                        and the academic standards described 
                        under section 1111; and
                            [(iii) is financially sound; and
                    [(C) the term ``supplemental educational 
                services'' means tutoring and other 
                supplemental academic enrichment services that 
                are--
                            [(i) in addition to instruction 
                        provided during the school day; and
                            [(ii) are of high quality, 
                        research-based, and specifically 
                        designed to increase the academic 
                        achievement of eligible children on the 
                        academic assessments required under 
                        section 1111 and attain proficiency in 
                        meeting the State's academic 
                        achievement standards.
    [(f) Schools and LEAs Previously Identified for Improvement 
or Corrective Action.--
            [(1) Schools.--
                    [(A) School improvement.--
                            [(i) Schools in school-improvement 
                        status before date of enactment.--Any 
                        school that was in the first year of 
                        school improvement status under this 
                        section on the day preceding the date 
                        of enactment of the No Child Left 
                        Behind Act of 2001 (as this section was 
                        in effect on such day) shall be treated 
                        by the local educational agency as a 
                        school that is in the first year of 
                        school improvement status under 
                        paragraph (1).
                            [(ii) Schools in school-improvement 
                        status for 2 or more years before date 
                        of enactment.--Any school that was in 
                        school improvement status under this 
                        section for two or more consecutive 
                        school years preceding the date of 
                        enactment of the No Child Left Behind 
                        Act of 2001 (as this section was in 
                        effect on such day) shall be treated by 
                        the local educational agency as a 
                        school described in subsection (b)(5).
                    [(B) Corrective action.--Any school that 
                was in corrective action status under this 
                section on the day preceding the date of 
                enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 
                2001 (as this section was in effect on such 
                day) shall be treated by the local educational 
                agency as a school described in paragraph (7).
            [(2) LEAs.--
                    [(A) LEA improvement.--A State shall 
                identify for improvement under subsection 
                (c)(3) any local educational agency that was in 
                improvement status under this section as this 
                section was in effect on the day preceding the 
                date of enactment of the No Child Left Behind 
                Act of 2001.
                    [(B) Corrective action.--A State shall 
                identify for corrective action under subsection 
                (c)(10) any local educational agency that was 
                in corrective action status under this section 
                as this section was in effect on the day 
                preceding the date of enactment of the No Child 
                Left Behind Act of 2001.
                    [(C) Special rule.--For the schools and 
                other local educational agencies described 
                under paragraphs (1) and (2), as required, the 
                State shall ensure that public school choice in 
                accordance with subparagraphs (b)(1)(E) and (F) 
                and supplemental education services in 
                accordance with subsection (e) are provided not 
                later than the first day of the 2002-2003 
                school year.
                    [(D) Transition.--With respect to a 
                determination that a local educational agency 
                has for 2 consecutive years failed to make 
                adequate yearly progress as defined in the 
                State plan under section 1111(b)(2), such 
                determination shall include in such 2-year 
                period any continuous period of time 
                immediately preceding the date of enactment of 
                the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 during 
                which the agency has failed to make such 
                progress.
    [(g) Schools Funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.--
            [(1) Adequate yearly progress for bureau funded 
        schools.--
                    [(A) Development of definition.--
                            [(i) Definition.--The Secretary of 
                        the Interior, in consultation with the 
                        Secretary if the Secretary of Interior 
                        requests the consultation, using the 
                        process set out in section 1138(b) of 
                        the Education Amendments of 1978, shall 
                        define adequate yearly progress, 
                        consistent with section 1111(b), for 
                        the schools funded by the Bureau of 
                        Indian Affairs on a regional or tribal 
                        basis, as appropriate, taking into 
                        account the unique circumstances and 
                        needs of such schools and the students 
                        served by such schools.
                            [(ii) Use of definition.--The 
                        Secretary of the Interior, consistent 
                        with clause (i), may use the definition 
                        of adequate yearly progress that the 
                        State in which the school that is 
                        funded by the Bureau is located uses 
                        consistent with section 1111(b), or in 
                        the case of schools that are located in 
                        more than one State, the Secretary of 
                        the Interior may use whichever State 
                        definition of adequate yearly progress 
                        that best meets the unique 
                        circumstances and needs of such school 
                        or schools and the students the schools 
                        serve.
                    [(B) Waiver.--The tribal governing body or 
                school board of a school funded by the Bureau 
                of Indian Affairs may waive, in part or in 
                whole, the definition of adequate yearly 
                progress established pursuant to paragraph (A) 
                where such definition is determined by such 
                body or school board to be inappropriate. If 
                such definition is waived, the tribal governing 
                body or school board shall, within 60 days 
                thereafter, submit to the Secretary of Interior 
                a proposal for an alternative definition of 
                adequate yearly progress, consistent with 
                section 1111(b), that takes into account the 
                unique circumstances and needs of such school 
                or schools and the students served. The 
                Secretary of the Interior, in consultation with 
                the Secretary if the Secretary of Interior 
                requests the consultation, shall approve such 
                alternative definition unless the Secretary 
                determines that the definition does not meet 
                the requirements of section 1111(b), taking 
                into account the unique circumstances and needs 
                of such school or schools and the students 
                served.
                    [(C) Technical assistance.--The Secretary 
                of Interior shall, in consultation with the 
                Secretary if the Secretary of Interior requests 
                the consultation, either directly or through a 
                contract, provide technical assistance, upon 
                request, to a tribal governing body or school 
                board of a school funded by the Bureau of 
                Indian Affairs that seeks to develop an 
                alternative definition of adequate yearly 
                progress.
            [(2) Accountability for bia schools.--For the 
        purposes of this section, schools funded by the Bureau 
        of Indian Affairs shall be considered schools subject 
        to subsection (b), as specifically provided for in this 
        subsection, except that such schools shall not be 
        subject to subsection (c), or the requirements to 
        provide public school choice and supplemental 
        educational services under subsections (b) and (e).
            [(3) School improvement for bureau schools.--
                    [(A) Contract and grant schools.--For a 
                school funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
                which is operated under a contract issued by 
                the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to the 
                Indian Self-Determination Act (25 U.S.C. 450 et 
                seq.) or under a grant issued by the Secretary 
                of the Interior pursuant to the Tribally 
                Controlled Schools Act of 1988 (25 U.S.C. 2501 
                et seq.), the school board of such school shall 
                be responsible for meeting the requirements of 
                subsection (b) relating to development and 
                implementation of any school improvement plan 
                as described in subsections (b)(1) through 
                (b)(3), and subsection (b)(5), other than 
                subsection (b)(1)(E). The Bureau of Indian 
                Affairs shall be responsible for meeting the 
                requirements of subsection (b)(4) relating to 
                technical assistance.
                    [(B) Bureau operated schools.--For schools 
                operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the 
                Bureau shall be responsible for meeting the 
                requirements of subsection (b) relating to 
                development and implementation of any school 
                improvement plan as described in subsections 
                (b)(1) through (b)(5), other than subsection 
                (b)(1)(E).
            [(4) Corrective action and restructuring for 
        bureau-funded schools.--
                    [(A) Contract and grant schools.--For a 
                school funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
                which is operated under a contract issued by 
                the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to the 
                Indian Self-Determination Act (25 U.S.C. 450 et 
                seq.) or under a grant issued by the Secretary 
                of the Interior pursuant to the Tribally 
                Controlled Schools Act of 1988 (25 U.S.C. 2501 
                et seq.), the school board of such school shall 
                be responsible for meeting the requirements of 
                subsection (b) relating to corrective action 
                and restructuring as described in subsection 
                (b)(7) and (b)(8). Any action taken by such 
                school board under subsection (b)(7) or (b)(8) 
                shall take into account the unique 
                circumstances and structure of the Bureau of 
                Indian Affairs-funded school system and the 
                laws governing that system.
                    [(B) Bureau operated schools.--For schools 
                operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the 
                Bureau shall be responsible for meeting the 
                requirements of subsection (b) relating to 
                corrective action and restructuring as 
                described in subsection (b)(7) and (b)(8). Any 
                action taken by the Bureau under subsection 
                (b)(7) or (b)(8) shall take into account the 
                unique circumstances and structure of the 
                Bureau of Indian Affairs-funded school system 
                and the laws governing that system.
            [(5) Annual report.--On an annual basis, the 
        Secretary of the Interior shall report to the Secretary 
        of Education and to the appropriate committees of 
        Congress regarding any schools funded by the Bureau of 
        Indian Affairs which have been identified for school 
        improvement. Such report shall include--
                    [(A) the identity of each school;
                    [(B) a statement from each affected school 
                board regarding the factors that lead to such 
                identification; and
                    [(C) an analysis by the Secretary of the 
                Interior, in consultation with the Secretary if 
                the Secretary of Interior requests the 
                consultation, as to whether sufficient 
                resources were available to enable such school 
                to achieve adequate yearly progress.
    [(h) Other Agencies.--After receiving the notice described 
in subsection (b)(14)(D), the Secretary may notify, to the 
extent feasible and necessary as determined by the Secretary, 
other relevant Federal agencies regarding the major factors 
that were determined by the State educational agency to have 
significantly affected student academic achievement.]

SEC. 1116. SCHOOL PERFORMANCE.

    Section 1116 (20 U.S.C. 6316) is amended to read as 
follows:

SEC. 1116. SCHOOL PERFORMANCE.

