[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 107 (Tuesday, June 5, 2007)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 31022-31048]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-10797]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Part 745

[EPA-HQ-OPPT-2005-0049; FRL-8132-7]
RIN 2070-AC83


Lead; Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

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SUMMARY: On January 10, 2006, EPA proposed new requirements under the 
authority of section 402(c)(3) of the Toxic Substances Control Act 
(TSCA) to reduce exposure to lead hazards created by renovation, 
repair, and painting activities that disturb lead-based paint in target 
housing. ``Target housing'' is defined in TSCA section 401 as any 
housing constructed before 1978, except housing for the elderly or 
persons with disabilities (unless any child under age 6 resides or is 
expected to reside in such housing) or any 0-bedroom dwelling. The 2006 
proposal would establish requirements for training renovators and dust 
sampling technicians; for certifying renovators, dust sampling 
technicians, and renovation firms; for accrediting providers of 
renovation and dust sampling technician training; for renovation work 
practices; and for recordkeeping. That proposal would also allow 
interested States, Territories, and Indian Tribes the opportunity to 
apply for and receive authorization to administer and enforce all of 
the elements of the new renovation requirements. This supplemental 
notice contains EPA's proposal to add child-occupied facilities to the 
buildings covered by the 2006 proposal. Child-occupied facilities may 
be located in public or commercial buildings or in target housing. A 
child-occupied facility would be defined as a building, or a portion of 
a building, constructed prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same 
child, under 6 years of age, on at least two different days within any 
week (Sunday through Saturday period), provided that each day's visit 
lasts at least 3 hours and the combined weekly visits last at least 6 
hours, and the combined annual visits last at least 60 hours.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before July 5, 2007.

ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by docket identification 
(ID) number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2005-0049, by one of the following methods:

[[Page 31023]]

     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the on-line instructions for submitting comments.
     Mail: Document Control Office (7407M), Office of Pollution 
Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 
Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001.
     Hand Delivery: OPPT Document Control Office (DCO), EPA 
East Bldg., Rm. 6428, 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC. 
Attention: Docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2005-0049. The DCO is open from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The 
telephone number for the DCO is (202) 564-8930. Such deliveries are 
only accepted during the DCO's normal hours of operation, and special 
arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information.
    Instructions: Direct your comments to docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPP-
2005-0049. EPA's policy is that all comments received will be included 
in the docket without change and may be made available on-line at 
http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information 
provided, unless the comment includes information claimed to be 
Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose 
disclosure is restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you 
consider to be CBI or otherwise protected through regulations.gov or e-
mail. The regulations.gov website is an ``anonymous access'' system, 
which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information 
unless you provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an e-
mail comment directly to EPA without going through regulations.gov, 
your e-mail address will be automatically captured and included as part 
of the comment that is placed in the docket and made available on the 
Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you 
include your name and other contact information in the body of your 
comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your 
comment due to technical difficulties and cannot contact you for 
clarification, EPA may not be able to consider your comment. Electronic 
files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of 
encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses. For additional 
information about EPA's public docket, visit the EPA Docket Center 
homepage at http://www.epa.gov/epahome/dockets.htm.
    Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the docket index 
available in regulations.gov. To access the electronic docket, go to 
http://www.regulations.gov, select ``Advanced Search,'' then ``Docket 
Search.'' Insert the docket ID number where indicated and select the 
``Submit'' button. Follow the instructions on the regulations.gov web 
site to view the docket index or access available documents. Although 
listed in the index, some information is not publicly available, e.g., 
Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose 
disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as 
copyrighted material, will be publicly available only in hard copy. 
Publicly available docket materials are available electronically 
athttp://www.regulations.gov, or, if only available in hard copy, at 
the OPPT Docket. The OPPT Docket is located in the EPA Docket Center 
(EPA/DC) at Rm. 3334, EPA West Bldg., 1301 Constitution Ave., NW., 
Washington, DC. The EPA/DC Public Reading Room hours of operation are 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding Federal 
holidays. The telephone number of the EPA/DC Public Reading Room is 
(202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the OPPT Docket is (202) 
566-0280. Docket visitors are required to show photographic 
identification, pass through a metal detector, and sign the EPA visitor 
log. All visitor bags are processed through an X-ray machine and 
subject to search. Visitors will be provided an EPA/DC badge that must 
be visible at all times in the building and returned upon departure.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For general information contact: Colby 
Lintner, Regulatory Coordinator, Environmental Assistance Division 
(7408M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental 
Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20460-
0001; telephone number: (202) 554-1404; e-mail address: TSCA-
Hotline@epa.gov.
    For technical information contact: Mike Wilson, National Program 
Chemicals Division (7404T), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, 
Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW., 
Washington, DC 20460-0001; telephone number: (202) 566-0521; e-mail 
address: wilson.mike@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. General Information

