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ENCLOSURE #1 PRESQUE ISLE STATE PARK BATHING BEACH CONTAMINATION INVESTIGATION Year 3 Final Report Prepared by ERIE COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH March 1991 The preparation of this report was financed in part through the Pennsylvania Coastal Zone Management Program under provisions of the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, administered by the Division of Coastal Zone Management, Bureau of Water Resources Management, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources. TC 225 P7 E7 1990 P@*Operty Of ese TABLE OF CONTENTS U - S - DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NOAA COASTAL SERVICES CENTER Page Preface 2234 SOUTH HOBSON AVENUE CHARLESTON , SC 29405-2413 I. Introduction/Background 1 II. Shoreline inspections 5 III. Stream, Storm Water and Lake Water Sampling 11 West of Presque Isle A. Non-Point Sources - Background 11 B. 1990 Stream Monitoring Samples 15 C. 1990 Non-Point Source Sampling 26 D. Sewer Overflows in the Vicnity of 27 Presque Isle IV. Bathing Beach Sampling 30 A. Routine Monitoring Samples 30 B. Hourly Sampling 31 V. Bay Water Sampling 36 VI. County-Wide Lake Erie Sampling 41 VII. Incubation Tests of Shoreline Materials 44 VIII. Sand Raking Trial 50 IX. Predictive Beach Closings 55 X. Summary and Recommendations 61 Literature Cited Appendix A: Presque Isle State Park Protocol for Sampling Beaches Appendix B: Presque Isle State Park 1990 Bathing Beach Sample Results Appendix C: 1990 Chem Sample Results Appendix D: Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples CM LAJ Pref ace During 1988 and 1989 the Erie County Department of Health, with partial funding from Coastal Zone Management of Pennsylvania, conducted studies at Presque Isle State Park to determine causes of high fecal coliform bacteria counts in beach water. The results of those studies are presented in the Presque Isle State Park Bathing Beach Contamination Report, dated June 1989 and the Presque Isle State Park Bathing Beach Contamination Report, Year 2, dated February 1990. In 1990 further work was done to supplement that done in 1988 and 1989. This report is intended to be a summary of the work completed in 1990. Introduction/Background In the Year I and Year 2 bathing beach contamination studies (1,2), it was determined that high levels of fecal coliform bacteria exist in wet shoreline sand and bottom sediment at Presque Isle State Park beaches in the warm summer months and that these bacteria are resuspended in rough water conditions, leading to beach closings. It was also shown under laboratory conditions that fecal coliform could reproduce in moist shoreline materials obtained from Presque Isle. Rainfall increased fecal coliform levels (per 100 ml sample) and flows from streams near Presque Isle. A beach area with a large gull population was shown to have higher fecal coliform levels than a neighboring beach area with less gulls. Areas with decreased circulation (e.g., behind the experimental breakwaters in 1988) were shown to have somewhat higher beach water fecal coliform levels than unprotected areas. Also, in the Year I and Year 2 studies, historical data (starting with 1976) was compared with recent data. Some differences in collection and storage of samples and reporting of results made comparisons difficult. It was determined that differences in regulations, sampling protocols, beach area designations and numbers of samples collected were factors apart from the actual water quality which were responsible for some of the beach closings in recent: years. Factors which were noted as possibly influencing increases in actual fecal coliform levels at Presque Isle beaches in the past decade were: increased land development in Erie County (residential and commercial), contributing to non-point runoff reaching Lake Erfe; record warm temperatures (both water and air) for several years in the 1980's; replenishment of Presque Isle beaches with upland sand; and reduced circulation behind the experimental breakwaters (Beach 10). During the 1990 study extensive sampling at Beaches 1, 8, 10 and 11 was continued in order to compare results with those of the Year I and Year 2 studies, along with fact:ors such as weather patterns for each year. Work included a sand incubation experiment, a sand raking trial, county-wide sampling of water along the Lake Erie shoreline, bay water sampling and a great deal of work to identify, non-point sources. In addition, investigators provided information and guidance to assist Presque Isle State Park with the development of the Protocol for Sampling Beaches. Work over the past three years has led to the development of a predict:ive model for immediately closing beaches under particular weather and lake conditions. It is preferable to close beaches immediately when it is predicted that fecal coliform will be high rather than wait 24 hours for sample 2 results, as that initial 24 bours is often the time period witb the greatest bealtb risk to batbers. The predictive model was used witb success by Presque Isle State Park in 1990. 3 Shoreline Inspections About 4 miles of shoreline west of Beach 1 (see Figure 1) were inspected on foot for any indications of sewage discharges or other observations worthy of note. This area is serviced by sanitary sewers, though inspections were conducted once in the spring and once in the fall of 1990, with spot checks of some areas conducted during the summer. Samples were collected from stream and storm water discharges and analyzed for fecal coliform levels. Fecal coliform levels from discharges tested during dry weather conditions were all very low (mostly <20/100 ml; see Appendix D). Wet weather spot checks of streams and storm drain outlets showed elevated fecal coliform levels (see Table 1). No sewage outfalls were discovered. Exposed sanitary sewer lines along the shoreline west of Marshall Run were inspected. These lines once served lake-front cottages that have since been destroyed by storms. No flow from these lines was seen. Except where cottage owners keep beaches clean, the shoreline west of Presque Isle to the vicinity of Powell Avenue (see Figure 1) generally contains a considerable amount of man-made debris brought by lake waters. Plastic items make up the greatest amount of the debris found. These included -plastic bottles and other 5 HIII.Id. S.... 0... fie. Ft. of Ch.at.q.. bird. each I Beach 9 Ft. Halley St. Lighth.... 8.a.h Mill Road B...h.. Beach 11 Perry Mon urne nt - North Perry Mon urne nt - South h a Ft. of Dunn Bfvd. Beach 7 Water Work. W..t Pier 9 h 6 13 ... h 2 Barrack. 8 ...h Beach I rlr.t Bay Parking Let h-ft., Creek and Beach K.I.. St.- D,.In K.I.o 8...6 Ft. f S-114.1- Dr. 9 h M.r.h.11 Run Sh-h-n C,..k Ft. of P-11 A- M..tp.11.1 A- Wilkin. Run Sample Collection Sites Walnut C ... k 1990 Bathing-Beach Contamination Study Erie County Dept. of Health March 1991 No Scale FIGURE 1 L.k..h.r. Wf C.u- containers, broken pieces of plastic, balloons, and plastic tampon applicators. The tampon applicators are significant in that they are indicators of raw sewage contamination. Approximately 15 - 20 of these items were observed on eacb of the two sboreline inspections between Beacb I and Powell Avenue. Significant numbers of applicators are also found on Presque Isle beacbes, especially in the spring. However, as these applicators are virtually indestructable, it is not possible to tell bow long they bave been in the lake or wbere they came from. It is interesting to note that no tampon applicators and very little otber manmade debris were seen west of Powell Avenue during eitber inspection. Driftwood was still seen in this area, as were balloons. Sboreline inspections were conducted in various areas witbin about two miles east of Presque Isle. Many areas east of Presque Isle are inaccessible by foot because of steep cliffs witb no beacb areas. Wbere inspections were conducted, some serious sanitary problems were seen. The sboreline area east of Presque Isle wbicb was inspected was primarily witbin the limits of the City of Erie. This area of the City is served by a combined sewer system witb wet weatber overflow points wbicb discbarge to the lake. 6 The following are descriptions of specific sites east of Presque Isle. 1. The beach just east from the East Avenue boat launch (also known as the foot of Dunn Boulevard): A combined sewer overflow (with periodic extremely high fecal coliform counts*) enters Lake Erie in the middle of the beach (see Figure 1). Otber than the overflow and the odor present from industries in the area, the beach itself is reasonably attractive and many children and some adults from the immediate area swim there. (The area is not a permitted bathing area and was posted with one small "No Swimming" sign.) West of the beach and boat launch is a warm water discharge from quench water that the Erie Coke Corporation plant uses in making foundry grade coke from low sulfur coal. In July .k a naturally occurring, -thick accumulation of dark algae covered the sboreline near the discharge. 2. The foot of Crancb Avenue: A sewage pumping station is located here. Increased flows during wet weather can back up sanitary sewers into homeowners' basements. The City of Erie, to prevent this from happening, will routinely pump the diluted sewage from a sump at Crancb Avenue directly to a stream which enters the lake. The City has also pumped the diluted sewage onto the ground just to the west of the pump station. *Often >60,000 fecal coliform/100 ml - see Appendix D 7 Pumping of sewage at this location occurs only during or after heavy rainfall. Presque Isle beaches routinely experience elevated bacterial levels with these weather conditions, but it is not possible at this time to determine the contribution of this overflow to high counts at Presqve Isle. 3. The foot of Chautauqua Boulevard: A stream, a sewage pumping station and a small beach are located here (see Figure 1). Sometimes local residents swim at the beach. Two sewage discharges were noted here. One discharge consists of a pipe (approximately 1/2 ft. diameter) which discharges sewage to a stream when there are electrical or mecharAcal problems with the municipal sewage lift station that serves the area, or when a hydraulic overload exists. It is interesting to note that following a rainstorm on September 24, 1990 samples of the discharge and samples upstream and downstream of the discharge all had >60,000 fecal coliform, >60,000 fecal strep and >60,000 E. coli/100 ml. City of Erie records indicate a combined sewer overflow point at Chautauqua Boulevard and East Lake Road, about one-half mile south (upstream) of the sampling point. That overflow may have been partially responsible for the high bacterial levels. The second discharge located at the foot of Chautauqua Boulevard is a pipe approximately two feet in diameter from a hillside just west of the lift station 8 wbicb flows directly to the beacb. Mucb sewage-related debris was seen on the beacb (feces, paper and plastic items). During the spring, the discbarge flowed constantly regardless of weatber. Conditions improved somewbat following maintenance work by the City of Erie Sewer Department. It is believed that this pipe now discbarges only during rainstorms. Approximately 100 tampon applicators appeared on the sboreline of the Gull Point area (between Beacb 10 and Beacb 11) after a storm in November. These items may bave traveled to Presque Isle's sboreline from east-side sewer overflows sucb as those described above, or from Erie sewage treatment plant effluent, after overflow conditions at tbe plant during a beavy rain. Samples taken during sboreline inspections are included in Appendix D. 4. Near-sbore algae accumulations and associated fecal coliform levels: An additional observation during sboreline inspections was that unusually beavy accumulations of algae appeared along different areas of the Lake Erie sboreline in 1990. Similar deposits of algae were documented in the 1960's but bave not been seen in recent years. The area witb the largest accumulations of algae (witbin the study area) extending from Kelso Beacb tbrougb the Beacbcomber Campground Beacb, Presque Isle Condominium Beacb and Beacbes 1, 1 East and I West 9 through Barracks Beach. The algae did not usually occupy this entire area at one time but sbifted locations, depending on currents. For instance, on August 2, 1990 a heavy accumulation of algae was present at the Beachcomber Camp beach (and some at the condominium beach) but not at neighboring Kelso Beach or Beach 1 West. Beachcomber Beach bad a fecal coliform level of 350/100 ml, and Kelso Beach bad a level of 10/100 MI. Algae accumulations were not unique to locations in the vicinity of Presque Isle. For instance, an inspection of Shade's Beach in Harborcreek Township (about 10 miles east of Presque Isle) on August 6, 1990 revealed heavy algae accumulations. Foamy water in the algae zone bad a fecal coliform level of 2,600/100 ml, while clearer lake water bad a fecal coliform level of 80/100 MI. Algae itself is not believed to be a source of fecal coliform. Heavy accumulations of algae, however, seem to be associated with higher fecal coliform levels than nearby clearer waters. 10 Stream, Storm Water and Lake Sampling West of Presque Isle A. Non-Point Sources - Background As part of the Year 1 and Year 2 studies (1,2) streams west of Presque Isle were sampled to determine whether they have the potential to affect fecal coliform levels at Presque Isle beaches. It was shown that during or immediately following a rainstorm, fecal coliform levels in streams (per 100 ml sample) were at least 10 tiraes higher than during dry weather levels. Since flows also increase, to perhaps 100 times (or more) of dry weather flow, fecal coliform contributions of these streams during a heavy rainstorm are significant. Bacterial samples of lake water collected upcurrent and downcurrent of streams confirmed the streams' impact on the lake. Beach water at Presque Isle can be affected when wind-driven currents are from the west or east. These findings formed the basis for predictive beach closings, based on certain rainfall and lake current conditions. Bacterial increases with heavy rainfall are not a new phenomena, nor are they unique to the area of Erie, Pennsylvania. For instance, Koozer State Park (Pennsylvania) has a policy of closing its bathing beach after a heavy rain. During wet weather conditions, silt high in fecal coliform is suspended in Koozer Run, which feeds Koozer Lake where the park's bathing beach is located. suspected that the decrease in the spring was due to the surface layer of sediment becoming resuspended due to increased stream flow during spring snowmelt and precipitation. In contrast, when stream flow decreased during the summer, bacteria associated with particulates settled to the bottom. A decrease in the bacteriological quality of the Detroit River during the summer was also noted by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (14). Samples collected during late June and July bad higher fecal coliform densities than those collected in May or early June. Kelch and Lee (6) found that drainage from cattle pastures was higher in E. coli in the colder months. They felt that this was due to E. coli's prolonged survival time in low temperatures and accelerated die-off at higher temperatures. Investigators have found high fecal coliform or E. coli levels in stream sediment (7), river sediment (8), estuary sediment (9-10), canal sediment (11) and lake bottom sediment (1,2,12). These fecal indicator bacteria become suspended during periods of high stream discharge, simultaneously with increases from runoff of terrestrial organisms and settle into the sediments during low and stable flow (7,8). organisms re- settle downstream, increasing sediment populations 13 there (8). ("Downstream" in the case of ECDH study area could include Beach 1 sediments, for instance.) Bacteria from lake sediments are suspended during periods of high wave! activity (1,2). Matson, et al. (8), states, "The importance of aquatic sediments as reservoirs of health hazard indicators is determined by at least two factors: 1) the possibility of extended survival or growth of indicators in sediments (thus altering temporal concepts of wastewater pollution), and 2) the potential for resuspension of: the sediment into the water column, thus exposing users to sediment-bound indicators and pathogens." Struck (9) found that peaks in water counts (in stream water) often correspond to decreases in bacterial counts in sediment and that fluctuations in water and sediment counts are associated with rainfall intensity. Twenty-four hour rainfall greater than 0.10 inch, preceded by several days of dry weather, was sufficient for disturbance and release of sediment-bound fecal coliform. Struck was able to show that 71 percent of the fluctuation in Winter Creek water fecal coliform levels could be explained by corresponding fluctuations in sediment concentrations. He also showed, in growth experiments, that the organically rich stream sediments provided "a suitable environment for fecal coliform reproduction." Struck concludes that the results of his studir and others, .0 14 indicate that non-point bacterial contamination is not limited to the original source of bacteria, but to the numerous interactions that occur after the fecal coliform enters the stream or estuary. Therefore, future efforts need to focus not only on farms and septic systems, but also on the multitude of land uses that can occur in a rapidly growing watershed." B. 1990 Stream Monitoring Samples Five streams and three shoreline areas west of Presque Isle were sampled weekly during the regular bathing season (May 26 - September 3). Samples were collected from the same stream and shoreline sites as in the Year 1 and Year 2 studies (Figure 1), and additional unscheduled samples were collected immediately following several heavy rainstorms. Fecal coliform levels were tested on all sampling excursions. Fecal strep, E. coli and Klebsiella were tested during wet conditions on two occasions. Weekly bacteriological monitoring results are listed in Table 1. The highest bacterial levels in stream water were noted during wet weather conditions in July through September. Nutrient samples were also collected as part of the 1990 stream monitoring program. Nutrient parameters included total phosphorus, nitrogen compounds (NH3, N02, NO 3) and total organic carbon (TOC). One set of nutrient samples was collected from each of the stream monitoring sites for both dry and wet conditions. Results can be found in Appendix C. 15 Wet Weatber Sampling Excursions Sampling before and during rain events was conducted on August 12 - 13, August 29 and September 5 - 6 (see Tables 2 - 4). Results sbowed dramatic increases in fecal coliform levels as soon as stream flows increased. On August 12 (about 6:00 p.m.) fecal coliform levels in Marsball 'Run rose from 1,500/100 mi to 14,000/100 mi in a period of 8 minutes at the onset of beavy rain. By the following morning, flow bad increased considerably and the fecal coliform level was 36,000/100 mi. Fecal coliform levels and stream flow botb started to decrease by afternoon (Table 2) Lake, stream and storm water samples were collected west of Presque Is.le on August 29 following a beavy thunderstorm (Table 3). At least some of the bigb fecal coliform levels in storm and lake water on August 29 can be attributed to observed sanitary sewer overflows (Section III-D) wbicb occurred at Kelso Beacb and at the Sborebaven Drive lift station (Figure 2). On September 5 bigb bacterial levels were found in stream water from streams west of Presque Isle immediately after a beavy rainstorm (Table 4). Levels decreased tbrougbout the day but were still elevated, as compared to "dry weatber" levels on September 6. 16 It was also observed that stream fecal coliform levels were bigber during summer rain events. Wet weatber stream samples in July tbrougb September routinely contained in the range of tens of tbousands of fecal coliforms per 100 ml sample. By October stream samples collected after a rainstorm bad fecal coliform levels in the order of bundreds per 100 ml sample. Spring samples (tbrougb early June) were also lower in fecal coliform tban summer samples. 17 Stream and Storm Drain Sampling TABLE 1 I B. C. I B. C. I KELSO I KELSO I MARSHALL I BAER "SHOREHAVENI WILKlm,; I WALNUT IMANCHESTEkf POOT OF i FOOT oi- DATE l BEACH I STREAM I STORM DR.1 BEACH I RUN I BEACH I CREEK I RLIN I CWEEK I BEACH IMONIPELIERi POWELL 4/10/90 1 ---- 1 200 1 620 1 ---- 1 910 1 ---- 1 210 1 4/24y"30 1 ---- I ---- I ---- 1 80 1 ---- I ---- I ---- I 5/7/90 1 1 ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- I - -- 1 2 E. 0 1 5/14/90 1 ---- 1 560 1 670 1 ---- 1 1000 1 ---- 1 230 1 4,,)Oj 1 280 5/17/90 1 ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- 1 2700 5/22/90 1 ---- 1 70 1 330 1 ---- 1 110 1 ---- i < 10 1 50 1 80 1 ---- I ---- 5/31/90 1 240 1 560 1 ---- 1 10 1 220 1 ---- 1 80 1 230 1 10 1 (10 6/7/90 1 25 1 320 1 ---- 1 20 1 460 1 ---- 1 700 30 1 10 1 <10 6/8/90 1 ---- 1 1000 1 ---- I ---- I i2ooo I ---- 1 7000 1 ---- 1 1050 1 ---- 6/15/90 f (10 1 1300 1 ---- I <10 1 320 1 ---- 1 450 1 ---- 1 20 1 (10 1 ---- I ---- 6/20/90 1 100 1 800 1 1400 1 20 1 600 1 ---- 1 800 1 260 1 50 1 10 1 ---- I 6/21/90 1 ---- I ---- I ---- 1 80 1 120 1 ---- I ---- 6/25/130 1 ---- 1 600 1 1000 1 420 1 1500 1 ---- I Iioo 1 2000 1 2900 1 ---- I ---- I ---- .. 7/5/90 1 (10 1 1300 1 ---- 1 500 1 1200 1 ---- 1 440 1 ---- 1 70 1 50 1 ---- i 7/9/90 1 3700 1 13000 1 3700 1 3600 1 24000 1 ---- 1 2900 1 9000 1 i9oo 1 240 1 ---- I ---- 7/12/90 1 ---- 1 10000 1 --- I ---- 1 60000 1 ---- 1 @400 1 ---- 7/20/90 1 1 b 0 0 1 6000 1 ---- I ---- I (@000 I ---- j -@00 7/23/90 1 210 1 1800 1 ---- 1 100 1 1200 1 ---- 7/24/90 1 20 1 1100 1 1 20 1 3"'10 1 ---- 1 240 1 1 110 1 20 1 ---- I ---- 7 I'Ll 6 /9 0 1 10 1 6130 1 -.- -- - 0 --- I ( I -,) 1 200 1 1 2 3 ---- ---- ---- ---- -D I ---- 7 / -i 1.,"10 1 1 1 1 8/2/90 1 350 1 110 1 ---- 1 10 1 310 1 ---- I logo 1 70 1 20 1 (10 1 8/7/90 1 3200 1 50000 1 ---- 1 140 1 13000 1 ---- 1 8000 1 -.- -- I ---- I ---- I 8/8/130 1 ---- 1 28000 1 ---- I ---- 1 13000 1 -- 1 2,100 1 ---- -- - 8 / 9.19 0 1 10 1 2000 1 1 i00 1 (20 1 P40 I ---- 1 2000 1 < 1-00 8/12/90 1 1 .500 1 8 3 /9 ".) I j 0 1 8/15/90 1 40 1 690 1 ---- 110 1 3000 1 ---- 1 550 1 ---- 8/22/90 1 1000 1 400 1 ---- I <10 1 900 1 ---- I 1@Aoo I ---- E, 11110 1 30"1") 1 '60000 1 >60000 1 1000 1 34000 1 4000 1 5 @14 0 0 1 1 40 1 28000 4., 9 0 1 1 ---- I ---- I --- i 3io i I -D I I - - - I --.- I ---- 5 1 12000 1 6000 1 10 -j 0 1 00;@ 1 100, 0 Q 70%'.)0 1 113000 j 19000 1 ---- 1 0 1 1 8000 1 ---- 26000 1 10000 1 1 1000 i .-- -.-- I -.- I 10 0 () @Z) I --, I I - - 3 1 1 4000 1 1 110 1 0 1 ILO 1 1 2000 1 580 i 10 1 2000 9 0 1 1 2000 1 --- -- -- - 1 --,(,'00 1 ---- I ---- I I ---- I ---- I ---- 9/17/90 1 ---- 1 3 j 0 1 ---- I I ---- 9/18/90 1 ---- I ---- I ---- I 1 1600 '3/2 0,,"3 0 1 1 1000 i - I I , '3/2 -/;' 9 0 1 52n I SIO 1 120 1 0 1 1 520 ') 2 6 /9 0 1 -.