[Federal Register Volume 67, Number 107 (Tuesday, June 4, 2002)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 38341-38352]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 02-13918]



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Rules and Regulations
                                                Federal Register
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Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 107 / Tuesday, June 4, 2002 / Rules 
and Regulations

[[Page 38341]]



DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Immigration and Naturalization Service

8 CFR Parts 100, 103, 236, 245a, 274a and 299

[INS No. 2115-01; AG Order No. 2588-2002]
RIN 1115-AG06


Adjustment of Status Under Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) 
Act Legalization Provisions and LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity 
Provisions

AGENCY: Immigration and Naturalization Service, Justice.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: On June 1, 2001, the Attorney General published an interim 
rule in the Federal Register that implemented section 1104 of the Legal 
Immigration Family Equity Act (LIFE Act) and the LIFE Act Amendments by 
establishing procedures for certain class action participants to become 
lawful permanent residents of this country. Persons who may be eligible 
to adjust status under section 1104 of the LIFE Act and its Amendments 
are aliens who have filed for class membership with the Attorney 
General, before October 1, 2000, in one of three legalization lawsuits: 
(1) Catholic Social Services, Inc. v. Meese, vacated sub nom. Reno v. 
Catholic Social Services, Inc., 509 U.S. 43 (1993) (CSS); (2) League of 
United Latin American Citizens v. INS, vacated sub nom. Reno v. 
Catholic Social Services, Inc., 509 U.S. 43 (1993) (LULAC); or (3) 
Zambrano v. INS, vacated, 509 U.S. 918 (1993) (Zambrano). The interim 
rule provided a 1-year application period from June 1, 2001, to May 31, 
2002, for those aliens applying for adjustment of status pursuant to 
section 1104 of the LIFE Act. The interim rule also implemented section 
1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments by providing for a stay of removal and 
work authorization for certain spouses and unmarried children of those 
aliens eligible to adjust status under section 1104 of the LIFE Act.
    This rule provides final adoption of the interim rule, with certain 
amendments as appropriate. This final rule is necessary to ensure that 
those aliens eligible to apply for legalization benefits under the 
provisions of the LIFE Act and LIFE Act Amendments are able to do so 
within the application period. This final rule will provide definitive 
regulations for all applicants under section 1104 of the LIFE Act and 
section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments.

DATES: This final rule is effective June 4, 2002.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elizabeth N. Lee or Suzy Nguyen, 
Assistant Directors, Residence and Status Branch, Office of 
Adjudications, Immigration and Naturalization Service, 425 I Street NW, 
Room 3214, Washington, DC 20536, telephone (202) 514-3228.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On December 21, 2000, former President 
Clinton signed into law the LIFE Act, Title XI of H.R. 5548, enacted by 
reference in Public Law 106-553 (Dec. 21, 2000), and the LIFE Act 
Amendments, Title XV of H.R. 5666, enacted by reference in Public Law 
106-554 (Dec. 21, 2000), which provide for numerous different 
immigration benefits. Section 1104 of the LIFE Act and its Amendments 
(LIFE Legalization) allow certain eligible aliens to apply for 
adjustment of status to that of a lawful permanent resident (LPR) under 
a modified version of section 245A of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act (Act) (8 U.S.C. 1255a). Aliens who are eligible to apply for 
adjustment under LIFE Legalization are those who, before October 1, 
2000, had filed with the Attorney General a written claim for class 
membership in the CSS, LULAC, or Zambrano legalization class action 
lawsuits. In order to qualify for adjustment, aliens must establish 
that they entered the United States before January 1, 1982, and 
thereafter resided in continuous unlawful status through May 4, 1988. 
Aliens also must establish that they were continuously physically 
present in the United States from November 6, 1986, through May 4, 
1988. Furthermore, aliens must demonstrate basic citizenship skills. 
Finally, aliens must be otherwise admissible to the United States under 
the Act. LIFE Legalization also provides for a stay of removal or 
deportation and work authorization for eligible aliens under this law 
while their adjustment applications are pending.
    Section 1504 of the LIFE Act Amendments provides that the Attorney 
General may not remove certain spouses and children of aliens eligible 
to adjust under LIFE Legalization and shall grant employment 
authorization to those eligible spouses and children for the period of 
time in which they have been afforded Family Unity protection. Aliens 
who might benefit from the Family Unity provisions of the LIFE Act 
Amendments are those who:
    (1) Are currently in the United States;
    (2) Are the spouse or unmarried child of an alien who is eligible 
for adjustment under LIFE Legalization; and
    (3) Entered the United States before December 1, 1988, and were 
residing in the United States on such date.
    On June 1, 2001, the Attorney General published an interim rule in 
the Federal Register at 66 FR 29661. The Attorney General amended the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service (Service) regulations by adding 
Subparts B and C to 8 CFR part 245a. Subpart B implemented the LIFE 
Legalization provisions of the LIFE Act and Subpart C implemented the 
Family Unity provisions of the LIFE Act Amendments.
    The interim rule invited interested persons to provide written 
comments on or before July 31, 2001. The Service received 132 comments 
during the comment period and has carefully considered all these 
comments in formulating this final rule. The following is a discussion 
of the comments and the Service's response.

Comments relating to LIFE Legalization

Fees (8 CFR 103.7)

    Five commenters questioned the Service's imposition of a $330 
filing fee for LIFE Legalization applications. Many of these commenters 
argued that the Service disregarded the legislative intent that LIFE 
Legalization applicants be treated in the same manner that they would 
have been treated had they filed applications for legalization during 
the

[[Page 38342]]

initial application period.\1\ These commenters contended that any 
alien who is eligible to apply for LIFE Legalization would have been 
required to pay only a $185 filing fee during the Immigration Reform 
and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) legalization application period (the 
filing fee for the Form I-687, Application to Adjust Status as a 
Temporary Resident-Applicants, under section 245A of the INA). The 
Service appreciates that many commenters have concerns regarding what 
they perceive to be a substantial increase in filing fees for 
legalization benefits. The Service must note, however, that in addition 
to the $185 filing fee for the Form I-687, IRCA legalization applicants 
were required to pay an additional $120 filing fee when applying for 
LPR status (the filing fee for the Form I-698, Application to Adjust 
Status From Temporary to Permanent Resident). As such, IRCA 
legalization applicants paid filing fees totaling $305, just $25 less 
than the fee imposed by the Service on LIFE Legalization applicants in 
the interim rule.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ On November 6, 1986, former President Reagan signed into law 
the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA), Public Law 
99-603. Section 201 of IRCA created a ``legalization'' program under 
section 245A of the Act that allowed for certain aliens to apply for 
adjustment to temporary resident status, and later to LPR status. 
The legalization program had a 1-year application period that began 
on May 5, 1987, and ended on May 4, 1988.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    That being said, the Service has reconsidered the fee that will be 
imposed on LIFE Legalization applicants. As was discussed in the 
preamble to the interim rule (66 FR 29665, 29667-68), in developing 
fees, the Service must comply with guidance provided in the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-25. The Service referred to a 
preliminary draft of its most recent fee review--the FY 2000 
Immigration Examinations Fee Account Review--when determining the fee 
to be levied on LIFE Legalization applicants using the Form I-485, 
Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. That 
review conducted an in-depth analysis of both direct and indirect costs 
using an activity-based costing methodology. The draft of the fee 
review identified the full cost of the Form I-485 to be $330. Since 
publication of the interim rule, the Service has re-evaluated the FY 
2000 Immigration Examinations Fee Account Review and calculated the 
full cost of the Form I-485 to be $255 instead (see the Service's final 
rule published on December 21, 2001, at 66 FR 65811). Accordingly, the 
application fee for LIFE Legalization applicants is reduced to $255. 
Any individual who previously filed a LIFE Legalization application and 
paid the $330 filing fee will receive a refund in the amount of the 
difference ($75) from the Service. If an individual is due a refund, 
there is no reason or need for that individual to contact the Service; 
the refund will be generated without any action from the LIFE 
Legalization applicant.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ The Service anticipates that all refunds will be delivered 
by September 3, 2002. If an individual has not received his or 
refund by September 3, 2002, he or she should contact Lorraine 
Juiffre at 802-872-6200 ext. 3035.
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    Some commenters argued that members of the LULAC class action 
lawsuit were previously required to pay the original $185 filing fee 
and they should be credited this amount when filing for LIFE 
Legalization. The Service does not agree. The LIFE Act provides for 
certain class action applicants to apply, under a new procedure, for 
adjustment of status pursuant to section 245A of the Act. Any prior 
Form I-687 that may have been filed by these class action applicants 
has no bearing on any Form I-485 that may be filed pursuant to LIFE 
Legalization. This is a new program with new filing requirements. As 
such, all aliens applying for LIFE Legalization are subject to the 
imposition of the full $255 filing fee.
    Some commenters also criticized the Service's position that none of 
the fees collected from the filing of LIFE Legalization applications 
will be used in the enforcement of IRCA's anti-discrimination 
provisions. As was discussed in the supplementary information of the 
interim rule (66 FR 29662), section 245A(c)(7) of the Act provided for 
the allocation of up to $3 million of the application fees for section 
245A of the Act to immigration-related unfair employment practices 
programs. Section 1104(c)(6) of the LIFE Act specifically prohibits the 
use of any funds collected through this program to be used in such a 
manner. Consequently, the Service is statutorily prohibited from using 
any LIFE Legalization application fees for the enforcement of 
immigration-related unfair employment practices.