    (a) School Accountability and Improvement System.--
            (1) In general.--Each State receiving a grant under 
        the program under this subpart and subpart 2 shall 
        establish a school accountability and improvement 
        system that--
                    (A) is part of the accountability system 
                required under section 1111(a)(3) and 
                implements the requirements of such system;
                    (B) supports schools that are not meeting 
                the State's performance targets under section 
                1111(a)(3)(C) for all students; and
                    (C) identifies the public elementary 
                schools and secondary schools in the State that 
                will need local interventions under subsection 
                (b), that are focus schools under subsection 
                (c), and that are priority schools under 
                subsection (d), and the processes to be used to 
                improve schools in each category, in accordance 
                with this section and section 2123(b)(2).
            (2) Review and approval.--The State shall include 
        information describing the school accountability and 
        improvement system in the State plan under section 
        1111(b), which shall be subject to peer review and 
        approval by the Secretary as part of the State plan, in 
        accordance with such section.
    (b) Local Interventions; Reporting.--
            (1) Local interventions.--Beginning in the 2015-
        2016 school year, each local educational agency 
        receiving a subgrant under the program under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 shall--
                    (A) identify each school that, after 2 
                consecutive years, has not met the same 
                performance target described in section 
                1111(a)(3)(C) for the same subgroup described 
                in section 1111(a)(3)(D); and
                    (B) ensure that such school, in 
                collaboration with the local educational 
                agency, develops and implements a locally 
                designed intervention to improve student 
                achievement in each such subgroup.
            (2) Reporting.--Each local educational agency that 
        implements locally designed interventions under 
        paragraph (1) to support schools that have not met 
        performance targets for a subgroup will report to the 
        State educational agency regarding the resources and 
        interventions used to address the achievement of 
        students in the subgroup, and the outcomes of those 
        efforts. The State educational agency shall annually 
        select the interventions with exemplary outcomes, share 
        such interventions and outcomes with the public, and 
        communicate such interventions and outcomes to the 
        Secretary.
            (3) Lack of improvement.--Each school served under 
        the program under this subpart that has been identified 
        as a school that has not met the same subgroup 
        performance target, as described in paragraph (1), for 
        the preceding 3 consecutive years shall work with the 
        State educational agency to implement a State-approved 
        intervention based on established best practices within 
        State.
    (c) Focus Schools.--
            (1) Identification.--Beginning in the 2015-2016 
        school year, a State shall identify as a focus school, 
        for the 3-year period following the school's 
        identification period (except as provided in paragraph 
        (4))--
                    (A) each public school in the State that--
                            (i) is not identified as a priority 
                        school under subsection (d); and
                            (ii) is in the 10 percent of all 
                        public schools in the State with the 
                        greatest achievement gaps among the 
                        subgroups described in section 
                        1111(a)(3)(D) as compared to the 
                        statewide average, as determined by the 
                        State academic assessments under 
                        section 1111(a)(2); and
                    (B) each public high school in the State 
                that--
                            (i) is not identified as a priority 
                        school under subsection (d); and
                            (ii) is in the 10 percent of such 
                        schools with the greatest graduation 
                        rate gaps among such subgroups as 
                        compared to the statewide averages.
            (2) Improvement strategies.--For each focus school 
        identified under paragraph (1), the local educational 
        agency serving the school shall, in accordance with the 
        State accountability system described in section 
        1111(a)(3), develop and implement a measurable and 
        data-driven correction plan to improve the performance 
        of low-achieving subgroups in the school in order to 
        close achievement gaps. A correction plan under this 
        paragraph shall be developed with input from teachers, 
        parents, community members, and other stakeholders.
            (3) State waiver.--If a State determines that all 
        schools that would otherwise be considered to be the 
        lowest-achieving 10 percent of schools with the 
        greatest achievement gap, or graduation rate gap, under 
        paragraph (1), are actually performing at a 
        satisfactory level of performance, the State may apply 
        to the Secretary to waive the requirements of this 
        subsection with respect to such schools.
            (4) Improvement.--The State educational agency 
        shall no longer identify a school that has been 
        identified as a focus school for any remainder of the 
        school's 3-year identification period if--
                    (A) at any time during the 3-year period 
                for which a school is so identified, the school 
                has met all of its performance targets as 
                described in section 1111(a)(3)(C) for the 
                school year; or
                    (B) after 2 years of the 3-year period, the 
                State determines, based on the most current 
                data, that the school's rate of improvement is 
                sufficient to enable the school to meet all of 
                the school's performance targets by the end of 
                the 3-year period.
    (d) Priority Schools.--
            (1) Identification.--
                    (A) In general.--Beginning in the 2015-2016 
                school year, a State shall identify as a 
                priority school, for the 3-year period 
                following the school's identification (except 
                as provided in paragraph (5))--
                            (i) each school served under this 
                        subpart in the State that is in the 
                        lowest-achieving 5 percent of 
                        elementary schools;
                            (ii) each school served under this 
                        subpart in the State that is in the 
                        lowest-achieving 5 percent of secondary 
                        schools;
                            (iii) each public high school in 
                        the State with a graduation rate of 
                        less than 60 percent; and
                            (iv) each school served under this 
                        subpart that has been identified as a 
                        focus school under subsection (c) for 
                        the 6 preceding consecutive years.
                    (B) State waiver.--If a State determines 
                that all schools that would otherwise be 
                considered to be the lowest-achieving 5 percent 
                of schools under clause (i) or (ii) of 
                subparagraph (A), are actually performing at a 
                satisfactory level of performance based on the 
                measures used by the State to identify priority 
                schools, the State may apply to the Secretary 
                to waive the requirements of this paragraph, 
                and paragraphs (2) through (5), for such 
                schools.
            (2) Needs analysis.--Each local educational agency 
        receiving assistance under the program under this 
        subpart and subpart 2 shall conduct a data-driven needs 
        analysis, which may involve an external partner with 
        expertise in conducting such needs analysis, of each 
        school identified as a priority school, as the case may 
        be, to determine the most appropriate school 
        improvement strategies to improve student performance. 
        Such needs analysis shall include--
                    (A) a diagnostic review of data related to 
                students and instructional staff;
                    (B) an analysis of the school governance, 
                curriculum, instruction, student supports, 
                conditions for learning, and parent and family 
                engagement practices relative to the needs of 
                the student population;
                    (C) the resources, which may include 
                community-based supports and early childhood 
                education, available at the school, local 
                educational agency, and community levels to 
                meet student needs and support improved student 
                achievement and outcomes and the implementation 
                of any school improvement strategy; and
                    (D) an analysis of the school's current use 
                of time and an assessment of how much student, 
                teacher, principal, and staff time will be 
                required to meet student needs and support 
                improved student achievement and outcomes and 
                the implementation of any school improvement 
                strategy, including consideration of whether 
                increased learning time is necessary to ensure 
                successful implementation.
            (3) State and local responsibilities for identified 
        schools.--
                    (A) State responsibilities.--Each State 
                receiving a grant under the program under this 
                subpart and subpart 2 shall ensure that a local 
                educational agency receiving assistance under 
                such program carries out the requirements of 
                subparagraph (B) for each school identified as 
                a priority school under paragraph (1) in the 
                State.
                    (B) Local educational agency 
                responsibilities.--Each local educational 
                agency receiving assistance under the program 
                under this subpart and subpart 2 shall, 
                consistent with the State's accountability 
                system under section 1111(a)(3)--
                            (i) establish a process for 
                        selecting an appropriate school 
                        improvement strategy for each school 
                        described in subparagraph (A) that is 
                        served by the local educational agency;
                            (ii) select the school improvement 
                        strategy to be used in each such school 
                        and the timeline for implementing the 
                        selected school improvement strategy in 
                        such school;
                            (iii) develop a detailed budget 
                        covering the 3-year identification 
                        period, including planned expenditures 
                        at the school level for activities 
                        supporting full and effective 
                        implementation of the selected school 
                        improvement strategy;
                            (iv) implement a school improvement 
                        strategy at the school in accordance 
                        with the requirements of paragraph (4);
                            (v) use appropriate measures to 
                        monitor the effectiveness of the 
                        implementation;
                            (vi) review and select turnaround 
                        partners to assist in implementing 
                        school improvement strategies;
                            (vii) align other Federal, State, 
                        and local resources with the school 
                        improvement strategy;
                            (viii) provide the school with the 
                        operational flexibility, including 
                        autonomy over staffing, time, and 
                        budget, needed to enable full and 
                        effective implementation of the 
                        selected strategy, including through 
                        the modification of practices or 
                        policies, if necessary;
                            (ix) collect and use data on an 
                        ongoing basis to adjust implementation 
                        of the school improvement strategy to 
                        improve student achievement;
                            (x) provide an assurance that the 
                        implementation of the selected school 
                        improvement strategy addresses the 
                        needs of all the subgroups of students 
                        described in section 1111(a)(3)(D) in 
                        the school;
                            (xi) take steps to sustain 
                        successful reforms and practices after 
                        the school is no longer identified as a 
                        priority school;
                            (xii) provide technical assistance 
                        and other support to ensure students 
                        graduate from high school college and 
                        career ready, as determined by the 
                        State's academic content standards 
                        under section 1111(a)(1), through the 
                        effective implementation of the school 
                        improvement strategy in the school, 
                        which--
                                    (I) may include assistance 
                                in--
                                            (aa) data 
                                        collection and 
                                        analysis;
                                            (bb) recruiting and 
                                        retaining staff;
                                            (cc) teacher and 
                                        principal evaluation;
                                            (dd) professional 
                                        development;
                                            (ee) parent and 
                                        family engagement;
                                            (ff) coordination 
                                        of services with high-
                                        quality early childhood 
                                        education providers;
                                            (gg) coordination 
                                        of services to address 
                                        students' social, 
                                        emotional, and health 
                                        needs;
                                            (hh) increasing 
                                        learning time;
                                            (ii) coordination 
                                        of services with 
                                        institutions of higher 
                                        education to facilitate 
                                        the implementation of 
                                        dual enrollment 
                                        programs and early 
                                        college high schools; 
                                        and
                                            (jj) monitoring the 
                                        implementation of the 
                                        school improvement 
                                        strategy selected under 
                                        paragraph (4); and
                                    (II) shall include 
                                assistance in the 
                                implementation of schoolwide 
                                positive behavior supports, 
                                school-based mental health 
                                programs, and other approaches 
                                with evidence of effectiveness, 
                                for improving the learning 
                                environment in the school and 
                                reducing the need for 
                                suspensions, expulsions, and 
                                other actions that remove 
                                students from instruction, 
                                including effective strategies 
                                for improving coordination of 
                                community resources;
                            (xiii) establish partnerships with 
                        employers, institutions of higher 
                        education, service providers, and 
                        others to assist in implementing school 
                        improvement strategies described in 
                        paragraph (4); and
                            (xiv) review school discipline and 
                        climate data, disaggregated by each 
                        subgroup described in section 
                        1111(a)(3)(D), in assessing the needs 
                        of the school and, if low-achieving 
                        subgroups receive a disproportionate 
                        amount of suspensions, expulsions, or 
                        other forms of exclusionary discipline, 
                        incorporate evidence-based strategies 
                        to reduce out-of-classroom punishment 
                        and promote student engagement in the 
                        school's improvement plan.
                    (C) State as local educational agency.--If 
                a school identified as a priority school under 
                this subsection for a 3-year identification 
                period is re-identified as a priority school 
                for the subsequent 3-year period, the State may 
                take over the school and act as the local 
                educational agency for purposes of this 
                subsection, if permitted under State law.
            (4) School improvement strategies.--
                    (A) Required activities for all school 
                improvement strategies.--A local educational 
                agency implementing any strategies under this 
                paragraph for a school shall--
                            (i) provide staff at the school 
                        with ongoing professional development, 
                        consistent with the needs analysis 
                        described in paragraph (2);
                            (ii) conduct regular evaluations 
                        for the teachers and principals at the 
                        school that provide specific feedback 
                        on areas of strength and in need of 
                        improvement;
                            (iii) provide time for 
                        collaboration among instructional staff 
                        at the school to improve student 
                        achievement;
                            (iv) provide instructional staff at 
                        the school with timely access to 
                        student data to inform instruction and 
                        meet the academic needs of individual 
                        students, which may include, in 
                        elementary school, school readiness 
                        data;
                            (v) collaborate with parents and 
                        families, the community, teachers, 
                        other school personnel at the school, 
                        and representatives of Indian tribes 
                        located in the area served by the local 
                        educational agency, on the selection 
                        and implementation of the strategy;
                            (vi) use data to identify and 
                        implement a research-based 
                        instructional program that--
                                    (I) analyzes student 
                                progress and performance and 
                                develops appropriate 
                                interventions for students who 
                                are not making adequate 
                                progress;
                                    (II) provides 
                                differentiated instruction and 
                                related instructional supports; 
                                and
                                    (III) meets the unique 
                                cultural, language, and 
                                educational needs of all 
                                students served by such school;
                            (vii) in the case of an elementary 
                        school with kindergarten entry--
                                    (I) examine factors that 
                                contribute to school readiness 
                                as part of the needs analysis 
                                conducted under paragraph (2);
                                    (II) coordinate with 
                                appropriate high-quality early 
                                childhood programs, such as 
                                programs under the Child Care 
                                Development and Block Grant Act 
                                of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 9858 et 
                                seq.), the Head Start Act (42 
                                U.S.C. 9801 et seq.), 
                                prekindergarten programs, and 
                                other similar Federal, State, 
                                and local programs, in order to 
                                align instruction to better 
                                prepare students for elementary 
                                school; and
                                    (III) develop a plan to 
                                improve or expand high-quality 
                                early childhood options which 
                                may include the use of funds 
                                under the program under this 
                                subpart and subpart 2 for such 
                                purposes;
                            (viii) provide ongoing mechanisms 
                        for parent and family engagement;
                            (ix) provide appropriate services 
                        and evidence-based, integrated supports 
                        for students as identified in the 
                        school's needs analysis;
                            (x) describe, in a report to the 
                        State educational agency and made 
                        available to the public upon request, 
                        how the local educational agency or 
                        school will adopt and implement 
                        policies or practices to develop, 
                        implement, improve, or expand positive 
                        behavioral interventions and supports, 
                        early intervening services, and school-
                        based mental health programs in 
                        accordance with the requirements of 
                        clauses (xi) through (xiv);
                            (xi)(I) review and analyze the 
                        school's efforts to address behavioral 
                        or disciplinary problems; and
                            (II) assist the school in 
                        developing, expanding, or improving the 
                        use of schoolwide positive behavioral 
                        interventions and supports that are 
                        aligned with activities carried out 
                        under the Individuals with Disabilities 
                        Education Act;
                            (xii) review and analyze the 
                        school's efforts to identify and assist 
                        students with poor academic achievement 
                        and students who are children with 
                        disabilities, and assist the school in 
                        developing, implementing, or improving 
                        early intervening services that are 
                        coordinated with activities carried out 
                        under the Individuals with Disabilities 
                        Education Act;
                            (xiii) review the number of 
                        discipline incidents in the school and 
                        use that information to assist the 
                        school to implement schoolwide positive 
                        behavioral interventions and supports 
                        or other early intervening services, or 
                        both; and
                            (xiv) review and analyze the 
                        school's efforts to address mental 
                        health needs among students and assist 
                        the school in developing or improving 
                        school-based mental health programs 
                        that are coordinated with activities 
                        carried out under the Individuals with 
                        Disabilities Education Act.
                    (B) Strategies.--A local educational agency 
                shall identify a school improvement strategy 
                for a school identified as a priority school 
                under paragraph (1) from among the following 
                strategies:
                            (i) Transformation strategy.--A 
                        local educational agency implementing a 
                        transformation strategy in a school 
                        shall--
                                    (I) replace the principal, 
                                if the principal has served in 
                                that role at the school for 
                                more than 2 years, with a 
                                principal who has a 
                                demonstrated record of success 
                                in increasing student 
                                achievement and--
                                            (aa) training or 
                                        experience in raising 
                                        student achievement; or
                                            (bb) training or 
                                        experience in turning 
                                        around low-performing 
                                        schools;
                                    (II) require existing 
                                instructional staff and school 
                                leadership to reapply for their 
                                positions;
                                    (III) require that all 
                                instructional staff and school 
                                leadership hiring be done at 
                                the school through mutual 
                                consent; and
                                    (IV) establish schedules 
                                and implement strategies that 
                                provide increased learning 
                                time.
                            (ii) Turnaround strategy.--A local 
                        educational agency implementing a 
                        turnaround model as a strategy for a 
                        school shall--
                                    (I) replace the principal, 
                                if the principal has served in 
                                that role at the school for 
                                more than 2 years, with a 
                                principal who has the 
                                demonstrated record of success 
                                and the training or experience 
                                described in item (aa) or (bb) 
                                of clause (i)(I);
                                    (II) screen all teachers in 
                                the school and retain not more 
                                than 65 percent of them; and
                                    (III) establish schedules 
                                and implement strategies that 
                                provide increased learning 
                                time.
                            (iii) Whole school reform 
                        strategy.--A local educational agency 
                        implementing a whole school reform 
                        strategy for a school shall implement 
                        an evidence-based strategy that ensures 
                        whole school reform. The strategy shall 
                        be undertaken in partnership with an 
                        external provider offering a school 
                        reform program that is based on at 
                        least a moderate level of evidence that 
                        the program will have a statistically 
                        significant effect on student outcomes, 
                        including more than 1 well-designed or 
                        well-implemented experimental or quasi-
                        experimental study.
                            (iv) Restart strategy.--A local 
                        educational agency implementing a 
                        restart strategy in a school shall 
                        carry out the following:
                                    (I)(aa) Convert the school 
                                into a public charter school, 
                                or close and reopen the school 
                                as a public charter school in 
                                partnership with a nonprofit 
                                charter school operator, a 
                                nonprofit charter management 
                                organization, or a nonprofit 
                                education management 
                                organization, that has a 
                                demonstrated record of 
                                improving student achievement 
                                for students similar to those 
                                served by the school; or
                                    (bb) convert the school to 
                                a magnet school or create a 
                                new, innovative school, as 
                                defined by the State.
                                    (II) Ensure that the new 
                                school--
                                            (aa) serves the 
                                        grade levels as the 
                                        original school for 
                                        which the strategy is 
                                        being implemented; and
                                            (bb) enrolls any 
                                        former student of the 
                                        original school who 
                                        requests to attend the 
                                        school and then, after 
                                        all such students are 
                                        enrolled, admits 
                                        additional students, 
                                        using a random lottery 
                                        system if more students 
                                        apply for admission 
                                        than can be 
                                        accommodated.
                            (v) School closure strategy.--A 
                        local educational agency implementing a 
                        school closure strategy for a school--
                                    (I) shall close the school 
                                and enroll the students who 
                                attended the school in other 
                                schools, including charter 
                                schools, served by the local 
                                educational agency that are 
                                within reasonable proximity to 
                                the closed school, as 
                                determined by the local 
                                educational agency, and that 
                                are higher-performing than the 
                                school that is being closed;
                                    (II) shall provide 
                                transportation, or shall pay 
                                for the provision of 
                                transportation, for each such 
                                student to the student's new 
                                school, consistent with State 
                                law and local educational 
                                agency policy;
                                    (III) shall provide 
                                information about high-quality 
                                educational options, as well as 
                                transition and support services 
                                to students, who attended the 
                                closed school and the students' 
                                parents; and
                                    (IV) may use school 
                                improvement funds provided 
                                under subsection (f) to pay for 
                                the expenses of--
                                            (aa) transitioning 
                                        students from the 
                                        school that is being 
                                        closed to the new 
                                        school;
                                            (bb) supporting the 
                                        new school; and
                                            (cc) expanding and 
                                        offering student 
                                        supports and services 
                                        within the new school, 
                                        which may include high-
                                        quality prekindergarten 
                                        programs and services.
                    (C) Flexibility.--
                            (i) Flexibility for certain local 
                        educational agencies.--Notwithstanding 
                        any other provision of this paragraph--
                                    (I) a local educational 
                                agency that is eligible for 
                                services under subpart 1 or 2 
                                of part B of title VI, as 
                                determined by the Secretary, 
                                may modify not more than 1 of 
                                the elements or activities 
                                required under subparagraph (A) 
                                of a school improvement 
                                strategy selected for a school 
                                identified under paragraph (4) 
                                in order to better meet the 
                                needs of students in such 
                                school; and
                                    (II) a State educational 
                                agency may apply to the 
                                Secretary for a waiver of 
                                clauses (i)(I) and (ii)(I) of 
                                subparagraph (B).
                            (ii) State flexibility.--
                        Notwithstanding any other provision of 
                        this paragraph, a State educational 
                        agency may, with the approval of the 
                        Secretary, establish an alternative 
                        State-determined, evidence-based, 
                        school improvement strategy that may be 
                        used by local educational agencies in 
                        the State in addition to the strategies 
                        described in subparagraph (B), except 
                        that funds provided under this title 
                        shall not be used for school vouchers.
                    (D) Public school choice.--
                            (i) In general.--In addition to the 
                        requirements of subparagraph (A) and 
                        the school improvement strategy 
                        determined under subparagraph (B) or 
                        (C)(ii), a local educational agency 
                        shall, not later than 3 months before 
                        the first day of the school year 
                        following identification as a priority 
                        school under paragraph (1), provide all 
                        students enrolled in the identified 
                        school with the option to transfer to 
                        another public school served by the 
                        local educational agency that has not 
                        been identified under such paragraph, 
                        unless such an option is prohibited by 
                        State law.
                            (ii) Priority.--In providing 
                        students the option to transfer to 
                        another public school, the local 
                        educational agency shall give priority 
                        to the lowest-achieving children from 
                        low-income families, as determined by 
                        the local educational agency for the 
                        purposes of allocating funds to schools 
                        under section 1113(a)(3).
                            (iii) Treatment.--Students who use 
                        the option to transfer to another 
                        public school shall be enrolled in 
                        classes and other activities in the 
                        public school to which the students 
                        transfer in the same manner as all 
                        other children at the public school.
                            (iv) Special rule.--A local 
                        educational agency shall permit a child 
                        who transfers to another public school 
                        under this subparagraph to remain in 
                        that school until the child has 
                        completed the highest grade in such 
                        school.
            (5) Improvement.--
                    (A) In general.--The State educational 
                agency shall no longer identify a school that 
                has been identified as a priority school for 
                any remainder of the school's 3-year 
                identification period if--
                            (i) after 2 years of the 3-year 
                        period for which a school is identified 
                        as a priority school under paragraph 
                        (1), the school has met all of the 
                        school's performance targets as 
                        described in section 1111(a)(3)(C); or
                            (ii) after 2 years of the 3-year 
                        period, the State determines, based on 
                        the most current data, that the 
                        school's rate of improvement is 
                        sufficient to enable the school to meet 
                        all of the school's performance targets 
                        by the end of the 3-year period.
                    (B) Continued eligibility for school 
                improvement funds.--If an eligible entity, as 
                defined in subsection (f)(1), was receiving 
                school improvement funds under subsection (f) 
                for a school that improves as described in 
                subparagraph (A), the eligible entity shall 
                continue to receive such grant funds, and use 
                such funds to carry out the grant activities in 
                such school, for the full period of such grant.
            (6) Repeated classification as a priority school.--
                    (A) In general.--For each public school 
                that is identified as a priority school under 
                paragraph (1) for any portion of a 3-year 
                period and is re-identified under such 
                paragraph for the subsequent time period, the 
                local educational agency shall carry out the 
                requirements of this subsection for such 
                subsequent period by implementing, with respect 
                to such school, the restart strategy or school 
                closure strategy under clause (iv) or (v) of 
                paragraph (4)(B).
                    (B) Special rule.--Notwithstanding 
                subparagraph (A), a local educational agency 
                serving a school described in such paragraph 
                may, in coordination with the State educational 
                agency and based on a community needs 
                assessment, apply to the Secretary for a waiver 
                to implement another school improvement model 
                not previously used by the local educational 
                agency for the school.
    (e) Report on Professional Development Funds for Priority 
Schools.--Each local educational agency that receives subgrant 
funds under the program under this subpart and subpart 2 shall 
prepare and submit a report to the State educational agency, at 
the end of each school year, regarding--
            (1) the local educational agency's use of funds for 
        professional development, as required under section 
        2123(b)(2), in schools identified as priority schools 
        under subsection (d) that did not receive funds under 
        subsection (f); and
            (2) any changes in, or effects on, student 
        performance at such schools during such school year.
    (f) School Improvement Funds.--
            (1) Definitions.--In this subsection:
                    (A) Eligible entity.--the term ``eligible 
                entity'' means--
                            (i) a State educational agency that 
                        is operating a statewide recovery 
                        school district;
                            (ii) a local educational agency 
                        that receives funds under the program 
                        under this subpart and subpart 2 and 
                        serves at least 1 eligible school;
                            (iii) a consortium of such local 
                        educational agencies; or
                            (iv) an educational service agency 
                        that serves at least 1 local 
                        educational agency described in clause 
                        (ii).
                    (B) Eligible school.--The term ``eligible 
                school'' means a school identified as a 
                priority school under subsection (d).
            (2) Allotments to states.--
                    (A) In general.--From the funds made 
                available to carry out this subsection under 
                section 3(a)(2) for a fiscal year, the 
                Secretary shall provide States that submit an 
                application described in paragraph (3) with 
                school improvement funds through an allotment, 
                as determined under subparagraph (B) and in 
                addition to the amounts made available to 
                States under subpart 2, to enable the States to 
                award subgrants and carry out the activities 
                described in this subsection to assist eligible 
                schools.
                    (B) Allotments to states.--From the funds 
                made available to carry out this subsection 
                under section 3(a)(2) for a fiscal year, the 
                Secretary shall allot to each State with an 
                approved application an amount that bears the 
                same relation to such funds as the amount that 
                the State received under subpart 2 for the 
                preceding fiscal year bears to the amount that 
                all States receive under such subpart for such 
                fiscal year.
            (3) State application.--A State that desires to 
        receive school improvement funds under this subsection 
        shall submit an application to the Secretary at such 
        time, in such manner, and accompanied by such 
        information as the Secretary may require. Each 
        application shall include a description of--
                    (A) the process and the criteria that the 
                State will use to award subgrants under 
                paragraph (5)(A)(i);
                    (B) the process and the criteria the State 
                will use to determine whether the eligible 
                entity's proposal for each eligible school 
                meets the requirements of paragraphs (2) and 
                (4), and subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph 
                (3), of subsection (d);
                    (C) how the State will ensure geographic 
                diversity in making subgrants;
                    (D) how the State will set priorities in 
                awarding subgrants to eligible entities;
                    (E) how the State will monitor and evaluate 
                the implementation of school improvement 
                strategies by eligible entities, including how 
                the State will use the results of the 
                evaluation to improve State strategies for 
                supporting schools identified under subsection 
                (d); and
                    (F) how the State will reduce barriers for 
                schools in the implementation of school 
                improvement strategies, including operational 
                flexibility that would enable complete 
                implementation of the selected school 
                improvement strategy.
            (4) State administration and technical 
        assistance.--A State that receives an allotment under 
        this subsection may reserve not more than a total of 5 
        percent of such allotment for the administration of 
        this subsection, which may include activities aimed at 
        building State capacity to support the local 
        educational agency and school improvement, such as 
        providing technical assistance and other support 
        (including regular site visits to monitor 
        implementation of selected school improvement 
        strategies to eligible entities serving eligible 
        schools), either directly or through educational 
        service agencies or other public or private 
        organizations.
            (5) School improvement activities.--
                    (A) In general.--A State that receives 
                school improvement funds under this subsection 
                shall use not less than 95 percent of such 
                allotment to carry out school improvement 
                activities for eligible schools by--
                            (i) awarding subgrants, on a 
                        competitive basis, to eligible entities 
                        to enable the eligible entities to 
                        carry out the activities described in 
                        subparagraph (C) for eligible schools; 
                        or
                            (ii) if the State chooses and the 
                        local educational agency serving an 
                        eligible school agrees, directly 
                        providing the activities described in 
                        subparagraph (C)(ii) to the eligible 
                        school and the local educational 
                        agency, or arranging for other 
                        entities, such as school support teams 
                        or educational service agencies, to 
                        provide such activities to the school.
                    (B) Subgrants.--
                            (i) Applications.--An eligible 
                        entity that desires a subgrant under 
                        this paragraph shall submit an 
                        application to the State at such time, 
                        in such manner, and including such 
                        information as the State shall require. 
                        The application shall include a 
                        description of how the eligible entity 
                        will carry out the requirements of 
                        paragraphs (2) and (4), and 
                        subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph 
                        (3), of subsection (d) for each 
                        eligible school to be served by the 
                        grant.
                            (ii) Demonstration of additional 
                        responsibilities.--Each eligible entity 
                        that desires a subgrant under this 
                        paragraph shall demonstrate in its 
                        application that the eligible entity 
                        has--
                                    (I) adopted human resource 
                                policies that prioritize the 
                                recruitment, retention, and 
                                placement of effective staff in 
                                eligible schools;
                                    (II) ensured that eligible 
                                schools have access to 
                                resources to implement the 
                                school improvement strategies 
                                described in subsection (d)(4), 
                                such as facilities, 
                                professional development, and 
                                technology;
                                    (III) identified 
                                opportunities to reduce 
                                duplication, increase 
                                efficiency, and assist eligible 
                                schools in complying with 
                                reporting requirements of State 
                                and Federal programs;
                                    (IV) developed an early 
                                warning indicator system that 
                                monitors school-level data, and 
                                alerts the eligible school when 
                                a student indicates slowed 
                                progress toward high school 
                                graduation, so that the school 
                                can provide appropriate student 
                                interventions; and
                                    (V) facilitated alignment 
                                and coordination between high-
                                quality early childhood 
                                education programs and services 
                                serving students who will 
                                attend eligible schools that 
                                are elementary schools, and 
                                teachers and principals of such 
                                eligible schools.
                            (iii) Subgrant size.--A State shall 
                        award subgrants under this paragraph of 
                        sufficient size to enable subgrant 
                        recipients to fully and effectively 
                        implement the selected school 
                        improvement strategies.
                            (iv) Subgrant period.--Each 
                        subgrant awarded under this paragraph 
                        shall be for a 5-year period.
                            (v) Withholding final funding.--In 
                        order for a State to award subgrant 
                        funds to an eligible entity for the 
                        final 2 years of the subgrant cycle, 
                        the eligible entity shall demonstrate 
                        that the schools receiving funds under 
                        this paragraph have made significant 
                        progress on the leading indicators.
                    (C) Use of subgrant funds.--An eligible 
                entity that receives a subgrant under this 
                paragraph shall use the subgrant funds to--
                            (i) carry out the requirements of 
                        subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph 
                        (3), and paragraphs (2) and (4), of 
                        subsection (d) in an eligible school 
                        that has been identified under such 
                        subsection as of the date of the grant 
                        award, which may include a maximum 1-
                        year planning period; and
                            (ii) carry out activities at the 
                        local educational agency level that 
                        directly support such implementation, 
                        such as--
                                    (I) assistance in data 
                                collection and analysis;
                                    (II) recruiting and 
                                retaining staff;
                                    (III) teacher and principal 
                                evaluation;
                                    (IV) professional 
                                development;
                                    (V) coordination of 
                                services to address students' 
                                social, emotional, and health 
                                needs; and
                                    (VI) progress monitoring.
                    (D) Supplement, not supplant.--An eligible 
                entity or State shall use Federal funds 
                received under this subsection only to 
                supplement the funds that would, in the absence 
                of such Federal funds, be made available from 
                non-Federal sources for the education of pupils 
                participating in programs funded under this 
                subsection.
                    (E) Intervention by state.--In the case of 
                a State educational agency that has taken over 
                a school or local educational agency, the State 
                may use an amount of funds under this 
                subsection similar to the amount that the 
                school or local educational agency would 
                receive, under this subsection, in order to 
                carry out the activities described in 
                subparagraph (C) for the school and local 
                educational agency, either directly or through 
                an eligible entity designated by the State 
                educational agency.
            (6) National activities.--From amounts appropriated 
        and reserved for this paragraph under section 
        3(a)(2)(B), the Secretary shall carry out the following 
        national activities:
                    (A) Activities focused on building State 
                and local educational agency capacity to turn 
                around eligible schools and schools in rural 
                areas through activities such as--
                            (i) identifying and disseminating 
                        effective school improvement 
                        strategies, including in rural areas;
                            (ii) making available targeted 
                        technical assistance, including 
                        planning and implementation tools; and
                            (iii) expanding the availability of 
                        turnaround partners capable of 
                        assisting in turning around eligible 
                        schools, including in rural areas.
                    (B) Activities focused on building capacity 
                to turn around eligible schools, including in 
                rural areas.
                    (C) The use of data, research, and 
                evaluation to--
                            (i) identify schools that are 
                        implementing school improvement 
                        strategies effectively;
                            (ii) identify effective school 
                        improvement strategies; and
                            (iii) collect and disseminate that 
                        information to States and local 
                        educational agencies in a manner that 
                        facilitates replication of effective 
                        practices.
                    (D) Other activities designed to support 
                State and local efforts to improve eligible 
                schools.
            (7) Evaluation.--The Director of the Institute of 
        Education Sciences shall conduct an evaluation of the 
        programs carried out under this subsection.
    (g) Construction.--Nothing in this section shall be 
construed to alter or otherwise affect the rights, remedies, 
and procedures afforded school or school district employees 
under Federal, State, or local laws (including applicable 
regulations or court orders) or under the terms of collective 
bargaining agreements, memoranda of understanding, or other 
agreements between such employees and their employers.