-. I - - -- I ---- I -- I E-0 1 5 0 1 <10 I ---- TABLE 2 Marshall Run Sampling August 12-13, 1990 August 12, 1990 5:55 PM Samples were collected by Bob Wellington, ECDH. There was a light rain earlier in the afternoon. A heavy rain event started about 15 minutes prior to samyling (about 5:40 PM EDST). Water at Marsha I Run was clear, 1.5 - 2 ft. wide and 2 in. deep. Estimated stream volume was 200 gal. per minute at the time of sampling. Stream was clear. Water temperature was 640F. Lake Erie was calm. Sample Collected: 1,500 fecal coliform/100 ml 6:03 PM Water at Marshall Run was very muddy, 4 ft. wide and 3 in. deep. Estimated volume was 300 gal. per minute. Sample collected: 14,000 fecal coliform/100 ml 6:11 PM Water at Marshall Run was very muddy, 4 - 6 ft. wide and 3 in. deep. Estimated volume was 400 gal. per minute. Stream temperature was 660F. Sample collected: 5,800 fecal coliform/100 ml 6:12 PM Water sample collected 50 ft. west of Marshall Run on beach (lake water). Lake Erie was clear at this point. Water temperature was 750F. Current was going from west to east. A muddy plume was developing along the shoreline east from the creek. Sample collected: 120 fecal coliform/100 ml Rained all night (very heavy at times) August 13, 1990 8:50 AM Stream sample was collected by Bob Wellington, ECDH. Mud plume extended perhaps 1/2 mile out into Lake Erie and was approaching Beach #1. However, the wind reversed direction (from the west) the night before to a NNE direction. Water at Marshall Run was very muddy, 12 ft. wide and 2 - 3 ft. deep. Estimated volume was 5,000 gal. per minute. Stream temperature was 670F. Sample collected: 36,000 fecal coliform/100 ml 19 TABLE 2 (cont.) Marshall Run Sampling August 12-13, 1990 8:58 AM Water sample was collected 50 ft. west of Marshall Run on beach (lake water). Same lake area as noted above. Waves on Lake Erie were 2 - 3 ft. (estimated NNE direction). Water at this site was cloudy but not muddy like the stream. Sample collected: 2,500 fecal coliform/100 ml 1:25 PM Stream water at Marshall Run was clearing up. Stream still very high. Sample collected: 13,000 fecal coliform/100 ml 1:32 PM Water sample was collected 50 ft. west of Marshall Run on beach (lake water). Same lake site as above; waves now less than 1 ft. Lake Erie was now muddy to the west (possibly due to reverse flow and/or influence from Walnut Creek) but clearer to the east near near Beach #1. Sample collected: 4,500 fecal coliform/100 ml 1:35 PM Sample of rain water was collected from a puddle nearby on a private roadway. No houses are nearby; all houses in vicinity on bluff are sewered. Sample collected: 60,000 fecal coliform/100 ml Beaches 10 and 11 were later closed (August 14-15, 1990). Possible causes are the Mill. Creek tube combined sewer overflows and Chautauqua lift station overflow. Wind from the NNE may aspirate bay water out through the channel, potentially affecting these beaches. 20 TABLE 3 August 29, 1990 Fecal Fecal Kleb- Coliforms Strep E. Coli siella /100 ml /100 ml /100 ml /100 ml Flooded Road - Kelso Beach >60,000 >60,000 >60,000 9,000 Flooded Road - Kelso Beach 53,000 >60,000 54,000 8,000 Kelso Beach - Lake Water 1,000 6,000 1,080 180 Baer Beach - Lake Water 4,000 18,000 2,000 2,000 Marshall Run 349000 58,000 24,000 5,000 Flooded Road - Baer Beach 35,000 51,000 28,000 1,000 Millcreek Storm Drain at >60,000 >60,000 >60,000 11,000 Bottom of Kelso Beach Access Road Sborebaven Creek - Above 10,000 5,000 6,000 2,000 Lift Station Sborebaven Creek - Below 5,000 3,000 5,000 1,000 Lift Station (Note: this lift station was overflowing earlier in the morning) Beachcomber Creek (most of >60,000 >60,000 56,000 7,000 flow is from west branch) Beachcomber Creek, West >60,000 >60,000 >60,000 18,000 Branch (mostly storm water from Kelso) Drainage from Waldameer 60 360 60 20 into Beachcomber Creek, West Branch Beachcomber Creek, South 1,000 3,000 1,040 120 Branch Beachcomber - Ditch by >60,000 42,000 61,000 8,000 Arcade Beachcomber Beach - Lake 3,000 4,000 880 200 21 TABLE 3 (cont.) August 29, 1990 Fecal Fecal Kleb- Coliforms Strep E. Coli siella /100 ml /100 ml /100 ml /100 mi Puddle - Beachcomber >60:,000 33,000 >60,000 20,000 Parking Lot Foot of Montpelier Avenue 40 20 20 <20 Storm Drain Foot of Montpelier Avenue 3,000 2,000 1,320 <20 Water Running Down Road Foot of Powell Avenue 28,000 29,000 21,000 3,000 Storm Drain Beach 1 West 1,700 Beach 1 West 1,500 Beach 1 700 Beach 1 East 1,200 Barracks Beach 500 Barracks Beach 600 22 Beach 1 Beach 1 West LAKE ERIE LAKE ERIE Beach 1 West Beachcomber Condo N, Boer Beach Kelso Beach Beach Beach 4,000 1,000 3,000 >60,000 Boer Beach Kelso Beach Beachcomber, parking lot 5,000 Creek_- itch >60,000 >60,000 35,000 S p pump >601000 1,000 34,000 duimscharge ****' 1, '1 f I aoded r.ood, Beach ornber Cc > to lake I >60, 00 .......... storm ................ a 60 drainage from drain 10,000 ......i----- -- ill Peninsula Drive a e 8 ape a -C Wcldameer Park V) FECAL COLIFORM CONCENTRATIONS FIGURE 2 August 29, 1990 Numbers Fecal coliform colonies per 100 ml Erie County Dept. of Health March 1991 No Scale TABLE 4 September 5 - 6, 1990 Fecal Coliform/100 ml SEPTEMBER 5 SEPTEMBER 6 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 2:30 PM 2:45 PM - 3:30 PM 3:45 Pm 12:40 PM - 2:35 PM Beach 1W Ext. 1,000 Beachcomber 12,000 (Fec.Strep 41,000) 6,000 8,000 4,000 (E.Coli 3,000) Stream (E.Coli 13,000) Beachcomber - 11,000 (Fec.Strep 20,000) 3,000 (E.Coll 3,000) West Branch (E.Coli 6,000) Beachcomber - >60,000 (Fec Strep >60,000) 6,000 (E.Coli 4,000) South Branch (E.Coli 58,000) Kelso Beach - 1,000 110 Lake Water Millcreek Storm 8,000 (Fec.Strep >60,000) 2,000 1,000 (E.Coli 840) Drain on Kelso (E.Coli 7,000) Property Marshall Run >60,000 (Fec.Strep 34,000) 19,000 26,000 10,000 2,000 (E.Coli 900) (E.Coli 54,000) Baer Beach - 7,000 120 East of Marshall Run Baer Beach - 6,000 West of Marshall Run TABLE 4 September 5 - 6, 1990 Fecal Coliform/100 ml SEPTEMBER 5 SEPTEMBER 6 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM 2:45 PM - 3:30 PM 3:45 PM 12:40 PM - 2:35 PM Shorehaven 8,000 Upstream of Lift Station Shorehaven - 10,000 (Fec.Strep 18,000) 3,000 10,000 1,000 (E.Coli 810) Downstream of (E.Coll 9,000) Lift Station Foot of 7,000 (Fec.Strep 800) Montpelier Ave. (E.Coli 4,400) 10 (E.Coli <10) Foot of Powell 23,000 (Fec.Strep >60,000) 3,000 1,000 2,000 (E.Coli 2,000) Avenve (E.Coli 18,000) Lake Erie at 490 Foot of Powell Avenue Walnut Creek 30,000 (Fec.Strep >60,000) 2,000 (E.Coli 2,000) (E-Coli 24,000) C. 1990 Non-Point Source Sampling Because of high bacterial levels found in streams during wet weather, efforts were made by the Health Department to determine fecal coliform levels in storm drainage entering streams west of Presque Isle. Storm sewer maps were obtained from Millcreek Township, and samples of storm water were collected at various points (upstream and downstream) in the drainage areas of the Beachcomber Campground creek, Marshall Run, Shorehaven Creek, the Powell Avenue storm drain, a storm drain at the foot of Montpelier Avenue, Wilkins Run, an unnamed stream which runs through the Lake Sbore Country Club and various other unnamed storm drains. Miscellaneous samples of storm water were collected east and south of Presque Isle, as well as to the west. Results of this storm water sampling program are in Appendix D. It was observed that samples taken from puddles with suspended sediments generally bad higher fecal coliform levels than samples from clear-looking puddles. Analysis of sediment samples from several storm drains confirmed that storm drain sediment can contain very high fecal coliform levels. Sediment fecal coliform results are included in Appendix D, and nutrient results in Appendix C. Additional work on non-point sources of fecal indicator bacteria west of Presque Isle is planned for 1991. 26 D. Sanitary Sewer Overflows in the Vicinity of Presque Isle Known sewer overflows in Millcreek and Fairview west of Presque Isle were Dot frequent in 1990, as compared to the frequent combined sewer overflows into the Presque Isle Bay and just east of Presque Isle. However, when these overflows do occur, they may contribute to beach closings and result in increased health risks for the public. (Fecal coliform from human sewage is more likely to indicate health risks to humans than is fecal coliform from animal. sources, because not all animal pathogens affect humans.) It should be noted that all of the area in the immediate vicinity of Presque Isle is sewered. However, much of tbe Walnut Creek drainage area is rural and on septic systems. Drainage from that area could affect Presque Isle, depending on currents. Overflows at two sites west of Presque Isle were documented on August 29, 1990 following a heavy rainstorm. An overflow at a Millcreek Township sewage pump station on Sborebaven Drive was seen at 11:30 a.m. In addition, raw sewage escaped from manhole covers on Kelso Beach. The Millcreek Township Sewer Authority attributed the overflow at Kelso Beach to increased sewage flows (from the 27 storm) not being able to negotiate a 900 bend in the sewer pipe. The 900 bend may be straightened by Millcreek Township if there is a recvrrence of the problem. It is not known if there were additional overflows elsewhere west of Presque Isle, but overflows east of Presque Isle almost certainly occurred on August 29. Presque Isle State Park closed Beach 1 West, Beach 1, Barracks Beach and Beach 11 as a precautionary measure (also see Section III.B and Table 3). The Health Department received two reports of sewage escaping to the ground from a lift station on Route 5 at Wilkins Run during 1990. By the time the complaints were received, sewage was no longer flowing to the ground; therefore, the incidents were not confirmed. On June 20 an anonymous source reported that a power outage to a Fairview Township sewage lift station located on Manchester Road bad resulted in a malfunction on Sunday, June 17. At about the same time, Pennsylvania Fish Commission personnel at the Walnut Creek access area noticed a dark, dirty, soot-like accumulation floating in their north basin. A sample of this substance, collected June 20, bad a fecal coliform level of 3,000/100 ml. (It should be noted that the first Presque Isle beach closings of 1990 occurred as a result of samples 28 collected June 18 at Beach 1 West, Beach 1, Beach 1 East, Barracks Beach and Beach 2, following a rainstorm and currents from the west). According to the Millcreek Township Sewer Authority, the Shorebaven pump station is scheduled for improvements which will be completed before the 1991 bathing season. The following work is planned: purchase and installation of an electric generator (an on-site generator will eliminate delays waiting for a portable generator during a power outage); the replacement of the existing pumps; and miscellaneous other work, including installation of a high water alarm and modification or replacement of the existing bar screen. These improvements should hopefully eliminate sewage overflows at this location, thereby improving lake water quality west of Presque Isle. Although occasional sewer overflows occur west of Presque Isle during very heavy rainfall events, it seems that the greatest amount of fecal coliform contribution from tbis region is from non-point source runoff. Non-point runoff and the related issue of storm water management are increasingly evident as important: issues to be dealt with as urban expansion occurs in Erie County. 29 IV. Bathing Beach Samplin& A. Routine Monitoring Samples During the 1990 bathing season, the same four areas studied in 1988 and 1989 (Beaches 1, 8, 10 and 11) were utilized for intensive data collection. In 1990 samples were collected four times per week at each of these four areas during the bathing season. The Sunday and Monday collections were part of Presque Isle State Park's sampling program.* Additional samples were collected by an ECDH employee using the same sampling protocol on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Three separate samples were collected from each beach on every occasion - one near each side and one in the center. The arithmetic average of the three was considered the sample" for that day. A tabulation of all Presque Isle State Park bathing beach samples is included in Appendix B. Locations of beach sampling sites are included in Appendix A. *Appendix A is Presque Isle State Park's Protocol for Sampling. The Protocol was written in the spring of 1990 by PISP, Erie County Department of Health and Pennsylvania DER Community Environmental Control personnel and was based partially on information gathered during Year 1 and Year 2 of this investigation. It provides detailed information on bow samples were collected and bow sample results were used to close or open beaches. 30 Table 5 summarizes Presque Isle bathing beach samples taken since 1976. The table reports the percentage of samples from each sampling site each year which equals or exceeds the geometric mean limit of 200 fecal coliform/100 ml. It can be noted that more areas were sampled on a regular basis and more samples collected in 1990 than ever before. It is believed that Presque Isle State Park has one of the most intensive beach sampling programs anywhere. The number of times and dates each beach was closed, as well as percentage of closures for each beach was tabulated by Presque Isle State Park (Table 12). B. Hourly Sampling On Tuesday, June 26, 1990 fecal coliform samples were collected at specific locations on an hourly basis. The purpose of hourly sampling was to monitor changes which might occur during the course of a day under certain weather conditions. Extensive hourly sampling was conducted during the Year 1 and Year 2 studies (1,2). Four sections of Beach I and Barracks Beach were sampled hourly from 8:00 a.m. through 8:00 p.m. for fecal coliform. Samples were collected by Department staff and transported to the Erie DER Laboratory for analysis. Sample results are reported in Table 6.. 31 TABLE 5 Percent of Samples With >200 Fecal Coliforms/100 ml Beach Barracks Beach Beach Beach Beach Mill Light Beach Beach Beach All Water 0 Samples Year I Beach 2 6 7 8 Road House 9 10 11 Beaches Temp*( F) Collected 1976 7.6 8.0 4.0 4.4 0.0 0.0 7.9 4.7 68.4 253 1977 11.7 7.7 0.0 3.2 0.0 2.0 2.4 4.3 68.2 306 1978 2.0 5.6 0.0 8.8 2.1 4.0 b8.6 176 N) 1979 11.1 9.5 11.1 11.8 6.3 8.8 20.5 14.2 66.5 311 1980 16.1 10.0 11.1 5.3 0.0 0.0 15.8 11.3 70.3 236 1981 27.6 17.6 0.0 13.3 6.7 26.7 7.9 14.6 68.2 161 1982 14.3 0.0 14.3 0.0 21.4 7.7 7.8 10.2 66.0 137 1983 10.7 0.0 8.3 0.0 16.7 21.4 16.7 12.0 67.2 150 1984 33.3 12.5 13.3 15.4 0.0 25.0 10.3 15.5 67.6 167 1985 5.9 0.0 0.0 6.3 0.0 4.8 8.1 5.3 65.1 206 1986 13.0 9.4 8.7 5.3 25.0 16.7 1.3 9.5 67.2 272 1987 23.5 17.6 22.2 36.8 25.0 17.1 11.1 18.1 69.7 192 1988 22.1 30.0 22.7 19.5 30.4 33.4 13.5 21.7 69.7 878 1989 27.3 7.1 14.3 14.8 11.1 16.9 18.7 19.3 70.1 740 1990 35.5 34.9 27.3 29.4 26.5 20.0 30.0 20.7 23.3 16.1 13.1 25.2 65.9 1,401 *From Presque Isle State Park records; Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day June 26 was a sunny, calm day. Wave heights were from <1/2 ft. to 1 ft. Average wind speed for the day was 11.1 mpb from the southwest. Bather load was zero to lour for most of the day, with medium bather load at 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. There bad been no precipitation for several days and, therefore, probably little direct impact from streams to the west on this day. There were no breakwaters at Beach I or Beach I West. There was one breakwater at Beach 1 East. Another breakwater was located between Beach 1 East and Barracks Beach and two were located at Barracks Beach at the time of this sampling event. It was also noted that there was an accumulation of algae along the sboreline at Beach 1 East and Barracks Beach on this day. The accumulation was heaviest at Barracks Beach. As noted in Section II, fecal coliform levels in the algae zone itself are likely to be higher than levels in surrounding water. None of the samples collected on June 26 were collected in the algae zone. Wave action at Barracks 3 1 Beach was very low (calm to 1/2 ft.) on this day. The higher counts coincided with (or followed) a period of 1/2 ft. waves, which occurred 10:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m. It is possible that this wave action, though very mild, may have released some fecal coliform from the algae zone near the shoreline. 33 As can be seen in Table 5, fecal coliform levels were quite low tbrougbout most of the day at the four Beacb 1 area sampling sites. Barracks Beacb bad significantly bigber peak, mean and geometric mean counts than the otber four areas. Fecal coliform levels on this day are assumed to depict typical conditions for this area on a day witb no precipitation and little wave action. 34 TABLE 6 June 26, 1990 Fecal Coliform/100 ml Beach 1 Beach 1 Water West West Beach 1 Time Temp. (West End) (East End) Beach 1 East Barracks 8 AM 640F 60 80 70 30 10 9 650F 10 30 20 10 <10 10 660F 150 20 50 40 90 11 660F <10 30 30 30 100 12 680F 40 <10 40 30 270 1 PM 70OF 10 <10 30 140 120 2 70OF <10 <10 20 --- --- 3 70OF 10 10 30 40 20 4 700F <10 10 10 10 30 5 70OF 10 <10 <10 20 <10 6 70OF <10 <10 <10 10 50 7 70OF <10 10 <10 10 150 8 70OF <10 <10 100 20 <10 Arithmetic 27.0 19.2 33.1 32.5 72.5 Mean Geometric 15.7 14.7 25.0 23.2 39.2 Mean 35 V. Bay Water Sampling Bay water samples were collected once per week throughout the 1990 bathing season (as well as some pre-season and post-season samples) from five selected locations (see Figure 3). These sites were intended to be control areas for the sampling program. The samples were tested for fecal coliform levels. One site, at bay parking lot #1, bad variable water quality. That area of the bay is likely influenced by drainage from Scott Run, depending on whether currents from that direction were present. Scott Run was tested and it was found that a branch of the stream which crosses West Sixth Street just east of Sixth Street and Peninsula Drive was possibly the source of much of the fecal coliform. Because fecal coliform levels were higher than could normally be attributed to storm drainage and because dry weather fecal coliform levels were also elevated, it is possible that at least part of the problem may be due to illegal sanitary sewer hookups to storm drains south of West Sixth Street. However, there was no visual evidence of sewage noted (feces, paper, etc.). This information was referred to enforcement personnel from the ECDH Environmental Health Division for further investigation. The other four bay sites tested bad consistently low fecal coliform levels (see Table 7). If these four areas had been bathing beaches, none would have been 36 say sdk.,fl.*143 p In COLOGICAL - --------- A 4-11 -4 MAR-A LAKE Ilk. In --5 4@, C@ Ll, m PRESOUE ISLE BAY SRIE Ir M4 OF C j'T'f WILLCRCEK TOWN511F PRESQUE ISLE STATE PARK H TABLE 7 Bay Samples Fecal coliform/100 ml. i=*,(iR,-,,r I WATER i WES*r I E R R y I P, 1 R R y DATE i P. LOT I WORKS I PIER I MON. N I MON. S 5/9/90 1 70 1 <10 1 20 1 .10 1 ioOO 5/15/90 1 '70 1 <10 1 10 1 <10 1 20 5/22/90 1 20 1 10 1 30 1 <10 1 40 5/30/90 1 ---- I <10 I <10 1 10 1 80 5/31/90 1 elio I ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- 6/1/90 1 10 1 ---- I ---- I ---- I ---- 6/6/90 1 1 ENO 1 30 1 120 1 <10 1 10 6/13/90 1 2 5 0 1 10 1 160 1 <10 i <10 6/28/90 1 300 1 40 1 <io 1 20 1 10 7/3/90 1 20 1 100 1 <10 I -)o 1 20 7/11/90 1 300 1 <10 1 20 1 10 1 io 7/18/90 1 1 <10 1 20 1 <10 I <10 7/25/90 1 20 1 @10 I <10 i <io 1 10 8/1/90 1 110 1 <10 1 410 1 <10 I <10 8/8/90 1 110 1 <10 1 20 1 20 1 50 8/ 15/90 1 100 1 <10 1 60 1 i 0 1 so 8/21/90 1 70 1 ---- 1 30 1 ---- I 3/2 2 /9 0 1 40 1 1.50 1 10 1 *,-10 i < 10 8/22/90 1 50 1 ---- f <10 1 20 1 <10 '31:-7 0 11 E TR I C 1 53.5 1 3.8 1 8.4 1 3.7 1 10.8 MEAN I I I closed due to exceeded allowable fecal coliform levels* during the summer of 1990, based on these samples. (Had these sites been bathing areas, however, bacterial levels may have been soniewbat higher because of contributions from bathers and resuspension of sediment-associated bacteria from bathers' activities.) The percentage of samples with >200 fecal coliforms/100 ml was used in Table 5 to compare sample results between Presque Isle beaches. In 1991 25.2% of all bathing beach samples collected at Presque Isle bad >200 fecal coliforms/100 ml. The percentage of samples with >200 fecal coliforms/100 ml from the bay control beach areas were as follows: First Bay Parking Lot 23.4% Waterworks Area 0 West Pier Area 0 Bay North of Perry Monument 0 Bay South of Perry Monument 6.2% (one sample over 200) It can be seen that: the percentage of high sample values is significantly less at the four control sites not directl y subject to non-point source runoff. Differences between these control sites and Presque Isle beaches that could account for different fecal coliform levels include: *A beach must be closed if the fecal coliform. density of any sample exceeds 1,000 per 100 ml, or if the fecal coliform, density in not less than fiv-e consecutive samples in a 30-day period exceeds a geometric mean of 200 per 100 ml. 39 - amount of non-point runoff from creeks, streams or storm drain outlets - relatively calm water in the bay, compared to the lake - amount of use by batbers - babits of birds and otber wildlife (fewer gulls at the four control areas witb low fecal coliform levels; bowever, ducks are often seen around the Perry Monument area) 40 VI. County-Wide Lake Erie Sampling On Tuesday, July 24, 1990, between 12:30 and 2:00 p.m., 19 streams that empty into Lake Erie and 29 beacb areas along the Pennsylvania sboreline of Lake Erie from near the Obio line to the New York State border were sampled (see Figure 4). This effort was similar to the tbree county-wide sampling events conducted 3 times during; 1989 (2). Samples were collected by Presque Isle interns for the Presque Isle beacbes, and by ECDH environmental personnel for the streams and beacbes in otber parts of the county. The day was sunny and clear witb winds from the west. Wave beigbts were one foot or less in most locations and lake water temperatures were approximately 700F. There bad been no rain since July 22, wben there was 0.3 in. of precipitation. Stream fecal coliform counts were mostly low, as was expected for dry weatber conditions (Figure 4). The exceptions were Mill Creek and Garrison Run, wbicb bad counts of >6,000 fecal coliform/100 ml. (Laboratory dilutions to detect exact fecal coliform levels above 6,000/100 ml were not prepared; tberefore, actual levels are riot known.) These streams bave combined sewer overflows and some dry weatber sewage overflows as tributaries. Beacb water fecal coliform levels were low along the County's Lake Erie sboreline. Beacb water fecal coliform levels reported for Presque Isle beacbes at the 41 Lake Erie EXPLANATION Strear@ -A 01C 13. z 10 * Lake Sarnple Lake Sornp I e n West of stre - East of strearn P 0 CD 20 'a 43 173 @p < a o;% after result indicates a d, a -5 -43 o 0 .5 43 43-,, ample collected frorn a :trearn or surfaca-water OQ Po, a, 53 q9 1 19 60 0 discharge to Lake Erie. %- 0 lip a All other -ples are take e. @ater 63 .50,* "Q 53 (3 20 up C, 6 INQ @3 0 CD lip C, NO - 0 j 0 0 0 NO 0 0 ^1013" 0 0 ,%a -50 0 Lake Erie -0 0 a C, 0 Countywide Sampling Results 0 0 FIGURE 4 July 20, 1990 Numbers Fecal coliform colonies per 100 ml Erie County Dept. of Health March 1991 No Scale time of the survey are noted on Figure 4. They are the arithmetic averages of the three samples collected for each beach, as is outlined in the Protocol for Sampling Beaches in Appendix A. Individual fecal coliform sample levels for each beach can be found in Appendix B. The arithmetic mean of individual beach samples collected at Presque Isle was 57.5 fecal coliforms/ 100 ml, compared with 63.0 fecal coliforms/100 ml for those collected off Presque Isle. The geometric mean of the individual Presque Isle samples was 43.8/100 ml, compared with 25.7/100 ml for samples off Presque Isle. It does Dot appear that there were any great differences in fecal coliform levels at Presque Isle State Park versus the remainder of the Pennsylvania section of the Lake Erie shoreline on this day under the weather conditions that existed during sampling. 