A. Does this Action Apply to Me?

    You may be potentially affected by this action if you perform 
renovations of child-occupied facilities for compensation or dust 
sampling in child-occupied facilities. EPA is proposing to define a 
child-occupied facility as a building, or a portion of a building, 
constructed prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same child, under 6 
years of age, on at least two different days within any week (Sunday 
through Saturday period), provided that each day's visit lasts at least 
3 hours and the combined weekly visits last at least 6 hours, and the 
combined annual visits last at least 60 hours. Examples of child-
occupied facilities are day-care centers, preschools, and kindergarten 
classrooms. Child-occupied facilities may be located in target housing 
or in public or commercial buildings. Potentially affected entities may 
include, but are not limited to:
     Building construction (NAICS 236), e.g., single family 
housing construction, multi-family housing construction, residential 
remodelers, nonresidential construction.
     Specialty trade contractors (NAICS 238), e.g., plumbing, 
heating, and air-conditioning contractors, painting and wall covering 
contractors, electrical contractors, finish carpentry contractors, 
drywall and insulation contractors, siding contractors, tile and 
terrazzo contractors, glass and glazing contractors.
     Real estate (NAICS 531), e.g., lessors of residential and 
nonresidential buildings, property managers.
     Child day care services (NAICS 624410).
     Elementary and secondary schools (NAICS 611110), e.g., 
elementary schools with kindergarten classrooms.
     Other technical and trade schools (NAICS 611519), e.g., 
training providers.
     Engineering services (NAICS 541330) and building 
inspection services (NAICS 541350), e.g., dust sampling technicians.
    This listing is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides 
a guide for readers regarding entities likely to be affected by this 
action. Other types of entities not listed in this unit could also be 
affected. The North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) 
codes have been provided to assist you and others in determining 
whether this action might apply to certain entities. To determine 
whether you or your business may be affected by this action, you should 
carefully examine the applicability provisions in Units IV.B. and IV.C. 
If you have any questions regarding the applicability of this action to 
a particular entity, consult the technical person listed under FOR 
FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

B. What Should I Consider as I Prepare My Comments for EPA?

    1. Submitting CBI. Do not submit this information to EPA through 
regulations.gov or e-mail. Clearly mark

[[Page 31024]]

the part or all of the information that you claim to be CBI. For CBI 
information in a disk or CD ROM that you mail to EPA, mark the outside 
of the disk or CD ROM as CBI and then identify electronically within 
the disk or CD ROM the specific information that is claimed as CBI. In 
addition to one complete version of the comment that includes 
information claimed as CBI, a copy of the comment that does not contain 
the information claimed as CBI must be submitted for inclusion in the 
public docket. Information so marked will not be disclosed except in 
accordance with procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2.
    2. Tips for preparing your comments. When submitting comments, 
remember to:
    i. Identify the document by docket ID number and other identifying 
information (subject heading, Federal Register date and page number).
    ii. Follow directions. The Agency may ask you to respond to 
specific questions or organize comments by referencing a Code of 
Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number.
    iii. Explain why you agree or disagree; suggest alternatives and 
substitute language for your requested changes.
    iv. Describe any assumptions and provide any technical information 
and/or data that you used.
    v. If you estimate potential costs or burdens, explain how you 
arrived at your estimate in sufficient detail to allow for it to be 
reproduced.
    vi. Provide specific examples to illustrate your concerns and 
suggest alternatives.
    vii. Explain your views as clearly as possible, avoiding the use of 
profanity or personal threats.
    viii. Make sure to submit your comments by the comment period 
deadline identified.