[SEC. 1117. SCHOOL SUPPORT AND RECOGNITION.

    [(a) System for Support.--
            [(1) In general.--Each State shall establish a 
        statewide system of intensive and sustained support and 
        improvement for local educational agencies and schools 
        receiving funds under this part, in order to increase 
        the opportunity for all students served by those 
        agencies and schools to meet the State's academic 
        content standards and student academic achievement 
        standards.
            [(2) Priorities.--In carrying out this subsection, 
        a State shall--
                    [(A) first, provide support and assistance 
                to local educational agencies with schools 
                subject to corrective action under section 1116 
                and assist those schools, in accordance with 
                section 1116(b)(11), for which a local 
                educational agency has failed to carry out its 
                responsibilities under paragraphs (7) and (8) 
                of section 1116(b);
                    [(B) second, provide support and assistance 
                to other local educational agencies with 
                schools identified as in need of improvement 
                under section 1116(b); and
                    [(C) third, provide support and assistance 
                to other local educational agencies and schools 
                participating under this part that need that 
                support and assistance in order to achieve the 
                purpose of this part.
            [(3) Regional centers.--Such a statewide system 
        shall, to the extent practicable, work with and receive 
        support and assistance from regional educational 
        laboratories established under part D of the Education 
        Sciences Reform Act of 2002 and comprehensive centers 
        established under the Educational Technical Assistance 
        Act of 2002 and the comprehensive regional technical 
        assistance centers and the regional educational 
        laboratories under section 941(h) of the Educational 
        Research, Development, Dissemination, and Improvement 
        Act of 1994 (as such section existed on the day before 
        the date of enactment of the Education Sciences Reform 
        Act of 2002), or other providers of technical 
        assistance.
            [(4) Statewide system.--
                    [(A) In order to achieve the purpose 
                described in paragraph (1), the statewide 
                system shall include, at a minimum, the 
                following approaches:
                            [(i) Establishing school support 
                        teams in accordance with subparagraph 
                        (C) for assignment to, and working in, 
                        schools in the State that are described 
                        in paragraph (2).
                            [(ii) Providing such support as the 
                        State educational agency determines 
                        necessary and available in order to 
                        ensure the effectiveness of such teams.
                            [(iii) Designating and using 
                        distinguished teachers and principals 
                        who are chosen from schools served 
                        under this part that have been 
                        especially successful in improving 
                        academic achievement.
                            [(iv) Devising additional 
                        approaches to providing the assistance 
                        described in paragraph (1), such as 
                        providing assistance through 
                        institutions of higher education and 
                        educational service agencies or other 
                        local consortia, and private providers 
                        of scientifically based technical 
                        assistance.
                    [(B) Priority.--The State educational 
                agency shall give priority to the approach 
                described in clause (i) of subparagraph (A).
            [(5) School support teams.--
                    [(A) Composition.--Each school support team 
                established under this section shall be 
                composed of persons knowledgeable about 
                scientifically based research and practice on 
                teaching and learning and about successful 
                schoolwide projects, school reform, and 
                improving educational opportunities for low-
                achieving students, including--
                            [(i) highly qualified or 
                        distinguished teachers and principals;
                            [(ii) pupil services personnel;
                            [(iii) parents;
                            [(iv) representatives of 
                        institutions of higher education;
                            [(v) representatives of regional 
                        educational laboratories or 
                        comprehensive regional technical 
                        assistance centers;
                            [(vi) representatives of outside 
                        consultant groups; or
                            [(vii) other individuals as the 
                        State educational agency, in 
                        consultation with the local educational 
                        agency, may determine appropriate.
                    [(B) Functions.--Each school support team 
                assigned to a school under this section shall--
                            [(i) review and analyze all facets 
                        of the school's operation, including 
                        the design and operation of the 
                        instructional program, and assist the 
                        school in developing recommendations 
                        for improving student performance in 
                        that school;
                            [(ii) collaborate with parents and 
                        school staff and the local educational 
                        agency serving the school in the 
                        design, implementation, and monitoring 
                        of a plan that, if fully implemented, 
                        can reasonably be expected to improve 
                        student performance and help the school 
                        meet its goals for improvement, 
                        including adequate yearly progress 
                        under section 1111(b)(2)(B);
                            [(iii) evaluate, at least 
                        semiannually, the effectiveness of 
                        school personnel assigned to the 
                        school, including identifying 
                        outstanding teachers and principals, 
                        and make findings and recommendations 
                        to the school, the local educational 
                        agency, and, where appropriate, the 
                        State educational agency; and
                            [(iv) make additional 
                        recommendations as the school 
                        implements the plan described in clause 
                        (ii) to the local educational agency 
                        and the State educational agency 
                        concerning additional assistance that 
                        is needed by the school or the school 
                        support team.
                    [(C) Continuation of assistance.--After one 
                school year, from the beginning of the 
                activities, such school support team, in 
                consultation with the local educational agency, 
                may recommend that the school support team 
                continue to provide assistance to the school, 
                or that the local educational agency or the 
                State educational agency, as appropriate, take 
                alternative actions with regard to the school.
    [(b) State Recognition.--
            [(1) Academic achievement awards program.--
                    [(A) In general.--Each State receiving a 
                grant under this part--
                            [(i) shall establish a program for 
                        making academic achievement awards to 
                        recognize schools that meet the 
                        criteria described in subparagraph (B); 
                        and
                            [(ii) as appropriate and as funds 
                        are available under subsection 
                        (c)(2)(A), may financially reward 
                        schools served under this part that 
                        meet the criteria described in clause 
                        (ii).
                    [(B) Criteria.--The criteria referred to in 
                subparagraph (A) are that a school--
                            [(i) significantly closed the 
                        achievement gap between the groups of 
                        students described in section 
                        1111(b)(2); or
                            [(ii) exceeded their adequate 
                        yearly progress, consistent with 
                        section 1111(b)(2), for 2 or more 
                        consecutive years.
            [(2) Distinguished schools.--Of those schools 
        meeting the criteria described in paragraph (2), each 
        State shall designate as distinguished schools those 
        schools that have made the greatest gains in closing 
        the achievement gap as described in subparagraph (B)(i) 
        or exceeding adequate yearly progress as described in 
        subparagraph (B)(ii). Such distinguished schools may 
        serve as models for and provide support to other 
        schools, especially schools identified for improvement 
        under section 1116, to assist such schools in meeting 
        the State's academic content standards and student 
        academic achievement standards.
            [(3) Awards to teachers.--A State program under 
        paragraph (1) may also recognize and provide financial 
        awards to teachers teaching in a school described in 
        such paragraph that consistently makes significant 
        gains in academic achievement in the areas in which the 
        teacher provides instruction, or to teachers or 
        principals designated as distinguished under subsection 
        (a)(4)(A)(iii).
    [(c) Funding.--
            [(1) In general.--Each State--
                    [(A) shall use funds reserved under section 
                1003(a) and may use funds made available under 
                section 1003(g) for the approaches described 
                under subsection (a)(4)(A); and
                    [(B) shall use State administrative funds 
                authorized under section 1004(a) to establish 
                the statewide system of support described under 
                subsection (a).
            [(2) Reservations of funds by state.--
                    [(A) Awards program.--For the purpose of 
                carrying out subsection (b)(1), each State 
                receiving a grant under this part may reserve, 
                from the amount (if any) by which the funds 
                received by the State under subpart 2 for a 
                fiscal year exceed the amount received by the 
                State under that subpart for the preceding 
                fiscal year, not more than 5 percent of such 
                excess amount.
                    [(B) Teacher awards.--For the purpose of 
                carrying out subsection (b)(3), a State 
                educational agency may reserve such funds as 
                necessary from funds made available under 
                section 2113.
            [(3) Use within 3 years.--Notwithstanding any other 
        provision of law, the amount reserved under 
        subparagraph (A) by a State for each fiscal year shall 
        remain available to the State until expended for a 
        period not exceeding 3 years receipt of funds.
            [(4) Special allocation rule for schools in high-
        poverty areas.--
                    [(A) In general.--Each State shall 
                distribute not less than 75 percent of any 
                amount reserved under paragraph (2)(A) for each 
                fiscal year to schools described in 
                subparagraph (B), or to teachers in those 
                schools consistent with subsection (b)(3).
                    [(B) School described.--A school described 
                in subparagraph (A) is a school whose student 
                population is in the highest quartile of 
                schools statewide in terms of the percentage of 
                children from low income families.]

[SEC. 1119]SEC. 1117. QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHERS AND 
                    PARAPROFESSIONALS.

    [(a) Teacher Qualifications and Measurable Objectives.--
            [(1) In general.--Beginning with the first day of 
        the first school year after the date of enactment of 
        the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, each local 
        educational agency receiving assistance under this part 
        shall ensure that all teachers hired after such day and 
        teaching in a program supported with funds under this 
        part are highly qualified.
            [(2) State plan.--As part of the plan described in 
        section 1111, each State educational agency receiving 
        assistance under this part shall develop a plan to 
        ensure that all teachers teaching in core academic 
        subjects within the State are highly qualified not 
        later than the end of the 2005-2006 school year. Such 
        plan shall establish annual measurable objectives for 
        each local educational agency and school that, at a 
        minimum--
                    [(A) shall include an annual increase in 
                the percentage of highly qualified teachers at 
                each local educational agency and school, to 
                ensure that all teachers teaching in core 
                academic subjects in each public elementary 
                school and secondary school are highly 
                qualified not later than the end of the 2005-
                2006 school year;
                    [(B) shall include an annual increase in 
                the percentage of teachers who are receiving 
                high-quality professional development to enable 
                such teachers to become highly qualified and 
                successful classroom teachers; and
                    [(C) may include such other measures as the 
                State educational agency determines to be 
                appropriate to increase teacher qualifications.
            [(3) Local plan.--As part of the plan described in 
        section 1112, each local educational agency receiving 
        assistance under this part shall develop a plan to 
        ensure that all teachers teaching within the school 
        district served by the local educational agency are 
        highly qualified not later than the end of the 2005-
        2006 school year.
    [(b) Reports.--
            [(1) Annual state and local reports.--
                    [(A) Local reports.--Each State educational 
                agency described in subsection (a)(2) shall 
                require each local educational agency receiving 
                funds under this part to publicly report, each 
                year, beginning with the 2002-2003 school year, 
                the annual progress of the local educational 
                agency as a whole and of each of the schools 
                served by the agency, in meeting the measurable 
                objectives described in subsection (a)(2).
                    [(B) State reports.--Each State educational 
                agency receiving assistance under this part 
                shall prepare and submit each year, beginning 
                with the 2002-2003 school year, a report to the 
                Secretary, describing the State educational 
                agency's progress in meeting the measurable 
                objectives described in subsection (a)(2).
                    [(C) Information from other reports.--A 
                State educational agency or local educational 
                agency may submit information from the reports 
                described in section 1111(h) for the purposes 
                of this subsection, if such report is modified, 
                as may be necessary, to contain the information 
                required by this subsection, and may submit 
                such information as a part of the reports 
                required under section 1111(h).
            [(2) Annual reports by the secretary.--Each year, 
        beginning with the 2002-2003 school year, the Secretary 
        shall publicly report the annual progress of State 
        educational agencies, local educational agencies, and 
        schools, in meeting the measurable objectives described 
        in subsection (a)(2).]
    (a) Teacher Qualifications.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph 
        (2), each local educational agency receiving assistance 
        under the program under this subpart and subpart 2 
        shall ensure that all teachers teaching a core academic 
        subject in a program supported with funds under such 
        subparts are highly qualified teachers and are 
        certified in the subject area in which the teachers are 
        assigned to teach.
            (2) Exception.--Each local educational agency 
        located in a State in which the State has fully 
        implemented a professional growth and improvement 
        system shall only be required to comply with the 
        requirements under paragraph (1) as they relate to new 
        teachers.
            (3) Special rule for small, rural, or remote 
        schools.--In the case of a local educational agency 
        that is unable to provide a highly qualified teacher to 
        serve as an on-site classroom teacher for a core 
        academic subject in a small, rural, or remote school, 
        the local educational agency may meet the requirements 
        of this section by using distance learning to provide 
        such instruction by a teacher who is a highly qualified 
        teacher for purposes of the core academic subject, as 
        long as--
                    (A) the teacher who is a highly qualified 
                teacher in the core academic subject--
                            (i) is responsible for providing at 
                        least 50 percent of the direct 
                        instruction in the core academic 
                        subject through distance learning;
                            (ii) is responsible for monitoring 
                        student progress; and
                            (iii) is the teacher who assigns 
                        the students their grades; and
                    (B) an on-site teacher who is a highly 
                qualified teacher for a subject other the core 
                academic subject taught through distance 
                learning is present in the classroom throughout 
                the period of distance learning and provides 
                supporting instruction and assistance to the 
                students.
    (b) Qualifications for American Indian, Alaska Native, or 
Native Hawaiian Language, Culture, or History Teachers.--
            (1) Language or culture.--
                    (A) In general.--Notwithstanding any other 
                provision of law, the requirements of 
                subsection (a) on local educational agencies 
                with respect to highly qualified teachers shall 
                not apply to a teacher of American Indian, 
                Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian language or 
                culture, whether the teacher is teaching on a 
                permanent, part-time, or occasional basis.
                    (B) Competency.--A State may require that a 
                local tribe or tribal organization, as defined 
                in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination 
                and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450b), 
                verify the competency of a public school 
                teacher of American Indian, Alaska Native, or 
                Native Hawaiian language or culture to teach 
                such subject, to the chief administrative 
                officer of the local educational agency or the 
                chief State school officer.
            (2) History.--
                    (A) In general.--Notwithstanding any other 
                provision of law, the requirements of 
                subsection (a) on local educational agencies 
                with respect to highly qualified teachers, 
                shall not apply to a teacher who is a Native 
                elder or other authority on American Indian, 
                Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian history and 
                who provides instruction in such subject, 
                whether on a part-time or occasional basis.
                    (B) Competency.--A State may require that a 
                local tribe or tribal organization, as defined 
                in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination 
                and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450b), 
                verify the competency of the instructor 
                described in subparagraph (A) of American 
                Indian, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian 
                history to teach such subject, to the chief 
                administrative officer of the local educational 
                agency or the chief State school officer.
    (c) New Paraprofessionals.--
            (1) In general.--Each local educational agency 
        receiving assistance under this part shall ensure that 
        all paraprofessionals [hired after the date of 
        enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and] 
        working in a program supported with funds under this 
        part shall have--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(d) Existing Paraprofessionals.--Each local educational 
agency receiving assistance under this part shall ensure that 
all paraprofessionals hired before the date of enactment of the 
No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, and working in a program 
supported with funds under this part shall, not later than 4 
years after the date of enactment satisfy the requirements of 
subsection (c).]
    [(e)](d) Exceptions for Translation and Parental 
Involvement Activities.--[Subsections (c) and (d)]Subsection 
(c) shall not apply to a paraprofessional--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(f)](e) General Requirement for All Paraprofessionals.--* 
* *
    [(g)](f) Duties of Paraprofessionals.--
            (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(h)](g) Use of Funds.--* * *
    [(i)](h) Verification of Compliance.--
            (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [[(j)](i) Combinations of Funds.--Funds provided under this 
part that are used for professional development purposes may be 
combined with funds provided under title II of this Act, other 
Acts, and other sources.]
    (i) Special Rule.--A State educational agency may not 
require a school or a local educational agency to expend a 
specific amount of funds for professional development 
activities under the program under this subpart and subpart 2.
    [(k)](j) Special Rule.--* * *
    [(l) Minimum Expenditures.--Each local educational agency 
that receives funds under this part shall use not less than 5 
percent, or more than 10 percent, of such funds for each of 
fiscal years 2002 and 2003, and not less than 5 percent of the 
funds for each subsequent fiscal year, for professional 
development activities to ensure that teachers who are not 
highly qualified become highly qualified not later than the end 
of the 2005-2006 school year.]

[SEC. 1118. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT.