Definitions (8 CFR 245a.10)

    One commenter wanted the Service to amend the requirement that an 
applicant must establish he or she filed a written claim for class 
membership in CSS, LULAC, or Zambrano. Alternatively, this commenter 
argued that any applicants who had submitted a Form I-687 prior to the 
enactment of the LIFE Act should be considered by the Service to have 
already established prima facie eligibility, as well as continuous 
residence and physical presence requirements. In addition, the 
commenter argues that anyone who filed a Form I-687 prior to the 
enactment of the LIFE Act should not have to file a new application 
pursuant to the LIFE Act. The Service disagrees with these arguments. 
Sections 1104(b) and (c)(2) of the LIFE Act specifically require that 
LIFE Legalization applicants must have filed a written claim for class 
membership, and establish continuous unlawful residence and physical 
presence, basic citizenship skills, and admissibility as an immigrant. 
Furthermore, use of the Form I-687 has not been exclusively limited to 
the CSS, LULAC, and Zambrano lawsuits, and in some cases, the Form I-
687 was not required to be completely filled out or signed by the 
applicant. Therefore, the fact that an individual may have filed a Form 
I-687 does not alone establish prima facie eligibility for LIFE 
Legalization. The Service will not amend the final regulations in 
response to this comment.
    However, the Service has decided to establish a definition for 
``written claim for class membership.'' During the past 14 years, the 
courts have provided sufficient periods of time for aliens alleging 
class membership to come forward and notify the Attorney General that 
they believe that they meet the class definitions. Various forms of 
evidence that would prove notice to the Attorney General are listed in 
8 CFR 245a.14. The Service is adding to that list other forms of 
evidence which would have been issued pursuant to filing a claim for 
class membership. The Service is adding Form I-765, Application for 
Employment Authorization, submitted by an alien who filed for class 
membership, and an application for a stay of removal submitted by an 
alien who filed for class membership, and notes that the Service will 
also evaluate all relevant documents offered by the applicant to 
establish notice.

Aliens in Exclusion, Deportation, or Removal Proceedings (8 CFR 
245a.12(b)(1))

    Six commenters objected to the requirement of the concurrence of 
Service counsel before an immigration judge or the Board of Immigration 
Appeals may administratively close proceedings, arguing that no 
guidance is provided in the regulations as to when Service counsel will 
withhold such concurrence. Service counsel will withhold such 
concurrence if the alien is not prima facie eligible for legalization. 
Further guidance through the final regulations is not necessary. No

[[Page 38343]]

amendments to the final regulations will be made as a result of this 
comment.
    These same commenters pointed out that an alien with a final order 
receives an automatic stay of removal by filing an application for LIFE 
Legalization, and as such argued that concurrence by Service counsel in 
order to administratively close the matter of an alien currently in 
proceedings is pointless because the Service could not remove such 
alien in any event. The Service points to the distinction between 
administrative proceedings to determine removability and the actual 
removal of an alien. Should the Service counsel find an alien in 
proceedings to be prima facie ineligible for LIFE Legalization 
benefits, such matter will not be administratively closed. If the alien 
were ultimately ordered removed, such order will be stayed pending the 
final outcome of the adjudication of that LIFE Legalization application 
(see 8 CFR 245a.13(f)). The final regulations will not be amended in 
response to these comments.

Filing From Abroad (8 CFR 245a.12(c))

    One commenter stated that the Service regulations governing 
application for LIFE Legalization from abroad is not specific enough 
with regards to procedures such as fingerprinting, interviewing, and 
parole into the United States. As indicated in the interim regulations, 
the Service will provide the applicant who applies for LIFE 
Legalization from abroad with specific instructions after his or her 
application has been reviewed. The Service is coordinating efforts with 
other Federal agencies and American consulates abroad in order to 
accommodate applicants who file from abroad. Since there are many 
scenarios for an applicant from abroad (e.g., he or she may reside in 
an area with an overseas Service office, or in an area with only an 
American consulate, or in an area remote from either, etc.), the 
Service will provide each applicant with specific procedures that would 
best accommodate his or her situation and location. Further, any 
additional procedural guidelines regarding applications from abroad may 
be set via Service policy memos. As such, the final regulations will 
not be amended as a result of this comment.

Proof of Citizenship Skills (8 CFR 245a.12(d)(10))

    Five commenters suggested that the Service clarify that a LIFE 
Legalization applicant may submit proof that he or she is 
satisfactorily pursuing a course of study to achieve basic citizenship 
skills at any time during the application process. The commenters 
stated that the Form I-485 Supplement D, LIFE Legalization Supplement 
to Form I-485 Instructions, advised applicants that such evidence could 
be submitted at the time of application, subsequent to filing the 
application but before the Service interview, or at the time of Service 
interview. The Service has considered this comment and has made 
appropriate adjustments to the language at 8 CFR 245a.12(d)(10) to 
accommodate this suggestion.

Secondary Evidence (8 CFR 245a.12(g))

    Four commenters questioned the necessity of 8 CFR 245a.12(g). These 
commenters contended that the section in the interim regulations that 
described secondary evidence and the Service's acceptance of such 
evidence is redundant and unnecessary. Upon further review of this 
section of the interim regulations, the Service finds that much of the 
language contained in 8 CFR 245a.12(g) is indeed unnecessary, 
especially when much of that language is contained in 8 CFR 
103.2(b)(2). As such, the Service has adopted these commenters' 
suggestions and has amended the language at 8 CFR 245a.12(f) and (g).

Employment Authorization (8 CFR 245a.13(d)(2))

    Five commenters requested that the Service include a timeframe 
within which a Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, 
must be adjudicated. The Service does not believe that any regulatory 
language needs to be included in the final rule to address this issue. 
Employment authorization shall be granted to certain LIFE Legalization 
applicants pursuant to 8 CFR 274a.12(c)(24). The regulations at 8 CFR 
274a.13(d) provide that a Form I-765 filed pursuant to 8 CFR 274a.12(c) 
(with certain specific exceptions) be adjudicated within 90 days of 
receipt. These same regulations provide for the issuance of interim 
employment authorization if a Form I-765 is not adjudicated within 
those 90 days. In other words, if a LIFE Legalization applicant applies 
for, and is eligible for, employment authorization, and does not 
receive such employment authorization within 90 days of filing, he or 
she may request interim employment authorization at the Service 
district office having jurisdiction over his or her place of residence. 
In light of these existing regulations, the Service will not amend the 
regulations at 8 CFR 245a.13(d)(2).

Travel Authorization (8 CFR 245a.13(e))

    Four commenters expressed concern for the language at 8 CFR 
245a.13(e) relating to the issuance of advance parole. Specifically, 
these commenters were troubled that the interim rule at 8 CFR 
245a.13(e) indicated that the Service shall issue advance parole 
``pursuant to the standards prescribed in section 212(d)(5) of the 
Act.'' Section 212(d)(5) of the Act states, in pertinent part, that the 
``Attorney General may * * * parole [aliens] into the United States 
temporarily under such conditions as he may prescribe only on a case-
by-case basis for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public 
benefit.'' A review of this reference, especially in light of the 
language at 8 CFR 245a.13(e)(1) (which indicates that the Service shall 
approve applications for advance parole filed by any alien eligible for 
LIFE Legalization), does appear to be too stringent. Accordingly, the 
Service has amended the regulations in response to these commenters' 
concerns.
    One commenter questioned the Service's requirement that all 
requests for advance parole be submitted to the lockbox address in 
Chicago and adjudicated at the Missouri Service Center. The commenter 
indicated that this filing requirement could pose a problem for those 
LIFE Legalization applicants who have to travel abroad due to emergent 
circumstances. The Service appreciates this commenter's concern. 
Therefore, if a LIFE Legalization applicant must travel abroad due to 
reasons described in section 212(d)(5) of the Act, he or she will be 
allowed to file the Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, with 
the District Director having jurisdiction over his or her place of 
residence. Such an alien must demonstrate to the District Director that 
he or she is an eligible alien who has filed for adjustment of status 
pursuant to LIFE Legalization and that he or she must travel abroad due 
to urgent humanitarian reasons. All other Forms I-131 filed by LIFE 
Legalization applicants must be filed with the Director of the Missouri 
Service Center. The regulations have been amended accordingly.
    Four commenters argued that the interim rule placed an unauthorized 
evidentiary burden of proof on LIFE Legalization applicants who travel 
abroad without advance parole. Nothing in the interim rule affects the 
Service's adjudication of a LIFE Legalization application due to an 
applicant's travel abroad while the LIFE Legalization application is 
pending. Section

[[Page 38344]]

