[Federal Register Volume 64, Number 7 (Tuesday, January 12, 1999)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 1765-1770]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 99-564]


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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Food and Drug Administration

21 CFR Part 101

[Docket No. 98P-0043]


Food Labeling: Nutrition Labeling of Dietary Supplements on a 
``Per Day'' Basis

AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS.

ACTION: Proposed rule.

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SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend 
its nutrition labeling regulations for dietary supplements to provide 
that the quantitative amount and the percent of Daily Value of a 
dietary ingredient may be voluntarily presented on a ``per day'' basis 
in addition to the required ``per serving'' basis, if a recommendation 
is made on the label that the dietary supplement be consumed more than 
once per day. This proposal responds to a citizen petition requesting 
that these regulations be modified to include this provision. FDA is 
proposing this action to provide manufacturers of dietary supplements 
flexibility to voluntarily present additional label information to 
consumers.

DATES: Submit written comments by March 29, 1999. Submit written 
comments on the information collection provisions by February 11, 1999. 
See section IX of this document for the effective date of any final 
rule that may issue based on this proposal.

ADDRESSES: Submit written comments to the Dockets Management Branch 
(HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, 
Rockville, MD 20852. Submit written comments on the information

[[Page 1766]]

collection provisions to the Office of Information and Regulatory 
Affairs, OMB, New Executive Office Bldg., 725 17th St. NW., Washington, 
DC 20503, ATTN: Desk Officer for FDA.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Carole L. Adler, Center for Food 
Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-165), Food and Drug Administration, 
200 C St. SW., Washington, DC 20204, 202-205-5494.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    In the Federal Register of September 23, 1997 (62 FR 49826), FDA 
published a final rule entitled ``Food Labeling; Statement of Identity, 
Nutrition Labeling and Ingredient Labeling of Dietary Supplements; 
Compliance Policy Guide, Revocation'' (hereinafter referred to as the 
``September 23, 1997, final rule''). This document was published in 
response to the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 
(the DSHEA) and established requirements for the identification of 
dietary supplements and for their nutrition labeling and ingredient 
labeling. These regulations provide, in part, that quantitative 
information be listed ``per serving'' and voluntarily ``per unit.'' The 
effective date of the September 23, 1997, final rule is March 23, 1999.
    In the November 27, 1991, proposed rule on nutrition labeling 
entitled ``Food Labeling; Reference Daily Intakes and Daily Reference 
Values; Mandatory Status of Nutrition Labeling and Nutrient Content 
Revision'' (56 FR 60366 at 60382), the agency suggested that the 
required nutrition information for dietary supplements be provided in 
``units'' and ``units per day'' if label directions advise consumption 
of more than one unit per day. The agency believed that, because more 
than one unit of a supplement is often consumed per day, the daily 
amount recommended by the manufacturer for consumption should be 
clearly stated. As addressed in the January 6, 1993, final rule 
entitled ``Food Labeling: Mandatory Status of Nutrition Labeling and 
Nutrient Content Revision, Format for Nutrition Label'' (58 FR 2079 at 
2168), the agency received several comments opposing dual labeling 
(i.e., ``per unit'' and ``per day'') of nutrition information if more 
than one unit is specified for consumption per day. Comments were 
opposed for various reasons, including that dual declaration may create 
consumer confusion, overcrowd labels, and discriminate against 
supplements that do not provide ``units per day'' information. The 
agency was persuaded that dual declaration may create a readability 
problem for consumers, given the limited space available on most 
dietary supplements, and that recommended daily consumption of other 
than well-defined dosages (e.g., ``consume 1 to 3 tablets per day'') 
would pose a problem in terms of labeling on a ``per day'' basis. The 
agency tentatively concluded that labeling ``per unit'' would be more 
useful in that the product would always be consumed ``per unit,'' and 
that consumers may not always follow the manufacturer's recommendations 
to consume a certain number of units per day of the product. The agency 
planned to propose that nutrition information be provided ``per unit'' 
in its future rulemaking required by the Dietary Supplement Act (the DS 
act) (see 58 FR 2079 at 2169).
    In the interim, FDA reexamined this issue, and in its June 18, 
1993, proposal entitled ``Food Labeling; General Requirements for 
Nutrition Labeling for Dietary Supplements of Vitamins, Minerals, 
Herbs, or Other Similar Nutritional Substances'' (58 FR 33715 at 
33716), tentatively concluded that quantitative information should be 
presented ``per serving'' rather than ``per unit.'' The agency 
explained in this document that consumers might be confused by a ``per 
unit'' declaration when more than one unit is to be consumed at one 
time (e.g., two capsules with each meal) because they might assume that 
the ``per unit'' information represents the amount specified for 
consumption at one time (i.e., ``per serving'') similar to conventional 
foods. The agency also noted that it preferred one consistent method of 
labeling for the various forms of supplements and that ``per unit'' 
labeling was not as appropriate for supplements that do not come in 
discrete units (e.g., liquid or powdered supplements). Therefore, the 
agency proposed that quantitative information be provided on a ``per 
serving'' basis consistent with Sec. 101.9 (21 CFR 101.9). The agency 
maintained this requirement in the January 4, 1994, final rule entitled 
``Food Labeling; General Requirements for Nutrition Labeling for 
Dietary Supplements of Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs, or Other Similar 
Nutritional Substances'' (59 FR 354 at 359).
    The DSHEA added section 403(q)(5)(F)(ii) (21 U.S.C. 
343(q)(5)(F)(ii)) to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the 
act). This section specifies that the listing of dietary ingredients in 
nutrition labeling shall include the quantity of each such ingredient 
``per serving.'' Therefore, in its December 28, 1995, proposal entitled 
``Food Labeling; Statement of Identity, Nutrition Labeling and 
Ingredient Labeling of Dietary Supplements'' (60 FR 67194 at 67198), 
FDA proposed in Sec. 101.36(b)(2)(ii) (21 CFR 101.36(b)(2)(ii)) that 
quantitative information be listed on a ``per serving'' basis. This 
requirement was unchanged in the September 23, 1997, final rule (62 FR 
49826 at 49830). However, the agency was persuaded that there may be 
some products in which the unit amount may be of interest to consumers, 
and, therefore, added Sec. 101.36(b)(2)(iv) to provide for quantitative 
information to be presented voluntarily on a ``per unit'' basis in 
addition to the required ``per serving'' basis in Sec. 101.36(b)(2)(ii) 
(62 FR 49826 at 49830).

