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OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN POINT PEDERNALES FIELD OCS P-0438 and P-0440 E:5ON COMPANY, U.S.A. PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT WESTERN DIVISION m 0 A2-1 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NOAA COASTAL SERVICES CENTER 2234 SOUTH HOBSON AVENUE .TARLESTON, SC 29405-2413 Property of CSC Librairy 1. INTRODUCTION- TABLE -OF CONTENTS R'fECEIE 4~ TABLE OF CONTENTS \KD'L'OPFRA� Section 100 INTRODUCTION 200 NOTIFICATIONS Diagram Notification List, Exxon and Agencies Government Notification Requirements 300 RESPONSE Offshore Spill Response Sequence of Response Actions Diagram - Initial Response and Backup Support Planning Guidelines Small Spill Action Checklist Large Spill Action Checklist Procedures for Sour Crude Spills Response Time for Clean Seas Equipment to Selected Locations . 400 ORGANIZATION AND TRAINING Offshore Spill Response Organizations Diagram of Organizations Onsite Response Team and Support Team Oil Spill Cooperatives Operating Concept of Oil Spill Cooperatives Clean Seas Notification and Organization Response Diagrams Emergency Response Team (ERT) Functions of ERT Diagram of ERT Positions, Names and Telephone Numbers of ERT Responsibility Sheet for each ERT Position Federal and State Oil Spill Response Teams Training Requirements for Exxon Personnel 500 IDENTIFICATION OF COASTAL AREAS Plats of Shoreline Characteristics and Pertinent Information 600 SITE-SPECIFIC COASTAL AREAS DESCRIPTIONS 700 MARINE MAMMALS AND BIRD HABITATS Tables: Reserves, Preserves, Sanctuaries, Biologically Significant and Sensitive Areas Common Areas of Pinniped Colonies Cetacean Siting and Movement in the Area Major Bird Habitats Possible Effects of Oiling Living Resources 800 EQUIPMENT Location and Availability Location and Response Time Exxon Communications Equipment Schematics of Various Containment and Cleanup Methods 900 CHEMICAL DISPERSANT EPA Schedule 408, - Required Data to use Chemicals Preplanning for Chemical Disperant Use Dispersion Aided by Chemical Dispersant Fate & Effect of Chemically Treated Oil Results of Test Conducted on Monterey Crude with Corexit 9527 Effects of Oil on Marine Life Chemical Disperant Characteristics EPA Acceptance of Corexit 9527 Spreading Regimes of Monterey Crude Disperant Application Techniques & Tables Effect of Disperant on Monterey Crude (Tech Report) 1000 RISK ANALYSES 1100 TRAJECTORY ANALYSES 1200 STORAGE AND DISPOSAL Appendix I MMS oil Spill Contingency Plan Guidelines, effective 8/1/82 II Commandant Notice 5740 - MMS/USCG MOU, effective 10/15/82 . INTRODUCT ION The objective of this contingency plan is to establish procedure, responsibilities and actions to be taken in the event of an oil spill from our Point Pedernales facilities. Our uppermost concern is the safety of lives and the prevention of damage to property and the environment. This plan provides guidance beginning from the oil spill discovery and notifications on through the cleanup and disposal stages. Outlined are provisions for varying response efforts for open ocean containment and cleanup and shoreline cleanup. The plan also contains risk and trajectory analyses for the platform and proposed pipelines. Coastal areas from San Luis Bay to Point Conception including the Channel Island, are segmented and identified for their specific type; i.e. rocky, sandy beaches, recreational, wetlands, bio- logical sensitivity, and wildlife habitats. Each type of coastal area.has a general and site-specific plan of response in the event it is impacted by an oil spill. The equipment required, its availability and response time to various sensitive areas and the method of deployment are also addressed in this plan. 1) NAT'L. RESPONSE CTR. 2) LOCAL COAST GUARD SPILL 3) MMS DIST. SUPV. DIVISION 4) CLEAN SEAS* PUBLIC RELATIONS 5) CALIF. OES** MANAGER Notify j s Notify If Mgr. Not Available FLNotfDL Notify _ PERSO HAORGE OPERATIONS SUPT. | MANAGER OPR. MGR. PERSONActivate RGE Sp RELIEF OPR. SUPT. Notify c Ivt & Cleanup I Has Approval To J Activate As Necessary � Activate CS Only l ONSITE | Lctiva . . CLEAN SEAS DIVISION RESPONSE TEAM If Emergency EXXON EMERGENCY ENVIR. CONSERV. RESPONSE TEAM MANAGER IMMEDIATE NOTIFICATION: The person responsible will notify the required agencies as soon as possible, when it does not substantially interfer with actions required to stop spill INTERFUNCTIONAL source, cleanup or other emergency measures. Notify within OIL SPILL one hour, or delegate reporting to another person. RESPONSE TEAM TELEPHONE NUMBERS REQUIRED TIMING E'gON COMPANY U.S.A. .<: NRC (800) 424-8802 Immediately Or Local USCG _ _ _ __ _ USCG (805) 962-7430 Immediately FIGURE 200-1 MMS (805) 648-5131 Immediately If>1 cu. me. ,12 Hrs. If <1 cu. me. (1 cu. meter = 6.3 bbl. or 265 gal.) OFFSHORE SPILL Clean Seas*(805) 965-6502 Immediate If Help Required, Notify To Standby If NOTIFICATIONS (OCS) Containment & Recovery By Exxon Is Uncertain SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL Calif. OES** (800) 852-7550 Immed. If Spill Threatens Or Enters State Waters SANTA MARIA BASIN OFFSHORE NOTIFICATION LIST Titles, names and telephone numbers for Exxon personnel, government agencies and oil spill cooperatives. Exxon Personnel Telephone Number Offshore District Operations Superintendent M.F. Rogers (805)654-6832 (805)967-6580 District Manager L.M. Smedley (805)654-6833 (805)493-l173 Division Operations Manager B.L. Boyd (805)494-2352 (805)497-7146 Division Environmental Conservation Manager D.E. Cornett (805)494-2355 (805)497-4227 Division Public Relations Manager D I Bolding (805)494-2415 (213)762-2811 Government Agencies National Response Center (NRC) (800)424-8802 U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Santa Barbara Area (805)962-7430 * Long Beach Area (213)590-2315 Minerals Management Service (MMS) OCS spill only Ventura District Supervisor (805)648-5131 (written report - 145 N. Brent St., Suite 202 Ventura, CA 93003) California Office of Emergency Services (800)852-7550 (OES) ' State Lands Commission (SLC) District Supv. (714)536-3018 or (If spill occurs from Belmont Island) (213)590-5201 . (written report - 245 W. Broadway, Suite 475 Long Beach, CA 90802) Oil Spill Cooperatives Clean Seas (Santa Barbara/Santa Maria) (805)965-6502 CCW (L.A., Long Beach areas) (213)432-1415 Revised January, 1984 200 NI'IFICATIONS Notification procedures for oil spills resulting from production or exploration operations have been devised to follow a logical sequence for timely not if i- cation to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations. This sequence of notifications is illustrated on figures 200-1, 2 and 3 for both offshore and onshore operations. Although the notification sequence has been established by Exxon, the notification timing is determined by federal and state regulations. It is essential that all notifications are made as timely as possible to ensure comp~liance with the law as well as provide protection for life, property and the environment. To notify 'immediately" means as soon as practical and a one hour maximum time~ limit has been established to allow for initiating action to stop the spill source and investigate the situation for reporting. The Field/ Drilling Superintendent may delegate the notification responsibility to another person if it detracts from his involvement in the corrective action being taken. The following information will be required by the District/Drilling operations Superintendent. 0 0 ~~~location, volume, time and cause of spill * injuries, hazardous to life, property or environment * Did spill enter navigable waters is spill threatening to enter navigable waters Does spill pose a threat to public health or welfare, aquatic life or public or private property is help required to contain and/or recover the spill In the event outside help is required to contain and/or recover a spill from offshore operations, the California Operations Manager is designated as the person to approve callout of the spill co-op and any other additional help. However, the not if icat ion and -approval sequence provides for the delegation of approval authority to others in the event of an extreme emergency or when the next level of authority is unavailable. When the normal notification sequence is re-established, approval authority will revert to those normally holding that authority. Rev. Oct. 1983 Federal and State Notification Requirements The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, commonly referred to as the Clean Water Act is the basis for all pollution control to maintain the biological integrity of the Nation's waters. The Act is administered by the EPA and the U.S. Coast Guard. The EPA administers the provisions of the Act when it concerns inland navigable waters and the Coast Guard administers the provisions of the Act as they apply to navigable coastal waters and OCS waters including the shoreline. Section 311(b)(5) of the Act requires: Any person in charge of a vessel or of an onshore facility or offshore facility shall, as soon as he has knowledge of any discharge of oil or hazardous substance from such vessel or facility, immediately notify the appropriate agency of the U.S. government. 33 CFR 153.203 (U.S. Coast Guard) Notify as described in 311(b)(5) except: "immediately notify by telephone, radio communication or a similar means of rapid communication the duty Officer, National Response Center 800-424-8802 or if that is impractical, then notify the 1) Regional On-Scene-Coordinator, 2) Commanding Officer or Officer- in-Charge of the nearest Coast Guard unit in the vicinity of the discharge or, 3) Commander of the Coast Guard district in the vicinity of the discharge. Pacific OCS Order 7 (MMS) 2.3 Pollution Reports. All spills of oil and liquid pollutants shall be reported orally to the District Supervisor and shall be confirmed in writing. All reports shall include the cause, location, volume of spill, and action taken. Reports of spills of more than 5.0 cubic meters (31.5 barrels) shall include information on the sea state, meteorological conditions, size, and appearance of slick. All spills of oil and liquid pollutants shall also be reported in accordance with the procedure contained in 33 CFR 153.203. 2.3.1 Spills. Spills shall be reported orally within the following time limits: a. Within 12 hours, if spills are 1.0 cubic meter (6.3 barrels) or less: b. Without delay, if spills are more than 1.0 cubic meter (6.3 barrels). Rev. 12/83 California State Lands Commission (SLC) * ~2142 Pollution Reports (a) All spills or leakage of oil and liquid pollutants origin- ating from operations on State oil and gas leases 'shall be reported orally without delay to the United States Coast Guard and to the State Office of Emergency Services in Sacramento. Subsequent to oral notification, a written report shall be filed with the State Lands Commissions, stating the source, cause, size of spill and the action taken. (b) Lessees shall report orally to the three authorities indicated in Section 2142 (a) any pollution of unknown source or pollution unassociated with lease operations that is observed on or in State waters. Cc) Lessees shall notify one another of information regarding equipment malfunction or of information regarding pollution resulting from another's operation. California Water Code - Section 13272 (Sept. 28, 1982) (a)- Except as provided by subdivision Cb), any person who, without regard to intent or negligence, causes or permits any oil or petroleum product to be discharged in or on any waters of the state, or discharged or deposited where it is, or probably will be, discharged in or on any waters of the state, shall, as soon as (1) such person has knowledge of the discharge, (2) notifica- tion is possible, and (3) notification can be provided without substantially impeding cleanup or other emergency measures, immediately notify the Office of Emergency Services of the discharge in accordance with the spill reporting provision of the state oil spill contingency plan. (b) The notification required by this section shall not apply to a discharge in compliance with waste discharge requirements or other provisions of this division. Cc) Any person who fails to provide the notice required by this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by a fine of not less than five hundred dollars ($500) or more than five thousand dollars ($5,000) per day for each day of failure to notify, or imprisonment of not more than one year, or both. Except where a discharge to the waters of this state would have occurred but for cleanup or emergency response by a public agency, this subdivision shall not apply to any discharge to land which does not result in a discharge to the waters of this state. This subdivision shall not apply to any person who Is fined by the federal government for a failure to report a discharge of oil. Rev. 12/83 (d) Notification received pursuant to this section or informa- tion obtained by use of such notification shall not be used against any person providing the notification in any criminal case, except in a prosecution for perjury or giving a false statement. (e) Immediate notification of an appropriate agency of the federal government of the discharge shall constitute compliance with the requirements of subdivision (a). (f) Immediate notification of the appropriate regional board of the discharge, in accordance with reporting requirements set under Section 13267 or 13383, shall constitute compliance with the requirements of subdivision (a). (g) The reportable quantity for oil or petroleum products shall be one barrel (42 gallons) or more, by direct discharge to the receiving waters, unless a more restrictive reporting standard for a particular body of water is adopted subsequent to January 1, 1983. State -Oil Spill Contingency Plan (revised May 1983) 510. Phase I - Discovery and Notification Upon discovery of a reportable oil discharge by the vehicle or facility operator, a member of the public, or a government agency, notification must be made to the state Office of Emer- gency Services COES) and to the federal National Response CenterS (NRC). OES and the NRC both maintain 14-hour toll free numbers: OES (800) 852-7550 NRC (800) 424-8802 Reportable Quantities There are various agencies' regulations that define the amount and type of substance that when discharged must be reported. The most stringent of these regulations is the EPA's definition in 40 CFR 110.3 which interprets section 311 (b) of the Clean Water Act. This regulation defines the reportable discharge quantities of oil as: The discharges of such quantities of oil into or upon the navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shore- -lines determined to be harmful to the public health or welfare of the United States, at all times and locations and under all circumstances and conditions, including discharges which: (a) Violate applicable water quality standards, or Rev. 12/830 (b) Cause a film or sheen upon or discoloration of the surface of the water or adjoining shorelines, or cause a sludge or emulsion to be deposited beneath the surface of the water or upon the adjoining shorelines. Therefore, any discharge of oil that enters or threatens to enter the navigable waters of the United States which includes streams, rivers, storm drains, water sheds that may enter navigable waters, harbors or the ocean must be reported to the appropriate government agencies. Rev. 12/83 -0~ (RGNZ~lO~ 5~~~~TAhi 300 OFFSHORE SPILL RESPONSE The primary objective of offshore spill response is the safety of personal life, preservation of property and prompt control to minimize adverse effects on the environment. Awareness, preparation, and proper training are the foremost qualities in making a rapid, effective response in case of a spill. Figure 301-1 Sequence of Spill Response Actions, Figure 301-2 Oil Spill Response, and the sections on Decision Guides, and checklists set out the actions and sequence required for response in the event of a spill. individual, team, and group job responsibilities are outlined in section 400. For the purpose of this section, spills are defined in two categories: Small Spill: Any spill which can be contained and recovered by the Onsite Response Team, (CRT) without the aid of outside assistance. This would be a spill of no more than 20 barrels in moderate weather and sea state that would not pose serious danger to the ORT during their response to the spill. Large Spill: Any spill too large or the weather and sea conditions are such that the Onsite Response Team requires outside assis- tance to contain and recover the oil spill. 300-1 Assessment and Action Initiation The Site Superintendent is charged with making the Primary and Secondary spill assessments. Since these assessments will not only determine the actions taken at the spill site, but will also, in part, determine the necessity for Secondary Response Phase measures, evaluation must be made with care. The preliminary evaluation may be complicated by any unique circumstances of the spill. The following guidelines are suggested to help the Site Superintendent make his assessment in an orderly manner. Response Assessment Guide * Evaluate the spill by considering the following: - hazards posed by the spill to personnel and site, and j necessity for shutdown of operations * Spill Size * Is spill stopped or continuous - hazardous to Onsite Response Team - causing spill movement toward or away from shore * Ability of Onsite Response Team to contain spill * Proximity of available assistance * General shoreline areas threatened a Activate appropriate spill response action (Figure 301-1 pg. 300-2) 300-2 300-Z PERSON(S) PHASE ACTION RESPONSIBLE DISCOVERY Detection first persons to sight spill Shutdown personnel on-scene PRIMARY RESPONSE Preliminary assessment of Site Superintendent spill and action initiation Activation of Onsite Site Superintendent Response Team and Onsite Support Group Notification of: Site Superintendent Operations Superintendent Government Agencies Operations Supt. District Manager California Operations Mgr. District Manager Additional Government Operations Supt. Agencies as required SECONDARY RESPONSE (large spills) Secondary assessment and Site Superintendent spill progress report to Operations Superintendent Activation of spill cooper- Operations Manager ative(s) Activation of Emergency Operations Manager Response Team Figure 301-1. SEQUENCE OF SPILL RESPONSE ACTIONS 300-3 Rev. Jan. 1984 8385 OIL SPILL RESPONSE GQ fD�~ ~INITIAL RESPONSE (o ' rO~~~~~NSITE RESPONSE TEAM - I LONSITE SUPPORT GROUP BACKUP SUPPORT iffi EMERENC OIL SPILL f7EXXON RESPONSE TEAM CONTRACTORS INTERFUNCTIONAL GOVERNMENT (DIV. DIST. COOPERATIVES. PERSON.) R S T E NI COORDINATOR CLEAN SEAS TUG BOATS ADVISORYISPECIAL COAST GUARD DIV. OPR. MGR. CCW BARGES CLEANUP STRIKE TEAM FIELD OPERATIONS (LARGE STATE HEAVY EQUIP. DISPOSAL STATE OPR. TEAM OF THE ART TRUCKS CHEMICALS FISH & GAME DRILLING EQUIPMENT) CLEANUP MGR.MENT) MAN POWER ECOLOGICAL U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE ONSHORE OPR. RELIEF PERSONNEL NATL. MARINE MAHINE OPR. FISHERIES SER. ASSESSMENT SUPV. POLICE WASTE DISPOSAL FIRE ,% ~ ADMINISTRATIVE LOGISTICS COMMUNICATIONS ?> ~ACCOUNTING/CLAIMS ,-.~ FUNCTIONAL STAFF So 0� ~ P.R., LAW, SECURITY SAFETY, TRAINING |Spill Within | Notify Government Navigable Wiaters _ Agencies and Exxon Navigable Water | Management I Management I 1 Spill Moving Towards Fire Hazard Created Shore or Out to Sea at Spill Site l l Are Containment and Is Application of Apply Dispersants and AreCovntFeasible? No Dispersants Authorized Yes Terminate Response Recovery By Federal OSC? (Section 505) I [ yes No Contain and Recover Is Shoreline Monitor Slick Movement Oil and Terminate Threatened? - No for Future Containment Response (Section 501) I and Recovery Yes 1 I 1 For Threatened For Threatened Harbors For Other Threatened Biologically Critical or Recreational Shore- Shorelines - SeeGuide 3 Shorelines - See Guide 1 lines - See Guide 2 Figure 302-1. OFFSHORE RESPONSE PLANNING GUIDE SOEIN LTHREATENEDI0 ExPosod Shoreline Can t reat be mitagated wicon- corntam oob =1 tration of equementleffrt?[ maom ant cleanup Ipol e Mitrancmnmon Frsals Lig~ ~~ heaytrds No warning or exclusion miedium NMe oils, resliodual fuell ois tachrimues known. Effect of I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~N idotters May low. insulation an direct contact with all. May evaporate. if I ISeal might haul-outs cmn sh oreline threat Persists. Probabl be cleaned with. Treat Is~ light cr d i *w eoysm out disturbing animals. Aitterrpt to divert to Cordi po unsafe. Assess came-by-cam in NM of lower iffvacq Go to(~Ciilainwt xet if poaeMbl. Go toI ~~~~~~~~~~~~~I I0v;.d, mtra P.W Sii Sea state < 3 Sea stat. 347 So su >7 ~~tiIC PblsSn af Lwlevel, reoey ev to Break any binding poaing Leave tow Is 14 md' o f ciancentra~~tIOEn natural after oil setis Sction SW6) natural Surface Aerial Surfa Aeir al Go to using sorbemns cleaning cleaning application appication application appication (Section 503) (Mixing rfmired) (Self-mix) momd effective an h1iS * rmk wow am ICan System be imrplgoemented in time~ IDvet to area of lower to effect dispersa in dee water? N W I .Go to~ Special bIOIO.a p Olepee(Scio 55 IsPoces boons Produced from ame o fN- OSC appOva reQuired Preposed dispersion? VW MMp W~l Allow slick to mom to nmor Wmeral Wme. Disperse only in canution wiali bioloica expern (OCM appoval requWe) Figure 302-2. RESPONSE GUIDE I BI1OLOGICALLY SENSITIVE SHORELINE0 300-6 Sensd Bar at Eflirmic Entrance Open LAiseu adequate bar height to exclude high tide/wasves. - reinforew if necessary Shorebirds and gulls will iwthan tend to avoid oil - diving birds, duckcs will not. Bird Nasoe a e erhr warning devices may haveca limited affect for ducks. scooter s. etc. For bird j A e p o w t goal" at point of eeg recoer oil place sacondry 1 booms (Section 511) Booming inadequate jBooming adequate 1,urhe action Irl up Filuwt ommresat h lI maeial to waer en I p ON W m 1000 perp m toz, 1 11owin n om aor chtannels. fringe a, eW recome. if recontamination 11"NtN enetreation . Reect overen I~ Wites velb mmt booliW or potential or wildlife threat exists * -l~ 4 ' .rsrc rolls. construct earth or other from unrecoered mtateial, light I bariers & low presoure e" b~UI UVCSatigi cetbe vi I(Section 5061a fSeCtioni Ws aI tting during growing period weov aaen with mom at pads an 300-7 HARBORS AND REMRAV*O#AL AREAS f P~~~~qn I Rockslww.14i I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ fGiw Oay #, am moo mawon Maagc.~a Reed SI IIUII C~~~~~~~~~~~~~b"O*(om o~e I R0eo4e aml - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~SW)T Roca Ituskn WONUW Amo blk oh 11ct50 ivu161 .4uu~ ltS 1f O ..Co w . *.Cm ~~a..gtWSW. Raft 0. 0k pbof MINum. Them Woks. dp us Figure 302.3. RESPONSE GUIDE 2 HARBORS AND RECREATIONAL AREAS 300-8 -- 1 a_ [ Smd ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 300-9 ,i r e. Ieo Ses< tw 300-9 OTHER SHORELINE TYPES | Oil at SeaOl Onshore o~ II O | Allow to Ground 0 ~~~~~~~~Light Oil Heavy Oil � I I I Cliffs, rocks, Sand, pebbles, .o~ 3~I |Marine terraces | cobbles < i > a ctonAllow to weather- disrupt any pavement formation mechanically Section 506 Figure 302-4. RESPONSE GUIDE 3 TO OTHER SHORELINE TYPES OFFSHORE SMALL SPILL CHECKLIST (1-20 barrels, Assume Onsite Response Team Can Handle) Person Responsible Action to be Taken as Quickly as Possible Person sighting Notify Site Superintendent (person in charge) spill REPORT: � Location of spill (in relation to facility) a Type of fluid (diesel, crude, other) � Size (estimate dimension or volume on water) � Direction of spread (away from or confined around facility) * If known, is source shut-in or continuing a After reporting, verify spill source is shut- in, obtain assistance if required. * IF SPILL IS SOUR CRUDE DO NOT ENTER SOURCE AREA ALONE, WEAR AIR PACK Site Superintendent * Alert all personnel of spill (Person-in-Charge) * Instruct Onsite Response Team to prepare and stand by * Determine danger to personnel, facility and feasibility of deploying containment equipment (danger includes: toxicity, flammability, weather and sea conditions and visibility) a Notify Operations Superintendent Operations * Notify required government agencies Superintendent Site Superintendent a If safe and feasible, activate ORT and deploy spill containment boom a Assess ORT progress - If spill contained, proceed to clean up - If spill uncontained, notify managementspill cooperative assistance required Operations Manager � Activate spill cooperative for assistance * Notify Public Relations Manager * Alert Emergency Response Team members ***If spill is sour crude, use procedure from Page 300-13 300-11 Revised June 1981 OFFSHORE LARGE SPILL CHECKLIST (Greater Than Onsite Response Tesm Can Handle) . Person Responsible Action to be Taken as Quickly as Possible Person sighting Notify Site Superintendent (person in charge) spill REPORT: * Location of spill (in relation to facility) * Type of fluid (diesel, crude, other) * Size (estimate dimension or volume) * Direction of spread (away from or confined around facility) * If known, is source shut-in or continuing * After reporting, verify spill source is shut- in, obtain assistance if required. * IF SPILL IS SOUR CRUDE DO NOT NTER SOURCE AREA ALONE, WEAR AIR PACK Site Superintendent * Alert all personnel of spill (Person-in-Charge) * Instruct Onsite Response Team to prepare and stand by *Determine danger to personnel, facility and feasibility of deploying containment equipment (danger includes: toxicity, flammability, weather and sea conditions and visibility) * Notify Operations Superintendent Operations * Notify Exxon management and government agencies Superintendent * Advise Operations Manager that spill cooperative assistance is needed * Advise if spill is hazardous and arrange for removal of nonessential personnel ORT * Deploy spill containment boom when safe and try to contain leading or shoreward edge of slick Site Superintendent * Reassess spill and evaluate ORT progress Operations Manager Secondary Response Phase or Designated * Activate CS or SC-PCO/OCW. If necessary, activate all Representative or portions of the Emergency Team (ERT) * Ensure support for removal of nonessential personnel. 300-12 Revised June 1981 SAFETY PROCEDURES FOR A HIGH SULFUR CRUDE SPILL Platform o If the spill is on the water beneath platform or crude is still being emitted into the sea, the Onsite Response Team is not to enter the plus 15 foot level until the H2S concentration is de- termined first. o Monitoring is to be done with a reliable measuring device - direct reading H2S meter or Drager tube. o H2S measurement should always involve two persons, one measures and the other is positioned for safety watch. o Portable breathing air sets are to be worn by each of the persons involved in the monitoring. � For personal safety, the concentration Of H2S must be monitored by instrument and not judged by the degree of odor, as the ability to smell H2S is lost at approximately 70 ppm. after brief exposure. o Measurement should be taken on the downwind side of the platform or of the spill surface. o If the spill slick has moved away from the platform and is visible thefioston Whaler should be deployed and approach the slick from upwind with caution. If H25 odor is detected, put on air packs. o Portable breathing sets and means of radio communication are to be taken with personnel on Boston Whaler. o Maintain radio contact with the platform at all times. o When the 112S concentration of the slick is determined by instrument to be below the exposure limit of 10 ppm, return to the platform and deploy the spill boom for containment. o Although the exposure limit of toxic substance to the clean-up team will be low, air packs should be available for each member. o The toxic and volatile fractions from raw high sulfur crude will be at its highest rate if the wind is low and the sea is calm. The greater the agitation from the wind and sea, the quicker the dis- persion of the toxic substances. Is 300-; Revised June 1981 RESPONSE TIME FOR CLEAN SEAS EQUIPMENT TO SELECTED LOCATIONS Approximate Distance between Storage Location Requiring Location of Nearest and Response Total Response Response Responding Equipment Site (Miles) Time (Hours)* Shamrock Platform Shamrock Platform 0 0.5 Port San Luis (Mr. Clean II) 42 5.0 Santa Barbara Harbor (Mr. Clean I) 70 7.5 Deer Canyon Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 8 2-3 Point San Luis Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 5 1.5-2.5 Avila Beach Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 0 1.5-2.5 Pismo Beach Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 5 2-3 Grover City Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 8 2-3 Santa Maria River Mouth Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 30 2.5-3.5 Lion Rock Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 33 2.5-3.5 Point Sal Avila Beach (Vans #3 and 10) 33 2.5-3.5 Purisima Point Gaviota (Van #2) 40 3-4 Santa Ynez River Mouth Gaviota (Van #2) 31 2.5-3.5 Point Pedernales Gaviota (Van #2) 35 3-4 Point Conception Gaviota (Van #2) 16 2-3 * Includes mobilization (1 hour for vessels; 1-2 hours for vans), travel time (@ 10-12 knots at sea and 30 mph on land), and deployment time (30 minutes). 7.22/3-T2-10 (Rev 3: 06/15/84) GENERAL RESPONSE TO OILED COASTAL AREAS The persistence of oil in an area is used as a measure of the sensitivity of the area to an oil spill. Oil generally does not persist in exposed, sandy beach and rocky coastline areas because it is rapidly dissipated by wave action or tidal flushing. Shoreline areas most vulnerable to oil include sheltered coast- line areas and salt marshes. In these areas, wave action and t idal Iflushing are not strong and oil would persist for a relatively long period of time. Most of the coastline adjacent to the Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Channel OCS areas is composed of exposed shoreline areas subject to high energy wave action and tidal flushing. There are , however, some sheltered areas bordering the Basin and Channel where oil could persist for longer periods of time (Woodward-Clyde, 1980). General Response Stra~tegies Three-major shoreline types are found adjacent to the Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Channel areas. Rocky Shoreline Areas: Most of the rocky shoreline areas are * exposed to high energy wave action and tidal flushing and probably would experience rapid rates of natural cleaning. Along very steep shores, most oil would be held offshore by reflected waves and any oil deposited would be rapidly removed. On less steep shores, the upper intertidal and supralittoral zones would be oiled, and might take up to 6 to 9 months for natural removal. On wave-cut platforms, short-term persistence of oil would occur along the upper intertidal sediments (Gundlach et. al., 1982). Sandy Beaches: Sandy beach areas have a low to moderate sensi- tivity to oil. The compact sediments of fine-grained sandy beaches would prevent the deep oil penetration which may be expected where the beach is composed of coarse-grained sediments (Gundlach et al., 1981). Small accumulations of oil would be deposited primarily along high-tide swashlines, while larger accumulations could cover the entire face of the beach. Sheltered Wetlands: Shoreline areas most vulnerable to oil are sheltered wetlands. Oil could persist in these areas for five to ten years; marsh plants, epifauna and infauna would be adversely affected (Gundlach et all, 1982). The principal technique for protecting such areas is to enhance, by mechanical means, the existing sand bars at outlets to the ocean or to use exclusionary booming techniques. 300-15 If a major spill cannot be contained and cleaned up at sea, and is likely to contact a shoreline area the following procedures will be followed: 0 1) Using this Oil Spill Contingency Plan, and the assistance of the MMS, U.S. Coast Guard, and other supporting organizations, the sensitivity of the shoreline areas will be determined. 2) Initial response efforts will be directed toward protection of sheltered wetlands, sensitive habitat areas, and harbor facilities. The response strategies discussed in this oil spill plan, the see state condi- tions, and the recommendations of federal and state agencies will be implemented. 3) Decisions concerning the feasibility of undertaking containment and cleanup efforts in areas less vulner- able to spilled oil will be made on a case-by-case basis by Exxon, Clean Seas, and the appropriate federal and state regulatory agencies. Channel Island Response All four of the Channel are considered biologically sensitive, as are the waters surrounding them. The waters out to six miles from the islands have been designated as a marine sanctuary. Each island is inhabited by many varieties of marine mammals and birds, including several endangered species. In the event a large oil spill threatening to impact any one of the islands, every available means at the disposal of the ail industry, spill cooperatives and USCG Regional Strike Team should be made available to contain the slick before it enters the tidal zone of the islands. Should the weather and sea state be such that mechanical means were not effective in controlling the slick at sea, Exxon would recommend that approval for and use of dispersants be done as quickly as possible. Most of the shorelines of the islands are high energy self- cleaning rocky shorelines, therefore, any oil impacting the islands would not accumulate or persist on the land mass very long. Every attempt to keep wildlife away from the slick should be made. 300-16 W~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A 400 OFFSHORE SPILL RESPONSE ORGANIZATIONS In the event of an offshore oil spill, any or all of several response organizations may be activated. As shown by Figure 400-1, these organizations are: Onsite Response Team (Exxon/contractor personnel) Onsite Support Group (Exxon/contractor personnel) Oil Spill cooperative (sponsored by member companies) Emergency Response Team (Exxon) Exxon Interfunctional Response Team Regional or National Response Teams (federal government) State Operating Team (California) Generally speaking, the initial response to an oil spill will be provided by the Onsite Response Team (ORT) and Onsite Support Group (OSG). Should additional support be required, one of the oil spill cooperatives, Clean Seas or CCW will be activated, and contractors if they are required. For major spills, the Emergency Response Team (ERT) will also be called upon to coordinate and control the spill response efforts. In such an event, the federal and state governments will provide advice and standby assistance through their Regional (or National) Response and State Operating Teams, respectively. The functions and responsibilities of each oil spill response organization are outlined in this chapter. 400-1 Revised Jan. 1984 o0 8385 OIL SPILL RESPONSE pi,~ I-. INITIAL RESPONSE ~o~ 0 =r O ~SITE RESPONSETEAMi ~~~NS~~IT ONSITE SUPPORT GROUP N BACKUP SUPPORT ~~~~~~~xo , RESPONSE TEAM N ON RESPONE TEAMOIL SPILL COTACOSINTERFUNCTIONAL!GVRMN FACTORS ~~~~~GOVERNMENT (DIV. & DIST. COOPERATIVES RESPONSE TEAM * AGENCIES PERSON.) i COORDINATOR CLEAN SEAS TUG BOATS ADVISORY/SPECIAL COAST GUARD DIV. OPR. MGR CCW BARGES CLEANUP STRIKE TEAM FIELD OPERATIONS (LARGE STATE HEAVY EQUIP. DISPOSAL STATE OPR. TEAM OF THE ART TRUCKS CHEMICALS FISH & GAME DRILLING EQUIPMENT) CLEANUP MGR. CLEANUP MGR. EQUIPMENT) MAN POWER ECOLOGICAL U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE ONSHORE OPR. RELIEF PERSONNEL NATL. MARINE MARINE OPR. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~FISHERIES SER. MARINE OPR. POLICE ASSESSMENT SUPV. WASTE DISPOSAL FIRE ADMINISTRATIVE di * LOGISTICS -4 COMMUNICATIONS ACCOUNTING/CLAIMS * FUNCTIONAL STAFF P.R., LAW, SECURITY DO> :TY, TRAINING A _ ._ 0 _~~~~~~~~d 401 ONSITE RESPONSE TEAM AND SUPPORT GROUP Initial, on-scene response to oil spills will be provided by two groups, the Onsite Response Team (ORT) and the Onsite Support Group (OSG). Each of these teams is composed of Exxon or contractor person- nel who are regularly assigned to the production or drilling facility. During spills, these groups shall answer to the Site Superintendent, and it shall be his responsibility to assign and train the members of the ORT and OSG. The Onsite Response Team will consist of at least four members of the production facility, drilling vessel, or supply boat. During fuel or crude oil transfers, the ORT will be assigned to the topside trans- fer manifolds. Its function is to stop, contain, and clean up any spill that occurs during the transfer operations. For times other than during fuel transfers, the Site Superintendent shall designate a standing crew of four or more men to respond in the event of a spill. The ORT respon- sibilities are listed on page 400-17. The ORT and OSG positions are shown in Figure 401-1. The Onsite Support Group will be comprised of four or more men and will be used only if the ORT requires assistance or relief. Each of the group's members should be familiar with the oil spill equipment and techniques for containing and recovering oil. 400-3 ONSITE RESPONSE ORGANIZATION SITE SUPERINTENDENT ONSITE RESPONSE TEAM FOUR PEOPLE DESIGNATED FOR EACH HITCH ASSIGNED TO DEPLOIIENT BOAT One-Boat Captain/Supervisor Twe-Spill Boom/Equipment Handlers ASSIGNED ONBDOARD FACILITY One-Boat/Equipment Deployment Handler ONSITE SUPPORT GROUP ASSIGNED AS REQUIRED Supervisorlsl Equipment Handlers Figure 401-1 0 Revised Jan. 1984 400-4 402 OIL SPILL COOPERATIVES Each of the spill cooperatives, Clean Seas (CS), and Clean Coastal Waters (CCW) is capable of responding to most spills without augmentation by Exxon personnel. However, in the event that any of the cooperatives must respond to a major spill, Exxon personnel will be used to provide supplementary staffing. As stated in the Offshore Spill Response Section, if an individual is assigned to both a spill cooperative's staff and the Emergency Response Team, that individual should perform both roles until a relief is designated by the Operations Manager. 400-5 Revised Jan. 1984 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA OIL SPILL COOPERATIVES CLEAN SEAS & CLEAN COASTAL WATERS OPERATING CONCEPT: �PROVIDE SPILL EQUIPMENT, MANPOWER & TRAINING FOR PARTICIPANT COMPANIES *PROVIDE REQUIRED STATE-OF-THE-ARTOIL SPILL EQUIPMENT & OPERATING TECHNIQUES � RESPOND TO OIL SPILLS IN THEIR AREA OF INTEREST AT THE REQUEST OF PARTICIPANT COMPANIES, GOVERNMENT AGENCIES OR NON-MEMBER COMPANIES �RESPONSE TO REQUEST FROM PARTICIPANT COMPANY --PARTICIPANT COMPANY PROVIDES KEY STAFF POSITIONS WITH THEIR PERSONNEL -PARTICIPANT STAFFING ASSURES CONTROL OVER POTENTIAL LEGAL ACTIONCLAIMS, PUBLIC RELATIONSGOVERNMENT LIAISON & EXPENDITURES --PARTICIPANT COMPANY IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL COSTS INCURRED FROM SPILL MEMBER COMPANY l If Oil Spill Occurs At Offshore At Marine Terminal At Onshore Drilling Location or Platform Inside Location or in Beyond 3-Mile of 3-Mile Limit Non-Navigable Limit Waters SPILLER I NOTIFIES SPILLER INOTIFIES SPILLER NOTIFIES MMS U.S. Environmental District U.S. Coast Guard Protection Agency- Supervisor (800) 424-8802 Region IX (805) 648-5131 (415) 556-6254 SPILLER j SPILLER I SPILLER I State of California State of California U.S. Coast Guard Office of Emergency Office of Emergency (800) 424-8802 Services Services (800) 852- 7550 (800) 852- 7550 SPILLER j SPILLER | SPILLER j Clean Seas Clean Seas Clean Seas (805) 965-6502 (805) 965-6502 . (805)65-6502 Figure 200-1. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE 400-6 a Revised 2/84 SPILL DIETECTED Spiller Takes Immeidiate, Response Actions Limit Volume and Spread of Oil Determine: * Volume of Oil Spill * Areas Threatened No lean ] ~~~~Notify Government Agencies Clean Seam Mobilize Primary Response Staff I, Primary Response Staff Consult' vvith Spiller to Determine Neture and Level of Assistance Noee Activate Secondary Response Personnel as Needed Figure 400-1. CS ORGANIZATION RESPONSE DIAGRAM 400-6b Revised 3/84 403 EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM The Emergency Response Team is a standing organization of Exxon employees whose purpose is to provide operational, administrative, and functional support in the event an oil spill requires these services. For the most part, the ERT will be activated only for spills of major propor- tions, but it may also be used for spills of lesser magnitudes at the discretion of the California Operations Manager. During a spill, the ERT will perform many functions. Figure 403-1 categorizes these functions according to the teams' major purposes. These functions are assigned to the individuals who fill the ERT positions as shown on the chart. Emergency Response Team members will be notified as needed by the California Operations Manager or Environmental Manager who assumes control of all oil spill response operations as the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. Once the plan is activated, operations will generally be conducted an a 24-hour a day basis until the spill cleanup operations are complete. The job descriptions and responsibilities of various team members are given in the following subsections. ERT job titles, names and telephone numbers for each member/alternate are listed on pages 400-10 a&b. In the event of an oil spill, the listed ERT duties will supersede their normal responsi- bilities. 400-7 Rev. Jan. 1984 OIL SPILL CLEANUP COORDINATOR FIELD OPERATIONS oCleanup & Restoration Manager oOnshore Supervisor oMarine Supervisor oAssessment Supervisor oWaste Disposal Supervisor Onsite Response Team ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT oSupport Manager oLogistics Supervisor oCommunications Supervisor oAccounting Supervisor oClaims Supervisor FUNCTIONAL STAFF oLegal Advisor oGovernment Liaison Coordinator aEnvironmental Coordinator oPublic Relations Coordinator oSecurity Coordinator oDocumentation Supervisor oPersonnel Safety & Medical Service oTraining Coordinator Figure 403-1. FUNCTIONS OF THE EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM 400-B Rev. Jan. 1984 EXXON Management Division Manager I Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator Div. Oper. Mgr. Well Control Director (If spill due to well blowout) Calli. Drill. Mgr. | FIELD OPERATIONS ADMIN. SUPPORT l I Cleanup and Restoration Manager Support Manager Dist. Manager Div.Engr. Mgr. Onshore Operationso Supervisor OeaosAssessment Supervisor Logistics Supervisor Communications r SYU Proj. Manager Div. Prod. Engr. Div. Serv. Supv. D ist. Serv. Supv Marine Operations 0b DurSu Opervisor Waste Disposal Supervisor Accounting Supervisor Claims Supervisor Dist. Opr. Supt. ' SYU Fac./Plan. Supv. Div. Acct. Mgr. Petr. Cas./Claims Onsite Response Team | | Opr. Personnel | FUNCTIONAL STAFF ' Di Legal Advisor e EnvironmentalCoordinator Security Coordinator Documentation Supervisor . Div. Attorney |Div. Env. Manager Div. Security Agt. Env. Reg. Supv. Government Liaison Public Relations Personnel Safety. L41 II I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Training Coordinator a Coordinator _ _ Coordinator and MedicatSuricor Pub. Affairs Mgr. Pub. Rel. Mgr. Employee Relations Env. Reg. Staff '0 Go Figure 403-2 EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (ERT) EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (APRIL, 1984) Member/ Position Alternate Office Home Western Div. Mgr. D.G. Warner (805) 494-2350 (805) Operations Mgr. B.L. Boyd (805) 494-2352 (805) 497-7146 EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM Oil Spill Cleanup Coord. B.L. Boyd (805) 494-2352 (805) 497-7146 D.E. Cornett (805) 494-2355 (805) 497-4427 Well Control Director OCS Offshore *M.F. Rogers (805) 654-6832 (805) 967-6504 Onshore *J.E. Garrison (805) 654-6834 (805) 659-1650 Cleanup & Restoration Mgr. *L.M. Smedley (805) 654-6833 (805) 493-1173 Support Mgr. C.G. Lyons (805) 494-2556 (805) 496-6142 E.F. Sabatka (805) 494-2219 (805) 497-3251 Marine Operations Supervisor-Onshore Oper. *J.E. Garrison (805) 654-6834 (805) 659-1650 Long Beach & L.A. Harbor J. B. Odom (805) 830-3240 Area Supervisor-Santa Barbara *M.F. Rogers (805) 654-6832 (805) 967-6504 Channel Onshore Operations Supv. T.H. Meadows,Jr. (805) 494-2609 (805) 496-0383 B.G. Altman (805) 494-2614 (805) 495-6854 Assessment Supervisor J.D. Rullman (805) 494-2557 (805) Documentation Supervisor D.R. Olsen (805) 494-2605 (805) 492-9534 J.M. Schweizer (805) 494-2357 (213) 991-1494 Waste Disposal Supervisor B.G. Altman (805) 494-2614 (805) 495-6854 M.E. Fedak (805) 494-2612 (805) 492-8286 Accounting Supervisor E.M. Causey (805) 494-2020 (805) 496-1442 All personnel located in Division Office except those noted by . *Ventura District Office from outside Exxon (805) 654-6800 400-10 (ERT) EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM (APRIL, 1984) Member/ Position Alternate Office Home EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM Logistics Supervisor C.M. Cunningham (805) 494-2001 (805) 482-4473 C.A. Weber (805) 494-2010 (213) 360-0683 Claims Supervisor (Risk Management, Houston) D.D. Dow Excom 680-5528 Communications Supervisor *J.I. Resh (805) 654-6801 Legal Advisor S.H. Moore, Jr. (805) 494-2391 R.A. Drum (805) 494-2397 (805) 643-0201 Gov't Liaison Coordinator C. Burks (805) 494-2419 (805) 497-6753 A.B. Greathouse (805) 494-2418 (805) 526-8165 Public Relations Coord. D I Bolding (805) 494-2415 (213) 762-2811 A.B. Greathouse (805) 494-2418 (805) 526-8165 Security Coordinator K.R. Gillespie (805) 494-2115 (213) 889-3927 J.L. Garcia (213) 492-6200 (714) 636-3189 Personnel Safety & Medical M.J. Morris (805) 494-2265 (213) 892-5527 Services Coordinator G.L. Palmer (805) 494-2270 (213) 888-3867 Training Coordinator D.R. Olsen (805) 494-2605 (805) 492-9534 H.E. Schlesinger (805) 494-2363 (213) 889-4794 400-10a Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator (Div. Opr. ?4gr.) The Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator will be Exxon's on-scene management representative during oil spill response activities. He will direct and control the Emergency Response Tea and! oil spill response actions and will assess the magnitude of the oil spill. He will determine and authorize the personnel to be mobilized; act as official spokesman to the news media; ensure that Contingency Plan is kept current; ensure training is implemented. Responsibilities. � Assess potential movement, magnitude, and hazard of the spill. * If the spill is assessed as hazardous by onsite superintendent, ensure the removal of all personnel from the facility who are not essential for spill containment operations. � Activate the Contingency Plan; implement protective measures and containment procedures; provide for oil cleanup. * Activate Emergency Response Team Members as necessary. * Establish Emergency Response Team headquarters. (Clean Seas, Ventura District Office, or private offices) � Coordinate company activities with Oil Spill Cleanup Cooper- atives. * Inform Exxon Management of size of spill and of actions taken. (Production and/or Exploration Managers as appropriate) * Ensure that appropriate government agencies are notified; provide necessary reports to government agencies. � Act as official Western Division spokesman to the news media. 9 Document all actions. � Schedule training programs on a regular basis so that all Emergency Response Team personnel are thoroughly familiar with their assigned duties and operation of equipment. * Ensure that the Contingency Plan is kept current and that revisions are made as necessary. 400-11 Revised June 1982 Well Control Director (Drlg. Mgr.) The Well Control Director will be responsible for abating the oil spill at its source in case of a well related spill. Responsibilities. * Examine the source of the spill using engineering, consulting services, or salvage organizations as required. * Develop the most effective means to abate the spill at its source considering, in order: personnel safety, environmental impact, cost, and time. * Direct repair or salvage operations until the spill is com- pletely abated. * Direct necessary removal and proper disposal of related damaged equipment. 400-12 Cleanup and Restoration Manager (Dist. Mgr.) The Cleanup and Restoration Manager will supervise the overall field containment and cleanup operations, both on water and on shore, as directed by the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. He will develop and conduct cleanup plans and procedures and will establish the sequence of cleanup operations. Responsibilities. * Supervise containment and cleanup actions after joining the Onsite Response Team in the field. � Ensure that equipment assigned to the Onsite Response Team is maintained, is operational, and is readily deployable. * Make an on-scene spill assessment and personnel and equipment recommendations to the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator for sub- sequent cleanup operations. � Maintain communication with the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator throughout immediate response operations. * Establish cleanup headquarters and provide staff as necessary for: - marine containment and cleanup operations - onshore containment and cleanup operations - sensitive-area protection � Assist the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator in determining the magnitude and movement of the spill and make recommendations for actions to be taken. * Inform Support Manager of manpower, equipment, and supplies needed to carry out cleanup operations. * Dispatch and supervise Emergency Response Team personnel and other manpower and equipment as necessary to take effective emergency action for containment, exclusion, and cleanup. * Determine which areas require maximum containment and cleanup efforts and assign personnel as necessary. 400-13 *Report progress of containment and cleanup activities to Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. *Maintain communications with Marine Operations and Assessment Supervisors about oil slick movement. Dispatch teams as directed by the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator to protect sensitive areas that may be affected. *Document all actions. 400-14 Support Manager (Div. Eng. Mgr.) The Support Manager will supervise and coordinate all actions of the Emergency Response Team headquarters staff; furnish supplies, equipment, and manpower as required by the Team; keep records of actions for future reports; and pay contractors hired to assist during the spill. Responsibilities. � Establish report headquarters and provide staff as necessary for. - logistics - documentation - accounting - communications - claims * Maintain contact with Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator and Cleanup and Restoration Manager so that their needs (present and anti- cipated) can be met. � Ensure that adequate manpower is available and that proper equipment and supplies are stockpiled and ready for distri- bution. * Ensure that the required communications equipment is mobilized and placed in service and that steps are taken for proper maintenance. � Provide twenty-four hour manning of headquarters radio and com- munications during oil spill cleanup. * Document all actions. 400-15 Marine Operations Supervisor (Dist. Opr. Supt.) The Marine Operations Supervisor will direct and coordinate all marine containment, protection, and cleanup activities on southern California offshore waters as directed by the Cleanup and Restoration Manager. There are two marine operations supervisors designated to cover Exxon' s California operations. One will supervise marine operations for the Santa Barbara Channel area and one for all other areas. Responsibilities. � Obtain radios and establish firm schedule of communication with Cleanup and Restoration Manager. * Assign personnel and equipment to specific marine containment, protection, and cleanup activities.6 * Ensure that equipment and supplies required for marine opera- tions are maintained in operational condition. � Ensure that appropriate personnel are trained to use the necessary equipment and supplies. � Advise Cleanup and Restoration Manager of progress, all suggested changes in plans, and requests for equipment and personnel. * Provide necessary support to Onshore Operations Supervisor. * Coordinate with the Waste Disposal Supervisor the disposal of recovered oil and oil-contaminated materials in approved disposal sites. * Document all actions. is 400-16 Onsite Response Team The Onsite Response Team is comprised of Exxon/Contractor onsite personnel. They are to be trained in all aspects of oil spill contain- ment. They will be directed by the onsite superintendent as the first line containment and cleanup operations group. Responsibilities. * Acknowledge and shut down spill source as quickly as possible. If fuel oil loading spill, shut down transfer pump(s) and close valves. * Notify site superintendent immediately; describe nature and extent of spill. * On supervisor's instruction shut down all contributing source equipment such as pumps, compressors, vessels, wells, etc. * Ensure spill source is isolated if not automated or should automated shutoffs fail. (upstream and downstream of leak) * If offshore, at supervisor's command, deploy containment equip- ment-work boat, boom, skimmer, floating storage container and absorbent materials. o All offshore personnel are to be thoroughly trained in the use of all pollution control equipment. * All offshore personnel will perform practice drills with con- tainment equipment at least once annually. 400-17 Onshore Operations Supervisor (SyU proj. Mgr.) The Onshore Operations Supervisor will supervise and coordinate all shoreline and terrestrial containment, protection, and cleanup opera- tions as directed by the Cleanup and Restoration Manager. Responsibilities. � Assign personnel and equipment to specific shoreline and/or terrestrial containment, protection, and cleanup activities. * Obtain radios and establish firm schedule of communication with Cleanup and Restoration Manager. � Supervise shoreline and terrestrial operations, including outside contractors; modify manpower and equipment require- ments as necessary to ensure efficient operations. * Establish containment, protection, and cleanup areas along the Southern California coastline. * Advise Cleanup and Restoration Manager of progress, suggested changes in plans, and requests for equipment- and personnel. * Provide support to Marine Op erations Supervisor as requested. � Coordinate with the Waste Disposal Supervisor the disposal of recovered oil and oil-contaminated materials in approved disposal sites. * Document all actions. 400-18 Revised June 1982 Assessment Supervisor (Div. Prod. Eng.) The Assessment Supervisor will implement surveillance of oil spill movement, provide information on movement and recommend response actions to the Cleanup and Restoration Manager. Responsibilities. * Establish radio communications schedule with the Cleanup and Restoration Manager. � Conduct surveillance of oil spill and inform the Cleanup and Restoration Manager of its extent, its location, the direction of its movement, and the emergency actions required. * Conduct aerial surveillance, if necessary, to assist in placing containment booms and skimmers. � Notify Cleanup and Restoration Manager of affected or threatened shoreline and land areas. * Recommend deployment of cleanup equipment to uncontained oil spills. * Report the observed effectiveness of response actions and equipment to the Cleanup and Restoration Manager. � Document all actions. 400-19 Waste Disposal Supervisor (SYU Fac./Plan. Supv.) The Waste Disposal Supervisor will arrange for disposal of oil, oil/water mixture, and oil-contaminated debris at designated locations as directed by the Cleanup and Restoration Manager. Responsibilities. � In conjunction with the Government Liaison Coordinator, request the appropriate County Sanitary Districts and the Regional Water Quality Control Board to designate suitable disposal sites and to issue applicable permits. * Ensure that designated disposal sites for oil, oil/water mixture, and oil-contaminated debris are prepared to accept waste materials. * Coordinate transfer of waste materials to disposal sites with the Marine and Onshore Operations Supervisors. * Supervise transfer of waste materials to disposal sites and advise the Cleanup and Restoration Manager of the volumes of oil, oil/water mixture, and oil-contaminated debris placed on disposal areas. * Maintain a log of volume and description of all waste materials transferred to disposal areas. * Document all actions. 400-20 Revised June 1982 Accounting Supervisor (Div. Acc't. Mgr.) The Accounting Supervisor will institute controls to ensure that the costs of activities related to the oil spill are documented. Responsibilities. �Provide accounting functions, including necessary auditing; preparation of billings; payment of invoices; and documenta- tion of labor, materials, and services used during spill, including: - labor expended with breakdown of hours and rates for: Emergency Response Team cleanup contractor and subcontractor personnel consultants - equipment rentals with breakdown of hours and rates for: heavy equipment aircraft boats transportation - materials and supplies purchased or rented, such as: sorbents tools booms food clothing * Advise the Support Manager of monies expended and prepare cost forecasts of completing oil spill response operations. * Perform other accounting functions as required. 400-21 Logistics Supervisor (Div. Serv. Supv.) The Logistics Supervisor will provide the necessary manpower, equipment, and supplies to conduct containment, protection, cleanup, and restoration. Responsibilities. � Alert service contractors to the emergency and activate them as necessary at the request of the Support Manager. � Obtain the manpower and equipment requested by the Support Manager in response to the needs of the Cleanup and Restor- ation Manager or the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. * Arrange for food and lodging as necessary for personnel activated for the oil spill. * Purchase supplies and equipment required by the Emergency Response Team. * Arrange for aircraft or vessels for reconnaissance of spill movements. * Coordinate the dispatch and operations of aircrafts or vessels. * Document all actions. 400-22 Revised June 1982 Claims Supervisor (Petr,/Cas./Claims) The Claims Supervisor will receive and process claims for damage attributable to the oil spill and to subsequent containment, cleanup, and restoration. Responsibilities. * Become thoroughly familiar with extent of the oil spill and possible areas of liability. * Establish procedures for receiving, reviewing, and processing damage claims. * Arrange for and supervise services of marine surveyors and adjustors. * Establish contact with Legal Advisor for necessary guidelines. * Document all actions. * For OCS spills, maintain liaison with Coast Guard OCS Liability Fund Representative. 400-23 Revised June 1982 Documentation Supervisor (Div. Env. Reg. Supv.) The Documentation Coordinator will document all aspects of the oil spill containment, cleanup, and restoration activities. Responsibilities. * Establish a system for keeping a complete chronological record of all activities related to the oil spill. * Arrange for all important aspects of the oil spill to be documented as discussed in Section 702 (Documentation). * Assist all Emergency Response Team Supervisors in keeping a chronological record of their activities and observations. * Hire a press clipping service to collect all articles covering the oil spill. * Prepare and submit to the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator, the Public Relations Coordinator, and the Government Liaison Coordi- nator data necessary for reports required by government agencies.j � Document all actions of Emergency Response Team. 400-24 Revised June 1982 Communications Supervisor (Dist. Serv. $upv) The Communications Supervisor will provide and maintain radio and telephone communication systems adequate to meet the needs of the con- tingency operations. All field supervisory personnel should have radio contact with the Emergency Response Team headquarters. Responsibilities. � Provide for a radio communication system among Emergency Response Team personnel including: -Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator - Cleanup and Restoration Manager -Support Manager - Marine Operations Supervisor -Onshore Operations Supervisor - Assessment Supervisor � Provide radio or telephone communication systems among all Team personnel. � Ensure that replacement batteries and recharging equipment for radios are located at each main point of use. * Arrange for additional radios and/or telephones as necessary in Emergency Response Team headquarters. � Maintain a record of distribution of radios and prepare a list of distribution and c~all numbers for each Team member or group using radios. * Provide routine maintenance and check of radio system in non- emergency periods. a Document all actions. 400-25 400-25 ~~Revised June 1982 Legal Advisor (Div. Attorney) The Legal Advisor will advise the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator, the Public Relations Coordinator, and the Government Liaison Coordinator on all legal aspects of the oil spill. Responsibilities. * Become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of the oil spill from which legal actions could arise. * Advise the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator and the Documentation Coordinator of the kinds of records and documentation that pos- sible suit actions and settlements would require. � Provide legal guidelines for press releases to the Public Relations Coordinator. * Advise the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator and the Claims Super- visor of necessary claims and adjustment services. * Inform appropriate personnel of records required for insurance and claims settlements. � Provide guidelines for claims handling; coordinate efforts of the Claims Supervisor. * Provide other legal assistance as requested by the Oil Spill Coordinator. * Ensure that the contingency plan reflects changes in oil spill regulations promulgated by government agencies. * Document all actions. 400-26 Revised June 1982 Government Liaison Coordinator (Pub. Affairs Ngr.) The Government Liaison Coordinator provides liaison with government representatives and conveys information, requests, and directives to and from the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. Responsibilities. � Ensure that all appropriate regulatory and government bodies have been advised of the spill (page 200-14 Government Agency Notification). * Coordinate release of information to government representatives with the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator, the Legal Advisor, and the Public Relations Coordinator to ensure that such information is correct and consistent. * Obtain approval, as directed by Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator, from appropriate government agencies for specific operations that are subject to regulations, such as use of government-owned equipment, access to lands, use of chemical agents, and loca- tion and use of disposal sites. � Establish and maintain liaison with representatives of regu- latory and government bodies and convey information, re- quests, and directives to appropriate members of the Oil Spill Task Force. * Set up observation tours of the cleanup and restoration opera- tions for federal, state, and local representatives, provided such tours are cleared with the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator and do not interfere with oil spill response operations. . * Serve as an Emergency Response Team representative on any com- mittee or group formed by government or cooperative to assist in the emergency operations. a Prepare the necessary reports to government agencies. * Perform other duties as directed by the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. * Document all actions. 400-27 Revised June 1982 Public Relations Coordinator (Public Rel. Mgr.) The Public Relations Coordinator will advise and assist the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator in his contacts with the news media and will prepare press releases and other material for Exxon Management. Responsibilitiest � Prepare press releases for the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator and Exxon Management. Press releases should include the fol- lowing information as it becomes available: - description of spill and affected areas - description of cleanup and restoration measures undertaken and planned - details of special efforts taken to protect sensitive areas * Provide answers to press queries relating to cleanup and restor- ation operations. * Consult with the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator and the Legal Advisor regarding content of releases. * Maintain a close working relationship with all news media, government agencies, conservation groups, and civic and public organizations. Make arrangements for onsite inspection by reporters and others, as necessary* * Prepare 'fact sheets' on information relating to the oil spill for distribution to the Emergency Response Team. * Document all actions. *Guidelines for public relations are contained in Appendix E. 400-28 Environmental Coordinator (Div. Env. M~gr.) The Environmental Coordinator will advise the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator, and the Cleanup and Restoration Manager, on environmental aspects related to the impact of the spill on proper cleanup and restoration procedures for affected areas and on subsequent response actions. He will recommend methods of restoring areas to their pre-spill condition and to assist in the care of wildlife. Responsibilities. � Become thoroughly familiar with the environmental character- istics of the southern California coast, particularly with ecologically sensitive areas. � Help to conduct onsite surveys to determine extent of oil contamination and advise the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator, and the Cleanup and Restoration Manager, on cleanup and restoration procedures. * Assist in establishing an environmental monitoring program during spill, post-spill, and restored conditions. * In conjunction with the Government Liaison Coordinator and the Public Relations Coordinator, provide liaison as requested by the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator between the Emergency Response Team and various government and public environmental groups. * Recommend environment specialists who can conduct a physical and biological environmental monitoring program to assess the impact of the oil spill. * Provide environmental statements for press releases as re- quested by the Public Relations Coordinator and the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. * Assess existing and anticipated damage to birds and other wildlife. 400-29 9 In cooperation with the State of California Department of Fish and Game, ensure that every reasonable effort is made to recover, clean, and rehabilitate affected wildlife. * Coordinate efforts of volunteer individuals and organizations to clean and rehabilitate birds and other wildlife. * Conduct training programs with key personnel, under the super- vision of qualified consultants or contractors, so that they can learn acceptable wildlife care techniques. � Keep up to date on new developments in bird and wildlife cleaning and rehabilitation techniques and advances in overall oil spill restoration. � Document all actions. 400-30 Security Coordinator (Div. Security Agent) The Security Coordinator will direct and coordinate all security arrangements for manpower and equipment at onshore staging areas and at Emergency Response Team headquarters. Responsibilities. * Establish security arrangements for stockpiled oil spill equipment and supplies. * Assign security personnel. as needed to equipment staging areas and Emergency Response Teom headquarters. * Coordinate security arrangements with local law enforcement agencies. � Provide for crowd or spectator control as requested by Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. * Provide access control to staging areas and Emergency Response Team headquarters as requested by Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. * Docunent all actions. 400-31 Personnel Safety and Medical Services Coordinator (Div.'Empl. Rela.) The Personnel Safety and Medical Services Coordina tor will pro- vide liaison with local medical personnel and facilities and will coordi- nate safety requirements with the U.S. Coast Guard. Responsibilities. � Arrange for ambulance, hospital, and medical services as needed. * Coordinate safety and medical efforts with U.S..Coast Guard and with oil spill cooperatives. * Prepare any safety-related reports as requested by the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. * Document all actions. 400-32RevisedJune 400-32 ~~Revised June 1982 Training Coordinator (Env. Reg. Staff) The Training Coordinator will ensure that the Response Teams are properly trained to implement the Contingency Plan and that all mem- bers are thoroughly familiar with their responsibilities and with the equipment, supplies, and materials required to carry them out. Responsibilities* � Ensure that Response Team members have received necessary training and instructions to allow them to effectively carry out their responsibilities. If Team members are changed, the replacement personnel are to be trained to ensure complete familiarity with their tasks. * Based on the contents of this Contingency Plan, prepare and conduct training exercises ('spill drills') to allow Team members to become familiar with cleanup equipment, supplies, and materials and with their responsibilities for oil spill containment and protection. � Ensure that this Oil Spill Contingency Plan is kept up to date with current listings of assigned personnel. * Update this Oil Spill Contingency Plan throughout the year to reflect the latest state of the art in oil spill technology as instructed by the Oil Spill Cleanup Coordinator. � Update or modify this Oil Spill Contingency Plan if weaknesses are noticed during spill operations or training exercises. * Perform other duties as directed by the Oil Spill Cleanup Co- ordinator. * Document all actions and forward to the Oil Spill Cleanup Co- ordinator. *Details on training requirements are discussed in Appendix C. 400-33 Revised June 1982 404 FEDERAL AND STATE OIL SPILL RESPONSE TEAMS Both the federal and California governments maintain oil spill response teams. Although there are several levels of response on the federal level, the federal Regional Response Team (RRT) is the team which will become immediately involved in the event of a major discharge; in such event, the RRT is activitated automatically. The state team, on the other hand, is activated at the discretion of the State Operating Authority (SOA) who represents the state on the RRT. The relationships among the various response teams are shown in Figure 404-1. As has been stated, federal response is comprised of several different levels of response. These are: at the national level, the National Response Team; at the regional level, the Regional Response Teams; at the local level, designated On-Scene Coordinators (OSC). Regional Response Team The Regional Response Team (RRT) is composed of the Commander of the Eleventh U.S. Coast Guard District; the Director of Surveillance and Analysis Division of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency; Commander of the U.S. Western Air Force Reserve Region; Director of the California Office of Emergency Services; and representatives from the U.S. Corps of Engineers (Los Angeles District), the Eleventh Naval District, Headquarters Sixth U.S. Army, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Regional Oil and Gas Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Headquarters for the Regional I ' 400-34 NATIONAL RESPONSE TEAM ADVISORY NATIONAL AGENCIES NEWS OFFICE STATE REIOA INPUT RESPONSE TEAM REGIONAL S *I ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~NEWS OFFICE ON-SCENE IISTATE AGENCY COORDINATOR F]COORDINATOR I------ I INDUSTRY I I SPECIAL ISTATE RESPONSE FORCES RESOURCES I~~~~~~~ I I.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ACTION Figure 404-1. FEDERAL OIL SPILL RESPONSE 400-35 Response Team is the Eleventh Coast Guard District office in Long Beach. Each federal Regional Response Team (RRT) acts within its region as an emergency response team under direction of the On-Scene Coordinator (OSC). It is the responsibility of the OSC to gather pertinent facts about: the spill's impact upon human health; the nature, amount, and location of material spilled; the resources that will be affected, and the priorities for protecting those resources. The OSC will encourage the responsible or involved parties to take the initiative in correcting the problem if they are able; if they are not, the OSC will call for and direct the deployment of available resources to initiate containment, cleanup, restoration, and disposal. The OSC will document and record all activities during cleanup operations. The documentation of actions, equipment, tech- niques, and progress provide protection for the federal agencies involved. Regardless of who is in control of cleanup, the OSC is responsible for the adequacy of the spill response operation, which means that he must maintain surveillance over the operations and evaluate both the short-term and long-term effects of the spill. 400-36 The federal regional plan for California's navigable waters adjoin- ing shorelines, for coastal territorial waters, and for the contiguous zone and high seas beyond this zone where there exists a threat to U.S. waters, calls for a single predesignated executive to coordinate and direct federal pollution control efforts at the scene of a spill. The U.S. Coast Guard provides the On-Scene Coordinator to direct cleanup operations in coastal waters, pqrts and harbors. The federal regional plan for California's inland navigable waters also establishes a single predesignated executive to coordinate and direct federal pollution control efforts at the scene of a spill. The Environ- mental Protection Agency provides the On-Scene Coordinator to direct cleanup operations in inland waters. The followeing federal agencies have responsibilities, established by statute, which may bear on the response to a pollution spill: * Department of Commerce is responsible for providing the response teams with information regarding marine environment; living marine resources; and current and predicted meteorologi- cal, hydrological, and oceanographic conditions through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). * Department of Health and Human Services - is responsible for providing assistance in spills that present a possible threat to public health and safety. * Department of Defense may help to maintain navigation channels, and may assist with salvage and the removal of obstructions. * Department of Interior provides information and expertise in oil production and pipeline transportation and also provides technical information to the OSC and ERT regarding land, fish and wildlife, and other resources for which it is responsible. 400-37 Revised June 1982 *Department of Transportation is expert in all modes of trans- portation and movement of oil and hazardous substances. The U.S. Coast Guard supplies support in the fields of port safety and seurit, marine law enforcement, and operation and safety of vessels and marine facilities. * Environmental Protection Agency will provide technical exper- tise to RRT in environmental pollution control techniques, including assessment of damages and environme~ntal restoration. Special Forces The National Strike Force consists of trained personnel who are prepared and available to provide technical expertise, supervisory assistance, and aid in the deployment of special equipment. The National Strike Force consists of U.S. Coast Guard Strike Teams on the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf coasts. Any combination of teams may be activated. Within two hours of notification, the Pacific Strike Team can provide at least four men who can be activated by the On-Scene Coordi- nator, by I.-ie "Coast Guard, or by a direct request to the commandinig of ficer of the Strike Team. State Response Organization The Oil Spill Contingency Plan adopted by the State of California provides for a coordinated response of state agencies to an oil spill. The plan sets up a State Operating Authority (SOA) who will represent the state on the Regional Response Team and who will have the authority to declare an oil spill a pollution incident and to activate the State Contingency Plan. 400-38 When the SOA declares a pollution incident, he will then appoint a State Agency Coordinator (SAC) who will be in charge of on-scene opera- tions for all state agencies engaged in combating a pollution incident. These agencies will comprise the State Operating Team (SOT). The SQA will also act in a capacity similar to that of the federal On-Scene Coordinator, with whom he will work closely. Figure 404-2 details the State of California's organizational response to a major oil spill. A State Support Team (SST) consisting of various state department executives will authorize the SOA and will monitor and evaluate his reports. The SST will also administer a standing State Interagency Oil Spill Committee (SIOSC) which will establish liaison with public and private oil pollution control organizations, review the state contingency plan, and recommend research and development. The SIOSC has no direct-line authority during an oil spill. The state oil contingency plan also requires that a delegate from the representative industry be appointed to the SOT. The Exxon Government Liaison Coordinator will normally assumie this position as described in Section 403. Federal and State Contingency Plans Existing contingency plans prepared by other agencies for the state of California are listed below. Copies of these contingency plans will be maintained by the Documentation Engineer. *National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. 400-39 STATE SUPPORT TEAM STATE FEDERAL OPERATING REGIONAL AUTHORITY RESPONSE TEAM STATE INTERAGENCY OIL SPILL COMMITTEE COMMITTEE STATE FEDERAL AGENCY _ ON-SCENE COORDINATOR CODNATOR PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER 1 -- STATE / EXXON OPERATING GOVERNMENT LIAISON TEAM LCOORDINATOR j ACTION Figure 404-2. CALIFORNIA OIL SPILL RESPONSE 400-40 � Region IX Oil and Hazardous Materials Pollution Contingency Plan for Inland Waters issued by the Environmental Protection Agency. � Region IX Pollution Contingency Plan as revised December 1971, issued by the Commander, Twelfth Coast Guard District. � State of California Oil Spill Contingency Plan, revised May 1983. 