[Federal Register Volume 66, Number 146 (Monday, July 30, 2001)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 39280-39284]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 01-18816]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 300

[FRL-7019-8]


National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; 
National Priorities List

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency.

ACTION: Direct final notice of deletion of the Sussex County Landfill 
No. 5 Superfund Site from the National Priorities List.

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SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region III is 
publishing a direct final notice of deletion of the Sussex County 
Landfill No. 5, Superfund Site (Site), located in Laurel, Delaware from 
the National Priorities List (NPL).
    The NPL, promulgated pursuant to Section 105 of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 
1980, as amended, is Appendix B of 40 CFR Part 300, which is the 
National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). 
This direct final notice of deletion is being published by EPA with the 
concurrence of the State of Delaware, through the Department of Natural 
Resources and Environmental Control, because EPA has determined that 
all appropriate response actions under CERCLA have been completed and, 
therefore, further remedial action pursuant to CERCLA is not 
appropriate.

DATES: This direct final deletion will be effective September 28, 2001 
unless EPA receives adverse comments by August 29, 2001. If adverse 
comments are received, EPA will publish a timely withdrawal of the 
direct final deletion in the Federal Register informing the public that 
the deletion will not take effect.

[[Page 39281]]


ADDRESSES: Comments may be mailed to: Richard Kuhn, Community 
Involvement Coordinator (3HS43), E-mail: kuhn.richard@epa.gov, U.S. EPA 
Region III, 1650 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029, (215) 814-
3063 or 1-800-352-1973, ext. 4-3063.
    Information Repositories: Comprehensive information about the Site 
is available for viewing and copying at the Site information 
repositories located at: U.S. EPA Region III, Regional Center for 
Environmental Information (RCEI), 1650 Arch Street (2nd Floor), 
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029, (215) 814-5254, Monday through Friday 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m.; Laurel Public Library, 6 East Fourth Street, Laurel, DE 
19956, (302) 875-3184, Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., 
Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and the Delaware 
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Division of 
Air and Waste Management, 391 Lukens Drive, Riveredge Industrial Park, 
New Castle, DE 19720, (302) 395-2600, Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. 
to 4:00 p.m.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Humberto J. Monsalvo, Jr., Remedial 
Project Manager (RPM) (3HS23), E-mail: monsalvo.humberto@epa.gov, U.S. 
EPA Region III, 1650 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029, (215) 
814-2163 or 1-800-352-1973 ext. 4-2163, FAX (215) 814-3002.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Table of Contents

I. Introduction
II. NPL Deletion Criteria
III. Deletion Procedures
IV. Basis for Site Deletion
V. Deletion Action

I. Introduction

    EPA Region III is publishing this direct final notice of deletion 
of the Sussex County Landfill No. 5 Superfund Site from the NPL.
    The EPA identifies sites that appear to present a significant risk 
to public health or the environment and maintains the NPL as the list 
of those sites. As described in 40 CFR 300.425(e)(3) of the NCP, sites 
deleted from the NPL remain eligible for remedial actions if conditions 
at a deleted site warrant such action.
    EPA considers this action to be noncontroversial and routine; as 
such, EPA is taking it without prior publication of a notice of intent 
to delete. This action will be effective September 28, 2001 unless EPA 
receives adverse comments by August 29, 2001 on this notice. If adverse 
comments are received within the 30-day public comment period on this 
action to delete, EPA will publish a timely withdrawal of this direct 
final notice of deletion before the effective date of the deletion and 
the deletion will not take effect. EPA will, as appropriate, prepare a 
response to comments and continue with the deletion process on the 
basis of the notice of intent to delete and the comments already 
received. There will not be any additional opportunity to comment.
    Section II of this document explains the criteria for deleting 
sites from the NPL. Section III discusses procedures that EPA is using 
for this action. Section IV discusses the Sussex County Landfill No. 5 
Superfund Site and demonstrates how it meets the deletion criteria. 
Section V discusses EPA's action to delete the Site from the NPL unless 
adverse comments are received during the public comment period.