II. Citizen Petition

    The Nutrilite Division of Amway Corp., (hereinafter referred to as 
``the petitioner''), submitted a citizen petition (filed January 23, 
1998, Docket No. 98P-0043/CP1), requesting that FDA amend its nutrition 
labeling regulations for dietary supplements to permit the option of 
listing the quantitative amount and the percent of Daily Value of 
dietary ingredients on a ``per day'' basis in addition to the required 
``per serving'' basis if the label of the product advises that the 
dietary supplement be consumed more than once per day.
    Specifically, the petitioner requested that FDA redesignate 
paragraphs (e)(9) and (e)(10) of Sec. 101.36 as (e)(10) and (e)(11). In 
place of former paragraph (e)(9) of Sec. 101.36, the petitioner 
requested that a new Sec. 101.36(e)(9) state:
    If the labeling for a dietary supplement recommends that more 
than one serving be consumed per day, the text of the ``Supplement 
Facts'' may also declare the total quantitative amount and the total 
percent of the Daily Value that will be consumed per day of each 
dietary ingredient. This additional information shall be provided in 
separate columns or other separate placement, but in the same type 
size and same format employed for the rest of the ``Supplement 
Facts'' information, and shall be introduced by the headings ``Total 
Amount Per Day'' and ``Total % DV Per Day''.
    The petitioner noted that the labels of some dietary supplements 
recommend consumption of more than one per day, for instance, in the 
morning and in the evening (i.e., two times a day), or with breakfast, 
lunch, and dinner (i.e., three times a day). The petitioner asserted 
that for safety reasons, the consumer should be provided with 
information about the quantitative amount and the percent of the Daily 
Value of each dietary ingredient to be consumed per day.
    The petitioner stated that it recognizes that the DSHEA provides 
that the listing of dietary ingredients be on a ``per