400-4 1 TRAINING AND DRILLS Onsite Responses Team (ORT) andSupport Group All personnel assigned to the ORT shall be trained in the use of all pollution control equipment. Training will consist of classroom instruction and actual equipment deployment and operation from the platform. hands-on equipment deployment will be conducted under realistic environmental conditions in which the equipment can safely be deployed without endangering the lives of the personnel. Personnel shall also participate in training exercise conducted by the oil spill cooperatives as time allows from their regular duties. Records shall be maintained on board the platform for MMS inspection of all personnel partici- pating in pollution control training. Supervisors The supervisory personnel responsible for directing oil spill control shall receive instruction suitable for all seasons. These persons shall also have a working knowledge of all oil spill control equipment associated with the offshore facilities. Drills The personnel making up the ORT shall participate in an annu~al preplanned drill to be witnessed by MMS Districts personnel. Sufficient advanced notice shall be given to the MMS to allow MMS personnel to witness the drill. Exxon personnel shall also be trained and available to conduct a surprise drill at the request of MMS so long as it does not interfere with critical operations. All drills will be documents and the records maintained on the platform. Emergency Response Team (ERT)_ Periodic training instruction shall be conducted to familiarize the ERT members with their assigned duties. 400-42 A~~~~~~ S IDENTIFICATION OF COASTAL AREAS The coastline areas that may be impacted by an oil spill from the Point Pedernales field operations are identified in this section. These coastal areas have been selected on the basis of the spill trajectory analyses prepared for this project. The segment maps depicting the shoreline characteristics and other pertinent information are taken from Clean Sees Oil Spill Cleanup Manuel. Although the probability of a spill from the Point Pedernales facilities impacting the shoreline is extremely low, these plats will provide needed information to persons responsible for containment and cleanup in the event the shoreline is threatened. 500-1 SUMMARY OF SHORELINE CLEANUP TECHNIQUES Shoreline Type Considerations Concerning Cleanup Activities Exposed Rocky . On very steep shores, no cleanup would be necessary Headlands � On less steep shores, high-pressure spraying would be effective only while oil remains liquid Wave-Cut Platforms . High-pressure spraying of rocks may be effective � Manual/mechanical cleanup of thick oil accumulations is recommended with caution Fine/Medium- . Cleanup should begin only after majority of oil is deposited onshore Grained Sand Beaches . Cleanup should concentrate on removal of oil from upper awash zone � Mechanical methods should be used cautiously but, generally, fine grained sand beaches are among the easiest to clean mechanically because of their hard, compact substrate � Removal of sand should be minimized Coarse-Grained . Cleanup should commence only after majority of oil is deposited onshore Sand Beaches � Cleanup should concentrate on removal of oil from upper awash zones � Mechanical methods should be used cautiously � Sediment removal should be minimized Mixed Sand and . Oil should be removed primarily from upper swashlines Gravel Beaches . High pressure spraying may be necessary � Mechanical reworking of sediment into the surf zone effective if oil accum- ulation is heavy R Removal of sediment shoull be restricted 121 W 120 W' 1I1 WI I""~~~~~~~~a I n o � SAN LUIS OBISPO KILOMETERS MILES 0 6 10 is H. MILES 36 N_ �SANTA MARIA EJ Point Pedernales VENTURA SANDY BEACH A NTA CRUZ I S. ROCKY SHORELINE SAN MIGUEL IS. A MAJOR WETLAND -SANTA ROSA IS. FIGURE FIGURE SHORELINE TYPES: SANTA MARIA BASIN AND SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL OCS AREAS H4 �WENT END OF BAN SIMEON SAY POINT PIEDRAS 6j.ANCAS' SAN SIM90N POINT 0 0 15 W.R. HEARST MEMORIAL STATE BEACHMIE 12 AN SIMEON BEACH STATEF PARKMLE_ 0 ~~~ 20 WHITI RO6CK I I KILOMETERS 15 ~~~CAYUCO2 POINT WES EN OFCHIA NR�Ot-~ 14 CAYUCOS STATE lEACH WEST EN OP CHNA HAROR~ ICAYUCOS STATE SEACH PIER ATASCADRO STAT SEACHMORRO STRAND STATE lEACH MORRO SACY MORRO 1AY MARINAM SAN LUIS OBISPO MORRO SAY STATE BEACH MONTANA Of ORO STATE PARK-!?ONT LICH AND PUP RC DIABLO CANON -ANILAl OEASPO PECH ~~~~~~~CREEK ESTUARY 2 -M~~ALLAGH LANDING WEST SIDE OF SAN LUIS OSISPO SAY-N1NCIJPE PORT SAN LUIS PI E A5IRJ PISMO~EACHSTATEPARKMOUTH OF SANTA MARIA RIVER ENTRANCE TO PISMO CREEK PISMO SEAC ).- PISMO~~~~~~~~~. PIE ENTRANCE TO ARROYO GRMANDS CREEK 32 32 INT SAL BEACH STATE PARK ENTRANCE TO SAN ANTONIO CREEK- 35 LEE SIDE Of PURISIMA POINT34SA T MOUTH OF THE SANTA YNEZ ROVERBA AR POINT ARGUELLO-A0 4 ENTRANCE TO JALAMA CREEK- POINT CONCEPTION CSEGMENTS CONTAINING SENSITIVE RESOURCES 8.S SAN MIGUEL I FIGURE SENSITIVE AREAS WITHIN CLEAN SEAS SEGMENTS 11BORDERING THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OFFSHORE S~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 0 MILES I~~~~ 1 2 0 SANTA BARBARA * ~KILOMETERS PINT ARGUELLO DEVEREAUX SL.QoUG - COAL OIL POINT - -GL T *OG GAVIOTA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~OLT ULOUGHRK SAVIOTA CASES LL WOOD PME - GOLETA POINT I -GOLETA% ROCKS �I \ OD~~L ETA RO VENTURAT POINT COCPIDu ~ 4 54 I5 SANTA.BAFIBARA 111~011 POINT LAGOONN EL CAITA STATE BlGLESACHR LAGOO SI.CAPTANGTAIE 9AC LAS POSITAS GREEK LAGOOALIND AGN VENTURA ROVER MOUTH SANTA BARBARA MA -ETRAO SANTA SANSAKA CITY gIRD REFUGE- SANTA CLARA RIVER MO0T0 13 SAN SUENAVENTURA STATE MEACH MIEN ISTATS SSACN)0 MCGRATH STATE *EACH- VENTURA MARINA PONT HURNEM CHANNEL ISLANDS MAN SAN MIGUEL IS. A4AN AAI. [sImEUTo CONTAINING sENSITIVE RESOURCES IFIO1URE 11-2 ~~SENSITIVE AREAS WITHIN CLEAN SEAS SEGMENTS 11-2 ~~~ BORDERING THE SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL Table 700-25. POINT SAN LUIS Shoreline Characteri sti cs General Description: rocky and marine terraces; narrow sand beach north of Port San Luis Backshore: cliffs Trafficability: fair on sand beaches Cleanup Technique Code (2) and (3) Access Principal Entry Points: None north of US Coast Guard Station at Point San Luis; coastline is all private access. Boat Launching Facilities: Pier at Port San Luis Inlets/ Streams Inlets: None Streams: Several high gradient intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) Marre L. Land & Cattle Co. U.S. Coast Guard Port of San Luis c/o Marre Ranch Avila Beach, CA 93424 Phone: Controlling Government Authority: 1) State of California 2) Federal Waterfront Usage: Natural north of Coast Guard Station, recreational to the south Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Seals Special Biological Significance: CC identifies the coastline area as one containing several seal rookeries. Harbor seals and California sea lions have been observed hauling out in an area one mile north of San Luis Obispo Lighthouse (Mate, 1977). Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control West side of San Luis Obispo Bay may impound oil. Other areas are high energy environments and should undergo rapid natural cleaning. Comments 700-64 LEGEND aMn wrstokr. ' ' w~s- d a zt akvSoeline Vahwicui acors * Suebrergsp rocks Poirnosiaf vsh~clwr 500S ISaney eh 2 -Strewn Sublneq oil Ppim.m Li > IltTarra"sis ..Il D.Pl,n 4 aterWinle-taeffhr mrn termil *Soon iitnfch..98 Offshwor oiS1n platfor ( 7 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~mile i/fl~~J. .3rd' .''t' . in~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~L i~~~~~�4S~~~~. I ~ +S ;VAHr ilx.~~~~~~~~~~~~~t ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~SatagRosa Reef Westdahl Rock Figure 700-25. POINT SAN LUIS Table 700-26. AVILA BEACH Shoreline Characteristics General Description: A) sandy beach, B) rocky shoreline at base of cliffs with small coarse sand pocket beaches. Large sandy beach at Mallagh Landing (locally known as Pirate's Cove). Entrance at Port San Luis Harbor. Backshore: A) low ledges, B) cliffs Trafficability: fair at Avila State Beach Cleanup Technique Code (2) and (3): Temporary disposal site at Avila Beach parking area Access Principal Entry Points: A) almost anywhere, B) road to area above cliffs but no safe access; potential vehicle access at Mallagh Landing Boat Launching Facilities: Avila Beach, Union Oil pier Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: CC identifies San Luis Obispo Creek as an anadromous fish stream. Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) Luigi Marre Land Port San Luis Harbor Union Oil Co. of California & Cattle Dist. Union Oil Building Avila, California LA, CA 90017 (4) (5) (6) State of California Macdonald, HF Unknown 4459 AVOCADO OFF. #102 LA, CA 90027 Phone: Controlling Government Authority: 1) Port of San Luis 2) State of Calif. Waterfront Usage: Recreation Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: seals - hauling out area at Mallagh Landing Special Biological Significance: productive San Luis Obispo Creek Estuary Seasonal Factors Beaches subject to seasonal on- and offshore sand migration Special Factors Effecting Spill Control San Luis Obispo Creekk Estuary subject to tidal action. High potential for oil intrusion (see Map 700-2 at end of section for special booming procedures); rocky areas are high energy environments - should self-clean naturally. Comments Boom creek at or landward of bridge - avoid sandbars. Monitor for seals, persistent oil accumulations west end Mallagh Landing. 700-66 - ~ ~ 2 - ~ z - ~ 1 2 { ) > K ' ~ 7 * ~ L E G E N DM m r a f r t U 0 O r a / ( ~~nh-p clas 1-1 ~~Rocky sror.40r." =Vahroif0c.. * S.b-,Wg~ rokg W= ot~t-ltokstlci Soytc, ~~-.2 .~~~~~~.'" Ar.of lpec.. 0rolopc 0 Oct.., floor conroraroS / q.~.5fKMCM O..hore Mos'arafonn ~ 8rdrooh~~as/nst~ngare. tr~..rtn toodliv I~~~~~~~~~~~- - - '--I Fish~~~~~~~~~~- Streamor A Roc Pc~~~~ntiai /~~~~ p),~ ~~ - k 0 13 S P 0 B A~1~ - 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~7P s UNION,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~B poc k A V ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ~~~~IL BEC Oil ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Type-Dua Vol-Nisit-75,00 W ~isr.J.Ve Howell~~~~~~~ 3 Pipeline Vol.-1,660 bb sRok * Figure 700-26. AVILAS BEACH Table 700-27. SHELL BEACH Shoreline Characteristics General Description: A and C) predominantly rocky shoreline and marine terraces with small pocket beaches; B) sandy beaches Backshore: low cliffs Trafficability: good on sandy beaches Cleanup Technique Code (3) at B; (4) A and C Access Principal Entry Points: A and C) limited foot access; B) from streets as indicated Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Pismo Beach I nl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: several intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Unknown Address: Phone: Controlling Government Authority: Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: Seasonal Factors Sandy areas may move on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control High energy environment - high rate of natural cleaning expected Comments 700-68 Miles LEGEND ==Poeia d..~a "toa Rok~y $belo rrow~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ACl Jitow-2h * Bat itO.tfk A offuDom's 0, d'.ft tw-i n ..**...*.E~~~~~~~~~~i.*..~Sa -,ch. mile-6. lmw Am o ami fm o i A 2~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~/ 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~0 C~~~~~~~~~~~~ml 0~~~~~~~~~~k Figure 700-27. SHELL BEACH~~~~~~~i~ Table 700-28. PISMO BEACH Shoreline Characteristics General Description: A) rocky shoreline and marine terrace. The rest of the shoreline is wide, sandy beach. Backshore: A) cliffs B) dunes Trafficability: Excellent; firm sand in beach area Cleanup Technique Code (3) temporary disposal site at Pismo Beach parking area Access Principal Entry Points: A) no access B) direct access at foot of Grand Ave., Grover City and at Pismo Beach Boat Launching Facilities: Pismo pier .nl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: CC identifies Pismo Creek as an anadromous fish stream Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): 1) Unknown 2) State of California Address: Phone: Controlling Government Authority: State of California Waterfront Usage: Recreation Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Anadromous fish, surf clams Special Biological Significance: Meadow Creek wetland area Seasonal Factors Sand can be expected to move on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Entrance to Pismo Creek generally closed by bar Comments Monitor bar at entrance to Pismo Creek. If open boom lagoon at interior area where water velocity drops. Beach cleanup efforts should cause minimal disturbance in lower intertidal (clam) areas; concentrate effort on high tide deposits. )LEGEND fd ga Fpoorr NM8d k& t hailiggC,nd onhr,hp dsla F.d Rcky vhoelin.* L/ I, S 4 jPci~tsa cohicula, inccow Sandv beach --Srrmw S- iq Shrr9dOil pooln." -~~~ i,.ii N; > Irdir ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Tgrarmw Oil piglin.v ~~~~~~~~~BM ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ CD ~ , .Wte-frinrrs A Offshore -iirwi. ,ruinl *scat im-nching adfsor i drilling piatfw-n I ~~~~Area of wwal wioogiacal * OcMi flOwr COrlluti., mile 1 A I * ~~~~~~ Francan! lkli i ns ~~~~' I t ~ ~ aiI-4 \P~~~~~~~~~~~~~C4 ill~ec \ ~~~~~~~~~ BM- - '% Fisho Btealem Andomu I, Uj . hi~~~~~~~~~v Figure 700-28. PISMO BEACH Table 700-29. OCEANO Shoreline Characteristics General Description: wide sandy beach Backshore: primarily sand dunes Trafficability: good; backshore dunes may be impassable to mechanized cleanup equipment without construction of road Cleanup Technique Code (3) temporary disposal site at Pismo Beach parking areas Access Principal Entry Points: west of Oceano Airport Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Pismo Beach Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: CC identifies Arroyo Grande Creek as an anadromous fish stream. Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): State of California Address: Phone: Controlling Government Authority: State of California Waterfront Usage: Recreation Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: anadromous fish, surf clams Special Biological Significance: CC designates coastal area as part of a special marine environment and wetland. Seasonal Factors Entrance to Arroyo Grande Creek generally blocked by bar Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Culvert connecting the southern end of Oceano Lagoon to the main lagoon area can be closed preventing oil intrusion into that area. Beach cleanup efforts should minimize disturbance of lower intertidal (clam) zones. Concentrate on high tide deposits. Comments 700-72 !fLEGEND -Maee.,~e~,, Vp,owvI." ami-toy to RCihw~o rmn4 W- CC=O*- itouI.nh.ng A offshom M,- tong"u'Mon M I *B "M sqn~h..�e Offsho's 0.1 pjon md AIRPORT * Anadromousmie' Fish Stream A Culvert- W.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.1 _T 8pit ? .wn T32S 14 .1 31 Tt2N ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Wells ~~~~~~"N Si, - Big Rocke~ take I ~~~~~~~~~~~7) Ici,~~~~~~~~~~~~~N Figure 700-29. OCEANO ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ 0 Table 700-30. 0SO FLACO LAKE Shorel ine Characteri sti cs General Description: wide sandy beach Backshore: sand dunes Trafficability: good on beach for most equipment Cleanup Technique Code (3) Access Principal Entry Points: from the north at Oceano access point or potential access from Oso Flaco Lake road Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Pismo Beach Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: Oso Flaco Creek (could provide means to transport oil back to Oso Flaco Lake and wetlands) Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) State of California Santa Maria Valley Assoc. Jackbilt, Inc. et.al. c/o Sho Lino Accountants c/o GR Howard 3731 Wilshire Blvd. Ste. 601 P. 0. Box 6366 LA, CA 90010 Burbank, CA 91510 (4) Mobil Oil Corp. 612 S. Flower LA, CA 90054 Phone: Controlling Government Authority: Waterfront Usage: Recreation/natural Bioloqical Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: surf clams Special Biological Significance: CC designates coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Oso Flaco Lake and wetlands is a very productive area. Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affectinq Spill Control Comments Beach cleanup should minimize disturbance of lower intertidal (clam) areas. Concentrate cleanup on high tide deposits. 700-74 -~~~~~~~~~~~~~~, FM Wi-J. LEGEND &m nmweckng rNM.M Roc, ,0uenc vv= l "VonIM8~U SUb.%wIMd,ocku POIt.nt0 nwhC~I ac., Sandy beac ;stem en - pzz0'0 111= ., lak A offvh~oma anna. r.e-nna *Bala Iajnchl.n fl6 0.1 ow.iI.0 platform Al ofn ,okrw~Maltolc (mm Inijn.1IcI.IV A..~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~' 'A ~~~~~~~~~mile V; Q4~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4 Laki ~ Little Oso [-latr Lake - ~~~~~~~~~- ~ 4 ,O0Z Figure 70030. OSO FLACO LAKE Table 700-31. GUADALUPE Shoreline Characteri sti cs General Description: wide sandy beach Backshore: sand dunes Trafficability: Good; sand dunes may be impassable to cleanup equipment. Cleanup Technique Code (3) Access Principal Entry Points: potential private access from Guadalupe oil field, from north along beach Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Pismo Beach Inlets/ Streams Inlets: None Streams: Santa Maria River Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) Mobil Oil Corp. Wells Fargo Bank (Leroy) Union Sugar Co. 612 S. Flower 464 California St. P. 0. Box Z LA, CA 90054 San Francisco, CA Betteravia, CA Phone: (415) 396-0123 (805) 925-8633 Controlling Government Authority: State of California Waterfront Usage: Recreation Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: surf clams, Santa Maria River wetlands Special Biological Significance: CC designates coastal area as part of a special marine environment, Santa Maria River wetlands. Seasonal Factors Sandy beaches will migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control The mouth of the Santa Maria River Is normally closed by sand bar. Comments Monitor entrance to Santa Maria River for adequate bar development. If inadequate, reinforce bar or boom landward. 700-76 LEGEND 4ft nmJoo,. ! P1 oOtv lin and'kay t rrlogromd ownershie data %J Rokv shorein = Veh,col. ooC..e S.W~rmnelp roks Paoteosre o.4 ,C ,-ICm. Sandy beah, -- st'eem - S.&Ilseed O., ypoel'n > Inlet - - - etra POil Mreln * Boat larinoirig U Offshoreoii. drillig Olatforn * Are. of xpacil biological * Ocass, floor cMpletions * O.shor searain .0 no. Bird rolrsne mrgarse tlt fi~lit ~~~~~~~~Io Dee ~~~~~1, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 C,, '53 010..~~~~ oC Sat isi 4X ~ ~ 'a i Wi ***l i 'eel'.,~ ~~~~~~IPAJ Figure 700-31. G U A D A L U PE~\ Q Table 700-32. MUSSEL POINT Shoreline Characteristics General Description: wide sandy beach, some rocks at Mussel Point Backshore: sand dunes with cliffs at Mussel Point Trafficability: Beach good; dunes may be impassable to cleanup equipment. Cleanup Technique Code (3) Access Principal Entry Points: Possibly south from Guadelupe Oil field Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Pismo Beach Inlets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: Intermittent creek south of Mussel Point Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) (4) Union Sugar Co. Gordon, Macetta Wells Fargo Bank Tognazzini Mercedes P. 0. Box Z 1223 Gibson Lane (Leroy) 402 Edward Street Betteravia, CA Santa Maria, CA 464 California St. Santa Maria, CA San Francisco, CA Phone: (805) 925-8633 (805) WA2-5918 (415) 396-0123 (805) WA5-3326 Controlling Government Authority: State of California Waterfront Usage: limited recreation Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Sand beaches may move on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Comments 700-78 40. $1 S4~~~~ *~~~~~~~~~~Mse Pon, -v~~~~~LGN p'00f~~~tv ".0 Gd k&V tol~r r."~ so -- ak ( c btf~W'k QK'~~~~~~~~Sw w St b la ip- f.0 vsalo1ppi. CC=- ~t, ffh~ ~-[2- B. WC'. . d -1. *~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~m ie -so /1~~~~~~~~~~~0so I.~~~~~~~~'21f.T I-.",~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ni Figure 700-32. MUSSEL POINT~~~~~~~ Table 700-33. POINT SAL Shoreline Characteri sti cs General Description: A) flat, sandy beaches B) irregular rocky shoreline and marine terraces C) sandy beach; some rocks 0) rocky shoreline Backshore: A) sandy cliffs B) rocky cliffs C) rocky bluffs D) rocks and marine terrace Trafficability: unknown on sand beaches Cleanup Technique Code (3) A and C; (4) B and D: temporary disposal site at beach parking area Access Principal Entry Points: Point Sal Beach State Park via Point Sal Road Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf I nl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: None Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) Field Oil Co. U.S. Government Kelly-Moore Paint Palos Verdes Est. Dept. 1015 Commercial St. Palos Verdes, CA San Carlos, CA Phone: Unlisted Unknown (415) 592-8337 (4) (5) (6) State of California Leroy, E. and A. Vandenberg Air Force Base c/o Wells Fargo Bank Vandenberg, CA 464 California St. San Francisco, CA Phone: (415) 396-0123 (805) 866-1611 Controlling Government Authority: State of California, Federal Government Waterfront Usage: recreation, natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment. .w/h./,l/ l fA .F Seasonal Factors Sandy beaches may move on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Rocky areas are high energy environments and should undergo rapid natural cleaning. Comments 700-80 ~'A /~~~~~~~ '4T ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~IL' ( ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~: -i[Fs "I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ *1 j]' (aAILtl / A L~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~X Stw,. Si,,mv ad a==D-~~~~~~ Of-hol. mm- A,.m of pmwl b~olog..M 0-- few, M.VlwtIo. S.. hlmWa-c . t~~mt,,,sf.I fac.1.1v~~~~~~~~~ LEGEND - ~~~main.laneirore, Figurer 700n33 PONT SAL Table 700-34. LIONS HEAD Shoreline Characteristics General Description: A) rocks and marine terrace B) sandy beach Backshore: A) low cliffs B) sand dunes Trafficability: Sandy areas should be passable; dunes probably impassable to cleanup equipment. Cleanup Technique Code: (4): potential temporary disposal site at suggested staging area Access Principal Entry Points: controlled access at Casmalia Road off Point Sal Road Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: several intermittent creeks in rock area Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: Vandenburg Air Force Base Vandenburg, California Phone: (805) 866-1611 Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: U.S. Air Force Missile Center Bioloaical Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Sandy beaches may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Rocky areas are high energy environments and should self-clean rapidly. Comments Sandy beaches are probable surf clam habitats as such operation in lower intertidal should be avoided and efforts concentrated on high tide deposits. 700-82 LEGEND__Mrerool okgI Io-hnihmr~ dSIS J Rocky rrhn * * V...."Is, acc e s s Subh*.rgW rocki It ns P""t,81~a yehI,01s WCor" Sandy beach, east1w~h. Offsho's 0.1 drd.- latt. Alm of special b-of aged Ooou.= foor corrrc.0mon S.91"dwahol, ~0 .6Osisfiors rasvon .r Bird rook*rM~flfltlf awas trsst-tr facdlir N , ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~m i l e ' --________ Potentia'- 0'~~ Staging Area lit ~~~~~IF It Figure 70034. LIONS HEAD Table 700-35. VANDENBURG Shoreline Characteristics General Description: sandy beach Backshore: sand dunes Trafficability: Beaches should be passable; dunes probably impassable to cleanup equipment. Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: from north and south along beach Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inlets /Streams Inlets: None Streams: San Antonio Creek Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: Vandenburg Air Force Base Vandenburg, California Phone: (805) 866-1611 Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Sandy beaches may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Entrance to San Antonio Creek commonly closed by bar. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Comments Monitor entrance to San Antonio Creek; institute control action if bar not developed. 700-84 T~~~~ P, ,d 2 Narlon 106 3853 Sn Antonio Cree 47130"r Is5216 LEGEND -Mro sria okrs I Proparry In. d key t o . . . in I'rQOuds "aioa cma * Subntarg locks I pot-ntiM .hcaftaula MCM - Sandyl bach > Wt-- Ttan w ..t&loi1 ppelin wtI AL mitTrretral Oil" O -,talt Beach 2 * *str intak . . Offu-tole 01otiF,11P.teminl. Area of 50pnin brolOOcai Oneaa ftoat Mmonetp.rio ~ sibnitie~nc. * Onsho& pre tn.aao and Bird oo~kw-r s.anlnatn are tr fmetwd'tv Figure 700-35. VANDENBERG Table 700-36. PURISIMA POINT Shoreline Characteri sti cs General Description: mostly rocky with marine terraces Backshore: sand dunes or rocky cliffs Trafficabi ity: undetermi ned Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: Ord Road off Tangier Road or Coast Road out of Lompoc Landing; both lead from Vandenberg A.F.B. Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: None Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: Vandenburg Air Force Base Vandenburg, Cali forni a Phone: (805) 86641611 Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment (CC, p. 369). Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control High energy environment high rates of natural cleaning can be expected in most areas. Comments Accumulations in "lee" of Purisima Point may be more persistent than other areas. 700-86 LEGPEN.D *,Cts two~nrnaroi ;~~}i ow~oioo~sa %J Rockv shroreli ==Pot"oI'al ahC1a,ilI weesU Sandy bachr 4=3. Waitr -.take A Offshw,.mri.e rih Rokbs" S ony laanCh.ng Off Shor. Oi drilling Wlait-n Alone of IMMI~ b-0olO1MCM Oman floor M int'Olo.. 4 d~~~O~ho.OIO.OShe ap'ato and a.1 MG $ ac1 * ~~~~~~~~mile 'V. ~~~470 000 * ~~~~FEET Purisimal Point i20 (~ Rocktsr' lifrigerilm 2( 'a~~~~~~~~~~~a' 38451 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~162 Figure 700-36. PURISIMA POINT Table 700-37. LOMPOC LANDING Shoreline Characteristics General Description: Mostly rocky to the north giving way to low, flat, sandy beach with tidal ponds at Santa Ynez River. Backshore: sand dunes or rocky cliffs to the north; sandy area to the south Trafficability: good - firm sand CleanuD Technique Code (4 and 3 for park beach): temporary disposal site at beach parking area Access Principal Entry Points: Surf road and/or Lompoc Landing Road. Surf road unimproved and steep; requires RR crossing. Boat access at state park. Boat Launching Facilities: ramp at county park Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: Santa Ynez River Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) Vandenberg Air Force Base County of Santa Barbara Vandenberg, California Ocean or Surf Beach Park Phone: (805) 866-1611 (805) RE6-6693 Controlling Government Authority: Dept. of Defense & County Parks & Rec. Waterfront Usage: Santa Ynez estuary is natural area. Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Numerous birds in Santa Ynez River wetlands Special Biological Significance: CC designates Santa Ynez River wetlands and estuary and coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Entrance to Santa Ynez River commonly barred - inlet could open up at cer- tain times of year. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control High currents will restrict booming seaward of RR trestle crossing estuary. Comments Monitor entrance to estuary for development of bar. 700-88 LEGEN D haOOmS,,le g 2M~ k.ch powtv lim on c haulin troni Rocky. ~~~~~~~~~~V...Culi G..H ** Sub.~eud ockA Ro~~~~~~~k~~~~~ ~~Po,~T,81 oh.C.IuW aCO.. Sedy beach * Landing __ = w..' Wn,ntakif A fsoe ,mw Site~~ SM i * B~oar Imiwichling Offiftwe -1 dlch4jia Plmf.,~, Am. of apec..6 bol1gcul Oman floor corvp~,,ons S.On~ ~ ~ ~~ Oshremarro ai ~~~~~~~~4 Birhd rOkrflifin t i smani fo6l M mile ' Packiard Rocks A3M 61 Gravel z /~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ N~~~~~~4E R E A C H / Staging Area - -- ~~~ (~Land) Figure 700-37. LOMPOC LANDING Table 700-38. SPRING CANYON Shoreline Characteristics 0 General Description: low, flat and sandy beach narrowing towards the south Backshore: steep cliffs Trafficability: fair to good on intertidal area of beach Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: from surf/ocean beach park along coast road; access controlled by gate onto military reservation Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inlets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: several intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) Vandenburg Air Force Base -. Vandenburg, California Phone: (805) 866-1611 Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Sandy beaches may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Comments 700-90 * y~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- S~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 18 3 6 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ "a '4 ~ ~ ~ ~ E E D .. okl. '4~~~~~~:) PlC)t i. M * o 1. S~~~~~~~.,1h dsa R c y sol. *~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~vmcl C b' k I LEGEN o f arina~oo Otammalo rompf"r.0, Propato lie aw e o h~ln cd MMa~ra aiclamm ""Uc.., Sand baetv Figu~~105-.Srean 7 0-8 SPmRING Ci iAlNYO Table 700-39. POINT PEDERNALES Shoreline Characteristics General Description: narrow short sandy beaches broken by rocky marine terraces Backshore: steep bluffs and cliffs Trafficability: unknown Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: Coast road from Surf on north or Jalama. Access control by gates on military reservation Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: several intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) Vandenburg Air Force Base Coast Guard Station Vandenburg, California Point Arguel Phone: (805) 866-1611 (805) 962-7430 (CG group SB) Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: leased to cattle ranchers (natural) Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Sandy beaches may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Rocky areas are high energy environments and should rapidly clean naturally. Comments 700-92 LEGEND -Mmn regu vehimapw evump su bwmpw~ rafts POMO "Namill , % x:: ggay: swov bon" Sum" summom, allgd -u aW gj > law1 - Tem~umm oil o5401S - I=-. wow amedl. A offa.,, Wun.wm * aw"Mmad wraw, ..a Wilinsplaterfw Ai" o f b."Opm oamo flaw.. mmWau~ makerw~al" smimm ovenent facilit mile Rocks ' Point Pedermaios / wrec Rock I I'~~~~~~~.L C)~~~~ .v, Figure 700-39. PO~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~INTPDRAE Table 700-40. POINT ARGUELLO Shoreline Characteristics General Description: rocky, marine terraces, with occasional pocket beaches Backshore: steep slopes Trafficability: not applicable Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: No direct access to shoreline Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Il ets/ Streams Inlets: None Streams: intermittent high gradient stream Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) Vandenberg Air Force Base Coast Guard Station Vandenberg, Cali fornia Phone: (805) 866-1611 (805) 962-7430 (CG group SB) Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control High energy environment; probably high rate of natural cleaning. Oil deposited in coves may be more persistent. Comments 700-94 ~~~~~~~- , , iP~oin~t Argell ' it6ii~ ~~~~ .2J0 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~LEGEND MMM16Moflowa I 4, owmr~~~~~~~~~Mh.p Class 1-1 Fkky show,"i * = vshKcuiw .c.. stM Su0~g rocks C WStL r -Po,.imtal ,Vhiaiw access sfirwvov bach - - S srr,. S.1bm.."d 0il p 'ein > 1.10 -- Tramisria oil P:Mi~ ~. w~sa ke� ffh,.main ~r~ie Bloat ia.ncih.ng U 10 o dr~, i drdllng platfo,,,, Are. of Xwecal b.6olp"t 0cew110 Gloir olet,on, Rocks, 6,,id rooknues,4W.M.M arm tmn facility d~~~bI ~~~mile Rocky Point * ~~~~~~PI Arguello - Rocks -30 Figure 700-40. POINT ARGUELLO Table 700-41. SUDDEN FLATS Shoreline Characteristics General Description: marine terraces, some sandy beaches Backshore: cliffs Trafficability: unknown Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: No access to beach. Boat landing available at old Coast Guard station Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inlets/ Streams Inlets: None Streams: Agua Viva Creek & several high gradient intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) Vandenberg Air Force Base Vandenberg, Cal i forni a Phone: (805) 866-1611 Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Sandy beach may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control High energy environment should self-clean rapidly. Comments 700-96 Sp 7? (~~~~~~~~~ LEGEND e a,.lok.gi f ~~~oOO /~~~~~~~ 01 h~ 0W~~date 1-1 Rock, shwoeI J00~ ~ ~ ~~~~~=VhC~I ~ ** S-b"IOWd IMMk - ~~~~~~~~~~pol,.nifa cM.uiw C=@W SSWV b.Whl ~~. J U ~~~~~~ '. ~~Stmwn S- MW a d ppqijo. I ~ ~ ~ . W~~i.~~>1 ,nt~k Tm.~iaf oappoi,n. VA C~~l, ftm-ll\ * Offshole nm-n tso-,, ( ( Offshoc~~goaor.1dl,li,nq,% plsllw 996 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~ As of Ipmc.l b.01OWMgca Omt. flew, cn0., 'r~~ \ ( "' ,qn.~~~.cbncmm * tw ,, PO M c okrMnt~g ~ Wl~tfcIt O'J p~~~~~~~~~~~r ' VAHM I Figure 700-41. SUDDEN FLATS Table 700-42. SUDDEN CANYON Shoreline Characteristics General Description: narrow, steep, sandy beaches, some rocky areas and mari ne terraces Backshore: steep bluffs Trafficabil ity: unknown Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: potential access southeast of Sudden Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Surf Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: several intermittent high gradient creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) Vandenberg Air Force Base Vandenberg, Cali forni a Phone: (805) 866-1611 Controlling Government Authority: Department of Defense Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: CC designates the coastal area as part of a special marine environment. Seasonal Factors Sandy beaches may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control High energy environment should self-clean rapidly. Comments 700-98 (I C LEGEND mwn MaNn. mm., o~kemv Plawtv lIne avnr�*Q w houl'Iffl uroftd *wwm.h.p data I.'lockv inhwooa4 volimt181 ~atccm cc Sb.GMv b o~i Po- Streal iml~ -wim sewn.~d oIOi@ > Inlt Trelti 0. oMmein Spnn 12 4= wl, inak AL Oso M MM,-r tan -n ~~ und Hill * B~~~~~~~~~~~~oot I~flch-flg U ffshmer,I Widrihg ttown, Are. of mmplacai owiOPcal Oweat, floor co"nwlaon u~~gn~hoa'cea * nerosiont faci. alea ~~~~nf ~ ~ ~ ~ n 'U~~~~~~~~~ m ID ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0sIe Figure 7OG42. SUDDEN ~CANO Table 700-43. JALAMA Shoreline Characteristics General Description: combination of rocky cliffs and small, narrow, steep, sandy beaches in north becoming broader and more sandy in the south Backshore: steep bluffs Trafficability: good on intertidal areas Cleanup Technique Code: (4 - northern half, 3 - beach area); temporary disposal site at beach parking area Access Principal Entry Points: Jalama Beach Road from the east of coast road from the south; stream crossing at Jalama Park may be impassable Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Gaviota Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: Jalama Creek (anadromous fish stream) and several other high gradient creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) Vandenberg Air Force Base County of Santa Barbara Point Conception Co. Vandenberg, California Park Dept 523 W. 5th Street Jalama Beach, California Los Angeles, CA Phone: (805) 866-1611 (805) 736-0222 Unlisted Controlling Government Authority: Dept. of Defense & Parks and Recreation Waterfront Usage: Natural and recreational Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: anadromous fish Special Biological Significance: Coastal area is designated as a special marine habitat. Seasonal Factors Jalama Creek inlet commonly barred; inlet could open at certain times of year. Sandy beaches may migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Jalama Creek inlet would have to be closed off if sand is eroded. I Comments 700-100 LEGEND ~ M', ~oIrd.,n patu~t.21 "hlcoM .900 SndyV Mach Ttt ~d > to... T"'. m O'l.. P-pol'.pm9 ~- *~i@~ 0T~k~ A off Shorn loa-mn S~l~ 37s~~~~~~ ~~~~~~ mo ofU tho I1.0e,1 d.069 laflg..Io. Alm. of opm.0w NOIO 0 Ocm- fire, CMrfls~tOl.o B.,d rokIn~ltn im tratin oc.y .c~v imle~~~~~~~/ miltV Anadromouis _ _ _ _ _ Fish StreamnAI Figure 700-43. JALAMA Table 700-44. POINT CONCEPTION Shoreline Characteristics General Description: narrow, steep, sandy beaches with many submerged rocks toward' the north Backshore: steep bluffs, many cliffs Trafficability: Unknown Cleanup Technique Code: (4) Access Principal Entry Points: Jalama Beach Park Road to the north; Coast Guard station at Point Conception in the south Boat Launching Facilities: None Nearest: Gaviota Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: several high gradient intermittent streams Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) (3) Point Conception Co. Standard Oil Co. USCG Reservation 523 W. 5th Street I Dominion Road Point Conception Los Angeles, CA Santa Maria, CA CA Phone: not listed/unknown (805) WE7-6333 (805) 962-7430 Controlling Government Authority: Waterfront Usage: natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Special Biological Significance: Kelp beds off the east coast of Point Conception provide good fishing for Santa Barbara's commercial fleet. Point Conception is the boundary between southern and cen- tral faunal zones; the boundary fauna is of particular interest and should be preserved (Siva, 1976). Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Very high energy environment, self-cleaning should be rapid. Comments 700-102 >\X. - ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 7 ~~~~LEGEND M.w.Ww hkbS Z111111 vshuiar meow* swoivmeq DC* =x. Pmgsiw "~Al am seem~ twjft *~ ~ ~~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~0 I&ftl- Offsbiwe 0.1 01WOM.fl 111.1d look'.W."'m Wm r,..,m~ facilitv ~~~~III~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~mile ---'7-~~~f R~~~~~* - ,,~ eeico COAW GU,:~~~~~~~ Po~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~inCocpio indian~~~~~* ead Rack~~~~~~~~~~4 U~~~~~~~~~' Pt CONCEPTIO ~ 4- Govermn RaIn Figure 700-44. POINT CONCEPTION Table 700-85. SAN MIGUEL ISLUND Shoreline Characteristics General Description: Pr edomnantly steep, cliffs with occasional sand/ gravel pocket beaches and rocky shoreline sections. Backshore: A few large, flat, sandQ beaches are located at the Western tip of the island, Simonton Cove, Cuylar Harbor, and Cardwell Pt. Trafficabilty: Good on sand, beaches Cleanuo Technique Code (3) Access Principal Entry Points: Potential access by boat at Southern side of Pt. Bennett in fair weather and at Cuyler Harbor dangerous. Inlets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: Intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): U.S. Government Address: Phone: Controlling Government Authority: U.S. Navy Waterfront Usage: Natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlfe: Marine Mamnuls and birds Special Biological Significance: This island provides rookeries for five Pinniped species and a haul-out area for a sixth. The west end is particularly important (Siva, 1976). The waters surrounding the island are of special biological significance, and the Coastal Corm- mission recomnnds that offshore and onshore habitats be preserved in their present, relatively undisturbed, condition. The Santa Barbara Channel waters and islands are regarded by the Coastal Com- mission as a fragile resource area. Numerous points and reefs pro- vide excellent habitats for aquatic species, and consequently a prime resource for fishermen. There are major fishing areas on Ventura Flats, imaediately west of Goleta, and around the islands. San Miguel Island is presently inhabited by three rare and endangered species. The endangered species is the California Brown Pelican and the rare species are the Guadalupe Fur Seal and the Island Fox. Seasonal Factors Sand beaches can be expected to migrate on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spitl Control The convergence of ocean and channel currents at the easternmost tip of the island results in breakers and rough seas, making access or approach extremely dangerous. Comments Pinnipeds are very sensitive to human disturbance thus no onshore cleanup * should be attempted near haul-out or rookery areas. 