II. NPL Deletion Criteria

    Section 300.425(e) of the NCP provides that releases may be deleted 
from the NPL where no further response is appropriate. In making a 
determination to delete a release from the NPL, EPA shall consider, in 
consultation with the State, whether any of the following criteria have 
been met:
    i. Responsible parties or other persons have implemented all 
appropriate response actions required;
    ii. All appropriate Fund-financed (Hazardous Substance Superfund 
Response Trust Fund) response under CERCLA has been implemented, and no 
further response action by responsible parties is appropriate; or
    iii. The remedial investigation has shown that the release poses no 
significant threat to public health or the environment and, therefore, 
the taking of remedial measures is not appropriate.
    Even if a site is deleted from the NPL, where hazardous substances, 
pollutants, or contaminants remain at the deleted site above levels 
that allow for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure, CERCLA Section 
121(c), 42 U.S.C. 9621(c) requires that a subsequent review of the site 
be conducted at least every five years after the initiation of the 
remedial action at the deleted site to ensure that the action remains 
protective of public health and the environment. If new information 
becomes available which indicates a need for further action, EPA may 
initiate remedial actions. Whenever there is a significant release from 
a site deleted from the NPL, the deleted site may be restored to the 
NPL without application of the hazard ranking system.

III. Deletion Procedures

    The following procedures apply to deletion of the Site:
    (1) The EPA consulted with Delaware on the deletion of the Site 
from the NPL prior to developing this direct final notice of deletion.
    (2) Delaware concurred with deletion of the Site from the NPL
    (3) Concurrently with the publication of this direct final notice 
of deletion, a notice of the availability of the parallel notice of 
intent to delete published today in the ``Proposed Rules'' section of 
the Federal Register is being published in a major local newspaper of 
general circulation at or near the Site and is being distributed to 
appropriate federal, state, and local government officials and other 
interested parties; the newspaper notice announces the 30-day public 
comment period concerning the notice of intent to delete the Site from 
the NPL.
    (4) The EPA placed copies of documents supporting the deletion in 
the Site information repositories identified above.
    (5) If adverse comments are received within the 30-day public 
comment period on this notice or the companion notice of intent to 
delete also published in today's Federal Register, EPA will publish a 
timely notice of withdrawal of this direct final notice of deletion 
before its effective date and will prepare a response to comments and 
continue with the deletion process on the basis of the notice of intent 
to delete and the comments already received.
    Deletion of a site from the NPL does not itself create, alter, or 
revoke any individual's rights or obligations. Deletion of a site from 
the NPL does not in any way alter EPA's right to take enforcement 
actions, as appropriate. The NPL is designed primarily for 
informational purposes and to assist EPA management. Section 
300.425(e)(3) of the NCP states that the deletion of a site from the 
NPL does not preclude eligibility for future response actions, should 
future conditions warrant such actions.

IV. Basis for Site Deletion

    The following information provides EPA's rationale for deleting the 
Site from the NPL:

A. Site Location

    The Site, also known as the Laurel Landfill, is a 38-acre landfill 
located off Route 494 and approximately 1 mile west of the Laurel 
Airport in Laurel, Delaware. The surrounding area is agricultural and 
residential.

[[Page 39282]]