1104(c)(3)(B) of the LIFE Act states that ``the Attorney General shall, 
in accordance with regulations, permit the alien to return to the 
United States after such brief and casual trips abroad as reflect an 
intention on the part of the alien to adjust to lawful permanent 
resident status and after brief temporary trips abroad occasioned by a 
family obligation involving an occurrence such as the illness of a 
close relative or other family need.'' As the Act directed the Attorney 
General to issue regulations on the topic, 8 CFR 245a.13(e) was issued. 
Pursuant to 8 CFR 245a.13(e), an alien who travels abroad will be 
afforded the opportunity to establish the requirements of section 
1104(c)(3)(B) of the LIFE Act to the Service or to an immigration 
judge.
    In addition, the regulation at 8 CFR 245a.13(e)(1) permits each 
LIFE Legalization applicant to apply for advance parole. Through 8 CFR 
245a.13(e)(2) and (3), applicants are encouraged to do so, in two 
different ways. Under 8 CFR 245a.13(e)(2), an alien who goes abroad and 
returns under a grant of advance parole is presumed to be entitled to 
return under section 1104(c)(3)(B) of the LIFE Act unless the Service, 
having placed the alien in an expedited removal or section 240 of the 
Act proceeding, proves by a preponderance of the evidence that the 
alien is not eligible for adjustment pursuant to LIFE Legalization. If 
the alien goes abroad without obtaining advance parole, however, 8 CFR 
245a.13(e)(3) provides that the alien must be denied admission and may 
be removed, unless the alien establishes ``clearly and beyond doubt'' 
that he or she filed a timely LIFE Legalization application showing 
prima facie eligibility, and the alien's absence meets the requirements 
of section 1104(c)(3)(B) of the LIFE Act.
    These commenters object to the ``clearly and beyond doubt'' 
standard of proof for 8 CFR 245a.13(e)(3), believing that this standard 
is impermissibly burdensome on aliens. Section 235(b)(2) of the Act 
clearly states that the Service must deny admission to an applicant for 
admission, unless the alien is ``clearly and beyond doubt'' entitled to 
admission. The same standard of proof applies in section 240 of the Act 
proceedings against an applicant for admission (section 240(c)(2)(A) of 
the Act). Moreover, the Service, under 8 CFR 245a.13(e)(1), must grant 
advance parole to any advance parole applicant who makes a prima facie 
showing of LIFE Legalization eligibility.

Establishing Class Membership Application (8 CFR 245a.14)

    Some commenters stated that the Service should not require LIFE 
Legalization applicants to submit evidence that they applied for class 
membership. These commenters contended that the Service should have all 
of the necessary evidence in its databases and administrative files, 
and that requiring LIFE Legalization applicants to file this evidence 
is an unfair burden. The Service does believe that aliens who filed a 
written claim for class membership in CSS, LULAC, or Zambrano prior to 
October 1, 2000, will appear in the Service's databases as so 
registered. If for some reason, however, an applicant who did timely 
file for class membership does not appear in Service databases, then 
any documentary evidence of such filing provided by the applicant will 
be reviewed by the Service. If this documentary evidence is provided 
with the application, the Service will not need to request such 
evidence from the applicant, thereby expediting the application 
process. If the applicant does not have this documentary evidence in 
his or her possession, but believes that the Service has this evidence 
in the applicant's administrative file, the interim regulations at 8 
CFR 245a.12(g) provide that applicants could submit a statement to that 
effect in lieu of the actual documentation. This language has been 
moved to 8 CFR 245a.12(f) in the final regulations. The Service is not 
amending the language in the final rule in response to these comments.
    Two commenters requested that the Service accept affidavits, 
letters, and documents from community agencies as evidence of class 
membership application. It is noted that the interim regulations at 8 
CFR 245a.14(e) (8 CFR 245a.14(g) in the final regulations) permit LIFE 
Legalization applicants to submit ``[a]ny other relevant document(s)'' 
in proving class membership application along with those listed under 8 
CFR 245a.14(a) through (d) (8 CFR 245a.14(a) through (f) in the final 
regulations). This regulatory language does not limit the type of 
documentation that may be submitted to prove class member application. 
The Service believes the inclusion of this phrase (other relevant 
documents) creates a practical, as well as an expansive, definition 
that encompasses all types of evidence, including those discussed by 
the commenters. As the Service's interim rule does allow for the 
submission of the above-mentioned documents, the Service will not amend 
the regulations in response to these comments.
    In addition, the Service clarifies that, where an alien filed a 
written claim for class membership, he or she is deemed to have also 
filed a claim for class membership on behalf of a spouse or child who 
was a spouse or child as of the date the alien (who filed a written 
claim for class membership) alleges that he or she attempted to file or 
was discouraged from filing an application for legalization during the 
original application period. Thus, the definition of ``eligible alien'' 
is amended to include a spouse or child who was a spouse or child as of 
the date the alien (who filed a written claim for class membership) 
alleges that he or she attempted to file or was discouraged from filing 
an application for legalization during the original application period. 
This in no way implies that such spouses and children will derive 
adjustment of status based on the LIFE Legalization application of the 
alien who filed a written claim for class membership. Rather, the 
spouse or child of the alien who filed the claim for class membership 
will also be considered to be an ``eligible alien'' who may file a 
separate application for LIFE Legalization that will be adjudicated 
based on the merits of such alien's documentation.

Continuous Residence (8 CFR 245a.15)

    Many commenters expressed concern over the Service's requirement 
that LIFE Legalization applicants produce evidence of their continuous 
residence in an unlawful manner prior to January 1, 1982, through May 
4, 1988. Several commenters cited the great length of time that has 
passed since 1982, while others cited LIFE Legalization applicants' 
unlawful status and fear of discovery, as possible reasons for not 
having evidence of their residence during this time period. The Service 
recognizes that LIFE Legalization applicants will be required to 
produce documents dated nearly 20 years ago. Because section 
1104(c)(2)(B) of the LIFE Act imposes this continuous residence 
requirement, however, the Service will continue to require LIFE 
Legalization applicants to document their residence in the United 
States during the requisite time period.
    One commenter suggested that an alien's departure between January 
1, 1982, and May 4, 1988, under an order of deportation should not 
interrupt the alien's continuous residence. The statute clearly 
provides that departure while a deportation order is in effect ends 
``continuous residence''; section 245A(g)(2)(B)(i) of the Act states 
that

[[Page 38345]]

``an alien shall not be considered to have resided continuously in the 
United States if, during any period for which continuous residence is 
required, the alien was outside the United States as a result of a 
departure under an order of deportation.'' No provision of the LIFE Act 
revoked this section of the Act. As such, the Service will not amend 
the final regulations in response to this comment.
    One commenter requested clarification of the language at 8 CFR 
245a.15(d). This commenter questioned the use of the word ``eligible'' 
in the following sentence: ``The following categories of aliens, who 
are otherwise eligible to adjust to LPR status pursuant to LIFE 
Legalization, may file for adjustment of status provided they resided 
continuously in the United States in an unlawful status since prior to 
January 1, 1982, through May 4, 1988.'' The Service has reviewed this 
sentence and is confident of its wording. The paragraphs following the 
sentence quoted above list those categories of nonimmigrants who might 
be able to establish unlawful residence in the United States. If an 
alien falls into one of these categories of nonimmigrants, and meets 
the other eligibility requirements of LIFE Legalization (i.e., he or 
she applied for class membership in one of the three class action 
lawsuits prior to October 1, 2000, he or she is admissible as an 
immigrant, he or she has not been convicted of a felony or of three or 
more misdemeanors, etc.), then he or she may file for adjustment of 
status pursuant to LIFE Legalization. The Service will not amend the 
final regulations in response to this comment.

Continuous Physical Presence (8 CFR 245a.16)

    Six commenters argued that the standards set out in 8 CFR 
245a.16(b) regarding brief, casual, and innocent absences in relation 
to the continuous physical presence requirement did not allow for case-
by-case adjudication. It was never the intent in the interim rule to 
set out a categorical definition of brief, casual, and innocent 
absences. The numerical standards were placed in the interim rule to 
serve as a guide to adjudicators. If the number of days the applicant 
was absent from the United States fell below the guidelines, the 
adjudicator need look no further. If the applicant's trip was greater 
than 30 days or an aggregate of 90 days, the applicant could provide 
reasons for why his or her return could not be accomplished within the 
time period(s) allowed. As such, a case-by-case adjudication is 
necessitated by the interim rule. Given the misinterpretation by these 
commenters, however, the Service will amend 8 CFR 245a.16(b) to remove 
the standards. Applicants should now be prepared to offer evidence 
establishing that absences of any period of time were brief, casual, 
and innocent.
    One commenter stated that the regulations at 8 CFR 245a.16(a) would 
prevent the submission of Social Security Administration (SSA) or 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) printouts as evidence of continuous 
physical presence. The regulations read, in pertinent part, that 
evidence ``may consist of any documentation issued by any governmental 
or nongovernmental authority, provided such evidence bears the name of 
the applicant, was dated at the time it was issued, and bears the 
signature, seal, or other authenticating instrument of the authorized 
representative of the issuing authority.'' The Service does not believe 
this language would prevent the submission of SSA or IRS printouts, 
provided these printouts bear the name of the applicant, are dated at 
the time they are issued (i.e., when they are printed out by the 
issuing agency), and are appropriately endorsed by the issuing agency. 
The Service will not amend the regulations in response to these 
comments.

