[Federal Register Volume 59, Number 91 (Thursday, May 12, 1994)]
[Unknown Section]
[Page 0]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 94-11441]


[[Page Unknown]]

[Federal Register: May 12, 1994]


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Part II





Department of Health and Human Services





_______________________________________________________________________



Administration for Children and Families



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Runaway and Homeless Youth Program; FY 1994 Final Program Priorities, 
Availability of Financial Assistance for FY 1994, and Request for 
Applications; Notice
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families
[Program Announcement No. ACF/ACYF/RHYP 94-1]

 

Runaway and Homeless Youth Program (RHYP): Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 
Final Program Priorities, Availability of Financial Assistance for 
Fiscal Year 1994, and Request for Applications

AGENCY: Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB), Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), Administration for Children and 
Families (ACF), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

ACTION: Notice of Fiscal Year 1994 Final Runaway and Homeless Youth 
(RHY) Program Priorities, announcement of availability of financial 
assistance, and request for applications for the following programs and 
activities: Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth (BCP), 
Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless 
Youth (DAPP), Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth (TLP), and 
Training and Technical Assistance (T&TA) Grants.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Family and Youth Services Bureau of the Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families is publishing final program priorities and 
announcing the availability of funds for the following:
    1. Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth (BCP): The 
purpose of the BCP is to provide financial assistance to establish or 
strengthen locally-controlled centers that address the immediate needs 
(e.g., outreach, temporary shelter, food, clothing, counseling, and 
aftercare services) of runaway and homeless youth and their families.
    2. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and 
Homeless Youth (DAPP): The purpose of the DAPP is to improve and expand 
drug abuse prevention, education and information services to runaway 
and homeless youth and their families.
    3. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth (TLP): The 
purpose of the TLP is to support projects in local communities that 
provide long term shelter, skill training and support services to 
homeless youth; to assist homeless youth in making smooth transitions 
to self-sufficiency; and to prevent long-term dependency on social 
services.
    4. Training and Technical Assistance (T&TA) Grants: The purpose of 
this T&TA is to improve the programmatic and administrative capacities 
of public and private agencies serving runaway and homeless youth.
    This single announcement for all runaway and homeless youth 
programs has been developed in order to save both the field and the 
Federal government significant resources. Also, the single announcement 
provides the field with the application due dates for all the programs, 
providing interested agencies the means to forecast the workload and 
resources needed to apply for these grants.
    This announcement contains all the necessary information and 
application materials to apply for funds under these grant programs. 
The estimated funds available by fiscal year and the approximate number 
of new grants to be awarded under this program announcement are as 
follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       Funds       New  
         Program                Fiscal year          available    grants
------------------------------------------------------------------------
BCP.....................  FY 1994................   $14,000,000      145
DAPP....................  FY 1994................     2,000,000       20
T&TA....................  FY 1994................     1,500,000       10
TLP.....................  FY 1995................     5,000,000       25
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    New BCP, DAPP, and T&TA grants will be awarded out of FY 1994 
funds. New TLP grants will be awarded out of FY 1995 funds, subject to 
the appropriation of funds by the Congress.
    In addition to new grants, the Family and Youth Services Bureau of 
the Administration on Children, Youth and Families anticipates 
providing FY 1994 continuation funds to current grantees, including 
Demonstration Projects (DEMOS), as follows: 

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Number of 
                   Program                        Funds     continuation
                                                available      grants   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
BCP.........................................   $23,231,452          205 
DAPP........................................     9,780,702          105 
TLP.........................................     5,095,648           41 
DEMOS.......................................     1,288,000            8 
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Grantees eligible for these continuation grants will receive a 
letter to that effect from the appropriate Regional grants management 
office and should not submit their continuation applications in 
response to this announcement. Only applications for new grants are 
solicited through this announcement.

DATES: The deadlines or closing dates for receipt of applications for 
new grants under this announcement are as follows: 

------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Programs                          Closing dates           
------------------------------------------------------------------------
BCP................................  June 15, 1994.                     
TLP................................  June 28, 1994.                     
DAPP...............................  July 12, 1994.                     
T&TA...............................  July 12, 1994.                     
------------------------------------------------------------------------

ADDRESSES: Application receipt point: Department of Health and Human 
Services, Administration for Children and Families, Division of 
Discretionary Grants, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., Aerospace Building, 
6th Floor, Washington, DC 20447. Attn: Maiso Bryant, ACF-94-ACYF/RHYP.
    Envelopes containing applications must clearly indicate the 
specific program that the application is addressing: Basic Center 
Program (BCP), Drug Abuse Prevention Program (DAPP), Transitional 
Living Program (TLP), or Training and Technical Assistance Grants 
(T&TA).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Administration on Children, Youth and 
Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, PO Box 1182, Washington, DC 
20013; Telephone: 1-800-351-2293.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This program announcement consists of six 
parts. Part I provides general information for potential applicants who 
wish to apply to operate programs serving runaway and homeless youth. 
Part II contains the evaluation criteria against which all applications 
will be competitively reviewed, evaluated and rated. Part III contains 
specific information necessary to apply for funds under each of the 
three service programs and the Training and Technical Assistance 
grants. Part IV describes the application process. Part V provides 
instructions on the assembly and submission of applications. Part VI 
contains appendices to be consulted in preparation of applications. All 
forms needed to prepare applications for any of the programs are found 
in Part VI, Appendix I, of this announcement.
    The following outline is provided to assist in the review of this 
Federal Register announcement:

Part I: General Information
    A. Background on Runaway and Homeless Youth
    B. Legislative Authority
    C. Program Purpose, Goals, and Objectives of the Federal Runaway 
and Homeless Youth Grant Programs
    1. Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    2. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and 
Homeless Youth
    3. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth
    4. Training and Technical Assistance Grants
    D. Definitions
    E. Final Priorities
    1. Public Comments in Response to the Proposed Priorities
    2. Final Program Priorities for Fiscal Year 1994
    a. Direct Service Grants for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    (1) Basic Center Program Grants
    (2) Transitional Living Program Grants
    b. National Communications System
    c. Program Support
    (1) Training and Technical Assistance Grants
    (2) National Clearinghouse on Runaway and Homeless Youth
    (3) Management Information System (MIS)
    (4) Monitoring Support for FYSB Programs
    d. Research and Demonstration Initiatives
    e. Evaluation Studies
    (1) Evaluation of the Transitional Living Program for Homeless 
Youth
    (2) Development of Evaluation Manuals for Use in ACYF Programs
    F. Eligible Applicants
    G. Availability of Funds
    l. Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    2. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and 
Homeless Youth
    3. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth
    4. Training and Technical Assistance Grants
    H. Duration of Projects
    I. Maximum Federal Share and Grantee Share of the Project
Part II: Evaluation Criteria
Part III: Priority Areas
    A. Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    B. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and 
Homeless Youth
    C. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth
    D. Training and Technical Assistance Grants
Part IV: Application Process
    A. Assistance to Prospective Grantees
    B. Application Requirements
    C. Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980
    D. Notification Under Executive Order 12372
    E. Availability of Forms and Other Materials
    F. Application Consideration
Part V: Application Assembly and Submission
Part VI: Appendices
    A. Basic Center Program Performance Standards
    B. National Runaway Switchboard
    C. National Clearinghouse on Runaway and Homeless Youth
    D. Runaway and Homeless Youth Continuation Grantees
    l. Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    2. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth
    3. Drug Abuse Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    E. Basic Center Program Allocations by State
    F. Administration for Children and Families Regional Office 
Youth Contacts
    G. Training and Technical Assistance Providers
    H. State Single Points of Contact
    I. Forms and Instructions

Part I. General Information

A. Background on Runaway and Homeless Youth

    The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB), within the 
Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), administers 
programs that support services to an adolescent population of 
approximately 1.3 million runaway and homeless youth. Many of these 
youth have left home to escape abusive situations, or because their 
parents could not provide them with the basic needs of food, shelter 
and a safe supportive environment. Many live on the streets.
    While living on the streets or away from home without parental 
supervision, these youth are highly vulnerable. They may become victims 
of street violence, or may be exploited by dealers of illegal drugs. 
Usually lacking marketable skills, they may be drawn into shoplifting, 
prostitution, and dealing drugs in order to earn money for food, 
clothing, and other daily expenses. Without a fixed address or regular 
place to sleep, they often drop out of school, forfeiting their 
opportunities to learn and to become independent, self-sufficient, 
contributing members of society. As street people, they may try to 
survive with little or no contact with medical professionals, the 
result being that their health problems may go untreated and may 
worsen. Without the support of family, schools, and other community 
institutions, they may not acquire the personal values and work skills 
that will enable them to enter or advance in the world of work at other 
than the most minimal levels. Finally, as street people, they may 
create substantial law enforcement problems, endangering both 
themselves and the communities in which they are located. All these 
problems, real and potential, call for a nationwide, community-based 
program to address the needs of runaway and homeless youth.

B. Legislative Authority

    Grants for the Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth 
are authorized by Part A of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHY 
Act), 42 U.S.C. 5701 et seq. The RHY Act was enacted as Title III of 
the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (Pub. L. 
93-415), and amended by the Juvenile Justice Amendments of 1977 (Pub. 
L. 95-115), the Juvenile Justice Amendments of 1980 (Pub. L.96-509), 
the Juvenile Justice Amendments of 1984 (Pub. L. 98-473), the Anti-Drug 
Abuse Act of 1988 (Pub. L. 100-690), and the Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention Act Amendments of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-586).
    Grants for the Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth are 
authorized under Part B of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act. Part B 
was established in 1988 as part of Public Law 100-690.
    Grants for the Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for 
Runaway and Homeless Youth are authorized under section 3511 of Public 
Law 100-690, the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (Anti-Drug Abuse Act), 
which established the Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for 
Runaway and Homeless Youth, as amended by Public Law 102-132.
    Grants for Training and Technical Assistance are authorized under 
section 342 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, as amended, and 
section 3511 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, as amended.

C. Purpose, Goals and Objectives of the Federal Runaway and Homeless 
Youth Grant Programs

1. Basic Center Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    The overall purpose of the BCP is to provide financial assistance 
to establish or strengthen community-based centers that address the 
immediate needs (e.g., outreach, temporary shelter, food, clothing, 
counseling, and aftercare services) of runaway and homeless youth and 
their families. Services supported by this program are to be outside 
the law enforcement, the child welfare, the mental health, and the 
juvenile justice systems. The program goals and objectives of Part A of 
the RHY Act are to:
    a. Alleviate problems of runaway and homeless youth,
    b. Reunite youth with their families and encourage the resolution 
of intrafamily problems through counseling and other services,
    c. Strengthen family relationships and encourage stable living 
conditions for youth, and
    d. Help youth decide upon constructive courses of action.
2. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless 
Youth
    The overall purpose of the DAPP is to help communities address the 
problem of drug abuse among runaway and homeless youth through the 
prevention, early intervention, and reduction of drug dependency. The 
specific goals and objectives of the program, as set forth in section 
3511 of the Act, are to:
    a. Provide individual, family, and group counseling to runaway 
youth and their families and to homeless youth for the purpose of 
preventing or reducing the illicit use of drugs by such youth;
    b. Develop and support peer counseling programs related to the 
illicit use of drugs by runaway and homeless youth;
    c. Develop and support community education activities related to 
the illicit use of drugs by runaway and homeless youth, including 
outreach to individual youth;
    d. Provide runaway and homeless youth in rural areas with 
assistance (including the development of community support groups) 
related to the illicit use of drugs;
    e. Provide information and training regarding issues related to the 
illicit use of drugs by runaway and homeless youth to individuals 
providing services to these youth;
    f. Support research on illicit drug use by runaway and homeless 
youth, the effects on such youth of drug abuse by family members, and 
any correlation between such use and attempts at suicide; and
    g. Improve the availability and coordination of local services 
related to drug abuse for runaway and homeless youth.
3. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth
    The overall purpose of the TLP is to support programs which assist 
older homeless youth in making a successful transition to self-
sufficient living and to prevent long-term dependency on social 
services. The specific goals and objectives of the program, as set 
forth in Part B of the Act, are to:
    a. Provide stable, safe living accommodations while a homeless 
youth is a program participant;
    b. Provide the services necessary to assist homeless youth in 
developing both the skills and personal characteristics needed to 
enable them to live independently;
    c. Provide education, information and counseling aimed at 
preventing, treating and reducing substance abuse among homeless youth;
    d. Provide homeless youth with appropriate referrals and access to 
medical and mental health treatment; and
    e. Provide the services and referrals necessary to assist youth in 
preparing for and obtaining employment.
    The Administration on Children, Youth and Families will award 
grants for these programs to support direct services to runaway and 
homeless youth. Specifics regarding each of these grant programs are 
found in Part III, Sections A-C, of this announcement.
4. Training and Technical Assistance Grants
    The overall purpose of the T&TA grants is to improve the 
programmatic and administrative capacities of public and private 
agencies to serve runaway and homeless youth. Specifics regarding these 
grants are found in Part III, Section D, of this announcement.

D. Definitions

    1. The term homeless youth is defined differently for different 
programs.
    Under Part A of the RHY Act, which authorizes the BCP, the term 
homeless youth means a person under 18 years of age who is in need of 
services and without a place of shelter where he or she receives 
supervision and care. This definition applies to all Basic Center 
projects and can be found in 45 CFR 1351.1(f).
    Under Part B of the RHY Act, which authorizes the TLP, homeless 
youth means an individual who is not less than 16 years of age and not 
more than 21 years of age; for whom it is not possible to live in a 
safe environment with a relative; and who has no other safe alternative 
living arrangement. This definition applies to all TLP projects and can 
be found in section 321(b)(1) of the RHY Act.
    2. The term public agency means any State, unit of local 
government, combination of such States or units, or any agency, 
department, or instrumentality of any of the foregoing. This definition 
applies to all runaway and homeless youth programs and can be found in 
section 3601(8) of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act, incorporating by reference 
section 103(11) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act 
of 1974, as amended.
    3. The term runaway youth means a person under 18 years of age who 
absents himself or herself from home or place of legal residence 
without the permission of parents or legal guardian. This definition 
applies to all Basic Center programs and can be found in 45 CFR 
1351.1(k).
    4. The term shelter includes host homes, group homes and supervised 
apartments. This definition applies to all TLP programs and is 
referenced in section 322(1) of the RHY Act. As currently understood in 
the field:
    Host homes are facilities providing shelter, usually in the home of 
a family, under contract to accept runaway and/or homeless youth 
assigned by the TLP service provider, and are licensed according to 
State or local laws.
    Group home are single-site residential facilities designed to house 
TLP clients who may be new to the program and/or require a higher level 
of supervision. These dwellings operate in accordance with State or 
local housing codes and licensure.
    Supervised apartments are single-unit dwellings or multiple-unit 
apartment houses operated under the auspices of the TLP service 
provider for the purpose of housing program participants.
    5. The term State means any State of the United States, the 
District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin 
Islands, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, and 
the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Palau). This definition 
applies to all runaway and homeless youth programs and can be found in 
section 3601(10) of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act, incorporating by reference 
section 103(7) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act 
of 1974, as amended.
    6. The term temporary shelter means the provision of short-term 
(maximum of 15 days) room and board and core crisis intervention 
services on a 24 hour basis. This definition applies to all Basic 
Center Program grantees and can be found in 45 CFR 1351.1(o).
    7. The term transitional living youth project means a project that 
provides shelter and services designed to promote transition to self-
sufficient living and to prevent long-term dependency on social 
services. This definition applies to all TLP program grantees and is 
found in section 321(b)(2) of the RHY Act.

E. Final Priorities

    Section 364 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHY Act) 
requires the Department to publish annually for public comment a 
proposed plan specifying priorities the Department will follow in 
awarding grants and contracts under the RHY Act. The proposed plan for 
FY 1994 was published in the Federal Register on January 28, 1994 and 
requested comments and recommendations from the field.
1. Public Comments in Response to the Proposed Priorities
    The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) received 13 written 
responses from a number of sources, including Runaway and Homeless 
Youth Program grantees in seven different States. The responses were 
generally supportive and the following summarizes the major issues 
raised:
    a. A number of respondents suggested that applicants with 
demonstrated experience in providing quality direct services to runaway 
and homeless youth be awarded extra points in the evaluation and 
ranking of their grant applications. The Administration for Children, 
Youth and Families agrees with this suggestion. Accordingly, applicants 
documenting such experience may receive up to five (5) extra points 
beginning with the current (FY 1994) reviews.
    b. A number of respondents supported the proposal to increase the 
project periods of the new Training and Technical Assistance (T&TA) 
awards from three to five years. The five-year project period will be 
adopted.
    c. A number of respondents suggested that the proposed focus of 
T&TA activities on findings resulting from the monitoring of runaway 
and homeless youth grantees might be too narrow. They suggested that 
T&TA activities should also address the perceived needs of local 
grantees, such as services to special populations and adherence to 
local and State licensing requirements. The Administration on Children, 
Youth and Families recognizes that T&TA providers may take into account 
such justified training needs, so long as a major emphasis is placed on 
assisting grantees in program improvement efforts, especially those 
efforts related to the findings from program monitoring activities.
    d. A number of respondents expressed concern that budget 
limitations on travel for Federal staff might lead to peer reviewers 
making site visits unaccompanied by Federal staff, and that negative 
evaluations by the peers might undercut Federal support for the 
affected grantees. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families 
recognizes that peer reviewers can assess program operations from a 
professional point of view, identifying areas of strength and areas for 
improvement, but that only Federal staff can be responsible for 
identifying and evaluating compliance issues that may affect funding.
    e. Several respondents expressed concern about the potential for 
consolidation of the three current, categorical programs for runaway 
and homeless youth (BCP, DAPP, and TLP) into a single program. Specific 
concerns included the negative effects of limited funding, the possible 
neglect of RHY services in rural areas, and the difficulties of a 
single grantee being required to address the entire range of youth 
problems. The Administration on Children, Youth and Families is aware 
of these and a number of other concerns and issues regarding 
consolidation, and any effort to consolidate these programs would 
include consultation with the field regarding implementation.
    f. A number of respondents requested that they be sent information 
about applying for runaway and homeless youth grants. All respondents 
will be entered into the mailing list to receive announcements of grant 
solicitations.
    To the extent feasible, ACYF addressed these and all other public 
comments in preparing the final priorities. The final program 
priorities below reflect the changes made in the proposed priorities in 
light of the comments received.
2. Final Program Priorities for Fiscal Year 1994
    a. Direct Service Grants for Runaway and Homeless Youth.
    (1) Basic Center Program Grants.
    Part A, section 311 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, as 
amended, authorizes grants to public and private entities, (State, 
Territorial, county, and local governments; agencies and subagencies of 
these governments; private for-profit and private non-profit 
organizations; American Indian Tribes) and to combinations of such 
entities, to establish and operate Basic Centers for Runaway and 
Homeless Youth.
    Approximately 350 new and continuation Basic Center Program grants 
will be funded in FY 1994 to support organizations which provide 
emergency services to runaway and homeless youth that include temporary 
shelter, food, clothing, counseling, aftercare, and related services 
which are provided outside the law enforcement, child welfare, mental 
health and juvenile justice systems.
    Part III, section A of this publication announces the availability 
of funds for these grants, and includes the minimum requirements that 
applicants must address in their applications for Basic Center Program 
funds.
    In FY 1994, approximately two-thirds of the current Basic Center 
grantees (those whose grant periods expire in FY 1995 or FY 1996) will 
be awarded noncompetitive continuation funds. The remaining grantees 
(those whose grant periods expire in FY 1994) will have the opportunity 
to compete for new grant awards by submitting new competitive 
applications. All other eligible youth-serving agencies not holding 
current awards may also apply for these new competitive funds.
    (2) Transitional Living Program Grants.
    Part B, section 321 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, as 
amended, authorizes grants to establish and operate transitional living 
projects for homeless youth. This program is structured to help older, 
homeless youth achieve self-sufficiency and avoid long-term dependency 
on social services. Transitional living projects provide shelter, 
skills training, and support services to homeless youth ages 16 through 
21 for a continuous period not exceeding 18 months.
    A competition for new-start TLP awards was held in the summer of 
1993 (in the last quarter of FY 1993) and successful applicants were 
awarded a total of $5,966,650 in FY 1994 funds, beginning on October 1, 
1993 (the first quarter of FY 1994). The remaining FY 1994 program 
funds will be awarded in the form of continuations to ongoing grants.
    This announcement solicits applications for new Transitional Living 
Program grant awards to be supported with FY 1995 funds, subject to the 
appropriation of these funds by Congress. Project periods for these new 
awards will begin when FY 1995 funds are appropriated and made 
available to ACYF, but in no case will they begin prior to October 1, 
1994. By soliciting applications and making funding decisions during 
1994, we will enable current grantees not eligible for FY 1994 
continuation funds to compete for new grants to be funded early in FY 
1995 and to continue their existing projects with a minimal disruption 
of services, if successful in the competition.
    Part III, section C of this publication announces the anticipated 
availability of funds for these FY 1995 grants, and includes the 
minimum requirements that applicants must address in their grant 
proposals.
    b. National Communications System.
    Part C, section 331 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, as 
amended, mandates support for a national communications system to 
assist runaway and homeless youth in communicating with their families 
and with service providers.
    In FY 1991, a three-year grant was awarded to the National Runaway 
Switchboard, Inc., in Chicago, Illinois, to operate the system. This 
grant expired in FY 1994.
    An announcement soliciting grant applications to operate the system 
for five years was published in the Federal Register on December 27, 
1993.
    c. Program Support.
    (1) Training and Technical Assistance Grants.
    Part D, section 342 of the RHY Act authorizes the Department to 
make grants to statewide and regional nonprofit organizations to 
provide training and technical assistance (T&TA) to organizations that 
are eligible to receive service grants under the Act. Organizations 
eligible to receive this T&TA include the Basic Centers authorized 
under Part A of the Act and the Transitional Living grantees authorized 
under Part B. In addition, section 3511 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 
1988, which authorized the Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program 
for Runaway and Homeless Youth (DAPP), authorizes support for T&TA to 
runaway and homeless youth service providers. The purpose of this T&TA 
is to strengthen the programs and to enhance the knowledge and skills 
of youth service workers.
    In FY 1991, the Family and Youth Services Bureau awarded ten 
Cooperative Agreements, one in each of the ten Federal Regions, to 
provide T&TA to agencies funded under the three Federal programs for 
runaway and homeless youth (the Basic Center Program, the Transitional 
Living Program, and the Drug Abuse Prevention Program). Each 
Cooperative Agreement was unique, being based on the characteristics 
and different T&TA needs in the respective Regions. Each of the 
Cooperative Agreements has a three-year project period that will expire 
in FY 1994.
    This announcement solicits applications for new five-year 
Cooperative Agreements to be supported with FY 1994 funds. Specific 
application information and evaluation criteria are addressed in Part 
III, Section D.
    (2) National Clearinghouse on Runaway and Homeless Youth.
    In June 1992, a five-year contract was awarded to establish and 
operate the National Clearinghouse on Runaway and Homeless Youth to 
serve as a central information point for professionals and agencies 
involved in the development and implementation of services to runaway 
and homeless youth.
    The Clearinghouse is in full operation and is currently collecting 
materials and responding to requests for information. Non-competitive 
continuation funding will be awarded to sustain the Clearinghouse in FY 
1994.
    (3) Management Information System (MIS).
    In FY 1992, a three-year contract was awarded to implement the 
Runaway and Homeless Youth Management Information System (MIS) across 
three FYSB programs: The Runaway and Homeless Youth Basic Center 
Program, the Transitional Living Program, and the Drug Abuse Prevention 
Program. The MIS, now a mandatory data collection system, is designed 
to be used as a management tool for individual programs. In addition, 
FYSB uses the data generated by the system to produce reports, to 
conduct analyses regarding the programs, and to provide information for 
required reports to Congress on efforts to serve runaway and homeless 
youth.
    Non-competitive continuation funding will be awarded to sustain the 
MIS in FY 1994.
    (4) Monitoring Support for FYSB Programs.
    In FY 1993, FYSB developed a comprehensive monitoring instrument 
and set of site visit protocols, including a peer-monitoring component, 
for the Runaway and Homeless Youth Basic Center Program, the 
Transitional Living Program, and the Drug Abuse Prevention Program. 
Additionally in FY 1993, a contract to provide logistical support for 
the peer monitoring system was awarded.
    The new peer monitoring system will improve Federal oversight of 
the RHY programs and will identify program innovations along with 
program strengths and weaknesses. The findings will be used to direct 
the provision of technical assistance and to inform policy development.
    Continuation funding for the logistical contractor will be provided 
in FY 1994.
    d. Research and Demonstration Initiatives.
    Section 343 of the Act authorizes the Department to make grants to 
States, localities, and private entities to carry out research, 
demonstration, and service projects designed to increase knowledge 
concerning and to improve services for runaway and homeless youth. 
These activities are important in order to identify emerging issues and 
to develop and test models which address such issues.
    In FY 1993, first-year funding was awarded to eight grantees to 
develop models of services to youth in rural areas. These grants are 
expected to produce written descriptions of the proposed service 
models, to identify issues related to model implementation, and to 
generate information on youth and program outcomes. The models will 
also incorporate formal collaboration with other major youth-serving 
agencies in the rural areas.
    Continuation funding of these eight grants will be provided in FY 
1994.
    e. Evaluation Study.
    Continuation funding will be awarded to an ongoing evaluation study 
entitled ``Development of Manuals for ACYF to Use in Evaluating 
Demonstration Projects'' (FY 1993-present). This project is developing 
general and specific manuals to assist ACYF grantees in the design and 
implementation of their internal program evaluations. One of the 
specific manuals will be designed for FYSB grantees.