[[Page 1767]]

serving'' basis, but that does not prevent FDA from allowing 
information about the quantity of each dietary ingredient consumed per 
day to be declared voluntarily.
    The petitioner maintained that providing additional columns of 
information to augment the basic nutrition labeling information would 
not be confusing or misleading, is consistent with the nutrition 
labeling regulations for dietary supplements, and would not conflict in 
any way with the required information. The petitioner noted that FDA 
has already authorized additional columns of information in other 
circumstances for dietary supplements (e.g., when a product contains 
two or more separately packaged dietary supplements that differ from 
each other (Sec. 101.36(e)(8) and (e)(10)(iii)), and dietary 
information may be provided on a ``per unit'' basis in addition to a 
``per serving'' basis (Sec. 101.36(b)(2)(iv)). The petitioner also 
provided examples of situations when additional columns for 
conventional foods may be used (e.g., two or more forms of the same 
food, and food commonly combined with other ingredients or that is 
cooked or otherwise prepared before eating may be presented ``as 
purchased'' and ``as prepared'' (Sec. 101.9(e) and (h)(4)).
    The petitioner noted that Sec. 101.9(b)(11) provides that if a 
product is promoted on the label, or in labeling or advertising for a 
use that differs in quantity by twofold or greater from the use upon 
which the reference amount in Sec. 101.12(b) (21 CFR 101.12(b)) was 
based, then the manufacturer shall provide a second column of nutrition 
information based on the amount customarily consumed in the promoted 
use, in addition to the nutrition information per serving derived from 
the reference amount in Sec. 101.12(b). According to the petitioner, 
this provision, which Sec. 101.36(b) references, includes the voluntary 
declaration of nutrition information for dietary supplements on a ``per 
day'' basis if the label recommends consumption more than once per day.

III. The Proposal

    The agency acknowledges that it had previous concerns about 
quantitative information for dietary supplements being presented on a 
``per day'' basis, and has discussed them in section I of this 
document. However, the agency is persuaded by the petitioner that this 
additional information may be useful to impress upon consumers of 
dietary supplement products the total daily intake of each dietary 
ingredient they will receive from a product that is recommended for 
consumption multiple times per day. Therefore, the agency tentatively 
concludes that if the labeling of a dietary supplement recommends 
consumption more than once per day, it would be acceptable to provide 
quantitative information ``per day'' in addition to ``per serving'' 
when the product label has sufficient space available to present this 
information in accordance with the format requirements specified in 
Sec. 101.36(e) or the special labeling provisions for small and 
intermediate-sized packages in Sec. 101.36(i)(2).
    The agency does not agree that this provision is covered by 
Sec. 101.9(b)(11). That paragraph refers to usage at one eating 
occasion of a quantity that differs by twofold from the quantity upon 
which the reference amount was based, not to the usage over a day's 
time.
    The agency agrees with the petitioner that it is appropriate to 
place this provision in Sec. 101.36(e), which is the section pertaining 
to the presentation of nutrition information. In doing so, the agency 
is proposing to remove paragraph Sec. 101.36(b)(2)(iv), which provides 
for the optional listing of quantitative information on a ``per unit'' 
basis and include this provision in a new Sec. 101.36(e)(9). 
Accordingly, FDA is modifying the sample language provided by the 
petitioner for a new Sec. 101.36(e)(9) and is proposing to provide in 
that paragraph that quantitative information by weight (or volume, if 
permitted) may be declared on either a ``per unit'' or ``per day'' 
basis in addition to the required ``per serving'' basis. The agency is 
also proposing to redesignate existing paragraphs (e)(9), (e)(10) and 
(e)(11) of Sec. 101.36 as (e)(10), (e)(11), and (e)(12), respectively, 
and to revise the reference in (e)(12) accordingly.
    As is the case when nutrient information is given in additional 
columns as shown in current Sec. 101.36(e)(10)(ii) and (e)(10)(iii), 
FDA believes that it is critical that clearly labeled column headings 
are provided to prevent consumer confusion about the information. 
Therefore, FDA is also proposing to provide a sample label in new 
Sec. 101.36(e)(11)(viii) of a suggested format for a dietary supplement 
providing information on both a ``per serving'' and ``per day'' basis. 
FDA requests comments on the proposed changes.
    The regulation specifying nutrition labeling requirements for 
dietary supplements will become effective March 23, 1999, and many 
dietary supplement manufacturers are currently making label changes 
necessary to come into compliance with those requirements. Although the 
agency does not expect to complete this rulemaking in time for the 
``per day'' information to be incorporated as part of the current 
changes, it has considered whether the information should be allowed on 
an interim basis prior to completion of the rulemaking so that firms 
wishing to incorporate it now with the other changes may do so. Because 
the agency believes that the proposed ``per day'' information would not 
be misleading, FDA does not intend to object to manufacturers declaring 
information on a ``per day'' basis prior to issuance of a final rule, 
provided it is presented in a manner consistent with this proposal. 
However, manufacturers should be aware that a final rule on this issue 
may differ from this proposal and that they would then be required to 
change their labels to conform to the final rule.