B. Site History

    The landfill was in operation between May 1970 and August 1979 and 
during that time accepted municipal and industrial waste. Waste was 
disposed in trenches which were excavated into the native soil. Waste 
placed in the landfill was covered by approximately two feet of soil 
obtained from soil stockpiles generated during the excavation of the 
trenches. After the landfill closed in 1979, a transfer station for 
municipal waste was operated on the northwest corner of the property 
under permit from the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and 
Environmental Control (DNREC) until 1993. During the 1980s, several 
investigations of the landfill were conducted by DNREC and Sussex 
County. As a result of these investigations, DNREC determined that 
ground water in the vicinity of the landfill had been impacted by 
contaminants coming from the landfill. On August 8, 1988, DNREC and 
Sussex County signed a Memorandum of Understanding to support the 
development and implementation of the Ground Water Management Zones 
(GMZs). GMZs were subsequently developed for the landfill and approved 
by DNREC. Three GMZs were established in the area surrounding the 
landfill; one of these restricted the installation of new ground water 
pumping wells (No Well Zone) and two of these restricted pumping rates 
of any new and existing wells (GMZ A-Wells less than 10 g.p.m. and GMZ 
B-Wells less than 100 g.p.m.).
    In 1986, EPA completed a Site Inspection which indicated that 
ground water in the area of the landfill had become contaminated with 
volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals coming from the landfill. 
The Site was proposed for the National Priorities List (NPL) in June 
1988 and was added to the list on October 4, 1989. On April 4, 1991 EPA 
and Sussex County entered into an Administrative Order on Consent which 
required Sussex County to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) and 
Feasibility Study (FS) for the Site.
Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS)
    Ground water samples obtained from onsite and offsite monitoring 
wells and two irrigation wells during the RI indicated ground water was 
mainly contaminated with low levels [in the low micrograms per liter 
(ug/L) range] of VOCs. Benzene and vinyl chloride were the only VOCs 
which were detected at concentrations above the Safe Drinking Water 
Act's Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs). VOC ground water contamination 
extended 1,000 feet down gradient of the northwest corner of the 
landfill.
    The analytical data generated from the RI showed no apparent 
adverse impacts on sediment, soil, and surface water quality at the 
landfill.
    During the RI, one offsite residential well was found to be 
contaminated with vinyl chloride just above the Safe Drinking Water Act 
MCL. As a result, Sussex County provided this resident with bottled 
water and later in February 1993 Sussex County installed a carbon 
filter water treatment system on this well to remove VOCs and an 
ultraviolet light to reduce bacteria levels.
    In October 1993, Sussex County completed the RI which included EPA-
prepared Baseline Human Health Risk Assessment and Ecological Risk 
Assessment. The Risk Assessment indicated that very low levels of 
contaminants of concern existed in the ground water which translated 
into correspondingly low risk levels at the Site. Based on the results 
of the RI and the Risk Assessments, EPA determined that a feasibility 
study was not necessary to evaluate remedial alternatives.
Record of Decision Findings
    Based on the results of the RI and Risk Assessment and in light of 
the activities being taken by DNREC and Sussex County under a Notice of 
Conciliation (NOC) signed by both parties in August 1994, EPA did not 
require any clean-up action to be taken at the Site under CERCLA. On 
December 29, 1994, EPA issued a No Action Record of Decision (ROD) 
which stated Five-Year Reviews would be conducted in order to determine 
if conditions at the Site remain protective of human health and the 
environment.
    According to the NOC, Sussex County was to perform the following 
activities:
     Provide Public Water Supply to Residents Down Gradient of 
the Landfill
     Establish a Ground Water Monitoring Program
     Maintenance of the Vegetated Soil Cover
     Restrict Well Installation and/or Operation in the GMZs
     Institutional Controls
Characterization of Risk
    The baseline risk assessment performed by EPA in 1994 determined 
through screening and evaluation of the Site media data that the only 
route of exposure of toxicological significance was through ground 
water. EPA assessed carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks from 
current and potential future exposure to contaminated ground water in 
residential well RW-02. In addition, EPA assessed carcinogenic and non-
carcinogenic risks due to potential migration of the organic 
contaminant plume offsite. EPA used data from monitoring wells LD-1, 
LS-7R, and LS-16 to represent the center of the organic contaminant 
plume that was considered to be the source of exposure to receptors if 
the contaminant plume were to migrate to some offsite point where this 
water may be used for future residential purposes.
    The risk assessment concluded that very low levels of contaminants 
of concern existed in the ground water corresponding to low risk levels 
at the Site. The increased carcinogenic risk for the residential 
exposure pathway was just slightly above the generally acceptable risk 
level of 1.0 E-04. The noncarcinogenic risk, or Hazard Index, 
calculated for the residential exposure pathway was 1.23 and the hazard 
was mainly attributable to inhalation of volatile organic compounds 
during showering. This Hazard Index value was marginally above EPA's 
generally acceptable level of 1.0. For the exposure pathway calculated 
using monitoring well data, the Hazard Index was 2.68 indicating that 
noncarcinogenic effects may be expected to occur if exposure to this 
ground water were to occur in the future.
    In 1999, EPA conducted a five-year review for the Site. During the 
preparation of the Five-Year Review Report, EPA reviewed the ground 
water data collected since the ROD date to determine if the risks 
associated with the Site had increased, or if assumptions or input 
values used in the baseline risk assessments had changed significantly 
enough to require a new risk assessment for the Site. The review of the 
ground water sampling data for the contaminants of concern revealed 
that overall the concentration levels had not increased since the 
baseline risk assessment was performed. The assumptions and input 
values for the Site contaminants of concern used in the baseline risk 
assessment had not changed since the issuance of the ROD with the 
exception of the oral exposure reference dose (RfD) for 1,4-
dichlorobenzene, a volatile organic compound. The oral RfD had been 
revised to a more stringent value than the RfD used in the baseline 
risk assessment. EPA conducted a qualitative assessment and determined 
that the Hazard Index calculated for the Site would not significantly 
change due to the revised RfD for 1,4-dichlorobenzene. EPA also 
conducted an Ecological Risk Assessment to