700-184 * ~~~~~~~~LEGEND 01property line and key to onrhp data - - - ~Stream :rBird rookeries/niesting areas Marine marrmml rookeries/ hauling grounds - * * ~~~~~~~~~~~Submerged rocks nautical miles 2 SANDY"- BEACH- ' s N Mi r F *1 f.j ' SANDY' O ------ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~BEACH * Figure 700-85. SAN MIGUEL ISLAND Table 700-86. SANTA ROSA ISLAND Shorel ine Characteristics General Description: Predominantly steep or vertical cliffs falling directly into the water with occasional pocket sand/gravel beaches and/or rocky shoreline Backshore: Trafficabil ity: Cleanup Technique Code (3) Access -rincipal Entry Points: Landing is possible at most pocket beaches during fair weather Boat Launching Facilities: Unknown Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: Numerous steep intermittent creeks Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: A. Vail 123 W. Padre St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Phone: Controlling Government Authority: Federal Government Waterfront Usage: Sheep and cattle grazing on bluffs Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Birds and marine mammals Special Biological Significance: Santa Rosa Island supports pinniped rookeries (Siva, 1976), and the waters surrounding it have been designated an area of special biological significance. Santa Rosa Island is inhabited by an endangered species, the California Brown Pelican and a rare species, the Island Fox. The island is also a hauling ground for Northern Elephant Seals, Harbor Seals, and California Sea Lions (Mate, 1977). Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Extensive kelp beds off the northwestern tip of the Island can restrict access to adjacent shoreline. Comments Pinnipeds are very sensitive to human disturbance thus onshore cleanup should not be attempted near haul-out or rookery areas. 700-186 LEG3END -LNO - rroperty line and key to BAH- ITI ownership data a r .-* -'Stream XBird rookeiries/nesting areas Marine mammal rookeries/ , * Al hauling gounds SNY * 4Submerged rocksBEC\ \ .- BEAC ~ ---�- 0 1 2 nautical miles SANDY -- BEAClP I- y SA~~~~~ X .-- 2 tt -' ~~~~~~~~~ -A / EC >1~~~~~~~A J., SANCJ- ( 4~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4. Fig~~~~~re 700436. S~~~~~~~~~~~~ANT OS SLN Table 700-87. SANTA CRUZ ISLAND Shoreline Characteri stics General Description: Predominantly steep or vertical Cliffs failing directly into, the water with occasional pocket sand/gravel beaches and rocky shoreline in the sheltered areas Backshore: Traf ficabil I ity: Cleanup Technioue Code (3) Access P-rincipal Entry Points: Access by boat at landings located at Scorpion Anchorage, Prisoner's Harbor and Willows Anchorage. There is also a roadway ending at Scorpion Anchorage. Boat Launching Facilities: Scorpion and Willows anchorages and Prisoner's Harbor Inlets/Streams Inlets. None Streams: Intermittent creeks ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: (1) (2) Pier Gherini Santa Cruz Island Company 230 La Arcada Blvd. Suite 1400 Santa Barbara, CA 93104 615 S. Flower St. Phone: ~~~~~~Los Angeles, CA 90017 Controlling Government Authority: U.S. Government Waterfront Usage: Cattle and sheep grazing on bluffs; natural Biological Data Potential Threat to Wildlife: Birds and marine mammals Special Biological Significance: Santa Cruz Island supports sea] and sea lion rookeries. The fauna of the intertidal zone is relatively undisturbed, and is biologically significant because the west end of the island intercepts the lower edge of the Santa Barbara Channel eddy (Siva, 1976). The waters surrounding the island have been designated an area of special biological significance. Santa Cruz Island supports habitats for three rare and endangered species. The endangered species is the California Brown Pelican and the rare spe- cies are the Guadalupe Fur Sea] and the Island Fox. The island also supports rookeries and hauling grounds for Northern Elephant Seals, Harbor Seals, and California Sea Lions (Mate, 1977). Seasonal Factors Sand and gravel in pocket beaches will move on- and offshore seasonally. Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Currents off Fraser Point can be extremely dangerous. Commnents I Pinnipeds are very sensitive to human disturbance thus onshore cleanup should not be attempted near haul-out or rookery areas. 700-188 0 0 0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A I, ,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ jg ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ f U~~~~~~~~~~i WO~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~GA VEL sew_"~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~* St,-~..& S I ~~~~2 Figur. 700-87. SANTA CRUZ ISLAND Table 700-88. ANACAPA Shoreline Characteristics General Description: Almost entirely vertical cliffs, terraces, and rocky shoreline with a few gravel pocket beaches Backshore: Traffi cabi 1i ty: Cleanup Technique Code (3) Access Principal Entry Points: Access by boat is possible at the Coast Guard landing on the north side near the eastern extremity. Other landings can be made on either side of the island near the west opening and at East Fish Camp. Boat Launching Facilities: Coast Guard Landing Inl ets/Streams Inlets: None Streams: None Ownership and Control Principal Property Owner(s): Address: Channel Islands National Monument 1699 Anchors Way Ventura, CA 93003 Phone: Controlling Government Authority: U.S. National Park Service Waterfront Usage: Limited recreation, diving, camping; mostly natural. Biological Data Potential threat to Wildlife: Birds, marine mammals, and intertidal communities Special Biological Significance: The waters around the island are desig- nated an area of special biological significance. Anacapa Island is inhabited by the California Brown Pelican which is listed as an endangered species. The island also supports rookeries and hauling grounds for Northern Elephant Seals, Harbor Seals and California Sea Lions (Mate, 1977). In addition, Anacapa supports the richest tide pools in southern California. Seasonal Factors Special Factors Affecting Spill Control Any disturbance of bird rookeries should be avoided. Helicopter landing is possible above Fish Camp and atop Middle and Eastern Islands. Comments Pinnipeds are very sensitive to human disturbance thus onshore cleanup should not be attempted near haul-out or rookery areas. 700-192 LEGEND Property line and key to ( ownership data -.J Stream - .- - ; ""Y Bird rookeries/nesting areas -.-.....- Marine mamma rookeries/ " � -" . . . . . . . hauling grounds - - * * � Submerged rocks . v�. -v 0 1 2 -' - - -nautical miles .* . ~... . . POCKet Figure 700-88� �A P - ISLAN D Figure 700-88. ANACAPA ISLAND f . SITE-SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION OF COASTAL RESOURCES WITHIN CLEAN SEAS SEGMENTS ADJACENT TO THE SANTA MARIA BASIN AND SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL OCS AREAS (Woodward-Clyde, 19801 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1981) CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT* DESCRIPTION 24 Deer Canyon Habitats: This segment is composed of rocky shorelines and rocky marine terraces at the base of cliffs. Living Resources: This area contains sev- eral shorebird and seabird nesting areas. 25 Point San Luis Habitats: Rocky shores extend from the the northern extremity of this segment southeast to Point San Luis. Along the west shore of San Luis Obispo Bay, the shoreline is composed of narrow sandy beaches. Living Resources: Shorebirds and seabirds also nest on Point San Luis. Significant beds of bull kelp are located immediately west of Point San Luis. Other Uses: The waterfront in the vicinity of Point San Luis is used for a variety of recreation uses, including sportfishing, sunbathing, sailing, etc. CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 26 Avila Beach Habitats: Sandy beaches are found in the western-most half-mile of this segment, in Avila State Beach (immediately northwest of Fossil Point) and at Mallagh Landing [0.5 km (0.3 miles) from the eastern edge of the segment]. Rocky shores are dispersed be- tween the sandy beaches. Living Resources: Seals haul-out at Mal- lagh Landing and shorebirds and seabirds nest in the area. 27 Shell Beach Habitats: The shoreline extending south- eastward 1.4 km (0.9 miles) from the west- ern edge of the segment and northwestward 2.3 km (1.4 miles) from the eastern edge of the segment mostly is comprised of rocky shorelines and marine terraces with small pocket beaches. Sandy beaches are found between the peripheral rocky beaches. Living Resources: Shorebirds and seabirds nest in the area. Z2S Pismo Beach Habitats: Rocky shores and marine terraces extend 1.1 km (0.7 miles) south from the northwestern edge of this segment. The re- maining shoreline is comprised of sandy beaches. Living Resources: Pismo Creek, which emp- ties into the Pacific Ocean through Pismo State Beach, has been identified as an an- adromous fish stream. Meadow Creek wet- land, which is located inland, is consid- ered to be a biologically significant area. Shorebirds overwinter and migrate through the area and wading birds inhabit the wet- lands. Pismo clams are found along this coastline. Other Uses: Pismo State Beach, located in the southern portion of the segment, con- tains recreational amenities including a boat launching site. Pismo Invertebrate Reserve is located immediately north of Pismo Beach. ( CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 29 Oceano Habitats: This segment is composed of wide sandy beaches. Living Resources: Arroyo Grande Creek, which empties into the Pacific Ocean 1.3 km (0.8 miles) south of the northern edge of this segment, has been identified as an an- adromous fish stream. Oceano Lagoon, which extends northward from the mouth of Arroyo Grande Creek to the edge of the segment, is considered to be a biologically significant area. Pismo clams are common on the coast. Other Uses: Pismo State Beach extends along the entire length of this segment. 30 Oso Flaco Lake Habitats: Wide sandy beaches line this segment. Living Resources: Oso Flaco Lake and wet- lands are productive inland areas. Pismo clams are common on the coast. Other Uses: Pismo State Beach encompasses the northern 3.6 km (2.2 miles) of this segment. Pismo Clam Preserve is located on the southern portion of the segment. 31 Guadalupe Habitats: The coastline of this segment is comprised of sandy beaches. Living Resources: The Santa Maria River wetlands area, located 0.8 km (0.5 miles) north of the southern edge of the segment serves as a bird feeding, resting, and nesting area and is considered to be a bio- logically significant area. Pismo clams are common on the coast. Other Uses: The beaches along this segment are used for recreation. 32 Mussel Point Habitats: The shore is predominantly san- dy, with some rocks at Mussel Point, lo- cated 1.6 km (I mile) north of the southern edge of this segment. OD CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 33 Point Sal Habitats: Sandy beaches extend 1 km (.6 ) miles) southward f ram the northern edge of this segment. Sandy beaches ar e also found in two 0.9 km (0.6 mile) sections south of Point Sal State Park. The remainder of the coastline is comprised of rocky shoreline and rocky marine terraces. Living Resources: California sea lions and harbor seals haul-out at Point Sal. Other Uses: Point Sal Beach State-Park is located approximately 1.62 km (I mile) east of Point Sal. 34 Lions Head Habitats: Rocky shorelines and rocky ma- rine terraces make up the northern 3 km, (1.9 miles) of this segment; the remaining. shoreline is composed of sandy beaches. Living Resources: Sandy beaches are proba- bly surf clam habitats. Other Uses: The coastline within this seg- ment is part of Vandenberg Air Force Base. 35 Vandenberg Habitats: The coastline is composed of@ sandy beaches. Living Resources: The sand dunes north of San Antonio Creek have been identified as bird rookeries/nesting areas. Other Uses: The coastline is within Van- denberg Air Force Base. 36 Purisima Point Habitatst The shoreline in this segment is mostly rocky with rocky marine terraces. Living Resources: Nesting area for Cal-i- fornia least tern. Other Uses: Coastline is within Vandenberg Air Force Base. CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 37 Lompoc Landing Habitats: The shoreline is mostly rocky to the north, giving way to low, flat sandy beaches with tidal ponds at the mouth of the Santa Ynez River. Living Resources: Numerous birds use the Santa Ynez River wetlands [located 1.62 km (1 mile) north of the southern edge of this segment] as rookeries/nesting/overwintering areas; these wetlands, along with the Santa Ynez estuary and coastal area, are consid- ered to be biologically significant areas. Other Uses: Coastline is within Vandenberg Air Force Base. 38 Spring Canyon Habitats: The shoreline is composed of low, flat, sandy beaches. Other Uses: Coastline is within Vandenberg Air Force Base. 39 Point Pedernales Habitats: Rocky marine terraces extend 4.0 km (2.5 miles) northward from Point Arguel- lo and 0.8 km (0.5 miles) southward from Point Pedernales. The remainder of the shoreline is composed of narrow sandy beaches with submerged rocks close to shore. Living Resources: Seabirds nest in the area. Other Uses: Vandenberg Air Force Base owns the entire coast except for a C.4 km (0.25 mile) section along the southern edge of the segment which is owned by the U.S. Coast Guard. 40 Point Arguello Habitats: The shoreline in this segment is comprised mostly of rocky marine terraces with occasional rocky beaches. Living Resources: Seabirds and shorebirds nest in the area. CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 40 Point Arguello Other Uses: The northern 0.4 km (0.25 (cont.) mile) of this segment is used as a U.S. Coast Guard Station and the remainder of the shoreline and inland area is part of Vandenberg Air Force Base. 41 Sudden Flats Habitats: About 3.2 km (2 miles) of this segment is composed of rocky marine ter- races. The eastern-most mile of shoreline is composed of sandy beaches. Other Uses: The shoreline is within the boundary of Vandenberg Air Force Base. 42 Sudden Canyon Habitats: The shoreline is comprised of narrow, steep, sandy beaches. Rocky areas and rocky marine terraces are interspersed throughout the segment. Other Uses: The shoreline is within the boundary of Vandenberg Air Force Base. 43 Jalama Habitats: Rocky cliffs line the northern shore of this segment. Small, narrow, steep, sandy beaches immediately south of the rocky cliffs broaden to the south. Living Resources: Jalama Creek, which is located in the middle portion of the seg- ment, has been identified as an anadromous fish stream. Giant kelp beds are found in this coastal segment. Other Uses: Jalama Beach County Park is located about 1.4 km (0.9 miles) north of Jalama. 44 Point Conception Habitats: The shoreline is characterized by narrow, steep, sandy beaches with many submerged rocks toward the northern portion of this segment. Living Resources: Kelp beds are located off the east coast of Point Conception. Government Point serves as a bird rookery/ nesting area. CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 85 San Miguel Island Habitats: 'Cliffs predominate in the shore- line. Occasional gravel pocket beaches and rocky. shoreline sections are interspersed throughout the segment. Living Resources: California sea lion, harbor seal, Guadalupe fur seal, northern fur seal, stellar sea lion and northerm elephant seal haul-out and use the island for rookeries. Many birds, including en- dangered species, also breed and nest in the area. Other Uses: Island waters serve as a najor fishing area. The island is owned by the U.S. Navy and managed by the National Park Service as a national park. The waters surrounding San Miguel are a State Ecolog- ical Reserve and are within the Channel Is- lands Marine Sanctuary. 86 Santa Rosa Island Habitat: Predominantly steep or vertical cliffs falling directly into the water with occasional sand/gravel pocket beaches and! or rocky shorelines. Living Resources: Island supports pinniped rookeries and hauling grounds for northern elephant seals, harbor seals, and Califor- nia sea lions. Waters surrounding island are designated as an Area of Special Sig- nificance. Important bird rookery/nesting area. Other Uses: Part of Channel Islands Na- tional Park and waters are part of Channel Islands Marine Sanctuary. Numerous boat sites are located on the western shores of Santa Rosa Island and five diving sites are located offshore. Sheep and cattle graze on bluffs along the waterfront. Waters be- tween Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Island are popular party boat areas. 6.1.7 CLEAN SEAS SEGMENT DESCRIPTION 87 Santa Cruz Island Habitat: Cliffs falling directly into wa- ter with occasional sand/gravel pocket beaches and rocky shoreline in sheltered areas. Living Resources: Supports rookeries and hauling grounds for northern elephant seals, harbor seals, and California sea lions. waters surrounding island have been designated as an Area of Special Biological Significance. Important bird rookery/nest- ing area. Other uses: Santa Cruz Island is part of the Channel Islands National Park and the waters are part of Channel Islands Marine Sanctuary. Boat launch sites are located along all shores of the island. Recreation also includes diving (7 sites on Island) and nature study. Cattle and sheep graze on bluffs. Waters between Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa Island are a popular party boat area. Comments: Currents off Fraser Point (west - ern tip of island) can be extremely danger- ous. 88 Anacapa Island Habitat: Almost entirely vertical cliffs, terraces, and rocky shoreline with a few gravel pocket beaches. Living Resources: Island supports rooker- ies and hauling grounds for northern ele- phant seals, harbor seals, and California sea lions. Waters around the island are designated as an Area of Special Biological Significance. Anacapa Island supports the richest tidal pools in southern California. The California brown pelican, an endangered species, has nested on Anacapa for the last two years. Other Uses: Part of Channel Islands Na- tional Monument, Channel Islands National Park; waters are part of Channel Islands Marine Sanctuary. Numerous boat launching areas and five diving areas are located on Anacapa's shores. Recreation activities in northern Channel Islands including sport- fishing and nature study have historicaliy centered on Anacapa. i~ ~ ~ ~~tMAIEMM~ MARINE MAMMALS AND BIRDS Marine Mammals: Sea otters, pinnipeds (seals and sea lions), and cetaceans (whales and toothed porpoises) exist in appreciable numbers in the rich oceanic waters off California. The pinniped species and locations where they are found on or offshore the coastline adjacent to the Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Channel OCS areas are listed in Table C-2-1. Information on the sitings of the most common cetaceans found in these OCS areas is presented in Table C-2-2. The sea otter (Enhydra lutris), which has been designated as a "threatened" species, is present along the central California coast as far south as the Santa Maria River Mouth (Segment No. 31), although individual sea otters have been sighted in the Santa Barbara Channel (UCSC, 1982). Most of the otters in the Santa Maria Basin offshore are bachelor males which migrate northward during summer and fall (Benech, 1982). Marine and Coastal Birds: Table C-2-3 lists the locations along the central and southern California coast that are used by major groups of birds, and the principal activities that take place in these areas. San Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) is the most important rookery in the Southern California Bight in terms of numbers and species. Anacapa Island (Segment No,. 88) supports the second largest number of seabirds in the Bight (NOAA, 1980). CLEANUP OF WATERFOWL AND OTHER MARINE ORGANISMS If a spill threatens waterfowl or marine mammals, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or the National Marine Fisheries Service' must be notified. The telephone numbers for these agencies are: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (213) 436-1183 National Marine Fisheries Service (213) 548-2575 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has responsibility for capturing and cleaning oiled birds in federal waters. It also has responsibility for taking precautionary measures and initiating cleaning activities, if feasible, for any species that is on the endangered species list. The National Marine Fisheries Service has responsibility for marine mammals under duress from spilled oil. 700-1 If birds or marine mammals in state waters or onshore are contaminated by spilled oil, the California Department of Fish i and Game normally assumes responsibility for capturing and cleaning the oiled birds and mammals. The number for the California Department of Fish and Game is (213) 590-5106. The role of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in California in these situations will be to assist in the implementation of the State's plan by providing people and equipment where the need is greatest. Exxon and Clean Seas will provide the necessary assistance during rehabilitation efforts. If birds are oil-contaminated, the following organization can provide immediate consultation service: International Bird Rescue Research Center Aquatic Park Berkeley, California 94710 Telephone Number: (415) 841-9086 The appropriate agency identified above shall be notified if any severly oiled and obviously sick marine mammals are seen. No attempt is to be made by Exxon to capture them except under specific directions from a wildlife biologist from one of these agencies. 700-2 TABLE C-1-2 RESERVES, PRESERVES, MARINE SANCTUARIES, AREAS OF SPECIAL BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE, BIOLOGICALLY SENSITIVE AREAS, OIL AND GAS SANCTUARIES, AND REFUGES IN VICINITY OF EXXON'S LEASES (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1981) LOCATION RELATIVE TO CLOSEST NAME EXXON LEASE PRINCIPAL SPECIES Ecological Reserves Santa Maria Basin: .Marro Rock Ecological 48 km 130 miles) north-northeast of Numerous species of nesting Reserve (Segment P 0405 shorebirds and seabirds, includ- No. 20) ing the 'endangered' American peregrine falcon . Pismo Lake Ecological Reserve is located 0.8 km (0.5 mile) Wading birds, numerous species Reserve (Se~gment inland of Pismo Beach which is 39 km of overwintering shorebirds and No. 28) (24 miles) northeast of P 0405 waterfowl and migrating shore- birds Santa Barbara Channel: Tide and submerged Reserve around San Miguel island is Northern fur seals, California lands surrounding 7 km (4 miles) south of P 0356 sea lions, Stellar sea lions, San Miguel and Ana- harbor seals, northern elephant capa Islands from seals, Guadalupe fur seals, and mean high tide line numerous species of nesting seaward I nautical shorebirds and seabirds including mile (1.8 kin) the 'endangered' California brown pelican on Anacapa Island TABLE C-1-2 (cont.) LOCATION RELATIVE TO CLOSEST NA/E EXXON LEASE PRINCIPAL SPECIES Preserves Santa Barbara Channel: � Federal Ecological P 0238 is immediately south of the N/A Preserve plus buffer buffer zone zone seaward of the Goleta-Santa Barbara- Montecito coastal strip extending 2 miles seaward of state waters Marine Sanctuaries Santa Barbara Channel: � Channel Islands P 0356 and P 0357 are located parti- Northern fur seals, California Marine Sanctuary en- ally within the Channel Islands Marine sea lions, Stellar sea lions, compassing ocean wa- Sanctuary. The closest proposed well harbor seals, northern elephant ters surrounding the is located 4 km (2 milesl northeast seals, Guadalupe fur seals, and northern Channel Is- of the sanctuary numerous species of nesting lands, Santa Barbara shorebirds and seabirds, includ- Island, Richardson ing the 'endangered" California Rock and Castle Rock brown pelican on Anacapa Island from the mean high tide seaward 6 nau- tical miles (10.8 km) TABLE C-1-2(cont.) LOCATION RELATIVE TO CLOSEST NAME EXXON LEASE PRINCIPAL SPECIES Areas of Special Biological Significance Santa Barbara Channel; . Waters around north- Area around San Miguel Island is 7 km Northern fur seals, California ern Channel Islands (4 miles) south of P 0356 sea lions, Stellar sea lions, to a distance of 1 harbor seals, northern elephant nautical mile (1.8 seals, Guadalupe fur seals, and km) offshore or the numerous species of nesting shore- 300-foot isobath, birds and seabirds, including the whichever is greater "endangered" California brown pelican on Anacapa Island .Area between Mugu 59 km (37 miles) east-southeast of Harbor seals Lagoon and Latigo P 0231 Point TABLE C.1-2 (cont.) LOCATION RELATIVE TO CLOSEST NAME EXXON LEASE PRINCIPAL SPECIES Biologically Sensitive Areas Santa Maria Basin: . Nipomo Dunes and 32 km (20 miles) east-northeast of Wading birds, overwintering Santa Maria River P 0405 waterfowl, overwintering, mi- Mouth (Segment No. grating and nesting shorebirds, 31) and nesting or overwintering waterfowl . Santa Ynez Lagoon 9 km (6 miles) northeast of P 0438 Numerous species of nesting, (Segment No. 37) migrating or overwintering shore- birds, including 'endangered' California least terns Santa Barbara Channel: . Point Conception 6 km (4 miles) north of P 0197 Extensive giant kelp beds, (Segment No. 44) nesting seabirds . Burmah/Naples Beach 8 km (5 miles) northeast of P 0187 Harbor seals . Goleta Slough 14 km (8 miles) north of P 0238 Numerous species of shore- birds, wading birds, sea- birds, and songbirds in- cluding the following "endangered' species: light-footed clapper rails, California black rails, California brown rails, California brown pelicans and Belding savannah spar- _*~~~~~~ _*~~~~~ ~rows _ TABLE C-2-1 INFORMATION ON PINNIPEDS COMMONLY FOUND OFFSHORE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1981; Morejohn, 1977; BLM, 1981; ELM, 1980; NOAA, 1980; and Daugherty, 1979) DISTANCE FROM SPECIES LOCATION LEASE Harbor Seals Santa Maria Basin: (Phoca vitulina) . San Simeon Point 79 km (49 miles) north- (Segment No. 10) northwest of P 0404 . San Simeon Beach 71 km (44 miles) north- State Park (Segment northwest of P 0404 No. 12) Cayucos Point 55 km (34 miles) north- (Segment No. 18) northeast of P 0405 . Diablo Canyon 37 km (23 miles) north- (Segment No. 23) northeast of P 0405 . Mallagh Landing 37 km (23 miles) north- (Segment No. 26) east of P 0405 Pismo Beach 39 km (24 miles) north- (Segment No. 28) east of P 0405 Point Sal 30 km (19 miles) east of (Segment No. 33) P 0405 . Purisima Point 10 km (6 miles) northeast (Segment No. 36) of P 0438 . Point Perdenales 9 km (6 miles) east of (Segment No. 39) P 0440 . Point Arguello 10 km (6 miles) east- (Segment No. 40) southeast of P 0440 Santa Barbara Channel: . Burmah/Naples Beach 8 km (5 miles) northeast (Segment No. 56) of P 0187 Devereaux Slough 13 km (8 miles) north of (Segment No. 58) P 0238 C.2.1.1 TABLE C.2.1(cont.) DISTANCE FROM SPECIES LOCATION LEASE Harbor Seals . Coal Oil Point 13 km (8 miles) north of (cont.) (Segment No. 58) P 0238 Goleta Rocks 14 km (8.5 miles) north- (Segment No. 59) east of P 0238 . El Estero 29 km (18 miles) north- (Segment No. 66) east of P 0231 . Standard Oil Pier 29 km (18 miles) north- (Segment No. 67) east of P 0231 Mugu Lagoon 59 km (37 miles) east- (Segment Nos. 77 southeast of P 0231 and 78) . Bay Cove to Glass 11.5 km (7 miles) south Float Beach, San of P 0356 Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) . Harris Point to 9 km (5 miles) south- Cuyler Harbor, San west of P 0356 Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) � Skunk Point, Santa 8 km (5 miles) south- Rosa Island (Seg- east of P 0360 ment No. 86) Carrington Point 5 km (3 miles) south- to Northwest southeast of P 0360 Anchorage, Santa Rosa Island, (Seg- ment No. 86) - . Diablo Point to 7 km (4 miles) south of West Point, Santa P 0232 Cruz Island (Segment No. 87) Cavern Point, 9 km (6 miles) southeast Santa Cruz Island of P 0231 (Segment No. 87) C.2.1.2 TABLE G.2.1 (cont.) DISTANCE FROM SPECIES LOCATION LEASE Harbor Seals . Morse Point, Santa 7 km (4 miles) south of (cont.) Cruz Island P 0232 (Segment No. 87) . Frenchys Cove, 14.5 km (9 miles) east- Anacapa Island southeast of P 0231 (Segment No. 88) California Santa Maria Basin: Sea Lions . Point Piedras Blancas 82 km (51 miles) north- (Zalophus (Segment No. 8) northwest of P 0404 caif'ornianus) . White Rock (Segment 65 km (40.5 miles) north No. 13) of P 0405 . Cayucos Point 55 km (34 miles) north- (Segment No. 18) northeast of P 0405 . Lion and Pup Rocks 30 km (19 miles) north- (Segment No. 23) east of P 0405 . Pecho Rock (Segment 30 km (18 miles) No. 24) northeast of P 0405 . Point Sal (Segment 30 km (19 miles) east of No. 33) P 0405 Santa Barbara Channel: . Point Bennett to 12 km (7 miles) southwest Simmonton Cove, San of P 0356 Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) . Richardson Rock, 18 km (11 miles) west- San Miguel Island southwest of P 0356 (Segment No. 85) . Corral Point, Santa 14 km (9 miles) south- Rosa Island southeast of P 0360 (Segment No. 86) C.2.1.3 TABLE C.2.l(cont.) DISTANCE FROM SPECIES LOCATION LEASE California Sea . Frazer Point, Santa 15 km (10 miles) south of Lions (cont.) Cruz Island P 0354 (Segment No. 87) . Frenchys Cove, 14.5 km (9 miles) east- Anacapa Island southeast of P 0231 (Segment No. 88) Northern Fur Santa Barbara Channel: Seal . Point Bennett to 12 km (7 miles) southwest (Callorhinus Simmonton Cove, of P 0356 ursinus) San Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) . Castle Rock, San 14 km (8.5 miles) south- Miguel Island west of P 0356 (Segment No. 85) . Richardson Rock, 18 km (11 miles) west- San Miguel Island southwest of P 0356 (Segment No. 85) Stellar Sea Santa Maria Basin: Lion . Point Piedras Blancas 82 km (51 miles) north- (Eumetopias (Segment No. 8) northwest of P 0404 jubatus) . Lion Rock (Segment 30 km (19 miles) north- No. 33) east of P 0405 Santa Barbara Channel: Point Bennett to 12 km (7 miles) southwest Si~mornton Cave, San of P 0356 Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) C.2.1.4 TABLE C.2.1 (cont.) DISTANCE FROM SPECIES LOCATION LEASE Northern Santa Maria Basin: Elephant Seal . Point Arguello 10 km (6 miles) east- (Mirounga (Segment No. 40) southeast of P 0440 angustirostris) Santa Barbara Channel: Point Bennett to 12 km (7 miles) southwest Simonton Cove, of P 0356 San Miguel Island (Segment No. 85) Guadalupe fur Santa Barbara Channel: seal . Point Bennett, San 17 km (11 miles) south- (Arctocephalus Miguel Island west of P 0356 townsendi) (Segment No. 85) C.2.1.5 TABLE C-2-2 CETACEANS COMMON TO TIHE SANTA MARIA BASIN OFFSHORE AND SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL (UCSC, 1982; Daugherty, 1979; Morejohn, 1977; BLM, 1981; BLM, 1980; Gundlach et al., 1982; NOAA, 1980) SITINGS IN SITINGS IN SPECIES SANTA MARIA BASIN SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL Pacific white-sided dolphin Common summer through winter; Sitings all year with peaks (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) Peak in autumn in summer near San Miguel Island Northern right-whale dolphin Sitings in summer and autumn Sitings winter and spring (Lissodelphis borealis) Risso's dolphin Sitings in winter and autumn; Sitings year-round; Most (Grampus griseus) Peak in autumn abundant in late spring, summer, and early autumn Dall's porpoise Sitings year-round with only Sitings all year; Most (Phocoenoides dalli) minor fluctuations in abundance common during winter and concentration Harbor porpoise No dramatic seasonal fluctuations Not common (Phocoena phocoena) Sperm whale (Physeter catodon)* Sitings only in autumn Not common Pilot whale (Globicephala Sitings only in autumn Sitings in autumn and scammoni) early winter Gray whale (Eschrichtius Sitings from late autumn to Sitings between early robustus)* spring winter and early spring Beaked whale (Ziphiidae) Sitings in sunmer Not common * *esignated as 'endangered' SITINGS IN SITINGS IN SPECIES SANTA MARIA BASIN SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL Humpback whale (Megaptera Sitings in summer and autumn; Sitings between winter and novaeangliae)* Peak in autumn early spring Blue whale (Balaenoptera Sitings in summer Not common musculus)* Fin whale (Balaenoptera Not common Sitings between late physalus) autumn and early winter Killer whale (Orcinus Sitings infrequent Sitings year-round; More orca) abundant with gray whales Common dolphin (Delphinus Not common Exceptionally heavy use of delphis) the Channel all year with peaks during cool water periods Minke whale (Balaenoptera Not common Sitings year-round; Most acutorostrata) abundant in spring and summer * Designated as "endangered" TABLE C-2-3 MAJOR BIRD HABITATS PRESENT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OFFSHORE AREA AND SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1981) CLEAN SEAS SHORE- SEABIRDS WATERFOWL WADING RAPTORS SEGMENT BIRDS BIRDS SANTA MARIA BASIN: 8 Point Piedras Blancas n n - - 10 San Simeon Point - n - - 11 Piedra Blanca w,m - w - 12 Cambria Rock w,m - w - 17 Cayucos Point n - - - 20 Morro Bay* n n - - n 21 Hazard Canyon* n - - - 22 Point Buchon n n - - - 24 Deer Canyon n n - - - 25 Point San Luis n n - - - 27 Shell Beach n n - - - 28 Pismo Beach n n - - - 29 Oceano w - - p - 31 Guadalupe* w,m - w p - 32 Mussel Point* n - 35 Vandenberg* n - 36 Purisima Point* n - 37 Lompoc Landing* n,w,m - w,m p w 39 Point Perdenales - n 40 Point Arguello n n n - nesting w - overwintering m - migrating p - present * - "endangered" or "threatened" bird species present C.2.3.1 CLEAN SEAS SHORE- SEABIRDS WATERFOWL WADING RAPTORS SEGMENT BIRDS BIRDS SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL: 44 Point Conception - n 59 Goleta Point w,m - m w,n 66 Sandy Point w,m - - n 71 Ventura River w,m - w,m - 72 Ventura n m - - 77 Laguna Point w,m m w n 85 San Miguel Island* n n - 86 Santa Rosa Island n n - 87 Santa Cruz Island n n - 88 Anacapa Island* n n p n'- nesting w - overwintering m - migrating p - present * - "endangered" or "threatened" bird species present C.2.3.2 TABLE C-2-4 POSSIBLE EFFECTS OF OILING ON SENSITIVE LIVING RESOURCES (Gundlach at al., 1982) LIVING RESOURCE POSSIBLE IMPACTS Cetaceans .Stress may occur through ingestion of oil-contaminated food, oil intake through blowholes, eye irritation, and skin absorption. Pinnipeds .Eye irritation. *Death of already stressed seals (emaci- ated, late molting, captive), from addi- tional stress of oil contamination. *Thermoregulatory stress in preweaned pups, which have not yet developed in- sulting fat layers. *Disturbance of feeding and reproductive activities by aircraft and cleanup ac- * iiisIngestion of oil during nursing byS young. Diving Birds .May dive or swim into oiled waters. *Sometimes form large feeding flocks; these would be especially susceptible to mass oiling. Waterfowl .Coastal species would be especially vul- nerable; Brant feed on seagrass flats in very shallow waters; may be oiled in wa- ter, or may be deprived of access to seagrass beds. *Ducks dive for food and are found in coastal or offshore waters; contamina- tion could result from swimming in oiled water; they may land in oil-calmed water for evening roost; they sometimes form large rafts which might result in mas- sive oiling; they may dive through or surface in oiled water. Shorebirds .May feed or roost on oil-contaminated beaches. *May ingest contaminated food. *May ingest oil when preening contamin- ated feathers. C.2.4.1 LIVING RESOURCE POSSIBLE IMPACTS Alcids .Form large colonies, subject to mass oiling. *If disturbed, will fly from nests into water. *May attempt to land in oil-calmed water. *Dive into water to escape danger. *May feed in oiled water. Shellfish *Oil on exposed sand during low tide would flow down burrows and perhaps be ingested by clams inhabiting tidal flats or beaches. *Stressed clams would move to surface, becoming more exposed to oil and preda- tion. *Individuals in planktonic stages would be exposed to oil in the water column. *Clams and mussels on rocky shores would be subject to physical damage. C.2.4.2 REFERENCES Benech, Susan. 1982. Personal Communication. Bureau of Land Management. 1981. Final Environmental Impact State- ment, Proposed 1982 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sale Offshore Southern California, OCS Sale No. 68. Bureau of Land Management. 1980. Final Environmental Impact State- ment, Proposed 1981 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sale Offshore Central and Northern California, OCS Sale No. 53. Bureau of Land Management. 1979. Final Environmental Impact State- ment, Proposed 1979 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sale Offshore Southern California, OCS Sale No. 48. Dames and Moore. 1980. Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Assessment, Union Oil Company Platform Gina and Platform Gilda Project. Daugherty, A. E. 1979. Marine Mammals of California. Published by the University of California Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program and the California Department of Fish and Game. Third Revi- sion. Gundlach, E. R.; Thebeau, L. C.; Sadd, J. L.; Pavia, R.; and Ernst, W. D. 1982. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments to Spilled Oil: Southern California. Prepared by Research Planning In- stitute, Inc. for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis- tration. Johnson, L. and Abell, H. 1977. Recreation Site Vulnerability. In A Summary of Knowledge of the Central and Northern California Coastal Zone and Offshore Areas. Prepared for the Bureau of Land Management. Jones & Stokes Associates, Inc. 1981. An Ecological Characteriza- tion of the Central and Northern California Coastal Region. Prepared for the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Morejohn, Victor G. 1977. Marine Mammals. In A Summary of Know- ledge of the Central and Northern California Coastal Zone and Offshore Areas. Prepared for the Bureau of Land Management. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 1980. Final Envi- ronmental Impact Statement On The Proposed Channel Islands Marine Sanctuary. University of California, Santa Cruz. 1982. Marine Mammals and Seabird Study Central and Northern California. Prepared for the Bureau of Land Management. POCS Technical Paper No. 82-1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1981. Pacific Coast Ecological In- ventory. Woodward-Clyde Consultants. 