IV. Analysis of Impacts

A. Benefit/Cost Analysis

    FDA has examined the impacts of this proposed rule under Executive 
Order 12866. Executive Order 12866 directs agencies to assess the costs 
and benefits of available regulatory alternatives and, when regulation 
is necessary, to select regulatory approaches that maximize net 
benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health 
and safety effects; distributive impacts; and equity). According to 
Executive Order 12866, a regulatory action is ``economically 
significant'' if it meets any one of a number of specified conditions, 
including having an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or 
adversely affecting in a material way a sector of the economy, 
competition, or jobs. A regulation is considered ``significant'' under 
Executive Order 12866 if it raises novel legal or policy issues. FDA 
finds that this proposed rule is neither an economically significant 
nor a significant regulatory action as defined by Executive Order 
12866.
    In addition, FDA has determined that this rule does not constitute 
a significant rule under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 
requiring cost-benefit and other analyses. A significant rule is 
defined in section 1531(a) of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 
as ``a Federal mandate that may result in the expenditure by State, 
local, and tribal governments in the aggregate, or by the private 
sector, of $100,000,000 (adjusted annually for inflation) in any 1 
year.''
    Finally, in accordance with the Small Business Regulatory 
Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, the administrator of the Office of 
Information and

[[Page 1768]]

Regulatory Affairs of the Office of Management and Budget has 
determined that this proposed rule is not a major rule for the purpose 
of congressional review.
    FDA is proposing to allow the nutrition labeling of dietary 
supplements to present the quantitative amount by weight (or volume, if 
permitted) and the percent of Daily Value of a dietary ingredient on a 
``per day'' basis in addition to the required ``per serving'' basis. 
This action provides manufacturers of dietary supplements flexibility 
to voluntarily present additional label information to consumers. This 
rule will result in costs and benefits only to the extent that firms 
elect to take advantage of the option of presenting information on a 
``per day'' basis. No firm will bear the cost of redesigning labels 
unless it believes that the claim will result in increased sales of its 
product.

B. Small Entity Analysis

    FDA has examined the impacts of this proposed rule as required by 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601-612). If a rule has a 
significant impact on a substantial number of small entities, the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act requires agencies to analyze options that 
would minimize the economic impact of that rule on small entities. 
Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 605(b)), the agency 
certifies that this proposed rule will not have a significant impact on 
a substantial number of small entities.
    This proposed rule would provide for voluntary, ``per day'' 
labeling of dietary supplements. Because ``per day'' labeling would be 
permitted and not required, a firm, including any small firm, will 
change its labeling and incur costs only if the benefits to it (e.g., 
increased sales) exceed the costs. FDA further notes that small product 
lines from certain small firms are exempt from the dietary supplement 
nutrition labeling requirements provided no claims are made.