Grounds of Inadmissibility (8 CFR 245a.18)

    Many commenters were concerned about individuals who have 
contracted a communicable disease of public health significance. LIFE 
Legalization applicants, like all other applicants for admission to the 
United States, must be able to establish their admissibility pursuant 
to section 212(a) of the Act. If a LIFE Legalization applicant is found 
inadmissible based on any of the health-related grounds described at 
section 212(a)(1) of the Act, he or she may file for a waiver of these 
grounds of inadmissibility. The interim rule does not prohibit this. 
Consequently, the Service will not amend the regulations based on these 
comments.
    Six commenters stated that the interim rule did not take into 
account the fact that many LIFE Legalization applicants have not been 
entitled to employment authorization and therefore may not be able to 
demonstrate consistent employment history. In this context, the 
application of the phrase ``history of employment'' is statutory and is 
found in the Special Rule for Determination of Public Charge at section 
245A(d)(2)(B)(iii) of the Act. The statutory Special Rule is found in 
IRCA and is incorporated by reference in the LIFE Act. The Service 
believes that the statutory Special Rule is meant to assist a 
legalization applicant to prevent a finding of being inadmissible on 
public charge grounds.
    One commenter argues that IRCA and the LIFE Act require that an 
applicant demonstrate that he or she is not likely to become a public 
charge; that the LIFE Act interim rule provides that an alien with a 
consistent employment history is not inadmissible; and that, if the 
adjudication took place during the original application period (May 5, 
1987, to May 4, 1988), the determination of whether a given class 
member was likely to become a public charge would have taken place when 
there ``was no legal bar to class members working in the United States, 
see 8 U.S.C. 1324a.'' This commenter fails to note that the 
``employment history'' is derived from the statutory Special Rule, and 
that employer sanctions provisions were enacted in IRCA on November 6, 
1986. Again, both IRCA and the LIFE Act require that an alien prove 
that he or she is not likely to become a public charge, clearly a 
prospective analysis. Both statutes contain the same ``Special Rule'' 
to be applied in the public charge analysis and both use the standard 
of demonstrating ``employment history'' to overcome a finding that one 
is likely to become a public charge.
    Nevertheless, the Service has decided to amend 8 CFR 245a.18. The 
Service is adding language to the regulations regarding the 
adjudication of public charge for a LIFE Legalization applicant. In 
adjudicating the issue of public charge, the Service will automatically 
apply the Special Rule. Adjudicating whether one is likely to become a 
public charge is necessarily a prospective analysis. The Special Rule 
provides for a retrospective analysis in determining the prospect of 
becoming a public charge. Accordingly, the Service will take into 
account an alien's employment history in the United States, to include 
the period prior to the 1986 advent of employer sanctions. Additional 
language in the regulation will encourage applicants to submit as much 
information as possible in order to preclude a public charge finding. 
The analysis will be on a case-by-case basis and will permit the 
applicant to prove financial responsibility pursuant to any number of 
ways, to include pointing to the ability to have a sponsor file a Form 
I-134, Affidavit of Support, on the applicant's behalf. Anyone can be 
the sponsor for the Form I-134.

Interviews (8 CFR 245a.19)

    Four commenters stated that the interim rule regarding the 
interviewing of LIFE Legalization applicants implied that they would 
not be interviewed by

[[Page 38346]]

an immigration officer in their jurisdiction. The Service did not 
intend to convey this message through the interim rule. The interim 
rule at 8 CFR 245a.19(a) stated that ``[a]pplicants will be interviewed 
by an immigration officer as determined by the Director of the Missouri 
Service Center.'' All LIFE Legalization applicants who applied for 
adjustment of status from within the United States, and who must appear 
for a Service interview, will be interviewed by a Service officer at 
the Service office with jurisdiction over their place of residence. 
Those LIFE Legalization applicants who applied for adjustment of status 
from abroad, and who must appear for a Service interview, will be 
interviewed by a Service officer as determined by the Director of the 
Missouri Service Center. The Service does not, therefore, believe that 
the final regulations must be amended in response to these comments.
    One commenter requested that the Service not require interviews of 
LIFE Legalization applicants. This commenter argued that many LIFE 
Legalization applicants had already been interviewed when they applied 
for class membership in one of the three class action lawsuits. While 
some applicants may not be required to establish basic citizenship 
skills because they meet one of the listed exceptions, or they have met 
the requirements in some other fashion (obtained a GED or are enrolled 
in an acceptable learning program), there will be many LIFE 
Legalization applicants who will be required to pass a basic 
citizenship test at the time of his or her Service interview. Further, 
in-person interviews are useful to both the Service officer and the 
applicant. It provides an opportunity for any inconsistencies or gaps 
in the application to be resolved in a timely manner without having to 
resort to correspondence through the mail. Moreover, there will be 
instances where an in-person interview will be necessary because 
shortcomings or discrepancies in an applicant's file cannot be resolved 
through correspondence (e.g., an applicant does not have sufficient 
documentation to establish continuous physical presence, but is able to 
convince a Service officer at an in-person interview that he or she was 
physically present in the United States). Accordingly, the regulations 
will not be amended.

Decisions and Appeals (8 CFR 245a.20)

    Four commenters requested that the Service's final rule provide for 
the issuance of a notice of intent to deny prior to the denial of any 
LIFE Legalization application. The interim rule at 8 CFR 245a.20(a)(2) 
does provide for the notification of a LIFE Legalization applicant if 
the Service intends to deny his or her application based upon 
information of which the applicant was not aware. The Service does 
recognize that applicants who filed for legalization under IRCA did 
receive a ``Notice of Intent to Deny'' prior to the issuance of a 
denial that clearly notified the applicant of the Service's intent to 
deny his or her application. While the Service has been and will be 
following this same procedure for LIFE Legalization applicants, it 
recognizes that this intention is not clearly delineated in the 
regulations as presently drafted. As such, the Service has made an 
amendment to the language at 8 CFR 245a.20(a)(2) in response to these 
commenters' concerns.
    These same commenters also requested that the Service expressly 
state that all LIFE Legalization applicants whose applications are 
denied may appeal their decisions to the Administrative Appeals Office. 
The interim rule at 8 CFR 245a.20(a)(2) clearly states that ``a party 
affected under this part by an adverse decision is entitled to file an 
appeal . . . to the Administrative Appeals Unit.'' The Service believes 
that the interim rule is quite clear that all decisions of denial 
issued pursuant to LIFE Legalization may be appealed. As such, the 
Service makes no changes pursuant to these comments.

Producing Supporting Documentary Evidence

    Many commenters stated that they had already submitted all required 
evidence in support of their claims to eligibility for legalization. 
Commenters also expressed concern over what could be a lengthy 
processing time for any Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to 
obtain these documents, and then presumably submit them in support of 
their LIFE Legalization applications. The Service acknowledges that 
there is a designated time period in which to apply for LIFE 
Legalization and, therefore, all FOIA requests for records of LIFE 
Legalization applicants will be expeditiously handled. The Service 
wishes to reiterate that the interim rule at 8 CFR 245a.12(g) advised 
applicants that, in lieu of the actual documentation, they could submit 
a statement indicating that supporting documentation is already 
contained in the Service's records. This language will be moved to 8 
CFR 245a.12(f) in the final rule. Also, the Service will be reviewing 
all previously created administrative files associated with LIFE 
Legalization applicants.

Regulatory Changes Deemed Necessary by the Service

    The interim rule at 8 CFR 245a.12(d)(2) instructed LIFE 
Legalization applicants to submit a $25 fingerprinting fee if they are 
between the ages of 14 and 75. Currently, all other applicants for 
adjustment of status must be fingerprinted if they are between the ages 
of 14 and 79, inclusive. Upon further consideration, the Service will 
require all LIFE Legalization applicants between the ages of 14 and 79 
to be fingerprinted. This change will bring the fingerprinting 
requirements for LIFE Legalization applicants into alignment with the 
fingerprinting requirements for all other applicants for adjustment of 
status. LIFE Legalization applicants should be aware that the December 
21, 2001, final rule at 66 FR 65811 raised the fingerprint fee from $25 
to $50. LIFE Legalization applicants are subject to this higher fee.
    The interim rule at 8 CFR 245a.17(c) provided exceptions for 
certain LIFE Legalization applicants to the establishment of basic 
citizenship skills. This final rule will clarify that the age exception 
(being 65 years of age or older) must be met at the time the 
application for adjustment of status is filed. Section 
1104(c)(2)(E)(i)(I) of the LIFE Act requires that LIFE Legalization 
applicants meet the requirements of section 312(a) of the Act. Sections 
312(b) and (c) of the Act provide for exceptions to the naturalization 
citizenship skills if certain criteria are met as of the date of 
filing. The implementing regulations at 8 CFR 312.1(b) and 312.2(b) 
also indicate that a person must meet the age requirement in order to 
meet these exceptions as of the date of filing. Accordingly, the 
Service will require that any exceptions to the basic citizenship 
skills requirements based on age must be met at the time of filing.
    Section 1104(c)(2)(D)(i) of the LIFE Act provides that an alien 
must establish that he or she is admissible to the United States as an 
immigrant except as otherwise provided under section 245A(d)(2) of the 
Act. Section 245A(d)(2) of the Act references waivers of grounds of 
exclusion. In particular, section 245A(d)(2)(B)(ii)(II) of the Act 
references in what capacity section 212(a)(2)(C) of the Act may not be 
waived. The Service sees a conflict between section 
245A(d)(2)(B)(ii)(II) of the Act and section 212(a)(2)(C) of the Act. 
When originally enacted, IRCA contained a similar admissibility 
provision at section 245A(d)(2) of the Act barring the waiver of 
certain