    [(a) Local Educational Agency Policy.--
            [(1) In general.--A local educational agency may 
        receive funds under this part only if such agency 
        implements programs, activities, and procedures for the 
        involvement of parents in programs assisted under this 
        part consistent with this section. Such programs, 
        activities, and procedures shall be planned and 
        implemented with meaningful consultation with parents 
        of participating children.
            [(2) Written policy.--Each local educational agency 
        that receives funds under this part shall develop 
        jointly with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents 
        of participating children a written parent involvement 
        policy. The policy shall be incorporated into the local 
        educational agency's plan developed under section 1112, 
        establish the agency's expectations for parent 
        involvement, and describe how the agency will--
                    [(A) involve parents in the joint 
                development of the plan under section 1112, and 
                the process of school review and improvement 
                under section 1116;
                    [(B) provide the coordination, technical 
                assistance, and other support necessary to 
                assist participating schools in planning and 
                implementing effective parent involvement 
                activities to improve student academic 
                achievement and school performance;
                    [(C) build the schools' and parents' 
                capacity for strong parental involvement as 
                described in subsection (e);
                    [(D) coordinate and integrate parental 
                involvement strategies under this part with 
                parental involvement strategies under other 
                programs, such as the Head Start program, 
                Reading First program, Early Reading First 
                program, Even Start program, Parents as 
                Teachers program, and Home Instruction Program 
                for Preschool Youngsters, and State-run 
                preschool programs;
                    [(E) conduct, with the involvement of 
                parents, an annual evaluation of the content 
                and effectiveness of the parental involvement 
                policy in improving the academic quality of the 
                schools served under this part, including 
                identifying barriers to greater participation 
                by parents in activities authorized by this 
                section (with particular attention to parents 
                who are economically disadvantaged, are 
                disabled, have limited English proficiency, 
                have limited literacy, or are of any racial or 
                ethnic minority background), and use the 
                findings of such evaluation to design 
                strategies for more effective parental 
                involvement, and to revise, if necessary, the 
                parental involvement policies described in this 
                section; and
                    [(F) involve parents in the activities of 
                the schools served under this part.
            [(3) Reservation.--
                    [(A) In general.--Each local educational 
                agency shall reserve not less than 1 percent of 
                such agency's allocation under subpart 2 of 
                this part to carry out this section, including 
                promoting family literacy and parenting skills, 
                except that this paragraph shall not apply if 1 
                percent of such agency's allocation under 
                subpart 2 of this part for the fiscal year for 
                which the determination is made is $5,000 or 
                less.
                    [(B) Parental input.--Parents of children 
                receiving services under this part shall be 
                involved in the decisions regarding how funds 
                reserved under subparagraph (A) are allotted 
                for parental involvement activities.
                    [(C) Distribution of funds.--Not less than 
                95 percent of the funds reserved under 
                subparagraph (A) shall be distributed to 
                schools served under this part.
    [(b) School Parental Involvement Policy.--
            [(1) In general.--Each school served under this 
        part shall jointly develop with, and distribute to, 
        parents of participating children a written parental 
        involvement policy, agreed on by such parents, that 
        shall describe the means for carrying out the 
        requirements of subsections (c) through (f). Parents 
        shall be notified of the policy in an understandable 
        and uniform format and, to the extent practicable, 
        provided in a language the parents can understand. Such 
        policy shall be made available to the local community 
        and updated periodically to meet the changing needs of 
        parents and the school.
            [(2) Special rule.--If the school has a parental 
        involvement policy that applies to all parents, such 
        school may amend that policy, if necessary, to meet the 
        requirements of this subsection.
            [(3) Amendment.--If the local educational agency 
        involved has a school district-level parental 
        involvement policy that applies to all parents, such 
        agency may amend that policy, if necessary, to meet the 
        requirements of this subsection.
            [(4) Parental comments.--If the plan under section 
        1112 is not satisfactory to the parents of 
        participating children, the local educational agency 
        shall submit any parent comments with such plan when 
        such local educational agency submits the plan to the 
        State.
    [(c) Policy Involvement.--Each school served under this 
part shall--
            [(1) convene an annual meeting, at a convenient 
        time, to which all parents of participating children 
        shall be invited and encouraged to attend, to inform 
        parents of their school's participation under this part 
        and to explain the requirements of this part, and the 
        right of the parents to be involved;
            [(2) offer a flexible number of meetings, such as 
        meetings in the morning or evening, and may provide, 
        with funds provided under this part, transportation, 
        child care, or home visits, as such services relate to 
        parental involvement;
            [(3) involve parents, in an organized, ongoing, and 
        timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of 
        programs under this part, including the planning, 
        review, and improvement of the school parental 
        involvement policy and the joint development of the 
        schoolwide program plan under section 1114(b)(2), 
        except that if a school has in place a process for 
        involving parents in the joint planning and design of 
        the school's programs, the school may use that process, 
        if such process includes an adequate representation of 
        parents of participating children;
            [(4) provide parents of participating children--
                    [(A) timely information about programs 
                under this part;
                    [(B) a description and explanation of the 
                curriculum in use at the school, the forms of 
                academic assessment used to measure student 
                progress, and the proficiency levels students 
                are expected to meet; and
                    [(C) if requested by parents, opportunities 
                for regular meetings to formulate suggestions 
                and to participate, as appropriate, in 
                decisions relating to the education of their 
                children, and respond to any such suggestions 
                as soon as practicably possible; and
            [(5) if the schoolwide program plan under section 
        1114(b)(2) is not satisfactory to the parents of 
        participating children, submit any parent comments on 
        the plan when the school makes the plan available to 
        the local educational agency.
    [(d) Shared Responsibilities for High Student Academic 
Achievement.--As a component of the school-level parental 
involvement policy developed under subsection (b), each school 
served under this part shall jointly develop with parents for 
all children served under this part a school-parent compact 
that outlines how parents, the entire school staff, and 
students will share the responsibility for improved student 
academic achievement and the means by which the school and 
parents will build and develop a partnership to help children 
achieve the State's high standards. Such compact shall--
            [(1) describe the school's responsibility to 
        provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a 
        supportive and effective learning environment that 
        enables the children served under this part to meet the 
        State's student academic achievement standards, and the 
        ways in which each parent will be responsible for 
        supporting their children's learning, such as 
        monitoring attendance, homework completion, and 
        television watching; volunteering in their child's 
        classroom; and participating, as appropriate, in 
        decisions relating to the education of their children 
        and positive use of extracurricular time; and
            [(2) address the importance of communication 
        between teachers and parents on an ongoing basis 
        through, at a minimum--
                    [(A) parent-teacher conferences in 
                elementary schools, at least annually, during 
                which the compact shall be discussed as the 
                compact relates to the individual child's 
                achievement;
                    [(B) frequent reports to parents on their 
                children's progress; and
                    [(C) reasonable access to staff, 
                opportunities to volunteer and participate in 
                their child's class, and observation of 
                classroom activities.
    [(e) Building Capacity for Involvement.--To ensure 
effective involvement of parents and to support a partnership 
among the school involved, parents, and the community to 
improve student academic achievement, each school and local 
educational agency assisted under this part--
            [(1) shall provide assistance to parents of 
        children served by the school or local educational 
        agency, as appropriate, in understanding such topics as 
        the State's academic content standards and State 
        student academic achievement standards, State and local 
        academic assessments, the requirements of this part, 
        and how to monitor a child's progress and work with 
        educators to improve the achievement of their children;
            [(2) shall provide materials and training to help 
        parents to work with their children to improve their 
        children's achievement, such as literacy training and 
        using technology, as appropriate, to foster parental 
        involvement;
            [(3) shall educate teachers, pupil services 
        personnel, principals, and other staff, with the 
        assistance of parents, in the value and utility of 
        contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to, 
        communicate with, and work with parents as equal 
        partners, implement and coordinate parent programs, and 
        build ties between parents and the school;
            [(4) shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, 
        coordinate and integrate parent involvement programs 
        and activities with Head Start, Reading First, Early 
        Reading First, Even Start, the Home Instruction 
        Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents as 
        Teachers Program, and public preschool and other 
        programs, and conduct other activities, such as parent 
        resource centers, that encourage and support parents in 
        more fully participating in the education of their 
        children;
            [(5) shall ensure that information related to 
        school and parent programs, meetings, and other 
        activities is sent to the parents of participating 
        children in a format and, to the extent practicable, in 
        a language the parents can understand;
            [(6) may involve parents in the development of 
        training for teachers, principals, and other educators 
        to improve the effectiveness of such training;
            [(7) may provide necessary literacy training from 
        funds received under this part if the local educational 
        agency has exhausted all other reasonably available 
        sources of funding for such training;
            [(8) may pay reasonable and necessary expenses 
        associated with local parental involvement activities, 
        including transportation and child care costs, to 
        enable parents to participate in school-related 
        meetings and training sessions;
            [(9) may train parents to enhance the involvement 
        of other parents;
            [(10) may arrange school meetings at a variety of 
        times, or conduct in-home conferences between teachers 
        or other educators, who work directly with 
        participating children, with parents who are unable to 
        attend such conferences at school, in order to maximize 
        parental involvement and participation;
            [(11) may adopt and implement model approaches to 
        improving parental involvement;
            [(12) may establish a districtwide parent advisory 
        council to provide advice on all matters related to 
        parental involvement in programs supported under this 
        section;
            [(13) may develop appropriate roles for community-
        based organizations and businesses in parent 
        involvement activities; and
            [(14) shall provide such other reasonable support 
        for parental involvement activities under this section 
        as parents may request.
    [(f) Accessibility.--In carrying out the parental 
involvement requirements of this part, local educational 
agencies and schools, to the extent practicable, shall provide 
full opportunities for the participation of parents with 
limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and 
parents of migratory children, including providing information 
and school reports required under section 1111 in a format and, 
to the extent practicable, in a language such parents 
understand.
    [(g) Information From Parental Information and Resource 
Centers.--In a State where a parental information and resource 
center is established to provide training, information, and 
support to parents and individuals who work with local parents, 
local educational agencies, and schools receiving assistance 
under this part, each local educational agency or school that 
receives assistance under this part and is located in the State 
shall assist parents and parental organizations by informing 
such parents and organizations of the existence and purpose of 
such centers.
    [(h) Review.--The State educational agency shall review the 
local educational agency's parental involvement policies and 
practices to determine if the policies and practices meet the 
requirements of this section.]

SEC. 1118. PARENT AND FAMILY ENGAGEMENT.

    (a) Local Educational Agency Parent and Family Engagement 
Assessment and Plan.--
            (1) In general.--In order to increase student 
        academic achievement and improve child development, a 
        local educational agency may receive funds under the 
        program under this subpart and subpart 2 only if such 
        agency develops and implements a strategic, evidence-
        based plan to support meaningful engagement of parents 
        and family members in education (referred to in this 
        section as the ``parent and family engagement plan''). 
        Such plan shall be--
                    (A) based on a needs assessment of parents 
                and family members, school instructional and 
                leadership personnel, and community leaders, 
                conducted to inform the development of the 
                plan; and
                    (B) developed and implemented through 
                meaningful consultation with--
                            (i) parents and family members of 
                        participating children;
                            (ii) youth who have graduated from 
                        schools that are part of the local 
                        educational agency;
                            (iii) as applicable, employers, 
                        business leaders, and philanthropic 
                        organizations;
                            (iv) other members of the community 
                        who are committed to increasing student 
                        academic achievement and improving 
                        child development;
                            (v) to the greatest extent 
                        practicable, individuals with expertise 
                        in effectively engaging parents and 
                        family members in education; and
                            (vi) organizations that have a 
                        demonstrated record of effectiveness in 
                        assisting students in becoming college 
                        and career ready, as determined in 
                        accordance with the State academic 
                        content standards under section 
                        1111(a)(1).
            (2) Annual survey.--A local educational agency 
        described in paragraph (1) shall, on an annual basis, 
        conduct a survey, through electronic means to the 
        extent practicable, including delivery through mobile 
        devices, of all parents, family members, and all school 
        instructional and leadership personnel, to--
                    (A) determine the needs of parents and 
                family members, in order to assist with the 
                learning of their children and engage with 
                school personnel, including all teachers of 
                their children;
                    (B) identify strategies to support school-
                family interactions, including identifying and 
                addressing the barriers to effective parental 
                involvement in a manner responsive to the 
                cultural and language needs of such parents;
                    (C) determine the level of parent and 
                family engagement in each respondent's 
                respective school and the level of engagement 
                of school leaders with parent and family 
                members;
                    (D) identify perceived and actual barriers 
                to the activities described in subparagraph 
                (A); and
                    (E) determine the perceptions about the 
                school's conditions for learning.
            (3) Parent and family engagement plan.--
                    (A) Development.--Based on the results of 
                the survey described in paragraph (2), each 
                local educational agency receiving funds under 
                the program under this subpart and subpart 2 
                shall develop and implement an annual parent 
                and family engagement plan jointly with the 
                parents and family members of participating 
                children and, where applicable, with a parent 
                advisory committee that represents the entire 
                school district. Such plan shall--
                            (i) be designed to foster the 
                        engagement of parents and other family 
                        members and school instructional and 
                        leadership personnel;
                            (ii) be designed to integrate such 
                        engagement into the practice of all the 
                        local educational agency's schools that 
                        are served under the program under this 
                        subpart and subpart 2;
                            (iii) establish parent engagement 
                        goals for the local educational agency 
                        and such schools; and
                            (iv) establish annual quantifiable 
                        performance benchmarks for such goals, 
                        which shall require continual progress 
                        toward the achievement of such goals.
                    (B) Additional elements.--The parent and 
                family engagement plan shall--
                            (i) establish the school's 
                        expectations for, and commitment to 
                        support, meaningful, evidence-based, 
                        parent and family engagement 
                        strategies;
                            (ii) describe the process through 
                        which the school will equip parents and 
                        family members, with particular 
                        attention to economically disadvantaged 
                        parents and family members, to--
                                    (I) act in partnership with 
                                local educational agency and 
                                school personnel to improve the 
                                academic achievement and 
                                development of their children; 
                                and
                                    (II) participate in school 
                                improvement strategies;
                            (iii) describe how the local 
                        educational agency will provide the 
                        coordination, technical assistance, and 
                        other support and conditions necessary 
                        to assist participating schools in 
                        planning and implementing effective 
                        parent and family engagement 
                        strategies, such as--
                                    (I) making facilities of 
                                the local educational agency 
                                available, as appropriate;
                                    (II) making compensatory 
                                time available for educators to 
                                conduct home visits;
                                    (III) establishing co-
                                location with public assistance 
                                programs;
                                    (IV) encouraging the 
                                implementation of community 
                                school models and related 
                                activities; and
                                    (V) utilizing the expertise 
                                of, and developing strategies 
                                with, organizations that have a 
                                demonstrated track record of 
                                success in supporting parent 
                                and family engagement;
                            (iv) provide for not less than 1 
                        schoolwide meeting during each academic 
                        year, at a convenient time, to which 
                        parents and family members of 
                        participating children shall be invited 
                        and encouraged to attend, in order to--
                                    (I) review the parent and 
                                family engagement plan;
                                    (II) inform parents and 
                                family members of opportunities 
                                for engagement in their child's 
                                education; and
                                    (III) explain to parents 
                                and family members the right of 
                                the parents and family members 
                                to be involved, and the 
                                benefits of meaningful 
                                engagement;
                            (v) provide parents with an 
                        opportunity to develop the knowledge 
                        and skills to engage in full 
                        partnerships with school instructional 
                        and leadership staff of the school in 
                        the education of their children;
                            (vi) provide for professional 
                        development and other evidence-based 
                        support to school instructional and 
                        leadership personnel regarding 
                        effective parent and family engagement;
                            (vii) to the extent feasible and 
                        appropriate, coordinate and integrate 
                        parent and family engagement programs 
                        and strategies with other Federal, 
                        State, and local programs;
                            (viii) provide information to 
                        school personnel, students, and parents 
                        about the school's use of positive 
                        behavioral interventions and supports, 
                        school-based mental health programs, 
                        and the expectations of school 
                        personnel, students, and parents in 
                        supporting a safe learning environment 
                        for all students; and
                            (ix) describe how the local 
                        educational agency will coordinate with 
                        parent and family information and 
                        resource centers established under part 
                        H of title IV.
    (b) Annual Review of Performance Benchmarks.--Each year, 
each local educational agency described in subsection (a), each 
school served under the program under this subpart, and the 
parent advisory board established under subsection (g) shall 
collaboratively review the benchmarks for each of the goals 
established under subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii). Based on the 
review--
            (1) if a local educational agency has met or made 
        continual progress toward meeting, its annual 
        benchmarks in such year, the local educational agency 
        will continue to implement the parent and family 
        engagement plan;
            (2) if the local educational agency has not met or 
        made continual progress toward meeting its annual 
        benchmarks in such year, the local educational agency 
        and parent advisory board shall jointly determine the 
        cause after taking into the account the results of the 
        end-of-the-year survey described in subsection (c); and
            (3) the local educational agency shall publicly 
        report on whether the agency has met or made continual 
        progress toward meeting such benchmarks, and the degree 
        to which the benchmarks were met.
    (c) End-of-the-year Survey.--As part of the review 
described in subsection (b), a local educational agency shall 
conduct an end-of-the-year survey of parents and school 
instructional and leadership personnel, including parents and 
personnel who participated in the survey described in 
subsection (a)(2), to determine whether the needs of parents 
and personnel were met through the implementation of the plan.
    (d) Revision of Plan.--The local educational agency and the 
parent advisory board established under subsection (g) shall 
address the causes described in subsection (b)(2) and the 
results of the survey in subsection (c) in the development or 
revision of the parent and family engagement plan.
    (e) Reservation and Use of Funds.--
            (1) In general.--Each local educational agency 
        shall reserve not less than 2 percent of such agency's 
        allocation under subpart 2 to assist schools in 
        carrying out the activities described in this section, 
        subject to paragraph (2).
            (2) Exception.--The reservation requirement under 
        paragraph (1) shall not apply if 1 percent of the local 
        educational agency's allocation under subpart 2 for the 
        fiscal year for which the determination is made is 
        equal to or less than $5,000.
            (3) Distribution of funds.--
                    (A) In general.--A local educational agency 
                shall--
                            (i) distribute not less than 75 
                        percent of funds reserved under 
                        paragraph (1) to schools served under 
                        this subpart; and
                            (ii) use not more than 20 percent 
                        of such funds for parent and family 
                        engagement activities at the local 
                        educational agency level.
                    (B) Priority.--In allocating the funds 
                described in subparagraph (A), each local 
                educational agency shall give priority to high-
                need schools.
            (4) Use of funds.--Funds reserved under paragraph 
        (1) may be used to carry out activities and strategies 
        consistent with the parent and family engagement plan 
        described in subsection (a), including not less than 1 
        of the following:
                    (A) Designating or establishing a dedicated 
                office or dedicated personnel for parent and 
                family engagement.
                    (B) Providing professional development for 
                local educational agency and school personnel 
                regarding parent and family engagement 
                strategies, which may be provided jointly to 
                teachers, school leaders, early childhood 
                educators, and parents and family members.
                    (C) Providing adult education and literacy 
                activities, as defined in section 203 of the 
                Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (20 
                U.S.C. 9201 et seq.).
                    (D) Supporting home visitation programs.
                    (E) Engaging in other evidence-based or 
                promising strategies for improving and 
                increasing parent and family engagement, which 
                may include family and student supports, as 
                defined in section 4703.
                    (F) Disseminating information on best 
                practices (such as implementation, replication, 
                impact studies, and evaluations) focused on 
                parent and family engagement, especially best 
                practices for increasing the engagement of 
                economically disadvantaged parents and family 
                members.
                    (G) Contracting with experienced parent 
                organizations to assist with training and other 
                activities under this section.
                    (H) Collaborating, or providing subgrants 
                to schools to enable the schools to 
                collaborate, with community-based 
                organizations, or employers, with a 
                demonstrated track record of success in 
                improving and increasing student academic 
                achievement and parent and family engagement 
                to--
                            (i) enhance student achievement and 
                        development through greater engagement 
                        with children, such as experiential 
                        learning opportunities and internships;
                            (ii) increase opportunities for 
                        such organizations and employers to 
                        support family engagement activities, 
                        including by offering family engagement 
                        training and supporting adult education 
                        and family literacy programs; and
                            (iii) expand the role of the school 
                        as a community resource, such as by 
                        using facilities for community events, 
                        meetings, career or health fairs, or 
                        adult education and family literacy 
                        activities.
    (f) Accessibility.--In carrying out the parent and family 
engagement requirements of this subpart, local educational 
agencies and schools, to the greatest extent practicable, shall 
provide opportunities for the full and informed participation 
of parents and family members (including parents and family 
members with disabilities), including providing information and 
school reports in a format and, to the greatest extent 
practicable, in a language such parents can understand.
    (g) Parent Advisory Board.--Each local educational agency 
described in subsection (a) shall establish a parent advisory 
board for the purposes of developing, revising, and reviewing 
the parent and family engagement plan. Such board shall--
            (1) consist of a sufficient number of parents of 
        children attending the local educational agency's 
        schools served under this subpart to adequately 
        represent the interests and needs of parents at the 
        local educational agency;
            (2) meet multiple times throughout the school year; 
        and
            (3) be representative of the population served by 
        the local educational agency.