1980. Oil Spill Cleanup Manual for Clean Seas. / ~8. *OUIPWN1T I~~~ TABLE 1 PROPOSED OIL SPILL CONTROL EQUIPMENT* POINT PEDERNALES PLATFORM (Shamrock) 1 32 ft. Munson boat, twin 150 hp/ob or equivalent 1 Walosep W-1 skimmer with powerpack and 1100 gallon storage/recovery container 1 Kepner 2500 gal. floating storage bag 1500 ft. Kepner 18" x 23"1 Sea Curtain on boom reel 15 Bales 3M Sorbent, Type 156 2 Drums of Corexit 9527 chemical dispersant 20 Gallons of Corexit OC-5 surface collecting agent I Hudson hand sprayer for dispensing chemical agents Assorted hand tools and storage containers All equipment and materials are subject to change to be state-of-the-art and will comply with MMS guidelines at the time of platform installation. Note: As required by Pacific OCS Order 7, all oil spill equipment and materials shall be inspected monthly and maintained in a state of readiness for use. The results of the inspection shall be recorded and maintained at the site. 800-1 TABLE 2 EXISTING POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT HONDO A PLATFORM 1500 ft. Kepner 18" x 23" Sea Curtain on boom reel 1 Komara mini-skimmer, including pump, engine and hose 1 Dunlop 1200 Imp. gal. (34 bbl) Dracone floating storage bag 20 Cyalume lightsticks 15 bales of 3M sorbent, type 156 2 drums of Corexit "9527" dispersant 20 gallons of Corexit OC-5 surface collecting agent 1 Hudson hand sprayer for dispensing chemical agents 1 21' Boston Whaler with two 70 hp outboard engines (OS&T) EXXON SANTA YNEZ 1000 ft. of Model 4300 Expandi-boom, assembled on pallet 1 Walosep W-1 oil recovery system (skimmer) 1 5000 gallon Kepner floating storage bag 20 Cyalume lightsticks 15 bales of 3M sorbent, type 156 2 drums of Corexit "9527" dispersant 20 gallons of Corexit OC-5 surface collecting agent 1 Hudson hand sprayer for dispensing chemical agents 1 32' MonArk workboat, Twin-CV53N Detroit Diesel inboard engines, dedicated for oil spill containment and recovery Crewboats servicing Hondo facilities to be adapted with HIAB-20 cranes to handle Walosep recovery system. E.1.2 TABLE 3 MR. CLEAN I OIL SPILL RESPONSE VESSEL (Moored at S. B. Harbor) Vessel * 136'x36' (supply type) USCG certified * 90'x30' clear deck space * Navigation Aids (radar, SSB radio, VHF radio, LORAN) * Transit speed, 10-12 knots * Two V-12 800 hp diesel engines * Fuel capacity 99,500 gals., potable water 7400 gal. * Two 60 kilowatt electric power generators * Galley and sleeping quarters for 12 people * Emergency skimmed oil/water storage (4000 bbls.) (to be used only until tank barge is on scene) Crew * Four men during oil spill operation Two men on duty 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week * One man on 24 hour call at all times Two hour callout and underway * Clean Seas personnel will supplement crew during oil spill response Equipment * Cyclonet Model 100 skimmer, with accessory equipment * Walosep stationary skimmer, with accessory equipment * Vikoma Seapack (1600' boom) * Expandi boom Model 4300 (1500' on reel) * Goodyear Sea Sentry Boom (12"x24"x2000') * Oil/Water separator system (90 bbl. capacity) One each Kepner 5000 gal. & 1200 gal. floating storage bags * Chemical dispersant and applicator system (5 drums Corexit 9527) One 32' boom boat/twin 175 hp OB * One 14' alum. skiff/9.8 hp OB * One 14' alum. lifeboat/9.8 hp OB * Pedestal crane-12 ton capacity * Absorbant material, hand tools, pumps, hoses, towlines, etc. E.1.3 TABLE 4 MR. CLEAN II OIL SPILL RESPONSE VESSEL (Moored at Port San Luis) Vessel * 130'x30' (supply type) USCG certified * 85'x25' clear deck space (estimated) * Navigation Aids (radar, SSB radio, VHF radio, LORAN) * Transit speed, 10-12 knots * Twin 16-V-92 diesel engines * Fuel capacity 25,000 gals., potable water capacity unknown Electrical generation capacity, 2-75 KW generators * Galley and sleeping quarters for 12 people Crew Four men during oil spill operation Two men on duty 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week * One man on 24 hour call at all times Two hour callout and underway * Clean Seas personnel will supplement crew during oil spill response Equipment Two Offshore Devices advancing skimmers and accessory equipment * One Walosep stationary skimmer and accessory equipment * Vikoma Seapack (1600' boom) Expandi boom Model 4300 (1500' on reel) * Goodyear heavy duty boom (12"x24"x1210') Oil/Water separator system (90 bbl. capacity) Four 5000 gal. Kepner floating storage bags * Chemical dispersant and applicator system (5 drums Corexit 9527) * One 32' Raider boom boat/twin 175 hp OB * One 14' alum. skiff/9.8 hp OB One 14' alum. lifeboat/9.8 hp OB * Pedestal crane-14 ton capacity * Absorbant material, hand tools, pumps, hoses, towlines, etc. E.1.4 TABLE 5 EQUIPMENT STORED IN CARPINTERIA YARD & SANTA BARBARA HARBOR Equipment Total No. CARPINTERIA YARD BOOMS Vikoma Seapack 1 - 1600' Sea Sentry (Goodyear) 1210' B-T boom 2000' SKIMMERS Floating weirs 3 Komara Mini 1 Cyclonet 050 1 Mark II (1 w/125 hp engine, 1 w/2-70 hp 2 engines OIL MOPS 400' 9" Mop & MK-II-9 machine 1 BOATS 21' skiff/OB 1 19' skiff/OB 1 14' skiff/OB 1 10' rubber raft/OB 1 VEHICLES Command Van 1 2-1/2 ton rapid response truck 1 1/2 ton pickup 2 3/4 ton personnel van 1 STORAGE BAGS & TANKS 1200 gal. bag 1 100 bbl. tanks 4 MISCELLANEOUS Pumps Hoses Sorbents 100 Drum tank trailers of corexit 9527 2 dispersant Drums of corexit 9527 55 SANTA BARBARA HARBOR Tide-Mar VII, 160'x39' 7840 bbl. storage barge 1 CSI skimmer with 5000 gal. storage bag 1 16" Kepner boom 500' E.1.5 VAN NOY MOIIO BAY SCALE 0 10 20 30 "SAN LUIS ObISPO Miles AVILA MEACH VAN No3 MI CLEAN II NJ SAL PUllSIMA tul POINT POINT L CoL SANTOTVAN SAT VAN NO 2 VAN NO S VA N0 MA CLEAN ILEM VAN Ne OUt HUENEME SAN IcJ FIGURE H -13 LOCATION OF CLEAN SEAS OIL SPILL RESPONSE VANS TABLE 6 CLEAN SEAS VAN #1* GREEN CARPINTERIA YARD 1. 16" Kepner Boom 800' 2. 8" Kepner Boom 800' 3. Sorbents Conwed: Boom 5 bxs/24' ea Sweeps 5 bxs/17"x17"/120 per Rugs 2 rolls/300' per Blankets 2 rolls/200' per 3-M Company: Boom 15 bxs/40' ea Sweeps 2 bxs/100' per Sheets 10 bxs/100' per Dow: Blankets 20 bxs/1 per Rug 2 bxs/100 per 4. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 ea 5. Oil Mops 6. 51 T Acme Skimmer w/1200 gal. bag 1 ea 7. 3" 25' suction hose w/3" valves 1 ea 8. 3" 25' discharge hose 2 ea 9. 1/2" 30' buoy lines w/buoys 4 ea 10. Hose floats 5 ea 11. Pitch forks 2 ea 12. Misc. Tools 13. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 14. Anchors 3/40 lb., 1/22 lb. 4 ea 15. Anchor lines 1/2" 200' (nylon) 4 ea 16. 200' Crown line 1/2" (poly) 4 ea 17. 5/8" wire towing bridles 1 ea 18. Chemical lights 7 ea 19. Flares 2 ea 20. Hand cleaner and rags 21. Life Jackets 4 ea *As of February 1983 E.1.7 TABLE 7 CLEAN SEAS VAN #2* BLUE AMINOIL TERMINAL/GAVIOTA 1. 16" Kepner Boom 800' 2. Sorbents Conwed: Boom 10 bxs/24' per Sweeps 5 bxs/17"x17"/120 ea 3-M Company: Sheets 10 bxs/100' per Sweeps 2 bxs/100' per Dow: Bags 1 bx/100 per Blankets 20 bxs/1 per 3. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 per 4. Chemical lights 5 ea 5. 51 T Acme Skimmer w/5000 gal. bag 1 ea 6. Skimmer Hose 2 ea 7. 25' 3" Hose 1 ea 8. 100' 1/2" and 3/4" tow line 1 ea (nylon) 9. 1000' 1/4" line (manila) 1 ea 10. Hose Floats 5 ea 11. Life Preservers 4 ea 12. Pitchforks 2 ea 13. Rake 1 ea 14. Misc. Tools 15. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 16. 30' 1/2" buoy line w/buoy 4 ea 17. Anchor line 200' 1/2" (nylon) 4 ea 18. Crown line 200' 1/2" (nylon) 4 ea 19. Anchors 3/40 lb., 1/22 lb. 4 ea 20. 3" valve 2 ea *As of February 1983 E.1.8 TABLE 8 CLEAN SEAS VAN #3* RED AVILA BEACH 1. 43" Expandi Boom 1300' 2. Mini Max Boom 1000' 3. Sorbents Conwed: Boom 5 bxs/24' per Sweeps 3 bxs/17"x17"/120 per 3-M Company: Boom 5 bxs/40' per Sheets 5 bxs/100' per Sweeps 2 bxs/100' per Dow: Bags 1 bx/100 per Blankets 20 bxs/1 per 4. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 per 5. 51 T Acme Skimmer w/1200 gal. bag 1 ea 6. 3" valves 2 ea 7. Skimmer 3" 50' hose 2 ea 8. 3" 25' discharge hose 1 ea 9. Hose floats 5 ea 10. 30' 1/2" (poly) buoy line w/buoy 4 ea 11. 100' 1/2" line (poly) 1 ea 12. 100' 3/4" tow line (nylon) 1 ea 13. Anchor line 200' 1/2" (nylon) 4 ea 14. Anchor crown line 200' 1/2" (poly) 4 ea 15. Anchors 3/40 lbs., 1/22 lb. 4 ea 16. Life jackets 4 ea 17. Pitch forks 2 ea 18. Rake 1 ea 19. Misc. tools 20. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 21. 14' aluminum boat w/OB 1 ea 22. Chemical lights 5 ea *As of February 1983 E.1.9 TABLE 9 CLEAN SEAS VAN #4* YELLOW VENTURA {FOR PT. HUENEE. & CHANNEL ISLANDS) 1. 43" Expandi Boom 3200' 2. 30" Expandi Boom - 10 Sect. 825' 3. Sorbents Conwed: Blanket 1 roll/200' per 3-M Company: Booms 20 bxs/40' per Sheets 11 bxs/100' per Sweeps 5 bxs/100' per Blanket 1 roll/150' per Dow: Blankets 20 bxs/1 per Bags 1 bx/100 per 4. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 per 5. 51 T Acme Skimmer 1 ea 6. 1200 gal. bag w/camlocks 1 ea 7. 3" valves 2 ea 8. 3" 50' discharge hose 2 ea 9. Hose floats 5 ea 10. Life jackets 4 ea 11. Pitch forks 2 ea 12. Misc. Tools 13. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 14. Anchors 4/20 lbs. 4 ea 15. 200' 1/2" anchor line (nylon) 4 ea 16. 200' 1/2" crown line (poly) 4 ea 17. 30' 1/2" buoy line w/buoys (poly) 4 ea 18. 3/4" tow line (nylon) 2 ea *As of February 1983 E. 1.10 TABLE 10 CLEAN SEAS VAN #5* BLACK SANTA BARBARA 1. Super Max Boom 1500' 2. Sorbents Conwed: Blanket 1 roll/35" 200'/1 ea Rug 1 roll/40" 300'/1 ea 3-M Company: Booms 3 bxs/40' per Sheets 3 bxs/100' per 3. 39 T Acme Skimmer 1 ea 4. 1200 gal. bag 1 ea 5. 3" 50' Skimmer hose 2 ea 6. 3" valves 2 ea 7. 30' 1/2" buoy line w/buoys (poly) 4 ea 8. 200' 1/2" anchor line (nylon) 4 ea 9. 200' 1/2" anchor crown line (poly) 4 ea 10. Anchors 4/22 lbs. 4 ea 11. 3/4" 100' tow lines (nylon) 2 ea 12. Misc. line 1/2" (nylon and poly) 13. Hose floats 5 ea 14. Pitch forks 1 ea 15. Misc. tools 16. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 17. Flares 2 ea 18. Life jackets 4 ea *As of February 1983 E.l.11 TABLE 11 CLEAN SEAS VAN #6* WHITE PT. MUGU 1. 30" Expandi Boom -34 Sect. 2805' 2. 8" Mini Max Boom 1000' 3. Sorbents 3-M Company: Boom 11 bxs/40' per Sheets 10 bxs/100' per Sweeps 2 bxs/100' per Dow: Bags 1 bx/100 per Blankets 20 bxs/1 per 4. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 per 5. Chemical lights 5 ea 6. 51 T Acme Skimmer w/1200 gal. bag 1 ea 7. 3" 25' sus. hose 1 ea 8. 25' 3" discharge hose 1 ea 9. 3" valve 2 ea 10. 30' 1/2" (poly) buoy line w/ buoys 4 ea 11. 100' 1/2" and 3/4" tow line (nylon) 1 ea 12. 1000' 1/4" Line (manila) 1 ea 13. Hose floats 5 ea 14. Life preservers 4 ea 15. Pitchfork 2 ea 16. Rake 1 ea 17. Misc. Tools 18. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 19. Anchor 4/22 lb. 4 ea 20. Anchor lines 200' 1/2" (nylon) 4 ea 21. Crown line 200' 1/2" (poly) 4 ea 22. Oil Mop (Engine) #1 1 ea 23. 400' of Mop, 9" 1 ea *As of February 1983 E. 1.12 TABLE 12 CLEAN SEAS VAN #7* BROWN MORRO BAY 1. 30" Expandi Boom - 7 Sect. 660' 2. 43" Expandi Boom - 32 Sect. 1600' 3. Sorbents 3-M Company: Booms 5 bxs/40' per Sheets 15 bxs/100' per Sweeps 5 bxs/100' per Dow: Bags 1 bx/100 per Blankets 20 bxs/1 per 4. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 per 5. Life Preservers 4 ea 6. Misc. Tools 7. Pitchforks 2 ea 8. Rakes 2 ea 9. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 10. Anchors 4/22 lb. 4 ea 11. Anchor line 200' 1/2" (nylon) 4 ea 12. Buoy lines 30' 1/2" (poly) w/buoy 4 ea 13. Tow line 100' 3/4" (nylon) 1 ea 14. 1000' 1/4" line (manila) 1 ea 15. 200' 1/2" (poly) crown lines 4 ea *As of February 1983 E.1.13 TABLE 13 CLEAN SEAS VAN #8* ORANGE PT. DUME 1. 30" Expandi Boom - 12 Sections 990' 2. 8" Kepner Boom 1200' 3. Sorbents 3-M Company: Booms 5 bales/40' per Sheets 15 bales/100' per Sweeps 5 bales/100' per Dow: Bags 1 bx/100 per Blankets 20 bxs/1 per 4. Oil Snare 1 bx/30 per 5. Life Preservers 4 ea 6. Misc. Tools 7. Pitchforks 2 ea 8. Rakes 2 ea 9. 55 gal. drums 2 ea 10. Anchors 4/22 lb. 4 ea 11. Anchor line 200' 1/2" (nylon) 4 ea 12. Crown line 200' 1/2" (poly) 4 ea 13. Tow line 100' 3/4" (nylon) 1 ea 14. 1000' 1/4" line (manila) 1 ea 15. Buoy line 30' 1/2" (poly) w/buoys 4 ea *As of February 1983 E. 1.14 605 OIL STORAGE Tide-Mar VII Barqe Description. The Tide-Mar VII is a 641-ton tank barge 160 feet long and 39 feet wide. Its ten tanks have an aggregate capacity of 7840 barrels. All of the tanks are controlled from the pump room just forward of the engine room. The Tide-Mar VII can be used in two ways -- either as a seagoing collection center for oil recovered from a variety of equipment or by towing directly behind a high-capacity skimmer such as the CS Skimmer. Deployment Instructions. 1. Load Stang portable pump onto forward deck of Tide-Mar VII. 2. Use tug to tow to site. 3. Line up valves as shown in Table 600-7 to fill desired tanks. 4. Attach filling hose at port or starboard cofferdam. Forward pipes fill the four midship tanks, and the after pipes are for filling the remaining six tanks. Tank filling is by gravity or external pumping (usually the Stang portable unit) only. 5. After recovery of oil, the Tide-Mar VII is off-loaded by using its self-contained pumps and the discharge valve arrangement shown in Table 600-8. Steel Tanks Description. CS has three types of steel oil storage tanks each of 100 barrels capacity, for a total of seven tanks. 600-63 Revised 3/84 a Oil holding tanks (4): these tanks are rectangular * Oil separation tanks (2): these tanks are cylindrical and have fittings for both oil and water * Oil vacuum tank (1) Deployment Instructions. These tanks may be used with any of CS 's oil recovery equipment and can be used from barge, work boat, truck, or on shore. Floating Storage Bags (Kepner) Description. CS uses 1200-gal and 5000-gal floating storage bags. The bags are useful for passive storage near a stationary skimmer or can be towed behind and filled directly by a moving skimmer. These bags can be used in the latter fashion with Mark II, CS , Cyclonet 050 skimmer, or the Sea Dragon. These bags should always be towed at low speed (less than 2 knots) and should never be towed into port unless absolutely necessary. Towing of these bags should always take weather and sea conditions into account to avoid possible damage to the bags. Deployment Instructions. 1. Untie the bag hold-downs. 2. Close all drain-and-vent valves on bag. 3. Connect filling hose. 4. Attach towing (or anchoring) lines. 5. Lower aft end of bag into water and proceed until entire bag is deployed. 6. Adjust towing lines to take all strain off of filling hose. 600-64 Table 600-7. VALVE ARRANGEMENTS FOR GRAVITY FILLING OF TIDE-MAR VII CARGO TANKS Stations Open:* Tank #1: STBD 56-41-47-20 Tank #1: PORT 65-45-47-20 Tank #2: STBD 56-41-47-46-4 Tank #2: PORT 65-45-41-47-4 Tank #3: STBD 54-18-13 Tank #3: PORT 63-5-12-13 Tank #4: STBD 54-18-12-61 Tank #4: PORT 63-5-61 Tank #5: STBD 54-18-17 Tank #5: PORT 63-5-12-17 Tank #6: STBD 54-18-12-60 Tank #6: PORT 63-5-60 Tank #7: STBD 56-41-47-30 Tank #7: PORT 45-47-30 Tank #8: STBD 56-41-47-46-24 Tank #8: PORT 65-45-47-46-24 Tank #9: STBD 56-41-47-27 Tank #9: PORT 65-45-47-27 Tank #10: STBD 56-41-47-46-00 Tank #10: PORT 65-45-47-46-00 *All other valves remain closed. 600-65 Table 600-8. VALVE ARRANGEMENTS FOR DISCHARGING CARGO AND BALLASTING OF TIDE-MAR VII CARGO TANKS PUMP #1 PUMP #1 Ballasting Discharging open open Tank #1 - 40-50-31-33-35-22-21-20 Tank #1 - 40-23-22-21-47-41-46 Tank #2 - 40-50-31-33-35-22-21-46-4 Tank #2 - 40-2-37-33-35-22-21-47-41-56 Tank #7 - 40-50-31-33-35-22-21-30 Tank #7 - 40-28-35-22-21-47-41-56 Tank #8 - 40-50-31-33-35-22-21-46-24 Tank #8 - 40-26-33-35-22-21-47-41-56 Tank #9 - 40-50-31-33-35-22-21-27 Tank #9 - 40-29-35-22-21-47-41-56 Tank #10 - 40-50-31-33-35-22-21-46-00 Tank #10 - 40-25-33-35-22-21-47-41-56 PUMP #2 PUMP #2 Ballasting Discharging open open Tank #1 - 34-50-31-37-2-3-46-20 Tank #1 - 34-23-35-33-37-2-3-46-47-45-65 Tank #2 - 34-50-31-37-2-3-4 Tank #2 - 34-1-2-3-46-47-45-65 Tank #7 - 34-50-31-37-2-3-46-30 Tank #7 - 34-28-33-37-2-3-46-47-45-65 Tank #8 - 34-50-31-37-2-3-24 Tank #8 - 34-26-37-2-3-46-47-45-65 Tank #9 - 34-50-31-37-2-3-46-27 Tank #9 - 34-29-33-2-3-46-47-45-65 Tank #10 - 34-50-31-37-2-3-00 Tank #10 - 34-25-37-2-3-46-47-45-65 PUMP #3 Discharging open Tank #3 - 38-14-57-16-18-54 Tank #4 - 38-11-58-57-16-18-54 Tank #5 - 38-15-57-16-18-54 Tank #6 - 38-9-58-57-16-18-54 PUMP #5 PUMP # 5 Pressure to Fire Mains Valve Positions open #50-#43 and valve on deck PUMP #6* PUMP #6 Ballasting Discharging open open Tank #1 - 38-50-49-8-36-33-35-22-21- Tank #1 - 38-23-35-32-49-8-36-37-2-3- 20 46-47-45-65 Tank #2 - 38-50-49-8-36-37-2-3-4 Tank #2 - 2-38-1-37-31-49-8-36-37-3-46- 45-65 Tank #7 - 38-50-49-8-36-37-2-3-47-30 Tank #7 - 38-28-32-49-8-36-37-2-3-46-47- 45-65 Tank #8 - 38-50-49-8-36-2-3-24 Tank #8 - 38-26-31-49-8-36-37-2-3-46-47- 45-65 Tank #9 - 38-50-49-8-36-37-2-3-27 Tank #9 - 38-29-32-49-8-36-37-2-3-46-47- 45-65 *Pump #6 will perform all functions of Pump #5 but will only be used in an emergency. 600-66 OIL SPILL RESPONSE - TRANSPORTABLE RADIO SYSTEM EXMDN CXMMUICATIONS EQUIPMENT (Stored in Hbuston/Onsite within 24 hours) Equipment: UHF PORTABLES (20 Units) OSR 1,2,3,4 UHF MOBILES(AUTO/BOAT) & 4 PORTABLES OSR 5,6 UHF BASE STATION OSR 7 UHF REPEATER WITH LOCAL AND REMOTE CONTROL OSR 8 VHF MARINE & AERONAUTICAL RADIO OSR 9 RECORDER AND SCANNER OSR 10 HIGH FREQUENCY SINGLE SIDE BAND BASE (HF-SSB) OSR 11 MOBILEFONE (BELL SYSTEM IMTS) OSR 12 TOOL KIT OSR 13 TEST EQUIPMENT, CABLES, & SPARES OSR 14, 15 LORAN C, PORTABLE NAVIGATION SYSTEM OSR 16 WEATHER STATION OSR 17 VHF PORTABLES (Co-Op & Marine) OSR 18 VHF BASE " OSR 19 OSR BALLOON & REPEATER FOR UHF OSR 20, 21 Features: * Van or Stand-alone operations Power from commercial 110 VAC or 12 volt battery system * Air Shipment - All units check as baggage and are self contained * All domestic licenses and permits enclosed for FCC Authorization * Set Up for operations : 4 Hours by Technical Personnel * Shipping Weight for equipment alone: 1000 Pounds - 21 Boxes 20 PORTABLES (OSR 1-4) 2 Mobiles & 4 Portables Repeater (OSR 8) Auto/Boat Units (OSR 5 & 6) Base Station (OSR 7) UHF S YSTEN Exxon & Others - Petroleum Users 454 / 459 MHZ 5 PORTABLES (OSR 18) Base or Mobile Station (OSR 19) V HF S YSTE PO, NT TO P OI N T S SYSTE HIGH FREQUENCY RADIO (OSR 11) m BILE FONE (OSR 12) SPECIAL ON SCENE Co-Op Operations CO' ANDERS SOSNE Marine Channels 6 A 16 - . Exxon A Others VHF MARINE BASE AIRCRAFT BASE OSR 9) WEATHER STATION OSR 17) LORAN C OSR 16) SCANNER & RECORDER OSR 10) BALLOON i REPETER OSR 20 21) MISC. EQUIPMENT W/ VAN, Fixed Antennas Tools, Test Equipment, Cables etc. FUNCTIONAL LAYOUT EXXON OSR COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM 12/82 0~~~~ COMMAND VAN COMMUNI C ATINS H PORTALES I UHF BASE or 2 UHF REPEATER MOBILES EXXON OFFI CES: HIGH FREQUENCY |EXXON TANKERS| iRADIO HOUSTON | LONG BEACH BAYTOWN RFtI CyCTrm I ATT I MOBILE/ BATON ROUGE INTS SYSTES (VHF).1 FONE COLLINS RADIO KHT TS SYSTES (VHF) I FON LQJL-RFCn U IKEY TELEPHONE DIRECT R/T I PRIVATE I I VHF MARIE I SMALL OATS EARTH STATION TANKERS AERONAUTICAL I I AIRCRAFT I VHF PERAT 5 PORTABLES I VHF OPERATINI I L Co-p " Ic I LOG SCANNER I & RECORDER I POINTS OF COHMUNICATION- OSR VAN SYSTEM 12/82 BOOM DEPLOYMENT METHOD DRILLING VESSEL OR PLATFORM 0 000 t REE~'-"- CURRENT ONBOARD BOOM BOAT OIL CREW BOAT CONTAINING A CONTINUING SPILL AT A DRILLING VESSEL (SEMISUBMERSIBLE OR PLATFORM) DRILLING VESSEL OR PLATFORM BOAT SKIMMER SPILL DEDICATED BOOM RESPONSE BOAT CONTAINMENT: OPEN WATER STANDBY BOOM BOAT DEDICATED RESPONSE BOAT SURFACE CURRENT OR WIND [ NYLON " LINE REEL BOOM SKIMMER / PUMP STORAGE BAG CLEANUP OF CONTAINED OIL SPILL BOOM BOAT PUMP & OIL/WATER e - STORAGE RESPONSE VESSEL 0 STA 143NA (OSRV) * * ~TIED-O �I� � * * 0 CONTAINMENT: FUEL OIL. TRANSFER rK71 DRILLING VESSEL K<cQa~ K| ~ SH1--~~JJTIED-OFF <: suPPLY SHIP] SPILL a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~" - . . ..,__ � .-., / DEDICATED REEL RESPONSEO BOAT BOOM DRILLING SHIP OR PROCESSING VESSEL CONTAINMENT SKIMMER -PUMP STORAGE BAG DRILLING VESSEL OR PROCESSING SHIP */* g 0 is~ g 0 0 SKIMMING UNCONTAINED SPILL WITH ADVANCING TYPE SKIMMER SLICK DRIFT - ~=.~. 4,--~ ~ SKIM AC.ROSS SLICK STORAGE TANKS CO-OP OIL SPILL RESPONSE VESSEL (OSRV) ADVANCING SKIMMER DEPLOYED t~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~zT gmm ~ ~ 1 f~ EPA SCHEDULE 408. ANNEX X - REQUIRED DATA TO USE DISPERSANM (National Oil Spill Contingency Plan) 408 SC1HED2l at CRIMICALS TO RDMOV2 OIL AMl 2AZARDO=3 SUIS'TANCI 4os.i %he use of chemical agents for oil spill removal Is discouraged Is preference to mechanical Stang. The use of chemicals may be applicable undot cetroai circuastances, as outlined is Anex X oel the Xational Oil SpilI contingency Plan. *Iasically chemicals say be used anytime, anywhere at the discretion of the OSC to reduce the immediate haxards to life and property due to explosion and fire. Other situations will be evaluated by the senior EPA reproesntative on scene on a case-by -case basis, is consultation with other appropriate Stata/Yederal representative*. A ist of acceptable removal agents is foiand in Anane I of this Plane 408.2 The method of evaluastio fot use of dispersant oan oil spill Is based on compilation of data to provide the soft accurate picture of the situation on-scene. To fcislitate the decision process, a dispersant is* form ass developed by a committee of 13? members fot use by the ?ederal on-scene coordinator. TU B form requires inforation that mst be provided prior to the IRT rendering a decision. C1O-1 DISUNANT USS YORK 0MOILTATTO OF DATA $~ PMi date as lefemtasaese ino re, p19dt. cellisies, Ott.) G. lCattem of spill (Latitudes Laugitudep rivet al1@* ett.) d o Iasteon of area to be spirayed MAd else So Volume of siabe~tance released J. Total potential of releases so Typ.IO release (inestataueous, Gottuuommeo Itsermittes: Pta.) h. Ia the #"rce expected to C311me to discloe~e 2.characteristics of the released masbtea"Cuco$ NOC@ C at SpecificB gravity$ be, viscosity go Pont Polat d. Solubility Go volati lisp - (Flash point) fe Sulphur coatent (seat trade, tet) go Suscep~tibility to mousse formation of to nature dispersien Ike 28latIve ?.sIGIST (luZbs meduium, lw) 3. weatheg sad wats Codtulereas (iAclude information few approxmasted tim of treatment) (NOWh so Air tempsratures vied aspeed, and directleal b. TIde and Carrost Information (direction, velocity, range, seige) s. Wave height and frequenicy do Water depth and depth of aiz=d lav. 900-2 982TI Esterme Si latlos (Fresh water 6irculaties) 4.9 2v Tajectery Isformatios (DMA) 2valuatiom of Probable rate of Oils uat, winl be the late of tire o1il Ist oas to dame? a. 68-bou surface all trajectory forecasts 1. Surf ace area, of slick 2. Expected areas of laid fall b.45-bour dispe rued .I1 trajectory ferecant: 1.Oil movement is water coim 2. surface oil movemeut mad expected lead tall 3. Characteristics of available diepersants and application equipment. a. characteristics of the diepersants: CUICG, GSC) product One Product 1.. Product Three 1. -t 2. manufacturer 3. whom ava~lable 4.location~s) 3. aeount available ~.type of containers 7.characteristics (a) toxicity ()reactions (a) applicability to spilled Ott (4) othe&- 6. application %etheds 900-3 be Type of tramsportati.. arA dispersion eutpelvmts ft"Say fte hapay we ampany Thrs 3. ime to &move 4. equipment sysilable 4. Zaf~mtio about jaygjlable ispeuOSant and disperstiq equipment. s. lam of the proposed dieperssat em Its acceptance lists (USCO9 DIF) bo Type (self-mixv comcentrates, eta) go proposed application methods and rates do Ifficlemcy Under existing Conditiens Et dispersed mgd voluu dispersed) a. Schedule of dispersing operattom t. tocation of the arsea to be treated so Surface area of Cho slicy vbichk gas be treatud is the scheduled 10, 7. Conventional Methods and tCmeo consideateions for containment and Cleanup feasible and svailable. (USCO) COIC) Oispersant treated spill Untreated *oill a. Contairmset at %he source b. Shoreline pretectiem strategies 4. Shoreline cleanup strategies 4. TIMe necessary to execute response 900-4 *. abitats and resources at risks (zesource Asencis) !iiyerseat treated suil untreated selil awrbselime habitat type NAn ame of immact b. Resources 1. endansered/threatened sepcies 2. 'aortas mammals (pspping$ vingrattom) 3. vaterfovi use (uueting, migratisa) 4. shellfish (spawning,9 harvestivg) 5., finf lab (spawning, release migration, harvest) 6* commeerical ase (aquaculture. water intakes. atc) 7. public use areas (parks, martnas.etc) Be other resources of special significance *indicates seasonal considerations 9. Sconomic Cousiderationa a. Cost of the dispersant operation b. Cost of conventional containment and protection 1. with dispiersant use 2. withot dispersant ase co Cost of shoreline cleanup (cost per barrel x nueber of barrels reaching shoreline) la with dispersmnt use 2. ~~~without dispereantus 900-5 lo 0. 6acme8datidooto this in a. b set age dieperseast beeIs dispersasta vS a trial best$, but see as a central or cleanup *. Kispese Is limited Of selected areas 4. gispgese to the maximum extent possible With accepted methods and Savilable equipment 11. 131 Evsluation of the consequences of a dispersent ApPlicatiot decision. so Viii epplicatien of dispersant remove a significant amount of the slIck from surf ace water? b. Can the extent of locationm of shaorline Impacts be altered Isa positive masner? as Cat the damage to endangered or, threatened species. menuse Samalso sad waterfowl be Lessened? d. will the damage to habitats and resources resulting from chemical dispersion be loes than those resulting without chemiceal dispersion? e. If recreational, economic and aesthetic considerations are a higher priority then natural resource consideratiom. what to the most effective isea"eo their ProtectIw 900-6 Dtspireast cbeckatat view ftar Still Date (2-1) Cberacteristles o the Oil (9-1) characterismtlic f Available ether/ae Condition*(53 blepermautij (3-S) COIC) ISC) letbod of Dispersaut all T etory Informaetio (11-4) conventional lamposse tabitat and Resouiess at ftonodel Consideration. (149) COS) awalubtiea of Consequences CC) 900-7 The folleviss etepe �bm~Id be McIII26 la deciding It the ago Of 416POT843to .111 be nqueatled 30T3:Zind ftwe u at to Ife sAM preperty pro-tat the fellevu t, the CIsthe us ef alaperatseils mutb. @113 NOViv 065ROVICI O aml CRITICAL ARl" IS MUTSCAZ. CONTROL. AMD Is AcTIow REQuRD A&COVER! FKASIRLS TN.. Oa DE3112S 43 twLDm1uoua "OR anmxas 40 PARTIIALLT CONTINUE A OIL TYPE A"D CONDITION aE ACTIONS CUMICALLT DISP ZSE OPESATION POSSIML US TRWA Oxazois VILL UVACTS ASISOCAT2D CHM3ICAL DISPIRSION SS LESS TKtAX THOU RESULTING WITHOUT CHEMICAL DISPESION REQUEST APPROVAL TO WILL VULNERASLI&RSOURCES USX OF DISMESANTS Y.... U OR MAITATS is ADV9SILY USING0 ATTAC2ID PROCEDUR Z)ACTZD WI THOUT DIAPIRSAIFTS TWAV? ONSEORE PREPLAING FOR CHEMICAL DISPERSANT USE The scope of dispersant preplanning use is to provide the On-Scene- Commander (OSC) with as much available information as required by Annex X of the National Oil Spill Contingency Plan as can be fur- nished before an actual spill incident. Available preplanning data that is required and can be furnished to the OSC are: characteris- tics of the spilled oil and the dispersant to be used, the availa- bility of dispersants, method of dispersant application, spill trajectory analyses from average monthly data, risk analyses, and location of biological sensitive areas that may be impacted by the spill. Also, locations of fixed facilities can be furnished in advance. Other data required by the OSC can only be furnished after the spill occurrence, and they are: the time of the spill, the weather and sea conditions, the volume of oil spilled, effectiveness of mechanical control, threatened life or property, economic consid- erations and the evaluation of the consequences. The information required for preplanned dispersant use is included in this plan on the following pages: * Characteristics of the dispersant to be used, page 900-22. Availability of the preplanned dispersant, page 900-21. Spreading characteristic of Monterey crude, pages 900-25 & 26. * Dispersant application, Method and Tables, pages 900-27-37. * Trajectory Modeling, Section 11. * Risk Analyses, Section 10. * Biological sensitive areas, Section 6. * Postulated spill volumes, time, radius, and size of areas of specific regimes for Monterey crude, page 900-26. 900-9 GUIDE FOR REQUEST TO USE DISPERSANT ON OIL SPILL Contact and furnish information to: OSC (USCG - 213/590-2315) 1. Spill Data: a. Cause of Spill b. Time of occurrence Date c. Geographic Location: Lat. Long. d. Location of slick and area size (acres, sq. mi., etc.), direction moving: Approx. Center: Lat. Long. Area: Direction: e. Volume of oil released: Bbl Gal f. Type of oil released: Crude Name g. Release: Instantaneous Continuous Intermittant h. Will source continue to discharge? Yes No i. If continuous, estimate time: Mos. Weeks Hrs. _ 2. Characteristics of Released Substance: a. Specific Gravity (API): b. Viscosity: c. Pour Point: d. Solubility: e. Volatility f. Sulfur Content: (Flash Point) ppm g. Susceptible Natural Dispersion to Mousse h. Relative Toxicity: High Medium Low 900'10 3. Characteristics of Available Dispersant: a. Name: COREXIT-9527 b. Manufacturer: Exxon Chemical c. Toxicity: Low Dosage Rate: Gal/Ac. 2-5, D/O 1:30 d. Effectiveness: Good Applicable to Spilled Oil: Good (Self-mixing concentrate or diluted) e. Amount available locally: 21,780 Gal. Within 24 hrs: 55,000 Gal. (Continuous supply within one week) f. Application Methods:Weather & sea permitting by boat, by aircraft if weather & sea excess or very large spill g. Aircraft Available: Globe Air/DC-4, 4 hours, boats im- mediate. Additional Aircraft: Local helicopters adapt- ed with bucket & spray booms from Clean Seas/2 to 4 hrs 4. Weather and Sea Conditions/Current and Forecasts: a. Air Temperature: OF Wind Speed __ mph/knts Wind direction from: b. Sea Condition: Temp. 0F Wave Height: ft. Frequency: min. Water Depth: ft. Current Speed: knots Direction: c. Tidal Information: High Low Stage: Flood Ebb Slack . (Information required at time of spill and corrected to time of dispersant use, if approval received.). 900-11 5. Characteristics of Shoreline of Potential Impact a. General Descriptions Rocky Sandy Beach Bluffs - or cliffs . s b. Biological Sensitivity Marine mammals baulout rookeries endangered species Birdss EnOdngered species nesting area Shellfish: Spawnins' bharvesting Finfish: Spawning migration -'irvest c. Other Resources: Public use commercial use parks marinas d. Accessibility for cleanup: Roads private prop. use heavy equipment hand work onoy a To obtain the shoreline information, locate potential shoreline impact area from shoreline maps in Section C. Review the descriptions in Section C of this Addendum and contact the California Department of Fish & Game if additional wildlife and fish information is required, (213) 590-5163 or (805) 772-1261. 6. Trajectory Information, Potential Shoreline Impact a. Use trajectory models in Section B for month of spill occurrence. if conditions apply, use model. If con-_ ditions are different, trajectories will have to be cal- culated. Use vector addition analysis as outlined in Section B. Weather permitting, use aircraft for sur- veillance. b. Surface area of slick, 48 hours: use Tables F-9-1 & 2 for projection if spill is Monterey or Sandstone or sim- ilar gravity crude. Weather permitting, observe from aircraft. 1. Use response guides for containment and cleanup as outlined in Section D. Advise Co-op to mobilize equipment. 2. Weather permitting, observe oil movement in water column from boat. 7. Identify and Advise OSC of Potential Threat to Marine Life, Waterfowl and Public and Commercial Use Areas 8. Review Economic and Social Considerations With and Without Dispersant a. Furnish conclusion of review to OSC. 9. OSC Will Evaluate Consequences 900-12 DISPERSION AIDED BY CHEMICAL DISPERSANT Oil on the ocean surface is naturally broken up by the motion of waves. This process (called dispersion) is rather slow, and a slick can travel long distan- ces before breakup is complete. The pieces formed during natural dispersion are usually rather large masses and are commonly composed of a water-in-oil emulsion, and often assume the form of a "tar ball" mousse. COREXIT chemical dispersants aid this natural process by reducing the oil/water interfacial tension, thereby making it easier for the sea to break up the oil slick. Very small oil droplets are formed, and complete dispersion is possible in a matter of minutes. In other words, chemical dispersants function to aid the environment to do what will eventually occur without treatment, but to do it much faster. The emphasis, however, is on the use of chemicals to aid the environment, which means using the least amount of chemicals needed to initiate the dispersion pro- cess. Overtreatment may result in the oil becoming invisible faster, but it is better to use less chemical and allow the sea time to finish the dispersion pro- cess. Dispersant formulations contain surface-active agents (surfactants). Each sur- factant molecule has a water-soluble and an oil-soluble end. After contacting an oil slick on water, these molecules diffuse through the oil to the oil/water in- terface under the slick. This is why dispersant chemicals must be applied di- rectly to the oil slick. Application to the water around the slick will have no effect and is thus misusing and wasting the chemical. Dispersants are best applied in droplets rather than a fine spray. The droplets aid in rapid penetration of the oil by the active surfactants, which are only ef- fective when properly oriented at the oil/water interface. The oil droplets are prevented from recoalescing because they are repelled by the surrounding water- soluble ends of the surfactant. The normal motion of the sea (wind and waves) or a workboat's wake usually provides adequate action for the rapid movement of oil droplets with attached dispersant molecules away from the slick. The droplets rapidly become diluted in the water as they leave the spill site. As the molecules of oil/dispersant spreads, it does not have a tendency to sink and generally remain at or very near the water's surface. These molecules will not adhere to birds, boats, or shorelines. In the dispersed form, the spilled oil increases to a much larger surface area. Therefore, the rates of solution, evaporation, oxidation and biodegradation are greatly increased. 900-13 Since most dispersant use is on water with reasonable wave action, requirement for external "mixing energy" input should be minimal. Dispersants are not generally used on spills on calm water; if they are, mechanical mixing or agitating equipment may be necessary. Excessive mixing, however, may lead to a need for an increased amount of chemical. There are three basic types of dispersant formulations. These are water-based products, hydrocarbon-solvent-based products and concentrates having a minimum of dlluent. They differ in activity in terms of the ease with which dispersed droplets are formed. Water-based products may require more time or more energy input to effect complete dispersion. Solvent-based products, which are used primarily to disperse waxy or heavy oils, cause dispersion to occur somewhat more easily, but require much higher dosages. Concentrates, especially the self-mix type, break the oil into extremely fine droplets and require minimal energy input. All of these actions are to some extent dependent on the oil treated, the method of application used and the result desired. It is important to know the nature of the dispersant formulation because it determines, at least in part, the application procedures required and the amount of product necessary. The most active of the COREXIT oil dispersants - COREXIT 9527 Dispersant Concentrate - should be stocked if circumstances prevent a full range of products from being stocked. Since it is essenti- ally a self-energizing dispersant, COREXIT 9527 requires little or no additional mixing energy when applied to oil in salt water. Because of this high degree of activity and the fact that much less of it is generally required to treat all types of spills, storage requirements and material costs are minimized with COREXIT 9527. Although COREXIT 9527 is a concentrate, it may be diluted to 10 to 15% in fresh water or a low toxicity solvent such as kerosene or other aliphatic solvents, depending on the application method. If applied by hand sprayer or a boat with spraying booms, it is normal- ly diluted. If applied by aerial spray, COREXIT 9527 should be applied in full strength. 900-14 FATE AND EFFECT OF CHEMICALLY TREATED OIL Although mechanical containment and cleanup are the preferred method of oil spill control, chemical dispersants can be invaluable to reduce the immediate hazard to life, property and to lessen the amount of damage to the environment. Several years ago, dispersants on the commercial market were only moderately effective and were relatively toxic. Their low effec- tiveness meant they had to be applied by surface vessels which provided additional mixing energy to the oil/dispersant layer on the water by the use of mixing devices such as breaker boards. Within the last few years, chemical manufacturers have developed more powerful, less toxic products which are sufficiently effective for many oil spills that only the mixing provided by natural ocean turbulence is required for dispersion to occur. This has allowed the chemicals to be applied via aircraft resulting in the potential for more rapid treatment of larger oil slicks than was possible with the use of surface application methods. The state-of-the-art has developed so that this technique is now considered an important option for dealing with large marine oil spills. In fact, dispers- ants were used extensively in this fashion to treat the world's largest oil spill, the Ixtoc I blowout in the Gulf of Mexico (Lind- blom et.al., 1981). In June 1979, the Pemex IXTOC blowout in the Bay of Campeche released 30,000 barrels of oil per day. The Mexican government contracted a four-engine aircraft from Conair Corporation and sprayed over one million gallons of COREXIT 9527 along the landward edge of the slick. The COREXIT 9527 was applied to the oil slick during a six month period and was credited with preventing oil contamination of Mexican beaches. In addition to visual evidence of the dispersants' effectiveness on fresh crude, in September 1979, a field test was conducted on weathered oil from the IXTOC blowout. COREXIT 9527 effectively dispersed the weathered oil into the top 10 feet of water. Preliminary findings in scientific tests conducted by Mexican authorities, indicated little or no short term measurable impact on the marine life in the area surveyed. Studies are still being conducted to determine if there are any observable long term impacts. 900-15 (continued) GOVERNMENT/INDUSTRY CHEVICAL DISPERSION TEST In order to determine the dilution rate of chemically dispersed oil at sea, two ocean dumping permits were obtained in the U.S. by the API. These research spills, funded by both government and industry, were meant to quantify the fate and effects of using dispersants in the real world. The program consisted of research spills which were conducted off Southern California and off New Jersey during 1978 and 1979. Both employed COREXIT 9527. Extensive and valuable data were obtained from both spills, which will be an aid to defining the role that dispersants could play. The tests conducted in 1978 and 1979 off Southern California showed the importance of proper application technique. In 1978 the aerial application produced too fine a spray and the delivery of the chemical to the research oil spill was limited. However, some level of dispersion did occur and indicated that most of the dispersed oil stayed in the upper meter of the water column and oil concentration levels were under 10 ppm. In 1979 the aerial application was improved with larger droplets delivered to the oil slick resulting in a greater degree of dispersal. Biological samples indicated no significant mortalities in plankton or fish. Tests off New Jersey in November 1978 resulted in a complete disper- sion of the research spill and oil movement in the water column down to 9 meters was monitored for 2-1/2 hours after the spill. After that time, the entire zone had returned to background oil levels. These results were duplicated in a repeat series of tests in October 1979. 