[[Page 38347]]

grounds in the then-existing section 212 of the Act. However, section 
245A(d)(2) of the Act was amended by section 603(a)(13)(D) of the 
Immigration Act of 1990 (IMMACT 90) (Public Law 101-649) to comport 
with the related changes to section 212 of the Act. Specifically, 
section 245A(d)(2)(B)(ii)(II) of the Act was amended by IMMACT 90 to 
remove the reference to pre-IMMACT 90 section 212(a)(23) of the Act 
(relating to a controlled substance and trafficking in controlled 
substance), insert a reference to section 212(a)(2)(C) of the Act, but 
retain the exception (so much of such paragraph as relates to a single 
offense of simple possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana). What 
would correlate to the pre-IMMACT 90 section 212(a)(23)(A) of the Act 
is now listed at section 212(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Act and would thus be 
referenced at section 245A(d)(2)(B)(ii)(I) of the Act. By its express 
terms, the exception pertains to ``simple possession'' and as such the 
Service makes the interpretation that the exception must be applied to 
the grounds listed at section 212(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Act and amends 
the regulations accordingly.
    The application period is established by section 1104(c)(2)(A) of 
the LIFE Act as ``the 12-month period beginning on the date on which 
the Attorney General issues final regulations to implement this 
section.'' Given the number of clarifications provided in this final 
rule and in keeping with congressional intent to permit eligible aliens 
an opportunity to apply and to end the litigation, the Service has 
decided to end the application period 1 year from publication of this 
final rule in the Federal Register. As such, the application period 
commenced with the publication of the interim rule, June 1, 2001, and 
will end on June 4, 2003.

Congressional Intent To End Litigation

    In enacting the provisions for LIFE Legalization, Congress sought 
to bring an end to the litigation and to permit eligible class members 
to apply for legalization under section 245A of the Act. Senators 
Kennedy and Abraham stated that ``the LIFE Act * * * directs the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to adjudicate the 
applications of individuals in * * * lawsuits on the merits, rather 
than continuing to litigate whether they were timely filed.'' 146 Cong. 
Rec. S11, 850-02, Exhibit 2 (daily ed. Dec. 15, 2000) (Joint Memorandum 
Concerning the Legal Immigration Family Equity Act of 2000 and The LIFE 
Act Amendments of 2000). Moreover, the Government has represented to 
Federal courts its willingness to accept applications of any alien who 
alleges he or she was ``front-desked.''\3\ The Service had set up a 
Front-Desking Legalization Questionnaire Program so as to permit any 
alien who established that he or she was ``front-desked'' to apply for 
legalization. Prior to the expiration of the Front-Desking Legalization 
Questionnaire Program, Congress enacted the LIFE Act establishing a new 
application period for the three identified class actions (CSS, LULAC, 
and Zambrano). In Reno v. Catholic Social Services, 509 U.S. 43, 67 
n.28 (1993), the Supreme Court left open the possibility that an alien 
who was not ``front-desked'' could show that the ``front-desking 
policy'' was a ``substantial cause'' of their failure to apply. In the 
LIFE Act, Congress provides benefits for, and identifies to the 
Attorney General, three lawsuits that include claims not only of aliens 
who allege that they were ``front-desked'' but also of aliens who claim 
that they were discouraged.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ There are certain aliens who claimed that they attempted to 
physically tender an application for legalization with a fee during 
the 1-year IRCA application period, at a Service office, but had 
that application rejected by the Service for filing. This is 
commonly referred to as having had an application ``front-desked.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The difference in requirements between IRCA and LIFE 245A 
provisions regarding the continuous unlawful residence requirement 
could produce results inconsistent with the above goal. In the 
abstract, a class member may not be able to meet the LIFE Act 
requirement but may be able to meet the IRCA requirement. Under IRCA, 
applicants must establish that they resided continuously in the United 
States in an unlawful status from before January 1, 1982, to the date 
they applied for legalization (section 245A(a)(2)(A)). The Supreme 
Court indicated that class members ``applied'' for legalization at the 
time they were ``front-desked.'' See Reno, Id. Under the LIFE Act, 
however, aliens must establish that they resided continuously in the 
United States in an unlawful status before January 1, 1982, to May 4, 
1988 (section 1104(c)(2)(B) of the LIFE Act).
    Similarly, the continuous physical presence requirement is 
different in the two statutes. Specifically, IRCA required applicants 
to prove continuous physical presence in the United States since 
November 6, 1986 (section 245A(a)(3)(A) of the Act). Service 
regulations allowed that the applicant's obligation to prove continuous 
physical presence from November 6, 1986, ran only to the date of 
application (8 CFR 245a.2(b)(1)). The LIFE Act, however, requires all 
applicants to prove continuous physical presence from November 6, 1986, 
to May 4, 1988. Thus, the LIFE Act's legalization provisions do not aid 
class members who allege they interrupted their continuous physical 
presence after being ``front-desked'' or discouraged.
    The Joint Memorandum states that ``nothing in this legislation is 
intended to preclude this option, or to preclude the Attorney General 
from resolving any other IRCA adjustment applications on the merits.'' 
Thus, to facilitate congressional intent, and in accordance with the 
Supreme Court decision and the Government's commitment, the Service has 
decided to add to the final rule a provision whereby the Service will 
adjudicate a LIFE Act application as an application under the standards 
of section 245A of the Act (that is, under the pre-LIFE Act standards) 
if the applicant is eligible for such relief under section 245A of the 
Act but not under section 1104 of the LIFE Act.
    For example, if an alien fails to meet the continuous unlawful 
residence requirement pursuant to section 1104(c)(2)(B) of the LIFE 
Act, the Service will apply the continuous unlawful residence 
requirement using section 245A(a)(2)(A) of the Act and deem the ``date 
the application is filed'' to be the date the applicant establishes 
that he or she was ``front-desked'' or discouraged from filing. If the 
alien then meets the continuous unlawful resident requirement at 
section 245A(a)(2)(A) of the Act, and all other legalization 
requirements under section 245A of the Act, such an alien shall be 
granted temporary resident status pursuant to IRCA. Such an alien would 
then be required to follow all requirements set forth in 8 CFR 245a, 
Subpart A, such as filing a Form I-698, Application to Adjust Status 
from Temporary to Permanent Resident, in order to adjust his or her 
resident status from temporary to permanent.

Comments Relating to LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity Provisions

Aging Out (8 CFR 245a.31)

    The majority of commenters requested that the Service reconsider 
its position on children of LIFE Legalization applicants who reach the 
age of 21. As was discussed in the interim rule, section 1504(b) of the 
LIFE Act Amendments describes an eligible child as an alien who ``is'' 
the unmarried child of an alien described in section 1104(b) of the 
LIFE Act. The statutory language of the Family Unity provisions of the 
LIFE Act Amendments do not permit Family Unity protection to be 
extended to aliens who were children

[[Page 38348]]