F. Eligible Applicants

    The legislation authorizing the runaway and homeless youth programs 
addressed in this Federal Register announcement identifies ``eligible 
applicants'' differently. Accordingly, the definition appropriate to 
each individual program is found in Part III of this announcement as a 
part of each priority area description.
    Organizations that have current Basic Center and/or Drug Abuse 
Prevention Program grants with project periods ending in FY 1994 and 
all remaining eligible applicants may apply for new grants for either 
or both of these two programs. Basic Center and DAPP grantees with one 
or two years remaining on their current awards and the expectation of 
continuation funding in FY 1994 may not apply for new grants under that 
particular grant program.
    Organizations that have current Transitional Living Program grants 
with project periods ending in FY 1994 and all remaining eligible 
applicants may apply for new Transitional Living Program grants. 
Transitional Living Program grantees with one or two years remaining on 
their current awards and the expectation of continuation funding in FY 
1994 may not apply for new grants under that particular grant program.
    Statewide and Regional nonprofit organizations, and/or combinations 
of such organizations, with demonstrated experience in providing 
services to runaway and homeless youth service providers are eligible 
to apply for T&TA grants.
    Applicants may refer to Part VI, Appendix D for a listing of 
current grantees that are ineligible to apply for one or more of these 
grant programs.
    Non-profit applicants which have not previously received financial 
support from the Administration on Children, Youth and Families must 
submit proof of their non-profit status with their grant application. 
This can be done either by making reference to the applicant's listing 
in the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) most recent list of tax-exempt 
organizations or by submitting a copy of its letter from the IRS (IRS 
Code, sections 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(6)). Non-profit applicants cannot 
be funded without acceptable proof of this status. Failure to provide 
proof of nonprofit status will result in rejection of the application. 
Such applications will receive no further consideration from ACF. For-
profit entities may participate as grantees under Priority Area A, 
Runaway and Homeless Youth Basic Center Programs, but may participate 
only as sub-grantees for any other priority areas in this announcement.

G. Availability of Funds

    The Administration on Children, Youth and Families expects to award 
approximately 600 new and continuation grants to serve runaway and 
homeless youth in FY 1994. Dollar amounts to be awarded by fiscal year 
and program are as follows:
1. Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth
    The Administration on Children, Youth and Families expects to award 
$32,499,000 in Basic Center Program grants in FY 1994. Of this total, 
$18,377,159 will be awarded in the form of non-competitive 
continuations to current grantees, and the remaining $14,121,841 will 
be available for competitive, new-start awards. In accordance with the 
RHY Act, the funds will be divided among the States in proportion to 
their respective populations under the age of 18. We recognize that the 
RHY Act also conditionally requires that the amounts allotted to each 
State (including the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) be at least 
$100,000, and the amounts allotted to the Virgin Islands, Guam, 
American Samoa, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands (Palau), and 
the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands be at least $45,000 
each. However, to apply these minimum allocations in FY 1994 would 
result in 23 of the remaining States receiving less than they received 
in FY 1992. Under these conditions, section 311(b)(3) of the Act 
becomes operable, which directs that the ongoing State minimum of 
$75,000 and the ongoing Territorial minimum of $30,000 continue as the 
basic award levels in FY 1994. The amount of funds available for both 
continuations and new starts in each of the States and Territories is 
listed in the Table of Allocations by State (Part VI, Appendix E) which 
reflects the FY 1994 allocations for each State. In this Table, the 
amounts shown in the column labeled New Starts are the amounts 
available for competition in the respective States.
    Current Basic Center Program grantees having one or two years 
remaining in their project periods will receive instructions from their 
respective ACF Regional Offices on the procedures for applying for 
these continuation grants and should not respond to this announcement. 
These grantees are listed in Part VI, Appendix D.1, have project 
expiration dates in FY 1995 and 1996, and are not eligible to apply for 
new Basic Center grants.
    Current Basic Center Program grantees with project periods ending 
by September 30, 1994, and all other eligible applicants not currently 
receiving Basic Center funds may apply for the new competitive grants 
under this announcement.
    The number of new awards made within each State will depend upon 
the funds available (i.e., the State's total allotment less the amount 
required for non-competing continuations), as well as on the number of 
acceptable applications. Therefore, where the amount required for non-
competing continuations in any State equals the State's total 
allotment, no new awards will be made.
    All applicants under this announcement will compete with other 
applicants in the State in which their services would be provided. In 
the event that an insufficient number of acceptable applications is 
approved for funding from any State or jurisdiction, the Commissioner, 
ACYF, will reallocate the unused funds.
2. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless 
Youth
    In FY 1994, the Administration on Children, Youth and Families 
expects to award $2,000,000 in new competitive Drug Abuse Prevention 
Program grants and $9,780,702 in non-competing continuation DAPP 
awards.
3. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth
    The Administration on Children, Youth and Families awarded 
$6,117,067 for 33 new Transitional Living Program grants in the first 
quarter of FY 1994 (October-December 1993). An additional $5,095,648 
will be awarded in FY 1994 for TLP continuation grants.
    No additional new TLP awards will be made in FY 1994. However, 
applications for new awards will be solicited in FY 1994 for funds to 
be provided in FY 1995 (beginning on October 1, 1994), subject to 
appropriation of funds by the Congress. It is anticipated that 
approximately $5,000,000 will be available for these new grants.
4. Training and Technical Assistance Grants
    In FY 1994, the Administration on Children, Youth and Families 
estimates the award of $1,500,000 in new cooperative agreements for the 
provision of training and technical assistance to RHY grantees.

H. Duration of Projects

    This announcement solicits applications for projects of up to three 
years duration (36-month project periods), with the exception of the 
T&TA cooperative agreements which will be awarded for five-year project 
periods. Initial grant awards, made on a competitive basis, will be for 
one-year (12-month) budget periods. Applications for continuation 
grants beyond the one-year budget periods, but within the 36-month 
project periods, will be entertained in subsequent years on a non-
competitive basis, subject to the availability of funds, satisfactory 
progress of the grantees, and determination that continued funding 
would be in the best interest of the government.

I. Maximum Federal Share and Grantee Share of the Project

    The maximum amount of Federal funds for which an applicant can 
apply is specified in each program description found in Part III of 
this announcement.
    The legislation authorizing runaway and homeless youth programs 
requires that grantees provide a non-Federal match for Federal funds. 
In some cases, this non-Federal share is a percent of the total cost of 
the project and, in some cases, it is a percent of the Federal share. 
Specific non-Federal share requirements for each Priority Area are 
found in Part III of this announcement.
    The non-Federal share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions. 
Federal funds provided to States and services or other resources 
purchased with Federal funds may not be used to match project grants. 
Applicants which do not provide the required percentage of non-Federal 
share will not be funded. For-profit applicants for Basic Center 
Program grants are reminded that no grant funds may be paid as profit 
to any recipient of a grant or sub-grant (45 CFR 74.705).

Part II. Evaluation Criteria

    The five criteria that follow will be used to review and evaluate 
each application under each of the three RHY programs and the training 
and technical assistance grants, and should be used in developing the 
program narrative. The point values following each criterion heading 
indicate the numerical weight each criterion will be accorded in the 
review process. Note that the highest possible value an application can 
receive is 105 points. See Criterion 4 for specific information.

Criterion 1. bjectives and Need for Assistance (15 Points)

    Pinpoint any relevant physical, economic, social, financial, 
institutional, or other problems requiring a solution. Demonstrate the 
need for the assistance and state the goals or service objectives of 
the project. Supporting documentation or other testimonies from 
concerned interests other than the applicant may be used. Give a 
precise location of the project site(s) and area(s) to be served by the 
proposed project. Maps or other graphic aids may be attached. (The 
applicant should refer to Part I, Section C, of this announcement for a 
description of each program's purpose.)

Criterion 2. Results or Benefits Expected (20 Points)

    Identify the results and benefits to be derived from the project. 
State the numbers of runaway and homeless youth and their families to 
be served, and describe the types and quantities of services to be 
provided. Identify the kinds of data to be collected and maintained, 
and discuss the criteria to be used to evaluate the results and success 
of the project.

Criterion 3. Approach (35 Points)

    Outline a plan of action pertaining to the scope of the project and 
detail how the proposed work will be accomplished. Describe any unusual 
features of the project, such as extraordinary social and community 
involvements, and how the project will be maintained after termination 
of Federal support. Explain the methodology that will be used to 
determine if the needs identified and discussed are being met and if 
the results and benefits identified are being achieved.

Criterion 4. Staff Background and Organizational Experience (20-25 
Points)

    List each organization, cooperator, consultant, or other key 
individuals who will work on the project along with a short description 
of the nature of their effort or contribution. Summarize the background 
and experience of the project director and key project staff and the 
history of the organization. Demonstrate the ability to effectively 
manage the project and to coordinate activities with other agencies. 
Legislation authorizing each of the Federal Runaway and Homeless Youth 
Programs requires that priority for funding be given to agencies with 
experience in providing direct services to runaway and homeless youth. 
In line with this requirement, applicants having three (3) or more 
years of continuous effort serving runaway and homeless youth in one or 
more areas set forth in section 312 of the Act are eligible to receive 
an additional five (5) points in this criterion. Applicants are 
encouraged to discuss staff and organizational experience in working 
with this population and may include information regarding their past 
performance under RHYP grants. (Applicants may refer to the staff 
resumes and to the Organizational Capability Statement included in the 
submission.)

Criterion 5. Budget Appropriateness (10 Points)

    Demonstrate that the project's costs (overall costs, average cost 
per youth served, costs for different services) are reasonable in view 
of the anticipated results and benefits. (Applicants may refer (1) to 
the budget information presented in Standard Forms 424 and 424A and in 
the associated budget justification, and (2) to the results or benefits 
expected as identified under Criterion 2.)
    The Program Narrative information provided by the applicant in 
response to the priority area description identified in Part III of 
this announcement should be organized and presented according to these 
five evaluation criteria.

Part III. Priority Areas

A. Runaway and Homeless Youth Basic Center Program

    Eligible applicants: Any State, unit of local government, 
combination of units of local government, public or private agency, 
organization, institution, or other non-profit entity is eligible to 
apply for these funds. Federally recognized Indian Tribes are eligible 
to apply for Basic Center grants. Non-Federally recognized Indian 
Tribes and urban Indian organizations are also eligible to apply for 
grants as private, non-profit agencies.
    Grantees (including subgrantees) with current Basic Center grants 
who are eligible to apply for continuation funding in FY 1994 may not 
apply for a new Basic Center grant under this announcement. Applicants 
may refer to Part VI, Appendix D.1 for a listing of current grantees 
which are ineligible for grants under this priority area.
    As required by runaway and homeless youth legislation, priority for 
funding will be given to agencies with demonstrated experience 
establishing and operating centers that provide direct services to 
runaway and homeless youth in a manner that is outside the law 
enforcement system, the child welfare system, the mental health system 
and the juvenile justice system. Demonstrated experience providing 
direct services means three (3) or more years of continuous effort 
serving runaway and homeless youth in one or more areas set forth in 
section 312 of the Act. Applications claiming credit for this 
preference must include a statement of no more than one page 
documenting the relevant experience.
    Program purpose, goals, and objectives: The Administration on 
Children Youth and Families will award approximately 150 new service 
grants to establish or strengthen existing or proposed runaway and 
homeless youth Basic Centers. These programs must be locally controlled 
efforts that provide temporary shelter, counseling and other services 
to juveniles who have left home without permission of their parents or 
guardians or to other homeless juveniles.
    Applications are solicited under this priority area to carry out 
direct service projects designed to carry out the program purpose, 
goals and objectives set forth in the legislation and as specified in 
Part I, section C.1 of this announcement. These goals and objectives 
are:
    1. To alleviate the problems of runaway and homeless youth,
    2. To reunite youth with their families and to encourage the 
resolution of intrafamily problems through counseling and other 
services,
    3. To strengthen family relationships and to encourage stable 
relationships for youth, and
    4. To help youth decide upon constructive courses of action.
    Background: The Runaway Youth and Homeless Youth Act was enacted in 
response to widespread concern regarding the alarming number of youth 
who were leaving home without parental permission, crossing State 
lines, and who, while away from home, were exposed to exploitation and 
other dangers of street life.
    Each Basic Center funded under the authorizing legislation is 
required to provide outreach to runaway and homeless youth; temporary 
shelter for up to fifteen days; food; clothing; individual, group, and 
family counseling; and related services. Many Basic Centers provide 
their services in residential settings with a capacity for no more than 
20 youth. Some centers also provide some or all of their shelter 
services through host homes (usually private homes under contract to 
the centers), with counseling and referrals being provided from a 
central location.
    Currently, approximately 60,000 youth annually receive shelter for 
an average of 12 nights and other ongoing services through ACYF-funded 
Basic Centers. The primary presenting problems of these youth include 
conflict with parents or other adults, including physical and sexual 
abuse (63 percent); other family crises such as divorce, death, or 
sudden loss of income (9 percent); and personal problems such as drug 
use, or problems with peers, school attendance and truancy, bad grades, 
inability to get along with teachers, and learning disabilities (28 
percent).
    Low self-esteem is a major problem among this population. Half (49 
percent) have a poor self image; somewhat less than half (43 percent) 
are depressed; and 12 percent are possibly suicidal.
    After receiving ongoing services from shelter programs, 50 percent 
of the youth return to their families. One-third (33 percent) are 
provided alternative, but safe, long-term living arrangements. Five 
percent return to the streets, and 12 percent leave the centers with no 
known destination.
    Minimum requirements for project design: As part of addressing the 
evaluation criteria outlined in Part II of this announcement, each 
applicant must address the following items in the program narrative 
section of the proposal.

Objectives and Need for Assistance

    1. Applicant must specify the goals and objectives of the project 
and how implementation will fulfill the purposes of the legislation 
identified in Part I, section C.1. of this announcement.
    2. Applicant must describe the conditions of youth and families in 
the area to be served, with an emphasis on the incidence and 
characteristics of runaway and homeless youth and their families. The 
discussion must consider matters of family functioning, along with the 
health, education, employment, and social conditions of the youth, 
including at-risk conditions or behaviors such as drug use, school 
failure, and delinquency.
    3. Applicant must discuss the existing support systems for at-risk 
youth and families in the area, with specific references to law 
enforcement, health and mental health care, social services, school 
systems, and child welfare. In addition, other agencies providing 
shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth in the area must be 
identified.
    4. Within the context of the existing support systems, applicant 
must demonstrate the need for the center and indicate the objectives 
that the program would work toward fulfilling.
    5. Applicant must describe the area to be served by the proposed 
center, and must demonstrate that the center is or will be located in 
an area which is frequented by and/or easily accessible by runaway and 
homeless youth.

Results and Benefits Expected

    1. Applicant must specify the numbers of runaway and homeless youth 
and their families to be served, the number of beds available for 
runaway and homeless youth and the types and quantities of services to 
be provided.
    2. Applicant must describe the anticipated changes in attitudes, 
values and behavior, and improvements in individual and family 
functioning that will occur as a consequence of the services provided 
by the center.
    3. Applicant must discuss the expected impact of the project on the 
availability of services to runaway and homeless youth in the local 
community and indicate how the project will enhance the organization's 
capacity to provide services that address the needs of runaway and 
homeless youth in the community.

Approach

    1. Applicant must describe how runaway and homeless youth and their 
families will be reached, and how services will be provided in 
compliance with the Program Performance Standards listed in Part VI, 
Appendix A.
    2. Applicant must describe the center's philosophy regarding the 
provision of services to runaway and homeless youth and the involvement 
of the youth's parents or legal guardians in these services.
    3. Applicant must include detailed plans for implementing direct 
services based upon identified goals and objectives. Applicant must 
identify the strategies that will be employed and the activities that 
will be implemented, including innovative approaches to securing 
appropriate center services for the runaway and homeless youth to be 
served, for involving family members as an integral part of the 
services provided, for periodic review and assessment of individual 
cases, and for encouraging awareness of and sensitivity to the diverse 
needs of runaway and homeless youth who represent particular ethnic and 
racial backgrounds, sexual orientations, or are street youth.
    4. Applicant must describe the center's plans for conducting an 
outreach program that, where applicable, will attract members of ethnic 
and racial minorities and/or persons with limited ability to speak 
English.
    5. Applicant must describe the center's plans and procedures for 
intake and assessment of the youth upon arrival at the center.
    6. Applicant must describe the center's plans for contacting the 
parents or other relatives of the youth they serve, for ensuring the 
safe return of the youth to their parents, relatives or legal guardians 
if it is in their best interests, for contacting local governments 
pursuant to formal or informal arrangements established with such 
officials, and for providing alternative living arrangements when it is 
not safe or appropriate for the youth to return home.
    7. Applicant must describe the type of shelter that will be 
available, the shelter capacity of the center and the system of staff 
supervision to be implemented in the shelter.
    8. Applicant must describe the center's plans for ensuring proper 
coordination with law enforcement personnel, health and mental health 
care personnel, social service personnel, and welfare personnel.
    9. Applicant must describe the center's plans for ensuring 
coordination with the schools to which runaway and homeless youth will 
return, and for assisting the youth to stay current with the curricula 
of these schools.
    10. Applicant must describe the center's procedures for dealing 
with youth who have run from foster care placements.
    11. Applicant must describe procedures for dealing with youth who 
have run from correctional institutions, and must show that procedures 
are in accordance with Federal, State and local laws.
    12. Applicant must describe the center's plans and procedures for 
providing aftercare services and for ensuring, whenever possible, that 
aftercare services will also be provided to those youth who are 
returned beyond the State in which the center is located.
    13. Applicant must agree to gather and submit program and client 
data required by FYSB's Management Information System (MIS). While the 
computer software and training for the implementation of the MIS will 
be provided by FYSB to grantees, applicant should include a request for 
funds in its budget for any computer equipment needed for 
implementation of the MIS.
    14. Applicant must agree to cooperate with any research or 
evaluation efforts sponsored by the Administration for Children and 
Families.
    15. Applicant must describe how the activities implemented under 
this project will be continued by the agency once Federal funding for 
the project has ended. The applicant must describe specific plans for 
accomplishing program phase-out for the last two quarters of the 36-
month project period in the event the applicant does not receive a new 
award.

Staff Background and Organizational Experience

    1. As priority for funding will be given to agencies and 
organizations that have documented experience in establishing and 
operating centers that provide direct services to runaway and homeless 
youth, applicant must include a brief description of the organization 
and its experience in providing services to this client population.
    2. Applicant must include a description of current and proposed 
staff skills and knowledge regarding runaway and homeless youth and 
indicate how staff will be utilized in achieving the goals and 
objectives of the program. Information on proposed staff training and 
brief resumes or job descriptions may be included.
    3. Applicant must describe procedures for maintaining 
confidentiality of records on the youth and families served. Procedures 
must insure that no information on the youth and families is disclosed 
without the consent of the individual youth, parent or legal guardian. 
Disclosures without consent can be made to another agency compiling 
statistical records if individual identities are not provided or to a 
government agency involved in the disposition of criminal charges 
against an individual runaway or homeless youth.
    4. Applicant must describe how the project has established or will 
establish formal service linkages with other social service, law 
enforcement, educational, housing, vocational, welfare, legal service, 
drug treatment and health care agencies in order to ensure appropriate 
referrals for the project clients when needed.
    5. Applicant must describe how community and other support will be 
secured to continue the project at the conclusion of the Federal grant 
period.

Budget Appropriateness

    1. Applicant must discuss and justify the costs of the proposed 
project in terms of numbers of youth and families to be served, types 
and quantities of services to be provided, and the anticipated outcomes 
for the youth and families.
    2. The applicant must describe the fiscal control and accounting 
procedures that will be used to ensure prudent use, proper 
disbursement, and accurate accounting of funds received under this 
program announcement.
    Duration of project: This announcement solicits applications for 
Basic Center projects of up to three years duration (36-month project 
periods). Initial grant awards, made on a competitive basis, will be 
for one-year (12-month) budget periods. Applications for continuation 
grants beyond the one-year budget periods, but within the 36-month 
project periods, will be entertained in subsequent years on a non-
competitive basis, subject to the availability of funds, satisfactory 
progress of the grantee, and determination that continued funding would 
be in the best interest of the government.
    Federal share of project costs: Priority will be given to 
applicants which apply for less than $200,000 per year. The maximum 
Federal share for a 3-year project period is $600,000.
    Applicant share of project costs: The Runaway and Homeless Youth 
Act requires a non-Federal matching requirement of ten percent of the 
total Federal funds awarded. For example, a project requesting $300,000 
in Federal funds over a three-year project period (based on an award of 
$100,000 per twelve-month budget period) must include a match of at 
least $30,000 (10 % of the Federal share).

B. Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless 
Youth (DAPP)

    Eligible applicants: Any State, unit of local government (or 
combination of units of local government), public or non-profit private 
agency, organization, institution, or other non-profit entity is 
eligible to apply for these funds. Federally recognized Indian Tribes 
are eligible to apply for DAPP grants. Non-Federally recognized Indian 
Tribes and urban Indian organizations are also eligible to apply for 
grants as private, non-profit agencies.
    Grantees (including subgrantees) with current DAPP grants with 12 
or more months remaining in their project periods may not apply for new 
DAPP grants under this announcement. Applicants may refer to Part VI, 
Appendix D.3 for a listing of current grantees which are ineligible to 
apply for grants under this priority area. No more than one grant per 
legal entity (organization) will be awarded under this priority area. 
Organizations submitting more than one application for DAPP funds must 
understand that only one application will be considered for funding.
    Legislation authorizing each of the Federal Runaway and Homeless 
Youth Programs requires that priority for funding be given to agencies 
with experience in providing direct services to runaway and homeless 
youth. In line with this requirement, applicants which have three (3) 
or more years of continuous effort serving runaway and homeless youth 
in one or more areas set forth in section 312 of the Act are eligible 
to receive an additional five (5) points in this criterion. 
Applications claiming credit for this preference must include a 
statement of no more than one page documenting the relevant experience. 
Empirical or applied research experience is not considered direct 
service.
    Program purpose, goals and objectives: The Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families will award approximately 20 new grants to 
support services within a community to maintain, improve and/or expand 
drug abuse prevention, early intervention, and reduction of drug 
dependency services to runaway and homeless youth and their families. 
Applications are solicited under this priority area to carry out direct 
service projects designed to address the issue of drug abuse among 
runaway and homeless youth in the applicant's community as required by 
the goals and objectives set forth in the legislation and specified in 
Part I, section C.2 of this announcement.
    Activities that may be maintained, improved and/or expanded through 
a DAPP grant include but are not necessarily limited to:
    1. Improving networking and service coordination to increase the 
availability of services to runaway and homeless youth;
    2. Expanding outreach activities, particularly street-based 
outreach programs;
    3. Providing individual, family, group, and/or peer prevention and 
intervention counseling related to alcohol and other drug use;
    4. Strengthening intake and assessment procedures for substance 
abuse at runaway and homeless youth shelters;
    5. Coordinating services with drug treatment facilities and making 
referrals to treatment that are geared to the runaway and homeless 
youth population;
    6. Providing aftercare and follow-up services to runaway and 
homeless youth with substance abuse problems who have received shelter 
and/or non-residential services;
    7. Increasing staff knowledge and skills related to working with 
runaway and homeless youth with substance abuse problems by improving 
or accessing training opportunities;
    8. Improving programming to address the unique cultural needs and 
concerns of minority runaway and homeless youth;
    9. Involving and educating parents, siblings and peers of runaway 
and homeless youth receiving drug abuse prevention services;
    10. Developing and implementing programs designed to reduce drug 
involvement among the target population by improving coping skills and 
reducing stress factors arising from such problems as homelessness, 
family dysfunction, and peer pressure; and
    11. Establishing linkages with community mental health programs 
that will provide comprehensive substance abuse counseling and/or 
treatment to runaway and homeless youth.
    Efforts that will not be funded under this priority area include 
research and demonstration projects on illicit drug use by runaway and 
homeless youth, and the direct provision of drug treatment services 
such as those services provided in a medical setting or by medical 
personnel.
    This priority area is specifically targeted to runaway and homeless 
youth. Potential applicants interested in providing drug abuse 
prevention services to high-risk youth other than those who are 
runaways or homeless are encouraged to contact the Center for Substance 
Abuse Prevention (CSAP). For information on CSAP grant programs and 
other drug abuse prevention resources, applicants should contact the 
National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, P.O. Box 2345, 
Rockville, Maryland 20847-2345; telephone: 1-800-729-6686.
    Background: The abuse of drugs has had an increasingly severe 
impact on runaway and homeless youth. Reports from shelters which serve 
this client population indicate a growing drug abuse problem. In 1988, 
15.4 percent of the youth entering shelters indicated a personal drug 
abuse problem. In addition, 16.6 percent of the youth entering shelters 
reported that their reason for running away was parental drug and/or 
alcohol abuse.
    A 1990 survey, conducted by the National Network of Runaway and 
Youth Services, of 185 community-based agencies that serve runaway and 
homeless youth found substance abuse to be the leading health problem 
among the youth served. Several other studies reveal that the incidence 
of substance abuse among runaway and homeless youth in large urban 
areas is significantly greater than the rate of abuse among other 
adolescents. The prevalence of the problem is underscored by the fact 
that not only are youth-serving agencies in major urban areas reporting 
an increase in drug use among their client population, but that 
providers in small towns and rural communities also are finding that 
more than half of their clients are reporting drug abuse as a primary 
problem.
    While several studies provide some evidence of alcohol and drug 
abuse decline in the general youth population, recent locally based 
studies indicate that this is not the trend among the runaway and 
homeless youth population. There is a marked increase in the use of 
alcohol and other dangerous and addictive drugs such as cocaine and its 
derivative, crack. Alcohol use among the younger adolescent population 
is also on the increase.
    This population's circumstances require more detailed and focused 
approaches to prevention and drug reduction services than those 
provided by traditional approaches. Many runaway and homeless youth 
have already experimented with, or become frequent users of, one or 
more drugs and need effective programs which help them understand drug 
use problems and teach them the decision-making skills they need to 
maintain a drug-free lifestyle.
    The Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program (DAPP) provides 
Federal assistance to comprehensively address the problem of drug 
involvement among runaway and homeless youth. Since the program's 
inception in 1989, ACYF has awarded approximately $82 million in 
discretionary grants to approximately 450 agencies and organizations 
located throughout the United States, including Puerto Rico and the 
Virgin Islands. These awards were made to support a wide variety of 
locally determined project designs which address the problem of drug 
involvement among runaway and homeless youth.
    While varying degrees of success have been reported by DAPP 
grantees, many of the most promising programs have implemented one or 
more of the following components:
    1. Candid discussions between youth and street-wise peer counselors 
and/or recovering youth substance abusers who can discuss addiction and 
recovery from their personal experience;
    2. Sessions in which youth obtain accurate facts on any and all 
aspects of substance abuse and treatment;
    3. Presentation of decision-making and self-assertiveness skills 
and techniques that assist youth in making independent choices and 
avoiding drug-involved friends and environments;
    4. Counseling and/or other strategies for helping youth to 
understand both the underlying causes of drug use and the effect of 
drugs on them, their families, their peers and their communities;
    5. Educational information that portrays the consequences of 
overdosing, the effects of drug withdrawal, and the increased chances 
of contracting the HIV virus and AIDS; and
    6. The provision of specific and realistic information on various 
treatment options that are available, assistance in enrolling in such 
programs, and appropriate follow-up by the service provider.
    Minimum Requirements for project design: As a part of addressing 
the evaluation criteria outlined in Part II of this announcement, 
applicants must address the following items in the program narrative 
sections of their applications.

Objectives and Need for Assistance

    1. Applicant must specify the goals and objectives of the program 
and how implementation will fulfill the requirements of the legislation 
identified in Part I, Section C.2, of this announcement.
    2. Applicant must discuss the rate of illicit drug use by 
juveniles, specifically addressing the issue and incidence related to 
runaway and homeless youth in the community(ies) to be served and the 
availability (or lack) of services for runaway and homeless youth in 
those communities.
    3. Applicant must identify the extent to which the proposed 
projects or activities will provide services in geographic areas where 
similar services are unavailable or in short supply.
    4. Applicant must demonstrate an understanding of the issues 
related to alcohol and other drug abuse among runaway and homeless 
youth and the provision of services to that population.

Results and Benefits Expected

    1. Applicant must identify the number of runaway and homeless youth 
and their families to be served, the types and quantities of services 
to be provided and how units of service will be defined and measured.
    2. Applicant must discuss how the project will enhance or increase 
the capacity of the applicant to provide services to address the 
illicit use of alcohol and other drugs by runaway and homeless youth.
    3. Applicant must describe the extent to which the project will 
maintain, increase or improve the community's level of services and/or 
the coordination of services for runaway and homeless youth.
    4. Applicant must discuss the expected impact of the project on the 
availability of services to homeless youth in the local community and 
indicate how the project will enhance the organization's capacity to 
provide services to address youth homelessness in the community.

Approach

    1. Applicant must describe how the program will maintain, improve, 
and/or expand direct alcohol and other drug abuse prevention, 
intervention and reduction services in their community.
    2. Applicant must include detailed plans for implementing direct 
services based upon identified goals and objectives. Applicant must 
identify the strategies that will be employed and the activities that 
will be implemented. These should include innovative approaches to 
securing appropriate drug treatment services for the runaway and 
homeless youth to be served, for involving family members as an 
integral part of services provided, and for encouraging awareness of 
and sensitivity to the diverse needs of runaway and homeless youth who 
represent particular ethnic and racial backgrounds, sexual 
orientations, or who are street youth.
    3. Applicant must identify, when appropriate, the short-term 
prevention and intervention strategies to be used with runaway and 
homeless youth in temporary emergency shelters and explain the follow-
up efforts to be implemented with the youth once they leave the 
shelters.
    4. Applicant must discuss how the proposed project will be 
integrated with other services to runaway and homeless youth that are 
provided by the applicant or that are available in the community. In 
addition, applicant is encouraged to show evidence of collaboration 
with other agencies in the development of a comprehensive approach to 
service delivery for runaway and homeless youth. Applicant must 
identify the organizations with which they will work and describe the 
contributions of these organizations to the project. A letter of 
commitment that indicates the level of responsibility and involvement 
must be included for each participating agency.
    5. Applicant must identify and explain how the program will provide 
alcohol and other drug abuse prevention services to address the 
particular needs of runaway and homeless youth who are members of 
ethnic and racial minority groups, persons with limited ability to 
speak English and/or who are street youth.
    6. Applicant must discuss the extent, if any, to which the project 
will incorporate new or innovative techniques.
    7. Applicant must discuss plans for evaluating the project, 
including assessing the outcomes and accomplishments of the program and 
the service delivery models being implemented.
    8. Applicant must describe how the activities implemented under 
this project will be continued by the agency once Federal funding for 
the project has ended. The applicant must describe specific plans for 
accomplishing program phase-out for the last two quarters of program 
project period in the event the applicant does not receive a new award.
    9. Applicant must agree to gather and submit program and client 
data required by FYSB's Management Information System (MIS). While the 
computer software and training for the implementation of the MIS will 
be provided by FYSB to grantees, applicant should include a request for 
funds in its budget for any computer equipment needed for 
implementation of the MIS.
    10. Applicant must agree to cooperate with any research or 
evaluation efforts sponsored by the Administration for Children and 
Families.

Staff Background and Organizational Experience

    1. As priority for funding will be given to agencies and 
organizations that have documented experience in providing direct 
services to runaway and homeless youth, applicant must include a brief 
description of the organization and its experience in providing 
services to this client population.
    2. Applicant must include a brief description of current and 
proposed staff skills and knowledge regarding runaway and homeless 
youth and indicate how staff will be utilized in achieving the goals 
and objectives of the program. Information on proposed staff training 
and brief resumes or job descriptions may be included.
    3. Applicant must describe procedures for maintaining 
confidentiality of records on the youth and families served. Procedures 
must insure that no information on the youth and families is disclosed 
without the consent of the individual youth, parent or legal guardian. 
Disclosures without consent can be made to another agency compiling 
statistical records if individual identities are not provided or to a 
government agency involved in the disposition of criminal charges 
against an individual runaway or homeless youth.

Budget Appropriateness

    1. Applicant must discuss and justify the costs of the proposed 
project in terms of numbers of youth and families to be served, types 
and quantities of services to be provided, and the anticipated outcomes 
for the youth and families.
    2. The applicant must describe the fiscal control and accounting 
procedures that will be used to ensure prudent use, proper 
disbursement, and accurate accounting of funds received under this 
program announcement.
    Duration of project: This announcement solicits applications for 
Drug Abuse Prevention Projects of up to three years duration (36-month 
project periods). Initial grant awards, made on a competitive basis, 
will be for one-year (12-month) budget periods. Applications for 
continuation grants beyond the one-year budget period, but within the 
36 month project period, will be entertained in subsequent years on a 
non-competitive basis, subject to the availability of funds, 
satisfactory progress of the grantee and determination that continued 
funding would be in the best interest of the government.
    Federal share of project costs: Up to $100,000 per year, which 
equals a maximum Federal share of $300,000 for a 3-year project period.
    Applicant share of project costs: Grantees must provide at least 25 
percent of the total approved cost of the project. The total approved 
cost of the project is the sum of the Federal share and the non-Federal 
share. For example, a project requesting $300,000 in Federal funds over 
a three-year project period (based on an award of $100,000 per twelve-
month budget period) must include a match of at least $100,000 (25% of 
the total approved cost of the project).

C. Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth (TLP)

    Eligible Applicants: Eligible applicants for a TLP grant under this 
announcement include States, units of local government (or a 
combination of units of local government), public or non-profit, 
private agency organizations, institutions or other non-profit 
entities. Federally recognized Indian Tribes are eligible to apply for 
TLP grants. Non-Federally recognized Indian Tribes and urban Indian 
organizations are also eligible to apply for grants as private, non-
profit agencies.
    Grantees (including subgrantees) with current project periods 
extending into FY 1995 may not apply for new TLP grants under this 
announcement. Applicants may refer to Part VI, Appendix D.2, for a 
listing of current grantees which are ineligible for grants under this 
priority area.
    As required by runaway and homeless youth legislation, priority for 
funding will be given to agencies with demonstrated experience in 
providing direct services to runaway and homeless youth. In line with 
this requirement, applicants which have three (3) or more years of 
continuous effort serving runaway and homeless youth in one or more 
areas set forth in Section 312 of the Act are eligible to receive an 
additional five (5) points in this criterion.
    Program purpose, goals and objectives: The Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families will award approximately 25 new service 
grants to provide shelter, skill training and support services to 
assist homeless youth in making a smooth transition to self-sufficiency 
and to prevent long-term dependency on social services. Applications 
are solicited under this priority area to carry out direct service 
projects designed to carry out the program purpose, goals and 
objectives set forth in the legislation and as specified in Part I, 
section C.3 of this announcement.
    Funds available under Part B of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act 
are to be used to enhance the capacities of youth-serving agencies in 
local communities to effectively address the service needs of homeless 
older adolescents and young adults. Activities that may be maintained, 
improved and/or expanded through a TLP grant must include, but are not 
necessarily limited to:
    1. Providing stable, safe living accommodations while a homeless 
youth is a program participant;
    2. Providing the services necessary to assist homeless youth in 
developing both the skills and personal characteristics needed to 
enable them to live independently;
    3. Providing education, information and counseling aimed at 
preventing, treating and reducing substance abuse among homeless youth;
    4. Providing homeless youth with appropriate referrals and access 
to medical and mental health treatment; and
    5. Providing the services and referrals necessary to assist youth 
in preparing for and obtaining employment.
    Background: It is estimated that about one-fourth of the youth 
served by all runaway and homeless youth programs are homeless. This 
means that many of the youth served cannot return home or to another 
safe living arrangement with a relative. Other homeless youth have aged 
out of the child welfare system and are no longer eligible for foster 
care.
    These young people are often homeless through no fault of their 
own. The families they can no longer live with are often physically and 
sexually abusive and involved in drug and alcohol abuse. They cannot 
provide the youth with their basic human needs such as shelter, food, 
clothing, let alone the supportive and safe environment needed for 
development of healthy self-images and the skills and personal 
characteristics which would enable them to mature into self-sufficient 
adults.
    Homeless youth, lacking a stable family environment and without 
social and economic supports, are at high risk of being involved in 
dangerous lifestyles and problematic or delinquent behaviors. More than 
two-thirds of homeless youth served by ACYF-funded programs report 
using drugs or alcohol and many participate in survival sex and 
prostitution to meet their basic needs.
    Homeless youth need a support system that will assist them in 
making the transition to adulthood and independent living. While all 
adolescents are faced with adjustment issues as they approach 
adulthood, homeless youth experience more severe problems and are at 
greater risk.
    Homeless youth have been a population eligible to receive services 
under the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act since 1978, but the service 
goals for homeless youth are different from those of runaways. For 
example, family reunification, though desirable, is typically not 
feasible for homeless youth. In many instances, programs serving the 
homeless populations are able to provide only limited assistance to 
homeless youth, whose needs are more complex and longer-term than those 
of runaway youth.
    The Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth specifically 
targets services to homeless youth and affords youth service agencies 
an opportunity to serve homeless youth in a manner which is 
comprehensive and geared towards ensuring a successful transition to 
self-sufficiency. The TLP also improves the availability of 
comprehensive, integrated services for homeless youth, which reduces 
the risks of exploitation and danger to which these youth are exposed 
while living on the streets without positive economic or social 
supports.
    Minimum requirements for project design: As a part of addressing 
the evaluation criteria outlined in Part II of this announcement, each 
applicant must address the following items in the program narrative 
section of their application.

Objectives and Need for Assistance

    1. Applicant must specify the goals and objectives of the program 
and how the implementation of the objectives will fulfill the 
requirements of the legislation identified in Part I, Section C.3, of 
this announcement.
    2. Applicant must discuss the issue of youth homelessness in the 
community to be served, the present availability of services for 
homeless youth and provide documentation of the incidence of homeless 
youth.
    3. Applicant must describe the system that will be used to ensure 
that individual clients will meet the eligibility criteria of need for 
service as established by the Act. This may include a discussion of the 
intake and assessment activities which will be conducted with a client 
prior to acceptance into the TLP project. The applicant is encouraged 
to include samples of any forms to be used to determine eligibility and 
appropriate services.

Results and Benefits Expected

    1. Applicant must describe how homeless youth will be reached and 
identify the number who will be served annually on both a residential 
and non-residential basis.
    2. Applicant must provide information on the expected results and 
benefits of the program in terms of the number of youth who will 
successfully complete the program as well as potential problems or 
barriers to program implementation that might be possible reason(s) for 
non-success. Applicant must also discuss the organization's policy on 
termination from and reentry into the program.
    3. Applicant must discuss the expected impact of the project on the 
availability of services to homeless youth in the local community and 
indicate how the project will enhance the organization's capacity to 
provide services to address youth homelessness in the community.

Approach

    1. Applicant must discuss how they will implement the statutory 
requirements of the Act. Specifically, the applicant must describe 
plans for the provision of shelter and services and for program 
administration.

a. Shelter

    (1) Applicant must assure that shelter is provided through one or a 
combination of the following:
    (a) A group home facility;
    (b) Family host homes; or
    (c) Supervised apartments.
    Applicant must indicate if the shelter will be provided directly or 
indirectly. When shelter will be provided indirectly, applicant must 
submit copies of formal written agreements with service providers 
regarding the terms under which shelter is provided.
    (2) Applicant must assure that the facility used for housing, 
whether a shelter, host family home and/or supervised apartment, shall 
accommodate no more than 20 youth at any given time; shall have a 
sufficient number of staff to ensure on-site supervision at each 
shelter option that is not a family home including periodic, 
unannounced visits from project staff; and is in compliance with State 
and local licensing requirements.
    (3) Applicant must assure, if applicable, that the applicant meets 
the requirements of the RHY Act for the lease of surplus Federal 
facilities for use as transitional living shelter facilities. Each 
surplus Federal facility used for this purpose must be made available 
for a period not less than two years, and no rent or fee shall be 
charged to the applicant in connection with use of such a facility. Any 
structural modifications or additions to surplus Federal facilities 
become the property of the government of the United States. All such 
modifications or additions may be made only after receiving prior 
written consent from the appropriate Department of Health and Human 
Services official.

b. Services

    (1) Applicant must include a description of the core services to be 
provided. The description must include the purpose and concept of the 
service, its role in both the overall program design and the individual 
client TLP plan. The services to be provided must include, but are not 
necessarily limited to, the following:
    (a) Basic life skills information and counseling, including 
budgeting, money management, use of credit, housekeeping, menu planning 
and food preparation, consumer education, leisure-time activities, 
transportation, and obtaining vital documents (Social Security card, 
birth certificate).
    (b) Interpersonal skill building, such as developing positive 
relationships with peers and adults, effective communication, decision 
making, and stress management.
    (c) Educational advancement, such as GED preparation and 
attainment, post-secondary training (college, technical school, 
military, etc.), and vocational education.
    (d) Job preparation and attainment, such as career counseling, job 
preparation training, dress and grooming, job placement and job 
maintenance.
    (e) Mental health care, such as counseling (individual and group), 
drug abuse education, prevention and referral services, and mental 
health counseling.
    (f) Physical health care, such as routine physicals, health 
assessments, family planning/parenting skills, and emergency treatment.
    (g) The substantive participation of youth in the assessment and 
implementation of their needs, including the development and 
implementation of the individual transitional living plan and in 
decisions about the services to be received.
    The applicant must specifically describe programmatic efforts 
planned and/or implemented to encourage awareness of and sensitivity to 
the particular needs of runaway and homeless youth who are members of 
ethnic and racial minority groups and/or who are street youth.

c. Administration

    (1) Applicant must describe the procedures to be employed in the 
development, implementation and monitoring of an individualized, 
written transitional living plan for each program client which 
addresses the provision of services, and is appropriate to the 
individual needs of the client.
    (2) Applicant must assure that the clients will substantively 
participate in the assessment of their needs and in decisions about the 
services to be received.
    (3) Applicant must assure that the outreach programs to be 
established are designed to attract individuals who are eligible to 
participate in the project.
    (4) Applicant must provide an assurance that housing and services 
will be available to a client for a continuous period not to exceed 540 
days (18 months).
    (5) Applicant must describe the methods to be employed in 
collecting statistical records and evaluative data and for submitting 
annual reports on such information to the Department of Health and 
Human Services.
    (6) Applicant must describe how the applicant will ensure the 
confidentiality of client records.
    (7) Applicant must describe how the activities implemented under 
this project will be continued by the agency once Federal funding for 
the project has ended. The applicant must describe specific plans for 
accomplishing program phase-out for the last two quarters of program 
project period in the event that the applicant would not receive a new 
award.
    (8) Applicant must agree to gather and submit program and client 
data required by ACYF's Management Information System (MIS). While the 
computer software and training for the implementation of the MIS will 
be provided by FYSB to grantees, applicant should include a request for 
funds in its budget for any computer equipment needed for 
implementation of the MIS.
    (9) Applicant must agree to cooperate with any research or 
evaluation efforts sponsored by the Administration for Children and 
Families.

Staff Background and Organizational Experience

    1. As priority for funding will be given to agencies and 
organizations that have documented experience in providing direct 
services to homeless youth, applicant must include a brief description 
of the organization and its experience in providing services to this 
specific client population.
    2. Applicant must include a description of current and proposed 
staff skills and knowledge regarding homeless youth and indicate how 
staff will be utilized in achieving the goals and objectives of the 
program. Information on proposed staff training and brief resumes or 
job descriptions may be included.
    3. Applicant must describe how the project has established or will 
establish formal service linkages with other social service, law 
enforcement, educational, housing, vocational, welfare, legal service, 
drug treatment and health care agencies in order to ensure appropriate 
referrals for the project clients where and when needed.
    4. Applicant must describe procedures for maintaining 
confidentiality of records on the youth and families served. Procedures 
must insure that no information on the youth and families is disclosed 
without the consent of the individual youth, parent or legal guardian. 
Disclosures without consent can be made to another agency compiling 
statistical records if individual identities are not provided or to a 
government agency involved in the disposition of criminal charges 
against an individual runaway or homeless youth.

Budget Appropriateness

    1. Applicant must discuss and justify the costs of the proposed 
project in terms of numbers of youth to be served, the types and 
quantities of services to be provided, and the anticipated outcomes for 
the youth.
    2. Applicant must describe the fiscal control and accounting 
procedures that will be used to ensure prudent use, proper 
disbursement, and accurate accounting of funds received under this 
program announcement.
    3. Applicant must describe how cost-effective use of TLP funds will 
be ensured by taking maximum advantage of existing resources within the 
State which would help in the operation or coordination of a TLP, 
including those resources which are supported by Federal Independent 
Living Initiatives funds. Also, applicant must describe efforts to be 
undertaken over the length of the project which may increase non-
Federal resources available to support the TLP.
    Duration of project: Because successful applicants will receive 
grants with funds appropriated by Congress for FY 1995, project periods 
for these new awards will begin when FY 1995 funds are appropriated and 
made available to ACYF, but in no case will they begin prior to October 
1, 1994.
    This announcement solicits TLP applications for projects of up to 
three years duration (36-month project periods). Initial grant awards, 
made on a competitive basis, will be for a one-year (12-month) budget 
period. Applications for continuation grants beyond the one-year budget 
period, but within the 36-month project period, will be entertained in 
subsequent years on a non-competitive basis, subject to the 
availability of funds, satisfactory progress of the grantee and 
determination that continued funding would be in the best interest of 
the government.
    Federal share of project costs: Up to $200,000 per year, which 
equals a maximum of $600,000 for a 3-year project period.
    Applicant share of the project: The Runaway and Homeless Youth Act 
requires a non-Federal matching requirement of ten percent of the total 
Federal funds. For example, a project requesting $600,000 in Federal 
funds over a three-year project period (based on an award of $200,000 
per twelve-month budget period) must include a match of at least 
$60,000 (10% of the Federal share).