43 VII. Incubation Tests of Shoreline Materials In the Year 1 and Year 2 Bathing Beach Contamination Studies (1,2) it was demonstrated that E. coli could grow under laboratory conditions in shoreline sand obtained from Presque Isle. This concurred with the work of others (7-12,15) who found that E. coli can survive for extended periods of time in natural conditions or can multiply in sediment under some laboratory conditions. Work for the Year 1 and Year 2 incubation tests was patterned after that done by LaLiberte and Grimes (12) on lake bottom sediment. Of the various materials tested in the Year 2 study (2), fresh upland replenishment sand and Beach 1 sand produced the most growth. Extensive retesting of various types of sand was not planned for 1990. Three types of sand were tested in May 1990 in an attempt to reconfirm results from the Year 1 and Year 2 studies. "Control" sand was obtained west of Presque Isle from a beach at the foot of Montpelier Avenue. Lake replenishment sand (from Erie Sand and Gravel) and upland replenishment sand (from West Ridge Sand and Gravel) were also tested. Lake water was collected to use in the incubation tests. Samples were processed as was outlined in the Year 1 and Year 2 studies (1,2). The following combinations of each of the three sand samples were prepared: 44 1. 10 g autoclaved sand + 90 ml lake water 2. 10 g sand + 90 ml lake water 3. 10 g autoclaved sand + 90 ml lake water + E. coli* 4. 10 g sand + 90 ml lake water + E. coli* 5. Lake water as received 6. Lake water with.E. coli 7. 10 g sand + 90 ml deionized sterile buffered water 8. 10 g autoclaved sand + 90 ml deionized sterile buffered water 9. 10 g autoclaved sand + 90 ml autoclaved lake water 10. 10 g sand + 90 ml autoclaved lake water Increases in fecal coliform levels through the second or third day of the experiment occurred in the sand samples spiked withf. coli for the control sand and lake replenishment sand. An increase in the second day was also noted for the lake water spiked with E. coli. (Previous ECDH tests on lake water showed steady declines in fecal coliform with no increases.) No other sand samples showed any appreciable evidence of growth, as was seen in our Year 1 and Year 2 studies. Results of the upland sand sample incubation tests were quite different from those in the Year 2 study. All sand incubation samples tested in 1990 bad very low fecal coliform levels, most of which were <10 fecal *One loopful of an E. coli culture slant was aseptically transferred to 100 ml of sterile buffered water; .1 ml of this mixture was used where indicated. 45 coliforms/100 ml. Even inoculation of sand samples witb E. coli did not produce an appreciable quantity of E. coli in tests run immediately after the inoculation. (Inoculation of lake water witb E. coli in this experiment resulted in a fecal coliform level of 560/100 ml.) The experiment was repeated using the same sand sample, witb virtually the same results. It would appear that there was some difference in this upland sand sample wbicb was dE@trimental to the survival of E. coli. Results follow in Tables 8 10. 46 TABLE 8 Incubation Test Control Sand (from foot of Montpelier Avenue) Fecal Coliform/100 ml Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 1. 10 g autoclaved 20 50 40 20 <10 sand + 90 ml lake water 2. 10 g sand + <10 10 <10 <10 <10 90 ml lake water 3. 10 g autoclaved 790 16,000 30,000 3,000 1,000 sand + 90 ml lake water + E. coli 4. 10 g sand + 770 6,000 1,700 400 2,800 90 ml lake water + E. coli 5. Lake water <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 as received 6. Lake water 550 3,000 2,000 500 100 witb E. coli 47 TABLE Incubation Test Upland Replenisbment Sand (from West Ridge Sand and Gravel) Fecal Coliform/100 ml Day_j Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 1. 10 g autoclaved <10 <10 20 <10 20 sand + 90 ml lake water 2. 10 g sand + <10 10 <10 <10 <10 90 ml lake water 3. 10 g autoclaved 20 10 <10 <10 <10 sand + 90 ml lake water + E. coli 4. 10 g sand + <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 90 ml lake water + E. coli 5. Lake water <10 <10 <10 <10 <10 as received 6. Lake water 550 3,000 2,000 500 100 witb E. coli 48 TABLE 10 Incubation Test Lake Replenisbment Sand (from Erie Sand and Gravel) Fecal Coliform/100 ml Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 1. 10 g autoclaved 120 60 110 <10 <10 sand + 90 ml lake water 2. 10 g sand + 110 150 100 20 <10 90 ml, lake water 3. 10 g autoclaved 470 5,000 4,000 420 180 sand + 90 ml lake water + E. coli 4. 10 g sand + 560 6,000 3,000 490 290 90 ml lake water + E. coli 5. Lake water 60 90 10 <10 <10 as received 6. Lake water 510 2,000 340 20 <10 witb E. coli 49 VIII. Sand Raking Trial In the Year 1 report (1), a bathing beach on a small recreational lake in Madison, Wisconsin was discussed (15). This beach bad problems resulting from high fecal coliform levels in wet shoreline sand. Bathing beach water experienced elevated bacterial counts (and frequent beach closings) when adverse weather (rain or wind) led to suspension of this material from the shoreline into the lake. In further correspondence with the City of Madison Health Department and the University of Wisconsin, it was learned that bacterial levels were being controlled by daily discing (turning over) of damp shoreline sand. Turning the sand over allowed more of it to be exposed to air and sunlight. The sand dried and fecal coliform levels were reduced. This program resulted in a significant reduction of beach closures for the Madison beach. This year's activity included raking damp sand at one Presque Isle beach to determine whether this procedure might be effective on the Presque Isle shoreline. Sawmill Beach was selected as the test site. Short Jetty Beach (west of Sawmill) and Ainsworth Beach (east of' Sawmill) were used as control sites. Periodic samples of damp sand and lake water were collected to assess the effectiveness of the program. 50 On July 18, 1990 samples of sand were collected for fecal coliform analysis at the test sites for background levels. On Thursday, July 19 pre-raking samples of sand and water were collected from 7:00 - 8:00 a.m. Sawmill Beach was raked about 7:30 - 8:00 a.m. with a bulldozer with a scarifier. The bulldozer made two passes, raking an area 6 - 8 feet wide at the water's edge to a depth of 3 - 4 inches. The entire length of the beach (approximately 800 feet) was raked. Sawmill Beach sand was re-sampled immediately following the raking, and periodic samples of test and control sand and water were collected throughout the day (Table 11). Sand was also re-sampled three days after raking. Fecal coliform results in Table 11 do not show a particular pattern or significant differences between test and control beaches. Some of the higher sand counts were from samples collected during (or immediately after) times when a large number of gulls were occupying the shoreline area. It was not shown that raking bad any significant effect on fecal coliform levels during this trial. Some problems with the raking trial were: 1. The most effective equipment for the program was not available. The bulldozer ran over the raked area, flattening part of the area with 51 its tracks. Different equipment may bave produced better results, bad the weatber remained calm all day. 2. Altbougb the lake was calm in the morning, waves increased, in the early afternoon and flattened the raked area. It was then identical to the control areas in appearance. Cbanges during a day, sucb as occurred on July 19, are usual ratber than an exception. 3. There were few periods of time witb ideal conditions for the raking trial (i.e., 3-4 days of bot, calm weatber). It was also difficult to predict wben sucb a period of time would occur. 4. Lake Erie water level can vary considerably due to seicbes (tide-like occurrences driven by wind). A seicbe would temporarily cbange the location of tbe sboreline, tbereby reducing the effectiveness of the program. A seicbe is not believed to bave occurred during the July 19 trial. Altbougb the raking program could be tried again in the summer of 1991, it does riot appear to bold mucb promise for Presque Isle's lake side batbing beacbes because of cbangeable lake conditions. The program migbt work at a small inland lake or an area sucb as Beacb 11, wbicb is sbeltered and is usually calm. 52 "s rm 'Ia IT 7-It @70 Fir AXM- -gq F-F - 4@ t lp 1@7 TABLE I I SAND SAMPLES WATER SAMPLES Fecal Coliform/10 g Fecal Coliform/100 ml Sbort Sawmill Sawmill Sbort Date Time Jetty West East Ainswortb Jetty Sawmill Ainswortb 7/18/90 12:00 4,000 --- 460 20 --- --- --- 7/19/90 7:00 --- 300 --- --- --- --- 7/19/90 8:00 20 --- 4,300 20 20 300 20 7/19/90 10:00 170 80 700 20 --- --- --- 7/19/90 13:00 1,000 1,400 2,300 60 80 60 160 7/19/90 15:30 <10 200 200 <10 --- --- --- 7/19/90 20:00 800 110 60 200 60 180 30 7/22/90 13:40 100 300 200 <100 --- --- --- IX. Predictive Beach Closings As a result of the first two years of this study (1,2) it was found that it is possible to predict the detection of high fecal coliform levels at Presque Isle bathing beaches with a good degree of accuracy. These predictions are based on weather and lake conditions. The following conditions were found to cause elevations in beach water fecal coliform levels, which were likely to approach or possibly exceed 1,000/100 ml.* 1. The onset of a windstorm and rough lake conditions following several days of hot, calm weather - Fecal coliform bacteria appear to accumulate and grow in shoreline sand during the hot, calm weather and are suspended in the water at the onset of rough weather. These conditions may affect any of Presque Isle's lake-side beaches. 2. A heavy rainstorm, together with lake currents from the west - Non-point source runoff affects Beach 1 and Barracks Beach because of proximity to those sources. Other beaches may also be affected, but fecal coliform levels at other Presque Isle beaches are not as likely to be high enough to warrant beach closings. A *A beach must be closed if a single sample exceeds 1,000 fecal coliform/100 ml or if the monthly geometric mean exceeds 200 fecal coliform/100 ml. 55 rainstorm, together with currents from the east, may produce high fecal coliform levels at Presque Isle's Beaches 10 and 11, but at this time it is not possible to predict, with any degree of accuracy, whether these levels might approach those requiring a beach closing under any given set of circumstances. Municipal sewer system malfunctions may allow discharges into streams or directly into the lake. Such a malfunction is most likely to occur during heavy rain, and. if it occurs, may exacerbate contamination incidents at Presque Isle beaches. 3. Lack of chlorination or incomplete chlorination of the City of Erie sewage treatment plant effluent - No malfunctions of this type were recorded for the summer of 1990. If such an event was to occur, preventative closing of Beaches 10 and 11 may be warranted because currents could carry sufficient effluent to those beaches to cause elevated fecal coliform levels. If it bappen,s it may cause high fecal coliform levels at Beach 10 and Beach 11. Fecal coliform levels resulting from any of these conditions may last from several hours to a day or more . However, laboratory analysis of a water sample takes 24 hours (48 hours for Sunday samples). In the absence 56 of instantaneous bacteriological data, swimming might be permitted during the time that fecal coliform levels are highest. By the time the sample analyses are completed and a beach closed, water quality has usually improved to within levels considered "safe" for swimming. Improvements were needed, both to safeguard public health and to prevent needless days of beach closures under acceptable water quality conditions. Generally speaking, changes in beach sampling and closing protocols made over the years were improvements in that more samples were being taken, more areas sampled and some precautionary beach closings were beginning to take place. However, beach designations, numbers of samples collected and interpretation of results varied from year to year or even from month to month. Increased beach closings caused by these changes resulted in a great deal of confusion for the public, who felt that increased closings indicated worsening pollution. Presque Isle State Park addressed these problems in the spring of 1990 by writing a sampling protocol to standardize and outline sample collection sites and procedures, as well as methods used in interpretation of results. Provisions were also made to close a beach as a precautionary measure if high fecal coliform levels were predicted (as in #1, 2 and 3 above). The protocol was developed in close cooperation with Pennsylvania 57 Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Community Environmental Control to assure that state regulations were being properly interpreted. Predictive closings in 1990 are believed to bave reduced bealtb risks to the public. Presque Isle State Park plans to continue using predictive closings, as needed, in the future. The Presque Isle State Park sampling protocol is included as Appendix A. Table 12, wbicb was developed by Presque Isle State Park, lists the precautionary (predictive) closings whicb occurred in 1990, as well as total beacb closures and percentage of time closed for eacb beacb. 58 TABLE 12 PRESQUE ISLE STATE PARK 1990 REGULAR SWIMMING SEASM --V TIMES BEACH CLOSED TOTAL AS A DAYS DATES VDAYS % TIME t TIMES PRECAUTION BEACH BEACH CLOSED BEACH CLOSED BEACH CLOSED BEACH CLOSED (INCLUDED 8EACHEI OPEN 411H COLIFIRM. HIGH CILIFORM HIGH COLIFORM HIGH COLIFORM IN COL. 6) COL I COL 2 COL 3 COL 4 COL 5 COL 6 COL 7 #1 West 93 6/19 -6/23/90 a 7.9% 3 1 7/31 -8/02/90 8/29 -8/31/90 11 91 6119 -6111/90 9 7.9% 3 1 7/'1 -8/02/90 8/29 -B/31/90 #1 East 95 6/19 -6/20/90 6 3.9% 4 7/18 -7/19/90 8/07 -8/10/90 8/29 -9/30/90 Barracks 95 6/19 -6/20/90 6 5.9% 4 2 7/19 -7/19/90 8/07 -8/10/90 8/29 -8/30/90 #2 100 6/19 -6/20/90 1 0.99% 1 #6 101 0 #7 100 7/31 -8/01/90 1 0.99% 1 #8 101 0 0 Stone Jetty 101 0 0 Duck Pond 101 0 0 Short Jetty I () 1 0 Saw Mill 101 A Ains- worth 11, Goddard 101 0 0 Light- house 101 0 0 #9 101 0 0 Pa g e 21 TIMES BEACH CLOSE 11 TOTAL AS A DAYS DATES DAYS Z TIME TIMES PRECAUTION BEACH BEACH CLOSED BEACH CLOSED BEACH CLOSED BEACH CLOSED (INCLUDED BEACHES OPEN HIGH COLIFORM HIGH COLIFORIA HIGH COLIFORM HIGH COLIFORM IN COL. 6 COL I COL 2 COL 3 COL 4 COL 5 COL 6 COL 7 #10 99 8/07 -8/08/90 2 1.98Z 2 8/14 -8/15/90 #11 96 8/14 -8/15/90 5 -4.95% 3 1 8/19 -8/22/90 8/29 -8/30/90 TOTAL 1781 37 2.04% 21 7 1818 Total beach days for the regular swimming season which runs from the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend (May 26, 1990) to and including Labor Da@ (Sept. 3, 1990). 101 Total beach days per beach for the regular season. X. Summary and Recommendations The Year 3 Contamination Investigation differed from the Year 1 and Year 2 studies in that the focus of the work shifted from Presque Isle to non-point sources off Presque Isle. The following observations, conclusions and recommendations were made as a result of this year's work. Non-Point Sources and Point Sources West of Presque Isle It appears that much of the fecal coliform affecting Presque Isle beaches are transported into Lake Erie by storm water. Literature and sampling conducted thus far both indicate that stream, storm drain and catch basin sediments are reservoirs of fecal indicator bacteria which are resuspended in storm water and carried to Lake Erie during heavy rain events. Depending on lake current conditions, high fecal coliform levels at some Presque Isle beaches may result soon after a rain event. Many of the fecal bacteria eventually settle into lake sediments or are washed into sand in the "splash zone" area of the beaches, where it has previously been shown that bacterial incubation may take place (1,2). Wind and waves can suspend these fecal indicator bacteria, resulting in high bacterial levels in beach water (1,2). 61 Indications are that most of the fecal coliforms in this system originate from non-point sources in the watershed area. Though sewer overflows are infrequent in the area west of Presque Isle, when they do occur they also add fecal indicator bacteria to the stream/storm drain sediment system. The following recommendations are made towards the goal of controlling and/or predicting health risks in Presque Isle bathing waters which originate from point and/or non-point sources west of Presque Isle. 1. Though sewer overflows west of Presque Isle do not appear to be frequent, overflows will add to fecal indicator bacteria and nutrients in sediments and contribute to increased lake water bacterial levels not only immediately but possibly even weeks after it occurred. It is recognized that the Millcreek Township Sewer Authority is planning a complete renovation of the Shorehaven Drive sewage pump station before the spring of 1991. This should eliminate one infrequent intermittent source of sewage. It is recommended that the Township also determine what repairs are necessary to prevent a recurrence of the sewer overflow incident at Kelso Beach on August 29, 1990 and to determine what improvements might be needed for the Route 5 sewage lift station on Wilkins Run. 62 Millcreek Township should also give a high priority towards locating and eliminating sources of inflow and infiltration to those portions of the sanitary sewer system that could adversely affect Presque Isle State Park. It is recommended that the Fairview Township Sewer Authority look closely into operation records for its Manchester Road sewage pump station. The Authority should determine if additional upgrades in the system are necessary to prevent unpermitted bypasses. All municipalities in Pennsylvania are required by law to immediately report any unpermitted sewage discharge. Knowing when and where such events occur on streams that empty into Lake Erie in the proximity of Presque Isle allows for the timely closing of beaches. These records also support the need to upgrade inadequate systems. Enforcement actions should occur when it is determined that an accidental or illegal discharger is negligent in reporting an unpermitted discharge. 2. Municipalities with known areas of septic problems should update their 537 plans to include those areas in future sewer projects. 63 3. Increased sewage flow during rainstorms is often indicative of Inflow and or infiltration of storm water into the sanitary sewer. All local municipalities should request the public's help in cutting down on inflow. A public education project should be initiated suggesting that residents check to determine whether their own residential downspouts and footer drains are discharging to the proper locations and to check for leaky basements. (Rain water entering a basement will probably run to the laundry sewer, adding to sanitary sewer flows.) Proper action should be taken to eliminate such problems. The responsibility of protecting the environment rests not only with various government agencies, but also in the bands of the general public. 4. An ordinance requiring pet owners to pick up their pets' wastes in a small beach town in New Jersey was helpful in reducing fecal indicator levels in beach water. Pet owners should be encouraged to pick up after their pets, particularly on or near paved areas leading to storm drains. This item is covered, in general, tinder the Rules and Regulations of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, 64 Chapter 243, Nuisances, Section 243.9. Public acceptance and cooperation is needed in order to meaningfully cut down on the bacterial runoff from domestic pets' wastes. It is recommended that Presque Isle State Park continue to enforce its policy prohibiting dogs on guarded bathing beaches and consider imposing "littering" fines on dog owners who do not pick Lip after their pets on unguarded beaches. 5. Periodic cleaning of streets, ditches, storm drains and catch basins may help to reduce fecal indicator bacteria in storm water. A study is being formulated for 1991-92 to determine whether there may be beneficial effects from frequent cleaning of a portion of a storm sewer system. Storm water and sediment from the study area and a control area will be compared to determine the effectiveness of the cleaning operations in removing fecal coliform. It is recommended that this plan be carried out. 6. A new storm water management plan is to be developed for the Lake Erie watershed in Erie County. It is anticipated that work on the plan will begin in the spring of 1991. It is recommended that municipalities implement this 65 storm water management plan after its development. Any reductions in storm water quantities might be expected to result in reductions in non-point bacteria reacbing Lake Erie. 7. It is recommended that the DER continue the breakwater monitoring program establisbed in 1989. One goal sbould be to determine wbetber the breakwaters in place at Barracks Beacb and Beacb 1 East may, under some conditions, slow or retain fecal indicator bacteria associated witb water or sediment from streams and storm drains to the west. 8. Investigations bave revealed that most of the fecal indicator bacteria in storm water west of Presque Isle are of non-point origin. These bacteria may bave survived for a prolonged period of time and possibly multiplied in the environment. Tberefore, buman bealtb risks associated with swimming may differ from those expected for a given indicator level of fecal coliform. If so, beacb closing mecbanisms for batbing beacbes would need to be reviewed and sbould be appropriately revised. It is recommended that storm water, storm drain sediment, Beacb 1 water and Beacb 1 sediment be analyzed for select buman and 66 animal pathogens in future studies. Based on the results, other water and sediment samples may also be tested for pathogens and a relative health risk estimated for a particular fecal coliform (or other indicator) level. Sewerage Overflows East of Presque Isle Sanitary sewer overflows from sources east of Presque Isle could possibly affect Presque Isle Beaches 10 and 11 under certain lake conditions. The following recommendations are made concerning these overflows. 