on December 21, 2000, but who ``age-out'' of the Act's definition of 
child by virtue of reaching their 21st birthday before their Family 
Unity applications are adjudicated. Given the need to implement an 
interpretation of the statute that is consistent as it applies to both 
spouses and children, and in view of the interpretation of other 
provisions of the immigration laws relating to a child who ``ages-out'' 
upon reaching the age of 21, the Service interprets section 1504(b) of 
the LIFE Act Amendments to require the requisite familial status (the 
spousal or parent-child relationship) both at the time when the 
application for Family Unity benefits is adjudicated and thereafter. If 
the familial status does not exist at the time of adjudication, the 
alien will not be eligible for Family Unity benefits. If the status as 
a spouse or child exists at the time of adjudication, but ceases to 
exist thereafter, the alien will no longer be eligible for Family Unity 
benefits. Similarly, an alien who ceases to be an unmarried child 
because of the alien's marriage is no longer eligible. Given the 
statutory constraints imposed by the LIFE Act Amendments, the Service 
is unable to adopt these commenters' suggestion to ``freeze'' the age 
of a child as of the date of enactment of the LIFE Act Amendments 
(December 21, 2000).
    One commenter argued that it would be proper for the Service to 
continue to grant LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity protection to 
unmarried adult sons and daughters of LIFE Legalization beneficiaries 
while denying similar protection to divorced spouses and married 
children of such beneficiaries. The commenter reasoned that, unlike 
divorced spouses and married children who have no means of receiving an 
immigrant visa or adjusting to LPR status through an alien who has 
adjusted to LPR status pursuant to LIFE Legalization, the unmarried son 
or daughter of such a LPR may be granted immigrant status based on that 
relationship. The Service appreciates this comparison; however, section 
1504(b) of the LIFE Act Amendments specifically limits protection to 
``an alien who is the spouse or unmarried child of an alien described 
in section 1104(b) of the [LIFE] Act.'' Had Congress intended to shield 
unmarried sons and daughters from aging out of LIFE Act Amendments 
Family Unity protection, it could have drafted section 1504 more in 
line with section 301 of the Immigration Act of 1990 (IMMACT 90), the 
provision that authorized the pre-existing Family Unity Program (FUP). 
Section 301 establishes a link between eligibility for immigrant status 
and continued eligibility for Family Unity protection by providing that 
the requisite family relationship had to have been established by a 
specific date and that the alien otherwise be a ``qualified 
immigrant'', which the Service has interpreted to mean continuously 
eligible for immigrant status based upon his or her relationship to a 
legalized alien. See, 8 CFR 236.12(a)(2). In the absence of similar 
language, the Service must treat LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity 
applicants consistently within the existing statutory definitions of 
child and spouse and therefore cannot adopt this commenter's 
suggestion.
    Other commenters requested that the Service allow for Family Unity 
benefits to continue to be granted to spouses of LIFE Legalization 
applicants even if the marriage ends in divorce. Again, section 1504(b) 
of the LIFE Act Amendments specifically states that an eligible spouse 
or child ``is the spouse or unmarried child of an alien described in 
section 1104(b) of the [LIFE] Act.'' The Service is, therefore, unable 
to grant Family Unity benefits to former spouses of LIFE Legalization 
applicants.
    Some commenters argued that once the principal alien has adjusted 
to LPR status under section 1104 of the LIFE Act, his or her family 
members may qualify for the same benefits as those aliens who benefit 
from the FUP established by section 301 of IMMACT 90. Section 301 of 
IMMACT 90 provides Family Unity benefits to the spouses and children of 
legalized aliens. Section 301(b)(2)(B) of IMMACT 90 defined legalized 
aliens as aliens who adjusted to temporary or permanent resident status 
pursuant to section 245A of the Act. The FUP applicants were required 
to establish entry into the United States before May 5, 1988, residence 
on that date, continuous residence in the United States since that 
date, and that a qualifying relationship with the legalized alien 
existed as of May 5, 1988 (8 CFR 236.12). Thus, the old FUP focused on 
unifying families that were in existence as of May 5, 1988. 
Beneficiaries of FUP protection do not automatically ``age-out'' upon 
turning 21, assuming that they are still eligible for family sponsored 
immigration status based upon his or her relationship to the legalized 
alien. These commenters argued that LIFE Legalization applicants may 
ultimately adjust to LPR status pursuant to section 245A of the Act, 
and, accordingly, their family members should be entitled to the 
benefits of the FUP under section 301 of IMMACT 90.
    Section 301 of IMMACT 90 provides Family Unity benefits to the 
relatives of aliens who adjust status under the terms of section 245A 
of the Act as established by IRCA. Section 1504 of the LIFE Act 
Amendments provides Family Unity benefits to the relatives of aliens 
who adjust status under the terms of section 245A of the Act as 
modified by section 1104 of the LIFE Act. Section 1504(b) of the LIFE 
Act Amendments defines those relatives eligible for Family Unity 
benefits as the ``spouse or unmarried child of an alien described in 
section 1104(b) of the [LIFE] Act.'' Section 1504(c) of the LIFE Act 
Amendments provides for the parole of eligible relatives into the 
United States if the principal alien ``has obtained lawful permanent 
resident status under section 1104 of the [LIFE] Act.'' It is clear 
that Congress established a family unity program for the relatives of 
the LIFE Legalization beneficiaries that is separate and apart from the 
FUP established for the relatives of IRCA Legalization beneficiaries.
    However, it must be noted that, given the decision to permit the 
conversion of a LIFE Legalization application to an application for 
IRCA legalization where such standards are more favorable to the 
applicant, it follows that if the principal alien's LIFE Legalization 
application is treated as an application under IRCA, then his or her 
family members, if eligible, may apply for Family Unity benefits under 
section 301 of IMMACT 90.

Filing and Decisions (8 CFR 245a.33)

    Four commenters noted that the interim rule failed to implement 
section 1504(c) of the LIFE Act Amendments allowing for the application 
for Family Unity benefits from outside the United States. The Service 
is drafting a proposed rule on the LIFE Act Amendments Family Unity 
provisions that will cover these areas of concern and, accordingly, 
they will not be addressed in this rulemaking.
    One commenter requested that the Service allow for the appeal of 
denials of applications for Family Unity benefits. This commenter 
stated that allowing applicants to reapply for Family Unity benefits 
subsequent to a denial for Family Unity benefits is not sufficient and 
that there must be an allowance for higher-level review of denied 
applications. First, there is no statutory instruction to create such a 
procedure within the Family Unity provisions of the LIFE Act 
Amendments. Second, 8 CFR 245a.33(c) provides an automatic 90-day delay 
between the denial of an alien's Form I-817 and the referral of the 
decision for enforcement action. This delay is designed to create an 
opportunity for renewed consideration of the alien's

[[Page 38349]]

claim to benefits under a process that will likely prove faster than 
the appeal procedure would have been. The Service has, therefore, 
concluded that the benefits of the more streamlined re-application 
process outweigh those of the proposed administrative appeal procedure 
and has not adopted this suggestion.
    This same commenter further requested that the Service provide 
Family Unity applicants the same confidentiality provisions afforded 
applicants for LIFE Legalization. This commenter expressed concern that 
applicants seeking Family Unity benefits may subject themselves to 
removal proceedings should their Forms I-817 be denied. Again, while 
section 1104 of the LIFE Act does provide specific confidentiality 
provisions with regards to legalization applicants, section 1504 of the 
LIFE Act Amendments provides no such confidentiality provisions. 
Consequently, no amendments to the final rule will be made as a result 
of this comment.

Duration of Family Unity Benefits (8 CFR 245a.34)

    One commenter requested that the Service clarify the length of time 
Family Unity benefits will be granted to eligible family members. This 
commenter stated that while it appeared Family Unity benefits would be 
granted in increments of 1 year, this was not explicit in the interim 
rule. This commenter also stated that Family Unity benefits should be 
granted in increments of 2 years, to mirror the existing FUP (whose 
beneficiaries receive 2-year periods of protection). Applicants for 
LIFE Legalization receive employment authorization valid for 1-year 
periods. The Service believes that any family members who derive Family 
Unity benefits based on the principal alien's application for LIFE 
Legalization should not receive employment authorization for longer 
periods than the principal alien. Therefore, the interim rule provided 
that any Family Unity beneficiary who received Family Unity benefits 
based on the principal alien's pending application for LIFE 
Legalization would receive Family Unity benefits only in increments of 
1 year. Upon further consideration, however, the Service has decided to 
grant Family Unity benefits in increments of 2 years once the principal 
alien has adjusted to LPR status. The final rule is amended 
accordingly.
    The Service has also reconsidered the duration of Family Unity 
benefits that will be granted to the children of LIFE Legalization 
applicants. If an alien is 20 years or older and applies for initial, 
or an extension of, Family Unity benefits based on his or her parent's 
pending application for LIFE Legalization, he or she will be granted 
Family Unity benefits that will end on the day before the alien turns 
21 years of age. If an alien is 19 years or older and applies for 
initial, or an extension of, Family Unity benefits pursuant to the LIFE 
Act Amendments based on his or her parent's adjustment to LPR status 
pursuant to LIFE Legalization, he or she will be granted Family Unity 
benefits that will end on the day before the alien turns 21 years of 
age. This will prevent a situation where the Service will be required 
to terminate Family Unity benefits when the child ages-out. This has 
been codified in the final rule.

Congressional Review Act

    Although this rule constitutes a ``major rule'' as that term is 
defined in 5 U.S.C. 804(2)(A), the Department finds that under 5 U.S.C. 
808(2) good cause exists for implementation of this rule on June 4, 
2002. The reason for immediate implementation is as follows: The 
provisions of Public Law 106-553 require that the Service provide a 
one-year application period for LIFE Legalization applicants. The 
regulations implemented by the interim rule published on June 1, 2001, 
provided that the one-year application period would expire on May 31, 
2002. Making this rule effective immediately upon publication in the 
Federal Register is necessary to ensure that the new one-year 
application period will begin before the one year application period 
under the interim rule ends. Allowing a gap between the two application 
periods would create confusion and thus be contrary to the public 
interest.

Administrative Procedure Act

    For the reasons just stated with respect to the Congressional 
Review Act, the Department also finds that this regulation falls within 
the ``good cause'' exception found at 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3). Delaying 
implementation of this final rule would be contrary to the public 
interest.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Attorney General, in accordance with the Regulatory Flexibility 
Act (5 U.S.C. 605(b)), has reviewed this regulation and, by approving 
it, certifies that this rule will not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities because of the 
following factors. This rule applies to individuals, not small 
entities, and allows certain class action participants who entered 
before January 1, 1982, to apply for adjustment of status. It therefore 
has no effect on small entities as that term is defined in 5 U.S.C. 
601(6).

Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995

    This rule will not result in the expenditure by State, local, and 
tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 
million or more in any one year, and it will not significantly or 
uniquely effect small governments. Therefore, no actions were deemed 
necessary under the provisions of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 
1995.

Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996

    This rule is a major rule as defined by section 251 of the Small 
Business Regulatory Enforcement Act of 1996 (5 U.S.C. 804). This rule 
will result in an effect on the economy of:

$43,293,000 for 2001;
$152,195,875 for 2002; and
$37,920,000 for 2003.