II. Background

A. What Action is the Agency Taking?

    EPA is proposing to add child-occupied facilities to the universe 
of buildings covered by a prior proposal. EPA would apply all of the 
training, certification, accreditation, work practice, and 
recordkeeping requirements of the January 10, 2006 proposal (``2006 
Proposal'', Ref. 1) to child-occupied facilities. A child-occupied 
facility would be defined as ``a building, or a portion of a building, 
constructed prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same child, under 6 
years of age, on at least two different days within any week (Sunday 
through Saturday period), provided that each day's visit lasts at least 
3 hours and the combined weekly visits last at least 6 hours, and the 
combined annual visits last at least 60 hours.'' Examples of child-
occupied facilities are day-care centers, preschools, and kindergarten 
classrooms. Child-occupied facilities may be located in target housing 
or in public or commercial buildings.
    The purpose of the 2006 Proposal was to establish new requirements 
to reduce exposure to lead hazards created by renovation, repair, and 
painting activities that disturb lead-based paint. The proposal 
contained requirements for training renovators and dust sampling 
technicians; certifying renovators, dust sampling technicians, and 
renovation firms; accrediting providers of renovation and dust sampling 
technician training; for renovation work practices; and for 
recordkeeping. These requirements would apply in ``target housing,'' 
which is defined in TSCA section 401 as ``any housing constructed 
before 1978, except housing for the elderly or persons with 
disabilities (unless any child under age 6 resides or is expected to 
reside in such housing) or any 0-bedroom dwelling.'' Initially the rule 
would apply to all renovations for compensation performed in (1) target 
housing where a child with an increased blood lead level resides; (2) 
rental target housing built before 1960; and (3) owner-occupied target 
housing built before 1960, unless, with respect to owner-occupied 
target housing, the person performing the renovation obtains a 
statement signed by the owner-occupant that the renovation will occur 
in the owner's residence and that no child under age 6 resides there. 
EPA proposed a subsequent phase-in for target housing built in the 
years 1960 through 1977, with certain exemptions. The training, 
certification, accreditation, work practice, and recordkeeping 
requirements of the 2006 Proposal would apply to all persons who do 
renovation for compensation, including renovation contractors, 
maintenance workers in multi-family housing, painters and other 
specialty trades, with certain exceptions. The 2006 Proposal contains 
exemptions for owner-occupied target housing where no children under 
age 6 reside, minor repair and maintenance activities that disrupt two 
square feet or less of painted surfaces per component, or renovations 
where specified methods have been used to determine that the areas 
affected by the renovation are free of lead-based paint.
    In this document, EPA is proposing to apply these same training, 
certification, accreditation, work practice, and recordkeeping 
requirements and exemptions to firms and individuals who perform 
renovations for compensation in child-occupied facilities. EPA welcomes 
comment on this supplemental proposal by entities, such as day care 
providers, elementary schools, and public or commercial building 
owners, who would be affected by the expanded scope of coverage. EPA 
intends to review the comments received on this supplementary proposal 
and then promulgate a final rule addressing both the 2006 Proposal and 
this proposal.

B. What is the Agency's Authority for Taking this Action?

    These training, certification and accreditation requirements and 
work practice standards are being proposed pursuant to the authority of 
TSCA section 402(c)(3), 15 U.S.C. 2682(c)(3), as amended by Title X of 
the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992, Public Law 102-550 
(also known as the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 
1992) (``the Act'' or ``Title X''). The notification and recordkeeping 
requirements associated with child-occupied facilities are being 
proposed pursuant to section 407 of TSCA. The Model State Program and 
amendments to the regulations on the authorization of State and Tribal 
programs with respect to renovators and dust sampling technicians are 
being proposed pursuant to section 404 of TSCA, 15 U.S.C. 2684.

III. Introduction

A. Reason for this Supplemental Notice

    On January 10, 2006, EPA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking for 
requirements to reduce exposure to lead hazards created by renovation, 
repair, and painting activities that disturb lead-based paint in target 
housing (Ref. 1). EPA received approximately 250 comments from a wide 
variety of commenters, including State and local governments, industry 
groups, advocacy groups, renovation contractors, training providers, 
and individuals. Twenty-nine of those commenters observed that the 
proposal did not cover buildings where children under age 6 spend a 
great deal of time, such as day care centers and schools. Commenters 
noted that the risk posed to children from lead-based paint hazards in 
schools and day-care centers is likely to be equal to, if not greater 
than, the risk posed from these hazards at home. These commenters 
suggested that EPA expand its proposal to include such places. Several 
suggested that EPA use the definition of ``child-occupied facility'' in 
40 CFR Sec.  745.223 to define the expanded scope of coverage.