V. The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995

    This proposed rule contains information collection provisions that 
are subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520). The 
title, description, and respondent description of the information 
collection provisions are shown in this section of this document with 
an estimate of the annual reporting burden. Included in the estimate is 
the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, 
gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing 
each collection of information.
    FDA invites comments on: (1) Whether the proposed collection of 
information is necessary for the proper performance of FDA's functions, 
including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) the 
accuracy of FDA's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of 
information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions 
used; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden of the 
collection of information on respondents, including through the use of 
automated collection techniques or other forms of information 
technology.
    Title: Food Labeling: Nutrition Labeling of Dietary Supplements on 
a ``Per Day'' Basis.
    Description: Section 403(q)(5)(F) of the act provides that dietary 
supplements shall bear nutrition labeling in a manner that is 
appropriate for the product and that is specified in regulations issued 
by FDA. FDA issued regulations establishing the requirements for 
nutrition labeling in Sec. 101.36 in the September 23, 1997, final 
rule. FDA is proposing to amend its nutrition labeling regulations for 
dietary supplements to provide that firms may voluntarily present the 
quantitative amount and the percent of Daily Value of dietary 
ingredients on a ``per day'' basis in addition to the required ``per 
serving'' basis, if a recommendation is made on the label that the 
dietary supplement be consumed more than once per day. These proposed 
provisions are in response to a citizen petition submitted by a 
manufacturer and marketer of dietary supplements. This proposed action 
would provide suppliers of dietary supplements flexibility to present 
additional label information voluntarily to consumers.
    Respondent Description: Suppliers of dietary supplements.

                                  Table 1.--Estimated Annual Reporting Burden1
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                                      No. or                                                           Total
 21 CFR Section       No. of       Responses per   Total Annual      Hours per     Total Annual      Operating
                    Respondents     Respondent       Responses       Response          Hours           Costs
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101.36(e)              85              10             850               0.25          213         $83,000
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\1\ There are no capital or maintenance costs associated with this collection of information.

    These estimates are based on agency communications with industry 
(Refs. 1, 2, and 3) and FDA's knowledge of, and experience with, food 
labeling. FDA estimated in the September 23, 1997, final rule (62 FR 
49826 at 49846) that there were a maximum of 850 suppliers of dietary 
supplements and that, on average, each supplier had 40 products whose 
labels required revision. FDA estimates that only 10 percent, or 85, of 
the dietary supplement suppliers would revise the labels of their 
products to incorporate nutrition levels for the daily use of their 
products. FDA also estimates that daily use levels for nutrition 
information would generally be placed on at most 25 percent, or at most 
10, of a firm's estimated 40 products, although this number would vary 
by firm based on the types of products that it produces. FDA also 
believes that the burden associated with the proposed disclosure of 
nutrition information on a daily use basis for dietary supplements 
would be a one-time burden for the small number of firms that would 
decide voluntarily to add this additional information to the labels for 
their products, separate from any other label changes for their 
products. FDA estimates that at least 90 percent of firms would 
coordinate addition of daily use nutrition information with other 
changes in their labels, in which case the voluntary cost of 
transmitting the information to consumers in labeling would be subsumed 
almost entirely in the cost of these other voluntary or required 
labeling changes. The incremental cost for these 76 firms would be 
approximately $50 per label for 760 labels, or $38,000 total. For the 
remaining 9 firms that would not coordinate changes with other labeling 
changes, FDA estimates that the cost would be approximately $500 per 
label

[[Page 1769]]

for 90 labels, or $45,000 total. The estimated total operating costs in 
Table 1 are, therefore, $83,000 total. Respondents are already required 
to disclose the quantitative amount and percent of Daily Value of 
dietary ingredients per serving as part of the nutrition information 
for dietary supplements. Respondents may also provide such information 
on a per unit basis. The information provided for under the proposed 
rule would be generated by simple extrapolation from that information.
    In compliance with 44 U.S.C. 3507(d), the agency has submitted the 
information collection provision of the proposed rule to OMB for 
review. Interested persons are requested to send comments regarding 
information collection by February 11, 1999, to the Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB (address above), ATTN: Desk 
Officer for FDA.