    This increase is directly associated with the expected increase in 
the number of applications as a result of Public Laws 106-553 and 106-
554, and the increase in fee that is provided for in section 245A(c)(7) 
of the Act (8 U.S.C. 1255a(c)(7)). The Service estimates that in fiscal 
year 2001, a total of 263,000 applications have been submitted because 
of the LIFE Act Legalization and Family Unity provisions as follows:

100,000 Forms I-485;
50,000 Forms I-131;
5,000 Forms I-193;
100,000 Forms I-765; and
8,000 Forms I-817.

    The Service projects that in fiscal year 2002, a total of 894,000 
applications will be submitted as follows:

300,000 Forms I-485;
155,000 Forms I-131;
15,000 Forms I-193;
400,000 Forms I-765; and
24,000 Forms I-817.

    The Service projects that in fiscal year 2003, a total of 328,000 
applications will be submitted as follows:

100,000 Forms I-130;
20,000 Forms I-131;
200,000 Forms I-765; and
8,000 Forms I-817.

Executive Order 12866

    This rule is considered by the Department of Justice to be a 
``significant regulatory action'' under Executive Order 12866, section 
3(f), Regulatory Planning and Review. Accordingly, this rule has been

[[Page 38350]]

submitted to the Office of Management and Budget for review.

Executive Order 13132

    This rule will not have substantial direct effects on the States, 
on the relationship between the National Government and the States, or 
on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various 
levels of government. Therefore, in accordance with section 6 of 
Executive Order 13132, it is determined that this rule does not have 
sufficient federalism implications to warrant the preparation of a 
federalism summary impact statement.

Executive Order 12988

    This rule meets the applicable standards set forth in sections 3(a) 
and 3(b)(2) of Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform.

Family Assessment

    The Attorney General has reviewed this rule and has determined that 
it may affect family well-being as that term is defined in section 654 
of the Treasury General Appropriations Act, 1999, Public Law 105-277, 
112 Stat. 2681, Div. A. Accordingly, the Attorney General has assessed 
this action in accordance with the criteria specified by section 654 
(c)(1). In this rule, the Family Unity provisions of the LIFE Act 
Amendments positively affect the stability of the family by providing a 
means for the family unit to remain intact.

Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995

    The information collection requirement contained in this rule, Form 
I-485 Supplement D, is being revised. This form will be submitted to 
the Office of Management and Budget for review and approval in 
accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act.

List of Subjects

8 CFR Part 100

    Organization of functions (Government agencies).

8 CFR Part 103

    Administrative practice and procedure, Authority delegations 
(Government agencies), Freedom of information, Privacy, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements, Surety bonds.

8 CFR Part 236

    Administrative practice and procedure, Aliens, Immigration.

8 CFR Part 245a

    Aliens, Immigration, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

8 CFR Part 274a

    Administrative practice and procedures, Aliens, Employment, 
Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

8 CFR Part 299

    Immigration, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.


    Accordingly, the interim rule amending 8 CFR parts 100, 103, 236, 
245a, 274a and 299 which was published at 66 FR 29661 on June 1, 2001, 
is adopted as a final rule with the following changes:

PART 245a--ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS TO THAT OF PERSONS ADMITTED FOR 
LAWFUL TEMPORARY OR PERMANENT RESIDENT STATUS UNDER SECTION 245A OF 
THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT

    1. The authority citation for part 245a continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 8 U.S.C. 1101, 1103, 1255a, and 1255a note.

    2. Section 245a.6 is added to part 245a, Subpart A, to read as 
follows:


Sec. 245a.6  Treatment of denied application under part 245a, Subpart 
B.

    If the district director finds that an eligible alien as defined at 
Sec. 245a.10 has not established eligibility under section 1104 of the 
LIFE Act (part 245a, Subpart B), the district director shall consider 
whether the eligible alien has established eligibility for adjustment 
to temporary resident status under section 245A of the Act, as in 
effect before enactment of section 1104 of the LIFE Act (part 245a, 
Subpart A). In such an adjudication using this Subpart A, the district 
director will deem the ``date of filing the application'' to be the 
date the eligible alien establishes that he or she was ``front-desked'' 
or that, though he or she took concrete steps to apply, the front-
desking policy was a substantial cause of his or her failure to apply. 
If the eligible alien has established eligibility for adjustment to 
temporary resident status, the LIFE Legalization application shall be 
deemed converted to an application for temporary residence under this 
Subpart A.

    3. Section 245a.10 is amended by:
    a. Revising the definition of ``eligible alien''; and by
    b. Adding the definition of ``written claim for class membership'' 
immediately after the definition of ``prima facie.''
    The addition and revision read as follows:


Sec. 245a.10  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Eligible alien means an alien (including a spouse or child as 
defined at section 101(b)(1) of the Act of the alien who was such as of 
the date the alien alleges that he or she attempted to file or was 
discouraged from filing an application for legalization during the 
original application period) who, before October 1, 2000, filed with 
the Attorney General a written claim for class membership, with or 
without filing fee, pursuant to a court order issued in the case of:
* * * * *
    Written claim for class membership means a filing, in writing, in 
one of the forms listed in Sec. 245a.14 that provides the Attorney 
General with notice that the applicant meets the class definition in 
the cases of CSS, LULAC or Zambrano.

    4. Section 245a.11 is amended by revising paragraph (a) to read as 
follows:


Sec. 245a.11  Eligibility to adjust to LPR status.

* * * * *
    (a) He or she properly files, with fee, Form I-485, Application to 
Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, with the Service during 
the application period beginning June 1, 2001, and ending June 4, 2003.
* * * * *

    5. Section 245a.12 is amended by:
    a. Revising paragraphs (a) introductory text, (a)(1), (a)(2), 
(a)(3), (a)(4) introductory text, and (a)(4)(i);
    b. Revising paragraphs (d)(1), (d)(2), and (d)(10);
    c. Adding a sentence at the end of paragraph (f); and by
    d. Removing paragraph (g).
    The additions and revisions read as follows:


Sec. 245a.12  Filing and applications.

    (a) When to file. The application period began on June 1, 2001, and 
ends on June 4, 2003. To benefit from the provisions of LIFE 
Legalization, an alien must properly file an application for adjustment 
of status, Form I-485, with appropriate fee, to the Service during the 
application period as described in this section. All applications, 
whether filed in the United States or filed from abroad, must be 
postmarked on or before June 4, 2003, to be considered timely filed.
    (1) If the postmark is illegible or missing, and the application 
was mailed from within the United States, the Service will consider the 
application to

[[Page 38351]]

be timely filed if it is received on or before June 9, 2003.
    (2) If the postmark is illegible or missing, and the application 
was mailed from outside the United States, the Service will consider 
the application to be timely filed if it is received on or before June 
18, 2003.
    (3) If the postmark is made by other than the United States Post 
Office, and is filed from within the United States, the application 
must bear a date on or before June 4, 2003, and must be received on or 
before June 9, 2003.
    (4) If an application filed from within the United States bears a 
postmark that was made by other than the United States Post Office, 
bears a date on or before June 4, 2003, and is received after June 9, 
2003, the alien must establish:
    (i) That the application was actually deposited in the mail before 
the last collection of the mail from the place of deposit that was 
postmarked by the United States Post Office June 4, 2003; and
* * * * *
    (d) * * *
    (1) The Form I-485 application fee as contained in 8 CFR 
103.7(b)(1).
    (2) The fee for fingerprinting as contained in 8 CFR 103.7(b)(1), 
if the applicant is between the ages of 14 and 79.
* * * * *
    (10) Proof of citizenship skills as described in Sec. 245a.17. This 
proof may be submitted either at the time of filing the application, 
subsequent to filing the application but prior to the interview, or at 
the time of the interview.
* * * * *
    (f) Evidence. * * * Subject to verification by the Service, if the 
evidence required to be submitted by the applicant is already contained 
in the Service's file or databases relating to the applicant, the 
applicant may submit a statement to that effect in lieu of the actual 
documentation.
* * * * *

    6. Section 245a.13 is amended by:
    a. Revising paragraph (e) introductory text;
    b. Revising the first sentence in paragraph (e)(1);
    c. Redesignating paragraphs (e)(2) through (e)(5), as paragraphs 
(e)(3) through (e)(6) respectively;
    d. Adding a new paragraph (e)(2);
    e. Removing the last sentence from redesignated paragraph 
(e)(4)(ii); and by
    f. Revising paragraph (f).
    The additions and revisions read as follows:


Sec. 245a.13  During pendency of application.