D. Training and Technical Assistance Grants (T&TA)

    Eligible applicants: Statewide and regional nonprofit 
organizations, and combinations of such organizations, with 
demonstrated experience in providing services to runaway and homeless 
youth service providers.
    Program purpose, goals and objectives: The Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families expects to fund up to ten cooperative 
agreements to improve the programmatic and administrative capacities of 
public and private agencies to provide services to runaway and homeless 
youth by the provision of technical assistance and short-term training. 
Applications to provide such assistance may cover one or more Federal 
Regions or may be restricted to a smaller geographic area (e.g., one or 
more States).
    Background information: Over the years, many State and local 
agencies and programs have been established to provide needed short- 
and long-term services to runaway and homeless youth. These agencies 
are both public and private, profit-making and nonprofit. Some focus on 
a single concern, such as drug abuse or dropout prevention, while 
others are multi- or even all-purpose agencies, with specific 
components that deal with the physical health, mental health, family 
reunification and functioning, employment, education and transitional 
living of these young people.
    Notwithstanding the significant numbers of effective agencies and 
competent professional staff dedicated to assisting runaway and 
homeless youth across the country, services in some areas are 
inadequate or non-existent. In other cases, existing programs lack 
staff members with the full range of skills required to carry out the 
responsibilities with which the individual programs are charged. Also, 
many of the developed and tested curricula and models are little known 
or understood, even among the programs and staff where they could be of 
greatest use. Further, as new issues and problems emerge (for example, 
the glamorization of the youth drug culture by the news and 
entertainment media, and the placement of troublesome youth in private 
mental institutions to remove them from the streets), even experienced 
staff need to enhance their existing skills and to develop new ones.
    To address these issues, the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, 
section 342, and the Drug Abuse Prevention Program for Runaway and 
Homeless Youth, section 3511 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, both 
administered by the Family and Youth Services Bureau, authorize support 
to nonprofit organizations for the purpose of providing training and 
technical assistance (T&TA) to runaway and homeless youth service 
providers.
    To effectively provide such assistance, extensive interaction with 
grantees, integration and sharing of knowledge, coordination with 
components supporting the runaway and homeless youth system, and a 
cooperative relationship among training and technical assistance 
providers is needed.
    Projects in this priority area are intended to result in a process 
which encompasses the following types of activities:
    1. The provision of assistance to grantees for the purpose of 
assessment of grantee and staff training needs and the development, 
management and implementation of training plans that ensure staff have 
the skills to carry out their responsibilities. Training and technical 
assistance designed and/or provided to grantees for this purpose must 
be accessible and individualized, must provide concrete information and 
skill building and must include follow-up efforts.
    2. The provision of quality staff training which focuses on skill 
development that (a) provides opportunities for hands-on participation, 
direct observation, practice and expert feedback; (b) analyzes, 
integrates and transmits knowledge obtained from research findings, 
curricula, and models of greatest interest to grantees; and (c) 
recognizes new and emerging youth issues and provides intensive skills 
training in these areas.
    3. The collaborative exchange of monitoring and MIS information 
with runaway and homeless youth programs for the purpose of planning 
training and technical assistance for the geographic area being served, 
and for the purpose of providing follow-up training and technical 
assistance responsive to the findings resulting from monitoring 
individual grantees;
    4. The promotion of a cooperative relationship among training and 
technical assistance providers for the exchange of information 
regarding identified training needs, emerging youth issues, research 
findings, curricula and models.
    The award of these cooperative agreements will include a 
delineation of the responsibilities of the successful applicants and 
the Administration on Children, Youth and Families. The 
responsibilities contained in each cooperative agreement may be geared 
toward the unique needs of the RHY programs in the geographic areas to 
be served. At a minimum, responsibilities of the successful applicants 
will include development and implementation of a workplan, provision of 
training and technical assistance to grantees and coordination with 
other grantee support efforts and T&TA providers. Responsibilities of 
ACYF will include, at a minimum, review and approval of workplans, 
coordination and sharing of monitoring data, as appropriate, and 
sponsorship of a national meeting of T&TA providers.
    Minimum requirements for project design: As a part of addressing 
the generic evaluation criteria in Part II of this Announcement, each 
applicant must address the following items in the program narrative 
section of their proposal.

Objectives and Need for Assistance

    1. Identify the exact geographic area(s) to be served in terms of 
its distinctive features.
    2. Discuss youth homelessness in the geographic area(s) to be 
served. Provide documentation of the incidence of homeless youth.
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the incidence and conditions of 
runaway and homeless youth in the geographic area(s) to be served; and 
current issues, special problems and needs associated with runaway and 
homeless youth such as substance abuse, learning disabilities, lack of 
independent living skills.
    4. Discuss services in the geographic area(s) for runaway and 
homeless youth (Basic Centers, Transitional Living Programs, Drug Abuse 
Prevention Programs, Demonstration grants).
    5. Indicate an understanding of the capacities and management 
systems necessary to establish and operate runaway and homeless youth 
agencies. Discuss the knowledge, skills, abilities and experience 
required by individual youth service professionals at both the 
administrative and direct service levels.
    6. Discuss and justify the need for training and technical 
assistance in the geographic area to be served.
    7. Discuss barriers to services in the geographic area and greatest 
training and technical assistance needs of runaway and homeless youth 
service providers.
    8. Demonstrate an understanding of relevant research and 
development findings and products, and knowledge of available 
curricula, models and experts.

Results and Benefits Expected

    1. Discuss the goals and objectives of the proposed training and 
technical assistance effort and how it builds and improves upon past 
efforts.
    2. Project the number of agencies and individuals that would 
receive training and technical assistance services.
    3. Describe how the training and technical assistance effort will 
increase the capacity of RHY grantees to deliver effective and quality 
services to runaway and homeless youth.
    4. Describe how training and technical assistance will build on 
current program strengths and assist grantees in program improvement.

Approach

    1. Describe the approach, philosophy, strategies, methodologies and 
models that would be used to assess and address the unique training and 
technical assistance needs of runaway and homeless youth service 
providers in the geographic area(s) to be served. Describe the proposed 
effort and activities in detail.
    2. Describe interaction with grantees to support assessment of 
training needs, development of training plans and design of training 
and technical assistance strategies.
    3. Discuss the approach that will be used to provide quality staff 
training which focuses on skill development that provides opportunities 
for hands-on participation, direct observation, practice and expert 
feedback; which analyzes, integrates and transmits knowledge obtained 
from research findings, curricula, and models of greatest interest to 
grantees; and recognizes new and emerging youth issues and provides 
intensive skills training in these areas.
    4. Describe the approach that will be used for the collaborative 
exchange of monitoring and MIS information for runaway and homeless 
youth programs for the purpose of planning, training, and technical 
assistance for the geographic area to be served. Include a discussion 
of training and technical assistance that is a follow-up to monitoring 
and responsive to the needs of individual grantees.
    5. Describe the approach that would be used to promote the 
transmittal of knowledge and skills from highly skilled youth service 
providers to less experienced staff.
    6. Describe the approach for establishing a cooperative 
relationship with other training and technical assistance providers.
    7. Provide a detailed description of the efforts that will be 
carried out by the applicant directly and those efforts to be carried 
out in conjunction with other agencies or consultants. Discuss how 
these efforts will enhance training and technical assistance provision.
    8. Describe the methodology that will be used to evaluate the 
effectiveness of the training and technical assistance provided to 
runaway and homeless youth service providers in the geographic area(s).
    9. Discuss the approach that would be used to encourage cultural 
competency of runaway and homeless youth service providers in areas 
such as outreach, program design, staffing and board development.
    10. Include proposed time frames for accomplishing major 
milestones, levels of effort, letters of commitment and support.

Staff Background and Organizational Experience

    1. Describe the organizational history, structure, and experience 
providing training and technical assistance. Discuss operating 
principles with respect to the development and implementation of 
training and technical assistance.
    2. Clearly define roles and provide job descriptions of key project 
positions.
    3. Provide resumes of current and proposed staff. Include skills, 
experience, and qualifications working with runaway and homeless youth, 
and developing and designing training and technical assistance for 
youth service providers.
    4. Describe facilities, equipment, and other resources that would 
be available to the project.
    5. Describe the administrative and organizational structure and 
linkages established with other relevant organizations (e.g. 
subcontractors, other projects). Provide charts summarizing these 
structures and linkages and written agreements defining them (include 
in appendices).

Budget Appropriateness

    1. Discuss and justify the cost of the proposed project in terms of 
types and quantities of services to be provided.
    2. Describe the fiscal control and accounting procedures that will 
be used to ensure the prudent use, proper disbursement, and accurate 
accounting of funds received.
    3. Describe how additional resources necessary to carry out this 
project would be obtained and integrated into the work of the project.
    4. Provide assurance that one key person from the project would 
attend an annual 2-3 day FYSB sponsored meeting in Washington, DC.
    Duration of Project: This announcement solicits applications for 
Training and Technical Assistance cooperative agreements of up to five 
years in duration (60-month project periods). Initial awards, made on a 
competitive basis, will be for one-year (12-month) budget periods. 
Applications for continuation cooperative agreements beyond the one-
year budget period, but within the 60-month project period, will be 
entertained in subsequent years on a non-competitive basis, subject to 
the availability of funds, satisfactory progress of the grantee, and 
determination that continued funding would be in the best interest of 
the government.
    Federal Share of Project Costs: The maximum Federal share is not to 
exceed $150,000 per Federal Region for the first 12-month budget 
period, or a maximum of $750,000 per Federal Region for the 5-year 
project period. (For example, a project covering two Regions may 
receive up to $300,000 for the first 12-month budget period. 
Conversely, a project serving less than a Federal Region (e.g., a 
Statewide system) would receive less than $150,000 for the first 12-
month budget period.)
    Matching Requirement: The minimum non-Federal matching requirement 
in proportion to the maximum Federal share of $750,000 is $75,000 for a 
5-year project period. This constitutes 10 percent of the total Federal 
share.
    Anticipated number of projects to be funded: It is anticipated that 
up to ten projects will be funded.

Part IV. Application Process

A. Assistance to Prospective Grantees

    Potential grantees can receive informational assistance in 
developing applications from the appropriate ACF Regional Youth 
Contacts listed in Part VI, Appendix F or from the Administration on 
Children, Youth and Families in Washington, DC (see address at the 
beginning of this announcement). Organizations may also receive 
information and technical assistance in preparing applications from the 
appropriate Training and Technical Assistance Provider grantee listed 
in Part VI, Appendix G.

B. Application Requirements

    To be considered for a Runaway and Homeless Youth grant, each 
application must be submitted on the forms provided at the end of this 
announcement (see Part VI, section I of this announcement) and in 
accordance with the guidance provided herein. The application must be 
signed by an individual authorized both to act for the applicant agency 
and to assume responsibility for the obligations imposed by the terms 
and conditions of the grant award.
    Applicants applying for grants under more than one program (Basic 
Center Program, Drug Abuse Prevention Program, Transitional Living 
Program, and/or Training and Technical Assistance grants) must submit a 
separate and complete application for each program and must identify 
the relevant Priority Area on Form 424, Item #11. Although coordination 
among program components is encouraged, applications that combine an 
application for more than one grant program in a single proposal will 
not be reviewed.
    All applicants must indicate in their applications their 
willingness to fully cooperate in any data collection and research 
efforts mandated by the Administration for Children and Families.
    If more than one agency is involved in submitting a single 
application, one entity must be identified as the applicant 
organization which will have legal responsibility for the grant.

C. Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980

    Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980, Pub. L. 96-511, the 
Department is required to submit to the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) for review and approval any reporting and record-keeping 
requirements in regulations, including program announcements. This 
program announcement does not contain information collection 
requirements beyond those approved for ACF grant applications by OMB.

D. Notification Under Executive Order 12372

    This program is covered under Executive Order (E.O.) 12372, 
Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs, and 45 CFR part 100, 
Intergovernmental Review of Department of Health and Human Services 
Programs and Activities. Under the E.O., States may design their own 
processes for reviewing and commenting on proposed Federal assistance 
under covered programs.
    All States and Territories except Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, 
Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, 
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, American Samoa 
and Palau have elected to participate in the Executive Order process 
and have established Single Points of Contact (SPOCs). Applicants from 
these seventeen jurisdictions need take no action regarding E.O. 12372. 
Applications for projects to be administered by Federally-recognized 
Indian Tribes are also exempt from the requirements of E.O. 12372. 
Otherwise, applicants must contact their SPOCs as soon as possible to 
alert them to the prospective applications and receive any necessary 
instructions. Applicants must submit any required material to the SPOCs 
as early as possible so that the program office can obtain and review 
SPOC comments as part of the award process. It is imperative that the 
applicant submit all required materials, if any, to the SPOC and 
indicate the date of this submittal (or date of contact if no submittal 
is required) on the Standard Form 424, item 16a.
    Under 45 CFR 100.8(a)(2), a SPOC has 60 days from the application 
deadline date to comment on proposed new or competing continuation 
awards.
    The SPOCs are encouraged to eliminate the submission of routine 
endorsements as official recommendations. Additionally, SPOCs are 
requested to clearly differentiate between mere advisory comments and 
those official State process recommendations which may trigger the 
``accommodate or explain'' rule.
    When comments are submitted directly to ACF, they must be addressed 
to: Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs, Department of Health and Human 
Services, Administration for Children and Families, Division of 
Discretionary Grants, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., Aerospace Building, 
6th Floor, Washington, DC 20047. Attn: Maiso Bryant.
    A list of the Single Points of Contact for each State and Territory 
is included as Part VI, Appendix H of this announcement.
Availability of Forms and Other Materials
    A copy of the forms required to be submitted as part of each 
application for a runaway and homeless youth grant, and instructions 
for completing the application, are provided in Part VI, Appendix I. 
The Basic Center Program Performance Standards as well as descriptions 
of the National Runaway Switchboard and the National Clearinghouse on 
Runaway and Homeless Youth are presented in Part VI, Appendices A, B 
and C. Addresses of the State Single Points of Contact (SPOCs) to which 
applicants must submit review copies of their proposals are listed in 
Part VI, Appendix H.
    Legislation referenced in Part I, section B of this announcement 
may be found in major public libraries and at the ACF Regional Offices 
listed in Part VI, Appendix F at the end of this announcement.
    Additional copies of this announcement may be obtained from the ACF 
Regional Offices or by calling the telephone number listed at the 
beginning of this announcement. Further general information may be 
obtained from the Training and Technical Assistance Providers listed in 
Part VI, Appendix G.

F. Application Consideration

    All applications which are complete and conform to the requirements 
of this program announcement will be subject to a competitive review 
and evaluation process against the specific criteria outlined in Part 
II of this announcement and the specific Minimum Requirements for 
Project Design contained in Part III of this announcement. This review 
will be conducted in Washington, DC, by teams of non-Federal experts 
knowledgeable in the areas of youth development and/or human service 
programs. Applications for a Basic Center Program grant will be 
reviewed competitively only with other applications from the same 
State. Applications for Drug Abuse Prevention Program, Transitional 
Living Program and Training and Technical Assistance grants will be 
reviewed as a part of a national competition.
    The non-Federal experts will review the applications based on the 
Evaluation Criteria listed in Part II of this announcement and the 
specific Minimum Requirements for Project Design contained in Part III 
of this announcement and will assign a score to each application. The 
results of the competitive review will be analyzed by Federal staff 
who, in consultation with ACF Regional officials, will select those 
applications to be recommended for funding to the Commissioner, ACYF.
    The Commissioner will make the final selection of the applicants to 
be funded. As required by runaway and homeless youth legislation, 
priority for funding will be given to agencies with demonstrated 
experience in providing direct services to runaway and homeless youth. 
However, current grantees ending a three-year funding period, and 
applying as a new applicant for funds under this program announcement, 
are reminded that when the current project period ends so does the 
funding agency's obligation for future awards. Criterion 3, Approach, 
requires applicants to specifically discuss how their project will be 
maintained after termination of Federal support.
    In addition to scores assigned by non-Federal reviewers, 
consideration also will be given to adequate geographic distribution of 
services and the Commissioner may show preference for applications 
proposing services in areas that would not otherwise be served. The 
Commissioner also may elect to consider an applicant's past performance 
in providing services to runaway and homeless youth and also may elect 
not to fund any applicants having known management, fiscal or other 
problems which make it unlikely that they would be able to provide 
effective services.
    Grant awards for Basic Center Program, Drug Abuse Prevention 
Program and Training and Technical Assistance grants will be made by 
September 30, 1994. Grant awards for Transitional Living Program grants 
will be made after October 1, 1994. Successful applicants will be 
notified through the issuance of a Financial Assistance Award which 
will set forth the amount of funds granted, the terms and conditions of 
the grant, the effective date of the grant, the budget period for which 
support will be given, the non-Federal share to be provided, and the 
total project period for which support is contemplated.
    Organizations whose applications will not be funded will be 
notified of that decision in writing by the Commissioner of the 
Administration on Children, Youth and Families. Every effort will be 
made to notify all unsuccessful applicants as soon as possible after 
final decisions are made, including grantees whose three-year project 
periods end in FY 1994.

Part V. Application Assembly and Submission

    Applicants applying for more than one runaway and homeless youth 
grant (Basic Center Program, Drug Abuse Prevention Program, 
Transitional Living Program and/or Training and Technical Assistance) 
must submit a separate and complete application for each program. 
Applications that combine more than one program in a single proposal 
will not be reviewed.
    A. Contents of application. Each application must contain the 
following items in the order listed:
    1. Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424, REV 4-88) 
(page i).
    2. Budget Information (Standard Form 424A, REV 4-88) (pages ii-
iii).
    3. Budget Justification (Type on standard size plain white paper) 
(pages iv-v).
    4. Assurances--Non-Construction Programs (Standard Form 424B, REV 
4-88) (pages vi-vii).
    5. Certification Regarding Lobbying (page viii).
    6. Program Narrative Statement (pages 1 and following; 40 pages 
maximum, double-spaced).

    Special Note: APPLICANTS ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO LIMIT THE 
PROGRAM NARRATIVE STATEMENT PORTION OF THE APPLICATION TO 40 DOUBLE-
SPACED PAGES.

    7. Organizational Capability Statement (pages OCS-1 and following; 
3 pages maximum).
    8. Supporting Documents (pages SD-1 and following; 10 pages 
maximum, exclusive of letters of support or agreement).

B. Instructions for Preparing Application Components

    1. Standard Forms 424 and 424A: Follow the instructions in Part VI, 
Appendix I. In Item 8 of Form 424, check New. In Item 10 of the 424, 
clearly identify the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program 
Number and Title for the program for which funds are being requested 
(93.623, Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth; 93.657, 
Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless 
Youth; or 93.550, Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth. 
Applicants applying for Training and Technical Assistance cooperative 
agreements must use the number and title for the Basic Center Program 
for Runaway and Homeless Youth, 93.623 and indicate T&TA in parentheses 
in the box.
    In Item 11 of the 424, identify the Priority Area (IV, A, B, C, D) 
and the program name (Basic Center Program (BCP), Drug Abuse Prevention 
Program (DAPP), Transitional Living Program (TLP), or Training and 
Technical Assistance (T&TA)) which the application is addressing.
    2. Budget Justification: Provide breakdowns for major budget 
categories and justify significant costs. List amounts and sources of 
all funds, both Federal and non-Federal, that will be used for this 
project.
    3. Standard Form 424B, Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace, 
Certification Regarding Debarment, and Certification Regarding 
Lobbying. Of these forms, only the Standard Form 424B and the 
Certification Regarding Lobbying need to be signed and returned with 
the application. By signing and submitting its application each 
applicant is certifying its compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace and 
Debarment certification requirements included in this announcement.
    4. Program Narrative Statement: Use the Evaluation Criteria in Part 
II as a way to organize the Narrative. Be sure to address all the 
specifics contained in the appropriate Priority Area Description in 
Part III, especially the information described under Minimum 
Requirements for Project Design.
    5. Organizational Capability Statement: Applicants must provide a 
description (no more than three pages, double-spaced) of how the 
applicant agency is organized and the types, quantities and costs of 
services it provides, including services to clients other than runaway 
and homeless youth. For the prior year, list all contracts with or 
funds received from juvenile justice, probation and/or welfare 
agencies. Provide an organizational chart showing any superordinate, 
parallel, or subordinate agencies to the specific agency that will 
provide direct services to runaway and homeless youth, and summarize 
the purposes, clients and overall budgets of these other agencies. If 
the agency has multiple sites, list these sites, including addresses, 
phone numbers and staff contact names, if different than the SF 424. If 
the agency is a recipient of funds from the Administration on Children, 
Youth and Families for services to runaway and homeless youth for 
programs other than that applied for in this application, show how the 
services supported by these funds are or will be integrated with the 
existing services. Discuss the experience of the applicant organization 
in providing services to runaway and homeless youth.
    6. Supporting Documentation: The maximum for supporting 
documentation is 10 pages, double spaced, exclusive of letters of 
support or agreement. These documents might include resumes, 
newsclippings, evidence of the program's efforts to coordinate youth 
services at the local level, etc. Documentation over the ten page limit 
will not be reviewed. Applicants may include as many letters of support 
or agreement as are appropriate.

C. Application Submission

    To be considered for funding, each applicant must submit one signed 
original and two additional copies of the application, including all 
attachments, to the application receipt point specified below. The 
original copy of the application must have original signatures, signed 
in black ink. Each copy must be stapled (back and front) in the upper 
left corner. All copies of a single application must be submitted in a 
single package.
    Because each application will be duplicated by the government, do 
not use or include separate covers, binders, clips, tabs, plastic 
inserts, maps, brochures or any other items that cannot be processed 
easily on a photocopy machine with an automatic feed. Do not bind, 
clip, fasten or in any way separate subsections of the application, 
including supporting documentation.
1. Closing Date for the Receipt of Applications
    The closing dates for receipt of applications for the grant 
programs contained in this announcement are:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Program                           Closing date            
------------------------------------------------------------------------
BCP................................  June 15, 1994.                     
TLP................................  June 28, 1994.                     
DAPP...............................  July 12, 1994.                     
T&TA...............................  July 12, 1994.                     
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Applications may be submitted to the following address: Department 
of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 
Division of Discretionary Grants, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., 
Aerospace Building, 6th Floor, Washington, DC 20447. Attn: Maiso 
Bryant, ACF-94-ACYF/RHYP. Hand delivered applications will be accepted 
during the normal working hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, on or prior to the established closing date at: Administration 
for Children and Families, Division of Discretionary Grants, 6th Floor 
OFM/DDG, 901 D Street, SW., Washington, DC 20447.
    Envelopes containing applications must clearly indicate the 
specific program that the application is addressing: Basic Center 
Program (BCP); Drug Abuse Prevention Program (DAPP), Transitional 
Living Program (TLP), or Training and Technical Assistance (T&TA).
2. Deadline for Submission of Applications
    a. Deadline. Applications will be considered as meeting the 
deadline if they are either:
    i. Received on or before the deadline date at the above address, or
    ii. Sent on or before the deadline date and received by the ACF in 
time for the independent review under DHHS GAM I-62. (Applicants are 
cautioned to request a legibly dated U.S. Postal Service postmark or to 
obtain a legibly dated receipt from a commercial carrier or the U.S. 
Postal Service as proof of timely mailing. Private metered postmarks 
are not acceptable as proof of timely mailing.)
    b. Late applications. Applications which do not meet the criteria 
stated above are considered late applications. The Administration for 
Children and Families (ACF) will notify each late applicant that its 
application will not be considered in the current competition.
    c. Extension of deadline. The ACF may extend the deadline for all 
applicants because of acts of God such as earthquakes, floods or 
hurricanes, etc., or when there is a widespread disruption of the 
mails. However, if ACF does not extend the deadline for all applicants, 
it may not waive or extend the deadline for any applicants.
3. Checklist for a Complete Application
    ________ One original application signed in black ink and dated 
plus two copies.
    ________ A completed SPOC certification with the date of SPOC 
contact entered in item 16 on page 1 of SF 424, if applicable.
    ________ SF 424 (The original application must have the word 
ORIGINAL hand printed in bold block letters at the top margin of its 
SF 424.
    ________ SF 424A.
    ________ Budget Justification.
    ________ SF 424B.
    ________ Certification Regarding Lobbying.
    ________ Program Narrative Statement (maximum of 40 pages, 
double-spaced).
    ________ Organizational Capability Statement (maximum of three 
pages, double-spaced).
    ________ Supporting Documents (maximum of 10 pages double-
spaced).