[[Page 31025]]

    EPA believes that the suggestions regarding day care centers and 
schools have merit. EPA is therefore issuing this supplemental proposal 
to specifically propose expanding the scope of the renovation, repair 
and painting program to these facilities. EPA believes that the 
proposed findings underlying the 2006 Proposal also support the 
expansion of coverage to child-occupied facilities.

B. Development of the Final Rule

    It is EPA's intention to issue a final rule based on the 2006 
Proposal and this supplemental proposal. As EPA moves forward with the 
development of the final rule, the Agency is considering the comments 
and information received during the public comment periods in 2006, and 
expects to consider the comments related to child-occupied facilities 
and any new information received on this supplemental proposal. In 
addition, as discussed in the 2006 Proposal, EPA intends to prepare 
further analyses and updated assessments for the final rule that will 
use the information received, as well as the data generated by the EPA 
study ``Characterization of Dust Lead Levels after Renovation, Repair, 
and Painting Activities'' (``Dust Study'', Ref. 10), and by the 
National Association of Home Builders' (NAHB) ``Lead Safe Work 
Practices Survey'' (``NAHB Survey'', Ref. 11). EPA will also consider 
the comments received on proposed work practice standards in light of 
the results of these studies.
    EPA is also updating the hazard and exposure assessments it used as 
a basis for estimating the benefits of the rulemaking. This benefits 
analysis is part of the economic analysis for the rulemaking. The 
hazard assessment for the final rule will be based on a hazard 
assessment that has recently undergone peer review by the Clean Air 
Science Advisory Committee (CASAC) Lead Review Panel. The revised 
exposure assessment for the final rule, which will use the data 
generated by EPA's Dust Study, the NAHB Survey, and other available 
information, will also undergo a peer review by the CASAC Lead Review 
Panel. The CASAC, which is comprised of seven members appointed by the 
EPA Administrator, was established under the Clean Air Act as an 
independent scientific advisory committee. More information on the 
CASAC consultation process, along with background documents, is 
available on EPA's website athttp://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/casac.htm.
    EPA is not yet able to say with any certainty how the economic 
analyses or proposed requirements might change for the final rule as a 
result of the additional analyses underway or planned, or EPA's 
consideration of comments or new information received on this 
supplemental proposal. The Agency does, however, expect that changes 
may occur.