[[Page 39283]]

evaluate any actual or potential ecological risk as a result of 
exposure to Site-related contaminants of concern. This assessment 
concluded that a negligible potential exists for negative impact to 
habitats onsite and in the surrounding area. The human health and 
ecological risk posed by the Site is negligible.
Response Actions
    On December 29, 1994 EPA issued a No Action Record of Decision; 
therefore, no CERCLA remedial action was conducted at the site. 
However, Sussex County performed the following work in accordance with 
the requirements of the Notice of Conciliation entered into with DNREC:
    (1) Provide Public Water Supply to Residents Down Gradient of the 
Landfill. A public water supply well, approximately 300 feet deep, was 
installed by Sussex County west of the landfill. The construction of 
the public water supply pipeline was completed in 1995 and residential 
connections to the system also began. As of December 1995, nineteen 
residences were connected to the public water supply system and by 
March 1996, one additional connection was completed. Sussex County had 
provided a carbon treatment unit for one residential well (RW-02) in 
which vinyl chloride had been detected at concentrations above the MCL. 
The treatment system was removed and this residential well was renamed 
monitoring well LS-20 after the residence was connected to the public 
water supply system. The public water supply system is currently owned 
and operated by Tidewater Utilities Company. The public supply well is 
tested by Sussex County approximately once annually. The Delaware 
Department of Public Health currently oversees the Tidewater Utilities 
Company monitoring program for the public supply well.
    (2) Establish a Ground Water Monitoring Program. A ground water 
monitoring program was established by Sussex County and approved by EPA 
and DNREC which included quarterly sampling for one year (November 
1994-October 1995) and then semi-annual sampling thereafter. The 
monitoring program currently consists of monitoring wells within, down 
gradient and west of the landfill; residential wells down gradient of 
the landfill which have not connected to the public water supply; an 
irrigation well; an up gradient residential well and an up gradient 
monitoring well. As of 2000, the wells are sampled annually.
    The samples are analyzed for volatile organic compounds and ammonia 
as nitrogen (N), chloride, soluble iron, soluble manganese, nitrate-
nitrite measured as nitrogen (mg-N/L), total dissolved solids, pH, and 
specific conductance.
    (3) Maintenance of the Vegetated Soil Cover. The NOC required 
Sussex County to maintain the integrity and effectiveness of the 
vegetated soil cover to correct any effects of settling, subsidence, 
and erosion and to prevent precipitation from eroding or otherwise 
damaging the cover which prevents direct contact with the waste 
material. In July 1995, DNREC approved the Site Care Work Plan 
submitted by Sussex County. The work consisted of clearing and grubbing 
areas to be backfilled, backfilling and compacting areas to grade in 
order to alleviate standing water and to produce an even fill surface 
throughout areas of the landfill designated by DNREC; constructing four 
swales in order to encourage drainage of water from the landfill 
surface; and grading and seeding the backfilled areas. Sussex County 
did not disturb any existing vegetation or trees in the areas of the 
landfill that DNREC did not require backfilling and grading. By March 
1998, Sussex County had completed all Site care work had been completed 
by Sussex County. Sussex County inspects the landfill cover at least 