    (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number 93.623, Basic Center 
Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth; Number 93.657, Drug Abuse 
Education and Prevention Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth; and 
Number 93.550, Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth.)

    Dated: April 27, 1994.
Olivia A. Golden,
Commissioner, Administration on Children, Youth and Families.

Part VI. Appendices

Appendix A--Basic Center Program Performance Standards

Program Performance Standards

I. Purpose

    The Program Performance Standards established by the Bureau for 
its funded centers relate to the basic program components enumerated 
in section 317 of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act and as further 
detailed in the Regulations and Program Guidance governing the 
implementation of the Act. They address the methods and processes by 
which the needs of runaway and homeless youth and their families are 
being met, as opposed to the outcome of the services provided on the 
clients served.
    The terms program performance standard, criterion, and 
indicators are used throughout both the instrument and the 
instructions. These terms are defined as follows:
    Program performance standard: The general principle against 
which a judgment can be made to determine whether a service or an 
administrative component has achieved a particular level of 
attainment.
    Criterion: A specific dimension or aspect of a program 
performance standard which helps to define that standard and which 
is amenable to direct observation or measurement.
    Indicator: The specific documentation which demonstrates whether 
a criterion (or an aspect of a criterion) is being met and thereby 
the extent to which a specific aspect of a standard is being met.
    Fourteen program performance standards, with related criteria, 
are established by the Bureau for the projects funded under the 
Runaway and Homeless Youth Act. Nine of these standards relate to 
service components (outreach, individual intake process, temporary 
shelter, individual and group counseling, family counseling, service 
linkages, aftercare services, recreational programs, and case 
disposition), and five to administrative functions or activities 
(staffing and staff development, youth participation, individual 
client files, ongoing project planning, and board of directors/
advisory body).
    Although fiscal management is not included as a program 
performance standard, it is viewed by FYSB as being an essential 
element in the operation of its funded projects. Therefore, as 
validation visits are made, the Regional ACF specialist and/or staff 
from the Office of Fiscal Operations will also review the project's 
financial management activities.
    FYSB views these program performance standards as constituting 
the minimum standards to which its funded projects should conform. 
The primary assumption underlying the program performance standards 
is that the service and administrative components which are 
encompassed within these standards are integral (but not sufficient 
in themselves) to a program of services which effectively addresses 
the crisis and long-term needs of runaway and homeless youth and 
their families.
    The program performance standards are designed to serve as a 
developmental tool, and are to be employed by both the project staff 
and the Regional ACF staff specialists in identifying those service 
and administrative components and activities of individual projects 
which require strengthening and/or development either through 
internal action on the part of staff or through the provision of 
external technical assistance.

II. Program Performance Standards and Criteria

    The following constitute the program performance standards and 
criteria established by the Bureau for its funded centers. Each 
standard is numbered, and each criterion is listed after a lower 
case letter.
    1. Outreach.
    The project shall conduct outreach efforts directed towards 
community agencies, youth and parents.
    2. Individual Intake Process.
    The project shall conduct an individual intake process with each 
youth seeking services from the project. The individual intake 
process shall provide for:
    a. Direct access to project services on a 24-hour basis.
    b. The identification of the emergency service needs of each 
youth and the provision of the appropriate services either directly 
or through referrals to community agencies and individuals.
    c. An explanation of the services which are available and the 
requirements for participation, and the securing of a voluntary 
commitment from each youth to participate in project services prior 
to admitting the youth into the project.
    d. The recording of basic background information on each youth 
admitted into the project.
    e. The assignment of primary responsibility to one staff member 
for coordinating the services provided to each youth.
    f. The contact of the parent(s) or legal guardian of each youth 
provided temporary shelter within the timeframe established by State 
law or, in the absence of State requirements, preferably within 24 
but within no more than 72 hours following the youth's admission 
into the project.
    3. Temporary Shelter.
    The project shall provide temporary shelter and food to each 
youth admitted into the project and requesting such services.
    a. Each facility in which temporary shelter is provided shall be 
in compliance with State and local licensing requirements.
    b. Each facility in which temporary shelter is provided shall 
accommodate no more than 20 youth at any given time.
    c. Temporary shelter shall normally not be provided for a period 
exceeding two weeks during a given stay at the project.
    d. Each facility in which temporary shelter is provided shall 
make at least two meals per day available to youth served on a 
temporary shelter basis.
    e. At least one adult shall be on the premises whenever youth 
are using the temporary shelter facility.
    4. Individual and Group Counseling.
    The project shall provide individual and/or group counseling to 
each youth admitted into the project.
    a. Individual and/or group counseling shall be available daily 
to each youth admitted into the project on a temporary shelter basis 
and requesting such counseling.
    b. Individual and/or group counseling shall be available to each 
youth admitted into the project on a non-residential basis and 
requesting such counseling.
    c. The individual and/or group counseling shall be provided by 
qualified staff.
    5. Family Counseling.
    The project shall make family counseling available to each 
parent or legal guardian and youth admitted into the project.
    a. Family counseling shall be provided to each parent or legal 
guardian and youth admitted into the project and requesting such 
services.
    b. The family counseling shall be provided by qualified staff.
    6. Service Linkages.
    The project shall establish and maintain linkages with community 
agencies and individuals for the provision of those services which 
are required by youth and/or their families but which are not 
provided directly by the centers.
    a. Arrangements shall be made with community agencies and 
individuals for the provision of alternative living arrangements, 
medical services, psychological and/or psychiatric services, and the 
other assistance required by youth admitted into the project and/or 
by their families which are not provided directly by the project.
    b. Specific efforts shall be conducted by the project directed 
toward establishing working relationships with law enforcement and 
other juvenile justice system personnel.
    7. Aftercare Services.
    The project shall provide a continuity of services to all youth 
served on a temporary shelter basis and/or their families following 
the termination of such temporary shelter both directly and through 
referrals to other agencies and individuals.
    8. Recreational Program.
    The project shall provide a recreational-leisure time schedule 
of activities for youth admitted to the project for residential 
care.
    9. Case Disposition.
    The project shall determine, on an individual case basis, the 
disposition of each youth provided temporary shelter, and shall 
assure the safe arrival of each youth home or to an alternative 
living arrangement.
    a. To the extent feasible, the project shall provide for the 
active involvement of the youth, the parent(s) or legal guardian, 
and the staff in determining what living arrangement constitutes the 
best interest of each youth.
    b. The project shall assure the safe arrival of each youth home 
or to an alternative living arrangement, following the termination 
of the crisis services provided by the project, by arranging for the 
transportation of the youth if he/she will be residing within the 
area served by the project; or by arranging for the meeting and 
local transportation of the youth at his/her destination if he/she 
will be residing beyond the area served by the project.
    c. The project shall verify the arrival of each youth who is not 
accompanied home or to an alternative living arrangement by the 
parent(s) or legal guardian, project staff or other agency staff 
within 12 hours after his/her scheduled arrival at his/her 
destination.
    10. Staffing and Staff Development.
    Each center is required to develop and maintain a plan for 
staffing and staff development.
    a. The project shall operate under an affirmative action plan.
    b. The project shall maintain a written staffing plan which 
indicates the number of paid and volunteer staff in each job 
category.
    c. The project shall maintain a written job description for each 
paid and volunteer staff function which describes both the major 
tasks to be performed and the qualifications required.
    d. The project shall provide training to all paid and volunteer 
staff (including youth) in both the procedures employed by the 
project and in specific skill areas as determined by the project.
    e. The project shall evaluate the performance of each paid and 
volunteer staff member on a regular basis.
    f. Case supervision sessions, involving relevant project staff, 
shall be conducted at least weekly to review current cases and the 
types of counseling and other services which are being provided.
    11. Youth Participation.
    The center shall actively involve youth in the design and 
delivery of the services provided by the project.
    a. Youth shall be involved in the ongoing planning efforts 
conducted by the project.
    b. Youth shall be involved in the delivery of the services 
provided by the project.
    12. Individual Client Files.
    The project shall maintain an individual file on each youth 
admitted into the project.
    a. The client file maintained on each youth should, at a 
minimum, include an intake form which minimally contains the basic 
background information needed by FYSB; counseling notations; 
information on the services provided both directly and through 
referrals to community agencies and individuals; disposition data; 
and, as applicable, any follow-up and evaluation data which are 
compiled by the center.
    b. The file on each client shall be maintained by the project in 
a secure place and shall not be disclosed without the written 
permission of the client and his/her parent(s) or legal guardian 
except to project staff, to the funding agency(ies) and its(their) 
contractor(s), and to a court involved in the disposition of 
criminal charges against the youth.
    13. Ongoing Center Planning.
    The center shall develop a written plan at least annually.
    a. At least annually, the project shall review the crisis 
counseling, temporary shelter, and aftercare needs of the youth in 
the area served by the center and the existing services which are 
available to meet these needs.
    b. The project shall conduct an ongoing evaluation of the impact 
of its services on the youth and families it serves.
    c. At least annually, the project shall review and revise, as 
appropriate, its goals, objectives, and activities based upon the 
data generated through both the review of youth needs and existing 
services (13a) and the follow-up evaluations (13b).
    d. The project's planning process shall be open to all paid and 
volunteer staff, youth, and members of the Board of Directors and/or 
Advisory Body.
    14. Board of Directors/Advisory Body (Optional).
    It is strongly recommended that the centers have a Board of 
Directors or Advisory Body.
    a. The membership of the project's Board of Directors or 
Advisory Body shall be composed of a representative cross-section of 
the community, including youth, parents, and agency representatives.
    b. Training shall be provided to the Board of Directors or 
Advisory Body designed to orient the members to the goals, 
objectives, and activities of the project.
    c. The Board of Directors or Advisory Body shall review and 
approve the overall goals, objectives, and activities of the 
project, including the written plan developed under standard 13.

Appendix B--The National Runaway Switchboard

     Facilitates communication among youth, their families 
and youth and community-based resources through conference calling 
services.
     Provides crisis intervention counseling and message 
delivery services to at-risk youth and their families.
     Provides information and referral services to at-risk 
youth and their families on youth serving agencies using a 
computerized national resource directory.
     Conducts an annual conference for local switchboard 
service providers.
    The Switchboard distributes information brochures, posters, a 
newsletter, and public service announcements. For more information, 
contact the National Runaway Switchboard, 3080 North Lincoln, 
Chicago, IL 60657; telephone 1-800-621-4000.

Appendix C--National Clearinghouse on Runaway and Homeless Youth

    The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) established NCRHY in 
June 1992 in response to the need for a central source of 
information on runaway and homeless youth and the provision of 
services to that client population. As a national resource for youth 
service professionals, policymakers and the general public, NCRHY 
offers the following specific services:
    Through its information line, bibliographic and FYSB program 
databases and special mailings, NCRHY distributes information about 
successful program approaches, available resources and current 
activities relevant to runaway and homeless youth organizations.
    NCRHY develops semi-annual briefing packages to inform the field 
about new developments, ideas and issues related to services to 
runaway and homeless youth. It also produces informational packets 
on FYSB programs and reports on critical issues, best practices and 
model programs.
    NCRHY facilitates FYSB-sponsored forums, bringing together 
experts in the field to discuss critical issues and develop 
strategies for addressing the causes and consequences of runaway 
episodes and homelessness.
    NCRHY will assist FYSB in collaborating with national, State and 
local organizations on youth-related policy and program initiatives.
    For more information, please contact the National Clearinghouse 
on Runaway and Homeless Youth, P.O. Box 13505, Silver Spring, 
Maryland 20911-3505, telephone (301) 608-8098.

Appendix D--Runaway and Homeless Youth Continuation Grantees

    The following grantees are expected to receive continuation 
grants in FY 1994 and are NOT eligible to apply for funds under this 
announcement.

D.1: Basic Center Programs for Runaway and Homeless Youth Grantees 
Ineligible for New FY 1994 Funding

Region I

Connecticut

Council of Churches, 126 Washington Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 06604, 
John Cottrell, (203) 334-1121
Quinebaug Valley Youth Services Bureau, P.O. Box 812, North 
Grosvenordale, CT 06255, Pamela Brown, (203) 923-9526
Educational Resources, 90 North Main Street, West Hartford, CT 
06107, Wayne Starkey, (203) 521-8035

Maine

Youth and Family Services, P.O. Box 502, Skowhegan, ME 04976, Ronald 
Herbert, (207) 474-8311
Youth Alternatives, 175 Lancaster Street, Portland, Maine 04101, 
Mike Tarpinian, (207) 874-1175

Massachusetts

Riverside Community, Mental Health, 450 Washington Street, Dedham, 
MA 02026, Susan Sawyer, (617) 244-4802
The Phaneuf Center, 104 Market Street, Brockton, MA 02401, David 
Kaufer, (508) 584-0500
Concord-Assabet Adolescent Services, Inc., 56 Winthrop Street, 
Concord, MA 01742, Stephen A. Joffe, (508) 371-3006
L.U.K. Crisis Center, Inc., 99 Day Street, Fitchburg, MA 01420, 
Ernest M. Pletan-Cross, (508) 345-0658

New Hampshire

Child and Family Services, 99 Hanover Street, Manchester, NH 03101, 
Gail Starr, (603) 668-1920
Community Youth Advocates, 36 Tremont Square, Claremont, NH 03743, 
Rodney Minkler, (603) 543-0427

Vermont

Washington County Youth Service Bureau, P.O. Box 627, Montpelier, VT 
05601, Tom Howard, (802) 229-9151

Region II

New Jersey

Anchor House, 482 Centre Street, Trenton, NJ 08611, Judith Donohoe, 
(609) 396-8329
Crossroads, 770 Woodlane Road, Suite 57, Mt. Holly, NJ 08060, 
Delores G. Martell, (609) 261-5400
Group Homes of Camden County, 35 S. 29th Street, Camden, NJ 08105, 
Sandra Mengestu, (609) 541-9283
Atlantic County Department of Social Services, 101 So. Shore Road, 
Northfield, NJ 08225 Don Leeds, (609) 645-5862

New York

Equinox, 214 Lark Street, Albany, NY 12210, Judith Watson, (518)465-
9524
Compass House, 370 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209, Janell Wilson, 
(716) 886-1351
Town of Huntington Youth Bureau, 100 Main Street, Huntington, NY 
11743, Paul Lowery, (516) 351-3061
YWCA of Binghamton/Broome County, 80 Hawley Street, Binghamton, NY 
13901, Saraanne Delafield, (607) 772-0340
Family of Woodstock, U.P.0. Box 3516, Kingston, NY 12401, Joan 
Mayer, (914) 679-9240
Chautauqua Opportunities, 188 South Erie Street, Mayville, NY 14757, 
Douglas Fricke, (716) 753-2117
Emergency Housing Group, 141 Monhagen Avenue, Middletown, NY 10940, 
John Harper, (914) 343-7115
Oswego County Opportunities, Inc., 223 Oneida Street, Fulton, NY 
13069, Janette Reshick, (315) 598-4717
Family and Community Services, 41 West Main Street, Cobleskill, NY 
12043, Tom Meyer, (518) 234-3581
Oneida County Community Action Agency, 303 West Liberty Street, 
Rome, NY 13440, Treva Wood, (315) 339-5640
Cortland County Community Action Program (Time Out Program), 23 Main 
Street, Cortland, NY 13045, Lenn Ann Underwood, (607) 753-6781
The Salvation Army, 749 S. Warren Street, Syracuse, NY 13202, 
Roberta Schofield, (315) 479-1323
Westchester County Youth Bureau, 150 Grand Street, 6th Flr., White 
Plains, NY 10601, Toni Collarini, (914) 285-2745
County of Nassau, One West Street, Mineola, NY 11501, Ann M. Irvin, 
(516) 571-5893

Puerto Rico

Centros Sor Isolina Ferre, Box 213, Playa Station, Ponce, PR 00734, 
Sister Rosita Bauza, (809) 843-1910

Region III

Delaware

Child, Inc., 507 Philadelphia Pike, Wilmington, DE 19809, Joseph 
Dell'Olio, (302) 762-8989

District of Columbia

Latin American Youth Center, 3045--15th Street, NW., Washington, 
D.C. 20009, Lori Kaplan, (202) 483-1140

Maryland

St. Mary's County Board of County Commissioners, P.O. Box 653, 
Leonardtown, MD 20650, Carl Loffler, (301) 475-4464

Pennsylvania

Voyage House, 1431 Lombard Street, Philadelphia, PA 19146, Susan 
Pursch, (215) 545-2910
Catholic Charities, P.O. Box 3551, Union Deposit Road, Harrisburg, 
PA 17105, MSG. Francis Kumontis, M.S.W., (717) 657-4804
Catholic Social Services, 33 E. Northhampton, Wilkes-Barre, PA 
18701, Thomas Cherry, (717) 824-5766
Three Rivers Youth, 2039 Termon Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, David 
Droppa, (412) 766-2215
Alternatives Family Resources, 1035 High Street, Pottstown, PA 
19464, Ronald Harris, (215) 327-1601
Council of Three Rivers, American Indian Center, 200 Charles Street, 
Pittsburgh, PA 15238, Russell Simms, (412) 782-4457
Youth Services of Bucks County, Neshaminy Manor Center, Almshouse 
Building, Doylestown, PA 18901, Roger Dawson, (215) 752-7050

Virginia

Volunteer Emergency Families for Children, P.O. Box 15416, Richmond, 
VA 23227, William Christian, (804) 261-0607
City of Roanoke, 4350 Coyner Spring Road, Roanoke, VA 24012, Andrea 
Krochalis, (703) 977-3324
Seton House, Inc., 642 North Lynnhaven Road, Virginia Beach, VA 
23452, Michael Inman, (804) 498-4673
Children, Youth and Family Services, 116 West Jefferson Street, 
Charlottesville, VA 22902, Betty Ann Hopke, (804) 977-4260
Family and Children's Services, 1518 Willow Lawn Drive, Richmond, VA 
23230, Richard J. Lung, (804) 282-4255

West Virginia

Daymark (Patchwork), 1598-C Washington East, Charleston, WV 25311, 
Dennis Pease, (304) 340-3675
Time Out Youth Services, 1431 - 7th Avenue, Huntington, WV 25701, 
Pamela Dickens-Rush, (304) 525-7161

Region IV

Alabama

American Red Cross, 405 South First Street, Gadsden, AL 35901, 
Dorothy West, (205) 547-8667
Group Homes, Inc., 1426 S. Court Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, 
George Hoyt/Martha Nachman, (205) 834-5512

Florida

Family Resources, Inc. (Residential South), P.0. Box 13087, St. 
Petersburg, FL 33733, Jane Harper, (813) 341-2200
Youth Crisis Center, P.O. Box 16567, Jacksonville, FL 32245, Tom 
Patania, (904) 720-0002
Youth & Family Alternatives (RAP), 7524 Plathe Road, New Port 
Richey, FL 34653, George Magrill, (813) 841-4184
Florida Keys Children's Center, 73 High Point Road, Tavernier, FL 
33070, Dale Wolgast, (305) 852-4246
Crosswinds Youth Services, Inc., P.O. Box 540625, Merritt Island, FL 
32954-0625, Jan Lokay, (305) 452-8988
Family Resources, Inc. (Residential South), P.0. Box 13087, St. 
Petersburg, FL 33733, Jane Harper, (813) 341-2200
Lutheran Ministries (Gulf Coast Youth and Family Services), 4610 W. 
Fairfield Drive, Pensacola, FL 32506, Neil Pape, (904) 453-2772

Georgia

The Bridge, 1559 Johnson Road, NW., Atlanta, GA 30318, Ann Starr, 
(404) 792-0070
Marshlands, Inc., 311 East Hall Street, Savannah, GA 31401, James 
McLaughlin, (912) 234-0103
Athens Regional Attention Home, 490 Pulaski Street, Athens, GA 
30601, Sharon Smith, (404) 548-5893
The Alcove, 507 East Church Street, Monroe, GA 30655, Gail Bayes, 
(404) 267-9156
Tri-County Protective Agency, P.O. Box 1937, Hinesville, GA 31313, 
Rita Campbell, (912) 368-9200
Safe Harbor Children's Shelter, P.O. Box 1313, Beunswick, GA 31521, 
Chuck Ballance, (912) 267-6000

Kentucky

Brighton Center, Inc., P.O. Box 325, Newport, KY 41072, Robert 
Brewster, (606) 491-8303 (606) 491-8303

Mississippi

Catholic Charities, P.O. Box 2248, Jackson, MS 39225-2248, Rev. 
Elvin Sunds, (601) 355-8634
Mississippi Children's Home, P.O. Box 1078, Jackson, MS 39215-9911, 
Christopher Cherney, (601) 352-7784

North Carolina

The Relatives, 1100 East Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28203, Jo Ann 
Greyer, (704) 377-0602
Mountain Youth Resources, P.O. Box 2847, Cullowhee, NC 28723-2847, 
Elizabeth Chambers, (704) 586-8958
Tuscarora Tribe, P.O. Box 8, Pembroke, NC 28372, Robert Locklear, 
(919) 521-1861
Youth Focus, Inc., 301 E. Washington Street, Greensboro, NC 27401, 
Charles Hodierne, (919) 333-6858
Lee County Youth Services, P.O. Box 57, Sanford, NC 27331-0057, Todd 
Edwards, (919) 774-8404

South Carolina

Dept. of Youth Services (Crossroads), 4360 Headquarters Road, N. 
Charleston, SC 29405, Greg Leighton, (803) 744-3381
Dept. of Youth Services (Hope House), 1940 Shivers Road, Columbia, 
SC 29210, Marilyn McEachern, (803) 731-1694
Dept. of Youth Services (Greenhouse), 529 N. Wise Drive, Sumter, SC 
29150, Howard McFadden, (803) 775-3311

Tennessee

Oasis Center, P.O. Box 121648, Nashville, TN 37212, Mary Jane Dewey, 
(615) 327-4455
Link House, Inc., P.O. Box 7022, Kingsport, TN 37664, Connie Steere, 
(615) 378-4163
Child and Family Services, 114 Dameron Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37917, 
Charlie Gentry, (615) 524-7483
Gardner House, 317 Oak Street, Chattanooga, TN 37403, Tom Edwards, 
(615) 755-2725
The Family Link, P.O. Box 40437, Memphis, TN 38174, Marian Carruth, 
(901) 725-6911