[SEC. 1120]SEC. 1119. PARTICIPATION OF CHILDREN ENROLLED IN PRIVATE 
                    SCHOOLS.

    (a) General Requirement.--
            (1) In general.--To the extent consistent with the 
        number of eligible children identified under section 
        1115(b) in the school district served by a local 
        educational agency who are enrolled in private 
        elementary schools and secondary schools, a local 
        educational agency shall, after timely and meaningful 
        consultation with appropriate private school officials, 
        provide such children, on an equitable basis, special 
        educational services or other benefits under this part 
        (such as dual enrollment, educational radio and 
        television, computer equipment and materials, other 
        technology, and mobile educational services and 
        equipment) that address their needs, and shall ensure 
        that teachers and families of the children participate, 
        on an equitable basis, in services and activities 
        developed pursuant to [sections 1118 and 1119]sections 
        1117 and 1118.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Allocation for Equitable Service to Private School 
Students.--
            (1) Calculation.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) Complaint process.--Any dispute regarding low-
        income data for private school students shall be 
        subject to the complaint process authorized in section 
        [9505]9503.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 1120A]SEC. 1120. FISCAL REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Maintenance of Effort.--A local educational agency may 
receive funds under this part for any fiscal year only if the 
State educational agency [involved] finds that the local 
educational agency has maintained the agency's fiscal effort in 
accordance with section 9521.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(c) Comparability of Services.--
            [(1) In general.--
                    [(A) Comparable services.--Except as 
                provided in paragraphs (4) and (5), a local 
                educational agency may receive funds under this 
                part only if State and local funds will be used 
                in schools served under this part to provide 
                services that, taken as a whole, are at least 
                comparable to services in schools that are not 
                receiving funds under this part.
                    [(B) Substantially comparable services.--If 
                the local educational agency is serving all of 
                such agency's schools under this part, such 
                agency may receive funds under this part only 
                if such agency will use State and local funds 
                to provide services that, taken as a whole, are 
                substantially comparable in each school.
                    [(C) Basis.--A local educational agency may 
                meet the requirements of subparagraphs (A) and 
                (B) on a grade-span by grade-span basis or a 
                school-by-school basis.
            [(2) Written assurance.--
                    [(A) Equivalence.--A local educational 
                agency shall be considered to have met the 
                requirements of paragraph (1) if such agency 
                has filed with the State educational agency a 
                written assurance that such agency has 
                established and implemented--
                            [(i) a local educational agency-
                        wide salary schedule;
                            [(ii) a policy to ensure 
                        equivalence among schools in teachers, 
                        administrators, and other staff; and
                            [(iii) a policy to ensure 
                        equivalence among schools in the 
                        provision of curriculum materials and 
                        instructional supplies.
                    [(B) Determinations.--For the purpose of 
                this subsection, in the determination of 
                expenditures per pupil from State and local 
                funds, or instructional salaries per pupil from 
                State and local funds, staff salary 
                differentials for years of employment shall not 
                be included in such determinations.
                    [(C) Exclusions.--A local educational 
                agency need not include unpredictable changes 
                in student enrollment or personnel assignments 
                that occur after the beginning of a school year 
                in determining comparability of services under 
                this subsection.
            [(3) Procedures and records.--Each local 
        educational agency assisted under this part shall--
                    [(A) develop procedures for compliance with 
                this subsection; and
                    [(B) maintain records that are updated 
                biennially documenting such agency's compliance 
                with this subsection.
            [(4) Inapplicability.--This subsection shall not 
        apply to a local educational agency that does not have 
        more than one building for each grade span.
            [(5) Compliance.--For the purpose of determining 
        compliance with paragraph (1), a local educational 
        agency may exclude State and local funds expended for--
                    [(A) language instruction educational 
                programs; and
                    [(B) the excess costs of providing services 
                to children with disabilities as determined by 
                the local educational agency.]
    (c) Comparability.--
            (1) In general.--
                    (A) Comparability.--Beginning for the 2015-
                2016 school year, a local educational agency 
                may receive funds under the program under this 
                subpart and subpart 2 only if the local 
                educational agency demonstrates to the State 
                educational agency that the combined State and 
                local per-pupil expenditures (including actual 
                personnel and actual nonpersonnel expenditures) 
                in each school served under this subpart, in 
                the most recent year for which such data were 
                available, are not less than the average 
                combined State and local per-pupil expenditures 
                for those schools that are not served under 
                this subpart.
                    (B) Alternative comparability.--If the 
                local educational agency is serving all of the 
                schools under its jurisdiction under this 
                subpart, the agency shall demonstrate to the 
                State educational agency that the average 
                combined State and local per-pupil expenditures 
                (including actual personnel and actual 
                nonpersonnel expenditures) for its high-poverty 
                schools, in the most recent year for which such 
                data are available, were not less than the 
                average combined State and local per-pupil 
                expenditures for its low-poverty schools.
                    (C) Basis.--A local educational agency may 
                meet the requirements of subparagraphs (A) and 
                (B) on a local educational agency-wide basis or 
                a grade-span by grade-span basis.
                    (D) Exclusion of funds.--
                            (i) In general.--For the purpose of 
                        complying with this paragraph, a local 
                        educational agency shall exclude any 
                        State or local funds expended in any 
                        school for--
                                    (I) excess costs of 
                                providing services to English 
                                learners;
                                    (II) excess costs of 
                                providing services to children 
                                with disabilities;
                                    (III) capital expenditures; 
                                and
                                    (IV) such other 
                                expenditures as the Secretary 
                                determines appropriate.
                            (ii) Changes after the beginning of 
                        the school year.--A local educational 
                        agency need not include unpredictable 
                        changes in student enrollment or 
                        personnel assignments that occur after 
                        the beginning of a school year in 
                        determining compliance under this 
                        subsection.
            (2) Documentation.--A local educational agency 
        shall demonstrate that it is meeting the requirements 
        of paragraph (1) by submitting to the State educational 
        agency the per-pupil expenditures, personnel 
        expenditures, nonpersonnel expenditures, and total 
        expenditures for each school served by the local 
        educational agency.
            (3) Inapplicability.--This subsection shall not 
        apply to a local educational agency that does not have 
        more than 1 building for each grade span.
            (4) Process and procedures.--
                    (A) Local educational agency 
                responsibilities.--Each local educational 
                agency assisted under the program under this 
                subpart and subpart 2 shall, by October 31, 
                2016, report to the State educational agency on 
                its compliance with the requirements of this 
                subsection for the preceding school year, 
                including a listing, by school, of actual 
                combined per-pupil State and local personnel 
                and nonpersonnel expenditures.
                    (B) State educational agency 
                responsibilities.--Each State educational 
                agency assisted under the program under this 
                subpart and subpart 2 shall ensure that such 
                information is made publicly available by the 
                State or the local educational agency, 
                including the school-by-school listing 
                described in subparagraph (A).
                    (C) Plan.--A local educational agency that 
                does not meet the requirements of this 
                subsection in any year shall develop and 
                implement a plan to ensure compliance for the 
                subsequent school year and may be required by 
                the State educational agency to report on its 
                progress in implementing such plan.
            (5) Transition provisions.--
                    (A) School years preceding the 2015-2016 
                school year.--For school years preceding the 
                2015-2016 school year, a local educational 
                agency may receive funds under the program 
                under this subpart and subpart 2 only if the 
                local educational agency demonstrates to the 
                State educational agency that the local 
                educational agency meets the requirements of 
                section 1120A, as in effect on the day before 
                the date of enactment of the Strengthening 
                America's Schools Act of 2013.
                    (B) Transition between requirements.--The 
                Secretary shall take such steps as are 
                necessary to provide for the orderly transition 
                between the requirements under section 1120A, 
                as in effect on the day before the date of 
                enactment of the Strengthening America's 
                Schools Act of 2013, and the new requirements 
                under this section, as amended by such Act.
            (6) Rule of construction.--Nothing in this 
        subsection shall be construed to require a local 
        educational agency to transfer school personnel in 
        order to comply with this subsection.
            (7) Comparable requirements.--In the case of a 
        State, State educational agency, or local educational 
        agency that has, before the date of enactment of the 
        Strengthening America's Schools Act of 2013, enacted 
        requirements relating to the comparability of 
        educational expenditures that differ from the 
        requirements of this subsection, the Secretary shall 
        allow the local educational agency to demonstrate 
        comparability of educational expenditures for purposes 
        of this subsection through the enacted requirements if 
        the Secretary determines that the enacted requirements 
        provide the same, or a higher, standard of 
        comparability for schools served under this subpart as 
        required by this subsection.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[[SEC. 1120B]SEC. 1120A. COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

    [(a) In General.--Each local educational agency receiving 
assistance under this part shall carry out the activities 
described in subsection (b) with Head Start agencies and, if 
feasible, other entities carrying out early childhood 
development programs such as the Early Reading First program.
    [(b) Activities.--The activities referred to in subsection 
(a) are activities that increase coordination between the local 
educational agency and a Head Start agency and, if feasible, 
other entities carrying out early childhood development 
programs, such as the Early Reading First program, serving 
children who will attend the schools of the local educational 
agency, including--
            [(1) developing and implementing a systematic 
        procedure for receiving records regarding such 
        children, transferred with parental consent from a Head 
        Start program or, where applicable, another early 
        childhood development program such as the Early Reading 
        First program;
            [(2) establishing channels of communication between 
        school staff and their counterparts (including 
        teachers, social workers, and health staff) in such 
        Head Start agencies or other entities carrying out 
        early childhood development programs such as the Early 
        Reading First program, as appropriate, to facilitate 
        coordination of programs;
            [(3) conducting meetings involving parents, 
        kindergarten or elementary school teachers, and Head 
        Start teachers or, if appropriate, teachers from other 
        early childhood development programs such as the Early 
        Reading First program, to discuss the developmental and 
        other needs of individual children;
            [(4) organizing and participating in joint 
        transition-related training of school staff, Head Start 
        program staff, Early Reading First program staff, and, 
        where appropriate, other early childhood development 
        program staff; and
            [(5) linking the educational services provided by 
        such local educational agency with the services 
        provided by local Head Start agencies and entities 
        carrying out Early Reading First programs.
    [(c) Coordination of Regulations.--The Secretary shall work 
with the Secretary of Health and Human Services to coordinate 
regulations promulgated under this part with regulations 
promulgated under the Head Start Act.]

SEC. 1120A. COORDINATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) In General.--Each local educational agency receiving 
assistance under the program under this subpart and subpart 2 
shall carry out the activities described in subsection (b) with 
Head Start agencies (consistent with section 642(e)(5) of the 
Head Start Act (42 U.S.C. 9837(e)(5)), providers of services 
under part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education 
Act, programs carried out under section 619 of such Act, and, 
if feasible, other entities carrying out high-quality early 
childhood education programs and services.
    (b) Activities.--The activities and services referred to in 
subsection (a) include--
            (1) developing and implementing a systematic 
        procedure for transferring, with parental consent, 
        early childhood program records for each participating 
        child to the school in which such child will enroll;
            (2) establishing ongoing communication between 
        early childhood program staff and their counterparts in 
        the schools (including teachers, principals, social 
        workers, local educational agency liaisons designated 
        under section 722(g)(1)(J)(ii) of the McKinney-Vento 
        Homeless Assistance Act, and health staff) to 
        facilitate the coordination and alignment of programs;
            (3) establishing ongoing communications between the 
        early childhood program and the local educational 
        agency for developing continuity of developmentally 
        appropriate instructional programs and shared 
        expectations for children's learning and development as 
        children transition to school;
            (4) organizing and participating in joint training, 
        including transition-related training for school staff 
        and early childhood programs;
            (5) establishing comprehensive transition policies 
        and procedures that support the school readiness of 
        children transitioning to school;
            (6) conducting outreach to parents, families, and 
        elementary school teachers to discuss the educational, 
        developmental, and other needs of children entering 
        school;
            (7) helping parents of children who are English 
        learners understand--
                    (A) the instructional and other services 
                provided by the school in which such child will 
                enroll after participation in a Head Start 
                program or other Federal early childhood care 
                and education program; and
                    (B) as appropriate, the information 
                provided to parents of English learners under 
                section 3202;
            (8) helping parents understand the instructional 
        and other services provided by the school in which 
        their child will enroll after participation in a Head 
        Start program or other Federal early childhood care and 
        education program; and
            (9) developing and implementing a system to 
        increase program participation of underserved 
        populations of eligible children, especially children 
        eligible for a free or reduced price lunch under the 
        Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 
        1751 et seq.), parents of children who are English 
        learners, and parents of children with disabilities.

SEC. 1121. GRANTS FOR THE OUTLYING AREAS AND THE SECRETARY OF THE 
                    INTERIOR.

    (a) Reservation of Funds.--From the amount appropriated for 
payments to States for any fiscal year under [section 1002(a) 
and 1125A(f)]paragraphs (1) and (3) of section 3(a), the 
Secretary shall reserve a total of 1 percent to provide 
assistance to--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Assistance to Outlying Areas.--
            (1) Funds reserved.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Limitation for competitive grants.--
                    (A) Competitive grants.--The Secretary 
                shall use funds described in paragraph (2) to 
                award grants to the outlying areas [and freely 
                associated States] to carry out the purposes of 
                this part.
                    (B) Award basis.--* * *
                    (C) Uses.--* * *
                            (i) * * *
                            (ii) to provide direct educational 
                        services that assist all students with 
                        meeting [challenging State academic 
                        content standards]college and career 
                        ready State academic content standards 
                        under section 1111(a)(1).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(c) Definitions.--For the purpose of subsections (a) and 
(b)--
            [(1) the term ``freely associated states'' means 
        the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated 
        States of Micronesia, and the Republic of Palau; and
            [(2) the term ``outlying area'' means the United 
        States Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the 
        Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.]
    (c) Definition of Outlying Area.--As used in subsections 
(a) and (b), the term ``outlying area'' has the meaning given 
that term in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of section 9101(44).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1122. ALLOCATIONS TO STATES.

    (a) Allocation Formula.--Of the amount appropriated under 
[section 1002(a) to carry out this part for each of fiscal 
years 2002-2007]section 3(a)(1) to carry out this part for each 
of fiscal years 2014 through 2019 (referred to in this 
subsection as the current fiscal year)--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1125A. EDUCATION FINANCE INCENTIVE GRANT PROGRAM.

    (a) Grants.--From funds appropriated under [subsection 
(f)]section 3(a)(3), the Secretary is authorized to make grants 
to States, from allotments under subsection (b), to carry out 
the programs and activities of this part.
    (b) Distribution Based Upon Fiscal Effort and Equity.--
            (1) In general.--
                    (A) In general.--Except as provided in 
                subparagraph (B), funds appropriated pursuant 
                to [subsection (f)]section 3(a)(3) shall be 
                allotted to each State based upon the number of 
                children counted under section 1124(c) in such 
                State multiplied by the product of--
                            (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    [(f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this section such sums as may 
be necessary for fiscal year 2002 and for each of the 5 
succeeding fiscal years.]
    [(g)](f) Adjustments Where Necessitated by 
Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1127. CARRYOVER AND WAIVER.

    (a) Limitation on Carryover.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    Subpart 3--Blue Ribbon Schools; Centers of Excellence in Early 
                    Childhood; Green Ribbon Schools

SEC. 1131. BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS.

    (a) Program Purpose.--It is the purpose of this section to 
assist States and local educational agencies in identifying and 
rewarding high-performing public schools.
    (b) Blue Ribbon Schools.--
            (1) Identification of blue ribbon schools.--Each 
        State receiving a grant under the program under subpart 
        1 and subpart 2 may--
                    (A) define the category of blue ribbon 
                schools, consistent with paragraph (2), for the 
                State as part of its State plan in section 
                1111(b); and
                    (B) identify, for each school year, the 
                schools in the State that are blue ribbon 
                schools for such year.
            (2) Blue ribbon school criteria.--
                    (A) In general.--If a State elects to carry 
                out this subsection, the State's blue ribbon 
                schools shall consist of the highest 5 percent 
                of the State's public elementary schools and 
                secondary schools, as designated by the State 
                based on--
                            (i) the percentage of proficient or 
                        advanced students, as determined under 
                        section 1111(a)(3)(B)(ii)(I), in 
                        English or language arts, and 
                        mathematics;
                            (ii) in the case of high schools, 
                        the school's graduation rates;
                            (iii) the performance of each 
                        category of students described in 
                        section 1111(a)(3)(D);
                            (iv) the percentage of students who 
                        are meeting or exceeding the State 
                        student academic achievement standards 
                        or are achieving sufficient academic 
                        growth as described in section 
                        1111(a)(3)(B)(iii); and
                            (v) school gains.
                    (B) Noneligibility for blue ribbon 
                status.--A school identified under subsection 
                (c) or (d) of section 1116 for a year shall not 
                be eligible for blue ribbon school status for 
                the same year.
    (c) Rewards.--
            (1) In general.--Each State that defines and 
        identifies blue ribbon schools under subsection (b)(1) 
        for a school year may--
                    (A) provide each blue ribbon school in the 
                State with increased autonomy over the school's 
                budget, staffing, and time;
                    (B) allow each blue ribbon school to have 
                flexibility in the use of any funds provided to 
                the school under this Act for any purpose 
                allowed under this Act (notwithstanding any 
                other provision of this Act), as long as such 
                use is consistent with the Civil Rights Act of 
                1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000a et seq.), title IX of the 
                Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681 et 
                seq.), section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 
                1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), the Americans with 
                Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et 
                seq.), and part B of the Individuals with 
                Disabilities Education Act; and
                    (C) reserve not more than .5 percent of the 
                funds allotted to the State under subpart 2 and 
                use such reserved amounts to distribute 
                rewards, on a competitive basis, to local 
                educational agencies that serve 1 or more blue 
                ribbon schools identified under subsection (b) 
                that receive funds under subpart 2 to enable 
                the local educational agencies to provide 
                awards to such blue ribbon schools that receive 
                funds under such subpart.
            (2) Use of rewards.--As a condition of receiving an 
        award from a local educational agency under this 
        subsection, a blue ribbon school shall agree to use the 
        award funds to--
                    (A) improve student achievement; and
                    (B) provide technical assistance to the 
                lowest-achieving schools in the closest 
                geographic region of the State to the blue 
                ribbon school, in accordance with the State 
                plan under section 1111(b)(1)(E).

SEC. 1132. CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD.