90D-16 RESULTS OF TEST CONDUCTED ON MONTEREY CRUDE WITH COREXIT 9527 In June of 1980, Dr. G.P. Lindblom of Exxon 9hemical Company con- ducted laboratory tests on Monterey crude, 16 API gravity from the South Ellwood Field. This crude is very similar to the Monterey crude produced from our Hondo field. The results of his laboratory tests showed that COREXIT 9527 concentrate was very active in reduc- ing oil/water interfacial tension of Monterey crude when natural or mechanical energy is applied. The laboratory tests showed that dis- persant chemicals themselves do not disperse oil; rather, they re- duce the strength of the oil film so that it becomes easily disper- sible when the movement of the water causes the dispersion of oil droplets from the treated slick. He hypothesized that the disper- sion rate would be even faster on an oil slick in an active sea. Several dispersants to oil ratios (D/O) were tested with seawater at 58�F and 780F. Ratios of 1:25 and 1:30 D/O effectively dispersed the Monterey crude at 58 OF. The tests showed that a ratio of 1:40 was the minimum D/O that was effective on Monterey crude at 58�F, which is about the average water temperature in the Santa Barbara Channel. Dr. Lindblom concluded that the sample oil probably represents a "worst case" API gravity for this area of California oil and COREXIT 9527 concentrate is certainly the best available choice for a single stockpiled dispersant. The full text of this laboratory report is included as an appendix to this section. 900-17 EFFECTS OF OIL ON MARINE LIFE Oil, even in very thin slicks, is known to be harmful to birds, so the advantages of protecting them through the use of dispersants are clear. The effects of chemically dispersed oil on water column dwellers are less clear, but a picture of the effects of their use in deep, offshore waters is emerging from the research during recent years. The latest generation of dispersants are relatively non- toxic themselves, so the effects on water-column dwellers are due primarily to the dissolved and particulate oil (Mackay and Wells, 1981; Sprague et.al., 1981; Trudel, 1978). When dispersants are applied, the resultant concentration of oil in the water column is initially high (in the parts per million range) but these concentra- tions decrease quickly to low levels (in the parts per billion range), so that sub-lethal effects rapidly become the main biologi- cal concern. The following three studies are pertinent because, prior to them, scientists had speculated publicly that oil could have serious detrimental effects on marine life. Since dispersants would make the oil more available to marine life, it was thought that dispers- ants would increase any damage that might be caused by oil, which was alleged to be a highly toxic substance. Following are summaries of the three studies. "Laboratory Studies on the Clinical Effects of Oil on Marine Organisms" by Dr. J. W. Anderson indicated that hydrocarbon uptake in tissue (from oil-water dispersion) was readily depura- ted from clams and oysters when the animals were returned to clean water. Although naphthalenes (possibly responsible for a major portion of the toxicity of refined oils) were most readily taken up by the test specimens, they released this compound to the levels in comparable control animals after approcimately ten days. Several important observations emanating from a "Survey of Substantial Effects of Chronic Exposure to Oil" by Dr. Dale Straughan are: - At Coal Oil Point (California) the total extractable hydrocar- bon in sediment from the natural seep area is as high as 90,000 ppm; this compares to a "background" level of 11 to 92 ppm at control sites. Despite this high sediment hydrocarbon content, the maximum water column hydrocarbon content is a remarkably low 0.5 ppm. - Petroleum hydrocarbons found in either the abalone or lobster were in either the viscera or gonads. No effect on the life cycle was found. No petroleum hydrocarbons were found in the muscle tissue - the edible part of the species - in either the abalone or lobster. 900-19 -Marine life, such as sea urchins, were observed to be liv- ing at Coal Oil. Point in close proximity to actual points of oil seepage with no apparent stress. Of most signifi- cance was the fact that no abnormalities in marine life could be found at Coal Oil Point. *A Battelle Northwest Laboratories project, "Effects of Oil Dis- charges on the Fisheries of Lake Maracaibo" was sponsored by Creole. Samples of commercially important fish were examined for hydrocarbon content to determine if petroleum hydrocarbons were accumulated in the tissues of Lake Maracaibo fish. The data show that there is little evidence of petroleum hydrocar- bon accumulation and that the saturated hydrocarbons found in the test specimens are similar to those compounds naturally occurring in plants. No naphthalenes,, indicators of oil con- tamination, were found in any of the samples analyzed. 900-20 CHEMICAL DISPERSANT CHARACTERISTICS "COREXIT 9527"/Manufactured by Exxon Chemical Americas * Low Toxicity * Self-mixing, concentrated product (non-solvent base) * Very efficient dispersion of oil in salt water * May be used full strength or diluted * Recommended dosage - 2 to 5 gal/acre * May be applied by hand spray unit or boats and aircraft with application equipment * Availability of Corexit 9527 to Exxon, Western Division - Local, Clean Seas 2-100 drum tank trailers, 55 drums stored in their Carpinteria yard, also 5 drums each on Mr. Clean and Mr. Clean II. Exxon has 2 drums on each OCS facility (6 drums). Clean Coastal Waters has 100 drums stored in the Long Beach Harbor area. Exxon Chemical stocks 25 drums in the Los Angeles Harbor area and can provide 1000 drums within 24 hours from Texas. Exxon Chemical can also provide over 600 drums per week if required. Toxicity (Laboratory testing results, Dr. G. P. Lindblom/Exxon Chem.) * Zebra fish 48 hours LC 50 550 ppm * Fathead minnows 48 hours LC 50 320 ppm * Mummichog (Fandulas) 48 hours LC 50 116 ppm * Brine shrimp (Artemia) 48 hours LC 50 130 ppm * Brown shrimp (crangon crangon) passes MAFF test, U.K. (Actual amount (ppm) in water for 5-10 gpa dosage is far below any value given.) EPA Accepted Corexit 9527 satisfies the requirements as prescribed for dispersing agents in 2003.3-4, Annex X. 900-21 CHARACTERISTICS OF COREXIT 9527- Specific Gravity, @ 600F/15.60C 1.01 Density, Lb/Gal @ 600F/15.60C 8.43 Flash Point, SETA CC, �F/�C 175/79.4 Pour Point, 0F/�C -321/-35 Viscosities cSt @ 600F/15.60C 67 cSt 8 1000F/37.70C 25 cSt a 1500F/65.6�C 10 SUS @ 1000F/37.70C 118 Solubility Soluble in fresh water and in hydrocarbon solvents. Dispersible in salt water. 900-22 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 : (" %.::...�. ! 0 MNAR 1979 MIr. Gordon P. Lindblom OFItCEOD WhtR AND Exxon Chemical Company HAZARDOUS MATZRIALS 8230 Stedman Street .-=:: - Houston, Texas 77029 --. Dear Mr. Lindblom: .;; -.1-1-.;;..- You are hereby notified that the technical product data submission on "COREXIT 9527" oil dispersant has been accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The furnished product data were reviewed and satisfy the requirements for dispersing agent testing as prescribed in Paragraph 2003. 3-4 of Annex X of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. In accordance with Annex X, . the technical product data will be maintained on file by the Oil and Special Materials Control Division, and the on-scene coordinator can authorize use of the dispersing agent for spills of oil and hazardous substances on a case-by-case basis. Acceptance of technical product data by the Environmental Protection Agency does not constitute approval of the dispersing agent or imply compliance with any criteria or minimum standards for such agents.. As stated in Paragraph 2003. 1, Authorization for use of dispersing agents, these agents may be used only when their use will: (1) prevent or substantially reduce hazard to human life or limb or substantially reduce explosion or fire hazard to property, (2) prevent or reduce substantial hazard to vulnerable species of waterfowl, and (3) result in the least overall environmental damage, or interference with designated water uses. To avoid any possible misinterpretation or misrepresentation, this letter of acceptance may be reproduced bnly in its entirety in any advertisement or technical literature on the dispersing agent. Failure to comply with restrictions in Annex X or an improper reference to EPA in an attempt to demonstrate approval of the dispersing agent will constitute grounds for withdrawal of the letter of acceptance. Any change in the composition or formulation of the dispersing agent, affecting data submitted under Paragraph 2003. 374, will require retesting of such agent before acceptance is reissued. Sincerely yours, Kenneth E. Bigl an:: Director, Oil and Special Materials Control Division (WEH-548) ,N 900-24 $SPRADIN R1INES OF NTEREY CRUDE The following spreading regime tables are for preplanning purposes in the event of a spill. They are for field use and for the potential use of dispersant. The volumes spilled are selected to use a an estimating guide for a spill of similar quantity. The tables will provide the field with a graphic source to estimate the time, spread radius and area in acres. These values can be used to estimate the amount of spill bown required to contain a similar size spill, and how much elapsed tine would be available to contain it with a given amount of boom. If the slick could not be contained by mechanical means, then the volume and/or area of the slick could be used to determine the type of application (boat or aircraft) and the amount of dispersant required. Section F.10 on application techniques and dosage rate tables requires the volume or area of spilled oil in acres to calculate the gllons of dispersant required. Therefore, these tables will be useful tools in making that decision. For exam- ple, the recommended dosage ratio for Monterey crude is 1:30 with 1:40 being the mininum dosage rate. That is, one part dispersant to 30 parts of oil to effect- ively disperse the oil. At a ratio of 1:40 in the laboratory tests, the oil started to show resuspension before five minutes. 900-25 SPREADING REGIMES FOR MONTEREY CRUDE VOLUME FIRST PHASE SECOND PHASE FINAL PHASE Elap. Radius Area Elap. Radius Area Elap. Radius Area Barrels Time Feet Acres Time Feet Acres Time Feet Acres 10 0:05 70 0.3 0:08 75 0.4 1;:48 690 34 25 0:07 t00 0.7 0:14 110 0.9 2:52 950 65 50 0:09 135 1.3 0:23 150 2.0 4:03 1280 118 100 0:12 180 2.0 0:36 215 3.0 6:44 1640 194 200 0:14 240 4.0 0:57 300 7.0 8:07 2135 328 500 0:20 350 9.0 1:45 480 16.0 12:50 3020 657 1000 0:25 470 16.0 2:47 675 33.0 18;08 3935 1117 5000 0:42 920 60.0 8:09 1510 165.0 40:34 7220 3760 10000 0:53 1230 110.0 12:56 2140 330.0 57:22 9185 6085 Spreading regimes calculated by Fay/Hann formula. First Phase - Gravity Inertia/Gravity Viscous Transition Second Phase - Gravity Viscous/Surface Tension - Viscous Transition Final Phase - Spreading Ceases Note: Numbers rounded off for ease of use. Natural dispersion not included, this would reduce areas 25-305 in approxi- mately 2 hours. * 16� API Gravity is assumed for this table. DISPERSANT APPLICATION TECHNIQUES COPXIT 9527 can be used with all types of application equipment and may be im- mediately adapted to meet local requirements in dispersing oil slicks. It is effective on a wide range of petroleum products, including viscous crudes and fuel oils. Depending on the type of oil, one part of COREXIT 9527 will usually treat 30 to 69 parts of oil. With particularly efficient application procedures, as much as 100 parts of oil have been treated. As with any dispersant, COREXIT 9527 should be-applied to the floating oil, not to the water around it. Best results are always obtained with dispersants if treatment is begun early. In addition to selection of the most effective dispersant, the successful dis- persion of an oil slick requires the availability and use of proper equipment and carefully planned application procedures. COREXIT 9527 Oil Dispersant Concentrate is usually diluted before or during use, although it nay be used as supplied under certain circumstances, such as in aer- ial spraying. If equipment for dilution during use is not available, pre-use di- lution may be required. The product is soluble in both fresh water and hydrocarbon solvents. It is not ccnpletely soluble in salt water. (This desirable property enhances its action as an oil dispersant at sea.) If salt-water dilutions are made long before use, active ingredients may concentrate near the bottom of the container, and agita- tion will be required during use. This does not occur during the eduction of the chemical into seawater. Dilutions containing one part of the concentrate to as much as 10 to 20 parts of water are equal to or superior in effectiveness to conventional dispersant for- mulations. More concentrated solutions may be necessary for very heavy slicks. If the oil to be treated is extremely viscous, a hydrocarbon solvent-based dis- persant may be required for treatment. In such a case, COREXIT 9527 should be diluted in kerosene or other aliphatic solvents. A solvent exhibiting a low order of toxicity is always preferred. A highly effective hydrocarbon-based dispersant dispersant is formed with dilutions of I part of OORFXIT 9527 to 5 parts or more of solvent. Hydrocarbon-based formulations made from COREXIT 9527 offer super- ior oil dispersing qualities. When these diluted formulations are applied to an oil slick, dispersion occurs rapidly with a minimum of mixing. HAND-HELD EQUIPMENT Small spills can often be treated by spraying COREXIT 9527 from hand-held in- secticide-type pressure cans or from backpack sprayers. In this use, a dilution or COREXIT 9527 of about 10 to 15% in fresh water will usually suffice. 900-27 OOREXIT 9527 is particularly adaptable to use with workboats equipped with spray boom mounted ahead of the bow Yake or as far forward as possible. The concen- trated nature of the chemical enables a boat to increase the amount of time it is able to spray by 10 to 30 times over the work period possible if conventional dispersants were being used. Spray equipment on workboats must be designed to provide a diluted dispersant solution to the spray booms. This is best accomplished by use of an eductor with a metering adjustment to feed chemical into the seamer stream produced by a pump operating at about 80 to 100 psi, with a total capacity of about 100 to 150 gpmn. Alternatively, with low-volume, low-pressure pumps (with which educ- tion is not possible), the chemical can be fed to the water stream with a small metering pump. The concentration of chemical required must be calculated from: the total pump capacity; the swath width covered by the booms employed; the speed of the boat; and (possibly) the thickness of the slick or the amount of oil to be" treated over a given area. Excellent results have been obtained with use of concentra- tions from 2 to 10% of the total water volume being ptmped. For instance, a 2% eduction rate at 4 knots using high-pressure equipment may be quite adequate. With a low-volume pump, a 10% eduction rate may be required at the same boat speed. A treatment rate of about 5 U.S. gallons (USG) per acre is recommended for slicks of average thickness. Unless land areas are immediately threatened, neither agitation nor chemical con- centration should necessarily be increased simply to cause rapid disappearance of the oil. Nozzles for spray booms should be carefully selected to give a uniform spray of droplets - not a fog or mist. This is necessary to aid in rapid penetration of the oil by the active surfactants, which are only effective when properly ori- ented at the oil/water interface. The spray pattern should be flat, striking the water in a line perpendicular to the direction of the boat's travel. The nozzle's spray angle should be such that the fan-shaped sprays from adjacent nozzles over- lap just above the water. No special mechanical mixing devices are necessary. The normal motion of the sea and the wake of the workboat are adequate. COREXIT 9527 may also be applied by eduction into a fixed fore-hose system on board a tug or workboat. The dose should be carefully regulated, since most fire system have very large capacities. Mos6t often a seawater bleed should be in- serted before the point of chemical entry. Also, it is important to attempt to maximize coverage be directing the hose stream at about 45 degrees upward. Di- rect high-pressure hosing will often be unsuccessful because the active surfac- tants are driven through the slick into the water without an opportunity to at- tach to the oil. 900-28 HELICOPTER/AIRPLANE SPRAYING Aircraft provide the most rapid method of applying dispersant to an oil spill. For aerial spraying COREXIT 9527 is used undiluted. A treatment rate of about 5 USG per acre is recommended, but this may need adjustment, depending on the type of oil and the thick- ness of the slick. A variety of fixed-wing aircraft can be used for spraying over a large area. These range from very small to very large aircraft equipped for carrying 100 to over 4,000 U.S. gallons of chemical. The spray nozzles used are most critical, since droplet size must be controlled. Many nozzles used for agricultural spraying are of low capacity and produce too fine a spray (actually a mist or fog) which is not desirable for dispersant spraying. Careful selection of nozzle capacity to achieve desired dose levels cannot be over- emphasized. Calculations similar to those mentioned previously for workboat spraying should also be made for aerial application. Considera- tion must be given to: the speed and altitude of the plane; the capacity of the chemical pumps; the pressure at which they oper- ate; the effective swath width obtained; and any windage losses. Flights should be made directly into the wind for best results. Helicopters may also be employed in aerial spraying, either with fixed spray booms, or by attachment of a slung-bucket system e- quipped with spray booms. If a bucket is used, it should be sta- bilized against rotating and swaying. Tests have shown that an altitude of 30 to 50 feet is optimum for both helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. Speed will vary with aircraft type, spray boom width, and pump capacity. 419 900-29 FIGURE 4-2 DISPERSANT APPLICATION TECHNIQUES ...........~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ,.v .* . ~~~~~~~~~~~.'... . .... WID OR1 CURET DIRECTION * The most desirable spraying procedure is to work in a circular fashion Al 1he edges61 Of the Spill. thus, Wintainifg the oil and retarding its spread Idiagram above. right). * 11 wind or current is vapidly moving oil toward She shoreline. spraying Parallel to the shorlin at this advancing edge of the spill is recommended (diagramn above. tefll. * Aerial application of dispeirsant should always be directly into the wind. although some small11 aircraft can oPerate safely downwind. Do not apply dispersants cross-wind. sinc dosage contol is not pass"bl. Chemical Dose Per Acre from Spray Boom$ of Various Swath Widths Mounted on Workboat Traveling At 3 to 10 Knots Using a Chemical Pump Operating at 2 to 20 USO Per Minute Figure 1 2 USG Per Minute Figure 2 8 USO Per Minute -': --3io~ -- ;F---�~ ---+- *-t l ----. I . .11-~z~ roc~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~w -- - x ___-~I - -T I---i":"~~~~~~~-- ~ ~ R-\--NCf-- zlanat -*nn-t. -" -r:t -� - - -XN T---- -. ~ -; - ~ ~ - ----'&%z--% NN -= . : 7 ~ -- ___ _ _ __ Figur*- 3 . 0 0Pr M iut igue420UGPr~ M inute ;s---r ~ ~ -.--::~.. -..: .-- .....�-I,- 2. . .... . . X -4-knots - -8-- .11.. - r 2~,.-.....M--.� -- - ~rr~ --. -.-��- -...--- . ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-,.- ..x-.x- ~~~~-tknats -- -.~~~~~~~~. -Ski~~0 kot 6- -ko- t - - - - 60knati . - -- ..-.- . . - - SD S~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~IC V ~ - -- ---. -.- ..-- -- U -. -. - . -. swoolk Width (fo) Swath Width (h) 900Q3 t71 7 . . tKI-7 3Lnat) ~ (i)Swt Wdh ft - ~.*Locc \-�� -'` ---900-31--- Relationship Botw'9*13 Soot or Aircraft Speed and Chernicall Pump Rate for 0150*rsant/0111 Ratio Of I '-I 0 to 1:50 Svmth Widths in MWOrs. Slick Nckmoss in Millim*ters. Figureg Figure 9 1:20 Ratio .3 'A U- -kw 7 A. Aor-= t t k, V- ---------- wo,.. .C Speed of Warkbow or Aircraft (krm0w) Speed of Wwkbaw ar Aircraft (Itm/w) Figure 10 1:30 Ratio Figure I I I -.50 Ratio :::7 Z, 7: 7:-. 0 -5" J41-- -AVF--- cm : /rC7,1 X X., :,7L Speed of Warkbow or Aircraft (kmN) Speed of Warkbaw at Aircraft (kmjw) 900-32 Table I Correlation of Oil Volume Per Unit Area with Slick Thickness Thices of uSOa US~ w US Gb/Ci V' bbU. W/I /b .c mil/' mllmRim f/ocre I/he'a Stcblized Film n(mm) 4.2 10.37 64 25 0.10 0.36 3.87 0.56 38.7 3.94 x 10'-3 5 12.35 76 29 0.12 0.43 4.63 0.67 46.3 4.69 x 10'3 8.4 20.76 128 49 0.20 0.73 7.85 1.12 78.5 7.88 x 10'3 10 24.71 152 59 0.24 0.87 9.36 1.33 93.6 9.30 x 10-3 12.6 31.13 192 74 0.30 1.09 11.73 1.68 117.3 -,.1 18 x 10'2 21 51.89 320 123 0.50 1.82 19.58 2.80 195.8 1.97 x 10'2 42 103.78 640 247 1.00 3.65 39.27 5.60 392.7 3.94 x 10'2 50 123.55 762 294 1.19 4.33 46.58 6.67 465.8 4.66 x 10'2 53.6 132.44 817 315 1.28 4.65 50.03 7.16 500.3 Sx 10'2 (50a) 84 � 207.56 1280 494 2.00 7.30 78.54 11.20 - 785.4 7.88 x I0'2 100 247.10 1524 588 2.38 8.67 93.27 13.33 932.7 9.33 x 10.2 150 370.65 2286 882 3.57 13.01 139.97 20.00 1399.7 0. 14 168 415.13 2560 988 4.00 14.60 157.07 22.40 1570.7 0.16 214.6 530.28 3270 1262 5.11 18.58 199.89 28.61 1998.9 0.20 250 617.75 3810 1471 5.95 21.65 232.92 33.33 2329.2 0.23 268 662.23' 4088 1578 6.38 23.23 249.92 35.76 2499.2 0.25 420 1037.82 6400 2470 10.00 36.50 392.68 56.00 3926.8 0.39 525 1297.27 8000 3088 12.50 45.62 490.80 70.00 4908.0 0.49 535.8 1323.96 8165 3155 12.76 46.45 499.73 71.44 4997.3 0 50 839 2073.17 12800 4941 20.00 72.91 784.39 111.87 7843.9 0.79 1071.6 2647.92 16329 6303 25.51 93.12 1001.82 142.88 10018.2 1 00 1607 3971 88 24494 9454 38.26 139.68 1502.73 214.32 150273 1 50 /1 = micrOrs Table 2 Dispersont Requirements for Spill Covering 10 Square Miles oil Slick Volume _ ___ Diseraf Oit Reu'rd (USG_ Thck mnes(mm) bbl USG e agp s 110 C 1 20 1;30 C 1:50 0.14 22,860 960,120 32,000 44,800 96,012 48.036 32,000 19,200 (1:30) (1:21) 0 25 40,880 1,716,960 32,000 44,800 171,969 85.848 57.232 ' 34,339 (1:53) (1:38) 0.50 81,650 3,429,300 32,000 44,800 342,930 171,465 114,310 68,568 (1:107) (1:76) 1 00 163,290 6,858,180 32,000 44,800 685.818 342,909 228,606 137,163 (1:214) (1:153) 2.50 408.230 17,145,660 32.000 44,800 1,714,566 857,283 571,522 342,913 (1:535) (1:383) g3o - g= :^s per ocre 900-33 Table 3 Volume of Oil Per Acre (bbl) Which Can Be Treated at Various Dos" of Dispomnt Per Acre (USG) Dic~gsimwg Diyospo Pv Afe (USG .1 ma,* 3 t7 10 20 50 1:1 0.12 0.17 0.24 0.48 1.20 1:2 0.24 0.33 0.47 0.94 2.35 1:4 0.47 0.65 0.94 1.80 4.70 1:10 1.20 1.70 2.40 4.70 12.00 1:20 2.40 3.30 4.70 9 40 23.50 1:30 3.50 5.00 7.20 14.30 36.00 1:50 5.90 8.40 11.90 23.80 59.50 Table 4 1:100 11,90 16.60 23.80 47.70 119.00 Spraying Logistics for Solvent-Based Dispersont from Workboot with Low-Volum* Pumps Delivering 2-20 USG Per Minute Aprozimat. Dai sa (USG/Acre) k dnots miniter 2gpm 4gmn 6Spm 8 gm 10gpm 20p " 3 17.93 35 73 109 143 180 358 4 13.46 28 53 80 108 135 270 5 10.76 23 43 65 88 108 215 6 8.97 18 38 55 73 90 180 16-H swath wicith 3 8.97 1a 36 54 71 90 179 4 6.73 14 26 40 54 68 135 5 538 11 21 33 44 54 108 6 448 9 19 28 36 45 90 20.f swath -odt_ 3 717 29 43 57 '2 143 4 ' 5.38 11 21 32 43 54 108 5 431 9 17 26 35 -,3 36 s 3.59 /5 22 29 36 - 30-h twath wi_ _ 3 478 10 9 1 29 38 a 8 9 4 3.59 7 15 22 29. 36 72 5 2.87 6 11 17 23 28 57 6 2.39 5 9 14 19 24 48 900-34 Table 7 Workboat Spray Data Time (m) tO C~r' One Acre ert Are/.e for vaheou S., 1 WW d10 (h) veiW" w t (h) knots ftwe 20 30 40 20 30 40 1 1.69 21.48 14.32 10.74 2.79 4.19 5.59 2 3.37 10.77 7.18 5.39 5.57 8.36 11.13 3 5.06 7.17 4.78 3.59 8.37 12.55 16.71 4 6.75 5.38 3.59 2.69 11.15 16.71 22.30 5 8.43 4.31 2.87 2.16 13.92 20.90 27.78 6 10.12 3.59 2.39 1.80 16.71 25.10 33.33 7 11.81 3.07 2.05 1 54 19 54 29.27 38.96 8 13.49 2.69 1.79 1.35 22.30 33.52 44.44 9 15.18 2.39 1.59 1.20 25.10 37.74 50.00 10 16.87 2.15 1.43 1.08 27.9t 41.96 55.55 Basis: 6076 feet per nautical mile Minutes to cover one acre' = travel distance per acre in feet - speed in feet per second x 60. 'S"e Table 8 fcr traoed dtntance i'nM per acre for varlous $woe w.dy'sh Table 8 Travel Distance Required for Spray Boat or Aircraft To Apply Dispersant to One Acre or One Hectore Totot SwAth Width Traver Disti'ce Table 9 ft fmrem, ftlacr m/hctore 8 2.44 5445 4098 Maximum Area Covered in 16 Hours' at Various 10 3.05 4356 3279 Boat Speeds for Swath Widths of 20, 30 and 40 Feet 16 4.88 2722 2049 20 6.10 2178 1639 20-h Sth Wid 30h SwWdth 40-fsoth Wdth 25 7.62 1742 1312 knots aesicres mi O acres mi mi' 25 7.62 1742 1312 I 45 0.07 67 0 10 89 0.14 30 9214 1452 1094 2 89 0.!4 '34 0.21 178 0 28 40 12.19 1089 820 3 - 134 0.21 201 0 31 267 042 50 15.24 871 656 4 178 0.28 267 0 42 357 0.58 60 18.29 726 547 5 223 0.35 234 0 .5 444 0 69 70 21.34 5 622 4069 6 267 0.42 -02 0C 63 533 0.83 180 24.38 545 410 7 313 0.49 -68 0.73 623 0.097 100 30.48 436 328 8 357 0.56 536 0 84 711 1.11 120 36.58 363 273 9 402 0.63 504 0.94 ' 800 1 25 0150 64.72 2,90 2189 10 446 0.70 471 1 05 889 1.39 200 60.96 218 164 225 68.58 194 146 'Gallons per acre x acces = Gallons per 16 hours 250 76.20 174 131 250 76.20 174 131 . (Boat size may rest-,c oad, t+erelore requiring W 300 91.44 145 109 re-loading at chemcoa s'::k po n' wl- attendant loss 350 106.68 124 94ransitme) of transit time.) 400 121.92 109 82 Distance in ft/acre = 43,560 - swuth width In feet. D:stance in m/hectare = 10,000 - swathwidth i meters. 900-35 Table 10 Dose Rote Factor, f (USG/Acre) For Boat Speeds of 1.10 Knots with 1 % Chemical Addition into Various Total Pump Capacities (gpm) And with Spray Boom Swath Widths of 20, 30 and 40 Feet 20-ft Swat Widt 30.h9 Sw" Wmd" ,O.ft Swath whdh Pump Cpdly (gpfm) PUvt Cpeqary (Wrm) Pup Capotyq (Wem) knon a 20 80 100 a 20 S0 100 I 20 80 100 1 1.72 4.30 17.18 21.48 1.15 2.86 11.46 14.32 0.86 2.15 "8.59 10.74 2 0.86 2.15 8.62 10.77 0.57 1.44 5.74 7.18 0.43 1.08 4.31 5.39 3 0.57 1.43 5.74 7.17 0.38 0.96 3.82 4.78 0.29 0.72 2.87 3.59 4 0.43 1.08 4.31 5.39 0.29 0.72 2.87 3.59 0.22 0.54 2.15 2.69 5 0.34 0.86 3.45 4.31 0.23 0.57 2.30 2.87 0.17 0.43 1.72 2.15 6 0.29 0.72 2.87 3.59 0.19 0.48 1.91 2.39 0.14 0.36 1.43 1.79 7 0.25 0.61 2.46 3.07 0.16 0.41 1.64 2.05 0.12 0.31 1.23 1.54 8 0.22 0.54 2.15 2.69 0.14 0.36 1.43 1.79 0.11 0.27 1.08 1.35 9 0.19 0.48 1.91 2.39 0.13 0.32 1.27 1.59 0.10 0.24 0.95 1.19 10 0.17 0.43 1.72 2.15 0.11 0.29 1.14 1.43 0.09 0.22 0.86 1.08 How to Use Table Multiply table value by percent of chemical addition to obtain dose rate. * To obtain f for different pump rate, P, divide P by next lowest pump rate in table, P', and multiply result by f in to. for P'. � Toobtainf fordifferentspeed, K, divide fintable (forproperpumprate,swathwidth, andspeed,K') byK, andmulttip, result by reference speed In table, K'. Dose rates for undiluted chemical are 100 times the factors shown. liters per hectare = USG per acre x 9 353 !iters oer minute = USG per minute x 3.79 U. S. gallcns per square rmie = USG per acre x 640 Aerial Spray Data Timm (s.c) to Co'v, One Acre For Acres Per M.nute of Spraying Time for Voarimor Swa Widths (#)' voro Swath Widths (ft) kno s h/slls 100 120 150 200 100 120 . 10 200 50 8433 5.17 4.30 3.44 2.58 11 6 13 9 17.4 23.3 60 101 20 4.31 3.59 2.86 2.15 13.9 16.7 20.9 27.9 75 126.50 3.45 2.87 2.29 1.72 17 4 20 9 26.2 34.9 100 168.67 2.58 2.15 1.72 1.29 23.2 27 9 34.9 46.5 150 253.00 1.72 1.43 1.15 0.86 349 41 9 52.2 69'80 200 337 33 1.29 1 08 0.86 0.65 46.5 55 5 69.8 92.3 sc-es - 6t0 = SaJre P/.!es 'Ttai soo'awng '.te per trip con be coa :ttred for indvidual aircraft by considering aork and ir--; ccoacity and dose oer unit area. Table 12 Boat Speed in Knots Required for Various Doses Per Acre For Different Chemical Eduction Rates and Total PJmp Volumes into Swath Widths of 20, 30 and 40 Feet Table Sw Speed in Knrot Chmica 20-f Swo Width 30-t Swh Width 40-h Swath Width Eduction Pump tSlrmm (wP) t1pwwM (00g) DiempWi (gpo) Prcfie (gpm) 7 10 5 7 10 5 7 10 2% 80 6.9 4.9 3.4 4.6 3.3 2.3 3.4 2:5 1.7 100 8.6 6.1 4.3 5,7 4.1 2.9 4.3 3.1 2.1 150 12.9 9.2 6.4 8.6 6.1 43 6.5 46 3.2 5% 80 17.2 12.3 8.6 11.5 8.2 5.7 8.6 6.1 4.3 100 21.5 15.4 10.7 14.3 10.2 7.2 10.8 7.7 5.4 150 32.3 23.1 16.1 21.5 15.4 10.7 16.1 11.5 8.1 6% 80 20.7 14.8 10.3 13.8 9.8 6.9 10.3 7.4 5.2 100 25.8 18.4 12.9 17.2 12.3 8.6 12.9 9.2 6.4 150 38.7 27.7 193 25.9 18.4 12.9 19.4 13.8 9.7 7% 80 24 1 17.2 12.0 16.1 11.5 8.0 12.0 8.6 60 100 30.1 21.5 15.0 20.1 14.3 10.0 15.1 10.8 7,5 150 452 32.3 22.6 30.1 21.5 150 22.6 16.1 11.3 10% 80 34.4 24.6 17.2 22.9 16.4 11.5 17.2 12.3 8.6 100 43.0 30.7 21.5 28.7 20.5 14.3 21 .5 15.4 10.7 150 64.5 46.1 32.2 430 30.7 21.5 32.3 23.0 16.1 Table 13 Pump Rate Required (USG/min) Fzr Cner- cal Doses of 5, 7 and 10 USG :e- Acre Over Swath Widths of 100-400 Feet from A; rcrof Traveling at 30-200 mph (26-174 knots, 100-. SWth Width 200-ft Swath Width 300-h Swath Wdth 400-f Swath Width mph krnot 5 gpo 7gpo 10g po 5gpa 7g lOpo $gpa gp ICgpa 5gpa 7ggpo lOgpa 30 26 30 42 60 60 85 120 91 127 !-2 120 169 2-2 50 43 51 71 101 101 141 202 152 212 303 202, 282 4C3 100 87 101 141 202 202 284 404 303 424 606 404 568 81 1 120 104 121 169 242 242 339 484 361 506 723 484 677 968 150 130 152 212 303 303 424 606 455 636 909 606 840 1200 175 152 176 247 353 353 494 706 526 737 1053 706 1000 1429 200 174 201 282 405 405 568 810 600 840 1200 810 1135 1622 g: = ;1ions pe acre 900-37 900-38 DOC NO 8OSPC T14 PERFORMANCE CHEfMICALS E' tON CHEMICAL COMPANY CHEMICALS 22 Amaton Sire. w"is'. 6uaB 0- 02 spat. ais LABUOAIORY Technical Service Report EFFECT OF OIL SPILL DISPERSANTS ON MONTEREY CRUDE OIL .TS01 NUMBER6807-38 CATIMICEIVED June 16, 1980 Raouawfloy: A. .De Mitchell ANALYSD0 BY! G. P. Lindblom l Using the sample of Monterey Crude (South Elwood Offshore) Sent to us by Mr. L. E. Carlson of ARCO Oil and Gas Company, we have run several laboratory tests with different types of dispersants. This oil, while extremely viscous, flows easily and spreads rapidly on the surface of seawater. However, additional oil deposited on this initial slick spreads very slowly, and remains in rather thick lenses. In our tests, COREXIT 9527 Oil Dispersant Concentrate was very active in causing interfacial tension reduction between the oil and water. After the chemical reaches the interface, only slight agitation of the water in the laboratory dish is necessary to cause complete dispersion. While penetration of this oil by COREXIT 9527 is slowed in the quiescent lab test it can be expected to proceed faster when used on a slick on an active sea, after the chemical has been delivered from sprayboats or aircraft. Both the rate of dispersant penetration and of slick breakup are much greater on the thinner oil film at the advancing edge of the slick. Also, both increase markedly as the API gravity of the oil treated increases. Since the sample oil probably represents a "worst case" (insofar as API gravity is concerned) for the California situation, COREXIT 9527 is certainly the best available choice for a single stockpiled dispersant. Of course, hydrocarbon solvent based dispersants are faster penetrants of heavy oil films but require much higher doses, perhaps as much as 5 to 10 times more. The breakup using COREXIT 8667 (a solvent-based product) is less complete with the Monterey oil than that obtained with COREXIT 9527. Larger pieces of this oil remain in a very milky solution at the ocean surface when treated with solvant-based products. Hore ocean energy or mechanical agitation is also necessary. In addition to evaluating the effects of dispersants, we also noted in the laboratory that a surface collecting agent (COREXIT OC-5), applied to the water around the periphery of spreading Monterey crude, was extremely effective in preventing further spread and in greatly limiting the area of involvement. With this heavy crude a very stable edge was formed with the collector. This would be very valuable in aiding skimmer operations or sorbent use, if either were feasible. OIL jOILL DISPERSANT TEST PROCEDURE Using the same sample of Monterey Crude Oil (API 16) as mentioned in the earlier report (DOC-80-SPCT-149), testing was expanded to include effectiveness at 58'F and a comparison of Monterey Crude Oil and Kuwait Crude Oil at same dose rate, the effectiveness procedure given in DOC-80-SPCT-42 was followed. Six ounce oval prescription bottles 'were filled with 4h ounces of synthetic see water and 5 mils of same KWO was added to half the bottle using a disposable syringe. Five mils of MCO was added to the remaining bottles. Half the bottles were then cooled to 58'F and the remainder remained at ambient temperature (78'F) The oil films (about 3 mils thick) were then treated with the appropriate amount of dispersant to give the desired dispersant to oil ratio. The treated bottle was gently rocked and the initial film breakup and oil droplet size observed. The bottle was then rotated end over end and allowed to stand. Observation of the rise time (resuspension) of the droplet provides another point of evaluation. Finally, the bottle is turned on its side to obtain the maximum water surface; and again, with gently rocking, observation of the droplet movement near the bottle side is made. This test shows that dispersant chemicals themselves do not disperse oil; rather, they reduce the strength of the oil film so that it becomes easily dispersible when natural or mechanical energy is applied. It is the movement of the water after treatment which really causes the dispersion of oil droplet from a treated slick. W Without the addition of chemical, large masses and pieces of oil result, and Tarbal!- Mousse formation is promoted. The results of a 1-25 and 1-30 dispersant to oil tree rate gave identical results in this test. As to be expected, the COREXIT 9527 on KCO showed easy film breakup and a nice cloud of dispersed oil when gently rocked at ambient temperature. On 58�F KWO and sea water, the results were the same. On MCO at the same treat ratios and ambient temperature, the initial film breakup required more energy (rocking move- ment) but the final result was a nice cloud of dispersed oil equal to that of the 9527 Kuwait bottle test. On the 580F MCO test, the results were the same as at ambient temperature. At a ratio of 1-40 D/O the results are still excellent for the Kuwait at ambient and 58oF and the Monterey at ambient, but at 58�F the mCO shows a start of resuspension before 5 minutes The usual dose ratio is from 1-30 to 1-40 D/O, so COREXIT 9527 would be effective on MCO at 58�F and a minimum dose ratio of 1-40. Any dispersant chemical used on heavy and/or cold crude oil will require longer to penetrate and more energy (like wave energy) for treating as mentioned in DOC-80-SPCT-149. Hydrocarbon products must be applied at a much higher dose rate and leave a milky appearance on the surface of the water. Of the non hydrocarbon products, C-9527 was better than anything tested. I M~~~0 ISJAAYI v-~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 t~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 4.g.l.b Oil Spill Risk Analysis 4.g.l.b.1 Methodology and Assumptions Me thodo logy The oil spill risk analysis methodology used in this report allows calcula- tion of the probable number of oil spills of a given minimum volume that sta- tistically could occur during the life of the Shamrock Project. The steps involved in performing the risk analysis are as follows: (1) Oil recovery and transport operations are separated into independent "categories" of operations for which historical accident data are available. Since oil spill rates are different for different types of facilities, the project is divided into components for which the risk can be determined separately. The total risk is then computed from the sum of the risks associated with the individual components. Categories used in the Shamrock Project analysis are platform spills and OCS pipe- line spills. (2) The appropriate "exposure variable" for each spill category is deter- * ~~~mined. The exposure variables associated with the platform are "1well-years" for blowouts and "platform-years" for non-blowout spills. Two exposure variables are used because daily platform operations pre- sent a very different level of risk than does well drilling and pro- duction. The pipeline exposure variable is "pipeline mile-years" (3) The historical accident rate of the exposure variables and the fre- quency distributions of the number of spill for spill volume classes of 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 barrels (bbl) are calculated from available data sources. (4) Using the project exposure data, the "expected value" of each exposure category for the project is determined. For example, if the histori- cal data indicate a platform blowout exposure variable of 0.000143 spill per well-year, and the project is projected to include 60 wells and have a 15-year lifespan (an exposure of 900 well-years), then the expected value for platform blowouts is: 7. 38/SAT-1 1000-1 0.000143 spill x 60 wells x 15 years = 0.1287 spill well1-year The expected values of the exposure variables for each category are summed to provide the total expected value for the entire project. (5) The probability of a given number of spills occurring within specified spill volume classes during the project life is then calculated assuming the spills occur randomly and can be described by a Poisson distribution. The assumption of a Poisson distribution allows the probability of all integer number of spills per project life to be predicted once the expected value is known for each of the spill classes. Assumptions Any attempt to predict future accidental events involves inherent uncerwr tainty. However, if certain assumptions are made regarding the nature of the accidents, it is possible to extrapolate observed events and trends into the future. The major assumptions made in this analysis are discussed below. Assumption 1. Oil spills occur relatively rarely in a purely random manner independent of other events and, therefore, can be repre- sented by a Poisson probability distribution. It is assumed that oil spills can happen at any time and are indepen- dent of other events such as a spill in another location or severe weather conditions. Also, the spills are assumed to occur rarely with respect to the times they do not occur. Under these conditions, the Poisson distribu- tion can be used to compute the probability of an integer number of inde- pendently random events occurring in a specified timeframe given that the statistically expected number of events in that timeframe is known. The Poisson distribution is given by: 7.38/SAT-2 1000-2 P(n,L) = Ln exp(-L) n! where: P(n,L) = the probability that n events will occur given a statistical expectation of L events, n!= (n)(n-1)(n-2)...(1) Assumption 2. Past spill data provide a reliable indicator of future spills. Statistical analysis can give an indication of trends in accident rates and, therefore, indicate which historical data are appropriate for use in predicting the near future. An example of these trends is shown in the data of Nakassis (1982), Figure 4.g-2. The figure shows the statisti- cally estimated offshore production spill rates in terms of spills greatec than 1000 bbl per billion bbl produced for the years 1964 to 1979. It can be seen that using the average 1965 to 1967 spill rate to predict 1979 spill rates would have overestimated the spill rate by a factor of 540% and that using the 1976 to 1978 data to estimate the 1979 rate overestimates by a factor of 15%. In this analysis, 1973 to 1975 data were used which would have overestimated the 1979 rate by 50%. Assumption 3. The underlying causes of oil spills will be the same in the future as they have been in the past. If it is assumed that spills are caused by human error and equipment failure then the underlying causes of oils spills should remain the same in the future. Implicit in this assumption is the corollary that either all types of accidents that will occur have already occurred once or, if an accident type has not already occurred, it probably happens too infre- quently to be statistically significant. Assumption 4. Causes of oil spills on the California OCS are the same as for other U.S offshore areas and regions of the world where historical spill data have been collected. 