once a year to determine if wastes are exposed, or excessive erosion or 
surface water ponding is occurring.
    (4) Restrict Well Installation and/or Operation in the GMZs. The 
NOC required Sussex County to continue implementing the GMZs as 
described in the August 1988 Memorandum of Understanding between the 
DNREC and Sussex County. Installation of drinking water wells are 
carefully controlled or restricted in the GMZs. There are three areas 
within the GMZ:
     No well installation area
     GMZ-A: limited to wells with a pumping rate of less than 
10 gallons per minute (g.p.m.)
     GMZ-B: limited to wells with a pumping rate of less than 
100 g.p.m.
    To date, the GMZs have been maintained and controlled through the 
oversight efforts of DNREC and Sussex County.
    (5) Institutional Controls. The NOC required Sussex County to 
record with the recorder of deeds a notation that will in perpetuity 
notify any potential purchaser that the property was used as a solid 
waste disposal Site and that land use restrictions under DNREC 
Regulations Governing Solid Waste apply. On March 26, 1996, Sussex 
County Council recorded a ``Declaration of Restriction'' with the 
Sussex County Recorder of Deeds addressing the requirements of the NOC. 
In addition, a statement restricting the landfill property from 
commercial or residential use and restricting any person from 
inhabiting or occupying the land at any future time was included in 
this ``Declaration of Restriction.''
Cleanup Standards
    EPA issued a No Action Record of Decision in 1994; therefore, no 
cleanup standards were established because the low contaminant and 
human health and environmental risk levels associated with the Site did 
not warrant cleanup activities. Sussex County and DNREC operating under 
the requirements of the Notice of Conciliation which both parties 
signed in 1994 continue to maintain the Ground Water Management Zones 
and the soil surface landfill cover; restrict commercial or residential 
use of the landfill, and monitor ground water in and surrounding the 
landfill to reduce the potential for exposure of human and 
environmental receptors to landfill wastes.
Five-Year Review
    In 1999, EPA conducted the first CERCLA Five-Year Review of the 
Site to determine if the chosen No Action remedy was still protective 
of human health and the environment. In order to evaluate the 
protectiveness of the remedy, EPA performed a Site visit, reviewed 
data, conducted interviews, and evaluated the work performed at the 
landfill since the Record of Decision was signed in 1994. Ground water 
data from the Site reviewed during this Five-Year review period 
indicated that there are no human exposures to VOCs in ground water at 
or surrounding the landfill. The data revealed that the nitrate-nitrite 
level in the ground water is elevated above the Safe Drinking Water 
Act's Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). The presence of nitrate or 
nitrite in drinking water sources is mainly a concern for infants under 
six months due to the possibility of ``Blue Baby Syndrome'' in which an 
infant experiences shortness of breath and therefore may look blue. 
Elevated levels of nitrate-nitrite above the 10 ug/L MCL were detected 
in ground water samples from monitoring and private wells, both up 
gradient and down gradient of the landfill indicating that the source 
of this nitrate-nitrite is not likely the landfill. EPA discussed the 
elevated nitrate-nitrite levels with DNREC and the Delaware Department 
of Public Health and learned that it is typical to find nitrate-nitrite 
levels in the 10-15 ug/L range in ambient ground water in Sussex 
County, Delaware. Since the

[[Page 39284]]