Region V

Illinois

McHenry County Youth Service, 101 South Jefferson Street, Woodstock, 
IL 60098, Susan Krause, (815) 338-7360
Hoyleton Youth and Family Services, 36 Loisel Village, East St. 
Louis, IL 62203, Shelly Byndom, (618) 398-0900
Youth Service Bureau, 1111 South Eighth Street, Springfield, IL 
62703, Kaywin Davis, (217) 753-8300
Mental Health Services of Franklin and Williamson Counties, Inc., 
902 West Main, P.O. Box 530, West Frankfort, IL 62896, Connie Baker, 
(618) 997-5336
The Night Ministry, 1218 West Addison, Chicago, IL 60613, David 
Roth, (312) 935-8300
Omni Youth Services, 1111 Lake Cook Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089, 
Dennis Depcik, (708) 537-6878
Children's Home and Aid Society, 1819 South Neal Street, Ste. D, 
Champaign, IL 61820, Tom Butero, (217) 359-8815
Youth Attention Center, 527 South Main Street, P.O. Box 606, 
Jacksonville, IL 62651-0606, Jerome Noble, (217) 245-6000
Youth Outreach Services, 6417 W. Irving Park Road, Chicago, IL 
60634, William Southwick, (312) 777-7112

Indiana

Indiana Juvenile Justice Task Force, 1800 N. Meridian, Suite 402, 
Indianapolis, IN 46202, James Miller, (317) 926-6100
Crisis Shelter, 1575 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Street, 
Indianapolis, IN 46202, Ron Carpenter, (317) 634-5050
Youth Service Bureau of St. Joseph County, 2222 Lincoln Way West, 
South Bend, IN 46628, Bonnie Strycker, (219) 235-9231
Stopover, Inc., 2236 E. 10th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46201-2099, 
Elizabeth Malone, (317) 635-9301
Clark County Youth Shelter, 118 East Chestnut Street, P.O. Box 886, 
Jeffersonville, IN 47131, Candice Chaney, (812) 284-5229

Michigan

Comprehensive Youth Services (Macomb Co. Youth Interim Care 
Facility), 422 Bart Street, Warren, MI 48091, Joanne Smyth, (313) 
463-7079
Link Crisis Intervention Center, 2002 South State Street, St. 
Joseph, MI 49085, Nancy Berendsen, (616) 983-6351
Youth Living Centers, 715 S. Inkster Road, Inkster, MI 48141, Linda 
Connelly, (313) 563-5005
Listening Ear Crisis Center, 107 E. Illinois Avenue, P.O. Box 65, 
Mt. Pleasant, MI 48804-0085, Donald Schuster, (517) 772-2918
Comprehensive Youth Services (The Harbor), 3061 Commerce Drive, 
Suite 2, Port Huron, MI 48060, Sally Currie, (313) 385-7010
Cory Place, 1218 Washington Avenue, Bay City, MI 48708, Raul 
Gonzales, (517) 895-5563
Saginaw County Youth Council, P.O. Box 3191, Saginaw, MI 48605, 
Ronald Spess, (517) 752-5175
Northeast Michigan Community Service Agency, 2373 Gordon Road, 
Alpena, MI 49707, John Swise, (517) 356-3474
League of Catholic Women (Off The Streets), 10612 E. Jefferson, 
Detroit, MI 48201, David Suttner, (313) 831-1000
Advisory Centers (The Bridge), 1115 Ball Avenue, NE., Grand Rapids, 
MI 49505, Nancy Ayers, (616) 451-3001
Ozone House, 608 N. Main Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, Paul Wood, 
(313) 662-2265
Every Woman's Place, 425 W. Western Avenue, Muskegon, MI 49440, Mary 
MacDonald, (616) 726-4493
Bethany Christian Services, 6995 W. 48th Street, Fremont, MI 49412, 
Dale A Painter, (616) 924-3390

Minnesota

The Bridge, 2200 Emerson Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55405, Thomas 
Sawyer, (612) 377-8800
St. Paul Youth Service Bureau, Inc., 1667 Arcade Street, St. Paul, 
MN 55108-2615, Nancy Letoumeau, (612) 771-1301
Crossroads of Owantonna, 565 Dunnell Drive, Owatonna, MN 55060, Roy 
Harley, (612) 388-1041
Evergreen House, 622 Mississippi Avenue, Bemidji, MN 56601, Cheryl 
Byers, (218) 751-4332
Ain Dah Yung Shelter (Our Home), 1089 Portland Avenue, St. Paul, MN 
55104, John Whitecloud, (612) 227-4184
Lutheran Social Services (Bethany Crisis Center), 9239 Odaho Street, 
Duluth, MN 55808, John Moline, (218) 626-2726

Ohio

Huckleberry House, 1421 Hamlet Street, Columbus, OH 43201, Douglas 
McCoard, (614) 294-8097
Shelter Care, Inc. (Safe Landing Youth Shelter), 680 E. Market St., 
Suite 306, Akron, OH 44304, David Fair, (216) 376-4200
Southern Consortium for Children, 7990 Dairy Lane, P.O. Box 956, 
Athens, OH 45701-0956, Steven Trout, (614) 593-8293
Children's and Family Service, 535 Marmion Avenue, Youngstown, OH 
44502, Gerald Janosik, (216) 782-5664
Council on Rural Service Programs, 116 E. Third Street, Greenville, 
OH 45331, Shirley Hathaway, (513) 548-8002
Center for Children and Youth Services, 42707 North Ridge Road, 
Elyria, OH 44035, John Ollerton, (216) 323-3400

Wisconsin

Briarpatch, 512 E. Washington Avenue, Madison, WI 53703, Steve 
Sperling, (608) 251-6211
Counseling Center of Milwaukee (Pathfinders), 2038 N. Bartlett, 
Milwaukee, WI 53202, Ted Seaver (414) 271-2565

Region VI

Arkansas

Youth Bridge, P.O. Box 668, Fayetteville, AR 72702, Scott Limbaugh, 
(501) 521-1532
Comprehensive Juvenile Services, 1606 South J, Fort Smith, AR 72901, 
Jerry Robertson, (501) 785-4031

Louisiana

Johnny Gray Jones Regional Youth Shelter, 4815 Shed Road, Bossier 
City, LA 71111, Gerry Gardner, (318) 747-1459
Tangipahoa Youth Service Bureau, 1826 River Road, Hammond, LA 70401, 
Jeanne Voorhees, (504) 345-1171
ETC Harbour House P.O. Box 864, Lake Charles, LA 70602, Martha 
Parnell, (318) 433-1062

New Mexico

A New Day, 2720-A Carlislen NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110, Jeffrey 
Burrows, (505) 881-5228
Youth Development, 1710 Centro Familiar SW., Albuquerque, NM 87105, 
Augustine C. Baca, (505) 873-1604

Oklahoma

Cherokee Nation Youth Shelter, P.O. Box 948, Tahlequah, OK 74465, 
Linda Vann, (918) 456-0671
Youth Services of Tulsa, 302 South Cheyenne, Room 114, Tulsa, OK 
74103, Sharon Wiggins, (918) 582-0061
Youth and Family Services of Canadian County, 2404 Sunset Drive, El 
Reno, OK 73036, Les Sparks, (405) 262-6556
Youth Services for Stephens County, P.O. Box 1603, Duncan, OK 73534, 
John Herdt, (405) 255-8800
Youth and Family Services of North Oklahoma, 2925 North Midway, 
Enid, OK 73701, Jane Webber, (405) 233-7220
Youth Services of Oklahoma County, 201 NE. 50th Street, Oklahoma 
City, OK 73105, Ken Young, (405) 235-7537
Payne County Youth Services 2224 W. 12th, Stillwater, OK 74076, 
James E. Lunsford, (405) 377-3380

Texas

Teen Connection, 1414 W. San Antonio Street, New Braunfels, TX 
78130, Conley Thompson, (210) 629-6571
Youth Alternatives (The Bridge), 3103 West Avenue, San Antonio, TX 
78213, Anita Johnston, (210) 340-8077
Catholic Family Services, 123 North Avenue, N., Lubbock, TX 79401, 
Stephen Hay, (806) 765-8475
Institute for Child and Family Services, 100 Sandman, Houston, TX 
77007, Jane Harding, (713) 863-7850
Children's Aid Society, 1101-30th Street, Wichita Falls, TX 76302, 
Patricia King, (817) 322-3141
SCAN Emergency Youth Shelter, 6202 McPherson, Suite #11 Laredo, TX 
78041, Iseld Dabdoub, (210) 724-3177
El Paso Center for Children, 3700 Altura, El Paso, TX 79930, Sandy 
Rioux, (915) 565-8361
YMCA of Dallas, 601 N. Akard Street, Dallas, TX 75201, Kathy Rod, 
(214) 954-0655
The Bridge Association, 115 West Broadway, Forth Worth, TX 76104, 
Cindy Honey, (817) 332-8317
Central Texas Youth Services Bureau, 703 Parmer Street, P.O. Box 
185, Killeen, TX 76540, Keith Wallace, (817) 634-2085
The Children's Center, 2127 Avenue M, Galveston, TX 77550, Lori Del 
Buono, (409) 765-5212
Harris County Children's Protective Services (Chimney Rock Center), 
6425 Chimney Rock Road, Houston, TX 77081, Ann Hibbert, (713) 664-
5701

Region VII

Iowa

Youth and Shelter Services 232-\1/2\ Main Street, Ames, IA 50010, 
George Belitsos, (515) 233-3141
United Action for Youth, 410 Iowa Avenue, Iowa City, IA 52240, Jim 
Swaim, (319) 338-7518
Foundation II, 1540 Second Avenue, Cedar Rapids, IA 52403, Steve 
Meyer, (319) 362-1170

Kansas

Wyandotte House, 4300 Brenner Drive, Kansas City, KS 66104, Wayne 
Sims, (913) 334-0294
United Methodist Youthville, 900 W. Broadway, Newton, KS 67114, 
Stacy Pfeiffer, (316) 823-5529
Temporary Lodging for Children, 333 E. Poplar, Olathe, KS 66061, 
Sherrie Love, (913) 764-2887

Missouri

Marian Hall Emergency Shelter, 325 N. Newstead Avenue, St. Louis, MO 
63108, Patty Johnson, (314) 653-0080
Synergy House, P.O. Box 12181, Parkville, MO 64152, Carol Kuhns, 
(816) 741-1477

Nebraska

Youth Service System, 2202 South 11th Street, Lincoln, NE 68502, 
James Blue, (402) 475-3040
Youth Emergency Services, 3001 Douglas Twin Towers, Omaha, NE 68131, 
Robert Sparby, (402) 345-5187
Panhandle Community Services, 3350 North 10th Street, Gering, NE 
69341, Ruth Vance, (308) 635-3089

Region VIII

Colorado

Human Services, Inc., 899 Logan Street, Denver, CO 80203, Ben 
Leonard, (303) 830-2714
Urban Peak, 1577 Clarkson Street, Denver, CO 80218, Jon Schwartz, 
(303) 863-7325
Pueblo Youth Service Bureau, 425 West Third Street, Pueblo, CO 
81003, Molly Melendez, (719) 542-5161
CHINS UP Youth and Family Services, 17 North Farragut Avenue, 
Colorado Springs, CO 80909, Gerar H. Veneman, (719) 475-0562
Volunteers of America, 1865 Larimer Street, Denver, CO 80202, Dianna 
Kunz, (303) 297-0408

Montana

Mountain Plains Youth Services, 709 East Third, Anaconda, MT 59711, 
Linda Wood, (701) 255-7229
Blackfeet Tribal Council, P.O. Box 1210, Browning, MT 59417, Violet 
Butterfly, (406) 338-5871

North Dakota

Mountain Plains Youth Services, 311 North Washington, Bismarck, ND 
58501, Linda Wood, (701) 255-7229

South Dakota

Mountain Plains Youth Services (Threshold), 1401 W. 51st, Sioux 
Falls, SD 57102, Linda Wood, (605) 334-1414
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, P.O. Box 430, Rosebud, SD 57570, Marilyn 
Gangone, (605) 747-2381,

Utah

Department of Social Services, 120 North 200 West, Salt Lake City, 
UT 84110, Jean Nielson, (801) 538-4100

Wyoming

Mountain Plains Youth Services, P.O. Box 6291, Sheridan, WY 82801, 
Howard Thomas, (701) 255-7220
Attention Home, P.O. Box 687, Cheyenne, WY 82003, James Cosgrove, 
(307) 778-7832

Region IX

Arizona

Our Town Family Center, P.O. Box 26665, Tucson, AZ 85726, Dennis 
Noonan, (602) 323-1708,
Children's Village of Yuma, 257 South Third Avenue, Yuma, AZ 85364, 
Judy Smith, (602) 783-2427

California

Ocean Park Community Center, (Stepping Stone), 245 Hill Street, 
Santa Monica, CA 90404, Vivian Rothstein, (310) 399-9232
Santa Cruz Community Center, 298 Harvey West Boulevard, Santa Cruz, 
CA 95060, Terry Moriarty, (408) 425-1830
Diogenes Youth Services, 8912 Volunteer Lane, Ste. 130, Sacramento, 
CA 95826, James Bueto, (916) 368-3350
YMCA Youth Development Service,
4715 Viewridge Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123, Beverly DiGregorio, 
(619) 292-4034
Bill Wilson Counseling Center 1000 Market Street, Santa Clara, CA 
95050, Sparky Harlan, (408) 984-5955
South Bay Community Services, 315 Fourth Avenue, Chula Vista, CA 
91910, Kathryn Lembo, (619) 420-3620
Mendocino County Youth Project, 202 S. State Street, Ukiah, CA 
95482, Arlene Rose, (707) 463-4915
Casa Youth Shelter, 10911 Reagan Street, Los Alamitos, CA 90720, 
Luciann Maulhardt, (310) 594-6825
Larkin Street Services, 1044 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94109, 
Roxane White, (415) 673-0911
Xanthos, 1355 Park Avenue, Alameda, CA 94501, Jon Schiller, (510) 
522-8363,
Chinatown Youth Center, 1693 Polk Street, San Francisco, CA 94109, 
Joseph Lam, (415) 775-2636
Center for Positive Prevention, 729 N. California Street, #18, 
Stockton, CA 95202, Linda Mascarenas, (209) 948-4357
Boys Town of Southern California, 303 West Lincoln Avenue, Anaheim, 
CA 92805, Michael Riley, (714) 491-7777
Tahoe Youth and Family Services, P.O. Box 848, S. Lake Tahoe, CA 
95705, Teri Mundt, (916) 541-2445
Center for Human Services, 1700 McHenry Village Way, Modesto, CA 
95350, Linda Kovacs, (209) 526-1440
Community Human Services, P.O. Box 3076, Monterey, CA 93942, Allison 
Olsen, (408) 373-3641
Youth and Family Assistance, 609 Price Avenue, #205, Redwood City, 
CA 94063, Richard Gordon, (415) 366-8401,
Klein Bottle, 401 N. Milpas, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, David Edelman, 
(805) 564-7830
1736 Family Crisis Center, 103 W. Torrance Boulevard, Redondo Beach, 
CA 90277, Carol A. Adelkoff, (310) 372-4674,
Butte County Department of Mental Health, 584 Rio Lindo Avenue, 
Chico, CA 95926, Ron Erickson, (916) 891-2850
Fred Finch Youth Center, 3800 Coolidge Avenue, Oakland, CA 94602, 
John F. Steinfirst, (510) 482-2244

Palau

Palau Community Action Agency, P.O. Box 3000, Koror, Republic of 
Palau 96940, Doroteo Nagata, Phone: 4882-469 (Operator Assistance 
Needed)

Guam

Sanctuary, P.O. Box 21030, Guam Main Facility, Guam, CM 96921, Tony 
Champaco, (671) 734-2661

CNMI

Commonwealth of the Marianas, Department of Community Cultural 
Affairs, Saipan, CM 96950, Margarita Olopai-Taitano, (670) 322-9366

Region X

Alaska

Alaska Youth and Parent Foundation, 3745 Community Park Loop, 
Anchorage, AK 99508, Sheila Gaddis, (907) 274-6541
Fairbanks Native Association, 310 First Avenue, Fairbanks, AK 99701, 
Banarsi Lal, (907) 452-6201

Idaho

Bannock Youth Foundation, P.0. Box 2072, Pocatello, ID 83206, 
Stephen Mead, (208) 234-2244
Hays Shelter Home, 5440 Franklin Road, Boise, ID 83705, Jonathan 
Wunrow (208) 336-1066

Oregon

Youthworks, 1307 W. Main Street, Medford, OR 97501, Maureen Koopman, 
(503) 779-2393
Northwest Human Services, 681 Center, NE., Salem, OR 97301, Karen 
Hill, (503) 588-5828
J Bar J Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend, OR 97701, Craig Christiansen, 
(503) 389-1409

Washington

YouthCare, 333 First Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119, Victoria 
Wagner, (206) 282-1288
Youth Help Association, 522 West Riverside, Suite 610, Spokane, WA 
99201, Bernadine Spalla, (509) 455-5226
Community Youth Services, 924 Fifth Avenue, SE., Olympia, WA 98501, 
Barbara Branstetter, (206) 943-0780
Auburn Youth Resources, 816 F Street, SE., Auburn, WA 98002, Richard 
Brugger, (206) 939-2202

D.2: Transitional Living Program for Homeless Youth Grantees Ineligible 
for New FY 1995 Funding

Region I

Connecticut

Hall Neighborhood House, 52 Green Street, Bridgeport, CT 06608, 
Pearl Dowell, (203) 334-3900

Maine

New Beginnings, 491 Main Street, Lewiston, ME 04240, Barbara 
Kawliche, (207) 946-7272

Massachusetts

Franklin County DIAL/SELF, Inc., 196 Federal Street, Greenfield, MA 
01301 Melanie Goodman, (413) 774-7054

New Hampshire

Child and Family Services, 99 Hanover Street, Manchester, NH 03101, 
Gail Starr, (603) 668-1920

Vermont

Washington County Youth Service Bureau, P.O. Box 627, Montpelier, VT 
05601, Tom Howard, (802) 229-9151

Region II

New Jersey

Somerset Youth Shelter, 49 Brahma Avenue, Bridgewater, NJ 08807, 
Jeffrey Fetzko, (201) 526-6605
Anchor House, 482 Centre Street, Trenton, NJ 08611, Judith Donohoe, 
(609) 396-8329
Covenant House, 14 William Street, Newark, NJ 07102, Catherine 
Ashman, (201) 621-8705

New York

Oneida County Community Action Agency, 303 West Liberty Street, 
Rome, NY 13440, Treva Wood, (315) 339-5640
The Salvation Army, 749 S. Warren Street, Syracuse, NY 13202, 
Roberta Schofield, (315) 479-1323
Center for Children and Families, 161-20 89th Avenue, Jamaica, NY 
11432 Merrith Hockmeyer, (718) 526-0722

Region III

District of Columbia

Sasha Bruce Youthwork, 1022 Maryland Avenue, NE., Washington, DC 
20002 Deborah Shore, (202) 675-9340
Latin American Youth Center, 3045--15th Street, NW., Washington, DC 
20009, Lori Kaplan, (202) 483-1140

Virginia

Residential Youth Services, 2701 Cameron Mills Road, Alexandria, VA 
22302, Bert Hawkins, (703) 548-8334

West Virginia

Time Out Youth Services, 1431--7th Avenue, Huntington, WV 25701, 
Pamela Dickens-Rush, (304) 525-7161

Region IV

Florida

Sarasota Family YMCA, 1075 S. Euclid Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34237, 
Carl Weinrich, (813) 955-8194
Daniel Memorial, Inc., 134 E. Church Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202, 
Kirk Swenson, (904) 353-5077

Tennessee

Oasis Center, P0 Box 121648, Nashville, TN 37212, Mary Jane Dewey, 
(615) 327-4455

Region V

Illinois

Teen Living Programs (Foundation House), 3179 N. Broadway, Chicago, 
IL 60657, Deborah Hinde, (312) 883-0025
The Harbour 1480 Renaissance Drive, Park Ridge, IL 60068, Mary 
Eichling (708) 297-8540
Jackson County Community Mental Health Center, 604 E. College, Suite 
101, Carbondale, IL 62901, Art Zaitz, (618) 457-6703

Michigan

The Sanctuary, 1222 South Washington, Royal Oak, MI 48067, Meri 
Pohutsky, (313) 547-2260
Every Woman's Place, 425 W. Western Avenue, Muskegon, MI 49440, Mary 
MacDonald, (616) 726-4493
Alternatives for Girls, 1950 Trumbull, Detroit, MI 48216, Amanda 
Good, (313) 496-0938

Region VI

New Mexico

Youth Shelters and Family Services, PO. Box 8135, Santa Fe, NM 87504 
Cynthia Gonzales, (505) 983-0586

Oklahoma

Youth Services of Tulsa, 302 South Cheyenne, Room 114, Tulsa, OK 
74103, Sharon Wiggins, (918) 582-0061

Texas

Middle Earth Unlimited, 3816 S. First Street, Austin, TX 78704, 
Mitch Weynand, (512) 447-5639
Sand Dollar, 527 Spring Drive, Pasadena, TX 77504, Happy Spillar, 
(713) 946-3030

Region VII

Iowa

Youth and Shelter Services, 232-1/2 Main Street, Ames, IA 50010, 
George Belitsos, (515) 233-3141
Youth Homes, Inc., P.O. Box 324, Iowa City, IA 52244, William 
McCarty, (319) 337-4523
Wyandotte House, 4300 Brenner Drive, Kansas City, KS 66104, Wayne 
Sims, (913) 334-0294

Missouri

Youth in Need, 516 Jefferson, St. Charles, MO 63301, James Braun, 
(314) 946-0101

Region VIII

Colorado

Volunteers of America, 1865 Larimer Street, Denver, CO 80202, Dianna 
Kunz, (303) 297-0408

Region IX

Arizona

Our Town Family Center, P.0. Box 26665, Tucson, AZ 85726, Dennis 
Noonan, (602) 323-1708

California

San Diego Youth and Community Services, 3255 Wing Street, Ste. 550, 
San Diego, CA 92110, Liz Shear, (619) 221-8600
Catholic Charities of San Francisco, 1049 Market Street, San 
Francisco, CA 94103, Rebecca Robertson, (415) 558-7072

Region X

Alaska

Alaska Youth and Parent Foundation, 3745 Community Park Loop, 
Anchorage, AK 99508, Sheila Gaddis, (907) 274-6541

Oregon

Janus Youth Programs, 738 NE. Davis, Portland, OR 97232, Dennis 
Morrow, (503) 233-6090
Looking Glass, 72-B Centennial Loop, Ste. 2, Eugene, OR 97401, Galen 
Phipps, (503) 689-3111
Youthworks, 1307 W. Main Street, Medford, OR 97501, Maureen Koopman, 
(503) 779-2393

Washington

Friends of Youth, 2500 Lake Washington Blvd. N., Renton, WA 98056, 
J. Howard Finck, (206) 228-5775
Pierce County Alliance, 710 S. Fawcett, Tacoma, WA 90402, Terree 
Schmidt-Whelan, (206) 572-4750

D.3: Drug Abuse Education and Prevention Program for Homeless Youth 
Grantees Ineligible for New FY 1994 Funding

Region I

Connecticut

Youth Continuum, Inc., 54 Meadow Street, New Haven, CT 06519 David 
Sorensen, (203) 562-3396
Council of Churches of Greater Bridgeport, 126 Washington Avenue, 
Bridgeport, CT 06604, John Cottrell, (203) 334-1121
Educational Resources, Inc., 90 North Main Street, West Hartford, CT 
06107, Wayne Starkey, (203) 521-8035

Maine

New Beginnings, 436 Main Street, Lewiston, ME 04240, Barbara 
Kawliche, (207) 474-8311

Massachusetts

The Bridge, 47 West Street, Boston, MA 02111, Sister Barbara Whelan, 
(617) 423-9575
Brookline Community Mental Health Center, 43 Garrison Road, 
Brookline, MA 02146, Cynthia Price, (617) 277-8107
Franklin County DIAL/SELF, 196 Federal Street, Greenfield, MA 01301, 
Melanie Goodman, (413) 774-7054
YMCA of Western Massachusetts, 120 Maple Street, Springfield, MA 
01103, Mary Johnson, (413) 732-3121