    (a) Definition of Eligible Early Childhood Education 
Program.--In this section, the term ``eligible early childhood 
education program'' means an early childhood education program 
that--
            (1) serves young children from households that 
        would be eligible to receive a free or reduced price 
        lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School 
        Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.); and
            (2) is nominated, by the Governor of the State in 
        which the program is located and through a competitive 
        selection process, to be a center of excellence in 
        early childhood under this section.
    (b) Program Authorized.--
            (1) In general.--The Secretary of Education, acting 
        jointly with the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
        as provided in paragraph (2), shall, subject to the 
        availability of funds under section 3(a)(4), establish 
        a program under which the Secretary shall--
                    (A) designate exemplary eligible early 
                childhood education programs as centers of 
                excellence in early childhood for the purposes 
                of sharing best practices among early childhood 
                education programs and to support or recognize 
                the centers of excellence to improve the 
                quality of care in programs in their local 
                region; and
                    (B) award bonus grants to each center of 
                excellence in early childhood, to enable the 
                center to carry out the activities described in 
                subsection (e).
            (2) Federal administration.--
                    (A) In general.--With respect to this 
                section, the Secretary shall bear 
                responsibility for obligating and disbursing 
                funds and ensuring compliance with applicable 
                laws and administrative requirements, subject 
                to subparagraph (B).
                    (B) Interagency agreement.--The Secretary 
                of Education and the Secretary of Health and 
                Human Services shall jointly administer 
                activities supported under this section on such 
                terms as the Secretaries shall set forth in an 
                interagency agreement.
    (c) Application.--
            (1) In general.--In order to be eligible to be 
        designated as a center of excellence in early childhood 
        under subsection (b), an eligible early childhood 
        education program shall submit an application to the 
        Secretary at such time, in such manner, and containing 
        such information as the Secretary may require.
            (2) Contents.--At a minimum, the application shall 
        include--
                    (A) evidence that the eligible early 
                childhood education program has significantly 
                improved the school readiness, as determined by 
                the Secretaries, of young children who have 
                participated in the program;
                    (B) evidence that the eligible early 
                childhood education program demonstrates 
                improved child outcomes across all the 
                essential domains of school readiness;
                    (C) evidence that the eligible early 
                childhood education program has high staff 
                qualifications that are designed to promote the 
                social, emotional, physical, and cognitive 
                development of children;
                    (D) an assurance that the eligible early 
                childhood education program will develop a 
                collaborative partnership with other providers 
                of early childhood education in the local 
                community involved to conduct activities under 
                subsection (e);
                    (E) a nomination letter, from the Governor 
                of the State in which the eligible early 
                childhood education program is located, 
                demonstrating the eligible early childhood 
                education program's ability to--
                            (i) provide the coordination, 
                        transition, and training services of 
                        the activities proposed to be carried 
                        out under the bonus grant, including 
                        the coordination of such activities 
                        with State and local agencies that 
                        provide early childhood education and 
                        development to young children and 
                        families in the community served by the 
                        eligible early childhood education 
                        program; and
                            (ii) carry out the activities 
                        described in subsection (e)(1); and
                    (F) a description of how the early 
                childhood program, in order to expand 
                accessibility and continuity of quality early 
                childhood education and development services 
                and programs, will coordinate activities under 
                subsection (e) with--
                            (i) programs serving children 
                        assisted under the Child Care and 
                        Development Block Grant Act of 1990 (42 
                        U.S.C. 9858 et seq.);
                            (ii) the temporary assistance for 
                        needy families program funded under 
                        part A of title IV of the Social 
                        Security Act (42 U.S.C. 601 et seq.);
                            (iii) the block grants to States 
                        for social services program funded 
                        under subtitle A of title XX of the 
                        Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1397 et 
                        seq.);
                            (iv) child care programs supported 
                        directly through the Community Services 
                        Block Grant;
                            (v) the Head Start and Early Head 
                        Start programs carried out under the 
                        Head Start Act;
                            (vi) programs supported by grants 
                        under part I of title IV;
                            (vii) other preschool programs 
                        supported under this title;
                            (viii) programs carried out under 
                        section 619 and part C of the 
                        Individuals with Disabilities Education 
                        Act;
                            (ix) State prekindergarten 
                        programs;
                            (x) programs that support parent 
                        and family engagement, including 
                        programs funded under section 1118 or, 
                        if applicable, grantees supported 
                        through parent and family information 
                        and resource center grants under part H 
                        of title IV; and
                            (xi) other programs of early 
                        childhood education and development; 
                        and
                    (G) a description of how the early 
                childhood education program, if selected as a 
                center for excellence in early childhood, will 
                work with the local educational agency of the 
                area in which the program is located, to--
                            (i) provide for effective 
                        transitions between the program and 
                        elementary schools; and
                            (ii) facilitate ongoing 
                        communication between the program and 
                        elementary school teachers concerning 
                        young children participating in the 
                        program to improve the teachers' 
                        ability to work effectively with low-
                        income, at-risk young children and 
                        their families.
    (d) Designation and Bonus Grants.--
            (1) In general.--For each 5-year term described in 
        paragraph (2), the Secretary shall--
                    (A) select and designate, as centers of 
                excellence in early childhood, not less than 1 
                early childhood education program from each of 
                the several States of the United States, the 
                District of Columbia, Commonwealth of Puerto 
                Rico, and each of the outlying areas from which 
                the Secretary has received applications; and
                    (B) award each center of excellence in 
                early childhood a bonus grant for the 5-year 
                term, subject to paragraph (2)(B).
            (2) Term of designation.--
                    (A) In general.--Subject to subparagraph 
                (B), the Secretary shall designate each early 
                childhood education program as a center of 
                excellence in early childhood under paragraph 
                (1) for a 5-year term. During the period of 
                that designation, the program shall receive a 
                bonus grant under this subsection.
                    (B) Revocation.--The Secretary may revoke a 
                program's grant and designation under 
                subparagraph (A) if the Secretary determines 
                that the program has not made substantial 
                progress in meeting the goals and objectives of 
                the grant.
            (3) Bonus grant amount.--
                    (A) Minimum amount of bonus grant.--Subject 
                to the availability of appropriations, each 
                bonus grant awarded under this subsection shall 
                be in an amount of not less than $200,000 per 
                year.
                    (B) Priority for increased bonus grant 
                funding.--In determining the amount of the 
                bonus grant for a center of excellence in early 
                childhood under this section, and subject to 
                the requirements of subparagraph (A), the 
                Secretary--
                            (i) shall give priority to centers 
                        that, through their applications, 
                        demonstrate that their programs are of 
                        exceptional quality and would serve as 
                        exemplary models for programs in the 
                        same geographic region; and
                            (ii) may give consideration to--
                                    (I) the populations served 
                                by the centers, such as centers 
                                that serve large proportions of 
                                young children who are English 
                                learners, children who are 
                                infants or toddlers with 
                                disabilities, as defined in 
                                section 632 of the Individuals 
                                with Disabilities Education 
                                Act, children with disabilities 
                                who are eligible for services 
                                under section 619 of such Act, 
                                homeless children, foster 
                                children, or children who 
                                receive child protective 
                                services, or young children of 
                                other underserved populations; 
                                and
                                    (II) centers that do an 
                                exceptional job meeting the 
                                needs of young children in such 
                                populations.
    (e) Use of Bonus Grant Funds.--A center of excellence in 
early childhood that receives a bonus grant under subsection 
(d) shall--
            (1) use not less than 15 percent of the funds made 
        available through the grant to disseminate to other 
        early childhood education programs in the State 
        involved (including to early childhood education 
        programs who serve young children who live on tribal 
        lands or come from families who engage in seasonal or 
        migrant work), best practices for achieving early 
        academic success, including best practices for--
                    (A) achieving school readiness, including 
                developing early literacy and mathematics 
                skills;
                    (B) achieving the acquisition of the 
                English language for English learners, if 
                appropriate to the population served;
                    (C) providing high-quality comprehensive 
                services, if applicable, for participating 
                young children and their families; and
                    (D) facilitating the social and emotional 
                development of children and young children; and
            (2) use the remainder of such funds for not less 
        than 2 of the following activities:
                    (A) In the case of a center of excellence 
                that is a Head Start program, providing Head 
                Start services to additional eligible young 
                children.
                    (B) Extending the services of the center of 
                excellence to provide full-day, full-week, or 
                full-year care to young children served by the 
                program, if appropriate to better meet the 
                needs of working families in the community 
                served by the center.
                    (C) Further coordinating early childhood 
                education programs and services and social 
                services available in the community served by 
                the center for at-risk young children, their 
                families, and pregnant women.
                    (D) Providing professional development for 
                program instructional and support staff, 
                including joint training for with child care 
                providers, public preschool and elementary 
                school teachers and school leaders, and other 
                providers of early childhood education and 
                development programs.
                    (E) Developing or maintaining partnerships 
                with institutions of higher education and 
                nonprofit organizations, including community-
                based organizations, that recruit, train, 
                place, and support postsecondary education 
                students to serve as mentors and reading 
                partners to preschool children in centers that 
                serve such children.
                    (F) Carrying out other activities 
                determined by the center to improve the overall 
                quality of the center's early childhood 
                education program and for which there is 
                evidence that the activities will lead to 
                improved safety, development, well-being, or 
                school readiness of the young children served 
                by the program.
                    (G) Sharing best practices concerning the 
                transition of children into elementary school.
    (f) Reports to the Secretary.--Each center of excellence in 
early childhood that receives bonus grant funds under this 
section shall submit an annual report to the Secretary, at such 
time and in such manner as the Secretary may require, that 
contains a description of the activities the center carried out 
with funds received under this section, including a description 
of how such funds improved services for young children and 
families.
    (g) Research and Technical Assistance.--From the funds made 
available to carry out this section, the Secretary may reserve 
not more than 1 percent of such funds to carry out the 
following activities:
            (1) Supporting a research collaborative among the 
        Institute of Education Sciences, the National Institute 
        of Child Health and Human Development, the Office of 
        Planning, Research, and Evaluation within the 
        Administration for Children and Families of the 
        Department of Health and Human Services, and, as 
        appropriate, other Federal entities, to support 
        research on early learning that can inform improved 
        State and other standards and licensing requirements 
        and improved outcomes for young children, which 
        collaborative shall--
                    (A) biennially prepare and publish for 
                public comment a detailed research plan;
                    (B) support early learning research 
                activities that could include determining--
                            (i) the characteristics of early 
                        learning programs that produce positive 
                        developmental outcomes for young 
                        children;
                            (ii) the effects of program quality 
                        standards on child outcomes;
                            (iii) the relationships between 
                        specific interventions and types of 
                        child and family outcomes;
                            (iv) the effectiveness of early 
                        learning provider training in raising 
                        program quality and improving child 
                        outcomes;
                            (v) the effectiveness of 
                        professional development strategies in 
                        raising program quality and improving 
                        child outcomes; and
                            (vi) how to improve the school 
                        readiness outcomes of young children 
                        who are English learners, children with 
                        special needs, and homeless children, 
                        including evaluation of professional 
                        development programs for working with 
                        such children; and
                    (C) disseminate relevant research findings 
                and best practices.
            (2) Evaluating barriers to improving the quality of 
        early learning programs serving low-income young 
        children, including evaluating barriers to successful 
        interagency collaboration and coordination, by 
        conducting a review of the statewide strategic reports 
        developed by State Advisory Councils on Early Childhood 
        Education and Care and other relevant reports, 
        reporting the findings of such review to Congress, and 
        disseminating relevant research findings and best 
        practices.

SEC. 1133. GREEN RIBBON SCHOOLS.

    The Secretary is authorized to identify and recognize 
exemplary schools, programs, and individuals. Such recognitions 
may include--
            (1) a Green Ribbon Schools program, such as the 
        Green Ribbons School program carried out by the 
        Secretary under section 5411(b)(5) as of the day before 
        the date of enactment of the Strengthening America's 
        Schools Act of 2013, that recognizes excellence in 
        reducing environmental impact, increasing health and 
        wellness, and providing sustainability education; and
            (2) an award program recognizing excellence 
        exhibited by classified school employees in the public 
        school system.

     Subpart 4--Grants for State Assessments and Related Activities

SEC. 1141. GRANTS FOR STATE ASSESSMENTS AND RELATED ACTIVITIES.

    (a) Grants for State Assessments.--From amounts made 
available under subsection (c)(1) to carry out this subsection, 
the Secretary shall make grants to States--
            (1) to enable States to pay the costs of 
        developing, improving, or administering State 
        assessments and standards consistent with section 
        1111(a), which may include the cost of working in 
        voluntary partnerships with other States, at the sole 
        discretion of each such State; and
            (2) in the case of States that have developed the 
        assessments and standards consistent with the 
        requirements of section 1111(a), to enable each such 
        State--
                    (A) to administer such assessments; or
                    (B) to carry out other activities described 
                in this section, which may include--
                            (i) developing college and career 
                        ready State academic content and 
                        student academic achievement standards 
                        and aligned assessments in academic 
                        subjects for which standards and 
                        assessments are not required under 
                        section 1111(a);
                            (ii) developing or improving 
                        assessments of English language 
                        proficiency necessary to comply with 
                        section 1111(a)(2)(D);
                            (iii) developing multiple measures 
                        of student academic achievement, 
                        including measures that assess higher-
                        order thinking skills and 
                        understanding, and elicit complex 
                        student demonstrations or applications 
                        of knowledge and skills to increase the 
                        reliability and validity of State 
                        assessment systems;
                            (iv) developing, enhancing, or 
                        administering, in publicly funded early 
                        childhood education programs and 
                        elementary schools, early learning 
                        assessments (including accommodations 
                        to provide access for young children 
                        with disabilities) to improve 
                        instruction for young children;
                            (v) strengthening the capacity of 
                        local educational agencies and schools 
                        to provide all students with the 
                        opportunity to increase educational 
                        achievement, including carrying out 
                        professional development activities 
                        aligned with State student academic 
                        achievement standards and assessments;
                            (vi) expanding the range, and 
                        improving the quality, of 
                        accommodations available to English 
                        learners and students with disabilities 
                        to improve the use of such 
                        accommodations, including professional 
                        development activities;
                            (vii) improving the dissemination 
                        of information about student 
                        achievement and school performance to 
                        parents and families, including the 
                        development of information and 
                        reporting systems designed to--
                                    (I) identify best 
                                educational practices based on 
                                scientifically valid research; 
                                or
                                    (II) assist in linking 
                                records of student achievement, 
                                length of enrollment, and 
                                graduation over time;
                            (viii) providing instructional 
                        supports, which may include formative 
                        assessments;
                            (ix) developing computer adaptive 
                        assessments that meet the requirements 
                        of section 1111(a);
                            (x) developing alternate 
                        assessments, as described in section 
                        1111(a)(2)(E), aligned to alternate 
                        achievement standards; and
                            (xi) providing professional 
                        development to local educational agency 
                        staff to transition between assessment 
                        systems, including technology for that 
                        purpose.
    (b) Grants for Enhanced Assessment Systems.--
            (1) Grant program authorized.--From amounts made 
        available under subsection (c)(3) to carry out this 
        subsection, the Secretary shall award, on a competitive 
        basis, grants to State educational agencies to enable 
        the State educational agencies to carry out the 
        activities described in paragraph (3).
            (2) Application.--Each State educational agency 
        desiring to receive a grant under this section shall 
        submit an application to the Secretary at such time, in 
        such manner, and accompanied by such information as the 
        Secretary may require.
            (3) Authorized activities.--Each State educational 
        agency that receives a grant under this section shall 
        use the grant funds to--
                    (A) enable States, or a consortia of 
                States, to collaborate with institutions of 
                higher education or other organizations or 
                agencies to improve the quality, validity, and 
                reliability of State academic assessments 
                beyond the requirements for such assessments 
                described in section 1111(a)(2);
                    (B) measure student academic achievement 
                using multiple measures of student academic 
                achievement from multiple sources, including 
                measures that assess higher-order thinking 
                skills and understanding;
                    (C) chart student progress over time; or
                    (D) evaluate student academic achievement 
                through the development of comprehensive 
                academic assessment instruments.
    (c) Allotment of Appropriated Funds.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph 
        (2), for each fiscal year, the Secretary shall use the 
        amount of funds made available for this section for 
        such year or $400,000,000 of such funds, whichever is 
        less, to--
                    (A) reserve one-half of 1 percent for the 
                Bureau of Indian Education;
                    (B) reserve one-half of 1 percent for the 
                outlying areas; and
                    (C) from the amounts remaining after the 
                application of subparagraphs (A) and (B), 
                allocate to each State, for the purposes of 
                carrying out the activities under subsection 
                (a), an amount equal to--
                            (i) $3,000,000; and
                            (ii) with respect to any amounts 
                        remaining after the allocation is made 
                        under clause (i), an amount that bears 
                        the same relationship to such total 
                        remaining amounts as the number of 
                        students ages 5 through 17 in the State 
                        (as determined by the Secretary on the 
                        basis of the most recent satisfactory 
                        data) bears to the total number of such 
                        students in all States.
            (2) Special rule for fiscal year 2014.--For fiscal 
        year 2014, the Secretary shall use not less than 
        $800,000,000 or, if a lesser amount is made available 
        for this section for such year, such entire lesser 
        amount, to carry out the requirements of paragraph (1).
            (3) Remainder.--Any amounts remaining for a fiscal 
        year after the Secretary carries out paragraph (1) 
        shall be made available to award funds to States under 
        subsection (b) according to the quality, needs, and 
        scope of the State application under this section. In 
        determining the grant amount, the Secretary shall 
        ensure that a State's grant shall include an amount 
        that bears the same relationship to the total funds 
        available under this paragraph for the fiscal year as 
        the number of students ages 5 through 17 in the State 
        (as determined by the Secretary on the basis of the 
        most recent satisfactory data) bears to the total 
        number of such students in all States.
            (4) Definition of state.--In this section, the term 
        ``State'' means each of the 50 States, the District of 
        Columbia, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

          [PART B--STUDENT READING SKILLS IMPROVEMENT GRANTS]

                       [Subpart 1--Reading First

[SEC. 1201. PURPOSES.

    [The purposes of this subpart are as follows:
            [(1) To provide assistance to State educational 
        agencies and local educational agencies in establishing 
        reading programs for students in kindergarten through 
        grade 3 that are based on scientifically based reading 
        research, to ensure that every student can read at 
        grade level or above not later than the end of grade 3.
            [(2) To provide assistance to State educational 
        agencies and local educational agencies in preparing 
        teachers, including special education teachers, through 
        professional development and other support, so the 
        teachers can identify specific reading barriers facing 
        their students and so the teachers have the tools to 
        effectively help their students learn to read.
            [(3) To provide assistance to State educational 
        agencies and local educational agencies in selecting or 
        administering screening, diagnostic, and classroom-
        based instructional reading assessments.
            [(4) To provide assistance to State educational 
        agencies and local educational agencies in selecting or 
        developing effective instructional materials (including 
        classroom-based materials to assist teachers in 
        implementing the essential components of reading 
        instruction), programs, learning systems, and 
        strategies to implement methods that have been proven 
        to prevent or remediate reading failure within a State.
            [(5) To strengthen coordination among schools, 
        early literacy programs, and family literacy programs 
        to improve reading achievement for all children.

[SEC. 1202. FORMULA GRANTS TO STATE EDUCATIONAL AGENCIES.