1. Some of these overflows (discussed in Section II) do not seem to be adequately emphasized by the 1990 consent decree between the City of Erie and the Pennsylvania DER. It is recommended that all of these sites be included in any cleanup plan formulated as a result of the consent decree. 2. It is recommended that the DER consider a connection ban prohibiting all municipalities from making any new sewerage connections to the City of Erie's east side interceptor sewer until the overflow problems are resolved. 67 Additional Findings and Recommendations 1. Evidence gathered during this study shows that levels of fecal coliform bacteria at selected sites on the Presque Isle side of the bay meet the requirements of the Public Bathing Place Regulations. 2. A sand raking trial at one of Presque Isle's lake side beaches was not successful in reducing fecal coliform levels in the damp shoreline sand zone, probably because of quickly changing lake levels and conditions. 3. Growth of E. coli was seen in some of the sand samples during incubation tests of shoreline materials. Contrary to Year 2 results, however, the upland sand sample would not support growth or even survival of E. coli. No definite conclusions can be made from this one upland sand sample. At this time, plans are to discontinue use of upland sand for beach replenishment once the breakwater construction project is complete. 4. The Protocol for Sampling Beaches developed by Presque Isle State Park appears to be a useful tool in protecting the public from exposure to .possible high pathogen levels in bathing beach waters, while preventing at least some closures 68 that migbt bave occurred in the past Linder acceptable water quality conditions. It is recommended that Presque Isle State Park continue to use this Protocol and to improve on it as new information and experience warrant such cbanges. 69 LITEIUTURE CITED 1. Presgve Isle State Park Bathing Beach Contamination Report. Erie (Pennsylvania) County Department of Health and Pennsylvania Coastal Zone Management (June 1989). 2. Presque Isle State Park Bathing Beach Contamination Report, Year 2. Erie (Pennsylvania) County Department of Health and Pennsylvania Coastal Zone Management (February 1990). 3. Quresbi, A. A. and Dutka, B. J. Water Res. (1979) 13, 977-985. 4. Lanka, K. G., et al. App. Environ. Microbiol. (1989) 39, 734-738. 5. McDonald, A. and Kay, D. Water Res. (1981) 15, 961-968. 6. Kelcb, W. J. and Lee, J., S. "Modeling Techniques for Estimating Fecal Coliforms in Estuaries," J. Water. Polut. Control Fed. (1978) 50, 862-868. 7. Palmateer, G. A., et al,, "A Study of Contamination of Suspended Stream Sediments With E. coli." Toxicity Assessment: An International Journal, Vol. 4, (1989) 377--397. 8. Matson, E. A., Horner, G. and Buck, J. D. "Pollution Indicators and Otber Microorganisms in River Sediment," J. Water Pollut. Control Fed. (1978) pp. 13-19. 9. Struck, P. H. "The Relationship Between Sediment and Fecal Coliform Levels in a Puget Sound Estuary," J. Environ. Health. (1988), pp. 50, 403-407. 10. Gerba, C. P. and McLeod, J. S. "Effect of Sediments on the Survival of Escbericbia Coli in Marine Waters," Applied and Environ. Microbiol. (Jul. 1976) pp. 114-IZU. 11. Gerba, C. P., et al. "Distribution of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens in a Coastal Canal Community,' Marine Pollution Bulletin, (1977) Vol. 8, No. 12, 279-282. 12. LaLiberte, P. and Grimes, D. J. "Survival of Escberichia Coli in Lake Bottom Sediment," Appl. and Envir6n--.--M --- T-crobiol. (1982) Vol. 43, 623-628. 70 13. Rivella, R. and Gonzalez, C. C. "Seasonal Variations of Pollution Indicators in a Wildfowl Reserve," J. Applied Bacteriology, (1989) 67, 219-223. 14. Report on the Bacteriological Quality of the Detroit River, 1977-198-4. Ontario Ministry of the Environment, (Nov. 1987). 15. Standridge, J. H., Delfino, J. J Kelppe, L. B. and Butler, R. "Effect of Wate@iowl (Anas platyrhnibos) on Indicator Bacteria Populations in a Recreational Lake in Madison, Wisconsin" APPI. and Environ. Microbiol. (1979) pp. 38, 547-536. 16. Flint, K. P. "The Long-Term Survival of Escberichia Coli in River Water," J. Applied Bacteriology (1-9-87) 63, 261-270. 17. Cbai, T. J. "Chracteristics of Eschericbia Coli Grown in Bay Water as Compared With Rich Medium" Applied and Environ. Microbiol. (1983) 45, 1316-1323. 18. Lim, C. H. and Flint, K. P. "The Effects of Nutrients on the Survival of Escbericbia Coli in Lake Water," J. Applied Bacteriology. (1989) 66, 559-569. 19. Fujioka, R.S., et al. "Effect of Sunlight on Survival of Indicator Bacteria in Seawater" A lied and Environ. Microbiol. (1981) 41, 690-6TE-. 20. McCambridge, J. and McMeekin, T. A. "Effect of Solar Radiation and Predacious Microorganisms on Survival of Fecal and Other Bacteria,11 A lied and Environ. "pp Microbiol. (1981) 41, 1083-1087. 21. Van Order, G. N. "Natural Bathing Beaches - Sanitary Survey Addresses Public Health Concerns," J. of Environmental Health. (1990) 52, 348-350. 71 I I I I I I I I I APPENDIX A I Presque Isle State Park I Protocol for Sampling Beacbes I I I I I I I I Rev. b/08/90 PROTOCOL FOR SAM13LING BEACHES Below is the protocol for sampling the beaches at Presque Isle State Park that will be implemented for the 1990 swimming season. Samplers will consist of a trained student intern team (2 each) who will be responsible for all sample collection, lab delivery, and input of sample data on a computer. The samplers will be trained by the Erie County Department of Health and park officials prior to the swimming season. Regulations samples will be taken between noon and 2:00 p.m. on Sundays and Mondays during the swimming season. Samples will not be collected prior to the swimming season. Three separate samples will be taken at each of the 11 permitted beach areas as delineated on the Presque Isle Bathing Permit which was filed with the Department of Environmental Resources Community of Environmental Control in 1957 (two permitted beach areas are no longer used for swimming). One sample will be taken approximately 50'in from each end of the beach, and the third will be taken in the center of the beach area. All three samples will be taken during the same visit to the beach and will not be spread throughout the day. All samples will be taken at the average water depth of the beach (approximately waist high). The lab will run separate tests for each of the three samples taken at each beach area. The final count for that particular beach will be the arithmetic mean of the three samples. This final count will be referred to as a sample throughout this protocol. Sporadic high anomalies will not be included in the arithmetic mean to determine the final beach count but the anomaly will be reported to the park. Attempts will be made to determine the cause of that anomaly and resamples may be taken. The Dean and Dixon Q-test will be used to determine statistically if a anomaly has occurred. This test relates the extreme sample range to the range between the suspect result and its nearest neighbor. If properly applied, the Q-test results in a 90% confidence level for data rejection. It should be noted that the Q-test will only be judiciously applied when the laboratory suspects an anomalous sample result. It would not be employed to routinely discard the highest of the three sample results. Since the statistical analysis of small ie., 3 sample, data sets is difficult, coliform counts from adjacent beaches will be included in this analysis when possible. Exceptions would be Beach 1 West and Beach 11 North. The sample results will be incorporated into a 30-day running geometric mean which will be calculated for each beach. The DER Lab in Erie is responsible for calculating the geometric mean. The 30-day running geometric mean is based on samples taken during the last 30 days and is not based on a calendar month. A minimum of five samples taken on five different days are necessary to run the geometric mean. Samples taken on the first day of the swimming season will start the 30-day running geometric mean. Samples taken on Sunday will be refrigerated and taken to the DER lab in Erie at 8:00 a.m. on Monday morning where they will be processed immediately. Sam@les taken on Monday will be taken to the Lab immediately after collection. Scheduled water samples will not be taken if the beaches are closed because of high wave activity, but samples will be taken the following day or when the beaches are reopened. For beach closing/opening, the lab will be responsible for immediately notifying one of the following persons at Presque Isle State Park: 1) Park Operation Supervisor 1, 2) Assistant Superintendent in charge of lifeguards and 3) Assistant Superintendent in charge of Park's Police; and one of the following persons at the Erie County Department of Health: 11 Director of Environmental Health, 21 Environmental Health Supervisor, 3) Director of Health Department, or 4) Aquatic Biologist. Presque Isle State Park must contact the Erie County Department of Health for approval to reopen beaches closed for conditions 1, 2, 3 as outlined in the "Closing a Beach Section." The park will also be responsible for contacting following any beach closure/opening: the Lifeguard Headquarters, the Presque Isle Police (so they can log the beach closure/opening in), Gateway Concession, Region #2, and the Chamber of Commerce. CLOSING A BEACH The water in bathing beaches should be considered contaminated for bathing purposes when one of the following conditions exist: 1. When officials determine (through visual inspection) that a substance is being discharged or may be discharged into the water and is or may be hazardous to the health of persons using the bathing beach. The beach will be closed and sampling will begin to determine the coliform count. Samples taken during the time the beach is closed because of this type of closure will not be counted towards compliance and will not be included in the 30-day running geometric mean. 2. When the fecal CDliform den sity of any sample collected at a bathing beach exceeds 1,000 per 100 milliliters. 3. Whenever the 30 day running geometric mean fecal coliform density of all samples exceeds 200 per 100 ml. 4. If the first few sample results taken at the start of the swimming season are greater than 500 per 100 ml, the beach should be closed until the running geometric mean, using a minimum of 5 samples, is less than 200 per 100 ml. 5. Beaches may be closed at the onset of high wave activity immediately following a hot, calm period of weather in anticipation of high fecal coliform counts. Historical data has indicated that during these conditions that a high fecal coliform count will be experienced immediately at the onset of high wave activity with the levels decreasing back to safe standards within several hours. The beacliss may be reopened two hours after closurefor this condition if the waves are not creating unsafe swimming conditions. Samples will be collected during this type of closure only for additional data to monitor and verify if this procedure is correct. Samples taken during this condition will not be considered "regulatory" and are not included as part of the 30-day running geometric mean. If samples taken when beaches are reopened and found to exceed 200 per 100 ml, indicating assumption for reopening was not valid, future reopening will not be allowed until confirmation of a level not more than 200 fecal coliform per 100 ml is received. OPENING BEACHES After a bathing beach has been closed due to conditions 1, 2, and 3 as stated above under "Closing a Beach", a re-sampling of the bathing beach will occur for five consecutive days, weather conditions and lab operations permitting (the lab is closed on Saturdays and Sundays). Bathing beaches will be reopened after closure when a visual survey of the beach area indicates the conditions which were responsible for the closure are no longer present and when: 1. The first re-sample after the closure which does not exceed 200 fecal coli+orm per 100 ml. The sample which closes a beach because of conditions 2 and 3 as stated above will be included in the 30-day running geometric mean. Samples taken while the beach is closed will also be incorporated in the 30 day running geometric mean., 2. If the conditions responsible for closing the beach cannot be identified the beach may not. be reopened until the 30-day running geometric mean does not exceed 200 fecal coliform per 100 ml. During the summer of 1990, the Erie County Health Department will be continuing the sampling of beaches for the ongoing "Beach Contamination Study" at Presque Isle State Park. Samples taken for this study during open beach hours and at designated swimming beaches will only be considered as regulatory samples if the protocol outlined previously is followed. For those samples, Sue or her designee will indicate on the sample form "Regulatory", and the DER Lab will handle these samples as previously indicated and include the samples into the running 30--day geometric mean. NOTIFY THE FOLLOWING FOR ANY BEACH CLOSING OR OPENING: 1. Erie County Health Departement - - - - - - - - - - 451-6700 (Joe Vogel, Mark Fedorchak, Joseph Trzybinski or Bob Wellington) 2. Lifeguard Headquarters - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 838-6804 3. Park Police 4. Park Region #2 - - - - - - -- - - Network- 8 -686-3080 5. Central Office - - - - - Wendy - Network - - - 8 -447-6640 6. Gateway Concessions (John Loyer) - - - - - - - 453-7787 (Call for #6, Pettinato, Budny and #11) (Beeper 453-0938 - when it beeps give our They will call us back) 7. Chamber of Commerce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 454-7191 (Bob Chandler, Don DiPlacido or Judy) 8. WICU-TV (Ch. 12) - - - - - Evan Lovett - - - - - - 454-5201 9. WJET-TV (Ch. 24) - - - - - Marsha) - - - - - - - 868-2424 10. WSEE-TV (Ch. 35) - - - - - Pierre - - - - - - - - 455-7575 11. Erie Times News - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 870-1715 12. Erie Morning News - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 870-1682 13. Rocket 101 - - - - - - Chris - - - - - - - - - 725-4000 14. WEYZ Radio - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 452-2041 (Ask for Jim or Chris Tarbell) Summer of 1990 PRESQUE ISLE STATE PARK BEACH SAMPLES FOR 17?0 SUMMER SEASON BEACH SAM. PERMIT AREA NAME LOCATION OF BEACH SAMPLES 1 Beach #1 One sample taken at west end of Beach #1-West. Two samples taken at Beach #1 (West of Bathhouse, East end of -Beach #1). 2 Barracks One sample taken at the West end of Beach #I-East. Two samples taken at Barracks Beach (West end, East end). 3 unguarded No samples taken in this area. 4 Beach #2 Three samples taken at Beach #2 (West end, middle and East end). 5 unguarded No samples taken in this area. 6 Beach #6 Three samples taken at Beach #6 (West end, middle and East end). 7 Beach #7 One taken at West end of Beach #7 One sample taken midway between W;st end and concrete jetty. One sample taken at concrete jetty. a Beach #8 One sample taken at the East end of Beach #7. One sample taken just east of the Beach #8 concession stand. One sample taken at the east end of Stone Jetty. 9 Mill Rd. One sample taken at the west end of Beaches Duck.Pond Beach. One sample taken at Saw Mill Beach. One sample taken at the east end of Goddard Beach. 10 Light Three taken at Light House Beach House (West end, middle, East end). Beach 11 Beach #9 Three samples taken at Beach (West end, middle and East end). 12 Beach 10 Three samples taken at Beach #10 (West end, middle and East end). 13 Beach 11 Three samples taken at Beach #11 (West end, middle and East end). I I I I I I I I APPENDIX B I Presque Isle State Park 1 1990 Batbing Beacb Sample Results I I I I I I I I I Presque Isle State Park 1990 Beach Sampling Results The following table was prepared by the Erie Department of Environmental Resources Laboratory to track sample results and keep a running 30-day geometric mean, per the "Protocol for Sampling Beaches" (Appendix A). The following information will be of use in interpreting the table: - All counts are reported in units of fecal coliform/100 ml. - A count of "1" indicates a day when no sample is collected. (The "l" is used as a multiplier and does not affect the 30-day geometric mean.) - Counts in column "A" are from the west area of the beach sampled (north for Beach 11). Counts in column "B" are from the center area of the beach. Counts in column "C" are from the east area of the beach (south for Beach 11). "Mean count" is an arithmetic mean of samples A, B and C for a particular day. The mean count is officially considered to be the "sample" for that beach on that day (per the "Protocol for Sampling Beaches). 110/111 : "0" indicates that no sample was taken that day or that the sample was taken for monitoring purposes. Monitoring samples are designated with an "M" in the collection date column. (Monitoring samples are not used in the geometric mean.) "1" indicates that the sample was used in geometric mean calculations. I - "Root" indicates the number of samples in the running I 30-day period. - "Geo Mean" is the running 30-day geometric mean. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 'EACH WATER SAMPLES PRIGR. TO MAt 26.19913 Date Beach I Belch 6 Beach 9 Belch 10 Belch 11 Wind Dir. Wive Ht. Dither Ld Like Elev. Rain? 10/1111981 30 40 30 to 40 2 ZERO 570.77 YES 10/1011989 230 110 too 220 350 NE 2 ZERO 570.56 10/2VIM to 10 10 10 10 so I ZERO 370.69 No 10/3111969 Hoo 280 290 440 10 No 4 ZUO 570.99 YES 1111111769 30 180 30 10 60 N 5 ZERO 571.22 No It/1511969 40 30 20 20 40 SE 5 ZEPO 570.52 No 1112111989 Ito 140 110 50 30 WE 5 ZERO 370.76 No 1112911989 go 40 so 40 20 No 3 ZERO 570.85 No 1210kil"? 40 90 40 30 to S I ZERO 570.46 No IZ/1111989 10 10 to 10 40 E 0 ZERO 570.29 YES 0311411990 10 10 10 to to so I ZERO 571.20 NO 03/2111990 20 to 30 20 10 SN 2 ZERO 571.30 No 03/30119" to 20 10 10 10 SE 0 ZERO 571.21 YES 04/0311"0 to 10 10 10 to S 0 ZERO 571.48 No 0410111"D 10 10 10 10 to No 0 ZERO 371.31 No 04/1711990 10 10 10 10 10 0 4 ZERO 371.69 NO 0412311"D to 10 10 30 10 V 2 ZERO 571.51 No 03/0211"o 20 to to 10 20 so 3 ZERO 571.18 No 05/0111"o too 70 130 40 it 59 1 ZERO 371.43 Ito OSIM119" 10 10 10 10 30 SV I ZERO 571.59 No 0512211"o 60 40 30 70 60 NE I ZERO 571.66 No This table gives the results of water samples taken on a weekly basis at designated beach locations on Presque Isle through the fall, winter and spring of 1989-1990. The samples were collected when the lake was not frozen over. Information listed to the right of the Beach #11 column indicates physical beach conditions for that testing date. Samples are tested for fecal coliform and the results listed are in number of fecal coliform colonies per 100 ml of water. BEACHI :0 ";t @.:E-'KTRIC ME43 FAEE I OctcW 13t IP1 WE 1149 m c E PEAK Cr".V G! I R'VOT 11FACTNIAL GED rEAn H20 TE@p W-VE HT PATFER L) CIND "R, P-1s, nAY 7.) 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 ERR M A 1 27 50 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I.OOE40 EAR MAY ',a go 3 10 20 10 13 1 1 I.:'E+01 13.113 52 1 LCK 9 1140 'AY "1 94 4 i 11 0 tio 760 673 1 2 B.Q?E#03 94.75 it 3 IEq NE @Es MAY 30 go 5 70 jo 40 50 1 3 4.4iE+05 76.17 53 1.5 ZERO N No MAY I Iff) 6 to to IQ 11 1 4 4.49E#06 46.03 56 1 ZERO v No XNE 01 90 7 1 1 1 0 4 4.4?E+06 46.03 56 1 IERG i NO JUNE 02 10 0 1 1 1 1 0 4 4.49E#06 46.03 JUNE 03 90 q I I I 1 0 4 4.49E+06 46.03 50 4 ZERO SK No JUNE 04 90 10 1 1 1 1 0 4 4.41E+06 46.03 JWNE 05 90 it 90 110 90 97 1 5 4.34E+08 51.39 55 2.5 LOW 5 go JUNE 06 90 12 jo 30 20 27 1 6 I.ItE#10 47.116 60 1.5 IERO SO NO JUNE 07 ?0 is to to 10 to 1 7 1.16E*11 30.06 62 0.3 LON sv 40 JUNE G 90 14 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.W+11 118.06 JUNE 09 10 15 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.16E+11 39.06 JUNE 10 10 16 30 40 40 37 1 8 4.24E+12 37.80 59 2.3 ZERO !N No JUNE it 90 17 50 jo 50 43 1 9 imb-14 36.45 H 2 LON NN NO JUNE 1,, 90 Is I I I 1 0 9 1.84E+14 "to. 45 JUNE 11 90 19 70 111) "100 97 1 10 I.IBE+16 42.17 64 1 LCV v NO JUNCE 14 90 20 jo 400 260 370 1 it CHE+19 51. 3,7 58 3 LON so YES JUN-' IS 70 11.1 1 1 0 11 6.58E+19 31.37 JUNE 16 90 22 1 1 1 1 0 it 648E*18 31.37 JUNE 17 90 23 10 60 30 33 1 12 2.I9E+20 49.55 60 0.5 LeW s NO JUNE Is 10 24 4:00 4AM 1600 1900 1 13 8.55E#23 69. 33 59 3 LOW 51 .140 JUNE 19 95 00 :30 1to 1 14 3.06E+16 77.49 64 3 ZERO v .40 :5 400 4 j I JL.*4E 20 90n 26 120 1400 1.500 1 0 14 3.06E+26 77.99 JU-24E ZI 40H 27 80 130 120 1 0 14 3.OeE#.26 77.59 66 3 ZERO CM No ;1UNE ill 9.) 2 9 120 1:0 Ito 117 1 15 3.5?E+28 80.11 65 0 ZERO s NO J U1.1 E Z 190 179 1 1 1 1 0 15 3.51E429 60.11 JUME 24 ?0 30 2010 11-110 700 567 1 16 2.05E+31 90.53 66 4 ZVO NW YES JU14: 45 90 1 320 "TO 190 247 1 17 3.0,E#33 .96.03 66 3 ZERO m No JUNE I's io 32 to to 30 17 1 19 0.34+",4 87.12 70 1 LCO N NO HIE 27 90 33 jo -'0 110 37 1 118 2.30E+35 92.16 JUNE 90 34 10 20 70 17 1 18 71.04 70 0.5 LON sE NO 3 US E _7 q90 t I I 1 0 17 1.14E+32 76A5 JUNE 30 50 36 1 1 1 1 0 16 1. 14 E ej I e7.:o JUL 1 01 90 37 60 70 70 67 1 17 7.5?E+32 65.93 70 2.3 LON sm No JULY 02 ?0 33 10 20 60 -0 1 18 2.16E+34 111.0s 72 0.3 LON cl NO 'Ift V 03 @o 39 10 too 20 1 0 18 2.21SE+34 01.05 JULY 04 90 40 1 1 1 1 0 13 2.11EE,`4 81.05 JUL! 05 ;0 41 3.) -!q 27 1 H 6. 1H#33 75.45 NE 40 illky @t go ;I I I 1 0 17 2.3tE+"2 e .1. 1. 1 JUL 0 16 2.,tE+',l il,!6 -%'LY m 40 44 60 10 140 73 1 17 1.73E+33 90.0 72 1 LON a q JULY P ?0 43 Wo 410 300 770 1 16 1.33E+.6 101.60 72 1.3 LON 9 No 10 ;0 1 0 17 3.6TE+-4 107.?B !_0 1 17 4.0E, 1118.74 71 5 LEA I! co YL f '0 i 1 0 17 4.1!E+34 NO 4 1 15 4. 5 1 1 0 is I.. + 01.il It 6 ";W 25.) 313 1 16 3X 1@6.46 LN E4 @EACHI 310 DAY SE..;mETRIC Ma PAGE 2 JULY !6 90 7 310 400 Mo 353 1 17 1.30E+35 116.26 to 3 LCN EW 0:3 JULY 17 70 8 1 1 1 1 0 16 LME433 125.71 hILY to ?0 9 20 30 10 27 1 16 2.&LEtil ?235 70 1.@ HIM NV JULY 119 90 10 310 10 20 20 1 16 1.41H,70 ?6.e4 71. 