VI. Environmental Impact

    The agency has determined under 21 CFR 25.30(k) that this action is 
of a type that does not individually or cumulatively have a significant 
effect on the human environment. Therefore, neither an environmental 
assessment nor an environmental impact statement is required.

VII. References

    The following references have been placed on display in the Dockets 
Management Branch (address above) and may be seen by interested persons 
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
    1. Memorandum of telephone conversation of August 10, 1998, 
between James C. Lassiter, Amway Corp., and Gerad L. McCowin, Office 
of Food Labeling, FDA.
    2. Memorandum of telephone conversation of August 20, 1998, 
between Paul Bolar, Pharmavite Corp., and Gerad L. McCowin, Office 
of Food Labeling, FDA.
    3. Memorandum of telephone conversation of August 20, 1998, 
between Mike Bradley and Bill Cochrane, Leiner, Inc., and Gerad L. 
McCowin, Office of Food Labeling, FDA.

VIII. Comments

    Interested persons may by March 29, 1999 submit to the Dockets 
Management Branch (address above) written comments regarding this 
proposal, except that comments regarding information collection are to 
be submitted to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB 
(address above), by February 11, 1999. Two copies of any comments are 
to be submitted, except that individuals may submit one copy. Comments 
are to be identified with the docket number found in brackets in the 
heading of this document. Received comments may be seen in the office 
above between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

IX. Effective Date

    The agency is proposing that any final rule that may issue based 
upon this proposed rule become effective 30 days after its date of 
publication in the Federal Register.

List of Subjects in 21 CFR Part 101

    Food labeling, Nutrition, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.
    Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and under 
authority delegated to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, it is 
proposed that 21 CFR part 101 be amended as follows:

PART 101--FOOD LABELING

    1. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 101 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1453, 1454, 1455; 21 U.S.C. 321, 331, 342, 
343, 348, 371.

    2. Section 101.36 is amended by removing paragraph (b)(2)(iv); by 
redesignating paragraphs (e)(9), (e)(10), and (e)(11) as paragraphs 
(e)(10), (e)(11), and (e)(12), respectively; by adding new paragraph 
(e)(9); by adding paragraph (e)(11)(viii) to newly redesignated 
paragraph (e)(11); and by revising newly redesignated paragraph (e)(12) 
to read as follows:

Sec. 101.36  Nutrition labeling of dietary supplements.

* * * * *
    (e) * * *
    (9) The quantitative amount by weight (or volume, if permitted) and 
the percent of Daily Value may be presented on a ``per unit'' basis in 
addition to on a ``per serving'' basis, as required in paragraph 
(b)(2)(ii) and (b)(2)(iii) of this section. Alternatively, if a 
recommendation is made on the label that a dietary supplement be 
consumed more than once per day, the total quantitative amount and the 
percent of the Daily Value that will be consumed per day of each 
dietary ingredient may be presented. The ``per unit'' or ``per day'' 
information shall be presented in additional columns to the right of 
the ``per serving'' information and shall be clearly identified by 
appropriate headings as illustrated in paragraph (e)(11)(viii) of this 
section.
* * * * *
    (11) * * *
BILLING CODE 4160-01-F
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP12JA99.000

BILLING CODE 4160-01-C

[[Page 1770]]

    (12) If space is not adequate to list the required information as 
shown in the sample labels in paragraph (e)(11) of this section, the 
list may be split and continued to the right as long as the headings 
are repeated. The list to the right shall be set off by a line that 
distinguishes it and sets it apart from the dietary ingredients and 
percent of Daily Value information given to the left. The following 
sample label illustrates this display:
* * * * *

    Dated: January 4, 1999.
William K. Hubbard,
Associate Commissioner for Policy Coordination.
[FR Doc. 99-564 Filed 1-11-99; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4160-01-F