C. Previous EPA Rulemakings on Lead-based Paint and Lead-based Paint 
Hazards in Child-Occupied Facilities

    In 1996, EPA promulgated the final lead-based paint activities 
regulations under TSCA section 402(a), codifying them at 40 CFR part 
745, subpart L. These regulations were designed to protect the public 
from the hazards of improperly conducted lead-based paint inspections, 
risk assessments and abatement projects. The regulation includes:
     Training and certification requirements to ensure the 
proficiency of contractors who offer these services.
     Accreditation requirements to ensure that training 
programs provide quality instruction in current and effective work 
practices.
     Work practice standards to ensure that these lead-based 
paint activities are conducted safely, reliably and effectively.
    As initially proposed in 1994, requirements for the training and 
certification of contractors and the accreditation of training 
programs, as well as specific work practice standards would have 
applied to lead-based paint activities conducted in target housing and 
public buildings (Ref. 2). A slightly different set of requirements 
would have applied to lead-based paint activities conducted in 
commercial buildings and on bridges and other structures. The 1994 
proposal would have defined public buildings to include all buildings 
generally open to the public or occupied or visited by children, such 
as stores, museums, airports, offices, restaurants, hospitals, and 
government buildings, as well as schools and day-care centers. During 
the comment period, a significant majority of commenters expressed the 
concern that applying these regulations to activities in all of the 
buildings that EPA would consider public would result in significant 
costs without a comparable reduction in lead-based paint exposures for 
children under age 6, the population most vulnerable to lead exposures. 
Many of these commenters recommended that EPA focus its attention on 
buildings that are frequented by children, rather than on buildings 
that may be briefly visited by children. In response to these comments, 
EPA established, in the final rule, a subset of the buildings EPA had 
intended to define as public. This subset, called ``child-occupied 
facilities,'' was delineated in terms of the frequency and duration of 
visits by children (Ref. 3). ``Child-occupied facility'' is defined in 
40 CFR 745.223 as `` a building, or portion of a building, constructed 
prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same child, 6 years of age or 
under, on at least two different days within any week (Sunday through 
Saturday period), provided that each day's visit lasts at least 3 hours 
and the combined weekly visits last at least 6 hours, and the combined 
annual visits last at least 60 hours. Child-occupied facilities may 
include, but are not limited to, day care centers, preschools and 
kindergarten classrooms.'' The training, certification, accreditation, 
and work practice requirements of the final lead-based paint activities 
regulations, codified at 40 CFR part 745, subpart L, apply only to 
activities in target housing and child-occupied facilities.
    Subsequently, in 1998, EPA initiated rulemaking under TSCA section 
403 to identify lead-based paint hazards. The final standards, 
promulgated in 2001 and codified at 40 CFR part 745, subpart D, define 
paint-lead, dust-lead, and soil-lead hazards (Ref. 4). Under 40 CFR 
745.61(b), these standards are applicable to target housing and child-
occupied facilities. The definition of paint-lead hazard refers to the 
presence of damaged or deteriorated lead-based paint, as well as lead-
based paint on surfaces where it can be damaged, abraded, or ingested. 
A dust-lead hazard is defined as surface dust that contains a mass-per-
area concentration of lead equal to or exceeding 40 micrograms per 
square foot ([mu]g/ft\2\) on floors or 250 [mu]g/ft\2\ on interior 
window sills based on wipe samples. A soil-lead hazard is defined as 
bare soil that contains total lead equal to or exceeding 400 parts per 
million ([mu]g/g) in a play area or an average of 1,200 parts per 
million in the rest of the yard based on soil samples. As discussed in 
detail in the preamble to the final TSCA section 403 regulations, the 
dust-lead and soil-lead hazard standards were set with reference to the 
likelihood that an exposure to such a level would result in a blood 
lead level above 10 micrograms per deciliter ([mu]g/dL) in a child 
(Ref. 4 at 1216-1217). This was based on the level that the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention had set as the level of concern for 
community action. This level is not a threshold for toxicity.

[[Page 31026]]

IV. Renovation Activities in Child-occupied Facilities

A. TSCA Section 402(c)(3) Determination

    The 2006 Proposal was issued under the authority of TSCA section 
402(c), which directs EPA to revise its TSCA section 402(a) lead-based 
paint activities regulations to apply to renovation activities that 
create lead-based paint hazards. The revisions proposed in the 2006 
Proposal were based on, among other things, a study of renovation 
activities that EPA conducted as directed by TSCA section 402(c)(2). 
This study is discussed in greater length in the 2006 Proposal (Ref. 1 
at 1591). In this study, EPA found that the following renovation 
activities, when conducted where lead-based paint is present, generated 
lead loadings on floors that exceeded 40 [mu]g/ft\2\, the dust-lead 
hazard standard for floors in 40 CFR 745.65(b):
     Paint removal by abrasive sanding.
     Window replacement.
     HVAC duct work.
     Demolition of interior plaster walls.
     Drilling into wood.
     Sawing into wood.
     Sawing into plaster.
    These results, along with the results of other phases of the study, 
which evaluated worker exposures and the blood lead levels of children 
in homes where renovations have taken place, led EPA to propose to 
conclude that renovation activities that disturb lead-based paint cause 
lead dust in amounts that will create, or could reasonably be 
anticipated to create, dust-lead hazards.
    The dust-lead hazard standards are the same for target housing and 
child-occupied facilities. EPA believes that the individual activities 
examined in its renovation study are likely to be part of renovation 
activities in child-occupied facilities as well as in target housing. 
EPA is therefore proposing to find that renovation activities that 
disturb lead-based paint in child-occupied facilities will create, or 
are reasonably anticipated to create, lead-based paint hazards. EPA 
requests comment on this proposed finding as well as any available data 
or studies on the similarities and differences between renovation 
activities in target housing and renovation activities in child-
occupied facilities.