1.9 Ku JULY Z 1 70 It I I I 1 0 16 1.4eE+',O 76.84 71 jULY 21 90 12, 1 1 1 1 0 16 1.48E+',o 76.?4 JULY 21, 10 is 170 50 to 243 1 16 3.06E@30 80.41 72 1 LON NO vc:z 140 120 lio 177 1 17 S.44E-j2 34.,!S 7,' 1.5 LOW sl L JULY 123 90 14 Q JULY '14 ;0 15 30 to 20 20 1 17 1.92E+31 69.22 73 1 LCN cW NO jLLy 25 qo 16 10 40 10 20 1 17 1.36E*30 59.71 73 M LOW N 0 JULY 26 90 !7 20 10 to is 1 17 1.25E+30 38.91 14 0 M.Ell NE NO JULY 27 40 19 1 1 1 0 th 3.40E+218 60.70 JULY 28 90 19 1 1 1 0 15 2.04E+27 66.16 JULY 29 90 20 360 200 go 213 1 16 MR-29 71.19 so 0.5 'ED NO ING "LILY M 90 21 Itoo 1:" 340 1041 1 17 4.5!E*32 a3.18 74 0.5 LOW SN No JULY 31 90 22 390 j90 340 Sri t 17 2.5.E,,33 92.17 72 3.5 ZERO NV .40 A *UG 01 90 All 10 10 70 30 1 17 IMM+33 92.27 71 1 ZERU 14E 40 AUG 02 90 24 10 70 20 31 1 18 8.30E+34 87.110 76 0.5 P.Ell NO %a AUG 01 90 25 20 to go 37 1 19 !.IZE*36 IS.11 71 0 LOW No NO AUG 04 90 26 1 1 1 1 0 16 1.17E+35 86.76 AUG 05 90 27 500 600 1000 700 1 19 8.18E+37 99.95 70 2 LON sl SO 4UG 06 90 718 1000 1000 640 eso 1 20 7.20E+40 110.37 70 2.5 LON NO No AUG 07 qO 29 1 1 1 1 0 19 9.81E+38 112.77 A UCS 08 10 30 10 to to 17 1 19 1.12E*37 12.17 73 1 LON NN NO AUG 09 90 31 10 70 40 40 1 20 9.30E+38 80.40 75 0.5 MED NE 40 AUS 10 99 32 1 1 70 70 1 20 1.19E#39 69.90 70 1 ZERO SE No ACS it 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 20 1.19E+37 89.90 AL16 12 90 34 10 20 410 17 1 21 1.9GE40 82.77 74 0.5 PED EN No Alus 13 903 35 1500 470 600 1 0 21 1.96i+40 112.97 70 0.5 ZEF0 N VES AUG 14 90 36 260 320 200 287 1 21 I.BIE+40 82.62 72 1.1 LON NN No AUG ti 90 31 1 1 1 1 0 20 1. 1' E+' P 76.al to 2.5 LCW %I lEi AUG is 90 76 1 1 1 1 0 20 1. IU#37 h.93 40 17 90 39 1 1 1 1 0 19 I.93,E+36 81.23 AUG to 90 40 1 1 1 1 0 is 9.6!E+34 67.81 AUG 19 90 41 :200 740 310 410 1 19 3.95E+37 95.22 70 1.3 LON NO YES AUS 20 qO 47 60 60 !A) 1 20 1.97E*jt 91.21 70 0 LCV4 91 No AUS 21 90 43 1 1 1 0 1? B.IIE+36 07.61 Q1 622 51 44 1 1 1 0 is 4.39E+34 IM? AUG 23 90 45 1 1 1 1 0 17 2.29E+33 91.71 'US 24 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 16 I.IIE+32 100.h AUG is 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 15 8.61E+30 113.41 AUS 26 90 48 20 .90 1 3110 210 1 is 1.31E+,3 119.93 79 1.6 L:W sw 40 A VS 27 90 49 !@A 11.0 90 o'! 1 17 !.6'E+ll 119.79 72 2.6 LCN W NO ALIS Is 90 so I I I 1 1) is 3.7,E#',2 114.52 AL16 119 4 @.l 5! !7eo I ! c 1) 70 1 0 is B.Jbc,+.19 ". a2 72 2 ZERO N 413 AUG 30 90 52 4160 :to 260 276 1 15 6.IEE+29 96.55 to I ZERG SE No ALIS 31 90 53 115 110 160 132 1 15 2.71E*30 106.88 SEPT 190 -@4 1 1 1 0 14 6.14E-119 116.16 FEPT 2q,,) 55 1 1 1 0 13 2.,2E+27 126.93 SEPT 3 90 55 1 1 1 0 13 2.2.E+117 126. SEPT 4 ;1) 5? 0 10, to t I- t 7r#'!5 91.15 0.5 SEPT qO 1.0 1 1) 12 ;.6(,E,,12 75.81 SEPT ^-Q 119 1 12 J.60E+22 Mal HACK @O NY SECMETRIC ,E,.4 PAIJE 3 October 13, 19?0 SEPT 7 90 69 1 1 1 1 0 it 2.16E+21 87.00 SE*T 9 901 61 1 1 1 1 0 I-) MINI q4.04 SEPT q 93 62 1 1 1 I 0 9 1.72EW 97.17 SEPT 10 @O 63 1 1 1 1 0 9 MIN? 97.17 SEPT It 90 64 1 1 1 1 0 9 4.6,E+16 1.11.13 SEPT 12 90 65 1 1 1 1 0 8 4.63E+16 121.!3 SE?T I I iO 66 1 1 t I 0 7 t.fiZE#1,4 tol.10 HPT 14 ?O P I I I I 0 7 1.62E+14 107.10 SEPT .5 90 68 1 1 I I 0 7 IXE+14 107.0 SEPT 16 i CA 69 1110 90 2jO 1 0 7 1.6,E+14 107.10 62 4 ZERO No SEPT 17 90 70 1 1 1 1 0 7 l.b2E,,14 107.10 SEPT If 90 11 I I I I 0 6 3.94E*ll 95.63 SEPT 17 20 72 1 1 1 1 0 3 7.89E+09 95.36 SEPT 20 90 73 I I I I 0 5 7.85E+09 95-36 SEPT N 90 74 1 1 1 1 0 5 7.59E#09 95.!6 SEPT 22 90 71 1 1 1 1 0 i 7.a9E#09 93.36 SEPT 23 90H 76 40 30 50 I 0 5 7.09E#09 93.J6 59 3 ZERO w No SEPT '14 90 77 1 1 1 1 0 5 7.69E+09 95.36 DA71 DAYII v C E MEAN COUNT 0/1 AGOT IFACTORIAL BEO MEAN H20 TEMP NAVE HT. FATHER LD WIND VR. RAIN? MAY 26 10 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 ERR MAY 27 90 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I.00E+0O ERR MAY 28" 3 10 10 to 10 1 1 I.0OE*OI 10.00 32 1 LON SW No MAY it to 4 420 150 0 190 1 2 1.90E#03 43.39 31 1 ZERO WE YES WAY 30 to 5 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.90E+03 43.59 RAY 31 TO 6 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.90E+03 43.59 JUNE 01 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.90E+03 43.59 JUK 02 10 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.90E+03 43.59 JUNE 03" 9 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.901*03 41.51 JUNE 04" 10 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.90E+03 4349 JUNE 03 90 If 30 30 20 27 1 3 3.07E+04 37.00 35 2 ZERO s No JUNE 06" 12 1 1 1 1 0 3 3.07E+04 37.00 JUNE 07" is I I t 1 0 3 5.07E(,04 37.00 c AK of to 14 1 1 1 1 0 3 3.07E+04 37.00 c JLK "" Is I I I 1 0 3 5.07E+04 37.00 1 JUK to" 14 40 so 20 37 1 4 1.86E+06 36.72 so 3 ZERO 511 NO JUNE If" 17 to 10 10 10 1 5 1.86E+07 28.43 38 1 LOW RW No c JUNE 12 90 to I I I 1 0 5 t.86E+07 28.43 t JUNE Is" it I I I 1 0 3 1.66E#07 28.43 c JUNE 14" 20 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.86E+07 21.43 JLK Is 90 21 1 1 1 1 0 5 I.lbE+O7 28.41 JUNE Ii" 22 1 1 1 1 0 5 1.86E+07 28.41 t JUNE 17" 23 to 10 40 20 1 6 3.72E+01 26.01 60 1 LOV s NO t JUNE 11" 24 1100 Boo "0 933 1 7 3.471#11 44.52 59 4 LON sv No JUNE 19 904 ?3 320 480 385 1 0 7 3.47E#ll 44.52 JUNE 20 "If 26 lit ISO so 1 4 1 MR411 44.52 JUNE 21 "ll 27 206 230 700 1 0 7 3.47E+II 44.32 JUNE 22" 28 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.47E*ll 44.52 JUNE 23" 21 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.47E*II 44.52 JUNE 24 90 30 40 290 300 no I I 1.14E*14 57.19 66 4 ZERO mv YES JUNE 23" 31 50 210 60 tol 1 9 1.22E#16 61.29 66 2 LOV v #0 JUNE u" 32 140 1 120 130 1 10 1.57E+ll 66.01 70 1 LON v No JUNE V" $3 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.59E#17 81.50 JUNE 21" 34 1 1 1 1 4 1 1.33E+14 73.32 JUNE 29" 33 1 1 1 1 0 8 8.35E#14 73.32 JUNE 30 90 36 1 1 1 1 0 8 8.33E#14 73.32 JULY of 10 37 230 210 170 203 1 9 1.70E#17 82.12 70 2 LON Nv NO JULY 02 90 38 10 20 to 13 1 10 2.260,111 68.47 72 1 RED sv NO JULY 03" 39 1 1 1 1 0 10 2.2fiE*IG 66.47 JUILY 04" 40 1 1 1 1 0 10 2.26E*18 68.47 JULY 05 90 41 1 1 1 1 0 9 8.49E+16 76.03 JULY 06 90 42 1 1 1 1 0 9 8.49E*16 76.03 JILT 07 90 43 1 1 1 1 0 9 8.49E4,16 76.03 JULY 01 90 44 340 110 130 193 1 10 1.64E+19 11.47 72 1 LON sl No JULY "10 43 300 300 270 210 1 11 4.76E+21 93.48 72 1 LON 59 No JULY to ?0 46 1 1 1 1 0 10 1.30E+20 102.65 JULY it to 47 1 1 1 t 0 9 1.30E+19 132.16 JULY 12 to 48 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.30E*I? L32.96 JULY 11 to 49 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.'jK+Il 132.96 JULY 14 90 50 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.30E+19 132.96 JULY is 90 51 700 1100 toot t2oo 1 10 1.56E+22 165.68 67 1 LON SN NO BAFRACKS "' 0DAY jECP.E'.RIC REAK ME 2 Septesber 07.. 1990 MY 16 90 52 59 1000 2400 1311 1 11 2.05E#25 200.03 68 2 LON sm No JULY 17 90 53 ISO 290 320 233 1 It 2.60E#26 251.t6 60 3 LON so No JULY 18 90 54 10 20 20 17 1 11 4.64E+24 174.75 70 1 ZERO No No JULY 19 90 53 20 130 10 53 1 12 2.47E+26 158.29 71 1 ZERO N NO MY 20 90 36 400 920 480 600 1 13 1.4K*29 173.38 70 2 RED AN YES JULY 21 90 37 1 1 1 1 0 13 1.48E4.29 173.33 T JULY 22 10 SO 120 100 20 00 1 14 1.19E#31 165.94 72 1 LON AN YES t MY 23 90 59 160 ISO 220 170 1 15 2.02E+33 166.11 71 2 LON so NO JULY 24 90 60 30 70 40 33 1 13 3.26E+32 147.08 73 1 RED sl NO n MY 23 90 61 1 1 1 1 0 14 3.06E#30 150.49 r JULY 26 90 62 1 1 1 1 0 11 2.33E+28 152.20 p JULY 27 90 63 1 1 1 1 0 13 2.35E*28 152.20 w MY 28 to 64 1 1 1 1 0 13 2.33E+26 132.20 JLLY 29 90 M 460 to 30 IV? 1 14 4.62+30 133.01 go I no AM No JULY 30 " 66 390 120 330 2B7 1 13 1.33E+33 161.4? 74 1 LON so NO c MY 31 to fil I I I 1 0 14 6.3x#30 158.111 AUG Of " 611 1 1 1 1 0 11 4.89E+29 192.21 f Aug 02 " 69 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.119E+29 112.21 AUB 03 " 70 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.BqE*29 192.21 c AU6 04 " It I I I 1 0 13 4.119E+29 192.21 t AU6 03 90 72 400 3400 3300 2367 1 14 1.16E*33 229.97 70 2 LON sv NO c AM 06 10 73 440 330 340 370 1 13 4.28E*33 237.39 70 2 LON AN No Aug Ol 90 74 90 120 so 97 1 13 2.14E*33 226.64 72 2 LON Sv No AUS Of " 75 240 70 90 133 1 15 9.14E*34 215.21 73 1 ZERO Nv No t AU6 0 90 76 20 20 to 17 1 16 1.64E*U 183.41 75 1 ZERO RE AD AU6 to" 77 10 10 10 10 1 17 1.64E#37 134.57 70 1 iERD SE No t AU6 I 110 is I I I 1 0 17 1.64E*37 154.57 f ALM 12" 79 to 30 30 37 1 11 9.29E*36 146.18 74 a RED sm No AUll 13 TOI 60 Boo 370 260 1 11 9.19E+38 146.19 70 0 ZERO A YES AU6 14 90 111 60 40 70 37 1 18 4.StE*37 123.31 72 2 RED AN NO Aug is" 02 1 1 1 1 0 17 3.33E#34 107.34 AUG 16 to 83 1 1 1 1 0 16 1.32E+32 101.73 Aug 17 04 1 1 1 1 0 13 7.9of"lo 114.77 Ats 18 es I I I 1 0 14 1.48E+21 121.23 An it m 210 170 170 183 1 14 4.32#2111 111.39 70 2 LON Nv YES AN 20 67 to 20 10 11 1 13 4.04E+29 96.69 70 0 LON AN YES AUG 21 Be I I I 1 0 14 7.35E#27 98.01 AUS 22 Vo 69 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.44E+23 93.93 AUG 23" I I I 1 1 12 6.33E+23 ?8.49 AN 24 90 91 1 1 1 1 1 12 8.13E#23 98.49 AUS 23" U I I I 1 1 12 8.33E*23 98.49 Aug 26" 93 100 70 03 83 1 13 7.OBE*25 97.30 78 1 RED sm No AU6 27" 94 220 520 560 433 1 14 3.07E+26 108.33 72 2 LON A NO AUG 28" 95 1 1 1 1 0 13 1.36E#26 103.48 AU6 29 108 96 1200 300 600 1 0 12 5.44E+23 95.03 72 3 ZERO A No AU6 SO 90 97 ISO 100 50 110 1 13 5.98E*25 96.13 70 1 RED SE NO 2C.*.C%2 30 DAY SiOMETRIC MEAN PAGE I Septesber 07, 1990 DATE DAY# It c E IGN COUNT Oil AGOT VACTORIAL Sig 1EAN M20 TESP WAVE HT. BATHER LD WIND DIR. PAIN? MAY 26 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 ERR k RAY 27 10 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I-00E4,00 ERR PAY 28 90 3 10 to to 10 1 1 I.O0E+Ot 10.00 52 0.5 LOW sv No MAY " " 4 230 330 200 2?3 1 2 2.93E+03 54.14 51 3 IERD WE YES RAY 30 90 5 1 1 1 1 0 2 2.93E#03 54.16 MAY 31 YO 6 1 1 1 1 0 2 2.93E+03 54.16 JUNE it 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 2 2.93E+03 54.16 JUNE 02 90 8 1 1 t 1 0 2 2.91E*03 34.16 JUNE 43 90 9 1 1 1. 1 0 2 2.M#01 34.14 JUNE 04 90 10 1 1 1 1 0 2 2.93E*03 54.16 JUNE 03" It 30 20 20 23 1 3 4.84E+04 40.91 55 3 ZERO 5 NO JUNE 06 " 12 1 1 1 1 0 3 6.14E#H 40.91 JUNE #7" 13 1 1 1 1 0 3 6.84E#44 40.91 JUNE 09" 14 1 1 1 1 0 3 i.84E+04 40.91 JUICE " 90 Is 1 .1 1 1 0 3 6.64E+04 40.11 JUK 10" 16 30 so 10 37 1 4 2.31E+Q& 39.80 38 2 ZERO sv No JLWE 11 90 17 50 50 30 43 1 5 I.QTE+01 40.40 so 1.3 ZERO NN No JUNE 12" It I I I 1 0 3 I.m+" 40.41 JUNE 11" 11 1 1 0 5 I.OIE*N 40.48 JUNE 14 90 20 1 1 0 5 I.OVE*N 40. 4 JUIAE 13 VO 21 1 1 0 3 MINI 40.41 JUNE th 90 22 1 1 0 3 I.OTE+01 40.40 JUNE 17 90 23 20 20 10 17 1 6 I.oIE#O9 34.92 60 0.5 CON s NO JUNE 18" 24 1000 2100 340 1147 1 7 2.OBE#12 37.50 39 4 ZERO SN No JUNE 19" 23 too IN 160 150 1 1 LIZE04 64.92 64 3 ZERO v No JUNE 20 90 24 30 20 60 43 1 9 1.302+16 61.79 64 0.3 ZERO SN No JUNE 21 701 27 240 200 170 1 0 1 1.32014 61. " 66 4 ZERO SN No JUNE 22 90 28 3" 200 260 287 1 10 3.87E*I1 72.24 65 0 ZERO S No JUNE 23 90 27 1 1 1 1 0 10 3.117E*18 72.24 JUNE 24 90 30 300 600 500 467 1 It t.8tE*Z1 83.60 66 4 ZERO NN YES JUNE 23 90 31 40 00 40 53 1 12 f.64E+22 82.ZV fifi 3 ZERO v No JUNE 26" 32 1 1 1 1 0 12 9.64E*22 92.29 JUNE 27" 33 1 1 1 1 0 It 9.64E+21 91.67 JUNE 28 90 34 1 1 1 1 0 10 3.27E*19 69.47 JUNE 29 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 10 3.291+19 89.47 JUNE 30 90 36 1 a I 1 0 10 3.27E+19 89.47 JULY I " 37 100 30 20 50 1 It 1.64E*21 $4.86 70 3 ZERO NN No JULY 2 90 36 10 10 10 to 1 12 1.64E,,22 11.01 72 0.3 ZERO I No JULY 3 90 39 1 1 1 1 0 tz 1.64E*n 71.01 JULY 4 90 40 1 1 1 1 0 12 1.64E+22 71.01 JULY 5 " 41 1 1 1 1 0 11 7.04E+20 70.37 JULY 4 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 It 7.04E#20 78.37 JULY 7 90 43 1 1 1 1 0 11 7.04E*20 78.37 JULY I " 44 50 20 to 27 1 12 1.80E*22 71.80 72 0.3 LOW SN No JULY 9 90 43 too 190 180 137 1 13 2.94E*24 7b.24 72 1.5 ZERO so YES JULY 10 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 12 I.OH*22 91.04 JULY 11 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 It 1.85E*21 85.78 JULY 12 90 48 1 1 1 1 0 11 1.112+21 03.78 JULY 13 90 4t 0 11 1.01E+21 85.78 JULY 14 90 50 0 11 I.85E+2I 03.78 JULY 13 90 it to to 10 1 12 1.62#22 71.72 61 1 ZERO sv No BijaCH2 10 DAW HCAETRIC 'Eml FACT, 2 St9tesber 07, 1990 MY th 90 52 NO 440 460 470 1 13 8.70E*24 82.89 68 3 LOV SN No MY 17 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 12 3.22E+23 94.73 JULY 18 90 54 1 1 1 1 0 it 4.54E'-20 75.51 MY It" 55 1 1 1 1 0 10 3.04E+19 70.51 JULY 20 90 56 1 1 1 1 0 9 7.OOE#16 74.42 XLY 21" 37 1 1 1 1 0 9 ?.00E+Ib 74.42 r JILY 22 90 58 to 40 50 33 1 9 8.15E*13 58.60 72 0.5 ZERO NN YES MY 21 to 59 ISO 120 160 150 1 10 1.22E*16 64.37 71 2 ZERO Sv No MY 24 to 60 80 50 60 63 1 10 1.6&E*17 52.72 73 0 ZERO so YES MY 23" 61 1 1 1 1 0 9 MIMS 32.65 MY 26 96 62 1 1 1 1 0 9 ].IIE*13 32.63 ALY 27 90 63 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.IIE+13 52.63 c JLLY 21 If 64 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.I)E+13 32.65 c MY 29 90 65 Ito 20 20 .50 1 10 I.S.',E+ll 52.38 80 0.5 la No JULY 34 go 61 220 70 toy 1 11 1.66E#ll 35. H 74 1 ZERO sm No JuLy 31 go 67 1 1 1 1 1 10 MEW 56.30 c Aus I" H I I I I I I 3.32E#14 68.49 t NA 2" 69 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.32E#16 68.49 AN I" 70 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.32E#16 68.49 c Ad 4If 71 1 1 1 1 0 9 Mx+Ib 68.49 1 AN 190 n 170 Ito 100 133 1 10 3.OlE+Il 74.24 70 2 ZERO Sv "a t AUS 4" 73 220 274 210 233 1 11 1.19E*21 82.38 70 2 ZERO Sm ma t PA 190 74 1 1 1 1 0 10 4.43E+19 92.22 AU6 190 73 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.84E+17 86.93 f AU6 9If U I I I 1 0 1 2.84E+17 86. " ALS to" 77 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.84E#17 86.95 AU6 It 10 le I I I 1 0 9 2.84EW 86.?3 AL16 12 10 79 20 20 0 27 1 10 7.57E+18 77.26 74 1 LOV Sv No WA is "M so 200 Ito 180 1 0 10 7.37E+tl 77.26 70 0.3 ZERO N YES AU6 14 90 el 140 90 110 113 1 10 8.38E+19 98.48 72 1.3 ZERO xv No Avi 13 go 82 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.03E*17 82.78 Aus I& to 93 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.BX+17 82.78 AU6 17" 64 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.89+17 82.78 AU6 If 90 05 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.13E#17 92.78 AU6 it 90 06 240 220 220 227 1 10 4.14E#lt V1.56 70 2 ZERO NN YES k46 20 90 07 to to 20 11 1 It 3.32E#20 76.03 70 0 LON Nd NO AU6 21" Be I I I 1 0 10 I.66E+IV 03.54 AU6 22 90 89 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.IOE*I7 78.28 AU6 21 90 90 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.74E+15 90.11 AU6 24 90 91 a I I 1 0 8 1.74E+13 00.38 AU6 25 90 92 1 1 1 1 0 8 I.,4E+13 80.30 AL16 26 90 93 40 too so 63 1 9 1.10E+17 78.20 75 1 LON so NO AU6 27 90 94 270 180 210 220 1 10 2.43E#19 86.00 72 2 LOV 9 No EEAE?6 ;0 bAY BECRETRIC MEAN PAGE I October 13, 1990 DATE DAys w C E MEAN CCUNT 0/1 ROOT IFACTCRIAL 6EO MEAN H20 TEMP VAIVE HT. BATHER LD NIND 31R. FA110 PAY 116 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 EAR PAY 27 90 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I.0OE+Q0 ERR PAY 29 10 3 to to 10 to 1 1 I.OOE#01 10.00 52 1 LON PAY 29 90 4 So 129 90 97 1 2 8.67E*02 119.44 31 3 ZERO NE YES MAY 10 90 - 3 1 1 1 1 0 2 9.67E4,02 29.44 KAY 31 90 & t I I 1 0 2 G.6?EtQZ 29.44 JUNE 01 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 2 8.67E+02 2t.44 JUNE 02 90 a I I I 1 0 2 8.67E+02 29.44 JUNE 03 90 9 1 1 1 1 0 2 8.67E+02 29-44 JUNE 04 90 10 1 1 1 1 0 2 8.67E+02 21.44 S NO JUNE 03 90 it 30 to 10 17 1 3 1.44E+04 24-35 53 3 ZERO jUNE 06 90 12 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.44E+04 24-35 JUNE 07 90 11 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.44E*04 24.33 JUNE Ol 90 14 1 1 1 t 0 3 1.44E+04 24.35 JU%E 09 10 Is f I I 1 0 3 1.44E+04 24.35 LON sw No JUNE to 90 16 30 10 30 23 1 4 3.37E+03 24.09 56 3 JUNE it" 17 10 50 to 23 1 5 7.86E+06 23.94 so 2 LON NV No JUNE 12 90 to I I I 1 0 5 7.26E+06 23.94 JUK 13 90 19 1 1 1 1 0 5 7.96E+06 23.94 JUNE 14 90 20 1 1 1 1 0 5 7.26E+06 23-94 JUNE 13 90 21 1 1 1 1 0 5 7.96E+06 23-94 JUNE 16 90 22 1 1 1 1 0 5 7.86E+Ob 23.94 5 NO JUNE 17" 23 10 10 10 to 1 6 7.86E+07 20.70 60 0.3 MED JUNE 18 90 24 210 270 220 233 1 7 1.93E+10 21-26 39 4 LON Sw No JUNE t9 90 25 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.93E*10 29-26 JUNE 20 90 26 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.83EfIo 1.9.26 JUNE 21 90 27 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.83E+10 29.26 JUNE 22 90 IS I I I 1 0 7 1.93E+10 29-26 JUNE 23 90 21 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.63E+10 29-26 Nw No JUNE 144 90 30 100 2DO 100 133 1 8 2.45E+12 35.36 66 4 Z E.R. 0 JUNE 25 90 31 70 so 50 37 1 9 1.39E+14 37.27 66 4 LON I No JLXE 26 90 32 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.39E*14 37.27 JUNE 27 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 a 1.19E#13 43.93 JUNE 28 90 34 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.60E411 39.86 'UME 29 50 35 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.6OE+II 39.06 JUNE 30 qO 36 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.60E*ll 39.?b NN 40 JUILY 190 37 30 to 40 27 1 a 4.27E*12 37.1t 70 3 LON JULY 290 Is 50 10 10 23 1 9 9.95E+13 is.92 72 1 NED Sv 40 JULY 390 39 1 1 1 1 0 9 9.7,E+13 33.92 J'.'LY 490 40 1 1 1 1 0 9 9.93E+13 35.92 jULY 590 41 1 1 1 1 0 9 5.9?E+12 39.34 3LILY 690 42 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.97E+12 P-14 J"Ll 7qO 43 1 1 1 1 0 6 3.97E+12 39.!4 JULY 190 44 360 00 &0 161 1 9 9.95E+14 46.39 72 0.5 FED Sv No JULY 990 43 so ISO so tol 1 10 1.03E#17 50.26 72 1.3 LON Sv YES XLY 10 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 9 4.41E+15 54.73 @llf 11 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 B I.8QE+I4 60.69 itly 12 90 48 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.99E+14 60-el 'lly 13 10 49 1 0 8 1.91E+14 60.89 I I I 11,11 14 90 50 1 1 1 1 0 8 I.a9E*14 6O.E9 XLY 15 90 51 67 1 Lev 5v go 30 230 60 107 1 9 11.0&'E+16 64.60 6EACH6 ',0 DAY GEOMETRIC MEAN PAGE 2 October 13, 1990 JULY 16 90 52 30 210 Ito 117 1 10 2.13E+18 69.T3 69 3 RED sv No JULY 17 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.!SE*17 85.14 JULY 19 90 54 1 1 1 1 0 8 I.OIE+13 75.06 juLY 19 10 55 1 1 1 1 0 a I.oIE*ls 75.06 JULY 20 90 56 1 1 1 1 0 0 1.01E+15 75.06 JULY 21 90 57 1 1 1 1 0 8 I.OIE#13 75.06 JULY 22 90 so 1300 1700 1100 1367 1 9 t.3eE+lQ 103.62 72 0.3 UN NN YES JULY 23 90 59 120 140 150 137 1 10 I.BeE#20 V6.33 71 2 ZERO sl No JULY 24 90 60 30 60 90 60 1 10 8.47E#19 90.33 73 1 RED Sw YES JULY 73 61 70 20 to 33 1 10 4.99E4-19 q3.27 73 0 LON Nv No JULY 2b fil 10 so 30 40 1 It 1.99E#21 66.36 70 CALK LEV NW NO JULY 27 90 63 1 1 1 1 0 it 1.99E#21 96.36 JULY 21 90 64 1 1 1 1 0 11 1.99E+21 06.36 JULY 29 10 63 140 70 430 213 1 12 4.25E+73 93.11, 82 0.5 HIE" NN No JULY 30 90 66 470 400 300 390 1 13 1.66E,,26 10.97 74 1 LCV Sv NO JULY 31 0 1 1 1 1 0 12 6.22E+24 116.43 AUG 1 60 1 1 1 1 0 It 2.661+21 134.77 AUS 2 fit I I I 1 0 11 2.66E*23 t34.77 AUG 3 90 70 1 1 1 1 0 It MUM 134.77 Aus 4 30 71 1 1 1 1 0 11 2.6bE#21 134.77 AUG 5 " 72 too 130 200 150 1 12 4.OQE#23 135.99 70 2.3 LON !w NO AUG 1 90 73 430 40 390 407 1 13 1.6N428 147.94 70 3 LON NN No k6 I " 74 1 1 1 1 0 12 9.7N+25 146.47 Aus 0 90 73 1 1 1 1 0 11 9.44E+21 151.19 AUG 9 90 76 1 1 1 1 0 it 1.44E+23 131.19 Pub 10 vo /I I I I 1 0 It 1.44E+23 151.19 AL'6 It " 78 1 1 1 1 0 11 9..',4[+23 ist.19 AUG 12 " 79 30 50 10 30 1 12 2.93E*25 132.13 74 0.5 MIEN Sw NO AUG 13 90A eo e0o 5bo 440 1 0 12 2.83E+23 132.13 AUG til 90 BI 120 170 170 153 1 12 4.07E*25 136.1? 72 1.7 RED NN NO AL16 15 90 B-1 I I I 1 0 11 3.49E+23 139.11 AL16 16 90 03 1 1 1 1 0 11 3.4?E+21 138.11 AV6 17 90 84 1 1 1 1 0 It 3.49E+23 138.11 AU6 10 " 65 1 1 1 1 0 It 3.41E+113 138.11 AUG 19 to 66 e.40 520 4eo 313 1 12 1.79E+26 154.09 70 3 LON No YES AUG 20 " 07 1410 60 20 67 1 11 1.19E#26 144.47 70 1 LON WN No ALI 21 " el I I I 1 0 12 B.,,4E424 119.00 AUG 22 90 69 1 1 1 1 0 11 6.39E+22 116.37 AL16 23 90 1 1 1 1 0 10 1.07Et2l 126.61 AV6 24 90 91 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.20E*19 146.95 AUG 25 90 92 1 1 1 1 0 8 7.99E+17 17.1.91 AUG 26 @O 91 "to 230 300 247 1 9 1.9?E*20 179.87 79 1.3 H16H SN NO AUG 27 40 94 190 150 450 263 1 10 3.19E*22 186.96 72 2.8 RED 0 NO AUG 23 50 95 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.42+20 184.13 4111 29 qO 96 1 1 1 1 0 0 6.24E+17 167.64 AV6 30 90 97 1 1 1 1 0 0 6.24f*ll 167.64 AUG 31 90 98 1 1 1 1 0 8 b.,14E#17 167.64 SEPY I " 99 1 1 1 1 0 6 6.24E+17 167.64 SEPT 2 90 100 1 1 1 1 0 9 fi.,4E#I7 t67.64 SEPT 3 10 101 1 1 1 1 0 8 6.24E+17 167.64 SEPT 4 90 102 10 to 10 is 1 9 V.14E*16 123.37 70 1 ZERO 5 No SEPT 5 90 103 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.36E+14 104.53 SiPT 6 90 104 1 1 1 1 0 7 104.53 REAM 130 DAY SEMETRIC KEAN PAGE 3 October 13, 1990 SEPT 7 90 105 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.36E*14 104.51 SEPT 9 90 106 I I I I 0 7 1.36E+14 104.53 SEPT 9 10 toy I I I I 0 7 1.36b.14 104.3S SEPT to 90 IN t I I I 0 7 1.36E+14 104.53 SEPT It 90 109 1 1 1 1 0 6 4.54E*12 128.70 SEPT 12 90 Ito I I I I 0 6 4.54E*12 128.70 SEPT 13 90 - III I I I I 0 5 2.96E#10 124.27 SEPT 14 90 112 I I I I 0 5 2.96E+10 124.27 SEPT 13 90 113 I I I I 0 3 2.96E*10 124.27 SEPT 16 90H 114 170 ;70 300 1 0 3 2.96f,,10 124.27 62 4 ZERO NO SEPT V 90 its I I I I 0 1 2.96E#tQ U4.27 SEPT 19 90 IN I I I I 0 4 3.77E#01 87.17 SEPT 19 20 III I I I I 0 3 8.66E+05 95.32 SEPT 20 90 III t I I I 0 3 8.66E+03 95.32 SEPT 21 90 119 1 1 1 1 0 3 S.UM5 95.32 SEPT 22 90 120 1 1 1 1 0 3 8.66E+05 95.1Z SEPT 23 9" 121 210 130 110 I 0 3 8.66E+05 95.32 50 5 ZEFO SEPT 24 90 122 1 1 1 1 0 3 8.66E+03 95.32 AACH7 30 DAY EHMETRIC nEAN P96E I Septesbtr 07, 1990 DATE DAY$ If c E MEAN ECUNT 0/1 RDOT IF4C'.CRIAL BED MEAN H20 TEMP WAVE MT. BATHER LP MIND DiR. RAIN? MAY 26 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 EAR MY 27 90 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I.OOEtOO EAR RAY 28 10 3 to to 10 10 1 1 I.O0E+OI 10.00 52 1 LON so NO NAY 29 " 4 150 200 180 177 1 2 1.77E+03 42.03 51 5 ZERO NE YES PAY so " 5 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.77E#03 42.03 44Y 31 90 6 1 1 1- 1 0 2 1.77E+01 42.03 JUNE 01" 7 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.77E+03 42.03 JUNE ol 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.77E#03 42.03 JUNE 03 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.77E+03 42.03 JUNE 04 10 10 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.77E+03 42.03 JUNE 03" It 20 to to Is 1 3 2.36E+04 20.67 53 1 ZERO S NO JUNE 01 90 12 1 1 1 1 1 3 2.36E*04 211.0 JUNE 17" 13 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.36E+04 28.67 JUNE Of" 14 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.36E+04 28.67 JUNE " 90 15 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.36E+04 20.67 JUNE to" 16 30 30 40 40 1 4 9.42E+05 31.14 50 3 ZERO so No JUNE It" 17 20 20 0 27 1 3 2.31E407 30.20 so 2 ZERO Am No JUNE 12" 10 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.51E+07 30.20 JUNE 13" it I I I I 1 3 2.51E+07 30.20 JUNE 14" 20 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.51E+07 30.20 JUNE 13 90 21 1 1 1 1 0 5 2.51E+07 30.20 JUNE 14 90 72 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.51E#07 30.20 JUNE 17 90 23 20 10 to is I i 3.35E+08 26,33 60 0.3 LON 5 No JUNE 11 90 24 220 110 140 137 1 7 3.23E+10 34.00 31 3 ZERO Sm No HIME ii ?5 1 1 1 i 0 7 !