* * * * *
    (e) Travel while the application is pending. This paragraph is 
authorized by section 1104(c)(3) of the LIFE Act relating to the 
ability of an alien to travel abroad and return to the United States 
while his or her LIFE Legalization adjustment application is pending. 
Parole authority is granted to the Missouri Service Center Director for 
the purposes described in this section. Nothing in this section shall 
preclude an applicant for adjustment of status under LIFE Legalization 
from being granted advance parole or admission into the United States 
under any other provision of law or regulation for which the alien may 
be eligible.
    (1) An applicant for LIFE Legalization benefits who wishes to 
travel during the pendency of the application and who is applying from 
within the United States should file, with his or her application for 
adjustment, at the Missouri Service Center, a Form I-131, Application 
for Travel Document, with fee as set forth in Sec. 103.7(b)(1) of this 
chapter. * * *
    (2) An eligible alien who has properly filed a Form I-485 pursuant 
to this Subpart B, and who needs to travel abroad pursuant to the 
standards prescribed in section 212(d)(5) of the Act, may file a Form 
I-131 with the district director having jurisdiction over his or her 
place of residence.
* * * * *
    (f) Stay of final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal. The 
filing of a LIFE Legalization adjustment application on or after June 
1, 2001, and on or before June 4, 2003, stays the execution of any 
final order of exclusion, deportation, or removal. This stay shall 
remain in effect until there is a final decision on the LIFE 
Legalization application, unless the district director who intends to 
execute the order makes a formal determination that the applicant does 
not present a prima facie claim to LIFE Legalization eligibility 
pursuant to Secs. 245a.18(a)(1) or (a)(2), or Secs. 245a.18(c)(2)(i), 
(c)(2)(ii), (c)(2)(iii), (c)(2)(iv), (c)(2)(v), or (c)(2)(vi), and 
serves the applicant with a written decision explaining the reason for 
this determination. Any such stay determination by the district 
director is not appealable. Neither an Immigration Judge nor the Board 
has jurisdiction to adjudicate an application for stay of execution of 
an exclusion, deportation, or removal order, on the basis of the 
alien's having filed a LIFE Legalization adjustment application.

    7. Section 245a.14 is amended by:
    a. Redesignating paragraph (e) as paragraph (g); and by
    b. Adding paragraphs (e) and (f).
    New paragraphs (e) and (f) read as follows:


Sec. 245a.14  Application for class membership in the CSS, LULAC, or 
Zambrano lawsuit.

* * * * *
    (e) Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, submitted 
pursuant to a court order granting interim relief.
    (f) An application for a stay of deportation, exclusion, or removal 
pursuant to a court's order granting interim relief.
* * * * *


Sec. 245a.16  [Amended]

    8. Section 245a.16 is amended by removing the last sentence of 
paragraph (b).


Sec. 245a.17  [Amended]

    9. Section 245a.17(c)(1) is amended by revising the term ``or 
older; or'' to read ``or older on the date of filing; or''.

    10. Section 245a.18 is amended by:
    a. Revising paragraphs (c)(2)(i) and (c)(2)(ii);
    b. Redesignating paragraphs (c)(2)(iii) and (c)(2)(iv) as 
paragraphs (c)(2)(v) and (c)(2)(vi), respectively;
    c. Adding paragraphs (c)(2)(iii) and (c)(2)(iv);
    d. Removing the introductory text of paragraph (d);
    e. Removing paragraph (d)(2);
    f. Redesignating paragraph (d)(3) as paragraph (d)(2);
    g. Revising newly redesignated paragraph (d)(2); and by
    h. Adding paragraph (d)(3).
    The additions and revisions read as follows:


Sec. 245a.18  Ineligibility and applicability of ground of 
inadmissibility.

* * * * *
    (c) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) Section 212(a)(2)(A)(i)(I) (crimes involving moral turpitude);
    (ii) Section 212(a)(2)(A)(i)(II) (controlled substance, except for 
so much of such paragraph as relates to a single offense of simple 
possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana);
    (iii) Section 212(a)(2)(B) (multiple criminal convictions);
    (iv) Section 212(a)(2)(C) (controlled substance traffickers);
* * * * *
    (d) * * *
    (2) An alien who has a consistent employment history that shows the 
ability to support himself or herself even though his or her income may 
be below the poverty level is not excludable under paragraph (c)(2)(vi) 
of

[[Page 38352]]

this section. The alien's employment history need not be continuous in 
that it is uninterrupted. In applying the Special Rule, the Service 
will take into account an alien's employment history in the United 
States to include, but not be limited to, employment prior to and 
immediately following the enactment of IRCA on November 6, 1986. 
However, the Service will take into account that an alien may not have 
consistent employment history due to the fact that an eligible alien 
was in an unlawful status and was not authorized to work. Past 
acceptance of public cash assistance within a history of consistent 
employment will enter into this decision. The weight given in 
considering applicability of the public charge provisions will depend 
on many factors, but the length of time an applicant has received 
public cash assistance will constitute a significant factor. It is not 
necessary to file a waiver in order to apply the Special Rule for 
determination of public charge.
    (3) In order to establish that an alien is not inadmissible under 
paragraph (c)(2)(vi) of this section, an alien may file as much 
evidence available to him or her establishing that the alien is not 
likely to become a public charge. An alien may have filed on his or her 
behalf a Form I-134, Affidavit of Support. The failure to submit Form 
I-134 shall not constitute an adverse factor.
* * * * *

    11. Section 245a.20 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(2), to 
read as follows:


Sec. 245a.20  Decisions, appeals, motions, and certifications.

    (a) * * *
    (2) Denials. The alien shall be notified in writing of the decision 
of denial and of the reason(s) therefor. When an adverse decision is 
proposed, the Service shall notify the applicant of its intent to deny 
the application and the basis for the proposed denial. The applicant 
will be granted a period of 30 days from the date of the notice in 
which to respond to the notice of intent to deny. All relevant material 
will be considered in making a final decision. If inconsistencies are 
found between information submitted with the adjustment application and 
information previously furnished by the alien to the Service, the alien 
shall be afforded the opportunity to explain discrepancies or rebut any 
adverse information. An applicant affected under this part by an 
adverse decision is entitled to file an appeal on Form I-290B, Notice 
of Appeal to the Administrative Appeals Office (AAO), with required fee 
specified in Sec. 103.7(b)(1) of this chapter. Renewal of employment 
authorization issued pursuant to Sec. 245a.13 will be granted until a 
final decision has been rendered on appeal or until the end of the 
appeal period if no appeal is filed. After exhaustion of an appeal, an 
alien who believes that the grounds for denial have been overcome may 
submit another application with fee, provided that the application is 
submitted on or before June 4, 2003.
* * * * *

    12. Section 245a.31 is amended by revising paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec. 245a.31  Eligibility.

* * * * *
    (c) If applying for Family Unity benefits on or after June 5, 2003, 
he or she is the spouse or unmarried child under the age of 21 of an 
alien who has filed a Form I-485 pursuant to this Subpart B.

    13. Section 245a.34 is amended by revising paragraphs (b) and (c) 
to read as follows:


Sec. 245a.34  Protection from removal, eligibility for employment, and 
period of authorized stay.

* * * * *
    (b) Duration of protection from removal. When an alien whose 
application for Family Unity benefits under the LIFE Act Amendments is 
approved, he or she will receive protection from removal, commencing 
with the date of approval of the application. A grant of protection 
from removal under this section shall be considered effective from the 
date on which the application was properly filed.
    (1) In the case of an alien who has been granted Family Unity 
benefits under the LIFE Act Amendments based on the principal alien's 
application for LIFE Legalization, any evidence of protection from 
removal shall be dated to expire 1 year after the date of approval, or 
the day before the alien's 21st birthday, whichever comes first.
    (2) In the case of an alien who has been granted Family Unity 
benefits under the LIFE Act Amendments based on the principal alien's 
adjustment to LPR status pursuant to his or her LIFE Legalization 
application, any evidence of protection from removal shall be dated to 
expire 2 years after the date of approval, or the day before the 
alien's 21st birthday, whichever comes first.
    (c) Employment authorization. An alien granted Family Unity 
benefits under the LIFE Act Amendments is authorized to be employed in 
the United States.
    (1) In the case of an alien who has been granted Family Unity 
benefits based on the principal alien's application for LIFE 
Legalization, the validity period of the employment authorization 
document shall be dated to expire 1 year after the date of approval of 
the Form I-817, or the day before the alien's 21st birthday, whichever 
comes first.
    (2) In the case of an alien who has been granted Family Unity 
benefits based on the principal alien's adjustment to LPR status 
pursuant to his or her LIFE Legalization application, the validity 
period of the employment authorization document shall be dated to 
expire 2 years after the date of approval of the Form I-817, or the day 
before the alien's 21st birthday, whichever comes first.
* * * * *
    14. Section 245a.37 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(3) to read 
as follows:


Sec. 245a.37  Termination of Family Unity Program benefits.

    (a) * * *
    (3) The alien, upon whose status Family Unity benefits under the 
LIFE Act were based, fails to apply for LIFE Legalization by June 4, 
2003, has his or her LIFE Legalization application denied, or loses his 
or her LPR status; or
* * * * *

PART 299--IMMIGRATION FORMS

    15. The authority citation for part 299 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 8 U.S.C. 1101, 1103; 8 CFR part 2.

    16. Section 299.1 is amended in the table by revising the entry for 
Form ``I-485 Supplement D'', to read as follows:


Sec. 299.1  Prescribed forms.

* * * * *

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Edition
               Form No.                  date             Title
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                  *        *        *        *        *
I-485 Supplement D...................  ........  LIFE Legalization
                                                  Supplement to Form I-
                                                  485 Instructions.
 
                  *        *        *        *        *
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dated: May 29, 2002.
John Ashcroft,
Attorney General.
[FR Doc. 02-13918 Filed 5-30-02; 4:59 pm]
BILLING CODE 4410-10-P