    [(a) In General.--
            [(1) Authorization to make grants.--In the case of 
        each State educational agency that in accordance with 
        section 1203 submits to the Secretary an application 
        for a 6-year period, the Secretary, from amounts 
        appropriated under section 1002(b)(1) and subject to 
        the application's approval, shall make a grant to the 
        State educational agency for the uses specified in 
        subsections (c) and (d). For each fiscal year, the 
        funds provided under the grant shall equal the 
        allotment determined for the State educational agency 
        under subsection (b).
            [(2) Duration of grants.--Subject to subsection 
        (e)(3), a grant under this section shall be awarded for 
        a period of not more than 6 years.
    [(b) Determination of Amount of Allotments.--
            [(1) Reservations from appropriations.--From the 
        total amount made available to carry out this subpart 
        for a fiscal year, the Secretary--
                    [(A) shall reserve one-half of 1 percent 
                for allotments for the United States Virgin 
                Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the 
                Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, 
                to be distributed among these outlying areas on 
                the basis of their relative need, as determined 
                by the Secretary in accordance with the 
                purposes of this subpart;
                    [(B) shall reserve one-half of 1 percent 
                for the Secretary of the Interior for programs 
                under this subpart in schools operated or 
                funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs;
                    [(C) may reserve not more than 2\1/2\ 
                percent or $25,000,000, whichever is less, to 
                carry out section 1205 (relating to external 
                evaluation) and section 1206 (relating to 
                national activities);
                    [(D) shall reserve $5,000,000 to carry out 
                sections 1207 and 1224 (relating to information 
                dissemination); and
                    [(E) for any fiscal year, beginning with 
                fiscal year 2004, for which the amount 
                appropriated to carry out this subpart exceeds 
                the amount appropriated for fiscal year 2003, 
                shall reserve, to carry out section 1204, the 
                lesser of--
                            [(i) $90,000,000; or
                            [(ii) 10 percent of such excess 
                        amount.
            [(2) State allotments.--In accordance with 
        paragraph (3), the Secretary shall allot among each of 
        the States the total amount made available to carry out 
        this subpart for any fiscal year and not reserved under 
        paragraph (1).
            [(3) Determination of state allotment amounts.--
                    [(A) In general.--Subject to subparagraph 
                (B), the Secretary shall allot the amount made 
                available under paragraph (2) for a fiscal year 
                among the States in proportion to the number of 
                children, aged 5 to 17, who reside within the 
                State and are from families with incomes below 
                the poverty line for the most recent fiscal 
                year for which satisfactory data are available, 
                compared to the number of such individuals who 
                reside in all such States for that fiscal year.
                    [(B) Exceptions.--
                            [(i) Minimum grant amount.--Subject 
                        to clause (ii), no State receiving an 
                        allotment under subparagraph (A) may 
                        receive less than one-fourth of 1 
                        percent of the total amount allotted 
                        under such subparagraph.
                            [(ii) Puerto rico.--The percentage 
                        of the amount allotted under 
                        subparagraph (A) that is allotted to 
                        the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a 
                        fiscal year may not exceed the 
                        percentage that was received by the 
                        Commonwealth of Puerto Rico of the 
                        funds allocated to all States under 
                        subpart 2 of part A for the preceding 
                        fiscal year.
            [(4) Distribution of subgrants.--The Secretary may 
        make a grant to a State educational agency only if the 
        State educational agency agrees to expend at least 80 
        percent of the amount of the funds provided under the 
        grant for the purpose of making, in accordance with 
        subsection (c), competitive subgrants to eligible local 
        educational agencies.
            [(5) Reallotment.--If a State educational agency 
        described in paragraph (2) does not apply for an 
        allotment under this section for any fiscal year, or if 
        the State educational agency's application is not 
        approved, the Secretary shall reallot such amount to 
        the remaining State educational agencies in accordance 
        with paragraph (3).
            [(6) Definition of state.--For purposes of this 
        subsection, the term ``State'' means each of the 50 
        States, the District of Columbia, and the Commonwealth 
        of Puerto Rico.
    [(c) Subgrants to Local Educational Agencies.--
            [(1) Authorization to make subgrants.--In 
        accordance with paragraph (2), a State educational 
        agency that receives a grant under this section shall 
        make competitive subgrants to eligible local 
        educational agencies.
            [(2) Allocation.--
                    [(A) Minimum subgrant amount.--In making 
                subgrants under paragraph (1), a State 
                educational agency shall allocate to each 
                eligible local educational agency that receives 
                such a subgrant, at a minimum, an amount that 
                bears the same relation to the funds made 
                available under subsection (b)(4) as the amount 
                the eligible local educational agency received 
                under part A for the preceding fiscal year 
                bears to the amount all the local educational 
                agencies in the State received under part A for 
                the preceding fiscal year.
                    [(B) Priority.--In making subgrants under 
                paragraph (1), a State educational agency shall 
                give priority to eligible local educational 
                agencies in which at least--
                            [(i) 15 percent of the children 
                        served by the eligible local 
                        educational agency are from families 
                        with incomes below the poverty line; or
                            [(ii) 6,500 children served by the 
                        eligible local educational agency are 
                        from families with incomes below the 
                        poverty line.
            [(3) Notice.--A State educational agency receiving 
        a grant under this section shall provide notice to all 
        eligible local educational agencies in the State of the 
        availability of competitive subgrants under this 
        subsection and of the requirements for applying for the 
        subgrants.
            [(4) Local application.--To be eligible to receive 
        a subgrant under this subsection, an eligible local 
        educational agency shall submit an application to the 
        State educational agency at such time, in such manner, 
        and containing such information as the State 
        educational agency may reasonably require.
            [(5) State requirement.--In distributing subgrant 
        funds to eligible local educational agencies under this 
        subsection, a State educational agency shall--
                    [(A) provide funds in sufficient size and 
                scope to enable the eligible local educational 
                agencies to improve reading instruction; and
                    [(B) provide the funds in amounts related 
                to the number or percentage of students in 
                kindergarten through grade 3 who are reading 
                below grade level.
            [(6) Limitation to certain schools.--In 
        distributing subgrant funds under this subsection, an 
        eligible local educational agency shall provide funds 
        only to schools that both--
                    [(A) are among the schools served by that 
                eligible local educational agency with the 
                highest percentages or numbers of students in 
                kindergarten through grade 3 reading below 
                grade level, based on the most currently 
                available data; and
                    [(B)(i) are identified for school 
                improvement under section 1116(b); or
                    [(ii) have the highest percentages or 
                numbers of children counted under section 
                1124(c).
            [(7) Local uses of funds.--
                    [(A) Required uses.--Subject to paragraph 
                (8), an eligible local educational agency that 
                receives a subgrant under this subsection shall 
                use the funds provided under the subgrant to 
                carry out the following activities:
                            [(i) Selecting and administering 
                        screening, diagnostic, and classroom-
                        based instructional reading 
                        assessments.
                            [(ii) Selecting and implementing a 
                        learning system or program of reading 
                        instruction based on scientifically 
                        based reading research that--
                                    [(I) includes the essential 
                                components of reading 
                                instruction; and
                                    [(II) provides such 
                                instruction to the children in 
                                kindergarten through grade 3 in 
                                the schools served by the 
                                eligible local educational 
                                agency, including children 
                                who--
                                            [(aa) may have 
                                        reading difficulties;
                                            [(bb) are at risk 
                                        of being referred to 
                                        special education based 
                                        on these difficulties;
                                            [(cc) have been 
                                        evaluated under section 
                                        614 of the Individuals 
                                        with Disabilities 
                                        Education Act but, in 
                                        accordance with section 
                                        614(b)(5) of that Act, 
                                        have not been 
                                        identified as being a 
                                        child with a disability 
                                        (as defined in section 
                                        602 of that Act);
                                            [(dd) are being 
                                        served under such Act 
                                        primarily due to being 
                                        identified as being a 
                                        child with a specific 
                                        learning disability (as 
                                        defined in section 602 
                                        of that Act) related to 
                                        reading;
                                            [(ee) are deficient 
                                        in the essential 
                                        components of reading 
                                        skills, as listed in 
                                        subparagraphs (A) 
                                        through (E) of section 
                                        1208(3); or
                                            [(ff) are 
                                        identified as having 
                                        limited English 
                                        proficiency.
                            [(iii) Procuring and implementing 
                        instructional materials, including 
                        education technology such as software 
                        and other digital curricula, that are 
                        based on scientifically based reading 
                        research.
                            [(iv) Providing professional 
                        development for teachers of 
                        kindergarten through grade 3, and 
                        special education teachers of 
                        kindergarten through grade 12, that--
                                    [(I) will prepare these 
                                teachers in all of the 
                                essential components of reading 
                                instruction;
                                    [(II) shall include--
                                            [(aa) information 
                                        on instructional 
                                        materials, programs, 
                                        strategies, and 
                                        approaches based on 
                                        scientifically based 
                                        reading research, 
                                        including early 
                                        intervention, classroom 
                                        reading materials, and 
                                        remedial programs and 
                                        approaches; and
                                            [(bb) instruction 
                                        in the use of 
                                        screening, diagnostic, 
                                        and classroom-based 
                                        instructional reading 
                                        assessments and other 
                                        procedures that 
                                        effectively identify 
                                        students who may be at 
                                        risk for reading 
                                        failure or who are 
                                        having difficulty 
                                        reading;
                                    [(III) shall be provided by 
                                eligible professional 
                                development providers; and
                                    [(IV) will assist teachers 
                                in becoming highly qualified in 
                                reading instruction in 
                                accordance with the 
                                requirements of section 1119.
                            [(v) Collecting and summarizing 
                        data--
                                    [(I) to document the 
                                effectiveness of activities 
                                carried out under this subpart 
                                in individual schools and in 
                                the local educational agency as 
                                a whole; and
                                    [(II) to stimulate and 
                                accelerate improvement by 
                                identifying the schools that 
                                produce significant gains in 
                                reading achievement.
                            [(vi) Reporting data for all 
                        students and categories of students 
                        described in section 
                        1111(b)(2)(C)(v)(II).
                            [(vii) Promoting reading and 
                        library programs that provide access to 
                        engaging reading material, including 
                        coordination with programs funded 
                        through grants received under subpart 
                        4, where applicable.
                    [(B) Additional uses.--Subject to paragraph 
                (8), an eligible local educational agency that 
                receives a subgrant under this subsection may 
                use the funds provided under the subgrant to 
                carry out the following activities:
                            [(i) Humanities-based family 
                        literacy programs (which may be 
                        referred to as ``Prime Time Family 
                        Reading Time'') that bond families 
                        around the acts of reading and using 
                        public libraries.
                            [(ii) Providing training in the 
                        essential components of reading 
                        instruction to a parent or other 
                        individual who volunteers to be a 
                        student's reading tutor, to enable such 
                        parent or individual to support 
                        instructional practices that are based 
                        on scientifically based reading 
                        research and are being used by the 
                        student's teacher.
                            [(iii) Assisting parents, through 
                        the use of materials and reading 
                        programs, strategies, and approaches 
                        (including family literacy services) 
                        that are based on scientifically based 
                        reading research, to encourage reading 
                        and support their child's reading 
                        development.
            [(8) Local planning and administration.--An 
        eligible local educational agency that receives a 
        subgrant under this subsection may use not more than 
        3.5 percent of the funds provided under the subgrant 
        for planning and administration.
    [(d) State Uses of Funds.--
            [(1) In general.--A State educational agency that 
        receives a grant under this section may expend not more 
        than a total of 20 percent of the grant funds to carry 
        out the activities described in paragraphs (3), (4), 
        and (5).
            [(2) Priority.--A State educational agency shall 
        give priority to carrying out the activities described 
        in paragraphs (3), (4), and (5) for schools described 
        in subsection (c)(6).
            [(3) Professional inservice and preservice 
        development and review.--A State educational agency may 
        expend not more than 65 percent of the amount of the 
        funds made available under paragraph (1)--
                    [(A) to develop and implement a program of 
                professional development for teachers, 
                including special education teachers, of 
                kindergarten through grade 3 that--
                            [(i) will prepare these teachers in 
                        all the essential components of reading 
                        instruction;
                            [(ii) shall include--
                                    [(I) information on 
                                instructional materials, 
                                programs, strategies, and 
                                approaches based on 
                                scientifically based reading 
                                research, including early 
                                intervention and reading 
                                remediation materials, 
                                programs, and approaches; and
                                    [(II) instruction in the 
                                use of screening, diagnostic, 
                                and classroom-based 
                                instructional reading 
                                assessments and other 
                                scientifically based procedures 
                                that effectively identify 
                                students who may be at risk for 
                                reading failure or who are 
                                having difficulty reading; and
                            [(iii) shall be provided by 
                        eligible professional development 
                        providers;
                    [(B) to strengthen and enhance preservice 
                courses for students preparing, at all public 
                institutions of higher education in the State, 
                to teach kindergarten through grade 3 by--
                            [(i) reviewing such courses to 
                        determine whether the courses' content 
                        is consistent with the findings of the 
                        most current scientifically based 
                        reading research, including findings on 
                        the essential components of reading 
                        instruction;
                            [(ii) following up such reviews 
                        with recommendations to ensure that 
                        such institutions offer courses that 
                        meet the highest standards; and
                            [(iii) preparing a report on the 
                        results of such reviews, submitting the 
                        report to the reading and literacy 
                        partnership for the State established 
                        under section 1203(d), and making the 
                        report available for public review by 
                        means of the Internet; and
                    [(C) to make recommendations on how the 
                State licensure and certification standards in 
                the area of reading might be improved.
            [(4) Technical assistance for local educational 
        agencies and schools.--A State educational agency may 
        expend not more than 25 percent of the amount of the 
        funds made available under paragraph (1) for one or 
        more of the following:
                    [(A) Assisting local educational agencies 
                in accomplishing the tasks required to design 
                and implement a program under this subpart, 
                including--
                            [(i) selecting and implementing a 
                        program or programs of reading 
                        instruction based on scientifically 
                        based reading research;
                            [(ii) selecting screening, 
                        diagnostic, and classroom-based 
                        instructional reading assessments; and
                            [(iii) identifying eligible 
                        professional development providers to 
                        help prepare reading teachers to teach 
                        students using the programs and 
                        assessments described in clauses (i) 
                        and (ii).
                    [(B) Providing expanded opportunities to 
                students in kindergarten through grade 3 who 
                are served by eligible local educational 
                agencies for receiving reading assistance from 
                alternative providers that includes--
                            [(i) screening, diagnostic, and 
                        classroom-based instructional reading 
                        assessments; and
                            [(ii) as need is indicated by the 
                        assessments under clause (i), 
                        instruction based on scientifically 
                        based reading research that includes 
                        the essential components of reading 
                        instruction.
            [(5) Planning, administration, and reporting.--
                    [(A) Expenditure of funds.--A State 
                educational agency may expend not more than 10 
                percent of the amount of funds made available 
                under paragraph (1) for the activities 
                described in this paragraph.
                    [(B) Planning and administration.--A State 
                educational agency that receives a grant under 
                this section may expend funds made available 
                under subparagraph (A) for planning and 
                administration relating to the State uses of 
                funds authorized under this subpart, including 
                the following:
                            [(i) Administering the distribution 
                        of competitive subgrants to eligible 
                        local educational agencies under 
                        subsection (c) and section 1204(d).
                            [(ii) Assessing and evaluating, on 
                        a regular basis, eligible local 
                        educational agency activities assisted 
                        under this subpart, with respect to 
                        whether they have been effective in 
                        increasing the number of children in 
                        grades 1, 2, and 3 served under this 
                        subpart who can read at or above grade 
                        level.
                    [(C) Annual reporting.--
                            [(i) In general.--A State 
                        educational agency that receives a 
                        grant under this section shall expend 
                        funds made available under subparagraph 
                        (A) to provide the Secretary annually 
                        with a report on the implementation of 
                        this subpart.
                            [(ii) Information included.--Each 
                        report under this subparagraph shall 
                        include information on the following:
                                    [(I) Evidence that the 
                                State educational agency is 
                                fulfilling its obligations 
                                under this subpart.
                                    [(II) Specific 
                                identification of those schools 
                                and local educational agencies 
                                that report the largest gains 
                                in reading achievement.
                                    [(III) The progress the 
                                State educational agency and 
                                local educational agencies 
                                within the State are making in 
                                reducing the number of students 
                                served under this subpart in 
                                grades 1, 2, and 3 who are 
                                reading below grade level, as 
                                demonstrated by such 
                                information as teacher reports 
                                and school evaluations of 
                                mastery of the essential 
                                components of reading 
                                instruction.
                                    [(IV) Evidence on whether 
                                the State educational agency 
                                and local educational agencies 
                                within the State have 
                                significantly increased the 
                                number of students reading at 
                                grade level or above, 
                                significantly increased the 
                                percentages of students 
                                described in section 
                                1111(b)(2)(C)(v)(II) who are 
                                reading at grade level or 
                                above, and successfully 
                                implemented this subpart.
                            [(iii) Privacy protection.--Data in 
                        the report shall be reported in a 
                        manner that protects the privacy of 
                        individuals.
                            [(iv) Contract.--To the extent 
                        practicable, a State educational agency 
                        shall enter into a contract with an 
                        entity that conducts scientifically 
                        based reading research, under which 
                        contract the entity will assist the 
                        State educational agency in producing 
                        the reports required to be submitted 
                        under this subparagraph.
    [(e) Review.--
            [(1) Progress report.--
                    [(A) Submission.--Not later than 60 days 
                after the termination of the third year of the 
                grant period, each State educational agency 
                receiving a grant under this section shall 
                submit a progress report to the Secretary.
                    [(B) Information included.--The progress 
                report shall include information on the 
                progress the State educational agency and local 
                educational agencies within the State are 
                making in reducing the number of students 
                served under this subpart in grades 1, 2, and 3 
                who are reading below grade level (as 
                demonstrated by such information as teacher 
                reports and school evaluations of mastery of 
                the essential components of reading 
                instruction). The report shall also include 
                evidence from the State educational agency and 
                local educational agencies within the State 
                that the State educational agency and the local 
                educational agencies have significantly 
                increased the number of students reading at 
                grade level or above, significantly increased 
                the percentages of students described in 
                section 1111(b)(2)(C)(v)(II) who are reading at 
                grade level or above, and successfully 
                implemented this subpart.
            [(2) Peer review.--The progress report described in 
        paragraph (1) shall be reviewed by the peer review 
        panel convened under section 1203(c)(2).
            [(3) Consequences of insufficient progress.--After 
        submission of the progress report described in 
        paragraph (1), if the Secretary determines that the 
        State educational agency is not making significant 
        progress in meeting the purposes of this subpart, the 
        Secretary may withhold from the State educational 
        agency, in whole or in part, further payments under 
        this section in accordance with section 455 of the 
        General Education Provisions Act or take such other 
        action authorized by law as the Secretary determines 
        necessary, including providing technical assistance 
        upon request of the State educational agency.
    [(f) Funds not Used for State Level Activities.--Any 
portion of funds described in subsection (d)(1) that a State 
educational agency does not expend in accordance with 
subsection (d)(1) shall be expended for the purpose of making 
subgrants in accordance with subsection (c).
    [(g) Supplement, not Supplant.--A State or local 
educational agency shall use funds received under this subpart 
only to supplement the level of non-Federal funds that, in the 
absence of funds under this subpart, would be expended for 
activities authorized under this subpart, and not to supplant 
those non-Federal funds.

[SEC. 1203. STATE FORMULA GRANT APPLICATIONS.