@?3E#I@ P-00 JUNE 20 26 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.25E+10 34.00 JUNE 21 27 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.22*10 34.00 JUNE 22 28 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.25E*10 34.00 JUNE 23 29 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.25E+10 34.00 JUNE 24 30 400 400 230 343 1 a I.BOE*tl 43.39 66 4 ZERO No No JUNE 25 31 20 30 10 20 1 9 3.60E#14 41.44 66 3 ZERO v No JUNE 26 32 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.60E*14 41.44 JUNE 27 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 8 3.60E*13 49.50 JUNE 28 90 34 1 1 1 1 0 7 2.04E+ll 41.27 JUNE 29" 35 1 1 1 1 0 7 2.OiE+ll 41.27 JUNE 30" 36 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.04E*ll 41.27 JULY I " 37 Ilo 50 20 30 1 9 1.02E#13 42.27 70 3 LON Nv so JULY 2 " 38 to to 10 10 1 9 1.02E+14 36.02 72 0.3 LON SK No JULY 3 " 39 1 1 1 1 0 1 I.O2E+I4 36.02 JULT 4 90 40 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.OZE+14 36.02 JULT 5 10 41 1 1 1 1 0 6 7.65E#12 40.78 JULY 6 10 42 1 1 1 1 0 8 7.65E#12 40.78 ILLY 7 90 41 1 1 1 1 0 a 7.65E4,12 40.78 JULY 9 90 44 40 10 40 30 1 1 2.2%+14 39.41 72 1 RED sw "a JULY 9 90 45 too too 120 107 1 10 2.45E+16 43.54 72 ZERO Sv YES JULY 10 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.12E*14 43.93 JULY 11 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 8 2.2?E+13 46.78 JULY 12" 48 1 1 1 1 0 8 2.29E*13 46.78 JULY 13" 49 1 1 1 1 0 8 2.2qE+ll 46.78 JULY 14" 50 1 1 1 1 0 6 2.119E+13 46.76 JULY 15 90 51 70 90 120 93 1 9 2.14E*13 50.52 67 1 LON so NO --mmm m mm m M = m = BEAM 30 DAY MONTRIC MEAN ME 2 septelber 07, tq?O ILLY 16 TO lz 31.0 270 230 1 10 &.OOE+17 3f.93 be 3.3 LOW So No .80 Al IT 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 9 4.SOE#li 70.03 JULY to If 34 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.87EM 64.16 ILLY 19 90 33 1 1 t 1 0 2 2.97EI-14 64.16 JULY ze To 56 1 1 1 1 1 1 2.8TE+14 64.16 Al 21 " 37 1 1 1 1 1 2.87E+14 64.16 JULY 22 " 51 64 ISO 170 137 1 9 3.92Efli 69.71 72 1 ZERO NE YES JULY 23 " 59 130 ISO 120 to I It MUM 74.11 71 2 ZERO So NO JULY 24 % 60 30 Be 30 be I Is MOW? 62.14 n I LON so No 40LV 25 " fit I I I 1 0 9 4.80E+16 71.36 J(A.1 U u I I 1 0 9 4.IQE#lb 71-34 JILY v 63 1 t 1 0 9 4.BDE*lb 71.36 JILT 29 90 64 1 a 1 0 9 4.$K*I& 71.36 JILT 29 " 63 0 go 370 In 1 10 7.64E+16 77.32 12 0.3 RED No No MY 30 90 66 2HO 2400 130 1 It 1.7242 tQ5.2Z 74 1 LON So in JULY 31 " fil 90 130 130 123 1 11 4. SX*22 114.23 72 1.2 IERG No No A96 191 fil 16 10 10 10, 1 It 4.3X#22 114.23 70 1.1 ZERO RE No AUS 2 " it 10 to to to 1 12 4.32E423 93.24 74 0.3 LON No No Aug 3 " 70 30 it 20 20 1 13 1.64E+24 12.83 72 0 LON No No AU6 4 it I I I 1 6 13 1.641+24 IL63 Ago 3 n 390 420 344 511 1 14 4.46E*27 14.0 70 2.3 LON So he a 6 73 370 30 530 30 1 15 2.41E430 106.04 70 3 ZERO No No Aul 190 74 1 1 1 1 4 14 I.OX421 114.05 as I" 73 1 1 1 0 13 ?.SN*U 116.0 An f " 76 1 1 a 0 13 7.3X+26 116.80 A96 It " 77 1 1 1 1 4 13 7.3x*U 111.80 AUB 11" 71 1 1 1 1 4 13 Muf2b 116.00 Ats 12 IS 71 20 to 70 33 1 14 2.31E#28 106.90 74 0.3 LON so No AU6 13 Too So tzoo 900 60 1 0 14 2.31E421 106.80 70 1 ZERO N me AM 14 To it 80 60 so 43 t 14 1. 70E*28 103.88 72 1.3 ZERO No No AUI 13" 82 1 1 1 t 0 13 6.OK*23 16.23 We li 90 13 1 1 1 1 0 Is 6.OK#25 96.25 AN 17" 04 320 800 0 660 1 14 4.OX+21 110.44 70 3 LON No YES Kra Is" 83 1 1 1 1 0 14 4.OX#21 110.44 AU6 It " % I I I 1 0 14 4.02E#n 110.44 NA 24 If 1? 0 126 60 73 1 13 2.94E*30 107.47 70 0.3 ZERO No No NA 21 To a I I I 1 0 14 2.13E+21 103.64 A14 12 To I I I 1 0 13 1.34E#24 103.37 AUB 23 " 90 1 1 1 1 0 12 2.37E*24 101.17 AN 24 10 if I I I 1 0 12 2.57E*24 108.17 ALS 23 IS 92 1 1 1 1 0 12 2.5?E#24 106.17 Aug 26 TO 93 230 3" 20 233 1 13 6.30E#26 U5.48 76 2 W16H So No AN 27 TO 94 700 1400 520 els 1 14 5.68E+29 133.44 72 2.5 LON v No AN 21 93 1 1 1 1 0 13 3.47E+27 131.38 AIDS zi 16 1 1 1 1 0 12 1.36E*24 103.75 Atra SO 90 97 1 1 1 3 0 11 1.26E+22 102-13 AUG 31 TO IS t I I 1 0 10 1.2bEi,21 128.65 SEPT I TO I I* I 1 0 9 1.26E#20 171.17 SEPT 1 100 1 1 1 1 1 1 6.SIE4tl 223.66 SEPT I M I I I 1 4 1 6.31E+tl 221.86 SE" 4 102 to 10 10 10 1 1.22E*ll 136.72 70 0.5 ZERO So NO BEACHS 30 DAY SECMETRIC MEAN PAGE I October 13, 1990 DATE DAYI N C E MEAN COUNT Oil ROOT VACTORIAL SEC MEAN H20 TEMP WAVE HT. BATHER LD WIND DIR. RAIN? MAY 26 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 ERA MAY 27 90 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I.OOE#00 ERR t $AT 20 90 3 10 10 10 10 1 1 I.OOEql 10.00 32 1 LOW SW No n FIAT 29 90 4 210 180 200 197 1 2 1.97E+03 44.35 51 5 ZERO WE YES r 1AY 30 " 5 20 10 to 11 1 3 2.62E+04 29.71 52 2 ZERO WE NO MAY 31 " 6 20 20 40 27 1 4 6.99E+05 28.92 56 1 ZERO W NO F JUNE 01 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 4 6.19E+05 116.?2 JUKE 02 90 a I I I 1 0 4 6.91E+03 28.92 JUNE 03" 9 1 1 1 1 0 4 4.99E+03 28.92 C JUNE 04" to I I I 1 4 4 6.99E+03 28.92 JUNE 05" it 50 30 10 30 1 5 2.IOE+O7 29.11 55 3 ZERO s NO C JUNE 06 90 12 10 40 10 20 1 6 4.20E+06 27.36 30 1.3 ZERO sv NO f JUNE 07 90 13 10 to 20 13 1 7 5.59E+09 24.69 62 0.5 ZERO mv NO C JUNE 01" 14 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.SqE#09 24.69 t JUNE 09" 13 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.5iE+09 24.69 JUNE 10" 16 20 to 30 20 1 8 I.I2E+II 1.4.05 56 2 LOW Sv NO C JUNE It" 17 00 60 100 80 1 9 0.95E#12 27.48 56 2 ZERO NN No I JUNE 12" is I 1 1 9 1.951#12 27.48 t JUNE 13" t9 20 10 10 is 1 10 I.I?E*14 25.57 63 1 LON v NO JUNE 14" 20 340 300 230 2" 1 It 3.46E+16 31.eo to 2.5 LON so No z JUNE 13" 21 1 1 1 1 0 It 3.46E+16 31.08 JUNE I&" 22 1 1 1 1 0 11 3.46E+16 31.68 aunt 11 TV 23 ZQ 10 10 13 1 lz 4.61t+11 IT.63 69 9.3 LUN b 1qu JUNE 19" 24 250 170 300 240 1 13 I.IIE+20 34.62 39 4.5 ZERO SK No JUNE 19 10 25 1 1 1 1 0 13 I.IIE+20 34.62 JUNE 20 90 26 1 1 1 1 0 13 I.IIE#20 34.82 JUNE 21 90 727 1 1 1 1 0 13 I.IIE#,10 34.82 J01E 22 90 28 1 1 1 1 0 11 I.IIE+20 34.82 JUNE 23 90 29 1 1 1 1 0 is I.IIE1,20 34.82 JUNE 24 90 30 190 170 300 220 1 14 2.44E+22 19.72 66 4 ZERO NN 40 JL74E 25" !1 30 10 30 21 1 13 3.69E+21 38.34 66 2 ZERO v No JUNE 26 90 32 1 1 1 1 0 15 5.69E#23 38.34 JUNE 27" 31 30 20 20 23 1 15 1.33E+1.4 40.57 66 2 LON SN No JUNE 20 90 34 120 90 140 111 1 15 7.87E+23 39.18 68 2 LON WE No JUNE 229 90 115 1 1 1 1 0 14 5.90E+22 42.32 JUNE 30 90 36 1 1 1 1 0 11 2.141E+21 43.83 JULY 190 37 70 120 90 tj 1 14 2.07E#23 46.29 70 2 LON SW NO JULY 290 'A 170 40 10 73 1 15 1.31E#25 47.72 72 0.5 LON SN No JULY 03 @Ofl 39 1200 30 70 1 0 15 1.51E+25 47.72 72 2 NED 9 No JULY 490 40 1 1 1 1 0 Is 1.51E+23 47.72 JULY 390 41 70 40 50 53 1 15 2.69E+25 49.50 73 1 NED HE No IULY 690 42 1 1 1 1 0 14 1.31E+24 52.91 JULY 790 41 1 1 1 1 0 is I.OIE+23 59.82 JULY 1 90 44 10 60 10 27 1 14 2.69E+114 55.59 72 1 NED so ND JULY 990 45 70 Ito so 17 1 13 2.IX+26 57.26 72 1 LON sv YES JULY 10 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 14 l.t7E*23 fiI.Ts J% Y it 90 47 40 90 50 60 1 14 8.72+24 60.40 71 0.5 LON N NO JULY 12 90 48 1 1 1 1 0 14 8.?X,,24 60.40 HILY 11 90 49 1 1 1 1 0 13 6.56E*23 67.91 JULY t4 q0 410 1 1 1 1 0 12 2.26E#21 60.110 JLV61 11 90 31 so 70 330 210 1 13 4.75E+23 66.27 V I ZERO Sv .40 BEACHO 30 DAY SECKTRIc RE;N PAGE 2 October 13, 1970 JULY 16 90 52 210 240 300 250 1 14 1.19E#26 72.86 68 3 LOU Sv No JULY 17 90 53 1 1 1 1 0 11 0.91E+24 83.03 JULY 10 90 34 14 to to to 1 13 3.71E#23 65.02 70 1.5 RED No NO JULY 19 90 53 10 10 to to 1 14 1.71E+24 36.66 70 1 Log m mo JULY 20 to 56 1 1 1 1 0 14 MIE44 56. al JULY 21 to 557 1 1 1 1 0 14 MIE+24 sfi.ea JULY 22 It 30 420 700 1200 773 1 13 2.87E#2? 61.69 72 1.3 LON NE YES JULY 21 to 59 Ito ISO Ito III I St 3.54E,,21 70.2% 72 2 IERQ so KO JULY 24 to 60 50 to 20 33 1 16 8.39E#21 64.32 73 1 RD SN NO JLLY 23 to 61 to to 20 13 1 16 4.91028 62.11 75 0.5 RED N NO JULY 24 14 62 14 20 to 40 1 t? t.96E*14 60.32 73 0.2 in NE NO JULY 27 to 61 1 1 1 1 0 16 0.41E*21 64.24 JULY 21 to 64 1 1 1 1 0 13 7.2tE#24 0.71 JULY 21 to 63 30 too 360 163 1 th 1. 1 K#29 63.60 82 0.3 .40 No NO RLY 30 " 66 20 464 200 2sl 1 17 2.93E#ll 71.03 74 0.3 1.011 Sv No JULY It to 67 1 1 1 1 0 16 3.20E*2t 49.91 AU6 190 68 10 10 10 to 1 16 CUM# 61.63 72 2 LON NE No ALI 2to 69 100 10 0 33 1 17 2.40E+30 61.24 74 0.3 RED ml No AUB 3to 70 1 1 1 1 0 17 2.40E#30 61.24 AU6 4to 71 1 1 1 1 0 16 4.4*E+20 61.77 AUS 5to 72 1000 360 700 733 1 17 1.39E*lt 71.56 70 2.6 LIN Ev No AUS 6to 73 400 700 600 567 1 Is 1.92E#34 80.28 70 3 LON NN No AUS Ito 74 1 1 1 1 0 17 7.2X42 65.66 AUS a90 75 Ito 40 so 103 1 17 IME032 96.53 71 1 RED )m No AU6 fto 76 40 100 10 50 1 11 4.29E*14 13.93 74 0.5 no ME No AVG to 90 77 1 1 1 1 0 17 7.13E+32 05.63 ks it" 75 1 1 1 1 0 17 7.121,32 15.63 Al.'s 12 90 79 to 20 40 23 1 18 1.67E*14 79.66 74 0.5 ?ED Sy MO A. US 13 9011 00 1200 1000 700 1 0 18 1.67E,,34 M66 70 1.3 ZERRI N YES AUG 14" St 190 200 70 153 1 to 1.22E+34 78.3 72 t.5 No N NO AUS Is 90 92 1 1 1 1 0 17 4.87E+ll 73.11 A! Is 16 94 Is I I I 1 0 17 4.87f#ll 73.11 ACS 17 70 U I I I 1 0 U M7E#3O 62.79 AVG is to as I I I 1 0 13 4.07E#2f 95.32 AV'S it 90 96 tool 1000 1000 NOO 1 16 4.87[+32 110.40 70 4 LCV xv NO KG 20 to 67 90 Ito 60 87 1 1? 4.2:E+"4 1.08.84 70 0.3 LEV NW NO ACS 21 90 sa To 90 ISO 113 1 17 6.19E+33 97.22 70 1.5 LOV E No AVG 22 to 99 Is to 20 13 1 17 6.69E#32 03.29 70 0.3 ZEAO ME No AN 23 to 90 10 to 10 to 1 17 1. 25E*32 77.29 70 0.3 LCK E me AUS 1.4 90 91 10 210 to 63 1 11 7.84E+32 66.09 72 0.5 LON SE NO ACS 23 90 92 1 1 1 1 0 la 1.96E+sj 90.32 AUS 26 90 13 2" Ito 30 10 1 17 2.lIE+ll 92.60 76 0.5 HISN Sm NO ALIS 27 90 ?4 1000 540 400 647 1 to 1. SM4.36 104.37 72 2.5 LC41 v No 11.16 :9 90 95 1 1 1 1 0 U 1. 1 If+,,# 100.63 AVG It 90 q6 I I I 1 0 H 4.39E+31 94.99 AUG 30 90 97 1 1 1 1 0 1& 4.39E#31 94.99 AVG 31 to 98 1 1 1 1 0 13 MIND 110.37 SEPT I" 99 0 14 7.9Sf#n Its." IPT Ito too 1 0 14 7.9K+ll Its." SEPT 3to 101 0 14 MKI-n Its." 10 90, 102 13 1 14 1.41f#21 86.13 70 9-: lull .4 $EPT Sgo 141"' 4 11 2.4;E*24 75.21 13 2.4%424 73.3 BEACHO 30 DAY SEOMETRIC MEAN PAK I October 13, 1950 SEPT 7 90 los I I I 1 0 Q 2.41E+22 73.32 SEPT 8 90 106 1 1 1 1 0 11 4.82#20, 75.91 SEPT 9 90 107 1 1 1 1 0 It 4.62*20 Mil SEPT 10 90 100 1 1 1 1 0 It 4.eSE+20 75.91 SEPT It 90 109 1 1 1 1 0 10 2.07E+19 95.42 SEPT 12 90 Ito I I I 1 0 10 2.07E+19 85.42 SEPT tl 90 111 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.35E*17 90.04 SEPT 14 90 112 1 1 1 1 0 9 I.M47 80.04 SEPT 13 To ItS I I I 1 0 9 I.,',5E#17 80.04 SEPT 16 90 114 100 160 120 1 0 9 t.33E+ll 60.04 62 4 ZERO HN YES SEPT 17 90 111 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.,')3E+17 80.04 SEPT to 90 116 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.35E#14 !8.38 SEPT It 20 It7 I I I 1 0 7 t.36E+12 55.17 SEPT 20 90 118 1 1 1 1 0 6 t.lTE+IQ 48.94 SEPT 21 90 119 1 1 1 1 0 5 I.OT,E+09 63.47 SEPT 22 " 120 1 1 1 1 0 4 1.03E+08 100.74 SEPT 23 90 121 Ito 80 too 1 0 3 1.24E+04 107.31 so 5 LON N VES SEPT 24 90 122 t I I 1 0 3 1.24E*06 107.31 -=mm mm mm mm mm mm= mm PEACH9 ;O 1AY SECIIETRIC REAN FAEE I September 01, 1990 DATE DAY1 v c I mm MT Oil NUT 1FACTCKAL 6EO -NW NZO TEFP. VAVE HT. SATPER LJ NINO 21R. AMIN? PAT 26" I I I I I 0 0 1 ERR MAY .17" 2 I I I I 0 0 I.OOE*Ql 01 nu 1.11 to I 10 to to to I I 1.00E+01 10.00 52 2 LON 9 no it 4 10 60 30 63 1 2 6.32#02 23.17 31 3 IUD K VES it" 6 2 MUM 23.17 WAY 31 to 6 I I I I I 2 MIX001 23.11 JIM[ #I to I I I I I I 2 6. IN402 23.17 ja 02 " I I I I I 9 2 6.39042 23.11' JIM[ is Von 9 110 IN too I 0 2 C INM Z3.11, 30 4 IUD so 14 JUN 0" to I I I I I 2 6.3x#12 23.17 JIM 03 to It 20 to IS II 3 1. 4KI04 24.34 I LON s No Jw 06 12 1 1 1 1 0 3 1. 4K$O4 24.34 am ff is I I I I I 3 I.W004 24.34 JUNE 41 14 1 1 1 1 0 1 1.411E44 24.54 JUK DO 13 1 1 1 1 0 3 I.48E##4 24.34 Jw to I& 20 It 20 IT 1 4 2.46M 22.28 31 2 IUD Sv No Jw 11 90 V 0 30 70 47 1 3 t.t3E$41 23.111 51 2.5 IUD N No JIM 12 to is I I I t I 5 1.12017 23. 113 Jw IS It I I t I I 3 1.13P07 23. B JUNE 14 20 I I I I I 3 1.11407 23.113 M Is 21 1 1 1 1 0 3 23.83 JIM 14 zz I I I I 0 5 1.15E47 23.83 AME IT 21 10 to to 10 I & I.IX041 22.03 61 Los 5 No JUK 11 24 330 110 210 247 1 7 2.14foll 31.13 9 4 LOV Si No RINE 19 23 1 1 1 1 4 I 2.1104,46 31.13 JUNE 20 26 1 1 a I 0 IF 2.64[oll 31.13 SL31E 21 21 1 1 1 1 1 7 2.84E'-If 31.13 JUK Z2 21 1 1 1 1 1 7 MU*% St. 13 ILK ZS If 29 1 1 1 1 1 7 2.84E*11 31.11 RINE Z4 " 30 lot To 60 77 1 1 2.17E#IZ 34.83 4 IUD la YES JLME Z3 If It go so 46 so a I t.GVE#14 S4.V 66 I LON v NO JCK 26" 32 1 1 a I 1 9 I.OIE#14 36.27 Jw vto IS a 8 1.41PIS 42.41 JUNE 21 34 1 7 Watit. - 40.27 JUK it 33 1 I I.Mfll 40.27 JLK 30 36 1 1 1 1 f 7 1.714,11 40.27 XILY I 37 so 30 130 17 I 1 1.3x*ls 43.44 .63 3 LON N No JULY 2 is 39 10 it 0 1 9 I..16E#14 43.22 72 I LON so No RLY 399 39 1 1 1 1 0 9 3. NE414 43.22 RLY 4" I I I I 0 9 3.26E#14 43.22 JLILY 3 " 4 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.260-11 44.61 RLY &to 42 1 1 1 1 0 8 2.26E*13 46. a JULY 7 10 43 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.26E*13 46.61 JULY I90 44 to la to 17 1, I 3.76E*14 41.63 72 1 LON so NO RILY 9to 45 0 so 40 43 1 10 1.63E*16 41.80 72 1 LON St No JULY to 90 46 I I I 0 9 9.77E#14 46.30 JULY I I" q? I t t a I MINS 46.23 ALY 1 290 I I I 2.09[013 46.23 MY 11 to I I I 2.0?E#13 46.223 1111 1 490 50 I 0 1 2.091#13 46.23 ;txv 13 to 51 it to 10 10 1 9 2.M#14 Zol 67 1 LON so No -E.KN9 :0 DAY k"IF17RIC NEAM FACE 2 Septester 09, 1190 JULY 16 to 52 160 70 80 101 1 10 2. 16f*l 6 43.01 be 2 LON So NO JULY 17 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.16E#13 30.37 JuLl to To 14 1 1 1 1 1 8 8.77E#12 41.49 JULY 19 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 8 0.77E4,12 41.49 JtLY 20 90 56 1 1 1 1 0 0 1. 77E#12 41.49 Jmv 21 " 37 1 1 1 1 0 0 1. 77E*12 41.49 JLLY 22 " 30 410 600 1700 "1 1 9 7.9x*13 38.42 72 1.3 Leo No VES JULY 23 to 39 30 90 60 64 1 10 4.76E*ll 30.118 71 2.3 ZERO so NO JULY 24 90 60 120 40 360 171 1 10 I.OBE*ll 63.53 73 1 LON So NO JULY 23 to fit I I 1 4 9 2.12#16 63. 2? JIT 26 to 62 1 1 1 0 9 2. 1 SE*16 43.27 iml 27 " fil I I 1 0 9 2.12416 63.27 JULY 21 " 64 1 1 1 0 1 2.13E*16 63.27 JULY 29 " is 10 90 140 103 1 10 2.22E4,10 68.34 12 0.3 RED I NO JLILT 30 to to 20 30 27 1 11 3.91#19 62. ?4 74 0.3 Lao So No JI.ILY It fil I I 1 10 7.71#17 61.49 AU6 I be I 1 9 1.92016 64.50 Atli 2If 69 1 1 1 9 1.93E#16 64.50 A116 3to 70 1 1 1 9 1.93Esifi, 64.50 AUS 1 11 1 1 0 9 1.93E#16 64.30 AU6 3 72 330 2" 400 30 1 It i.37E#ll 76.16 70 2 LON So NO A116 &to is 430 430 270 313 1 11 2.31#21 go. Z2 70 3 Lev No NO AN I111 74 1 1 1 1 0 10 I.IIE#20 104.21 Alto 190 73 1 1 1 1 4 9 3.49E*ll HUY Ats 9" 74 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.49E#ll 114.1f AUS 10 to 77 1 1 1 1 f 3.49E+ll 114.39 Me I I to 71 a I 1 1 9 3.4n*ll 114.89 WS 12 50 io 50 33 1 1.0 1. SK9#20 M.40 0.3 LON sm m AU6 11 60 1000 600 860 1 1 10 l.UE*ZO 106.40 70 2 ZERO No No AN 14 el 60 so 100 70 1 10 I.SOE+21 129.26 72 1.3 LON 0 No AUG Is al I 1 0 9 1.2fiEsIV 132.31 AU6 16 90 83 1 1 0 T 1. 26E*19 132.31 WA V" 04 1 1 0 f 1.26E*if 132.31 AUG I Ito 83 1 1 1 1 1.26E+19 132.31 Ats 19 TON ei 270 290 290 1 0 9 1.26E+19 132.31 10 3 ZEAD No No ALS 20" 1? 50 40 50 47 1 10 3.90b,20 119.31 70 1 LOV No )m AU6 ZI" Be I I 1 0 9 6.SIE#17 93.34 AM 22 " 89 1 1 1 0 1 1.08E*16 101.02 AUG 23 to 90 1 1 1 1 7 6.26E43 93.32 At% 24" 91 1 1 1 0 7 fi.I.&E+13 93.32 AU6 23 " 92 1 1 1 1 7 6.26E*13 13.52 AU6 116 to vi 210 30 so 97 1 6 6.09+15 ISM is 1.3 "16N So No AUS 27 90 94 50 1300 430 393 1 9 3.39VII 113.26 72 2.3 LON 0 No MILLROAD 30 DAY GEGRETRIC MEAN P46E t September 0% 1990 IATE Dayl v f MEAN COUNT 0/1 ROOT #FACTCRIAL 6ED MAN KID TEMP. WAVE MT. RATHER LD MIND DIR. RAIN? "Al 26 90 1 1 0 0 1 ERR "AV 27 10 2 1 1 1 0 0 1.00E#00 ERR WAY 28 10 3 to 260 10 93 1 1 9.3x#oI 93.33 32 0.3 ZERO SM No RAW 29 90 4 140 t7o so 130 1 2 1.21E+04 110.15 51 5 ZERO ME YES MAY 30 90 3 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.21E404 110.0 MAY 31 90 6 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.21E#04 110.13 JUNE ol 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.21E+04 110.15 JUNE 42 90 a I I I 1 0 2 1.21E+04 110.15 JUNE 03 10 9 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.21E+04 Ito.ts 31K 04 10 10 1 1 1 1 0 2 1.21E+04 110.13 JUNE 011 to It 30 20 20 23 1 3 2.03E+03 63.66 55 2 ZERO 5 No JUNE 06 90 12 1 1 1 1 0 3 2. ex +05 65.66 JUNE ol 13 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.82#03 65.66 JUNE 01 14 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.8X+05 63. " JUNE " 14 13 1 1 1 1 0 3 2.83E+03 63.66 JUNE to 90 16 20 10 50 27 1 4 7.33E+06 52.42 so 2.3 ZERO Sv NO JUNE 11 10 17 60 40 20 40 1 5 3.0100 41.66 58 2 ZERO NN NO JUNE 12" to I I I 1 0 3 3.0a+01 49.64 JUNE 13 90 19 1 1 1 1 0 3 3.09+01 49. " JUNE 14 90 20 1 1 1 1 0 3 s.ox+0l 49.66 JUNE 15 10 21 1 1 1 1 0 5 3.01#01 49.66 JUNE 16" 22 1 1 1 1 0 3 3.01#0 4T.0 JUNE 17 90 23 20 30 20 23 1 & 7.05E409 43.79 60 0.3 LOW s No JUNE to 90 24 260 ISO 230 230 1 7 1.6A+12 55.49 59 3.3 ZERO 59 NO JUNE 11 90 23 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.fix*Iz 53.41 JLVE 20" 26 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.61#12 55.49 JUNE 21" 27 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.bX*12 53.49 JUNE n90 26 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.6x*tz 55. " JUNE 23 90 29 1 1 1 1 0 7 1.62E#12 33.49 JUNE 24 90 so 130 100 130 120 1 8 t.94E#14 61.11 66 4 ZERO xv go JUNE 25 90 it so so 20 33 1 9 6.45E+13 37.13 3 ZERO v NO JUNE 26 90 32 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.48E#13 57.13 JUNE 27 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 a 6.12#13 53.73 JUNE 140 10 34 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.34E+11' 47.36 JUNE 27 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.34E*ll 47.34 31XE so 90 36 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.34E*ll 47.36 JULY 190 37 220 320 350 297 1 8 1.59E#14 39.57 10 1 ZERO sw NO JULY 290 39 90 20 10 40 1 q 4.14E+15 56.99 72 0.5 LON sm NO JULY 390 39 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.34E+15 56.99 JULY 4" 40 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.34E+13 56. " JULY 390 41 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.72E+14 63-72 JULY 6to 42 1 1 1 1 0 8 2.72E+14 63.72 JULY 710 43 1 1 1 1 0 8 2.72E+t4 63.72 JULY 890 44 10 to 10 to 1 9 2.72E+13 31.97 72 1 LON SW No JULY 990 43 so 80 60 73 1 10 I.q9E+I7 ". 70 72 1 LOW Sv YES JULY to 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 9 7.47E+15 39.04 JULY It 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 1 1,97E#14 60.80 JILT 12" 48 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.87E*14 60.60 JULY 13 90 49 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.07E+14 60.80 JULY 14 to 50 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.07E414 60.80 JULY 13 90 st 40 10 to 40 1 1 7.47E,45 51.04 V I NED so NO .iILLOCAD 50 DAY BEDAETRIC MEAN PACE Z 01. 1390 JLLY 16 90 52 320 1440 @140 467 1 10 3.4%*18 71.49 68 2.5 LON So No JULY 17 90 53 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.49E#17 80.96 JULY 11 10 54 1 1 1 1 0 6 6.50E+14 71.05 JULY 19 90 53 1 1 1 1 0 8 6.50E+14 71.03 JULY 20 90 56 1 1 1 1 0 8 6.SOE+14 71.03 MY 21 90 37 1 1 1 1 0 6 6.50E*14 71.03 XLY 22 90 58 600 560 40 4" 1 9 2.60E+17 66.10 72 1.3 ZERO NE YES JULY N 90 59 Ho 70 10 to 1 10 2.34E+If 86.48 71 1 LON So No MY 24 90 60 30 50 30 43 1 10 8.45E*11 78.10 72 1 LON so No JULY 23 90 61 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.5n+17 05.83 JmT zi" 62 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.sx+Il 63.03 MY 27 to 63 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.53E*17 85.85 JULY 28 64 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.53E017 83.63 MY 29 63 30 90 130 63 1 10 2.IIE#IV 83.60 02 0.3 LON v Ito JULY 30 66 340 70 100 170 1 11 3.39E+21 91.11 74 0.3 LON sw No JULY 31 67 1 1 1 1 0 10 1.21E+19 BO.qb AU6 1 69 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.02#17 87.36 AU6 2 fit I I I 1 0 9 3.03E+17 Bl.U AU6 1 70 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.03E417 07. u A06 4to if I I I 1 0 9 3.O3E*Il al. u Aus 3" 72 1200 540 500 747 1 10 2.26E#20 108.49 70 2.3 LON So NO AU6 i" n 360 250 210 273 1 11 6.17E+22 116.00 70 3 ZERO No NO NA 7" 74 1 1 1 1 0 10 6.17E#21 t5t.03 AU6 a" 73 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.42E+19 163.0 AUG 9" 76 t t I 1 0 It 8.4x+I? 163.63 AUG 10" 77 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.4X+19 163.43 AM it to 78 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.42EM 163.65 AU6 12" 79 10 50 to 23 1 10 t.96E*21 IS4.69 74 1 PIED so NO ks Is to" eal 520 300 240 1 0 10 1.96E*21 134.69 70 1.8 ZERO N YES VA 14 st 90 "bo 140 163 1 10 8.02E#21 153.03 72 1.2 ZERO 51 NO AUG 13 82 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.72E#I? U7.17 AU6 I& to 83 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.72E#19 137.17 AUG 17" 64 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.72E#19 137.17 Aus to" 83 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.72E*19 137.17 A116 It VON 86 700 1700 too 1 0 9 1.72E#19 137.17 70 4 ZERO No No AN 20 10 87 60 60 70 63 t 10 1.09E+21 126.97 70 1 Lou No No AL16 21" Be 50 so 50 W 1 10 1.36E#20 103.13 70 1 LON E No AUS 22" 89 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.3]E+18 104.70 AU6 21" I I I 1 0 0 3.4qE+16 116.91 AL16 24" it I I I 1 0 9 3.49E#16 116.91 A06 2S 10 92 1 1 1 1 0 8 3ME016 116.91 A06 126" 93 10 40 120 57 1 9 1.98E#11 107.07 76 1 B16H so No AU6 27" 94 310 340 340 330 1 10 6.53E#20 120.63 72 2 LON v NO LTHOUSE !0 DAY EUPETRIC lEAN FAEE I 5.1ptesbef 09, 1990 DATE DAY# N C E REAM COUNT 0/1 ADGI #FACTORIAL BEO MEAN M20 TEMP. WAVE HT. BATHER LD WIND Dill. RAIN? MAY 26 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 ERR PAY 27 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 1.00E+00 ERR MAY 26 3 to 10 10 10 1 1 I.oOE+0I 10.00 32 2 LON sw .40 PAY 29 4 70 60 90 73 1 2 7. 3X+02 27.08 31 3 ZERO WE VES RAY 30 90 5 1 1 1 1 0 2 7. 3X+02 27.08 RAY 31 90 6 1 1 1 1 0 2 7.33E+02 27.08 JUNE 01 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 2 7. 3X+02 27.08 JUNE 02 90 0 1 1 1 1 0 2 7.33E+02 27.08 JUNE 03 90 9 1 1 1 1 0 2 I.SX+02 27.01 JUNE 04 to 10 1 1 1 1 0 2 I.SX+92 27.08 JUNE 03 90 It 10 20 20 17 1 3 1.2x+04 23.03 33 1.3 LON s No JUNE 06" 12 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.22E+04 23.03 JUNE ol 90 13 1 1 1 1 0 3 1. 