New Hampshire

Child and Family Services, 99 Hanover Street, Manchester, NH 03101, 
Reed Carver, (603) 668-1920

Rhode Island

Stopover Shelters, 3380 East Main Road, Portsmouth, RI 02871, Peter 
Marshall, (401) 683-1824
Marathon of Rhode Island, 131 Wayland Avenue, Providence, RI 02906, 
Denise Roberge, (508) 660-0144
Tides Family Services, 1599 Main Street, West Warwick, RI 02893, 
Michael Reis, (401) 822-1360

Vermont

Washington County Youth, Service Bureau, P.O. Box 627, Montpelier, 
VT 05601, Tom Howard, (802) 229-9151 Counseling Service of Addison 
County, 89 Main Street, Middlebury, VT 05753, Barbara Rachelson, 
(802) 388-6751

Region II

New Jersey

Together, 7 State Street, Glassboro, NJ 08028, Susan Sasser, (609) 
881-6100
Anchor House, 482 Centre Street, Trenton, NJ 08611, Judith Donohoe, 
(609) 396-8329

New York

Dutchess County, 22 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601, Patrice 
Kellett, (914) 454-3600
The Salvation Army, 749 S. Warren Street, Syracuse, NY 13202, 
Roberta Schofield, (315) 479-1323
Educational Alliance, 197 East Broadway, New York, NY 10002, Marion 
Lazer, (315) 479-1323
The Hetrick-Martin Institute, 401 West Street, New York, NY 10014, 
Judith Verdino, (212) 633-8920
Metropolitan Assistance (Streetwork Project), 2 Lafayette Street, 
New York, NY 10007, Helene Lauffer, (212) 577-3806 71Virgin Islands
Caribbean Institute for Psychology, P.O. Box 1547 Kingshill, St. 
Croix, VI 00851, Chester Copemann, (809) 773-5113

Region III

District of Columbia

Sasha Bruce Youthwork, 1022 Maryland Avenue, NE., Washington, DC 
20002, Deborah Shore, (202) 675-9340

Maryland

Youth Resources Center, 4320 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville, MD 20781, 
Holger Kjeldsen, (301) 864-9735
Diakonia, Inc., 12747 Old Bridge Road, Ocean City, MD 21842, 
Fredericka Danielus, (410) 213-0923

Pennsylvania

Centre County Youth, Services Bureau, 410 South Fraser Street, State 
College, PA 16801, Norma Keller, (814) 237-5731
Valley Youth House Committee, 539 Eighth Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 
18018, David Gilgoff, (215) 691-1200
Whale's Tale, 250 Shady Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15206, Christopher 
Smith, (412) 661-1800
Catholic Social Services, 33 E. Northhampton Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701, 
Thomas Cherry, (717) 824-5766
Three Rivers Youth, 2039 Termon Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, David 
Droppa, (412) 766-2215

Virginia

Alternative House, 2136-G Gallows Road, Dunn Loring, VA 22027, Jim 
Warwick, (703) 771-5300
Loudoun County Youth Shelter, 16450 Meadowview Court, Leesburg, VA 
22075, Jerry Tracy (703) 771-5300

West Virginia

Daymark, Inc., (Patchwork), 1598-C Washington St. East, Charleston, 
WV 25311, Dennis Pease, (304) 340-3675
Time Out Youth Services, 1431 - 7th Avenue, Huntington, WV 25701, 
Pamela Dickens-Rush, (304) 525-7161

Region IV

Florida

Family Resources, Inc., P.O. Box 13087, St. Petersburg, FL 33733, 
Jane L. Harper, (813) 341-2200
Crosswinds Youth Services, Inc., P.O. Box 540625, Merritt Island, FL 
32954, Jan Lokay, (305) 452-8988
Project III of Central Florida, 1412 West Colonial Drive, Orlando, 
FL 32804, David Congdon, (407) 423-2273

Georgia

The Bridge, 1559 Johnson Road, NW., Atlanta, GA 30318, Ann Starr, 
(404) 792-0070

Kentucky

YMCA Center for Youth Alternatives, 1410 South First Street, 
Louisville, KY 40208, Kevin Connelly, (502) 635-5233
Brighton Center, P.0. Box 325, Newport, KY 41072, Robert Brewster, 
(606) 491-8303

Mississippi

Catholic Charities, PO Box 2248, Jackson, MS 39225, Rev. Elvin 
Sunds, (601) 355-8634

North Carolina

North Carolina Department of Human Resources, 101 N. Salisbury 
Street, Raleigh, NC 27603, Arthur Jones, Jr., (919) 733-4555

Tennessee

Oasis Center, PO. Box 121648, Nashville, TN 37212, May Jane Dewey, 
(615) 327-4455
Child and Family Services, 114 Dameron Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37917, 
Charlie Gentry, (615) 524-7483

Region V

Illinois

Project OZ, 502 Morris Avenue, Bloomington, IL 61701, Peter 
Rankaitis, (309) 827-0377
Hoyleton Youth and Family Services, 36 Loisel Village, East St. 
Louis, IL 62203, Shelly Byndom, (618) 398-0900
Youth Services Project, 3942 W. North Avenue, Chicago, IL 60647, 
Nancy Abbate, (312) 772-6270

Indiana

Youth Service Bureau of St. Joseph County, 2222 Lincolnway West, 
South Bend, IN 46628, Bonnie Strycker, (219) 235-9231
Park Center, Inc., 2722 Fairfield Avenue, Fort Wayne, IN 46807, Kim 
Butcher, (219) 481-2700

Michigan

The Sanctuary, 1222 South Washington, Royal Oak, MI 48067, Meri 
Pohutsky, (313) 547-2260
Gateway Community Services, 910 Abbott Road, East Lansing, MI 48823, 
David Glerum, (517) 351-4000
Youth Living Centers, 715 S. Inkster Road, Inkster, MI 48141, Linda 
Connelly, (313) 563-5005
Comprehensive Youth Services (Harbor), 3061 Commerce Drive, Port 
Huron, MI 48060, Sally Currie, (313) 385-7010
Advisory Centers (The Bridge), 1115 Ball Avenue, NE., Grand Rapids, 
MI 49505, Nancy Ayers, (616) 451-3001
Alternatives for Girls, 1950 Trumbull, Detroit, MI 48216, Amanda 
Good, (313) 496-0938
Juvenile Diversion Program, 301 Francis Street, Jackson, MI 49201, 
Gene Hubbard, (517) 788-4240

Minnesota

The Bridge, 2200 Emerson Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55405, Thomas 
Sawyer, (612) 377-8800

Ohio

Lutheran Metropolitan, Ministries, Inc., 1468 West 25th Street, 
Cleveland, OH 44123, Thomas Sutton, (216) 241-4791

Wisconsin

Wisconsin Association for Runaway Services, 2318 E. Dayton Street, 
Madison, Wisconsin 53704, Patricia Balke, (608) 241-2649
Briarpatch, 512 E. Washington Avenue, Madison, WI 53703, Steve 
Sperling, (608) 251-6211
Counseling Center of Milwaukee, 2038 N. Bartlett, Milwaukee, WI 
53202, Ted Seaver, (414) 271-2565

Region VI

New Mexico

Youth Shelters and Family Services, P.O. Box 8135, Santa Fe, NM 
87504, Cynthia Gonzales, (505) 983-0586

Oklahoma

Youth Services for Stephens County, P.O. Box 1603, Duncan, OK 73534, 
John Herdt, (405) 255-8800
Youth and Family Services of North Oklahoma, 2925 North Midway, 
Enid, OK 73701, Jane Webber, (405) 233-7220

Texas

Middle Earth Unlimited, 3816 S. First Street, Austin, TX 78704, 
Mitch Weynand, (512) 447-5639
Promise House, 236 W. Page Street, Dallas, TX 75208, Lee Schimmel, 
(214) 941-8578
Youth Alternatives (The Bridge), 3103 West Avenue, San Antonio, TX 
78213, Anita Johnston, (210) 340-8077
Montgomery County Youth Services, PO Box 1316, Conroe, TX 77305, 
Gretchen Faulkner, (409) 756-8682

Region VII

Iowa

United Action for Youth, 410 Iowa Avenue, Iowa City, IA 52240, Jim 
Swaim, (319) 338-7518
Foundation II, 1540 Second Avenue, Cedar Rapids, IA 52403, Steve 
Meyer, (319) 362-1170
Youth Emergency Services, 921 Pleasant Street, Des Moines, IA 50309, 
Susan Gehring-Liker, (515) 243-7825

Kansas

Wichita Children's Home, 810 N. Holyoke, Wichita, KS 67208, Sarah 
Robinson, (316) 684-6581

Missouri

Youth in Need, 516 Jefferson, St. Charles, MO 63301, James Braun, 
(314) 946-0101
Marian Hall Emergency Shelter, 325 North Newstead Avenue, St. Louis, 
MO 63108, Patty Johnson, (314) 653-0080

Nebraska

Youth Service System, 2202 South 11th Street, Lincoln, NE 68502, 
James Blue, (402) 475-3040

Region VIII

Colorado

Urban Peak, 1577 Clarkson Street, Denver, CO 80218, Jon Schwartz, 
(303) 863-7325
Pueblo Youth Service Bureau, 425 West Third Street, Pueblo, CO 
81003, Molly Melendez, (719) 542-5161
Ute Mountain Ute Nation (Sunrise Youth Shelter), General Delivery, 
Towaoc, CO 81334, Rita Arnett, (303) 565-3751, Ext. 213

Montana

Blackfeet Tribal Council, PO Box 1210, Browning, MT 59417, Violet 
Butterfly, (406) 338-5871

South Dakota

Crow Creek Sioux Tribe (Red Horse Lodge), PO Box 49, Ft. Thompson, 
SD 57339, Tamara Schmidt, (605) 245-2213

Utah

Salt Lake City Division of Youth Services, 3975 South Main, Suite A, 
Murray, UT 84107, Lamar Eyre, (801) 264-2254

Region IX

Arizona

Open-Inn, 4810 E. Broadway, Tucson, AZ 85711, Darlene Dankowski, 
(602) 323-0200

California

Santa Clara Social Advocates for Youth, 1072 Saratoga-Sunnyvale Rd., 
San Jose, CA 95129, Kathleen Lynch, (408) 253-3540
Central City Hospitality House, 146 Leavenworth Street, San 
Francisco, CA 94102, Kate Durham, (415) 776-2102
San Diego Youth and Community Services, 3255 Wing Street, Suite 550, 
San Diego, CA 92110, Liz Shear, (619) 221-8600
Diogenes Youth Services, 8912 Volunteer Lane, Suite 130, Sacramento, 
CA 95826, James Bueto, (916) 368-3350
Bill Wilson Counseling Center, 1000 Market Street, Santa Clara, CA 
95050, Sparky Harlan, (408) 984-5955
South Bay Community Services, 315 Fourth Avenue, Chula Vista, CA 
91910, Kathryn Lembo, (619) 420-3620
Mendocino County Schools, 202 S. State Street, Ukiah, CA 95482, 
Arlene Rose, (707) 463-4915
Larkin Street Services, 1044 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94109, 
Roxane White, (415) 673-0911
Tahoe Youth and Family Services, PO Box 848, South Lake Tahoe, CA 
95705, Teri Mundt, (916) 541-2445
Center for Human Services, 1700 McHenry Village Way, Modesto, CA 
95350, Linda Kovacs, (209) 526-1440
Youth and Family Assistance, 609 Price Avenue, Suite 205, Redwood 
City, CA 94063, Richard Gordon, (415) 366-8401
Community Service Programs, 17200 Jamboree, Suite D, Irvine, CA 
92714, Margot Carlson, (714) 250-0488
Los Angeles Free Clinic, 8489 W. 3rd St., Suite 1080, Los Angeles, 
CA 90048, Andrea Sobbe/May Rainwater, (213) 462-7400
Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian, 1213 North Highland Avenue, Los 
Angeles, CA 90038, Jackie Gelfand, (213) 464-7400

Region X

Alaska

Fairbanks Native Association, 310 First Avenue, Fairbanks, AK 99701, 
Banarsi Lal, (907) 452-6201

Oregon

Youthworks, 1307 W. Main Street, Medford, OR 97501, Maureen Koopman, 
(503) 779-2393
J Bar J Youth Services, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend, OR 97701, Craig 
Christiansen, (503) 389-1409

Washington

Friends of Youth, 2500 Lake Washington Blvd. N., Renton, WA 98052, 
Jo. Howard Finck, (206) 228-5775
United Indians, PO Box 99100, Seattle, WA 98199, Bernie Whitebear, 
(206) 285-4425
Youth Help Association, 522 W. Riverside Avenue, Spokane, WA 99201, 
Bernadine Spalla, (509) 455-5226
Pierce County Alliance, 710 S. Fawcett, Tacoma, WA 98402, Terree 
Schmidt-Whelan, (206) 572-4750
South Puget Intertribal Planning, SE 1750 Old Olympic Highway, 
Shelton, WA 98584, Amadeo Tiam, (206) 426-3990
Tacoma Housing Authority, 1728 East 44th Street, Tacoma, WA 98404, 
Patricia Harrington, (206) 473-2331

 Appendix E.--Basic Center Program for Runaway and Homeless Youth, Table
                         of Allocations by State                        
          [Total 57 States and Jurisdicitons--Fiscal Year 1994]         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   Regions and states     Continuations     New starts        Totals    
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Region I:                                                               
    Connecticut.........        $227,131        $148,724        $375,855
    Maine...............          93,977          55,195         149,172
    Massachusetts.......         337,653         332,159         669,812
    New Hampshire.......         132,680           3,817         136,497
    Rhode Island........               0         112,123         112,123
    Vermont.............          75,000               0          75,000
Region II:                                                              
    New Jersey..........         315,319         582,639         897,958
    New York............       1,417,254         711,130       2,128,384
    Puerto Rico.........         103,758         458,806         562,564
    Virgin Islands......               0          30,000          30,000
Region III:                                                             
    Delaware............          45,547          36,426          81,973
    District of Columbia          28,800          46,200          75,000
    Maryland............          82,040         503,436         585,476
    Pennsylvania........         750,573         628,538       1,379,111
    Virginia............         412,533         337,228         749,761
    West Virginia.......         207,075           5,958         213,033
Region IV:                                                              
    Alabama.............         243,315         278,787         522,102
    Florida.............         671,401         789,608       1,461,009
    Georgia.............         539,190         326,106         865,296
    Kentucky............         144,599         322,904         467,503
    Mississippi.........         295,669          70,436         366,105
    North Carolina......         460,712         340,235         800,947
    South Carolina......         362,187          95,079         457,266
    Tennessee...........         582,844          16,769         599,613
Region V:                                                               
    Illinois............         821,865         639,144       1,461,009
    Indiana.............         405,665         308,509         714,174
    Michigan............         911,928         298,999       1,210,927
    Minnesota...........         489,912          89,714         579,626
    Ohio................         706,441         667,795       1,374,236
    Wisconsin...........         245,184         393,916         639,100
Region VI:                                                              
    Arkansas............         112,985         192,184         305,169
    Louisiana...........         323,698         277,378         601,076
    New Mexico..........         133,452          89,819         223,271
    Oklahoma............         374,266          37,664         411,930
    Texas...............       1,305,103       1,117,238       2,422,341
Region VII:                                                             
    Iowa................         227,579         126,339         353,918
    Kansas..............         250,912          76,682         327,594
    Missouri............         267,560         385,677         653,237
    Nebraska............         148,056          64,002         212,058
Region VIII:                                                            
    Colorado............         197,182         233,272         430,454
    Montana.............         105,671           3,039         108,710
    North Dakota........          81,977           2,435          84,412
    South Dakota........          76,790          21,285          98,075
    Utah................         304,690           8,766         313,456
    Wyoming.............          75,000               0          75,000
Region IX:                                                              
    American Samoa......               0          30,000          30,000
    Arizona.............         109,579         382,787         492,366
    California..........       2,216,474       1,762,424       3,978,898
    Guam................          30,000               0          30,000
    Hawaii..............               0         140,885         140,885
    Northern Marianas...          30,000               0          30,000
    Nevada..............               0         156,972         156,972
    Palau...............          30,000               0          30,000
Region X:                                                               
    Alaska..............          52,859          34,969          87,828
    Idaho...............         151,161           4,349         155,510
    Oregon..............         171,171         193,472         364,643
    Washington..........         342,910         297,653         640,563
                         -----------------------------------------------
        Totals..........      18,229,327      14,269,673      32,499,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Appendix F--Administration for Children and Families Regional Office 
Youth Contacts

Region I: Sue Rosen, Administration for Children and Families, John 
F. Kennedy Federal Building, Room 2011, Boston, Massachusetts 02203 
(CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT) (617) 565-2480
Region II: Estelle Haferling, Administration for Children and 
Families, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 4149, New York, NY 10278 (NJ, NY, 
PR, VI) (212) 264-1329
Region III: Dave Lyon, Administration for Children and Families, 
3535 Market Street, P.O. Box 13714, Philadelphia, PA 19101 (DC, DE, 
MD, PA, VA, WV) (215) 596-4139
Region IV: Viola Brown, Administration for Children and Families, 
101 Marietta Tower, Suite 903, Atlanta, GA 30323 (AL, FL, GA, KY, 
MS, NC, SC, TN) (404) 331-7210
Region V: Kathleen Penak, Administration for Children and Families, 
105 West Adams, 23rd Floor, Chicago, IL 60603 (IL, MI, MN, OH, WI) 
(312) 886-3380
Region VI: Ralph Rogers, Administration for Children and Families, 
1200 Main Tower, 20th Floor, Dallas, TX 75202 (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX) 
(214) 767-4542
Region VII: Lynda Bitner, Administration for Children and Families, 
Federal Office Building, Room 384, 601 East 12th Street, Kansas 
City, MO 64106 (IA, KS, MO, NE), (816) 426-5401
Region VIII: Vicki Wright, Administration for Children and Families, 
Federal Office Building, 1961 Stout Street, 9th Floor, Denver, CO 
80294 (CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY), (303) 844-3100, Ext. 361
Region IX: Al Brown, Administration for Children and Families, 50 
United States Nations Plaza, San Francisco, CA 94102 (AZ, CA, HI, 
NV, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Marshall 
Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau) (415) 556-6153
Region X: Steve Ice, Administration for Children and Families, 2201 
Sixth Avenue, RX 32, Seattle, WA 98121 (AK, ID, OR, WA) (206) 615-
2558, Ext. 3075

Appendix G--Training and Technical Assistance Providers

    FYSB funds ten regionally based organizations to provide 
training and technical assistance to programs funded under the Basic 
Center, Transitional Living and Drug Abuse Prevention Programs, and 
to other agencies serving runaway and homeless youth.
    Each of the training and technical assistance providers offers 
on-site consultations; regional, State and local conferences; 
information sharing and skill-based training.
    For more information, contact the training and technical 
assistance provider in your region.

The New England Consortium for Families and Youth, 25 Stow Road, 
Roxbury, MA 01719, (508) 266-1998, Contact: Nancy Jackson
Empire State Coalition, 121 Avenue of the Americas, Room 507, New 
York, NY 10013, (212) 966-6477, Contact: Margo Hirsch
Mid-Atlantic Network of Youth and Family Services, Inc., 9400 
McKnight Road, Suite 106, Pittsburgh, PA 15237, (412) 366-6562, 
Contact: Nancy Johnson
Southeastern Network of Youth and Family Services, 337 South 
Milledge Avenue, Suite 209, Athens, GA 354-4568, Contact: Gail Kurtz
Michigan Network of Runaway and Youth Services, 115 West Allegan, 
Suite 310, Lansing, MI 48933, (517) 484-5262, Contact: Bruce Haas
Southwest Network of Youth Services, 2525 Wallingwood Drive, Austin, 
TX 78746, (512) 328-6860, Contact: Theresa Andreas-Tod
M.I.N.K., A Network of Runaway and Youth Serving Agencies, PO Box 
14403, Parkville, MO 64152, (314) 946-0101, Contact: Laura Harrison
Mountain Plains Youth Services, 311 North Washington, Bismarck, ND 
58501, (701) 255-7229, Contact: Linda Wood
Western States Youth Services Network, 1306 Ross Street, Suite B, 
Petaluma, CA 94954, (707) 763-2213, Contact: Nancy Fastenau
Northwest Network of Runaway and Youth Services, 603 Stewart Street, 
Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 628-3760, Contact: Carmen Ray

Appendix H--Executive Order 12373--State Single Points of Contact

Arizona

Mrs. Janice Dunn, Attn: Arizona State Clearinghouse, 3800 N. Central 
Avenue, 14th Floor, Phoenix, Arizona 85012, Telephone (602) 280-1315

Arkansas

Tracie L. Copeland, Manager, State Clearninghouse, Office of 
Intergovernmental Services, Department of Finance and 
Administration, PO Box 3278, Little Rock, Arkansas 72203, Telephone 
(501) 682-1074

California

Glenn Stober, Grants Coordinator, Office of Planning and Research, 
1400 Tenth Street, Sacramento, California 95814, Telephone (916) 
323-7480

Colorado

State Single Point of Contact, State Clearinghouse, Division of 
Local Government, 1313 Sherman Street, Room 520, Denver, Colorado 
80203, Telephone (303) 866-2156

Delaware

Ms. Francine Booth, State Single Point of Contact, Executive 
Department, Thomas Collins Building, Dover, Delaware 19903, 
Telephone (302) 736-3326

District of Columbia

Rodney T. Hallman, State Single Point of Contact, Office of Grants 
Management and Development, 717 14th Street, NW., Suite 500, 
Washington, DC 20005, Telephone (202) 727-6551

Florida

Florida State Clearinghouse, Intergovernmental Affairs, Policy Unit, 
Executive Office of the Governor, Office of Planning and Budgeting, 
The Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001, Telephone (904) 488-
8441

Georgia

Mr. Charles H. Badger, Administrator, Georgia State Clearinghouse, 
254 Washington Street SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30334, Telephone (404) 
656-3855

 Illinois

Steve Klokkenga, State Single Point of Contact, Office of the 
Governor, 107 Statton Building, Springfield, Illinois 62706, 
Telephone (217) 782-1671

Indiana

Jean S. Blackwell, Budget Director, State Budget Agency, 212 State 
House, Indianapolis, Indiana 46204, Telephone (317) 232-5610

Iowa

Mr. Steven R. McCann, Division of Community Progress, Iowa 
Department of Economic Development, 200 East Grand Avenue, Des 
Moines, Iowa 50309, Telephone (515) 281-3725

Kentucky

Ronald W. Cook, Office of the Governor, Department of Local 
Government, 1024 Capitol Center Drive, Frankfort, Kentucky 40601, 
Telephone (502) 564-2382

Maine

Ms. Joyce Benson, State Planning Office, State House Station #38, 
Augusta, Maine 04333, Telephone (207) 289-3261

Maryland

Ms. Mary Abrams, Chief, Maryland State Clearinghouse, Department of 
State Planning, 301 West Preston Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-
2365, Telephone (301) 225-4490

Massachusetts

Karen Arone, State Clearinghouse, Executive Office of Communities 
and Development, 100 Cambridge Street, Room 1803, Boston, 
Massachusetts 02202, Telephone (617) 727-7001

Michigan

Richard S. Pastula, Director, Michigan Department of Commerce, 
Lansing, Michigan 48909, Telephone (517) 373-7356

Mississippi

Ms. Cathy Mallette, Clearinghouse Officer, Office of Federal Grant 
Management and Reporting, 301 West Pearl Street, Jackson, 
Mississippi 39203, Telephone (601) 960-2174