nitrate-nitrite levels in ground water drinking wells in the area of 
the landfill are within the ambient (10-15 ug/L) range typically found 
in Sussex County and the nitrate-nitrite levels were elevated in 
monitoring wells located up gradient of the landfill, the landfill did 
not appear to be the source of nitrate-nitrite in ground water. Private 
residential wells serving less than 25 people are not regulated by the 
Safe Drinking Water Act; therefore, EPA, DNREC and Sussex County 
decided to send public information fact sheets to the residents to 
inform them of the potential adverse health effects due to elevated 
levels of nitrate-nitrite in drinking water and precautions the public 
can take to reduce exposure to nitrate-nitrite. In summary, EPA 
concluded that conditions at the Site had not worsened and no 
additional risks are presented to human health and the environment at 
the Site since the signing of the No Action ROD in 1994; therefore, EPA 
concluded that the No Action remedy was still protective of human 
health and the environment.
    In the 1999 Five-Year Review Report, EPA recommended the following 
activities be performed by Sussex County so that it can continue to 
monitor the conditions at the landfill and surrounding area in order to 
ensure continued protectiveness of human health and the environment. 
These recommended actions are the following: continue the ground water 
monitoring program, modifying it as necessary, and maintain the Ground 
Water Management Zones; continue maintenance of the vegetative soil 
landfill cover; and notify the residents nearby the landfill who have 
not been connected to the public water supply system of the elevated 
levels of nitrate-nitrite in the ground water and that the source of 
this nitrate-nitrite does not appear to be the landfill.
    Sussex County in cooperation with DNREC followed up on these 
recommendations by issuing public information Fact Sheets to the nearby 
residents who still use ground water from private wells. The facts 
sheets informed the residents of the presence of elevated levels of 
nitrates-nitrites in the water and discussed precautions they could 
follow to reduce the impact of these nitrate-nitrites on their health. 
In addition, Sussex County is, with oversight by DNREC, continuing to 
maintain the integrity and effectiveness of the landfill vegetative 
soil cover as required in the NOC, and maintain the Ground Water 
Management Zones. In addition, Sussex County has modified the Ground 
Water Monitoring Program in accordance with the NOC and MOU and 
continues to conduct the Ground Water Monitoring Program at the Site 
according to DNREC's requirements and as outlined in a revised 
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU-2) signed between DNREC and Sussex 
County on March 14, 2000.
    Since waste is being left in place at the landfill, EPA will 
continue to conduct Five-Year Reviews at the Site. The date for the 
next EPA five-year review is December 2004.
Community Involvement
    Public participation activities have been satisfied as required in 
CERCLA Section 113(k), 42 U.S.C. 9613(k), and CERCLA Section 117, 42 
U.S.C. 9617. Documents in the deletion docket which EPA relied on for 
recommendation of the deletion from the NPL are available to the public 
in the information repositories.

V. Deletion Action

    The EPA, with concurrence of the State of Delaware, has determined 
that all appropriate responses under CERCLA have been completed, and 
that no further response actions, under CERCLA, other than Five-Year 
Reviews, are necessary. Therefore, EPA is deleting the Site from the 
NPL.
    EPA considers this action to be noncontroversial and routine; as 
such, EPA is taking it without prior publication of a notice of intent 
to delete. This action will be effective September 28, 2001 unless EPA 
receives adverse comments by August 29, 2001 on a parallel notice of 
intent to delete published in the Proposed Rule section of today's 
Federal Register. If adverse comments are received within the 30-day 
public comment period on the proposal, EPA will publish a timely 
withdrawal of this direct final notice of deletion before the effective 
date of the deletion, and it will not take effect, EPA will then 
prepare a response to comments and continue with the deletion process 
on the basis of the notice of intent to delete and the comments already 
received. There will not be any additional opportunity to comment.

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 300

    Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Chemicals, 
Hazardous waste, Hazardous substances, Intergovernmental relations, 
Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution 
control, Water supply.

    Dated: July 23, 2001.
Thomas C. Voltaggio,
Acting Regional Administrator, EPA Region III.


    For the reasons set out in this document, 40 CFR part 300 is 
amended as follows:

PART 300--[AMENDED]

    1. The authority citation for Part 300 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 33 U.S.C. 1321(c)(2); 42 U.S.C. 9601-9657; E.O. 
12777, 56 FR 54757, 3 CFR, 1991 Comp., p.351; E.O. 12580, 52 FR 
2923, 3 CFR, 1987 Comp., p.193.

Appendix B--[Amended]

    2. Table 1 of Appendix B to Part 300 is amended under Delaware 
(``DE'') by removing the site name, Sussex County Landfill No. 5, 
and the city, Laurel, DE.

[FR Doc. 01-18816 Filed 7-27-01; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-P