2X+04 23.03 JIUME 01 90 14 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.22E+04 23.03 JUNE 09 to is I I I 1 0 3 I.2X#04 23.03 JUNE 10 90 16 20 20 40 27 1 4 3.26E+03 23.01 so I LON su No JUNE It 10 17 60 40 20 0 1 3 1.30E+07 26.49 9 2 ZERO No NO JUNE 12 90 18 1 1 1 1 0 5 1.30E+07 26.49 JUNE 13 90 19 1 1 1 1 0 5 1.30E+07 26.49 ME 14 20 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.30E*07 26.49 JUNE 15 21 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.30f+oy 26.49 JUNE 14 90 22 1 1 1 1 0 3 1.30E+07 26. JUNE 17 90 23 10 to 10 to 1 6 I.SOE+09 22.52 60 0.3 LON s No JUNE 10 90 24 530 3" 420 423 1 7 S.SZE+10 34.24 st 3 ZERO so No JUNE It 90 23 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.52E+10 34.24 JUNE 20 90 26 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.5x*Io 34.24 JUNE 21 to 27 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.52E*10 34.24 JUNE 22 90 20 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.52E*10 34.24 JUNE 23" 29 1 1 1 1 0 7 5.52E*10 34.24 JUNE 24 90 30 190 140 too 143 1 0 7.91E+12 40.93 66 3 ZERO NN No ;UKE 23 90 31 20 10 A^O 17 1 9 1.32E+14 17.06 66 2 ZERO w No JUNE 26 90 32 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.3x+14 37.06 JUNE 27 33 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.3,"E+13 43.63 JUNE 21 90 34 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.BOE*lI 40.53 JUNE 229 90 35 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.8DE*II 40.53 JUNE 30" 36 1 1 1 1 0 7 I.8OE+II 40.53 JULY 1 90 37 70 70 70 70 1 8 1.26E+13 43.40 70 3 LOW so No JULY 2 90 36 30 30 to 23 1 7 2.94E*14 40.51 72 0.5 LON sw No JULY 3 90 39 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.94E+14 40.51 JULY 4 90 40 1 1 1 1 0 9 2.94E+14 40.51 JULY 3 to 41 1 1 1 1 0 a 1.76E*13 45.26 JULY 6 90 42 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.76E*13 45.26 JULY 7 90 43 1 1 1 1 0 a 1.76E*13 45.26 JULY 8 90 44 to 10 10 10 1 9 1.76E*14 38.27 72 1 LON so NO JULY 9 90 41 go 40 Ito 77 1 10 1.35E+lk 41.03 72 1.3 LON sm No JULY to 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 9 5.07E+14 43.04 JLLY 11 90 47 1 1 1 1 0 a 1.27E4,13 43.43 JULY 12 90 40 1 1 1 1 0* 1 1.27E+13 43.43 JULY 13 to 49 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.27E+13 43.41 JULY 14 90 so I I I 1 0 8 1.2?E+13 43.43 JULY 13 90 51 410 10 10 Is 1 9 1.69E*14 39.09 67 1 ZERO sv NO L14CUSE 30 DAY 6ESIETRIC MPAN PAGE 2 September 09, 1990 JULY 16 90 52 170 ISO 220 190 1 to 3.21E+16 44.73 66 2 LOW SW NO JULY 17 90 53 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.21E+tl 52.91 JtLY 18 90 34 1 1 1 1 0 8 7.,BE+12 40.73 JULY it to 51 1 1 1 1 0 9 7.58E+12 40.73 JULY 20 90 56 1 1 1 1 0 8 MeE+12 40.73 JIXT 21 90 37 1 1 1 1 0 8 7. IK+12 40.73 JULY 22 90 58 320 304 190 337 1 9 2.55E#15 31.31 72 1.3 ZERO NV YES JULY 23 90 39 60 90 100 03 1 10 2.11+11 34.03 71 2.2- LOW SN No JULY 24 90 60 30 so 50 43 1 10 6.42#16 47.111 73 0.3 LON SW NO JULY 23 " 61 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.86E*is 53.13 JULY 26 90 62 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.86E*ls 33.93 JMT 2T 10 63 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.86E+13 33.93 JULY 20 90 64 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.86E*ls 53.11 AT 29 90 65 70 20 to 33 1 10 1.2?E#ll 51.39 62 0.3 RED Nv NO JULY 30 90 66 40 10 20 23 1 11 3.OE*ll 47.83 74 0.3 LON SN No JILY 31 90 67 1 1 1 1 0 10 4.29E+16 46.03 AUB I " be I I I 1 0 9 1.84E#13 49.66 A116 2 90 69 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.84E415 49.66 AU6 3 to 70 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.84E+15 49.6k AM 4 to 71 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.841415 49.66 AUB 5 " 72 70 220 330 207 1 10 MONT 37.21 70 2 LON SN No A116 6 " 73 470 380 380 1 it 1.44E#20 66.02 70 3 ZERO NN No AU6 7 to 74 1 1 1 0 10 1.441+19 82.40 AUS I to 75 1 1 1 0 9 1.88E+17 03.04 AUS 9 " 76 1 1 1 0 9 I.BBE#17 83.06 AU6 10 to n I I 1 0 9 1.11BE47 83.Ob Aus 11 90 76 1 1 1 0 9 1.116E+17 83.06 Aurs 12 to 79 20 10 to is 1 10 2.SIE#ll 69.17 73 1 NED sv No AUG 13 9011 80 too 390 630 1 0 10 2.51f4ill 69.17 70 2 ZERO Mv YES kl6 14 to 111 40 tic so 67 1 30 1.23E+19 81.23 72 1.5 LOW S11 No Ats Is 82 1 1 1 1 0 7 6.60E+lb 73.93 AM 16 93 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.60E+14 73.93 AUG 17 to 84 1 1 1 1 0 9 6.60E+16 73.93 AU6 18 90 Is I I I 1 0 9 6.60E*16 73.93 AM 19 9011 86 370 430 260 1 0 9 6.60E+li, 73.91 To 5 ZERO NV No AUG 20 " 87 tic 60 40 70 1 10 4.62E+ll 73.33 70 1 ZERO NN NO Me 21 90 80 1 1 1 1 0 9 1.37Ei,16 62. " AU6 22 " 89 1 1 1 1 0 8 1.&SE+14 39.83 Aus 23 " 90 1 1 1 1 0 7 3-80E*12 62.60 AU6 24 90 It I I I 1 0 T MOE412 bl.bl AL16 25 90 92 1 1 1 1 0 7 3.BOE#12 62.68 AUG 26 90 93 10 to 20 20 1 6 7.60E+13 34.34 78 1 HIGH SN No AUG 27 94 20 so 20 23 1 9 1.77E+15 49.47 72 2 LON W No BE@C410 30 DAY 6EC*,ETR!t MEAN PA6E I October 13, 1910 DATE DAY$ I C E MEAN COGNT 0/1 ROOT IF-MCCRIAL GEO MEAN M20 TEMP. WAVE WT. BATHER LD VIND BUR. RAIN? MAY 26 90 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 E;R MAY 2? 90 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 I.QOE#00 E;R RAY I'll 90 3 to to to 10 1 1 I.OQE+01 10.00 52 1 LCV sm NO MAY .19 90 4 70 100 70 eo 1 2 1.00E+02 29.419 it 5 ZERO 4E YES PAY so 90 5 10 10 to 10 1 3 8. 00E+03 20.00 st '.5 I IEFO ME NO PAY 31 90 6 10 10 to 10 1 4 B.OOE*04 16A2 34 0.5 ZERO W NO JUNE ot 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 4 8.00E+04 16.02 JUNE 02 90 8 1 1 1 1 0 4 8.00E*04 16.92 JUNE 03 400 9 130 50 100 1 0 4 O.OOE+04 16.02 30 4 ZERC Sm No JUNE 04 90 10 1 1 1 1 0 4 1.00E+04 16.92 JVME 05 90 It 30 30 20 27 1 3 2.13E+06 19.44 35 1.5 ZERO S NO JUNE 06 90 12 10 to to 10 1 6 2.IX+07 16.63 38 0.5 IERO sw %G JUNE 07 90 13 to 20 10 13 1 7 2.04E+08 16A3 61 0.5 ZERO MW NO JUNE 09 90 14 1 1 1 1 0 7 2.84E+08 16.13 JUNE 09 90 15 1 1 1 1 0 7 2.0441 16.13 JUNE 10 90 16 so 40 20 30 1 1 B.31#09 17.43 59 0.3 ZERO sv No JUNE 11 90 17 20 20 40 27 1 9 2.20E+ll 19.29 58 2.5 ZERO NV NO JUNE 12 90 to I I I 1 0 9 2.29E+II 19.28 JUNE 13 90 19 10 to 10 to 1 10 2.18E+12 17.21 62 0.5 LON v No JUNE 14 90 20 390 490 610 497 1 11 I.IX415 38 1 LON sm No JLVE 15 90 21 t I t 1 4 It I.Inits 23.36 JUNE th 90 22 1 1 1 1 0 11 1.13E*13 23.36 ME 1? 90 23 to to !.A 410 Is 144, a, . I X I Is I LON JUNE 18 iO 24 380 350 430 187 1 13 4.37E#I; 27-;@ 59 2.5 ZERO 'I JUNE 19 io 23 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.37E+18 27.16 JUNE 20 90 26 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.3?E+ll 27.16 J`ME 21" 27 1 1 1 1 0 11 4.37E+ll 27.16 JUNE 22 90 29 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.37E+ll 27.16 JUNE 23 90 29 1 1 1 1 0 13 4.37E+19 27.16 WE 224 90 30 200 too 140 147 1 14 6.4&E*20 30.63 66 2.5 ZERO NN YES JBE 25 90 31 45 20 es so 1 13 3.20E+22 31.65 66 1 LCK W NO JUNE 26 90 32 1 1 1 1 0 13 3.20E#22 31.63 JUNE 27 90 33 40 10 20 23 1 13 7.46E+22 33.49 66 1 Z EIRO S NO JUNE 2 a90M 34 90 70 160 1 0 14 9.3!1*20 31.47 68 4.5 ZERO ME NO JUNE 29 90 33 1 1 1 1 0 13 9.35E*19 34.37 JUNE 30 90 36 1 1 1 1 0 12 9.311+10 38.10 JULV I to 37 700 500 360 $20 1 13 4.86E+21 46.58 70 3 LON No NO JULY 11 90 ia 20 20 30 23 1 14 1.13E*23 44.34 72 1 LOW sl No JULY 3 ion 39 to 10 1 1 0 14 1. lx#23 44.34 72 2 RED w No ALY 4 90 40 1 1 1 1 0 14 1.13E+23 44.34 JULY 5 90 41 20 so 40 30 1 14 1.2eE+13 44.71 ?4 1 RED NE .40 3ULY 6 90 42 1 1 1 1 0 lj I.20E+22 110.17 MY 7 90 4] 1 1 1 1 0 12 9.57E+20 36.03 JULY 8 90 44 to 10 10 to 1 13 9.57E+21 49.07 72 0.5 RED SN No JULY 9 90 45 50 40 40 43 1 14 4.15E+23 48.64 72 0.5 LON 5w so JULY 10 90 16 1 1 1 1 0 13 1.39E#22 50.48 JULY it 40 47 too 1140 190 137 1 13 7.08E+22 V.24 70 0.5 LCI N NO JULY 12 90 48 1 1 1 1 0 13 7.01E+22 57.24 ,ULY 13 Go 44 J I I I 1 0 11 7.01E#ll 6b.20 JULY 14 130 50 1 1 1 1 o u 1.4m.19 55-12 JULY 15 ?0 51 10 so AD 33 1 12 4.7!E+Z0 52.96 67 1 LGV NO BEACHIO 30 DAY SEGMETRIC MEAN PAK 2 Octobtr 13, 19?0 JULY th 90 52 190 210 190 197 1 13 9.35E+22 56.46 68 2 LOW SW NO ifty 17 90 53 1 1 1 1 0 11, I.I'E+21 57.75 JULY Is 90 9 10 40 10 20 1 12 4.04E+20 52.93 71 0 HIE" NW NO JULY 19 90 55 to to 20 Is 1 13 6.45E+21 47.60 70 0.5 ZERO w No JULY 20 90 56 1 1 1 1 0 13 6.4l.E+21 47.bO JULY 2t 90 57 1 1 1 1 0 13 6XE+21 41.60 JULY 22 90 58 770 TAN 2600 743 1 14 4.60E*"4 37.94 72 1 LOW RN VES h'L V 23 90 59 9 10 20 30 1 Is 1.44E+2b 555.45 71 2 ZEPO SW No .3 Lq. 1 24 90 bo to to 40 20 1 is 1.97E+25 4a.53 71 1 LON Sw .40 JULY 23 30 61 40 to so 33 1 13 1.31E+115 47.26 74 0.3 RED N NO BLY .16 90 62 1.0 30 10 30 1 lb 3.93E*26 45.94 73 0.5 RED NE 40 JULY 21 GO 63 1 1 1 1 0 15 1.6eE+25 48.06 JULY 29 50 64 1 1 1 1 0 Is 1.6EE+25 48.06 JULY 29 90 65 so 190 so 117 1 16 1.97E+21 50.80 82 0.5 %.ED .4v 40 illy 7.0 90 66 to to to to 1 17 1.97E+28 46.17 74 0.5 LOW 59 .40 JULY 31 90 67 1 1 1 1 0 16 3.7BE+25 39.68 pus 190 69 10 10 60 27 1 16 4.32E+25 40.01 71 4 LON NE .40 AUS 2to 69 70 20 40 43 1 17 1.87E+27 40.20 74 0.5 RED a NO AU6 1 70 1 1 1 1 0 17 1.87E#21 40.20 ADS 4to 71 1 1 1 1 0 16 6.24E+25 40.94 AU6 5to 72 1900 2100 Boo 1600 1 11 9.98E#28 50.80 70 1 LON Sw No AUG ito 73 41,90 400 240 310 1 Is 3.09E,".1 56.17 70 3 LCv mm No A06 7to 74 so so 60 63 1 Is 1.96E+32 62.23 72 1.3 LON SW 4 .0 AU6 890 73 30 40 20 so I is t.36E*32 60.97 lz 0.5 IERC NOW No Pis 990 76 60 10 180 63 1 19 I.ISE*34 61.90 71 4 LON WE NO AUS 10 90 77 1 1 1 1 0 18 0.27E*31 39.32 ALIS 11 90 78 1 1 1 1 0 is 8.27E+31 59.32 ALS 12 90 79 20 60 360 147 1 19 1.21E+',4 62.22 75 0.5 LON Sm No Aul; 13 to eo 1700 )Boo 1!00 1667 1 20 2.02E+jl 73.33 70 2.5 ZERO NN No ALIS 14 90 at 60 90 220 123 1 2 0 7.4EE+31 78.429 73 1 LON Sw No ktG IS 10 92 140 ,10 ITO 170 1 20 6.47Et37 77.T2 73 1.5 LON so %a AV6 16 90 93 110 60 60 77 1 21 4.96E*39 77.67 is 1.5 LON @v No Ail 17 70 e4 40 too 70 70 1 21 t.74E+40 82.41 72 0 ZERO 0 No AVS 19 90 65 1 1 1 1 0 20 1.30E+J9 90.31 AC-3 19 90" eb 2.10 1140 130 1 0 410 1.SOE#39 90.31 70 6 ZERO mm NO AUS 20 90 87 Ito 20 20 30 1 21 6.SIE#40 87.00 69 1.5 LON No No 43 21 90 ps I I I 1 0 20 8.74E+37 79.90 All 22 90 9? 1 1 1 1 0 19 2.91E+36 93.02 ALS 23 to 90 1 1 1 1 0 19 1.46E+35 09.65 AC-6 24 90 it I I 1 0 17 4.37E*33 @5.24 AVG 23 90 92 1 1 1 0 16 1.46E+32 102.38 KS 26 90 93 40 70 60 57 1 17 11.2'1+33 96.28 78 1 HICH Sw No ALIG 27 90 @4 440 700 470 537 1 is 4.4!E*36 100.62 72 2.2 LON N NO AVS 29 90 i5 I I I 1 17 3.BOE+34 108.16 AL6 119 90 96 1 1 1 1 0 16 3.80E+33 125.52 AV6 30 90 ?7 1 1 1 1 0 16 3.60E+33 125.52 ADS 31 90 Is I I I 1 0 15 1.42E+32 139.17 -EFT 190 99 Ir t I 1 0 14 3.29E*30 151.27 .EFT 290 VO I I I 1 0 14 3.28E+30 151.27 SEPT 3 90 101 1 1 1 1 0 14 3.,'BE*10 151.27 SEPT A 90 M 10 to to to 1 14 2.VE#28 105.27 66 0 ZERO SE No SEPT 5 70 103 1 1 1 0 13 6.6^,E*25 96.58 'EFT 6 to 104 .1 1 1 0 12 1.05E+24 100.37 BEACH10 30 DAY SECrEIRIC MEAN PASE 3 October 13, 1910 SEPT 1 90 los I I I I 0 14 3.4!E*22 40.75 5'?T 8 10 lis I I 1 1 0 10 4.IEE*',O 115"N Et. T 9 qO toy I I I I o to cm+n 115.39 62 ZERO NW NO SEPT JO 90 109 I I I I 0 to 4-teme 115.78 SEPT 11 90 109 1 1 1 1 0 9 LOINS 112.13 SEPT 12 90 Ito I I I I 0 9 1.71f+ls eO.20 SEPT 13 90 III I I I I 0 7 I.j5E4II 73.41 SEpt 14 90 112 I I I I 0 i 8.16E*10 63.06 SEPT 15 70 III I I I I 0 5 1.06E*09 63.89 SEPT 16 900 114 150 90 90 1 0 4 1.5,'E+07 62.45 62 4 ZERO NV YES SEPT 17 to 115 I I I I 0 4 1.51,E+07 62.45 SEPT 19 90 116 1 1 1 1 0 4 1.52+07 62.45 SEPT 19 1, S 0 117 I I I I 0 3 3.04E+05 67.25 SEPT 20 90 lie I I I I 0 3 3.04E+05 67.25 SEPT 21 " Iff I I I I 0 3 3-0445 0.25 SEPT 22 90 120 1 1 1 1 0 3 3.04E*03 67.25 SEPT 23 90H 121 270 250 150 I 0 3 3.04E+05 67.115 38 5 ZERO W %a SEPT 24 90 122 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.04E*05 67.25 EEXHII 30 DAY GEOIETRIC MEAN PAGE I October 13, 1990 DATE DAY# E MEAN COUNT Bit ROOT IFACTCRIAL EEO PE4 M20 TEIP 'AAVE HT. BATHER LD MIND JIR. PAIN? PAY 2b 90 1 1 1 0 0 1 ERR MAY 27" 2 1 1 0 0 I.OOEfOO ERR NAY 29" 3 10 10 to 10 1 1 I.QOE*Ol 10.00 52 0.5 MED 59 .40 FAY 29 90 4 10 1310 1.17E#03 34.16 51 2 ZERO NE YES 90 117 1 2 PAY 30 90 5 20 50 70 47 1 3 5.44E*04 37.90 56 0.3 ZERO rAY 31 90 6 10 10 10 10 E 40 1 4 5.44E*05 27.1b 54 0 ZERO M .49 JUNE 01 90 7 1 1 1 1 0 4 3.44E+03 27.16 JUNE 02 90 9 1 1 1 1 0 4 5.44E+02 27.16 JUNE 03 90 9 30 220 7 0 97 1 5 5.24407 35.01 30 0.3 LON Sw No JUNE 04 90 to so 73 20 58 1 6 3.OlEto? 38.12 1UNE 03 90 11 1 1 1 1 0 6 3.OTE*09 38.12 JL14E 06 90 12 to 10 20 13 1 7 4.09E*10 32.81 59 0 ZE36 SO JUNE 07 10 13 10 to 10 10 1 8 4.OlEoll 28.29 60 0.3 LGV Ito JUNE 08 90 14 1 1 1 1 0 6 4.05E*tt 28.28 JUNE 09 90 is I I I 1 0 8 4.09E*11 28.1.8 JUNE 10 90 16 10 30 3 Is 1 9 6.14E*12 26.36 59 0.3 LCV S9 No JUNE 11" 17 10 20 10 Is I to 8.19E+13 24.62 IS 0.3 LON No No JUNE 12 90 18 1 1 1 1 0 to 1.19E4,13 24.b2 JUNE 13 90 19 100 too 20 73 1 It 6.OOE+15 27.19 64 0.3 RED No JUNE 14 90 20 2 0 200 40 87 1 12 5.20E417 21.93 118 0 LGM sw .40 JUNE 13" 21 1 1 0 12 5.12CEW 27.?S 60 0.3 LON s NO JUNE 16 90 22 1 1 0 12 5.2DE+17 29.93 59 0 LVI ev Na JUNE 11 to 23 40 30 30 31 1 13 1.7l.E*19 30.19 60 0.3 Lei s 40 JUNE 10 90 24 330 2110 123 235 1 14 4.09E+21 34.96 39 0 LON sm No JUNE 19 40 A'S I I I 1 0 14 4.tBE+21 44.96 JUNE 20 90 26 1 1 1 1 0 14 4.OBE+21 34.96 JUNE 21 90 21 1 1 1 1 0 14 4.08E+21 34.96 JUNE 22 90 28 1 1 1 1 0 14 4.08E+21 34.96 jUNE 21 90 29 1 1 1 1 0 14 4.0?E+21 34.96 jUME 24 90 30 400 "to 130 247 1 13 I.OlE1,24 39.82 66 0 ZERO NM YES JUNE 23 to it so 70 40 63 1 16 6.37E*25 41.00 66 0 ZERO 40 JUNE 26 10, 32 1 1 1 1 0 16 6.37E+25 41.00 JUNE 27 90 33 so 134 so 77 1 16 4.68E#26 46.56 66 0 LON No JUNE 779 90 34 4NO too 140 147 1 16 6.14E#26 47.23 he 0.3 ZERO 4E NO JUNE 29 to 33 1 1 1 1 0 13 1.32E#25 47.27 JUNE 30 90 36 1 t I 1 0 14 1.32E#24 52.02 JULY 190 37 130 so 270 ISO 1 15 1.97E#26 36.62 70 0.5 LOV wo NO jULY 2to la 20 10 20 17 1 16 3.29E#27 52.46 72 0 LON N1 NO JULY 390" 39 110 20 50 1 0 15 3.40E#25 30.36 JULY 490 40 1 1 1 1 0 14 5.83E+23 49.64 JULY 390 41 100 10 121 147 1 Is 9.5!E#25 53-16 76 0.5 RED NE va .JULY &90 42 1 1 1 1 0 14 6.41E+24 59.15 JULY 700 43 1 1 1 1 0 13 6.41E#23 61.01 IULY 990 44 20 40 30 30 1 14 1.92E#23 63.98 76 0 RED CALM NO @ULY 990 43 210 200 170 173 1 13 3.72E*27 69*37 72 0 LDI CALM No JULY to 90 46 1 1 1 1 0 14 2.48E+25 76.79 ITULY it 20 37 ISO 330 150 353 1 14 6.57E+27 97.05 71 0 LOV No JULY V90 48 t I I 1 0 14 6.57E+27 97.03 .,ULY 13 90 41 1 1 1 1 0 13 8.96E+25 99.16 i VL V 14 qO 50 1 1 1 1 0 12 1.031E+214 100-26 15 ?o st 10 10 13 1 13 1-3WIS 65.06 69 0 LEV CALI. .90 BEACHII ;0 DAY GEGMEiRl--. MEAN PAGE 2 Odder 13, 1530 JULY 16 90 52 20 20 20 20 1 14 2.76E#26 77.:9 to 0 LN ME .40 JULY 17 90 53 1 1 1 1 0 13 9.27E+24 811.55 JULY to 90 54 70 150 20 to 1 13 2.82E*24 11.99 71 0 HIEH MR NO JULY 19 10 55 20 30 50 33 1 14 9.3iE*25 71.64 70 0 LON 4 40 JULY 20 90 Sh I I I 1 0 14 9.39E+25 71.64 JULI N90 57 1 1 1 1 0 14 9.39E*25 71.64 JULY 22 90 58 410 60 30 41 1 15 4.OTE#27 69. 'It 8 74 0.5 LON ME YES 3ULY 23 90 59 270 170 150 197 1 16 B.OOE+29 73.95 72. 1 LGI Sk 40 JULY IN 90 60 70 30 30 43 1 16 1.41E+29 66.33 76 0 MiD so NO JULY 23 90 61 20 30 20 23 1 16 5.18F+29 62.32 76 0.3 NISH N 'No JLLY 26" 62 Igo 00 120 127 1 17 6.56E+30 64.98 76 0.3 HIE" N NO JULY 27 90 63 t I I 1 0 16 1.35E+26 64.31 JULY 21 to 64 t I I 1 0 Is 5.8'.%+26 60.87 JULY 29 90 63 160 40 too too 1 16 3.81+719 62.79 02 0.3 RED CALM No JLLY 34 90 66 so 20 10 27 1 17 1.36E+jO 59.70 so 0 LOW Sw No JULY 31" 67 1 1 1 1 0 16 1.04E+26 36.36 Q6 190 ba 10 to 10 10 1 16 6. 2ZE427 54.59 71 0.5 LOW ME No &Us 290 69 N 10 10 23 1 17 1.43E+21 SIM 76 0.5 RED MW No AUG 1 70 1 1 1 1 0 17 1.45E#29 31.91 AUG 4 71 1 1 1 1 0 16 9.90[*26 40.67 AUS 590 72 60 1" 290 177 1 17 1.75E+29 52.50 72 0 LON CALM 40 AUG 690 73 120 1000 so* 640 1 Is LIZE432 60.32 70 0.3 LON ME NO AUS 790 74 1 1 1 1 0 17 3.7x*30 62.85 AUS 8" 75 30 50 10 30 1 17 5.79E+.19 36.33 72 0 LON CALM No AUG I" 76 10 80 10 33 1 18 t.93E+31 54.71 74 0.5 Him ME RD AUG 10 90 17 1 1 1 1 0 17 5.46E+21 49.03 Aus it" 79 1 1 1 1 0 17 5.41E4,118 49.03 AUG 12 50 79 20 goo 20 20 1 to I.O?E#jQ 46.64 76 0.5 FED 51 NO AUG 11 90 80 1000 340 2100 1290 1 19 1.4OE4,33 55.33 70 0.5 ZERO ME YES 4US 14" st 30 20 20 21 1 19 2.4sE+33 57.19 73 0.5 LON N 49 AUG IS 90 82 to 10 160 60 1 19 7.14E+33 60.59 74 0.5 LOW so 40 AUG 16 90 63 10 60 10 33 1 20 2.45E+35 58.01 72 0.3 LOW Sw .40 AUS 11 to e4 so 70 40 63 1 1110 1.94E*',5 U. 12 72 0 ZERO W NO AUG 19 90 es I I I 1 0 19 5.BIE+33 39.65 At$ 19 ton E6 1200 570 1500 1 0 19 5.81E+33 59.83 70 1 ZERO E NO AUG 20 90 67 340 380 290 337 1 20 1.96E436 65.25 6q 0.5 LON ME No AUS 21 50 go to 10 to 10 1 20 4.31E+35 60.64 70 E 4 0.3 VERO .40 AUG 22 90 69 20 20 10 17 1 20 3.91,E+34 13.60 66 0.3 ZERO ME NO At% 23" 90 30 to 10 17 1 20 1.47E*34 51.10 68 1 LON E No AUG 24 90 11 20 to to 13 1 120 6.41E*33 4q.69 72 1 ZERO SE No 4116 25 90 92 t I I 1 0 19 6. 64E+31 A 47.30 A1.16 26 90 93 10 10 20 is 1 20 B.BSE+32 44.40 76 0.3 HIGH Sm NO AUG 27 qO q4 40 so 300 207 1 11 1.83E+35 47.77 72 0.5 LON v No AUG 26 90 95 1 1 1 1 0 7^0 1.9'.T*33 46.04 AV6 211 5.14 96 70 I'D 2 0 1 0 19 6.96E+31 47.38 72 0.5 ZERO 4 40 AUG 30 90 q7 to 20 50 27 1 20 1.63E+33 46.04 70 0.5 RED SE No AUG it to I I I 1 0 19 1.01+32 41.89 SEPT I" I I I 1 0 19 7.84E+30 52.04 SEPT 2qO 100 1 1 1 1 0 to ?.B&E+30 !2.04 SEPT 390 101 1 1 1 1 0 19 7.64E#30 52.04 SEPT 490 102 10 40 60 31 1 to 1.63E#30 47.69 68 0 ZERO SE NO SEPT 5;1 103 1 1 1 1 0 17 23,44,17 40.33 SUT 140 104 1 1 1 1 0 17 2.54E+27 40.93 REACHII 30 DAY GUMETRIC MEAN PAGE 3 October 13, 1990 SEPT 7 90 103 1 1 1 1 0 16 8.47E+25 41.74 SEPT 8 90 106 1 1 1 1 0 15 2.14E+24 42.37 SEPT 9 90 107 1 1 1 1 0 is 2.54E#24 42.37 SEPT 10 90 108 1 1 1 1 0 15 2.54E+24 42.37 SEPT It " 109 1 1 1 1 0 14 1.27E+23 44.70 SEPT 12 90 110 1 1 1 1 0 13 9.9xflq 34.53 SEPT 13 90 111 1 1 1 1 0 lz 4.116E+18 35.66 SEPT 14 90 112 1 1 1 1 0 11 7.09E+lb 34.03 SEPT 13 90 113 1 1 1 1 0 10 2. Im+15 34.10 SEPT 16 90H 114 60 60 60 1 0 9 3. 'AE+13 31.64 62 1 ZERO NV YES SEPT 11 " 113 1 t I 1 0 9 3.3fif+13 31.84 SEPT if 90 116 1 1 1 1 0 9 3.36E+13 31.84 SEPT 19 20 111 1 1 1 1 0 6 9.9K+10 23.71 SEPT 20 90 Ill I I I 1 0 7 9.96E+09 26.82 SEPT 2t 90 119 1 1 1 1 0 6 3."E+08 29.03 SEPT 22 " 120 1 1 1 1 0 5 3.59E*07 32.44 SEPT 23 901 121 20 80 40 1 0 4 2.69E�06 40.51 59 1 ZERO NO SEPT 24 90 122 1 1 1 1 0 4 2.69E+06 40.51 I I I I I I I I APPENDIX C I 1 1990 Cbem Sample Results I I I I I I I I k IT ;@I Rr f - 0 3 RE C E I v 11 F 6 Fl, bi-APLE kb.?,,2ER 9 0 35 co; REPOVED 7127190 L E,.- i 0;l S . Zup. III c E I, / E 7L H., D SAMPLING DATE 5i03/5@0 CO@-d[,TDR NO. 1690-004 SAMPLING TME 2 : 10 ESTABUSmENT FRES@JE ISLE S1. Mk Q( C. () 0 CASE tiA@,E LAKE REPLENISHME;NT SAND WE oo FArt"IL" T I' ERIE SA@'%'D SOURCE 00 ID CODE 5T I ANDARID ANAL 0 0 LATITUDE 0 : 0 0 : 0 rV . 0 LIN G I 'I u b E 00 0 000 0 LABJRATORY PI@LYbl$: R-1 PT ON E'S T RESul-i 11WIL Y, ER I F BY VERIFY DATE CLIM@,ENT 4 V"' 6 1 '0 N 0.0rJ00 MG/L 6 6OZ 710?190' i.VbIr N- AsTr!^ O'V* w', ),@oi L G @z @1,02/90 06?o N03 ASThA 11110' ri L'3 / L 6 L-IL M2/90 i j, I ,I A "" ' IVY) h@! L & 7102/70 1.*M0 rG/L G 710250 "@1940 Ci A' @ -A w'7 @0002 ASTMA 0 . f) 0 0 6 wcz 6/13/90 MSEE QUAL REFORT%M@MENTS 7 9?007 QJMLITATIVE 0.00c, 7/02/90 ***S;-7E QUAL REPORT-00MIENTIS T MAL Nlwt-EER OF TESTS FOR THIS SAhFLE 7 ANA0ST COMENTS EST S w,'Z -85 -1 UQ D-35,0`7 Li'ETILLED WATE& LEr`!u,-'H PRO'C'EDUPE il)'! REA)LEN-11 6@.ADE wATER."SPAPLE RATIO -,WET 6@,,315) !8 Ht@-;."( ROIARY E).-IRA:NION TlmE Al'S'@-. REC"OLTS FROM AE-IM-A LLAL-ti- L1@4 1M @iG/L k c. r- L , - 1 v - D U-k 'b,ilPLE N.21,KK 0 3 0 5 RE PORI ED 7/27M'; C 'U"L L E7 '10 R S . 1-UlF.@11 :L, -LO/ E V S-RIPLIN'u- 1)"l-lE 4/cibl'i:V COLLEC TOR r4o. 16 SAIPLING 11:30 E S 1 A L 'E'M r, E I JERu"!,t-7v' ktit- nAlUIAL IwQN 00 CASE NAME TTPE ov F AcliLi I y S@iUREHAVEti @'rEA [ILI R CE 00 III cor..-6 STANDAR1 ANAL 100 LATITUIDE 0011`:00.0 LOitl-31TUDE 'JO:00:00.0 V-@*Ff DAT T Lo' L L'. 17 P T I E @'i U? L I C 31 & I F Y B T E @'T 40403 PH h20 LEACH i.6200 6 wi.i. 7/02/90 @z 4410 N83 A.KfhA 1 '1 '0 "Ji I Vu-L 6 @:w i / V` i " 9'V 40615 N02 ASTMA < 0.0040 mrGIL G wCZ 7/02/90 G 4 c 'Ju h V; v llo/ @L i cd vrz 4665 P Tu,"T AST..-.;I Q. 0200 M&/L 6 t, 7102M 0 0',) 2 A'T'A H2"-'d 0.001jo 6 wi.,- 6--i3/90 vWSEE Quk RE PORI -ClOmmENT S 95fA7 QUA"J TAT IVE O.ovvlo G @Cz 7102/90 ***SEE QUAL REPORT-CIG-MMENTS T PAL ti'UhiER OF 1E)IS FOR T@ib' SAFFLE 7 ANALYST COrmENTS TEST Cbm',ENTS ANALYST wcz ASTh @UrirLllpl b-@vAK-K LISHLILED WkTER LEACH PROCEDURE ?0:1 REAC-ENT &RADE wAE'R/SAliF:-E RATIO (biET BASIS) 116 H(,,jK ROTAR! Erl@Nm^,C.110N TltiE KM-A. LEA,,-H. PE@,lj@ TS Fkor.. AS M-' eb/l. C0MM0'4wcALTh Of PEiNSTL4A41A PAGE: I DEFART9"i-ST OF EhVIF,0kMEhTA#.. RESCURCLS LA50FA-SCRY @REFOiT R @. C E 1 li-'-. !r 5/04/90 FOR SAMPtE NUkEEP H9027833 x"PORTZ'D 5/21/90 COtt-'TCTOR S.ZURAD CEC/ECHD SAMPLING DATE 5102/90 COLO-SCTOR NO. 1690003 SAhFLING TIAE EST49LISHMENT CITY OF ERIE STANDARD ANAL 100 CASE WAKE LIFT STATION OVERFLOW TYPE CODE FACILITY CHAUTAQUA AVE. Wfih TO CODE STRZAM CODE RIVER 14ILE IND TFC!T DESCPIPTION RESULT CONC VERIFY BY VERIFY DATE co"kic IBOD 5-DAY 105.0000 MG/L G ktT 5110/90 OC510A T FH3-N 7.4800 MG/L 6 ELF 5/08/90 Llre65A PHOS-T MG/L 3.4100 MG/L 6 S 8 IT, 5/09/'@O 3P?6c 14PAS AS MG/L < C.5000 MG/L 6 fFV 5/04/9U TOTAL NUMBER OF TESTS FOR THIS SAMPLE 4 'PT OF HEAL-Ti, HEAM V T L F S F L L t? E P 11, 02 @Sf_',6 5/ 24/ 9 0 r ot,. v C T V R J T R Z Y 8 1 N F I E_ c E ll@ S 1-@ F L 4 G A T 5114/ rf@ll_rCTCR NO. r6qCorg S@%P,FL1NG 7-i'ME 1 r r, 'r A Q, L.1 StirENT EEACHC011'&F-@ C."IiF ST#kKi@ARD ASAL @UC ff-T I Y F t L -'V' 0 E ke,%/ P A C TL ITY N. I CRI E 1% P, c E I V E R M I L E I N 0 b L T c; c Vik, FY y V-RIFY uATt'_ #61 & r r n T @-Hl-k 1.M G M, C L 6 e L F 5/18/90 r 6 1 ICA. T 1@02-N C.C7ro q j, ki 6- L F 5/18/90 f'r" 6 ? r . r I.; . f T Nn!-N 1 .1 4H G L ELF 5/16/90 r r% ic A c,' p @ - I A PEOS-T C-/ L 1 @, CT f;- L 21 1@r, c c G f L F.20CO Pb/L 4 m 5115/90 TOT;@L @)F TESTS FOR THIS SA&.PLE. 5 ERIE DEPT. OF HUlbi 17NVIRONI'@'ArENTAL HEALTH ~0 L ~C ~F ~f ~~~S Y ~qU~l ~p ~E~: I F ~v~q%~q!~qF ~ql~i~qT~qAL ~qk~-~:~q5~qCU~qk~qt ~-~'S ~I~L T Y ~qi I P ~q0 T 5/15/~q90 ~qF~4qU~: r~-~qL~'~:~?E~ql~-~q@ ~qH~qI~qL~129507 ~qR~qE~qE~qORT~C~qD 5124~q/~qY~qD ~~C~ql.L~=~-C~qT~q0R J~.~6qU~qZ~qY~qB~qI~qN~qS~qV~qI ~qF C ~qt~t~,~-~% ~qSA~qPPL~qI~qf~qi~f~qi DATE 5/14/90 C~OLL~n~-~qE~qTC~q9 NO, C ~q69C ~q9~q;~q10 ~qS~qA~qNF~qL~qI~qN~qG TIME 2~q&45 ~~5~qT~q4~0~qL~qI~qS~qH~qO~-~qE~qN~qT ~-~A~qE~qAC~qI~qFE~qO~qV~qB~qER ~qL~qf~qi~.~4q1~q6~qRCU~qN~qD STA~qN~qOA~qR~qD ANAL 000 ~~~r~-~qs~e ~q@~qk~qp~6ql ~q@~,E~qL~qE~qO ~qE~q@~qAC~qh ~qST~qG~p~qK~qA~qk~qk~ql~-~-~-~qR TYPE CODE ~~q&~PTL~qITY ~0qL~qa ~6qr~ql a ~qw ~qk~qa~qh ~~" ~qr~r~q'~8q" ~6qM~qkA~qh CODE ~qPIV~qE~qR MILE IND T~qF~qST ~I~qD~qE~qS~0qM~qp~qT~qi~qc~qh i~% E I~.~- ~qL~' L T ~q0~.~,~v C VERIFY of WE~qRIFY DATE ~n~MA~q1~6~-A ~q7 ~q?~-~qp~q3~q-~qt~; C~,52C~qO ~qF~.~qG/~qL ~q6 ~qbLF 5~q/l~qb/9~q0 ~qL~n ~qn ~0~9~, 1 ~4~@ A T ~qk~u~^2-~qk ~qE~.~qV~q4~qF~qE~D ~06~q1L ~qG ~qEL F 5/~q1~q9/9~q0 ~- ~m~ql~-~q0~1~q2~0q0 T 1.~q5~qs~qc~qo ~qM~qG /~q1~. ~q6 ~qbLF ~q5~q1~q1~q8~q/90 ~f~'~r~% 6 ~q6 5.~: ~2qmi~qcs-~qi ~qP~-~qG~qIL ~qC.~0qU~qE~qD ~P~-~qG/~qL ~q6 BE A 512419~q0 ~qC~. 7 DEE C ~qF~-~qG~q/L ~qf.2~q0~qC~qO ~M~qf~qi/L ~q6 ~qk ~qv fit 5/15/90 ~qT~qOT~q;L ~qRU~qP~qEE~qF OF TESTS FOR THIS SAMPLE 5 WE CO. ~4qDE~2qF~4q1~q. Of RAW~q, .~24qW~q-~q1~6q1~q-~92qE~88qK~8qIAL ~96qH~8qEALTI~q' PAGE LABORATORY REPORT FOR SAMPLE RECEIVED 5/15 REPORTED 5/24/90 COLLECTOR J. TRZYBINSKI ECHD SAMPLING DATE 5/14/90 COLLECTOR NO. 0690008 SAMPLING TIME 12:20 ESTABLISHMENT MARSHALL RUN STANDARD AWAL 000 CASE NAME LEW FLEW TYPE CODE FACILITY WON ID CODE STREAM CODE RIVER MILE IND TEST DESCRIPTION RESULT 0.0500 0.0100 0.8500 0.0500 5.3000 VERIFY G G G G G EY VERIFY DATE 5/18/90 5/18/90 5/18/90 5/24/90 5/15/90 TOTAL NUMBER OF TESTS FOR THIS SAMPLE 5 ERIE CO. DEPT. OF HEALTH JUN 8 1990 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSTLVANIA PAGE:1 ` DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY RECEIVED 5/15/90 COLLECTOR J. TRZYEINSKI ECHD COLLECTOR NO. 0690007 ESTABLISHMENT CREEK. CASE NAME LEW FLEW FACILITY TD CODE SAMPLING DATE 5/14/90 SAMPLING TIME 12:55 STANDARD 000 TYPE CODE STREAM CODE RIVER MILE IND TEST DESCRIPTION RESULT 0.0200 0.00060 1.6600 0.0600 3.2000 VERIFY G G G G G VERIFY DATE 5/18/90 5/18/90 5/18/90 5/24/90 5/15/90 TOTAL NUMBER OF TESTS THIS SAMPLE 5 COLLECTOR J.TRZYBINSKE SAMPLING DATE 5/14/90 COLLECTOR 0690006 SANOKUBG TIME 1:20 ESTABLISHMENT WILKINS STANDARD ANAL 000 CASE NAME TYPE CODE FACILITY LOW FLOW VAN ID CODE STREAM CODE RIVER MILE IND TEST 00610A 00615A 00670A 00665A 00680 DESCRIPTION RESULT 0.0600 0.0100 0.4300 0.0900 6.4000 VERIFY G G G G G BY VERIFY DATE 5/18/90 5/18/90 5/18/90 5/24/90 5/15/90 TOTAL NUMBER OF TESTS FOR THIS SAMPLE 5 ~0 ~qJ ~qp ~qp r ~q1 ~qh ~qV ~qF~qT J~% L ~q7~. E ~qS I-, ~qL~- if. ~qL ~qb A ~qE ~qC~.