Missouri

Ms. Lois Pohl, Federal Assistance Clearinghouse, Office of 
Administration, PO Box 809, Room 430, Truman Building, Jefferson 
City, Missouri 65102, Telephone (314) 751-4834

Nevada

Department of Administration, State Clearinghouse, Capitol Complex, 
Carson City, Nevada 89710, Telephone (702) 687-4065, Attention: Ron 
Sparks, Clearinghouse Coordinator

New Hampshire

Mr. Jeffrey H. Taylor, Director, New Hampshire Office of State 
Planning, Attn: Intergovernmental Review, Process/James E. Bieber, 
2\1/2\ Beacon Street, Concord, New Hampshire 03301, Telephone (603) 
271-2155

New Jersey

Gregory W. Adkins, Acting Director, Division of Community Resources, 
N.J. Department of Community Affairs, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-
0803, Telephone (609) 292-6613

Please direct correspondence and questions to: Andrew J. Jaskolka, 
State Review Process, Division of Community Resources, CN 814, Room 
609, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0803, Telephone (609) 292-9025

New Mexico

George Elliott, Deputy Director, State Budget Division, Room 190, 
Bataan Memorial Building, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87503, Telephone 
(505) 827-3640, FAX (505) 827-3006

New York

New York State Clearinghouse, Division of the Budget, State Capitol, 
Albany, New York 12224, Telephone (518) 474-1605

North Carolina

Mrs. Chrys Baggett, Director, Office of the Secretary of Admin., 
N.C. State Clearinghouse, 116 W. Jones Street, Raleigh, North 
Carolina 27603-8003, Telephone (919) 733-7232

North Dakota

N.D. Single Point of Contact, Office of Intergovernmental 
Assistance, Office of Management and Budget, 600 East Boulevard 
Avenue, Bismarck, North Dakota 58503-0170, Telephone (701) 224-2094

Ohio

Larry Weaver, State Single Point of Contact, State/Federal Funds 
Coordinator, State Clearinghouse, Office of Budget and Management, 
30 East Broad Street, 34th Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43266-0411, 
Telephone (614) 466-0698

Rhode Island

Mr. Daniel W. Varin, Associate Director, Statewide Planning Program, 
Department of Administration, Division of Planning, 265 Melrose 
Street, Providence, Rhode Island 02907, Telephone (401) 277-2656. 
Please direct correspondence and questions to: Review Coordinator, 
Office of Strategic Planning

South Carolina

Omeagia Burgess, State Single Point of Contact, Grant Services, 
Office of the Governor, 1205 Pendleton Street, Room 477, Columbia, 
South Carolina 29201, Telephone (803) 734-0494

South Dakota

Ms. Susan Comer, State Clearinghouse Coordinator, Office of the 
Governor, 500 East Capitol, Pierre, South Dakota 57501, Telephone 
(605) 773-3212

Tennessee

Mr. Charles Brown, State Single Point of Contact, State Planning 
Office, 500 Charlotte Avenue, 309 John Sevier Building, Nashville, 
Tennessee 37219, Telephone (615) 741-1676

Texas

Mr. Thomas Adams, Governor's Office of Budget and Planning, PO Box 
12428, Austin, Texas 78711, Telephone (512) 463-1778

Utah

Utah State Clearinghouse, Office of Planning and Budget, Attn: 
Carolyn Wright, Room 116 State Capitol, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114, 
Telephone (801) 538-1535

Vermont

Mr. Bernard D. Johnson, Assistant Director, Office of Policy 
Research & Coordination, Pavilion Office Building, 109 State Street, 
Montepelier, Vermont 05602, Telephone (802) 828-3326

West Virginia

Mr. Fred Cutlip, Director, Community Development Division, West 
Virginia Development Office, Building #6, Room 553, Charleston, West 
Virginia 25305, Telephone (304) 348-4010

Wisconsin

Mr. William C. Carey, Federal/State Relations, Wisconsin Department 
of Administration, 101 South Webster Street, PO Box 7864, Madison, 
Wisconsin 53707, Telephone (608) 266-0267

Wyoming

Sheryl Jeffries, State Single Point of Contact, Herschler Building, 
4th Floor, East Wing, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82002, Telephone (307) 777-
7574

Guam

Mr. Michael J. Reidy, Director, Bureau of Budget and Management 
Research, Office of the Governor, PO Box 2950, Agana, Guam 96910, 
Telephone (671) 472-2285

Northern Mariana Islands

State Single Point of Contact, Planning and Budget Office, Office of 
the Governor, Saipan, CM, Northern Mariana Islands 96950

Puerto Rico

Norma Burgos/Jose H. Caro, Chairman/Director, Puerto Rico Planning 
Board, Minillas Government Center, PO Box 41119, San Juan, Puerto 
Rico 00940-9985, Telephone (809) 727-4444

Virgin Islands

Jose L. George, Director, Office of Management and Budget, #41 
Norregade Emancipation Garden Station, Second Floor, Saint Thomas, 
Virgin Islands 00802, Please direct correspondence to: Linda Clarke, 
Telephone (809) 774-0750.

BILLING CODE 4184-01-P

TN12MY94.000

      

Instructions for the SF 424

    This is a standard form used by applicants as a required facesheet 
for preapplications and applications submitted for Federal assistance. 
It will be used by Federal agencies to obtain applicant certification 
that States which have established a review and comment procedure in 
response to Executive Order 12372 and have selected the program to be 
included in their process, have been given an opportunity to review the 
applicant's submission.

Item and entry

1. Self-explanatory.
2. Date application submitted to Federal agency (or State if 
applicable) & applicant's control number (if applicable).
3. State use only (if applicable).
4. If this application is to continue or revise an existing award, 
enter present Federal identifier number. If for a new project, leave 
blank.
5. Legal name of applicant, name of primary organizational unit which 
will undertake the assistance activity, complete address of the 
applicant, and name and telephone number of the person to contact on 
matters related to this application.
6. Enter Employer Identification Number (EIN) as assigned by the 
Internal Revenue Service.
7. Enter the appropriate letter in the space provided.
8. Check appropriate box and enter appropriate letter(s) in the 
space(s) provided:
    --``New'' means a new assistance award.
    --``Continuation'' means an extension for an additional funding/
budget period for a project with a projected completion date.
    --``Revision'' means any change in the Federal Government's 
financial obligation or contingent liability from an existing 
obligation.
9. Name of Federal agency from which assistance is being requested with 
this application.
10. Use the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number and title of 
the program under which assistance is requested.
11. Enter a brief descriptive title of the project, if more than one 
program is involved, you should append an explanation on a separate 
sheet. If appropriate (e.g., construction or real property projects), 
attach a map showing project location. For preapplications, use a 
separate sheet to provide a summary description of this project.
12. List only the largest political entities affected (e.g., State, 
counties, cities).
13. Self-explanatory.
14. List the applicant's Congressional District and any District(s) 
affected by the program or project.
15. Amount requested or to be contributed during the first funding/
budget period by each contributor. Value of in-kind contributions 
should be included on appropriate lines as applicable. If the action 
will result in a dollar change to an existing award, indicate only the 
amount of the change. For decreases, enclose the amounts in 
parentheses. If both basic and supplemental amounts are included, show 
breakdown on an attached sheet. For multiple program funding, use 
totals and show breakdown using same categories as item 15.
16. Applicants should contact the State Single Point of Contact (SPOC) 
for Federal Executive Order 12372 to determine whether the application 
is subject to the State intergovernmental review process.
17. This question applies to the applicant organization, not the person 
who signs as the authorized representative. Categories of debt include 
delinquent audit disallowances, loans and taxes.
18. To be signed by the authorized representative of the applicant. A 
copy of the governing body's authorization for you to sign this 
application as official representative must be on file in the 
applicant's office. (Certain Federal agencies may require that this 
authorization be submitted as part of the application.)

BILLING CODE 4184-01-P

TN12MY94.001


TN12MY94.002


Instructions for the SF-424A

General Instructions

    This form is designated so that application can be made for funds 
from one or more grant programs. In preparing the budget, adhere to any 
existing Federal grantor agency guidelines which prescribe how and 
whether budgeted amounts should be separately shown for different 
functions or activities within the program. For some programs, grantor 
agencies may require budgets to be separately shown by function or 
activity. For other programs, grantor agencies may require a breakdown 
by function or activity. Sections A, B, C, and D should include budget 
estimates for the whole project except when applying for assistance 
which requires Federal authorization in annual or other funding period 
increments. In the latter case, sections A, B, C, and D should provide 
the budget for the first budget period (usually a year) and section E 
should present the need for Federal assistance in the subsequent budget 
periods. All applications should contain a breakdown by the object 
class categories shown in Lines a-k of section B.

Section A. Budget Summary

Lines 1-4, Columns (a) and (b)
    For applications pertaining to a single Federal grant program 
(Federal Domestic Assistance Catalog number) and not requiring a 
functional or activity breakdown, enter on Line 1 under Column (a) the 
catalog program title and the catalog number in Column (b).
    For applications pertaining to a single program requiring budget 
amounts by multiple functions or activities, enter the name of each 
activity or function on each line in Column (a), and enter the catalog 
number in Column (b). For applications pertaining to multiple programs 
where none of the programs require a breakdown by function or activity, 
enter the catalog program title on each line in Column (a) and the 
respective catalog number on each line in Column (b).
    For applications pertaining to multiple programs where one or more 
programs require a breakdown by function or activity, prepare a 
separate sheet for each program requiring the breakdown. Additional 
sheets should be used when one form does not provide adequate space for 
all breakdown of data required. However, when more than one sheet is 
used, the first page should provide the summary totals by programs.
Lines 1-4, Columns (c) through (g.)
    For new applications, leave Columns (c) and (d) blank. For each 
line entry in Columns (a) and (b), enter in Columns (e), (f), and (g) 
the appropriate amounts of funds needed to support the project for the 
first funding period (usually a year).
    For continuing grant program applications, submit these forms 
before the end of each funding period as required by the grantor 
agency. Enter in Columns (c) and (d) the estimated amounts of funds 
which will remain unobligated at the end of the grant funding period 
only if the Federal grantor agency instructions provide for this. 
Otherwise, leave these columns blank. Enter in columns (e) and (f) the 
amounts of funds needed for the upcoming period. The amount(s) in 
Column (g) should be the sum of amounts in Columns (e) and (f).
    For supplemental grants and changes to existing grants, do not use 
Columns (c) and (d). Enter in Column (e) the amount of the increase or 
decrease of Federal funds and enter in Column (f) the amount of the 
increase or decrease of non-Federal funds. In Column (g) enter the new 
total budgeted amount (Federal and non-Federal) which includes the 
total previous authorized budgeted amounts plus or minus, as 
appropriate, the amounts shown in Columns (e) and (f). The amount(s) in 
Column (g) should not equal the sum of amounts in Columns (e) and (f).
    Line 5--Show the totals for all columns used.
Section B Budget Categories
    In the column headings (1) through (4), enter the titles of the 
same programs, functions, and activities shown on Lines 1-4, Column 
(a), Section A. When additional sheets are prepared for Section A, 
provide similar column headings on each sheet. For each program, 
function or activity, fill in the total requirements for funds (both 
Federal and non-Federal) by object class categories.
    Lines 6a-i--Show the totals of Lines 6a to 6h in each column.
    Line 6j--Show the amount of indirect cost.
    Line 6k--Enter the total of amounts on Lines 6i and 6j. For all 
applications for new grants and continuation grants the total amount in 
column (5), Line 6k, should be the same as the total amount shown in 
Section A, Column (g), Line 5. For supplemental grants and changes to 
grants, the total amount of the increase or decrease as shown in 
Columns (1)-(4), Line 6k should be the same as the sum of the amounts 
in Section A, Columns (e) and (f) on Line 5.
    Line 7--Enter the estimated amount of income, if any, expected to 
be generated from this project. Do not add or subtract this amount from 
the total project amount. Show under the program narrative statement 
the nature and source of income. The estimated amount of program income 
may be considered by the federal grantor agency in determining the 
total amount of the grant.

Section C. Non-Federal-Resources

    Lines 8-11--Enter amounts of non-Federal resources that will be 
used on the grant. If in-kind contributions are included, provide a 
brief explanation on a separate sheet.
    Column (a)--Enter the program titles identical to Column (a), 
Section A. A breakdown by function or activity is not necessary.
    Column (b)--Enter the contribution to be made by the applicant.
    Column (c)--Enter the amount of the State's cash and in-kind 
contribution if the applicant is not a State or State agencies should 
leave this column blank.
    Column (d)--Enter the amount of cash and in kind contributions to 
be made from all other sources.
    Column (e)--Enter totals of Columns (b), (c), and (d).
    Line 12--Enter the total for each of Columns (b)-(e). The amount in 
Column (e) should be equal to the amount of Line 5, Column (f), Section 
A.

Section D. Forecasted Cash Needs

    Line 13--Enter the amount of cash needed by quarter from the 
grantor agency during the first year.
    Line 14--Enter the amount of cash from all other sources needed by 
quarter during the first year.
    Line 15--Enter the totals of amounts on Lines 13 and 14.

Section E. Budget Estimates of Federal Funds Needed for Balance of 
the Project

    Lines 16-19--Enter in Column (a) the same grant program titles 
shown in Column (a), Section A. A breakdown by function or activity is 
not necessary. For new applications and continuation grant 
applications, enter in the proper columns amounts of Federal funds 
which will be needed to complete the program or project over the 
succeeding funding periods (usually in years). This section need not be 
completed for revisions (amendments, changes, or supplements) to funds 
for the current year of existing grants.
    If more than four lines are needed to list the program titles, 
submit additional schedules as necessary.
    Lines 20--Enter the total for each of the Columns (b)-(e). When 
additional schedules are prepared for this Section, annotate 
accordingly and show the overall totals on this line.

Section F. Other Budget Information

    Line 21--Use this space to explain amounts for individual direct 
object-class cost categories that may appear to be out of the ordinary 
or to explain the details as required by the Federal grantor agency.
    Line 22--Enter the type of indirect rate (provisional, 
predetermined, final or fixed) that will be in effect during the 
funding period, the estimated amount of the base to which the rate is 
applied, and the total indirect expense.
    Line 23--Provide any other explanations or comments deemed 
necessary.

Assurances--Non-Construction Programs

    Note: Certain of these assurances may not be applicable to your 
project or program. If you have questions, please contact the 
awarding agency. Further, certain Federal awarding agencies may 
require applicants to certify to additional assurances. If such is 
the case, you will be notified.

    As the duly authorized representative of the applicant I certify 
that the applicant:
    1. Has the legal authority to apply for Federal assistance, and the 
institutional, managerial and financial capability (including funds 
sufficient to pay the non-Federal share of project costs) to ensure 
proper planning, management and completion of the project described in 
this application.
    2. Will give the awarding agency, the Comptroller General of the 
United States, and if appropriate, the State, through any authorized 
representative, access to and the right to examine all records, books, 
papers, or documents related to the award; and will establish a proper 
accounting system in accordance with generally accepted accounting 
standards or agency directives.
    3. Will establish safeguards to prohibit employees from using their 
positions for a purpose that constitutes or presents the appearance of 
personal or organizational conflict of interest, or personal gain.
    4. Will initiate and complete the work within the applicable time 
frame after receipt of approval of the awarding agency.
    5. Will comply with the Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 (42 
U.S.C. 4728-4763) relating to prescribed standards for merit systems 
for programs funded under one of the nineteen statutes or regulations 
specified in appendix A of OMP's Standards for a Merit System of 
Personnel Administration (5 CFR 900, Subpart F).
    6. Will comply with all Federal statutes relating to 
nondiscrimination. These include but are not limited to: (a) Title VI 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-352) which prohibits 
discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin; (b) 
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended (20 U.S.C. 
1681-1683, and 1685-1686), which prohibits discrimination on the basis 
of sex; (c) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended 
(29 U.S.C. 794), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of 
handicap; (d) the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended (42 U.S.C. 
6101-6107), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age:
    (e) the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-255), 
as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of drug abuse; 
(f) the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, 
Treatment and Rehabilitation Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-616), as amended, 
relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of alcohol abuse or 
alcoholism; (g) section 523 and 527 of the Public Health Service Act of 
1912 (42 U.S.C. 290 dd-3 and 290 ee-3), as amended, relating to 
confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records: (h) Title 
VIII of the Civil Right Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3601 et seq.), as 
amended, relating to nondiscrimination in the sale, rental or financing 
of housing; (i) any other nondiscrimination provisions in the specific 
statute(s) under which application for Federal assistance is being 
made; and (j) the requirements of any other nondiscrimination 
statute(s) which may apply to the application.
    7. Will comply, or has already complied, with the requirements of 
Titles II and III of the Uniform Relocation Assistanced and Real 
Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-646) which provide 
for fair and equitable treatment of persons displaced or whose property 
is acquired as a result of Federal or federally assisted programs. 
These requirements apply to all interests in real property acquired for 
project purpose regardless of Federal participation in purchases.
    8. Will comply with the provisions of the Hatch Act (5 U.S.C. 1501-
1508 and 7324-7328) which limit the political activities of employees 
whose principal employment activities are funded in whole or in part 
with Federal funds.
    9. Will comply, as applicable, with the provisions of the Davis-
Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. 276a to 276a-7, the Copeland Act (40 U.S.C. 276c 
and 18 U.S.C. 874), and the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards 
Act (40 U.S.C. 327-333), regarding labor standards for federally 
assisted construction subagreements.
    10. Will comply, if applicable, with flood insurance purchase 
requirements of section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 
1973 (P.L. 93-234) which requires recipients in a special flood hazard 
area to participate in the program and to purchase flood insurance if 
the total cost of insurable construction and acquisition is $10,000 or 
more.
    11. Will comply with environmental standards which may be 
prescribed pursuant to the following: (a) institution of environmental 
quality control measures under the National Environmental Policy Act of 
1969 (P.L. 91-190) and Executive Order (EO) 11514; (b) notification of 
violating facilities pursuant to EO 11738; (c) protection of wetlands 
pursuant to EO 11990; (d) evaluation of flood hazards in floodplains in 
accordance with EO 11988; (e) assurance of project consistency with the 
approved State management program developed under the Coastal Zone 
Management Act of 1972 (16 U.S.C. 1451 et seq.); (f) conformity of 
Federal actions to State (Clear Air) Implementation Plans under Section 
176(c) of the Clear Air Act of 1955, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7401 et 
seq.); (g) protection of underground sources of drinking water under 
the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended (P.L. 93-523); and (h) 
protection of endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 
1973, as amended (P.L. 93-205).
    12. Will comply with the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968 (16 
U.S.C. 1271 et seq.) related to protecting components or potential 
components of the national wild and scenic rivers system.
    13. Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with 
section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as 
amended (16 U.S.C. 470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of 
historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation 
Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 469a-1 et seq.).
    14. Will comply with P.L. 93-348 regarding the protection of human 
subjects involved in research, development, and related activities 
supported by this award of assistance.
    15. Will comply with the Laboratory Animal Welfare Act of 1966 
(P.L. 89-544, as amended, 7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq.) pertaining to the 
care, handling, and treatment of warm blooded animals held for 
research, teaching, or other activities supported by this award of 
assistance.
    16. Will comply with the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act 
(42 U.S.C. 4801 et seq.) which prohibits the use of lead based paint in 
construction or rehabilitation of residence structures.
    17. Will cause to be performed the required financial and 
compliance audits in accordance with the Single Audit Act of 1984.
    18. Will comply with all applicable requirements of all other 
Federal laws, executive orders, regulations and policies governing this 
program.
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Signature of Authorized Certifying Offical

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Applicant Organization

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Title

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Date Submitted

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BILLING CODE 4184-01-P

TN12MY94.003


TN12MY94.004


Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility 
Matters--Primary Covered Transactions

    By signing and submitting this proposal, the applicant, defined as 
the primary participant in accordance with 45 CFR part 76, certifies to 
the best of its knowledge and believe that it and its principals:
    (a) Are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, 
declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from covered transactions 
by any Federal Department or agency;
    (b) Have not within a 3-year period preceding this proposal been 
convicted of or had a civil judgment rendered against them for 
commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with obtaining, 
attempting to obtain, or performing a public (Federal, State, or local) 
transaction or contract under a public transaction; violation of 
Federal or State antitrust statutes or commission of embezzlement, 
theft, forgery, bribery, falsification or destruction of records, 
making false statements, or receiving stolen property;
    (c) Are not presently indicted or otherwise criminally or civilly 
charged by a governmental entity (Federal, State or local) with 
commission of any of the offenses enumerated in paragraph (1) (b) of 
this certification; and
    (d) Have not within a 3-year period preceding this application/
proposal had one or more public transactions (Federal, State, or local) 
terminated for cause or default.
    The inability of a person to provide the certification required 
above will not necessarily result in denial of participation in this 
covered transaction. If necessary, the prospective participant shall 
submit an explanation of why it cannot provide the certification. The 
certification or explanation will be considered in connection with the 
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) determination whether to 
enter into this transaction. However, failure of the prospective 
primary participant to furnish a certification or an explanation shall 
disqualify such person from participation in this transaction.
    The prospective primary participant agrees that by submitting this 
proposal, it will include the clause entitled ``Certification Regarding 
Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility, and Voluntary Exclusion--Lower 
Tier Covered Transaction.'' provided below without modification in all 
lower tier covered transactions and in all solicitations for lower tier 
covered transactions.

Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility and 
Voluntary Exclusion--Lower Tier Covered Transactions (To Be Supplied to 
Lower Tier Participants

    By signing and submitting this lower tier proposal, the prospective 
lower tier participant, as defined in 45 CFR part 76, certifies to the 
best of its knowledge and belief that it and its principals:
    (a) Are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, 
declared ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participation in this 
transaction by any federal department or agency.
    (b) Where the prospective lower tier participant is unable to 
certify to any of the above, such prospective participant shall attach 
an explanation to this proposal.
    The prospective lower tier participant further agrees by submitting 
this proposal that it will include this clause entitled ``certification 
Regarding Debarment, Suspension, Ineligibility, and Voluntary 
Exclusion--Lower Tier Covered Transactions.'' without modification in 
all lower tier covered transactions and in all solicitations for lower 
tier covered transactions.

Certifiction Regarding Lobbying, Certification for Contracts, Grants, 
Loans, and Cooperative Agreements

    The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and 
belief, that:
    (1) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, 
by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for influencing or 
attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member 
of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a 
Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal 
contract, the making of any Federal grant, the making of any Federal 
loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the 
extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any 
Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.
    (2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been 
paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to 
influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, 
or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal 
contract, grant, loan or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall 
complete and submit Standard Form-LLL, ``Disclosure Form to Report 
Lobbying,'' in accordance with its instructions.
    (3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this 
certification be included in the award documents for all subawards at 
all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and contracts under 
grants, loans, and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients 
shall certify and disclose accordingly.
    This certification is a material representation of fact upon which 
reliance was placed when this transaction was made or entered into. 
Submission of this certification is a prerequisite for making or 
entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. 
Code. Any person who fails to file the required certification shall be 
subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10,000 and not more than 
$100,000 for each such failure.

State for Loan Guarantee and Loan Insurance

    The undersigned states, to the best of his or her knowledge and 
belief, that:
    If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for 
influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any 
agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an 
employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this commitment 
providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the 
undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form-LLL ``Disclosure 
Form to Report Lobbying,'' in accordance with its instructions.
    Submision of this statement is a prerequisite for making or 
entering into this transaction imposed by section 1352, title 31, U.S. 
Code. Any person who fails to file the required statement shall be 
subject to a civil penalty or not less than $10,000 and not more than 
$100,000 for each such failure.

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Signature

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Title

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Organization

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Date

BILLING CODE 4184-01-P

TN12MY94.005


[FR Doc. 94-11441 Filed 5-11-94; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4184-10-C