    [(a) Applications.--
            [(1) In general.--A State educational agency that 
        desires to receive a grant under section 1202 shall 
        submit an application to the Secretary at such time and 
        in such form as the Secretary may require. The 
        application shall contain the information described in 
        subsection (b).
            [(2) Special application provisions.--For those 
        State educational agencies that have received a grant 
        under part C of title II (as such part was in effect on 
        the day before the date of enactment of the No Child 
        Left Behind Act of 2001), the Secretary shall establish 
        a modified set of requirements for an application under 
        this section that takes into account the information 
        already submitted and approved under that program and 
        minimizes the duplication of effort on the part of such 
        State educational agencies.
    [(b) Contents.--An application under this section shall 
contain the following:
            [(1) An assurance that the Governor of the State, 
        in consultation with the State educational agency, has 
        established a reading and literacy partnership 
        described in subsection (d), and a description of how 
        such partnership--
                    [(A) coordinated the development of the 
                application; and
                    [(B) will assist in the oversight and 
                evaluation of the State educational agency's 
                activities under this subpart.
            [(2) A description, if applicable, of the State's 
        strategy to expand, continue, or modify activities 
        authorized under part C of title II (as such part was 
        in effect on the day before the date of enactment of 
        the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001).
            [(3) An assurance that the State educational 
        agency, and any local educational agencies receiving a 
        subgrant from that State educational agency under 
        section 1202, will, if requested, participate in the 
        external evaluation under section 1205.
            [(4) A State educational agency plan containing a 
        description of the following:
                    [(A) How the State educational agency will 
                assist local educational agencies in 
                identifying screening, diagnostic, and 
                classroom-based instructional reading 
                assessments.
                    [(B) How the State educational agency will 
                assist local educational agencies in 
                identifying instructional materials, programs, 
                strategies, and approaches, based on 
                scientifically based reading research, 
                including early intervention and reading 
                remediation materials, programs, and 
                approaches.
                    [(C) How the State educational agency will 
                ensure that professional development activities 
                related to reading instruction and provided 
                under section 1202 are--
                            [(i) coordinated with other 
                        Federal, State, and local level funds, 
                        and used effectively to improve 
                        instructional practices for reading; 
                        and
                            [(ii) based on scientifically based 
                        reading research.
                    [(D) How the activities assisted under 
                section 1202 will address the needs of teachers 
                and other instructional staff in implementing 
                the essential components of reading 
                instruction.
                    [(E) How subgrants made by the State 
                educational agency under section 1202 will meet 
                the requirements of section 1202, including how 
                the State educational agency will ensure that 
                eligible local educational agencies receiving 
                subgrants under section 1202 will use practices 
                based on scientifically based reading research.
                    [(F) How the State educational agency will, 
                to the extent practicable, make grants to 
                eligible local educational agencies in both 
                rural and urban areas.
                    [(G) How the State educational agency will 
                build on, and promote coordination among 
                literacy programs in the State (including 
                federally funded programs such as programs 
                under the Adult Education and Family Literacy 
                Act, the Individuals with Disabilities 
                Education Act, and subpart 2), to increase the 
                effectiveness of the programs in improving 
                reading for adults and children and to avoid 
                duplication of the efforts of the program.
                    [(H) How the State educational agency will 
                assess and evaluate, on a regular basis, 
                eligible local educational agency activities 
                assisted under section 1202, with respect to 
                whether the activities have been effective in 
                achieving the purposes of section 1202.
                    [(I) Any other information that the 
                Secretary may reasonably require.
    [(c) Approval of Applications.--
            [(1) In general.--The Secretary shall approve an 
        application of a State educational agency under this 
        section only if such application meets the requirements 
        of this section.
            [(2) Peer review.--
                    [(A) In general.--The Secretary, in 
                consultation with the National Institute for 
                Literacy, shall convene a panel to evaluate 
                applications under this section. At a minimum, 
                the panel shall include--
                            [(i) three individuals selected by 
                        the Secretary;
                            [(ii) three individuals selected by 
                        the National Institute for Literacy;
                            [(iii) three individuals selected 
                        by the National Research Council of the 
                        National Academy of Sciences; and
                            [(iv) three individuals selected by 
                        the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National 
                        Institute of Child Health and Human 
                        Development.
                    [(B) Experts.--The panel shall include--
                            [(i) experts who are competent, by 
                        virtue of their training, expertise, or 
                        experience, to evaluate applications 
                        under this section;
                            [(ii) experts who provide 
                        professional development to individuals 
                        who teach reading to children and 
                        adults based on scientifically based 
                        reading research;
                            [(iii) experts who provide 
                        professional development to other 
                        instructional staff based on 
                        scientifically based reading research; 
                        and
                            [(iv) an individual who has 
                        expertise in screening, diagnostic, and 
                        classroom-based instructional reading 
                        assessments.
                    [(C) Recommendations.--The panel shall 
                recommend grant applications from State 
                educational agencies under this section to the 
                Secretary for funding or for disapproval.
    [(d) Reading and Literacy Partnerships.--
            [(1) In general.--For a State educational agency to 
        receive a grant under section 1202, the Governor of the 
        State, in consultation with the State educational 
        agency, shall establish a reading and literacy 
        partnership.
            [(2) Required participants.--The reading and 
        literacy partnership shall include the following 
        participants:
                    [(A) The Governor of the State.
                    [(B) The chief State school officer.
                    [(C) The chairman and the ranking member of 
                each committee of the State legislature that is 
                responsible for education policy.
                    [(D) A representative, selected jointly by 
                the Governor and the chief State school 
                officer, of at least one eligible local 
                educational agency.
                    [(E) A representative, selected jointly by 
                the Governor and the chief State school 
                officer, of a community-based organization 
                working with children to improve their reading 
                skills, particularly a community-based 
                organization using tutors and scientifically 
                based reading research.
                    [(F) State directors of appropriate Federal 
                or State programs with a strong reading 
                component, selected jointly by the Governor and 
                the chief State school officer.
                    [(G) A parent of a public or private school 
                student or a parent who educates the parent's 
                child in the parent's home, selected jointly by 
                the Governor and the chief State school 
                officer.
                    [(H) A teacher, who may be a special 
                education teacher, who successfully teaches 
                reading, and another instructional staff 
                member, selected jointly by the Governor and 
                the chief State school officer.
                    [(I) A family literacy service provider 
                selected jointly by the Governor and the chief 
                State school officer.
            [(3) Optional participants.--The reading and 
        literacy partnership may include additional 
        participants, who shall be selected jointly by the 
        Governor and the chief State school officer, and who 
        may include a representative of--
                    [(A) an institution of higher education 
                operating a program of teacher preparation in 
                the State that is based on scientifically based 
                reading research;
                    [(B) a local educational agency;
                    [(C) a private nonprofit or for-profit 
                eligible professional development provider 
                providing instruction based on scientifically 
                based reading research;
                    [(D) an adult education provider;
                    [(E) a volunteer organization that is 
                involved in reading programs; or
                    [(F) a school library or a public library 
                that offers reading or literacy programs for 
                children or families.
            [(4) Preexisting partnership.--If, before the date 
        of enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, a 
        State educational agency established a consortium, 
        partnership, or any other similar body that was 
        considered a reading and literacy partnership for 
        purposes of part C of title II of this Act (as such 
        part was in effect on the day before the date of 
        enactment of No Child Left Behind Act of 2001), that 
        consortium, partnership, or body may be considered a 
        reading and literacy partnership for purposes of this 
        subsection consistent with the provisions of this 
        subpart.

[SEC. 1204. TARGETED ASSISTANCE GRANTS.

    [(a) Eligibility Criteria for Awarding Targeted Assistance 
Grants to States.--Beginning with fiscal year 2004, from funds 
appropriated under section 1202(b)(1)(E), the Secretary shall 
make grants, on a competitive basis, to those State educational 
agencies that--
            [(1) for each of 2 consecutive years, demonstrate 
        that an increasing percentage of third graders in each 
        of the groups described in section 1111(b)(2)(C)(v)(II) 
        in the schools served by the local educational agencies 
        receiving funds under section 1202 are reaching the 
        proficient level in reading; and
            [(2) for each of the same such consecutive 2 years, 
        demonstrate that schools receiving funds under section 
        1202 are improving the reading skills of students in 
        grades 1, 2, and 3 based on screening, diagnostic, and 
        classroom-based instructional reading assessments.
    [(b) Continuation of Performance Awards.--For any State 
educational agency that receives a competitive grant under this 
section, the Secretary shall make an award for each of the 
succeeding years that the State educational agency demonstrates 
it is continuing to meet the criteria described in subsection 
(a).
    [(c) Distribution of Targeted Assistance Grants.--
            [(1) In general.--The Secretary shall make a grant 
        to each State educational agency with an application 
        approved under this section in an amount that bears the 
        same relation to the amount made available to carry out 
        this section for a fiscal year as the number of 
        children counted under section 1124(c) for the State 
        bears to the number of such children so counted for all 
        States with applications approved for that year.
            [(2) Peer review.--The peer review panel convened 
        under section 1203(c)(2) shall review the applications 
        submitted under this subsection. The panel shall 
        recommend such applications to the Secretary for 
        funding or for disapproval.
            [(3) Application contents.--A State educational 
        agency that desires to receive a grant under this 
        section shall submit an application to the Secretary at 
        such time, in such manner, and accompanied by such 
        information as the Secretary may require. Each such 
        application shall include the following:
                    [(A) Evidence that the State educational 
                agency has carried out its obligations under 
                section 1203.
                    [(B) Evidence that the State educational 
                agency has met the criteria described in 
                subsection (a).
                    [(C) The amount of funds requested by the 
                State educational agency and a description of 
                the criteria the State educational agency 
                intends to use in distributing subgrants to 
                eligible local educational agencies under this 
                section to continue or expand activities under 
                subsection (d)(5).
                    [(D) Evidence that the State educational 
                agency has increased significantly the 
                percentage of students reading at grade level 
                or above.
                    [(E) Any additional evidence that 
                demonstrates success in the implementation of 
                this section.
    [(d) Subgrants to Eligible Local Educational Agencies.--
            [(1) In general.--The Secretary may make a grant to 
        a State educational agency under this section only if 
        the State educational agency agrees to expend 100 
        percent of the amount of the funds provided under the 
        grant for the purpose of making competitive subgrants 
        in accordance with this subsection to eligible local 
        educational agencies.
            [(2) Notice.--A State educational agency receiving 
        a grant under this section shall provide notice to all 
        local educational agencies in the State of the 
        availability of competitive subgrants under this 
        subsection and of the requirements for applying for the 
        subgrants.
            [(3) Application.--To be eligible to receive a 
        subgrant under this subsection, an eligible local 
        educational agency shall submit an application to the 
        State educational agency at such time, in such manner, 
        and containing such information as the State 
        educational agency may reasonably require.
            [(4) Distribution.--
                    [(A) In general.--A State educational 
                agency shall distribute subgrants under this 
                section through a competitive process based on 
                relative need of eligible local educational 
                agencies and the evidence described in this 
                paragraph.
                    [(B) Evidence used in all years.--For all 
                fiscal years, a State educational agency shall 
                distribute subgrants under this section based 
                on evidence that an eligible local educational 
                agency--
                            [(i) satisfies the requirements of 
                        section 1202(c)(4);
                            [(ii) will carry out its 
                        obligations under this subpart;
                            [(iii) will work with other local 
                        educational agencies in the State that 
                        have not received a subgrant under this 
                        subsection to assist such nonreceiving 
                        agencies in increasing the reading 
                        achievement of students; and
                            [(iv) is meeting the criteria 
                        described in subsection (a).
            [(5) Local uses of funds.--An eligible local 
        educational agency that receives a subgrant under this 
        subsection--
                    [(A) shall use the funds provided under the 
                subgrant to carry out the activities described 
                in section 1202(c)(7)(A); and
                    [(B) may use such funds to carry out the 
                activities described in section 1202(c)(7)(B).

[SEC. 1205. EXTERNAL EVALUATION.

    [(a) In General.--From funds reserved under section 
1202(b)(1)(C), the Secretary shall contract with an independent 
organization outside of the Department for a 5-year, rigorous, 
scientifically valid, quantitative evaluation of this subpart.
    [(b) Process.--The evaluation under subsection (a) shall be 
conducted by an organization that is capable of designing and 
carrying out an independent evaluation that identifies the 
effects of specific activities carried out by State educational 
agencies and local educational agencies under this subpart on 
improving reading instruction. Such evaluation shall take into 
account factors influencing student performance that are not 
controlled by teachers or education administrators.
    [(c) Analysis.--The evaluation under subsection (a) shall 
include the following:
            [(1) An analysis of the relationship between each 
        of the essential components of reading instruction and 
        overall reading proficiency.
            [(2) An analysis of whether assessment tools used 
        by State educational agencies and local educational 
        agencies measure the essential components of reading.
            [(3) An analysis of how State reading standards 
        correlate with the essential components of reading 
        instruction.
            [(4) An analysis of whether the receipt of a 
        targeted assistance grant under section 1204 results in 
        an increase in the number of children who read 
        proficiently.
            [(5) A measurement of the extent to which specific 
        instructional materials improve reading proficiency.
            [(6) A measurement of the extent to which specific 
        screening, diagnostic, and classroom-based 
        instructional reading assessments assist teachers in 
        identifying specific reading deficiencies.
            [(7) A measurement of the extent to which 
        professional development programs implemented by State 
        educational agencies using funds received under this 
        subpart improve reading instruction.
            [(8) A measurement of how well students preparing 
        to enter the teaching profession are prepared to teach 
        the essential components of reading instruction.
            [(9) An analysis of changes in students' interest 
        in reading and time spent reading outside of school.
            [(10) Any other analysis or measurement pertinent 
        to this subpart that is determined to be appropriate by 
        the Secretary.
    [(d) Program Improvement.--The findings of the evaluation 
conducted under this section shall be provided to State 
educational agencies and local educational agencies on a 
periodic basis for use in program improvement.

[SEC. 1206. NATIONAL ACTIVITIES.

    [From funds reserved under section 1202(b)(1)(C), the 
Secretary--
            [(1) may provide technical assistance in achieving 
        the purposes of this subpart to State educational 
        agencies, local educational agencies, and schools 
        requesting such assistance;
            [(2) shall, at a minimum, evaluate the impact of 
        services provided to children under this subpart with 
        respect to their referral to, and eligibility for, 
        special education services under the Individuals with 
        Disabilities Education Act (based on their difficulties 
        learning to read); and
            (3) shall carry out the external evaluation as 
        described in section 1205.

[SEC. 1207. INFORMATION DISSEMINATION.

    [(a) In General.--From funds reserved under section 
1202(b)(1)(D), the National Institute for Literacy, in 
collaboration with the Secretary of Education, the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services, and the Director of the Eunice 
Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human 
Development shall--
            [(1) disseminate information on scientifically 
        based reading research pertaining to children, youth, 
        and adults;
            [(2) identify and disseminate information about 
        schools, local educational agencies, and State 
        educational agencies that have effectively developed 
        and implemented classroom reading programs that meet 
        the requirements of this subpart, including those State 
        educational agencies, local educational agencies, and 
        schools that have been identified as effective through 
        the evaluation and peer review provisions of this 
        subpart; and
            [(3) support the continued identification and 
        dissemination of information on reading programs that 
        contain the essential components of reading instruction 
        as supported by scientifically based reading research, 
        that can lead to improved reading outcomes for 
        children, youth, and adults.
    [(b) Dissemination and Coordination.--At a minimum, the 
National Institute for Literacy shall disseminate the 
information described in subsection (a) to--
            [(1) recipients of Federal financial assistance 
        under this title, title III, the Head Start Act, the 
        Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and the 
        Adult Education and Family Literacy Act; and
            [(2) each Bureau funded school (as defined in 
        section 1141 of the Education Amendments of 1978).
    [(c) Use of Existing Networks.--In carrying out this 
section, the National Institute for Literacy shall, to the 
extent practicable, use existing information and dissemination 
networks developed and maintained through other public and 
private entities including through the Department and the 
National Center for Family Literacy.
    [(d) National Institute for Literacy.--For purposes of 
funds reserved under section 1202(b)(1)(D) to carry out this 
section, the National Institute for Literacy shall administer 
such funds in accordance with section 242(b) of Public Law 105-
220 (relating to the establishment and administration of the 
National Institute for Literacy).

[SEC. 1208. DEFINITIONS.

    In this subpart:
            [(1) Eligible local educational agency.--The term 
        ``eligible local educational agency'' means a local 
        educational agency that--
                    [(A) is among the local educational 
                agencies in the State with the highest numbers 
                or percentages of students in kindergarten 
                through grade 3 reading below grade level, 
                based on the most currently available data; and
                    [(B) has--
                            [(i) jurisdiction over a geographic 
                        area that includes an area designated 
                        as an empowerment zone, or an 
                        enterprise community, under part I of 
                        subchapter U of chapter 1 of the 
                        Internal Revenue Code of 1986;
                            [(ii) jurisdiction over a 
                        significant number or percentage of 
                        schools that are identified for school 
                        improvement under section 1116(b); or
                            [(iii) the highest numbers or 
                        percentages of children who are counted 
                        under section 1124(c), in comparison to 
                        other local educational agencies in the 
                        State.
            [(2) Eligible professional development provider.--
        The term ``eligible professional development provider'' 
        means a provider of professional development in reading 
        instruction to teachers, including special education 
        teachers, that is based on scientifically based reading 
        research.
            [(3) Essential components of reading instruction.--
        The term ``essential components of reading 
        instruction'' means explicit and systematic instruction 
        in--
                    [(A) phonemic awareness;
                    [(B) phonics;
                    [(C) vocabulary development;
                    [(D) reading fluency, including oral 
                reading skills; and
                    [(E) reading comprehension strategies.
            [(4) Instructional staff.--The term ``instructional 
        staff''--
                    [(A) means individuals who have 
                responsibility for teaching children to read; 
                and
                    [(B) includes principals, teachers, 
                supervisors of instruction, librarians, library 
                school media specialists, teachers of academic 
                subjects other than reading, and other 
                individuals who have responsibility for 
                assisting children to learn to read.
            [(5) Reading.--The term ``reading'' means a complex 
        system of deriving meaning from print that requires all 
        of the following:
                    [(A) The skills and knowledge to understand 
                how phonemes, or speech sounds, are connected 
                to print.
                    [(B) The ability to decode unfamiliar 
                words.
                    [(C) The ability to read fluently.
                    [(D) Sufficient background information and 
                vocabulary to foster reading comprehension.
                    [(E) The development of appropriate active 
                strategies to construct meaning from print.
                    [(F) The development and maintenance of a 
                motivation to read.
            [(6) Scientifically based reading research.--The 
        term ``scientifically based reading research'' means 
        research that--
                    [(A) applies rigorous, systematic, and 
                objective procedures to obtain valid knowledge 
                relevant to reading development, reading 
                instruction, and reading difficulties; and
                    [(B) includes research that--
                            [(i) employs systematic, empirical 
                        methods that draw on observation or 
                        experiment;
                            [(ii) involves rigorous data 
                        analyses that are adequate to test the 
                        stated hypotheses and justify the 
                        general conclusions drawn;
                            [(iii) relies on measurements or 
                        observational methods that provide 
                        valid data across evaluators and 
                        observers and across multiple 
                        measurements and observations; and
                            [(iv) has been accepted by a peer-
                        reviewed journal or approved by a panel 
                        of independent experts through a 
                        comparably rigorous, objective, and 
                        scientific review.
            [(7) Screening, diagnostic, and classroom-based 
        instructional reading assessments.--
                    [(A) In general.--The term ``screening, 
                diagnostic, and classroom-based instructional 
                reading assessments'' means--
                            [(i) screening reading assessments;
                            [(ii) diagnostic reading 
                        assessments; and
                            [(iii) classroom-based 
                        instructional reading assessments.
                    [(B) Screening reading assessment.--The 
                term ``screening reading assessment'' means an 
                assessment that is--
                            [(i) valid, reliable, and based on 
                        scientifically based reading research; 
                        and
                            [(ii) a brief procedure designed as 
                        a first step in identifying children 
                        who may be at high risk for delayed 
                        development or academic failure and in 
                        need of further diagnosis of their need 
                        for special services or additional 
                        reading instruction.
                    [(C) Diagnostic reading assessment.--The 
                term ``diagnostic reading assessment'' means an 
                assessment that is--
                            [(i) valid, reliable, and based on 
                        scientifically based reading research; 
                        and
                            [(ii) used for the purpose of--
                                    [(I) identifying a child's 
                                specific areas of strengths and 
                                weaknesses so that the child 
                                has learned to read by the end 
                                of grade 3;
                                    [(II) determining any 
                                difficulties that a child may 
                                have in learning to read and 
                                the potential cause of such 
                                difficulties; and
                                    [(III) helping to determine 
                                possible reading intervention 
                                strategies and related special 
                                needs.
                    [(D) Classroom-based instructional reading 
                assessment.--The term ``classroom-based