~- ~qv ~qi P ~q7 ~qL ~qk ~q1 ~qV ~V~. ~qD ~q5 ~q11 ~q1~q9 ~q0 ~,~%~qL~,~t ~L~qF~@ ~qh~q@~,r.2~q95~q02 5~qi24~q/~qo~qU FC~qi~c ~q$~q@~P~qPLL ~qEF~qO~qR~qTE~qD ~C~C~L~qI.~'~"~qET~qC~qR J~mT~qRZY~qb~qi~qh~qs~qK~q1 ~qSC~qP~qD ~qS~qi.~qK~.~-FL~qI ~qN~q6 DA~qf ~qE 5~q,14/~qV~qO ~C~Lt~qFC~qT~qOR ~PO~, ~qC69~qC~qE~q05 SA~qP~.~qP~qL~qI~qP~qG T1~q0~i~qi 1~q: ~q4 5 e~~~~qA~q9~qL~q1~q$~qW~q&~-~qF~qh~qT ~2qW~q:~qUT C~qKE~qEK ~qS~6qU~qhDA~qR~qD A~qkAL ~4q0~q6~q0 ~(~!~qF ~q@A~qP~qE LOW flew ~qT~qYF~qF ~qE~qC~qLE ~1~""L~qITY ~qV~q0~q4 ~T~r ME ~q@TR~qEA~qA CODE ~q;~@I~qVE~qR ~qm~qIL~qL I ~qLD E ~q6 ~qVLT ~qc~qo~qk~qc VERIFY C. ~qy ~q4~qE~qN~qI~qF~qY DATE ~~~~~1~q6~q1 ~qr~qp T ~qN~qP~q3~q-~qN < C, C2~q0~q0 ~qk~qi~q6/L ~qG ~qBL ~qF ~q5~q1~q1 ~-~qb~qi ~q9~qG ~~~qf~-~q1~q5A T ~qN~q(~@~q2-~N ~q1~,~qL~qC60 ~qPG/L ~q4 ~qFL~qF 5~q1~q1~q1~q1~q90 ~r~- ~k~qi 2 CA T ~qNn~q3-~qt-~.~' ~q0,~6q0~0q00 ~qm~qb/L ~qG ELF 5~q/1 ~2qU 9~4q0 ~~~A~q65A r~qpc~qS-T ~4~qG~q/~qL ~qC.~q64C~qO ~qV~qG~q/~qL ~qi ~qE~c~qk~.~qk~. 5~q12~q4~q/~q9~q0 ~n~n~q,~.~qq~qo T ~qO~qP~qE ~qC ~qF~qG/~qL ~q4~,60~q0~q0 ~q1~0~,~q6 ~q1 L ~q6 ~qV ~qp 5/15~q/~q;~q0 ~q1~q0~1T~6qf~6qt ~qt~-~qU~qK~qE~q!~qP ~q9F T~qE~qST~qE F~qG~qK THIS SA~qrPLF 5 ERIE M DEPT. OF HEALTI JUN ~q8 1~q9~q2~q3 ~6qENV~6qIR~04qO~92qN~q'~6qi~q'~qv~4qI~6qENTAL HEALTH ~4q(~q%~8qC ~2qV~2qv~4qi~28qr~8qr~qo ~0 F ~qR ~qt: ~qE.~'~.~- 5 2 ~q5 ~q1~q) ~w~qi~ql ~qZ~qi ~-~f~qu ~qc ~qT ~qi ~qi ~qR ~qz ~qv ~q6 1 I'll' IS ~qK I I ~qc ~qb~:~.~? ~v~q%T~qi ~qt~qo~q/~q0~q5~q1~q9~qc~, ~qr ~qf ~q1' R ~q1~,~,~ql ~qc ~q6 9 ~qC~, ~qr~- ~q1~q3 ~qII~qA~qE I I : 1~4q0 L ~q1 ~qF~qE -~q4~q1 ~l~qk ~qP 5 ~q!~@ A LL ~q9 ~qU ~qN ~qS~-~qT~qX~q%~:~qD~qF~%~.~qR~qD ~qA~qkAL 0~q00 I.- ~E a ~ql~qy~qp~p ~qc~k~,~qE~-~p~c ~P~qC~qI~qL~qITY ~qW ~q0, ~k ~qR1~6-~qh FILE I~qR ~q0 ~qC ~qT I ~qK~, ~q0~1~q@~-~q!~q@~qULT ~qc ~qC ~qc I ~'~A~p ~qF ~qy ~q6 ~qv ~'~qJ~qE~qR~qI~qF~qY ~q1~-~qf~-~qT~!~: ~qf~, ~qi ~qC~.~qi T ~6~.~q1~@~'~A~q-~f~z ~q/9~qc ~qC.~q5~q!~qCC ~qk~qG/~qL ~q6 ~qL~qYL 9/07 ~q5 ~q6 2 ~qC~r~i 20 1 ~qi. ~qb ~8q0~q1~qC 9107/90 ~q2 ~qc~q; ~qT ~qZ , ~q0 ~@~" C ~-~qG~q/ L T ~r~" ~r~i L ~;~qK~qi/ ~q9/~q12/90 6 ~q! ~qF ~qv ~@~"~- ~4~@ ~' ~q0~, ~q3~q5 ~qD ~t, ~v n T ~qT~. G C ~qC~' I L 1~q1.~q40~6q0~-~6q2 if ~qG It. ~q9106/90 "1~0~q7 C . 5 ~q0~. ~qO~l ~q0 ~l~4~qb ~q/L 91061~q40 T~qC~'~.~1 A L ~qk ~qL~, ~i~qb~:~: Of ~qF IS T~qt~qi ~qf ~q0 7 H I ~qS A~0qA~qF LE ~q6 ~0 ~qC I ~qJ6 1 r 2 5 ~q2 ~qV ~qi ~qt~qt ~qS K I L ~qL L ~q/~q0~q5~q/ ~q1 C T ~qC~.~:~-~@ ~C~' ~qC1~q0 1 ~qP ~q6 1~q0 ~q: ~r~qj 5 ~q0 ~qF ~qH A V ~f~qF~qI~qV C ~qR ~q5 Of ~r ~qi L ~8qN~' L I F- S T A I ~qT IF ~: ~qC ~qC T I Y ~q14~.~6q5~0qk -flow ~'~i ~qS~qT ~qk~:~-~- ~qA~q1~4~qC ~qI~r L~qe ~qi ~qK~qt~. ~1~. C ~qF ~"~' 1 ~q41.~q1 ~qc~hd ~qL ~qf ~qV 3~qV ~0qV~J~I ~P~q6~4q4 Ili ~-~;~qv ~qC ~q9~q/~q0~q7~q/~q90 ~qT~, ~qF~qi I T 2- ~q1 ~qU 2 ~W~Z~' ~q0 1~.~q5~q?~qCG ~W~,~q@ ~qi L ~qV~qC ~7~%~q/~q0~q7~q/ ~y~"~qD I- ~qS/L ~qr~. 7 ~4qV L ell 219~-~q3 ~qT ~q*~qL~qIL 7. ~qi 0~q0~1~q0 L ~i~qo ~I~qm ~q9 ~q0 6/ r [#a ~~ ~q7 tic ~L~p ~qe I., ~qL ~8q< L ~q0 6~q1 ~qJ ~v 6 ~q0 T A L ~q4~q) ~r~%~qE ~q0 F T ~qi ~S~IL ~q1 ~q4~qA~U~8qVLE ~0 T~;~ F ~f~ I ~qi 5 2 ~qJ' 7 r-~I ~qL~T~qC~-~r~qf~-~qR~- ~qJ~.T~7~-~qZY~I~qF~qI~q%~qS~qK~qI F ~!~V~* ~qi '~qD ~qt~-~. ~qi~, L I C. 5 ~qC ~qC T ~qC~1~1~-~qZ IV ~q0 C it ~qS~qC~'~qf~- 12 ~~~r~A~I~ML~I~AS~qE~qFE~qN~qT ~qF~qC~qC~ql ~q(~'~-F ~qP~q?~j~i~-~.EL~i~. AVE ~:~i ~qE ?I A ~qFf ~qT ~qy ~qp ~qS T ~qX E-A ~qC ~D ~qf ~qE ~qC ~qF ~q1 F ~qT 1 ~.~q9 ~qV I F ~qZ~.~P~.~qI~qE ~*~1~q6~q1 ~qo~qt ~qT ~qk~qH ~q3~q- ~qC~. ~. ~qb 1~q0 ~q1 L 90 ~~v~q A ~.~q15 A ~qT 2-~q6 ~qC~' . C 520 1 ~3~qi~qi ~q0~q7~q190 IS ~q7 ~qC~. ~.~1~k ~q1 ~qL ~qk ~qv ~qc ~q1~q0~6q7~q1~q9 C~. ~~2q"~q6~qs~qk ~qP. C ~v~qC/L ~q2 5 ~qf~- ~qQ ~qk~i I L 12~q! ~q1 ~"~.~1 ~qc~- -~~ ~qr ~q6 ~q; ~qC~. 9. ~1~-~1 ~qC~qO~qU ~q1~q0 ~q6 / if ~qZ~qI ?A ~qr ~qV~qe ~q1. ~qc C~. ~qG ~qC ~qC~, ~1~4~qF~qJ~:~- ~1~q; ~qi F ~qV ~qv~ql~qo~qb~ql~qi~qv ~qC 7 ~qL ~qi~L ~qL~, ~qP e ~T~r ~qH ~qF L ~qF ~0 F L I. ~qE ~qt ~qF Y ~qF ~qF ~i~L I; ~qi FL~qR ~q!~.~;~;~w~qf~_~qL~qi~. ~q?~.~,~qL~f~qb~4qk~q@~l ~q@~;~0~q6~q5~0qM~q;~q6 L ~qL~t C ~qT ~qf- ~qF J~eT~qk~qZY~2q6~q1~qN~qS~qX~qI ~qf ~qZ ~qF ~qS~A~qi~-~'~. ~qPL ~q1~,~% a A I ~qi ~q0~.5 1~q9 ~q1 ~~~f~~LL~qFCT~qC~-~.~qR NO. ~q169~qC~qE~ql~ql S A.,,* ~qF L I ~i~ql ~'~Q~%~' ~qi I ~p~i ~z10:25 ~"~~qI~qR~qL~qI~qS~qH~qME~qNT~. FOOT Of ~q%~qO~qKTPEL~qI~qER ~qST~.~qA~qN~qD~qA~qR~.~- ANAL. ~4q0~q0~q0 NIX ~qk ~qr ~qS~qT~qO~qR~qP~. ~qo~qp~qA~,~'~qv~qA~qr~l~qE ~ql~qY~qP~qE ~qC~qV~,~q@E "#CIL ITY Hitt~, flow ~q1~9 ~qQ r~qi ~qSTR~qt~qP~qA COD--: ~qP~qI~qV~qL~qR ~qAILE IND ~qD ~qt~: ~qc ~qF~qi~'~? ~qp ~qT I a ~qx IR ~qE ~t~q@~qULT ~qC ~qL~. ~qC~q; ~qUt ~qi ~q1 ~qF I ~"~' I VERIFY DATE ~L~l T ~q%~qF~q3-N C~q9 ~qC~-~q0 ~qX~qG~q/L. 9~q10~q7~q190 ~q7 ~qK~q02~q-~qh C. ~q0~q100 ~q0~q6~q1L ~8qm~qi~qc 9/07/~2q90 ~~~~q6~q2~qCA T ~qH~qO 3- N ~q2~1 ~q1~q9 ~qC~-~4q0 %c/o- 9~q1~q0~q7~q1~q90 ~~~q! ~qA~qA CA ~qP~qP~qO~qS-~q7 ~qK~qC~qIL ~q0.~0q0~q0~0q0 ~qF ~qC I L C~. a ~q3 A 911219~q0 ~r ~2q&~P ~q0 T ORE C ~q1~q@~q6~q1L ~q2.~q5~q0~q0~q0 ~qP~qS~qf~qL ~q6 3~qF~q?~q6~q0 ~qF~0qW~qA~qS AS ~qM~q6~q/L ~2q4 ~qC.5~6q0~qC~qO NEIL ~qi~r ~qFF~qV 9~q/~0q0~q6~q190 TOTAL ~0qR~2qU~qP~@~qS~qE~qk OF ~qT~qES~qIS FOR THIS SAMPLE 6 ~32qr ~0 ~F ~L :0 ~L~. FOR L ~= ~qCT~qO A J T~qP Z Y ~q6 ~2qU~"~I~qs ~qK~qi ~qc ~qH ~qp ~qt~I~-A~q?~:PL~qi~:~t~qb ~-T~qE ~qI~,~,~j~q5~q/~q;~7~q0 ~2qU ~c ~qCT ~qC~qP ~qC 69 IN 4 A~qSL~qI~qS~qH~qM~qE~qN7 LAL~qNUT C RE ~2qM ~q?-~qt~qAL ~qD~6qe~qc~t ~;~: ~q@ ~t ~q@~:~qE ~qT I ~qp C ~qV H~2q6~qj~qI~, flow T ~qL ~q7 1 Y ~D~qI~qV~'~-~'~qP ~qK~qI~qL~qE ~qI~qk~a ~qP~q@~qE~qULT ~qc ~qC ~qc ~qv ~qk ~qi ~qF ~qv ~q5~1 ~qT JAT~qE ~qC~. T 2 3 ~q0~q0 ~'~q4~q6~q/ L I ~qC~-71 9 E~ql ~"~qA~ql ~qS~qA ~q7 ~qC~. ~q2 ~q- ~qh ~q(~.~.~L~'~15 c~qC ~qf~@G~qIL ~qC~. Sri ;1~q7 ~q1 ~1~q@ ~0q0 n 6 2 CA 1.13C~qU ~qS I L ~q6 ~qS~qv ~qc ~q9~q/~. 7/90 ~-~q5 ~qS C . 3 9 ~qC~"~L~l ~qG~, I - ~4~1 ~qr~z ~qi~-~- ~q;~@~, ~qi 112 ~q1 ~qC~o ~~,~r~,~q6~q? ~qV ~q1 ~qC~P~qE C ~*~qS/L ~:~qB . 9 ~qG~I~qC ~qD ~q@~:~qG/L ~q6 ~.~I~b ~-~q4 if 'I ~qi ~1~-~q3~t 6 ~q1 ~-~q>~q6 re~qk~qS AS F~qS~q/L ~q0 . ~.~q5 ~q0 C~qD ~qP~o-~, ~q/ L ~I~qG ~qf~qf~qw ~q@~q@~q1~q06~q/ TOTAL ~qNU~N~qi~q@E~qR Of 7~qt~qS~qT~qS FOR "NIS ~qS~qA~qV~qP~i~.~.~4 6 On COLLECTOR SAMPLING DATE 10/01/90 COLLECTOR NO. 0690021 10/1090 10/10/90 10/10/90 10/11/90 10/03/90 10/16/ 10/11/90 COLLECTOR J. TREYEISKI SCH STARTING DATE 10/01/90 COLLECTOR NO. 0690022 STARTING TIME 14:30 ESTISHMENT CRYSTAL POINT CO TYPE CODE FACTLITY STORK WATER ID CODE DESCRIPTION F CODE V Q DATE 90610A T WH3-A 0.1000 E/L G LF 10/10/90 90615A T WO2-A 0.0200 E/L G LF 10/10/90 90620A T NO3-N 0.7100 E/L O LF 10/10/90 90665A PH05-T MO/L 1.0000 G/L BB 10/11/90 3 260 0.5500 FAV 10/03/90 TOTAL NUMBER OF TASTE FOR 5 THE CO DEPT. OF HEALTH OCT 24 1990 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES COLLECTOR J.TAZYMINSKI STARTING DATE 10/22/ COLLECTOR NO 0690820 STARTING TIME 10:25 ESTABLISHMENT . 26TH & ID CODE DESCRIPTION 086101 T 3-A 0.0 00 /L G 10/10/90 086151 T 2-A 0.0123 /L 10/10/90 08620 T 03-A < 0.0400 /L 10/10/90 0 665 08-1 O/L 1.3400 /L 10/11/90 30260 /L < 0.5000 /L 10/23/90 TOTAL POWER OF TESTS FOR 5 ERIE CO. DEPT. OF HEALTH OCT 24 1990 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 10/ /90 10/11/90 COLLECTOR J.TEZYEINSKI STARTING DATE 10/02/90 COLLECTOR NO. 0690020 STARTING TIME 10:25 ESTABLISHMENT . 26TH & COLONIAL FACILITY STORE WASTE ID CODE DESCRIPTION CODE DATE 00610A T HH3-A 0.0 00 /L G GL7 10/10/90 00615A T HO2-A 0.0120 /L 10/10/90 00620A T HO3-A < 0.0400 /L 10/10/90 0 665A P 08-Y /L 1.3400 /L 10/11/90 3 260 /L < 0.5000 /L 10/23/90 TOTAL NUMBER OF TESTS FOR 5 ERIE CO. DEPT. OF HEALTH OCT 24 1990 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SRVICES @A_PORATORY REPORT RECETI@;@-'- 9/20/gn FOR NUMEER 900073? REPORTED 12/26/90 COLLECTOR J.TRZYBINSKI ECHD SAMPLING DATE 9/?0/90 COLLECTOR NO. 0690016 SAMPLING TIME 11:35 ESTABLISHMENT KELSO BEACP ASSN. WQN 000 CASE NAME SEDIMENT TYPE "'o v FACILITY MILLCREEK ST0"RM SEWER SOURCE 00 ID CODE ONGT STANDARD ANAL 000 LATITUDE 00:00:00.0 L ITUDE 00:00:00.0 LABORATORY ARALYSIS: TEST DESCRIPTION RESULT CONC VERIFY BY VERIFY DATE CCKMENT 40009 PH CORROSVTY 7.3900 PH G GLM 10/12/90 40403 PH H20 LEACH 7.31700 G GLM 12/26/90 40615 N02 ASTMA e.01@0 M61L G G16M 12/26/90 40620 N03 ASTMA 0.2700 MG/L G GLM 12/26/" 40665 P TOT ASTMA < 0.0200 MG/L G GLK 12/26/90 90002 ASTMA H20LCH 0.0000 G WCZ 11/28/90 ***Scz QUAL REPORT-COMMENTS 9?007 QUALITATIVE 0.0000 G GLM 12/26/90 ***SEE QUAL REPORT-COMMENTS TOTAL NUMBER DF TESTS FOR THIS SAMPLE 7 ANALYST COMMENTS TE LT COMMENTS ANALY,@' T 0 0. 02 wCz A@74 M7THOD D39E7-Sqw .lm@ L, DTSTILLED WATER LEACH PROCEDJRE ?0:1 REAGENT GRADE WAITER/51'0PLE RATTn 'WET S@STSI, is HO"JR, ROTARY EXTRACTION TIME ,@@007S ACTM nT UA@ER L- TOC 2.7 15/L MBAs 0.5 @011 c IV '4 I I I I I I I I I "PENDIX D I Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples I I I I I I I I I Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 2/6/90 Dunn Boulevard Creek Muddy 58,000 2/6/90 Cbautauqua Boulevard lift station Sewage debris from 3,150 overflow pipe recent overflow present 2/7/90 Cbautauqua Boulevard lift station Sewage debris from 5,100 overflow pipe recent overflow present 4/25/90 Cbautauqua Boulevard billside Sewage debris on >60,000 discbarge beacb 5/2/90 Halley Street storm sewer 50 5/3/90 Water running across Peninsula 49,000 Drive (west to east) in the area of Waldameer 5/7/90 Sborebaven Creek: Near moutb 190 Just downstream of lift station 260 Just upstream of lift station 400 About 200 ft. upstream of lift 320 station (but downstream from duck ponds) 5/14/90 Storm pipe to sboreline - west of <10 Marsball Run Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 5/14/90 Small stream to sboreline midway 420 between Marsball Rvn and Sborebaven Creek 6/5/90 Scott's Run - west brancb (next 10 fecal coli to lift station) <10 E. coli 6/5/90 Scott's Run - soutb brancb 21,000 6/5/90 Scott's Run - downstream of wbere 16,000 the two brancbes meet 6/5/90 Scott's Run - bebind boat store 8,000 fecal coli 6,200 E. coli 6/5/90 Scott's Run - near moutb 10,000 fecal coli 4,600 E. coll 6/8/90 Baer Beacb - storm water pipe on Rain in a.m. 570 west 6/8/90 Baer Beacb - storm water pipe on 1,000 east 6/8/90 Scott's Run - west brancb Rain in a.m. 70 6/8/90 Scott's Run - soutb brancb 18,000 6/8/90 Scott's Run - bebind bait sbop 9,000 6/8/90 Storm water retention area - near 1,000 West 26tb and Colonial Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 6/20/90 Walnut Creek access area Svspected sewage lift 3,000 north basin station malfunction upstream 2-3 days previously, some solids were still floating in the basin 6/25/90 Inlet to collapsed storm drain Wet weather 3,000 exiting into Beach 1 West (Inlet is by Sara's Restaurant) - 7/2/90 Scott's Run - west branch Dry weather 310 7/2/90 Scott's Run - south branch 5,000 7/9/90 Scott's Run - west branch Wet weather 2,300 fecal coli 300 E. coli 7/9/90 Scott's Run - south branch 44,000 fecal coli 40,000 E. coli 7/9/90 Inlet to collapsed storm drain 32,000 exiting onto Beach 1 West 7/10/90 "Shoreline hole" dug in sediment accumulated in collapsed storm drain outlet on Beach 1 West: Sand <10/10 g Water 300 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 7/10/90 "Shoreline bole" - Beach I West Sand 40/10 g Water 1,000 7/17/90 Scott's Run - west branch Dry weather 120 7/17/90 Scott's Run - south branch: Next to lift station 530 Upstream in woods, area of >6,000 drive-in theater Upstream, just north of >6,000 West 6tb Street near peninsula Tributary of south branch of 180 Scott's Run at West 10th, near peninsula 7/20/90 Scott's Run - west branch 200 7/20/90 Scott's Run - south branch 400 7/20/90 Inlet to collapsed storm drain >600 exiting onto Beach 1 West 7/20/90 Presque Isle Sbores Condominium Beach: East 410 West 1,200 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 7/26/90 Kelso Access Road - water running 290 in ditcb 7/31/90 Kelso Beacb - puddle in parking lot Wet weatber >60,000 7/31/90 Marsball Run: Near moutb 5,200 Soutb of-West Lake Road, 5,700 west of cemetery Near 15th and Harper Drive 12,000 fill-I 13 11 U LI.L U U e r, ooms/ End of tube at 22nd and Midland 1,700 Bebind Erie Ceramic (soutb l-,800 of railroad tracks) 8/3/90 Dunn Boulevard Creek Dry weatber, mucb algae 1,080 on beacb 8/3/90 Dunn Boulevard Beacb: Near sbore in algae 1,000 (I ft. water) Outside of algae zone 300 (2 ft. water) 8/3/90 Creek from Erie Coke 40 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 8/6/90 Dunn Boulevard Creek 6,000 8/6/90 Shade's Beach (near shore) 80 Foamy material at shoreline 2,600 8/8/90 Beachcomber Campground - ditch >60,000 by arcade 8/9/90 Kelso Beach - storm drain behind 1,300 parking lot Sediment from above catch 19100/10 g basin 8/9/90 Storm drain at foot of Montpelier <20 Avenue 8/12 - See Table 2 8/13/90 8/13/90 Calvary Cemetery - puddle Wet weather 7,000 8/13/90 Puddle near mouth of Marshall Run >60,000 8/22/90 Small stream from Waldameer - near 1,000 Beachcomber office 8/26/90 See Table 3 9/5 - See Table 4 9/6/90 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/12/90 Kelso Beacb - storm water overflowing 2,000 from storm drain bebind parking lot 9/12/90 Kelso Beacb - storm water (above) 18,000 mixed witb sediment 9/12/90 Kelso Beacb parking lot - puddle 2,000 9/12/90 Baer Beacb - ditcb draining into 40 Marsball Run 9/12/90 Marsball Run - west brancb (area of 1,000 700 block of Marsball Drive) 9/12/90 Marsball Run - soutb brancb (area of 160 700 block of Marsball Drive) 9/12/90 Ditcb - soutb side of West 17tb, 40 1/2 block west of Marsball Drive 9/12/90 Ditcb - nortbwest corner of West 17tb >60,000 and Marsball 9/12/90 Ditcb next to ball field near West 17tb 90 and Linden 9/12/90 Ditcb in front of 1610 Linden <10 9/12/90 Ditcb in trailer park (West 15tb and 1,000 Clifton) 9/12/90 Marsball Run at West 15tb and Harper 180 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/12/90 Marsball Run at 10tb and Micbigan 230 9/14/90 Waldameer - puddle at top of bluff, 60 on west side of property 9/14/90 Storm water in gully near Kelso 2,000 access road (goes to storm drain at the back of the Kelso property, then exits to Lake Erie via the Beacbcomber Camp creek) 9/14/90 Pond at Sboreline Apartments 150 9/17/90 Puddle (muddy) in trailer park on Wet weatbet 2,000 West 6tb Street, across from New Process 9/17/90 Puddle - corner of West 6tb Street 1,000 and West Lake Road 9/17/90 Puddle - Calvary Cemetery, near 460 center (on paved road) 9/17/90 Puddle (muddy) - east end of >60,000 Calvary Cemetery, near West 10th Street gate 9/17/90 Puddle - West Iltb Street, just soutb 1,000 of Calvary Cemetery (sparrows were batbing in the puddle) 9/17/90 Marsball Run - soutb brancb at 700 1,000 block of Marsball Drive Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/17/90 Marsball Run - west brancb at 700 1,000 block of Marsball Drive 9/17/90 Marsball Run - just soutb of West 1,000 Lake Road 9/17/90 Sborebaven Creek: Near moutb (a man was 4,000 sboveling sediment and moving debris in the streambed just upstream of the sampling point) just downstream of lift station 1,000 Upstream of lift station, just 1,000 downstream of last duck pond Water running into first duck pond 10 9/17/90 Moutb of small stream wbicb drains 460 the Clifton Drive area 9/17/90 Marsball Run: Near moutb 3,000 At West 10tb and Micbigan 930 At West 15tb and Harper 2,000 Near West 14tb and Clifton Drive 1,000 Just nortb of West 22nd and 460 Midland Drive Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/17/90 Storm water retention area at 2,000 West 26th near Colonial 9/17/90 Flooded area - southwest corner 8,000 of West 12th and Harper Drive 9/18/90 Presque Isle: Puddle - second bay parking lot 1,000 Puddle - Nature Center parking lot 80 Puddle - on lake-side road, by 60 Beach 1 Ditch on west side of Peninsula 130 Drive, next to beige water slides at Waldameer Water running down hill to ditch 1,200 from area of water slides (above) First catch basin north of 2,000 Waldameer's driveway on Peninsula Drive 9/18/90 Puddle - 3000 block of West 9th Street 6,000 (behind Trinity Cemetery) 9/18/90 Storm water foot of Powell Avenue 1,800 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/18/90 Storm water (above) at 400 block of 190 Powell Avenue 9/18/90 Trinity Cemetery - puddle at northwest 30 side of cemetery 9/18/90 Puddle at corner of West 6tb Street 760 and West Lake Road 9/18/90 Sediment from storm water retention >60,000/10 g area on West 26tb near Colonial 9/18/90 Ditch - Hastings Avenue north of 110 West 32nd Street 9/18/90 Sediment from the above ditch 100/10 g 9/18/90 "Creek" at 3400 block of Pondview 340 9/18/90 Sediment from the above "creek" 700/10 g 9/19/90 Storm water running into catch Wet weather 680 2600 block of East 33rd Street 9/19/90 Four Mile Creek at Station and 240 Shannon Roads 9/19/90 Ditch near St. Benedictine Sisters 220 on East Lake Road (muddy) 9/19/90 "Potbole" in road near ditch above 16,000 9/19/90 Bebrend College - creek by barn, at 3,000 foot bridge Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/19/90 Bebrend College - puddle by visitors' 27,000 parking area 9/19/90 Puddle on street, 800 block of 6,000 West 21st Street 9/15/90 Puddle - Rolling Ridge School 50 parking lot 9/19/90 Puddle in the middle of Cherry Street 1,000 next to the Health Department building 9/19/90 Gannon University - puddle in front >60,000 of Zurn Science Building 9/19/90 Puddle - Erie Day School parking lot 9,000 9/19/90 Puddle by entrance to One Zurn Place 2,000 9/19/90 Puddle - 1400 block of South Shore <1,000 Drive 9/19/90 Puddle - Villa Maria College campus 9,000 9/19/90 Puddle - top of State Street 1,300 (Glenwood Hills) 9/19/90 Puddle - East Grandview behind 22,000 Mercyhurst Prep 9/19/90 Puddle - parking lot behind Zurn 33,000 Science Building, Mercyhurst College 9/19/50 Puddle - Wintergreen Gorge Cemetery 700 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/20/90 Gully near the Kelso access road: Storm water 400 fecal coli 330 E. coli 12,000 fecal strep Sediment 27,000 fecal coli/10 g 17,000 fecal strep/10 g 9/20/90 Storm sewer at the bottom of the Kelso access road: Storm water 1,000 fecal coli 1,0080 E. coli 5,000 fecal strep Sediment 2,900 fecal coli/10 g 7,000 fecal strep/10 g 9/20/90 Wet sediment wbere drainage is 1,600 seeping downbill from Kelso Vacationland to Kelso Beacb access road 9/20/90 Rain water in a tire (Kelso Beacb) 10 9/20/90 Puddle on West 15tb between 420 Peninsula and Harper Drives 9/20/90 Flooded yard - nortbeast corner 500 of West 15tb and Harper Drive Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/20/90 Ditcb - Harper Drive soutb of 30 West 15tb Street 9/20/90 Wet sediment - bottom of above 3,000 ditcb (was run as a liquid) 9/20/90 Puddle - 3400 block of West 12tb 7,000 9/20/90 Puddle - soutb of West 12tb Street 220 near airport lift station 9/20/90 Puddle - on Wolf Road near West 700 Lake Road - very muddy from land-moving operations at Wolf Run 9/20/90 Lake Sbore Golf Course Stream 7,000 Stream nearer to moutb in woods 200 Small stream near a sewage 300 lift station 9/20/90 Ditcb on Mancbester Road, nortb 40 of West Lake Road 9/20/90 Creek/storm drain at Foxglove Lane 900 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/24/90 Foot of Chautauqua Boulevard: Wet weather earlier Overflow pipe into stream >60,000 fecal coli >60,000 E. coli >60,000 fecaT -strep Stream upstream of overflow >60,000 fecal coli discharge >60,000 E. coli >60,000 fecal strep Stream downstream of overflow >60,000 fecal coli discharge >60,000 E. coli >60,000 fecal strep 9/24/90 Foot of Dunn Boulevard - 42,000 fecal coli creek/combined sewer overflow 35,000 E. coli 25,000 fecaT -strep 9/24/90 Puddle near the Dunn Boulevard 8,000 fecal coli 4,000 E. coli 23,000 fecal strep 9/24/90 Kelso Beach - puddle (overflow 1,200 from storm drain) 9/24/90 Kelso Beach - damp sand between 400/10 g storm drain and parking lot 9/24/90 Kelso Beach - puddle in parking lot 2,000 9/24/90 Kelso Beach - sediment from 27,000/10 g parking lot puddle Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/24/90 Puddle in private drive between 38,000 Crystal Point and Kelso property (Crystal Point storm drainage route) 9/24/90 Damp &oil west of drive (above) 11,000/10 g 9/24/90 Crystal Point storm water from 1,000 end of pipe 9/24/90 Crystal Point - wet sediment at 27,000/10 g end of storm water pipe 9/24/90 Pond at Sboreline Apartments 80 9/24/90 Sediment from pond above 350/10 g 9/25/90 Presque Isle: Lily Pond (by Administration 20 Building Marina Lake (at Public Boat Ramp) 30 West end of Long Pond (at bridge) 70 Marsby area at edge of Big Pond 10 (near Perry Monument) Graveyard Pond 50 Niagara Pond <10 Horsesboe Pond <10 MiscellaDeous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/25/90 Presque Isle: Marsby area next to Sidewalk Trail 1,200 Puddle at base of Beacb 11 10 sand mound Beacb 10 - large puddle in 180 west parking lot Marsby area next to Marsb Trail 40 9/26/90 Presque Isle: Puddle between east sand mound 11,000 and aerobic tanks at Beacb 1 Puddle at base of west sand 200 mound at Beacb 1 9/26/90 Puddle - Sara's Restaurant driveway 2,500 9/26/90 Beacbcomber Camp: Ditcb by arcade 9,000 Ditcb on west side of playground 13,000 Ditcb on east side of playground 4,300 Hole in ground soutb of 500 playground (end of storm pipe could be seen in bole) Puddle in camp road 5,500 Miscellaneous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 ml 9/27/90 Kelso Beach (storm drain bas been excavated and is now a trench): Usual sampling site, at catch 510 basin behind parking lot 'Downstream, at end of trench 1,300 (at fence between Kelso and Beachcomber Campground) 9/27/90 Beachcomber Campground - drainage <10 from Waldameer, east side of camp 9/28/00 Lakeshore Golf Course: Stream 10 Downstream, in woods 40 10/1/90 Crystal Point storm water 19,000 10/1/90 Small stream east of Sborebaven, 280 at mouth 10/2/90 Walnut Creek at Kearsarge lift station 440 10/2/90 Ditch - West 40tb Street, just east of 480 Sterrettania 10/2/90 Storm water retention area at Porreco 40 Extension Center (on West 38tb Street) 10/2/90 Water with suspended sediment 180 from retention area above MiscellaDeous Stream and Storm Water Samples Fecal Coliform/ Date Location Special Conditions 100 MI 10/2/90 Storm water culvert in front of 360 Porreco Extension Center 10/2/90 Puddle in front of Millcreek Townsbip 3,000 Building on West 26tb Street 10/22/90 Combined sewer overflow at foot Wet weatber 34,000 of Dunn Boulevard 10/22/90 Foot of Cbautauqua Boulevard >60,000 overflow pipe to stream 10/22/90 Foot of Halley Street - storm 130 water I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I . 1 3 6668 00001 1207 1