7.38/SAT-3 1000-3 The number of blowouts and pipeline spills on the California OCS is so small that it is not possible to develop the necessary statistics from the Pacific region alone. Therefore, data from other areas, such as the Gulf of Mexico, must be used. There are notable differences between offshore California and the Gulf of Mexico OCS. Operation in the Gulf of Mexico 005 involves greater risk than the California 005 because of more severe sea and weather conditions (particularly hurricanes) and significantly greater vessel traffic. While some adjustment of Gulf of Mexico spill rates is justifiable, such as neglecting spill causes which do not apply to the California OCS (e.g., hurricanes), the remaining non-specific data must be used in the risk ana- lysis. Use of the Gulf of Mexico data probably leads to considerable overestimation of the spill risk. Assumption 5. Oil spill occurrence rates will not be affected by improver ments in spill prevention technology or regulatory require- ments imposed on OCS operators. This assumption implies that nothing operators or regulatory bodies do will reduce the rate of spills. Inspection of the data summarized in Figure 4.g-2 suggests that this is not true. As an example, implementation of OCS Order No. 8 for platform operations has been shown to have decreased spill rates (Nakassis, 1982). However, due to the difficulty in predicting future rate changes associated with each project category, the conservative assumption of no change in rates was made in this risk analysis. As tech- nology and regulatory improvements are introduced, the number of spills from spill-prone elements and the spill rates should drop. Therefore, by assuming the rates will be constant, the analysis probably overestimates the expected number of spills. Assumption 6. Exxon's success in preventing spills from the Shamrock Project will be typical or average for the industry as inferred from past industrywide performance. 7.38/SAT-4 1000-4 Operator-related spill data indicate that not all OCS operators have equal performance records in the prevention and containment of oil spills (Danenberger, 1976; MKS, 1979). The use of industry average data for better-than-average operators results in conservative estimates with the converse applying to worse-than-average operators. Because of Exxon's generally good operating record, applying the industry average to the Shamrock Project is expected to result in a conservative estimate of the spill risk. 4.g~l.b.2 Historical Spill Rate and Volume Data Historical data indicate that spill sizes range from a few gallons to over a million barrels. However, most of the oil spilled is associated with a few very large spills (e.g., the IXTOC I spill released more oil than all other 1979 spills combined). Because there are many more small spills than large, the fre- quency distribution of spill sizes is highly non-uniform; consequently, it is difficult to describe the entire frequency distribution accurately. In addition, oil spill data are often difficult to obtain (Futures Group, 9 ~1982) and are of limited accuracy because of the necessity to make visual judgments of the volumes released. For example, fairly reliable estimates of the volume released in the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill range from 10,000 to 77,000 bbl (USGS, 1983). The above factors indicate considerable caution is required in developing and interpreting quantitative spill risk statistics. For example, it has been noted (MIT, 1974) that the confidence intervals on estimated total spill volume are much larger than the spill volume itself. However, the rate of spill occurrence and the spill size distributions separately exhibit distinctive pat- terns. Therefore, estimating the spill rates and size distributions separately and recombining them to estimate the probability of spill occurrence as a func- tion of spill size results in greater predictive accuracy than attempting to estimate a total spill volume. 7.38/ SAT-5 1000-5 The following sections provide a summary of the spill rates and volumes used in the risk analysis as developed from historical records. The pertinent spill categories for the Shamrock Project are platforms and offshore pipelines. Platforms Platform spills are separated into blowout and non-blowout exposure cate- gories due to the marked differences in the two sets of historical spill rates and volume distributions. Typically, blowouts occur infrequently but release large volumes while non-blowouts, or operational spills, occur more frequently but release very small volumes. Platform Blowout Spills: The historical rate of blowout spills used in this analysis was derived by Stewart and Kennedy (1978) from the USGS Event File covering 'the period 1964 to 1975. Applying the logic that the more wells that are drilled and the longer they are in use the greater the probability of a blowout, leads to the selection of "well-years" as the appropriate exposuref variable. This variable reflects both drilling blowouts and the large propor- tion of non-drilling blowouts (Danenberger, 1976 and 1980). The inferred rate of blowouts appropriate to California OCS operations (i.e., non-hurricane induced blowouts) which resulted in oil spillage of greater than I bbl is 7' blowout spills in 49,100 well-years of operation which translates to a spill rate of 1.43 x Jo04 blowout per well-year. Although more recent data are available for the period 1979 through 1982 (USGS, 1983), the data presented in that report are insufficient to update the spill rate estimates. It should be noted that all of the 31 blowouts reported from 1979 through 1982 occurred in the Gulf of Mexico. The USGS (1983) report concludes that the rate of blowouts is declining because of MMS emphasis on training as well as improved equipment and well-control methods. Therefore the use of the Stewart and Kennedy (1978) data is expected to be conservative. In addition to spill rate data, the distribution of spill volumes is needed in the risk analysis. Stewart and Kennedy (1978) derived a cumulative probabi- lity density function of the volume distribution of blowout spills which is shown on Figure 4.g-3. By defining size classes of spills greater than 10, 100, 7. 38/SAT-6 1000-6 1000, and 10,000 bbl, the density function can be used to estimate the propor- tion of spills occurring in each class. The results of numerical offsets to Figure 4.g-3 are given in the following table. Volume Distribution of Blowout Spills Probability of a Blowout Spill Volume, bbl Spill > 1 bbl in this Class >10 0.952 >100 0.847 >1000 0.577 >10,000 0.302 Non-blowout Platform Spills: Non-blowout or operational spills have very different spill rates and volumes from blowout spills and are therefore con- sidered separately. Typically, while operational spills occur more frequently than blowout spills they release far smaller volumes of oil. Since operation spills are related to platform numbers and years of operation the appropriate exposure variable is "platform-years". Using the MMS (USGS) Event File for 1973 to 1975, Stewart and Kennedy (1978) analyzed the historical non-blowout spill data for spills greater than 1 bbl. They detected a trend for "new" platforms, i.e., those less than 10 years old, to experience break-in problems which led to higher spill rates than "old" platforms (greater than 10 years old). Consequently, two rates of operational spills are used in the analysis. They are 4.3 x 10-2 and 2.6 x 10-2 spills/ platform-year for new and old platforms, respectively. As in the case of blowout spills, the rate of operational spills appears to be dropping and, therefore, the above operational spill rates are probably conservative. The oil spill size cumulative frequency distribution for operational spills is shown on Figure 4.g-4. The following table summarizes the volume distribu- tions used in the risk analysis for operational spills. 7.38/SAT-7 1000-7 Volume Distribution of Platform Operational Spills Probability of a Non-blowout Spill Volume, bbl Spill >1 bbl in this Class >10 0,117 >100 0.001 >1000 < 0.001 >10,000 < 0.001 Offshore Pipelines The exposure variable for offshore pipelines, "pipeline mile-years", reflects that the causes of pipeline spills such as corrosion, weld failure, and accidental puncture are a function of the length of pipeline and time. The volume of oil carried through the pipeline does not significantly contribute to pipeline failure. The calculated distribution of spill volumes is based on the assumption that the pipeline diameters and flow rates for the Shamrock Project are average for the industry. Using data from the MMS Pipeline Management System's Segment Specific Pipeline List for 1973 to 1975 and the MMS (USGS) Event File, Stewart and Kennedy (1978) estimated a cumulative exposure of 3700 pipeline mile-years for offshore pipelines. During this period there were 76 spills greater than 1 bbl. The average spill rate from offshore pipelines was therefore calculated to be 2.1 x 10-2 spills per pipeline-year. The oil spill size cumulative frequency distribution for offshore pipeline spills is shown on Figure 4.g-5. The table below summarizes the volume distri- butions used in the risk analysis for offshore pipeline spills. Volume Distribution of Offshore Pipeline Spills Probability of a Pipeline Spill Volume, bbl Spill > 1 bbl in this Class >10 0.232 >100 0.020 >1000 0.002 >10,000 < 0.001 7.38/SAT-8 1000-8 4.g.l.b.3 Analysis Results Exxon is evaluating two possible development options for the Shamrock Project. Both options include a drilling and production platform on Lease OCS P-0440 and a subsea oil pipeline. For the purposes of the oil spill risk analy- sis the Shamrock platform is assumed to have a life of 15 years (1986 to 2001) and that 60 wells will be drilled from the platform. Each well is assumed to have an average production life of 15 years. All of these assumptions are con- servative; the current project plans call for a 12-year platform life and a 31-well development program. No injection wells are planned at this time. In the Gaviota Option, the produced oil would be transported via pipeline to either Platform Hermosa or a nearby subsea tie-in on Lease P-0316. The Gaviota Option pipeline length is approximately 13.3 statute miles. In the Lompoc Option, the produced oil would be transported via pipeline to Platform Irene on Lease P-0441, a distance of 2.2 statute miles. The development option elements as they related to oil spill risk are summarized in the table below. Elements of Development Options Gaviota Lompoc Option Option Platform OCS P-0440 OCS P-0440 60 wells 60 wells Offshore Wet Oil OCS P-0316 OCS P-0441 Pipeline 13.3 miles 2.2 miles Gaviota Option The oil spill risk exposures used in the analysis of the Gaviota Option are shown below. Spill Type Estimated Exposure Platform Blowouts 900 Well-years Operational: Break-in Period 10 Platform-years Operational: Post Break-in 5 Platform-years Pipeline Leak or Rupture 199.5 Pipeline mile-years 7.38/SAT-9 1000-9 Combining these exposures with the historical spill and volume data described previously yields the predictions of the statistically expected values of oil spills associated with the Gaviota Option. The expected values for the total project and the individual project elements are shown in Table 4.g-1. The table shows that only pipeline spills in the size class 10 bbl or larger have an expected value approaching 1. The probabilities of spill occurrence for the individual project elements within each of the four spill size classes is shown in Table 4.g-2. With the exception of pipeline spills in the size class of 10 bbl or greater, all the project elements show probabilities of greater than 83% of a spill NOT occurring in the project lifetime for all size classes. The total oil spill probabilities for the Gaviota Option are listed in Table 4.g-3 and illustrated on Figure 4.g-6. The results show that there is a 96% probability of no 10,000-bbl or larger spills occurring and a 31% probabil- ity of no 10-bbl or larger spill. Table 4.g-3 shows that the 69% probability of a 10-bbl spill is distributed as a 36% probability of 1 spill, 21% probability of 2 spills, 8% probability of 3 spills, and 2% probability of 4 spills7 Table 4.g-3 also indicates there is a 16% probability of 1 100-bbl or larger spill and a 8% probability of 1 1000-bbl or larger spill. To summarize, one or more small spills (>10 bbl) are probable under the Gaviota Option, while a large spill (>10,000 bbl) is highly improbable. Lompoc Option The oil spill risk exposures used in the analysis of the Lompoc Option are shown below. Spill Type Estimated Exposure Platform Blowouts 900 Well-years Operational: Break-in Period 10 Platform-years Operational: Post Break-in 5 Platform-years Pipeline Leak or Rupture 33.0 Pipeline mile-years 7.38/SAT-10 1000-10 Combining these exposures with the historical spill and volume data described previously yields the predictions of the statistical expected values of oil spills associated with the Lompoc Option. The expected values for the total project and the individual project elements are shown in Table 4.g-4. The table shows that none of the project elements have an expected value greater than 1. The probabilities of spill occurrence for the individual project elements within each of the four spill class sizes is shown in Table 4.g-5. All the project elements show probabilities of greater than 83% of a spill NOT occurring during the project life for all spill size classes. The total oil spill probabilities for the Lompoc Option are listed in Table 4.g-6 and illustrated on Figure 4.g-7. The results show that there is a 96% probability of no 10,000-bbl or larger spills occurring and a 71% probability of no spill occurring in the 10-bbl or larger size class. The 29% probability of a 10-bbl spill is distributed as a 25% chance of 1 spill and a 4% probability of 2 spills. Table 4.g-6 indicates there is an 11% probability of a 100-bbl ox larger spill and a 7% probability of a 1000-bbl or larger spill. The lower risk of 10 and 100-bbl spills in the Lompoc Option as compared to the Gaviota Option is attributable to the shorter pipeline route. However, the risk of larger spills is similar for both options as larger spills are most likely to be related to platform drilling operations. In both options, the pro- bability of a small spill is more likely than a large spill. A large spill is highly improbable in either case. 7.38/SAT-11 1000-11 TABLE 4.g-1 SUMMARY OF STATISTICALLY EXPECTED SPILLS GAVIOTA OPTION Statistically Expected Spills >10 >100 >1000 >10000 Project Element bbl bbl bbl bbl Platform 0.188 0.109 0.074 0.039 Emulsion Pipeline 0.972 0.084 0.008 0.000 Total 1.160 0.193 0.083 0.039 TABLE 4.g-2 PROBABILITY OF SPILL OCCURRENCE VERSUS SPILL VOLUME FOR INDIVIDUAL PROJECT ELEMENTS GAVIOTA OPTION V > 10 bbl(a) V > 100 bbl P(0 P P( P(>1 P(O P(1 P(>1 Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Platform 0.83 0.16 0.02 0.90 0.10 0.01 Emulsion Pipeline 0.38 0.37 0.25 0.92 0.08 0.00 V > 1000 bbl V > 10,000 bbl P(0 P P( P(>1 P(0 P(1 P(>1 Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Platform 0.93 0.07 0.00 0.96 0.04 0.00 Emulsion Pipeline 0.99 0.01 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 (a) V = Volume. P = Probability (of the indicated number of spills occurring. 7.38/SAT-T1 1000-12 TABLE 4.g-3 TOTAL OIL SPILL PROBABILITY - GAVIOTA OPTION >10 bbl(a) >100 bbl >1000 bbl >10,000 bbl N P(N) N P(N) N P(N) N P(N) 0 0.3135 0 0.8242 0 0.9207 0 0.9619 1 0.3636 1 0.1594 1 0.0761 1 0.0374 2 0.2109 2 0.0154 2 0.0031 2 0.0007 3 0.0816 3 0.0010 3 0.0001 3 0.0000 4 0.0237 4 0.0000 4 0.0000 4 0.0000 5 0.0055 5 0.0000 5 0.0000 5 0.0000 6 0.0011 6 0.0000 6 0.0000 6 0.0000 7 0.0002 7 0.0000 7 0.0000 7 0.0000 8 0.0000 8 0.0000 8 0.0000 8 0.0000 9 0.0000 9 0.0000 9 0.0000 9 0.0000 10 0.0000 10 0.0000 10 0.0000 10 0.0000 (a) N = Number of spills. P(N) = Probability of the indicated number of spills occurring. 7.38/SAT-T3 1000-13 TABLE 4.g-4 SUMMARY OF STATISTICALLY EXPECTED SPILLS LOMPOC OPTION Statistically Expected Spills >10 >100 >1000 >10,000 Project Element bbl bbl bbl bbl Platform 0.188 0.110 0.074 0.039 Emulsion Pipeline 0.161 0.014 0.001 0.000 Total 0.349 0.123 0.076 0.039 TABLE 4.g-5 PROBABILITY OF SPILL OCCURRENCE VERSUS SPILL VOLUME FOR INDIVIDUAL PROJECT ELEMENTS LOMPOC OPTION V > 10 bbl(a) V > 100 bbl P(0 P(1 P(>1 P(O P(1 P(>1 Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Platform 0.83 0.16 0.02 0.90 0.10 0.01 Emulsion Pipeline 0.85 0.14 0.01 0.99 0.01 0.00 V > 1000 bbl V > 10,000 bbl P(0 P P( P(>l P(0 P(1 P(>l Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Spill) Platform 0.93 0.07 0.00 0.96 0.04 0.00 Emulsion Pipeline 1.00 0.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 0.00 (a) V = Volume. P = Probability (of the indicated number of spills occurring). 7.38/SAT-T4 1000-14 TABLE 4.g-6 TOTAL OIL SPILL PROBABILITY - LOMPOC OPTION >10 bbl(a) >100 bbl >1000 bbl >10,000 bbl N P(N) N P(N) N P(N) N P(N) 0 0.7055 0 0.8839 0 0.9271 0 0.9495 1 0.2461 1 0.1091 1 0.0701 1 0.0492 2 0.0429 2 0.0067 2 0.0027 2 0.0013 3 0.0050 3 0.0003 3 0.0001 3 0.0000 4 0.0004 4 0.0000 4 0.0000 4 0.0000 5 0.0000 5 0.0000 5 0.0000 5 0.0000 6 0.0000 6 0.0000 6 0.0000 6 0.0000 7 0.0000 7 0.0000 7 0.0000 7 0.0000 8 0.0000 8 0.0000 8 0.0000 8 0.0000 9 0.0000 9 0.0000 9 0.0000 9 0.0000 10 0.0000 10 0.0000 10 0.0000 10 0.0000 (a) N = Number of spills. P(N) = Probability of the indicated number of spills occurring. 7.38/SAT-T6 1000-15 20 -J cn2 - C)16.14 -o~~1 0 w ir wCL U. ci) cr)C I- CL w 4 coo U- co~~~~~ 0 co~~~ >- 03 CALENDAR YEAR DATA PLOTTED FROM NAKASSIS. I 982. FIGURE 4.g-2 ESTIMATED PARAMETRIC RATE * ~~~~~~~~~OF OCCURRENCE OF OIL SPILLS LARGER THAN I ,OOO BARRELS BY YEAR, 1964 THROUGH 1979 1.0- 0 0.9 - 0.8- - > 0.6- 0.4 - G0.3 - 0.?2 - 0.1 0 I I I o0'3 1 04 1 05 1 06 I 07 1 08 Vo, SPILL VOLUME (GALLONS) DATA FROM STEWART AND KENNEDY (1978). FIGURE 4.9-3 CUMULATIVE SPILL VOLUME DISTRIBUTION FOR PLATFORM BLOWOUTS 1.0- 0 0 0� co - o G ~~~/ 1973-1975 USGS DATA I 02 INCIDENTS) Io I o 100 1,000 10,000 0 (i)1 I I I I I I I I 42 100 420 1000 4200 10,000 42,000 100.000 420,000 SPILL VOLUME Vo (BBL) (GALLONS) DATA FROM S.TEWART AND KENNEDY (1978). FIGURE 4.9-4 CUMULATIVE SPILL VOLUME DISTRIBUTION FOR OFFSHORE PIPELINES 1.0 - 0 ~ 0 0 I-l 0o 0.5 - i/ 1973-1975 USGS DATA (264 INCIDENTS) /~ IO~ 10~10 I0 1 0,000 1I 0,000 ~'0 I III I [ 1 42 1 00 420 10 1 00.000 1 00,000 420.000 SPILL VOLUME Vo (SBL) (GALLONS) DATA FROM STEWART AND KENNEDY (1978). FIGURE 4.9-5 CUMULATIVE SPILL VOLUME DISTRIBUTION FOR NON-BLOWOUT PLATFORM SPILLS IC IC . 0.0 rO0.8 ~x I- nIl 0.7 2 0.4 10.000 0Oc,~�i~;.~~ijI BBL w " 0.4 -z=- w0.2 100 BBL 0.1 �wj~: /W /.2 > 10 BBL. 00 1 2 3 4 a a 7 a a 10 NUMBER OF SPILLS FIGURE 4.g- 6 GAVlOTA OPTION, * ~~~~~~~~~~~PREDICTED OIL SPILL PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION AS A FUNCTIONJOF SPILL SIZE ou~~~~~~~~~I Oj. 0.6 0,0 IC w 00 ~~~~~~~A. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 0.4 0.3 Ow0.2 100 BBIL IL0.1 00 1 / / ~~~~~~~~10 BBL 0 0 ~2 3 4 5 6 7 a 10 NUMBER OF SPILLS FIGURE 4.g- 7 LOMPOC OPTION, * ~~~~~~~~~~~PREDICTED OIL SPILL PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION AS A FUNCTION OF SPILL SIZE I f.SJ~tn>X 4.g.2 oil Spill Trajectory Analysis Although the potential for a large oil spill occurring as a result of Exxon's Shamrock Project is quite low (see Section 4.g.l.b), such an event could occur. To aid in assessing potential environmental impacts, a set of month-by- month oil spill trajectories was generated by computer-modeling. These trajec- tories provide information about the movement of a theorized spill under different sets of meteorologic and oceanographic conditions. Such information is useful in evaluating the locations of marine or coastal resources which could be impacted by a large spill, as well as the degree to which these resources could be affected (see Section 4.g.3 for discussions of such impacts). 4.g.2.a Trajectory Model Description A trajectory model is used to simulate the movement of the centroid of an oil spill with the objective of identifying the area(s) of shoreline which it could affect, and to estimate the time for the oil slick to reach the impact point, The predominant driving forces in the model are geostrophic currents, tidal currents, and winds. Trajectory results are not dependent on oil spill volumes or mass-dependent effects (e.g., spreading, evaporation, dissolution, * dispersion, emulsification, sedimentation, biodegradation, and autooxidation). However, because interpretation of the model results becomes increasingly difficult with increasing spill volumes (and associated greater spreading diam- eters), the model is representative for spill volumes of 10,000 bbl or less. The trajectory model involves vectoral addition of wind and current forces acting on the centroid of a two-dimensional surface oil slick. Second-order forces, such as waves and wind-wave current interaction, have much lesser effect on spill movement and, consequently, are not incorporated in the model. Similarly, physicochemical processes such as evaporation, sinking, dissolution, and emulsification are not incorporated. These assumptions produce conservative results with respect to impact probabilities. Published results from experiments and observations concerning the effect of wind on a marine oil slick indicate that, in the absence of surface currents, the centroid of a slick moves in the direction of the wind at a velocity of about 3 percent of that of the wind (Van Dorn, 1953; Stewart, et al.;, 1974; * Oceanographic Institute of Washington, 1977). 7. 38/SAT-1 1100-I A surface slick on a moving stream of water in the absence of waves moves with the currents at the surface current velocity (Stolzenbach et al., 1977). For modeling purposes, the surface currents are divided into two components: a geostrophic current and a tidally induced current. During each trajectory simu- lation, the net geostrophic surface current component is assumed to remain constant with time, while the tidal current component is phased with the tide. In the trajectory model, the slick centroid is calculated to move at the same instantaneous velocity as the vectoral sum of the underlying surface currents, plus 3% of the wind velocity vector. The centroidal velocity vector can be written as: Uoil = 0.03 Uwind + Utidal + Uoceanic (Equation 1) 4.g.2.b Model Application Application of the oil spill trajectory model involves superimposing a grid system on the study area to provide a basis for inputting the wind and current information. The definitions of shoreline impact locations are also based on this grid. The grid resolution of 3 miles is dictated by the: (1) combined resolution of the available environmental data; (2) magnitude of the wind and current gradients; and, (3) size of standard OCS leases. Each trajectory is generated by using appropriate values of the wind and current data in Equation 1 over a sequence of time steps until the centroid reaches shore or the outer boundary of the grid system, or an upper limit on time is reached. The meteorology of the Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Channel region has been classified into a number of readily discernible, frequently occurring wind regimes. Each regime has a characteristic seasonal frequency of occurrence and an average and maximum duration. For each type, the generalized wind pat- tern can be described for certain periods of the day for each grid square. For the remainder of the 24-hour cycle, the wind pattern is described by inter- polation between the known wind patterns. 7.38/SAT-2 1100-2 During the period that a particular wind regime is in effect, its hourly wind patterns are used in sequence to move the centroid of the spill. During each season, the wind regimes themselves can also be sequenced according to the actual frequency of occurrence of each type. The frequency of occurrence of these regimes is controlled so that the actual average duration of each type is observed. By varying the combinations of spill time, spill location, tidal currents, and environmental data, a frequency distribution is assembled from the deter- ministic runs to show the percentage and distribution of impact points along the shoreline. The average and minimum time for the slick centroid to reach the shore is tabulated for each shoreline grid location. 4.g.2.c Environmental Data 4.g.2.c.l Winds An 11-year record of daily surface wind observations and interpretation� from synoptic charts was used to classify winds into general wind regimes, some with a characteristic diurnal variation (Strange, 1983; de Violini, 1974; DeMarrais et al., 1965). Four basic meteorological types, some with multiple subtypes, were distinguished for the region. The observed frequency of occurrence of each wind regime and a transition matrix (based on the observed frequency of transitions from one specific wind type to another) was determined for input to the model. Each wind regime is discussed briefly below and illustrated on Figures 4.g-8 through 4.g-15. Seabreeze Regime Summer A: The seabreeze or stratus flow regime (Figure 4.g-8) is charac- terized by coastal fog and stratus clouds. Winds in the outer region typically remain northwesterly throughout the day at speeds of approximately 15 knots (8 m/s). During the early morning, coastal winds are light and from the west to southwest. By mid-morning, the coastal seabreeze begins to set in, increasing coastal winds to 10 to 12 knots (5-6 m/s). Winds in the region of Point Conception increase to 20 knots (10 m/s). The wind direction remains relatively constant throughout the afternoon, but the wind speed generally decreases by late afternoon particularly in the Point Conception area. At night, the offshore wind pattern is influenced by land breezes from coastal areas. 7.38/SAT-3 1100-3 The Summer A regime is prevalent in the Santa Barbara Channel/Santa Maria Basin region 50 to 60% of the time in the spring and summer months. The O average persistence of this regime is 4 to 6 days, but it may persist for as long as 20 days before being interrupted by another weather pattern. Summer B: The Summer B regime (Figure 4.g-9) is typified by light offshore northwesterly winds and much greater coastal influence. The mid-day and after- noon winds approach the coast from the southwest at 8 knots (4.3 m/s). The evening, night, and early morning coastal winds run approximately parallel to shore in a northerly direction. The Summer B regime occurs 10 to 20% of the time in the spring and summer months and has an average persistence of 1 to 2 days. Winter: Wind patterns in winter are more variable than in summer. The most common pattern is the land-sea breeze regime, a seasonal variation of the summer stratus regime. The major sea breeze is weaker and the land breeze stronger during winter. A typical representation of this regime during the daytime is shown on Figure 4.g-10. After sunset, the land breeze dominates, causing the wind to shift to the northeast in nearshore areas. Wind speeds throughout the day range from about 4 to 12 knots (2 to 6 m/s). This flow regime occurs between 50 and 60% of the time during fall and winter. It typically persists for 3 to 6 days, but may last for as long as 25 days. Northwester Local Northwest Gradient: The northwester meteorological type is often marked by strong northwesterly winds in the outer region which become stronger in the vicinity of Point Conception due to a pressure system situated over that area (Figure 4.g-11). A local gradient of wind to the northwest results. The strength of the northwest wind is variable, as is the distance to which it progresses eastward during the day. 0 7. 38/SAT-4 1100-4 The local northwest gradient flow regime occurs between 20 and 30% of the * time during the summer months and 10 to 15% of the time in the winter. The average duration in summer is 2 to 3 days with a maximum duration of 10 days. The average duration in the winter is I to 2 days with a maximum of 8 days. Entire Region: This flow regime is marked by strong winds throughout the region (Figure 4.g-12). A minimum wind speed of 20 knots (10 m/s) occurs for several hours during the day (usually in the afternoon). The wind direction varies from west to northwest, with less frequent winds from northwest to north. This flow regime occurs most frequently during the winter and spring (10 to 20% of the time). Its average duration is about I day and its maximum duration is about 3 days. This condition occurs 10 to 15% of the time during the summer- fall months. Southeas ter Frontal Passage: Southeasters that influence the project region are asso= ciated with migrating low pressure systems and a frontal passage. The strongest * winds may occur long before the frontal passage and extend over a considerable period of time or they may occur for a short time and be confined largely to the frontal zone. The diurnal influence is minimal, being offset by the large-scale synoptic features. However, frontal passages do have peak frequency of occurrence during the early morning hours and a secondary peak in the evening. A typical frontal passage scenario affecting the Point Conception'area is shown on Figure 4.g-13. The vector plots show a southerly wind setting in initially over the entire region, followed by increasing wind speeds and a southward shift of the area of influence. After the frontal passage, light, west to southwest winds occur for about 12 to 24 hours, followed thereafter by a northwester or calm conditions. The duration of the southeaster is dependent on the speed of the migrating pressure system, but is generally about 2 days. The frequency of occurrence of the southeast regime is generally in the range of 10 to 20% from November to April. These conditions are rare during the other months of the year (less . than 3%). 7.38/SAT-5 1100-5 Entire Region: Southeast winds are often associated with migratory low pressure systems prior to the frontal passage. This regime occurs between 1 and 5% of the time from November to April, and rarely during the other months. Wind speeds attained in the Point Conception area as a consequence of this regime usually range between 15 and 20 knots (8 to 10 m/s) (Figure 4.g-14). This flow regime may result from a storm that has no effect on the eastern Santa Barbara Channel or from a front that eventually moves eastward, accom- panied by southeast winds. The average duration is 1 day in the winter, with a maximum duration of about 3 days. Northeaster/Santa Ana The northeaster flow regime (Figure 4.g-15) is a winter condition occurring from 5 to 10% of the time between November and February. The flow regime is marked by strong (15 to 20 knots; 8 to 10 m/s) southward flows during the night and early morning hours. During the afternoon and evening, the nearshore flow# moderate to 10 knots (5 m/s), while the offshore flows remain constant at 20 knots (10 m/s). The average persistence of this regime is 1 day, except during January when the average persistence is 2 days. The Santa Ana is a dry, offshore wind associated with high pressure over the western states. It usually establishes itself between about 0300 and 0900 hours as a northeast wind in the Oxnard area confined to the southeastern end of the Santa Barbara Channel and along the Channel Islands. It often remains throughout the day, although a westerly seabreeze sometimes appears in the afternoon hours during weak to moderate Santa Ana conditions. Wind speeds may reach 28 knots (14 m/s) or more during the morning hours in the offshore area between Oxnard and Anacapa Island. During the afternoon hours, when the northeast winds are countered by the westerly seabreeze, speeds of about 14 knots (7 m/s) are not uncommon in this area. Santa Anas typically do not extend into the western part of the Channel or into the Santa Maria Basin. However, on rare occasions, a severe Santa Ana with winds reaching 50 to 60 knots (26 to 31 m/s) in the eastern Channel will occur. Usually, the duration of such an event is 2 days, with Santa Ana winds in the 7.38/SAT-6 1100-6 western Channel/Point Conception area only occurring an the second day. The * frequency of the Santa Ana-Entire Channel regime during November to March was between 0 and 1.98% during the 11-year study period. 4.g.2.c.2 Currents Surface Currents The surface currents in the Point Conception area form a complex pattern of large-scale horizontal circulations and eddies, all of which are subject to seasonal and meteorological effects. The dominant influence in the region is the southward-flowing California Current. As the current passes the eastward break in the coastline at Point Conception, a permanent counterclockwise eddy, the Southern California Counter Current, is induced. The current usually flows west- and northward through the Santa Barbara Channel (Dailey et al., 1974; Jones, 1971; Wyllie, 1966). Seasonal variations in meteorology modify the current pattern. Pinie et al. (1975) have identified three periods of current patterns from LANDSAT and NASA high altitude air photographs. The Oceanic Period, occurring * from July to November, corresponds to the situation described in the preceding paragraph. During the so-called Davidson Period from November to mid-February, the normally submerged Davidson Current rises as the California Current weakens. This produces a more northward flow along the entire coast. In between these two periods, strong winds dominate over the geostrophic effects. The surface wind shear induces vertical circulation characteristic of the Upwelling Period. Pinie et al. (1975) show current patterns typifying these three periods for the entire California coast. Considering the various sources of surface current data presently available, surface current patterns of Pinie et al. (1975) and Kolpack (1971) were selected for use in the oil spill trajectory model. As additional input to the trajectory model in the Santa Maria region, the monthly surface currents provided by Williams et al. (1981) were used. Examples of surface currents used in the model for the Oceanic, Davidson, and Upwelling periods are shown on Figure 4.g-16. 7.38/SAT-7 1100-7 Current speeds in the Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Channel region are highly variable. Typical current speeds are 0.3 knot (0.15 m/s) in deep water and 0.2 knot (0.1 m/s) near shore (City of Oxnard and USGS, 1980); however, extreme conditions from nearly calm to double the preceding values have been recorded (Schwartzlose, 1963). The trajectory model incorporates the typi- cal values. Tidal Currents In the Point Conception region, the tides are predominantly semi-diurnal with the tide peak moving in a northwesterly direction along the coast. The current velocities are greatest during the mid-tide period with zero velocities at high and low water. An average maximum tidal current of 0.2 knot (0.10 m/s) occurs during the mid-tide period (NOAA, 1982; Dailey et al., 1974). The current is assumed to have this value for water depths from the shoreline to a depth of 90 feet (27 m). Current velocities are then assumed to decrease linearly to a value of zero at a depth of 300 feet (91 m). 4.g.2.d Results Month-by-month oil spill trajectory analyses were carried out for two oil spill release locations: the site of the proposed platform on Lease P-0440 and a point halfway along the Gaviota Option pipeline corridor from the platform to the vicinity of the proposed Platform Hermosa site on Lease P-0316. Trajectory analyses were not carried out for the Shamrock to Platform Irene pipeline corri- dor for two reasons: (1) The midpoint of the pipeline corridor is only 1.1 miles (1.8 km) from the Shamrock platform site. This is a very short distance with respect to the resolution of the model and, consequently, trajectories from the pipeline midpoint would be essentially the same as those from the platform site. (2) Trajectory analyses for Platform Irene are available as part of Union's DPP submittal. The Platform Irene site is only 2.2 miles (3.5 km) from the Shamrock platform site and 1.1 miles from the pipe- i line corridor midpoint. 7.38/SAT-8 1100-8 At each release site, 200 trajectories were initiated per month for a total * of 2400 trajectories per site per year. For each trajectory, the starting wind type, time of day, and duration are determined by entering the monthly frequency and duration tables with uniformly distributed random numbers. The starting tidal current phase and hence velocity and direction, is also selected by a ran- dom, number. The surface current pattern to be used is determined by month. The transition between wind types during a trajectory is determined by entering a monthly transition matrix of wind type changes, again using a random number. All the wind tables were assembled from the 11 years of data collected as described previously. The trajectories were run until either a land or water boundary was contacted or 72 hours passed. The results of the oil spill trajectory analysis for the platform release site are shown on Figures 4.g-17 through 4.g-28. The pipeline corridor release point results are shown on Figures 4.g-29 through 4.g-40. On each f igure, a trajec-tory of a spill arriving at the shore segment with the greatest impact percentage and taking the medium time is shown. The dots mark the spill loca= tion at 2-hour intervals. The average and minimum times to shore contact are in * hours. Also shown on each figure is the percentage of all trajectories which remain at sea after 72 hours. The dotted lines bordering the trajectory centerlines indicate the pre- dicted width of the oil slick caused by spreading. The Fay/Hoult spreading algorithm (Fay, 1971) used here calculates the plume diameter as a function of the oil characteristics, volume spilled, and time. The oil characteristics used, primarily density, viscosity, and surface tension, are typical of the crude in this region. For the platform release a spill volume of 10,000 barrels (bbl) was assumed. This volume marks the upper limit for which the assumptions of trajectory modeling are valid. The oil pipeline release was assumed to be 1000 bbl. The results indicate that for both release sites the greatest percentage of trajectories remain at sea in the Santa Barbara Channel after 72 hours. This is due to the predominance of northwesterly winds in the release site region. Averaged annually the trajectory results translate to a 11.1% probability of a 7. 38/SAT-9 1100-9 spill from the proposed platform reaching the shoreline. The monthly probabili- ties range from 6% in May to 23.5% in January with a minimum time of 14 hours to I shoreline contact. The results for the pipeline release are similar with an annual average of 11.8% probability of shoreline contact ranging from 5% in October to 19.5% in February. The minimum time to shoreline contact from the midpoint pipeline location is 11 hours. The results show a pronounced seasonal variation associated with the seaso- nal variation in severe storms. In the summer months the only trajectories which contact land are those occurring during the strong northwesterly storms. In the winter, the more northerly shoreline contacts are due to the greater per- centage of storms with southeasterly winds. 0 7. 38/SAT-10 1100-10 *A 5'.Z . INN. 'VA, X,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ SANTA BARBARA 0200 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- -80HS X ~~~~ ~~ ~S _______ SEABREZESUMERSANA ARI +-~ 2kNOS EA REZE UMER A"100 IRS .-ItN\o SANTA BARBARA 0200- 0800 HRS.~~~~x **S.SS *.~~~~~~~~~~ , S S. .5~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 5-- XN X ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~FIGURE 4.q-8 ::~~kk~k~. ~~ -. - - -~~--~- - --- -- ~SUMMER A SEABREEZE ........ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~WIND REGIME SEA BREEZE SUMMER "A" 1400 fiRS -20 K14oTS SEA BREEZE SLIMMER "A"'2100 IIRS 20 KNOTS SOURCES STRANGE. #961. --~ -. - - -------- \\'\ N SEA BREEZE SUMM4ER 'B" 2000 -0800 HRS 20 KNOTS SEA BREEZE SUM4ER "B" 1400 HRS 20 KNOTS FIGURE 4.g-9 SUMMER B SEABREEZE WIND REGIME SOURCEx STRANGE.I I t NN I X, IN-- YI) Ic Ill-I-, _______ N -. IN~~ X N IN SEA BREEZE ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~WINTER 2000 R E E Z 2EKOT SOURCEi STRANGE. I 981. ..11 - ..: - -- -� LOCAL NW GRADIENT 0800 HRS -30 KNOTS LOCAL NW GRADIENT 1400 HRS -30 KNOTS xx Ix IxI -- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ,~~- FIGURE 4.g- II1 LOCAL NORTHWEST GRADIENT WIND REGIME LOCAL NW GRADIENT 2000 -0200 HR- 30 KNOTS SOURCEs STRANGE. ISO81. 0 9w u-we ......v - . ,sS *.,,.,, , .,., o_ -� wz - N N\ ,.N~.N-.',",,,,, ~ -.-~.-...--___1.::-" ,-- � ,,,.-,.. NORTHWESTER 0200 - 0800 MRS 30] KNOTS NORTHWESTER 1400 HRS - 30 KNOTS . .'.~, ',,<,,,'. ,.,. . \;' *, ,. _ X k ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~FIGURE 4.9- 12 � , .C'.'s--,.,:s~' '..s '. '_:,.c. '~-',. '., : , (ENTIRE RE GION) v SvsKArkk\ .s sis WIND REGIME \~~~~~.. NORTHWESTER 2000 HRS _ 3o KNOTS SOURCE: STRANGE. 198 . * rr //17 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~fU~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~IN *~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ -,v/I -\ -. - ---------- FI 4 - 1 3 I '-,r-/-- -' ~ -- FRNA ASG 00IR.-fbKOSFRONTAL PASSAGE 0600 + 0600 HRS. - 60 KNOTS 2:::IS SN I- ./~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~FGR .-1 ~~~ FRONTAL PASSAGE~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i .~~~~~/ IN EGM .~~~~~~~~~//~~~~~~~~~~~~///I ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ ORE STRNGE I * 0~~~~~:- /1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~FGR 4.-' i/I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--- 4eM.. *~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. SOUHEATE *~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ETR REGION) SOTHESE 0010/fS 0KOS OTESE O + /140 .6 NT *,,-///~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ORC;SRNE 7191 i . .. ', , . .... /, ,,,,,,,/i./ /.',,. _ .. -----" -' - ;.- - ----- ;, ,. . . : . *' t :; ,a,, Al, . &iI..1 I/, /,,/,,ill11-), ialI, .I I .. NORTHEASTER 0200 - 0800 HRS --60 KNOTS ,NORTHEASTER 1400 HRS -60 KNOTS '. . SANTA ANA 60 KNOTS .~SOUCE: STRANGE.. . ,, . II' .....:- ,, _:_ ,. 1 1... . . . .. . ... .... ,. ,, ,.-. -:--. '. ,l. Ir II# SURFACE CURRENTS - UPWELLING PERIOD ..-0.24 KNOTS SURFACE CURRENTS - OCEANIC PERIOD --0.24 KNOTS r- E. _ ID E T . .. ... - , . , I. � ".4.1. I :' -::.. c-� i~ans~~ i It I ,._ \I,,e.......... s~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ 5*..%- .. ~ ~ 'L~" 'i\ -� ;; . ................ UFCECRET SURACECURENS -DAIDSN ERIO -0.4 KOT 121OO' 1120030 1200001, o 10 20 MLE3 .0 4.0 Pt. Sal 34(32 1.0 30(30) 3.0 24(24) 4.0 23(23) 17(17) 15(15bCI Release, Site 5*'64(64)0. 0.5 + 35 35) . 34"301- 23(23 Pt. Conc9Ption 23(23) Santa barbara 76.5% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Miguel - Sn Cu l d Island Santa Cruz island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: ACM) FIGURE 4.g- I 7 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A u AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE ONOFACTS CONTACT (HRS.) CONTACTS LEASE P-044 CM) M MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT CHRS.) (JANUARY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES [121�0�' fi120�30' 120 * 11 o10 20 MILES + �. + 3500o'- Pt. Sal .3S 32(32) 3o(28) , , 5. 25(25) 22(22) Release Site 5 7(27I 34030. Pt. Conception 23s23) Santa Barbara 83s OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Miguel Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa sland LEGEND: A(M) FIGURE 4.9- 1 8 WHERE: P � PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A - AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CONN*ACTS LEASE P-0440 M) � MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (FEBRUARY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 121.000' 120030 1200030, -NI o 10 20 MILES Pt. Sal 4 3.0 24(24) RelelaseI Sit e1 + 0.5 .,34.30. Pt. Conception Santa Barbara 86t OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS 2.3 0.5 / . 2.3 67 Son Miguel 71 7 Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rose Island LEGEND: p A N)3 FIGURE 4.g- 1 S WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A a AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CONT4ACTS LEASE P-044( 0M) * MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (MARCH) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES ~~I~~~~ ~ i 121000' 120030' 120�00. 10 20 j,~~~ laS~~~MLES +)+ .+M35000 Pt. Sal 4 1.0 ..,.1) 1:2.0 Release Sit*e ( 34o030- Pt. Conception Santa 93.5sOF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS 0.5 72(72)~ s I7 71(71 b.3 San Migu l M i70) island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGENDO: FIGURE 4.g-20 WHERE: P PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES A � AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE ISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE *CONTACT (HRS.) CONT*CTS LEASE P-0440 DA) MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (APRIL) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES __________________________________________ i 121000' 12030 120000,z~ol -n-1 o 10 20 + + MILES PtSal+ 36(36) 0.5 3 0.5 34(34), 1.0 25(25) Roeleas Site + 34"3Ot Pt.d ctir Santa 94% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS \\ 2.0 2.0 San Miguel 72 70 island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: p A(M) FIGURE 4.g-2 I WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A a AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HAS.) CONTqACTS LEASE P-0440 *0) - MINIMUM T1NE TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HAS.)( (MAY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES - 121 000 i120�30' 120000. * 0 20 MLES _ + Z + + 3500O- Pt. Sal 19(191 C301 Pt. E8ptc Relese Site% / C,� *~~~~ �~~~\ Santa t. c~:,tio"-9'arbara 86.51 OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS N� 3.8 �_ j;~---2.8 -3.8 + an Miguel Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: AM) FIGURE 4.g-22 WHERE: P m PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A * AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CM) - MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (JUNE) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES ++ +35000 + Pt. Sal 20(20)' Release Site a + 11 t+ 34�30'- Pt. ption Santa Barbara 87s OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN \ AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS \ m\00~~~~~~~ ~4.3 + -', 3 -++ Sa n Migu6l 7(677 Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: p FIGURE 4.g-.3 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CONTXACTS LEASE P-044 (M) - MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (JULY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES ~121�~00'~ f~.120030, 12000. o 1i 20 MLES - + + + 35100- Pt. Sal Relases*it 0.3_ + + 34030- *\\ Santa \~~\'~ *\ 8 ~Barbara 93% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN \ AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS \ '. N: *� 03'3.0 ++ n 7 1+7 7�0-O_ Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: D ACM) FIGURE 4.g-24 WHERE: P � PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A � AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CONTACTS LEASE P-0440 0M) � MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (AUGUST) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 121�O0' 120�30' 120000' O 10 20 )+ +MLES /+ 3s5ooo0 Pt, Sal 36(36) 0.5 3.0 23(23). 4.3 43 Ri.leae Sit\e + 34330'- Pt. Conception Santa 86% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Mlguel Iland Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Irland LEGENO: 1J A OA) FIGURE 4.g-25 WHERE: PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A , AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CONTJACTS LEASE P-044 ) . MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (SEPTEMBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES .IrI I Id, , "" Ize I i 121�00' 120030- 120000. *120�30' \ ~0 10 20 MILES _ + + + 35000- Pt. Sal 5.5 .1 t 34030_ 30(30) 0.5 -A- 22(22) Pt. Conception 22(22) Barbara s88 OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Miguel Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: FIGURE 4.g-26 WHERE: P * PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A � AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE i CONACS.) CONTCTS LEASE P-0440 CM) - MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (OCTOBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES Li 121 :00 0 120�30' 2 xo 10 20 0+ 0+ + 3500'0 Pt Sal 36(36) 1.5 30(30) 2.5 1722(22) 17(17 Release Site �.3 (580.3 3430 0.3 + 34030L- 0.3 22(22 Pt. Conception' Santa Barbara 83% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS Santa Crux Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: A(M) FIGURE 4.g9-27 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A a AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (MHRS.) CONTXACTS LEASE P-044 o). MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE PLATFORM SITE CONTACT (HRS.) (NOVEMBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES CONTACT (MRS.) (NOVEMBER) F 121 00', 120o30, 120,00o . o o 10 20 IlES ' 3.0 Pt. Sali M S 35(35 5.0 30(30) 3s3s" .5 Release Site 0 .3 0.3 0.3 51(51 0 .3 39 39 /a + + 39(3s) 8 + . 34030 1 23(23 Pt. Conception 23(23) Santa 82% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara Af SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Miguel Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: A(M) WHERE: FIGURE 4.g-28 P * PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES A a AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) ) CON CTS LEASE P-0440 (h) MIN IMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) (DECEMBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 12IzoO 120030, 120000' I IL o 10 20 MILES + + + 350o'- Pt. Sal 2 .5 38(38) . 34(3 3(32) 2 2.s 27(27) 1.5 2.0 26(19) 17(17) 13(11 + Release Site r 0.3_"+ 340301 Pt Conception47(47) Santa Barbara 83.5% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Miguel Island 2�n MlguSanta Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: A(M) FIGURE 4.9-29 WHERE: P a PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A - AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (MRM.) CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) A) i MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (JANUARY) |I ,72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 121000, 120030' 120000 - + ) J!~~~~+ 35000'- ('d~fl' w . ..5 ~ ~ ~MES .5 , 36(34), 32(32), . 27(27) - + Relese Sitei 11 tl 0.3 .34 . j . 34o30,_ Pt. Conception Santa Barbara 50.51 OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS Ban Migu I Islandn ElFon~Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: A(M) FIGURE 4.9-30 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A - AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (MRS.) CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CM) - MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (FEBRUARY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 1210O0' 120030' 120000' o 10 20 3500oo_ Pt. Sal tion 318.1 O COAN Release Sit* _ Pt Qupetion *Santa Rosa ldant \LEGEN :9arbara P .s ERC OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN O E AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURE \ _+ 6 64(F63) 12 O1 I~nd 69(69) Santa Cruz tIlnd Santa Rosa Isnd LEGENo: A(W) FIGURE 4.g-31 WHERE: P I PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIE S DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A � AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE OA) MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (MARCH) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 12100' 120030' 1200001 o t o 20 MLES + Y + ' + ++ 35000, Pt. Sal 020( , s+ S.i. te,' -'+]"elease sit.U 16(16) + 34o30L. Pt. Conception Santa 93.S% OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS n0(60) 0503 San Miguel - :in Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: D AO ) FIGURE 4.g-32 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A * AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) 4) zMINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (APRIL) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 121000' I 120030, 120�00' j O 10 20 0.5 35�00'- Pt. Sal f: 43(43):0 36(36)0 '5 0.5 .3 +- Release Site _,+ 340301- 931 OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS \�x Ct� N.l t��`� 3.0 \ 0\ n Miguel 65(65) 7(7) Island Sants Cruz lland Santa Ros Island LEGEND: ~A|) WFIGURE 4.9-33 WHERE: P � PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (RS.)DPOINT CM) MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (MRS.) (MAY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES I 121o00'30 120�,00 00 0 10 20 MLES + Y + + 35000. Pt. Sal Realea Site +v + ; + 34�30' Pt~piception Santa Barbara 83.51 OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS \ \ 3 4.3 4.3 ~~~~~~~+ A n _~~~~~~61(60 an Migul 61(61) Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: A(M) FIGURE 4.9-34 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A a AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CORRIDOR MIDPOINT Do) a MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) (JUNE) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES Jr~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 121000' 120030, 120oo 0 I I + 3s5ao'- Pt Sal + Releas Site Rele esl t,~,+ 3430 '- PtN\ o:nception Ne _Santa \�~~ e\ ~~~~Barbara 84s OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN N AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS 3.0 4.8 San Miguel 64(61) Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: AW() FIGURE 4.9g-35 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A - AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (MRS.) CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) _ 04) � MINIMU TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (JULY) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 121 00, 120�30' 120000 o 0o10 20 MIL ES _ + . + 3000+ Pt. Sal .... _-+ Reiease Sl e 34�30L \ \�^~~~~\ _~Santa 86s OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN a AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS e * _ + \ ex\ 5.3 San Miguel 63(63) Santa Cruz Island Santa Rome Island LEGEND: oA (h FIGURE 4.g-36 WHERE: P � PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A a AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (NRS.) CONTACTS PIPELINE CM) * MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (MRS.) (AUGUST) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 1__ �~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 121o00, 120030' 12&000' J o 10O 20 MILES - + + ~~~+ ~35o00a_ Pt. Sal 38(38)]O* + Release 5lte+ 8s) 0.3 + ~(i~~y~t ~ ~ f 34030'- Pt. Conception Santa Barbara 92z OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS 63(63) .8 San Miguel - Island Santa Cruz Island 8anta Ros Island LEGEND: p FIGURE 4.g-37 WHER�: P * PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A - AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) D() MNIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (SEPTEMBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES i 121�00' 12030' 120000. *1~~9 I o to 20 MLES 35000-. Pt Sal S,'' 1.5 34030L Pt. Conception Santa 95s OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN Barbara AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS .A , 0.3 0.3 1.0 1.0 61(650.3 San Miguel 6(66)66(66 (67(67) 7 - Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rosa Island LEGEND: p ^A ) FIGURE 4.g-38 WHERE: P a PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A * AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CONTACTS PIPELINE DO) - MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (OCTOBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES O .10 20 - + + Pt. Sal . 1.0 37(371 36(35)J '!.s 25(26) .5 + Releaue 81t@; 106(3): 0.3 72(,2 + 34.03. Pt. Conception Santa Barbara 91.5S OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN B AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS J~ . 1.5 60(60) +Sn Miquel 57)6 Ss Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rose Island LEGENO: p A(M) FIGURE 4.g-39 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A - AVERAGE TIrE TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) CM) * MINIMUM TIM4E TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (NOVEMBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 121o00't 120030' 12000'0 0 10 20 MILES + + - +++ 35000- Pt. Sal s 40(40 3. 35(35) 3 / .s@Es)'y 1 33(33j 2.0 I iz1u)~ .0 t;P9(i t0.3 +, iReleale Site U 72(71 + 34030cL Pt. Conception Santa Barbara 91� OF TRAJECTORIES REMAIN AT SEA AFTER 72 HOURS San Miguel lw Island Santa Cruz Island Santa Rose Island LEGEND: A W) FIGURE 4.g-40 WHERE: P - PERCENT OF TOTAL TRAJECTORIES DISTRIBUTION OF SHORELINE A * AVERAGE TIME TO SHORELINE CONTACTS PIPELINE CONTACT (HRS.) OA) - MINIMUM TIME TO SHORELINE CORRIDOR MIDPOINT CONTACT (HRS.) (DECEMBER) 72 HOUR TRAJECTORIES 1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I 6w T * STORAGE AND DISPOSAL Storage Temporary storage is an essential part of oil spill recovery operations. The present state-of-the-art storage for minor spills is a container that functions as an oil/water separator and stores a high percentage of oil only. The storage/container of the Walosop skimmer meets this criteria. The most common type of temporary storage container maintained at offshore facilities is the floating storage bag. Exxon maintains these bags at each site as back-up storage containers in the event they are re- quired. The preferred method of storing recovered oily debris such as oiled sorbent material and vegetation, is in heavy duty plastic bags that can be readily transported and disposed of at approved onshore disposal sites. However, any nonleakable container such as drums or solid sided dumpsters can be used to store oily debris. In the event of a large spill of several thousand barrels, Clean Seas storage barge Tide-Mar VII would be activated for storage. The Tide-Mar VII which stores 7840 barrels is described in detail in the equipment section of this plan. Disposal * Disposal of a large volume of recovered oil from an offshore facility may be returned to an offshore production facility and separated through the deck drainage/rerun system if it is free of debris. This would be oil that is recovered by a skimmer containing only oil/water. Oily debris containing vegetation, trash, or sorbent material must be hauled to shore for disposal at an approved California Department of Health Services (DOHS) hazardous waste site. Disposal of oily debris must comply with the regulations of the EPA, DOHS and the Regional Water Quality Control Board. To ensure Exxon compliance with these agencies, hazardous waste manifest must be properly filled out be the generator (Exxon), transported by approved haulers and taken to approved waste disposal sites. the following table and plat list and locate the present southern California DOHS approved hazar- dous waste disposal facilities. 1200-1 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL SITES CALIFORNIA DISPOSAL SWRCB FACILITY CLASS EPA I.D. I OPERATOR CONTACT DISPOSAL SITE LOCATION BKK 1 CAD 067 786 749 BKK Corporation Joe Fulton 2210 So. Azusa Ave. (West Covina) 2250 237th Street (213) 810-1085 West Covina, 91792 * Closed for 2 mi South of San Bernardino Freeway on left liquid waste* side, (left turn lane), entrance well marked Casmalia 1 CAD 020 748 125 Casmalia Resource Co. Me. Jan Lachenmaier S.W. of Santa Maria about 10 miles. Exit P.O. Box 5275 (805) 969-5897 Betteravia Rd. off Hwy 101, W. on Betteravia Santa Barbara, 93108 to Mahoney Rd. which bears left at Y, S.W. on Mahoney which merges into Black Rd., continue on Black Rd. crossing Hwy 1. Site is on the right about 3 mi. past Hwy 1, marked with a small sign (Casmalia Resources) Kettleman Hills 1 CAT 000 646 117 Chemical Waste Mgt. Mark Langowaki West of Kettleman City, 3 miles West of 1-5 P.O. Box 471 (209) 386-9711 on Hwy 41. Entrance on right has a small hard Kettleman City, 93239 to see sign. Petroleum Waste 11-1 CAD 980 675 276 Petroleum Waste Inc. Gary J. Leary Exit I-5 W on Hwy 58 W. through Buttonwillow, (Buttonwillow) P.O. Box 3366 (805) 325-5355 cont. 3 1/2 mi. to Lokern Rd., W. on Lokern Bakersfield, 93385 4 mi. site on north side of road. Roads are well marked, site is visible. EPC East Side 11-1 CAD 030 384 267 Environ. Protect. Corp. Chris O'harra Exit Airport Rd. from Hwy 99 in Bakersfield, (Round Mountain) 3040 19th St. (805) 327-9681 bear right on Roberts, E. on Roberts to Bakersfield, 93301 Chester, N. on Chester 3 blks to China Grade Rd, E. on China Grade which turns into Round Mtn. Rd., cant. on Round Mtn. Rd. several miles, site is on left and well marked with EPC sign and flagpoles. EPC West Side 11-1 CAT 080 010 283 " " " " Site on Hwy 33, 3 miles N. of Fellows or 10 (Fellows) miles S. of MaKittrick. Site on W. side of road. Hard to see sign. Getty field office large metal barn next to turn off. Liquid Waste Mgt. 11-1 CAD 980 638 498 Liquid Waste Mgt. Gene Kozlowski South on Hwy 33/58 through McKittrick, S. 1 mi. (MoKittrick) P.O. Box B (714) 828-8330 turn right on Hwy 58, site on left, entrance *Do not use for Stanton, CA.90680 about 1/4 mi. from Hwy 33, sign visible. Exxon waste* JNJ Dump Site 11-1 CAD 980 636 773 J.N.J. Sales & Service Jack Jammar Site is located at the N.E. corner of Harbor (Oxnard) 1579 Los Angeles Ave. _ (805) 656-3836 Blvd. and 5th Street in Oxnard. Entr off ** CLOSED@ Saticoy 5th Street. E.P.A. -IDENTIFIED - ~~-, WASTE DUMPSITES F. 71.1 A . ~~~BKClsS. Casmaila Class I k " T Y ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~C. J.N.J. Class Il-I (Closed) I D. Kettelman Hills Class I E. EPC, East Side Class Il-I TUL.AR F. EPC, West Side Class il-I G. Liquid Waste Mgt. Class Il-I M. Petr. Waste Inc. Class Il-i KING~~~~~~~~~~~ T~~~~~~~ >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~4 N~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~fI C~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ OUX SID SAN "mm.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ s-c-~~~~~~~t. C~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ALSONI 13. APPENDIX Is., 0 .., United States Department of the Interior MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE PACIFIC OCS REGION 1340 WEST SIXTH STREET LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 90017 July 28, 1982 In Reply Reter To 1 Or;;;radii stp Re: Oil Spill Contingency Plan Guide- lines, Pacific OCS Region The Minerals Management Service, Pacific OCS Region, has developed guidelines to aid lessees in the preparation of oil spill contingency plans. Listed below are these guidelines and amplifying information. Effective August 1, 1982, all oil spill contingency plans submitted for approval to the Deputy Minerals Manager (DMfM), Field Operations must conform to the guidelines. Plans submit- ted and approved prior to August 1, 1982 for ongoing drilling/production operations which do not meet these guidelines are to be modified and resubmit- ted to the DMM, Field Operations for approval no later than February 28, 1983. In addition to these guidelines, existing oil spill response capabilities are to be upgraded to "state-of-the-art' as defined in Commandant Notice No. 5740 (enclosed) by February 28, 1983. Also enclosed for your information is Section 408 of the Region IX Oil and Hazardous Substance Contingency Plan, entitled "Schedule of Chemicals to Remove Oil and Hazardous Substances." This section details the approval procedure and the information that must be pro- vided prior to the Regional Response Team (RRT) rendering a decision on the use of dispersants. Lessees are reminded that oil spill contingency plans are required to be reviewed and updated annually with all modifications promptly submitted to the DMM, Field Operations for approval. Oil spill contingency plans are to contain the following: 1. Provisions to assure that full resource capability is known and can be committed during an oil spill, including the identification and inventory of applicable equipment, materials, and supplies which are available locally and regionally, both committed and uncommitted, and the time required for deploy- ment of the equipment. Vessels or vessel types to be used in deploying and opejrating the response equipment and dispersant equipment, types, and toxicities proposed for use shall also be identified. 2. A discussion of the lessee's relationship with respect to any oil spill cooperatives. If a member, then describe how, when, and to what degree 2 the lessee will use the cooperative and what the respective roles will be during'a spill. In this regard, describe to what degree the lessee will rely upon the cooperative to manage and perfose the cleanup and provide equipment and technical advice. 3. Provisions for varying degrees of response effort depending upon the severity of the oil spill, including how additional equipment will be made available for extraordinary spills that exceed the recovery capacity of the readily available equipment. 4. Provisions that drills and training for familiarization with pollu- tion-control equipment and operational procedures will be conducted in accor- dance with OCS Order No. 7. 5. Provisions for identifying and protecting areas of special biological sensitivity, including: (a) Maps of sufficient scale to identify areas of special biological sensitivity. Sensitive areas to be identified include: critical habitats for endangered/threatened species, rocky intertidal shorelines, kelp beds, estu- aries, marsh/wetlands, nesting areas for marine birds and marine mammal haul- out and breeding areas. (b) A discussion concerning the protection and handling of oiled marine birds and mammals. The names and telephone numbers of those agencies to be contacted which have responsibility for the protection of oiled marine birds and mamnals should be given. (c) General strategies and procedures for protecting the various types of vulnerable resources which could be impacted. (d) Initial site-specific response strategies for protecting those especially biologically sensitive areas which oil spill trajectory analysis indicates could potentially be impacted. The strategies should be based upon the characteristics of the oils being handled as well as environuental condi- tions and equipment characteristics and anticipated use of dispersants/chemical agents. 6. A risk analysis which indicates the number and size of spills that could occur during OCS exploration, development, and production operations. Also, a detailed oil spill trajectory analysis shall be included which indicates where spilled oil is likely to travel with time. These trajectories shall be on a monthly or at least a seasonal basis and shall be based on known surface currents and average wind/weather conditions. The risk analysis for the number and size of anticipated spills contained in the Environmental Impact Statement for the sale area is appropriate upon which to base the trajectory analysis. 7. Provisions for the establishment of procedures for the purpose of early detection and timely notification for well-defined and specific actions to be taken after discovery of an oil spill. This would include a current : list of names, telephone numbers, and addresses of the responsible persons and alternates on call to receive notification of an oil spill, and the names, 3 telephone numbers, and addresses of regulatory organizations and agencies to be notified when an oil spill is discovered, including: (a) Specification of an oil spill response operating tean consisting of trained, prepared, and available operating personnel; (b) Predesignation of an oil spill response coordinator who ls charged with the responsibility and is delegated commensurate authority for directing and coordinating response operations; and (c) A preplanned location for an oil spill response operations cen- ter and a reliable comununlcations system for directing the coordinated overall response operations. 8. Provisions for storage and disposal of recovered materials. If you have any questions, please contact Messrs. Andy Clifton or Glenn Shackell of my staff at (213) 688-2846. Sincerely yours, 7a~A w, p~~v~ :H T. Cypher Deputy Minerals Manager Field Operatilons, Pacific OCS Region DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION UU.A35 UNITED STATES COAST GUARD U3.Coasti Guard M.Md Wa~fshington, De 20.593 Phones (202) 426-9568 1 5 APR 1982 COMMIANDANT NOT ICS 5740 S U M S LDI1 Is Oa sbs Memorandum of Understanding between the Us 5. 06ologii1Sre and the go go Coast fuard concerning Regulation, of Activitiex and * Wecir~alitles on the U. as Outer Continental shelf Met (a) Federal Registers, Vol,, 46, No* 5, Thursday* Jan S. 1981j, Page 2199 I. PURPOSI. This notice provides amplifying Information and revised guidelines to be used by On-Scene Coordinators in the review of oil &pill contingency plans submitted to the Minerals Management Service (MMS) as part of OCC Uploration Plans#, or Development and Production Plans. Vhe guidelines established In COMDTNOTU 5740 of 14 Kay 1981 are superceded effective I gone I1982. 2. DISCUSSION*. a, The gogU. coia Survey (USGS) and the USCO signed subject- NOV to promote the safety of activities and facilities an the OCS. The twi~t of the M4OU was published In reference (a) The MOO affects activities associated with the exploration, development,, and production of mineral resources on the OCCI, anid In iatenAe6 ft avoid duplication of effort, and to promote coiteiatento coordinated, and less burdensome regulation of those faclltties. Xn a recent Department of Interior internal reorganization, responsibility for CCI activities was transferred from USGS to the newly created Minerals Management Service. This organizational name change does not otherwise effect the Mg* -b-cd elfg hli j klm nn v Q r st u vwxv Z A LA B 410 12 5 C 5 D 5 1_ E I 1 5 F 15APR 1982 2.b. Paragraph YU1 of the fNM gives the co the responuibility to' review the adequacy of the oil spill contingency plans suwmtte to the MrS as a part of the Jkploration Plans or Development and production Plans* "a. "DU further states that the criteria by which to judge the adequacy of the oil spill response. organizations clean up equipment,, and procedures will be jointly agreedl upon by the MME and the U3099 The On-Scene Coordinator for the zone in, which the drilling activity will occur mill conduct this review. Planning guidelines for conducting this review were Initially devevloped for Lease Sale 42 on eOtrges sanik and later were pramulgated, for nationwide application AA comm=tOT 5740 of 14 May 1981. Mhile the guidelines have been implemented quite effectively for Lease gale 42, It has became apparent that they do not allow sufficient flexibility to meet the diverse geographic differences and local conditions La other areas where drilling or production activity occur. co Revised guidelines for evaluating OCC oil spill contingency *plans have boon jointly agreed upon by MN1 and USCG and ame contained In enclosure (1)0, They are intended to provide general consistency In setting standards nationwide WWIle allowing wsom flexibility to account for local. conditions. The planning guidelines apply to OCc Zxploration Vians or Development and Production Plans submitted for approval after I 9- ~~~JuneJ9jZ.L.. Plans submitted and approved prior to that datei are not affected by these guidelines except that operators at ongoing drilling/production operations shall ensure existing response equipment to upgraded to "state-of-the-artm an It La * ~~replacede de A regional Technical Review Board (TR*) will assist Oafs in assessing the capabilities of open water equipment and in applying the general guidelines of enclosure (1) to his particular area. Specifically the MM WILLI (1) advise the CIC on whether response equipment proposed is the contingency plan seats currently accepted *&tate-of- the-aft" criteria. (2) advise the 03C on the adequacy of the amounts and types of equipment proposed. (3) advise the OSC an acceptable response times for locad conditions. (4) keep abreast of developments In response equipment technology and revise s~tate-of -the-art` criteria accordingly. (5) provide OCIS with technical. information on equipment proposed by operators. 5APR1982 2.4. Membership of the regional Technical Review Doard Lot USO= 5-trIft Commander representative - Co-chairman. MgE Zepat& M~inerals Manager Representative - Co-chairman Appeopriiit IDSC8 Rational Strike Force, Commanding Of ficer -,,941Zpk OBMWST representative lSC(= 52 cmI representative viceG i* vzx representative Rmm Ng reprosentattve 3. Acn~l a * District Commanders shal~l .rT Totablift and maintain liaison with the appropriate Ming.als JManagoemnt official. [see enclosure (2)3 to ensure. thistal l spill contingency plans for the OCS are su~bmitted for ~~Gly revlew. (2) 2stablish a rftional Technical Review Board &a describe4 above to assist Ohio in reviewing contingency plans. b. On-Soone Coordiuiatayo shall consider the Planning Guidelines of enclosure (1) In avaluatlng oil spill Contingency Plana submitted In accordance with the NOV and advise MO5 as to adequacy of the Plane* a. Commcdant will Inctryorate the provisions of this Notice In t1e Marine Safety Ka.,ual., CG-495., W. E. CALD WEL Chiesf OffiTce of Markse byllonment and systems 2nd:t 1) planning GuidemLinas 2 ) A4dxasses and p~oaa numbers of weS points of contact I5APR 1982 Planning Guidelness a. Iisk analysis. 2he contingency plan should contain an analysLu which Indicates the number and size of spills that Could Doomu during OCC mineral. exploration, developments and production operationlse The spill trajectory analysis should Indicate whore an oil spill Is likely to flow under the various expected cots of. local. sea sonal meteorological and oceanographic conditions Impact areas should be identified and strategies should be fully developed for the protection of poter4ially vulnerable areas and resources., The depth of detail In flexible but should be sufficient to asswo the OSC that adequate contingency planning has been done. b., Recovery Squipment. The type of recovery equipment and its method of deployment rests entirely with the operator. However, subjaft t the prevalent conditions Identified In the risk analysis, the equipment should be wstate-of-the-arte Based on previous MID studies, observations,, and experiences, currently avafl~le "state- of-the-art" equipment La capable of oprating La 3-10 foot seas and 20 knot winds with deployment accomplished In the 546 foot range. However,, the OSC should be aware that mechanical equipment cannot be expected to perfors at optimum efficiencies La all environsental situations. Local conditions such as high energy sea states with short wave lengths, or severe icing. may not allow all of the above operational criteria' to be met. a. Zquipment Availability: The quantity and capability of the equipment to be made available should be related to the risk analysis. For planning purposes, open water recovery devices typically have a recovery capacity of at least 1000 barrels/day, A recovery rate of 1000 barrels/day should therefore be considered appropriate unless the risk analysis suggest. a higher spill rate La likely. This recovery rate may be attained from one device or an array of devices which would be utilized in concert with each other. The contingency plan should also indicate how additional equipment will be made available for extraordinary spills, that is, spills that exceed the recovery capacity of the readily available oquipment. de Response Time. It local conditions or geography permits the tarqet for initiating recovery operations with pre-stageA eqTipmnt.(IaeOR the response time) should be six to twelve hours from the time of the spill dependent upon the location and general operating chs racteristics of the drilling or production activity. Whatever amount of equipment Is required to be available for responding to spills should be fully deployed and In operation within thbe specified response time. weather permitting. The location of stag"d equipment will be left to the operator. For extraordinary spills. the operator should be expected to obtain additional equipment within 43 hours. Enclosure (1) to COMMDTUO 5740 ~~ 15 APR 1982 Go vriilsB " spouse exercisefs for deploying equipment in open water *~~occuz at lst annually to test the equipment and the contingency plane This exercise should be hold under realistic environmental conditions ID which deP1Ylomet and operation mm be acemvplishod without endangering the safety of personnel., Zn -adidtian., at'least onet hands-on drill should be conducted annually as part of a tradining program and may Include full deployment conducted La protected waters. Zxeral.sea that test the alertingflirtta2'rtgponhe mechanism and command,, controjl, and communications should be held eas frequently asnecessary to demonstrate effectiveness to the OUC. 9- Support V0390e,: Vesselis at vessel, types to be used In deploying anc1'a PratiraW tyle'r'sos eqipent should be identified in the contingency plan,. 2he vessels should be available within the same response time parameters an used for response equipment. 2he crave of all candidate support vessels should be familiar wit~h equipment deployment and operating techniques, at a system should be developed to supply trained crews/supervisors to the support vessels within the specified response tame. go Dispersant 2quipmonts -216-dditlon to oil recovery equipment, disprerant equipuent OhOul.d be included In the contingency plan, Equipment capab*ole ip pi-iing dispersants should be maintained at appropriate staging points an well as adequate stockpiles of dispersants If they are not readily available frc local distributors. The tYPes'and toxicities of dispersants proposed fox, use should be identified In the contingency plan. The quantity and tYPes Of dispeisant0 presited should be related to the risk analysiai, takiaigjL,,o account dispersant toxicity, oil composition and water temnperat.ure,, The above should not be interpreted as a predilectioni an t~h. part DC government for the use of dispersantse but a recognition that spill& way occur when, due to environmental conditions or lack of adequate support resourcesj, mechanical recovery is not possible. The decision to use dispersants would of course be made using the criteria and procedures got forth in tje National oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. a response target of twenty-four hours from the tins the spill occurs Is appropriate, unless Pre-VPprOVed contingency plans or a streamlined RRT authorization procedures for the age of dispersants are in'effect. in this event* the response time may be lessened. 15 APR 1982 addre5sse and PhOAS Rumber Of Minerals Ma"98ement Serk6 PmIS 49t Minerals Management Service Mary Donn Pload Barbstable Municipal Uizport/ft~~t bmTp CON: OM17 771-506 CCOD 3, COGD 5. CWD. 7 District Superrisord, mid-ritlantft viptvrivt, Minerale Management Soe*vc 515 Tilton madi Northfield,, W. 08225 CQM: (609) 641-7266o CCG a Deputy Minerals Manager Minerals Managczent, Service Offshore Field Oprations 3301 We Causeway Blvdgg Suite 643 VI. Do Box 7944 Netarins &a 70010- TT3: 650-9227 CON: (504) 837-4720 L CGGD lie COGD 12 District supervisor, Ventura blitilft Minerals Management Service 145 Worth Brent gtxoeto,.. SItel 202 Ventura# Ch 93003 PTU: 96046305- CON: (6005) 648-5131 CCG 17 Deputy Minerals manager Offshore Field operatiom~ Minerals Management Fervice. 300 A street Anchorage.v AM 99510% FT3: 271-4303 COX$ (907) 271-4303