B. Buildings Covered

    1. Buildings covered by the 2006 Proposal. The requirements of the 
2006 Proposal would take effect in two major phases. In the first 
phase, the proposed requirements would apply to renovations performed 
for compensation in:
     Target housing where the firm performing the renovation 
obtains information indicating that a child under age 6 resides there, 
if the child has a blood-lead level greater than or equal to 10 [mu]g/
dL or a State or local government level of concern, if lower, or the 
firm does not provide the owners and occupants with the opportunity to 
inform the firm that a child under age 6 with such a blood-lead level 
resides there.
     Owner-occupied target housing built before 1960, unless 
the firm performing the renovation obtains a statement signed by the 
owner that the renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no 
child under age 6 resides there.
     Rental target housing built before 1960.
    The second phase, which would take effect 1 year after the first 
phase takes effect, would extend the proposed requirements to:
     Owner-occupied target housing built between 1960 and 1978, 
unless the firm performing the renovation obtains a statement signed by 
the owner that the renovation will occur in the owner's residence and 
no child under age 6 resides there.
     Rental target housing built between 1960 and 1978.
    EPA proposed the two-phase approach primarily because of the 
reduced prevalence of lead-based paint in housing constructed between 
1960 and 1978. According to the National Survey of Lead and Allergens 
in Housing, 24% of the housing constructed between 1960 and 1978 
contains lead-based paint (Ref. 5). As discussed in the 2006 Proposal, 
EPA is working toward the development of improved test kits that could 
be used to determine whether or not lead-based paint is present in an 
area to be renovated (Ref. 1 at 1599). These kits are expected to be 
commercially available by the time that the second phase of the 
proposal would take effect, and thus could be used to accurately 
exclude the 76% of housing constructed between 1960 and 1978 that does 
not contain lead-based paint.
    The 2006 Proposal also discussed several other options for 
applicability based on the age of the housing, including a single phase 
regulation covering pre-1960 target housing or pre-1978 target housing. 
EPA received a great many comments on this aspect of the proposal and 
the merits of these comments are still being considered.
    2. Buildings covered by this proposal--a. Background. This proposal 
would extend the coverage of the training, certification, 
accreditation, work practice, and recordkeeping requirements of the 
2006 Proposal to buildings that children under age 6 frequent, such as 
day care centers, preschools, and kindergarten classrooms. To 
accomplish this, EPA is proposing to incorporate into 40 CFR 745.83 the 
definition of ``child-occupied facility'' from 40 CFR 745.223, with two 
modifications. The proposed definition would refer to visits by 
children under age 6, rather than to visits by children 6 and under, to 
make the definition consistent with the other scope provisions of the 
2006 Proposal. In addition, the proposed definition would clarify that 
child-occupied facilities may be located in target housing or public or 
commercial buildings.
    The preamble to the 1996 final lead-based paint activities 
regulations referred to child-occupied facilities as a subset of 
buildings that EPA had initially proposed to call ``public buildings'' 
(Ref. 3 at 45780). The proposed definition of ``public building'' in 
the lead-based paint activities rulemaking included buildings that may 
also be thought of as commercial buildings, such as office buildings. 
In order to avoid any potential confusion over the scope of buildings 
covered by this supplemental proposal, EPA is proposing to use the 
phrase ``public or commercial building'' to denote buildings generally 
open to the public or occupied or visited by children. Public or 
commercial buildings would include stores, museums, airport terminals, 
convention centers, office buildings, restaurants, hospitals, schools, 
government buildings, and day care centers.
    EPA is proposing to use the term ``child-occupied facility'' in 
this rulemaking to identify buildings, or portions of buildings, that 
would be covered by the rule, regardless of whether those buildings are 
target housing or public or commercial buildings. EPA is proposing to 
use the term this way to ensure that day care centers located in target 
housing would be covered.
    One of the elements of the 2006 Proposal is a provision allowing 
owners of target housing to opt out of the rule if they occupy the 
housing to be renovated and there is no child under age 6 in residence. 
If this provision were retained in the final rule, and the definition 
of ``child-occupied facility'' did not apply in target housing, the 
rule would not cover child care centers in owner-occupied target 
housing where no children under age 6 reside. To ensure that these 
types of day care

[[Page 31027]]

centers are covered, EPA is proposing to add a sentence to the 
definition of ``child-occupied facility'' that states: ``Child-occupied 
facilities may be located in target housing or in public or commercial 
buildings.''
    b. Child-occupied facilities in target housing. This supplemental 
proposal would cover owner-occupied target housing that meets the 
definition of ``child-occupied facility'' in the same way that EPA 
would cover owner-occupied target housing where a child under age 6 
resides. The 2006 Proposal, in effect, would require a renovation firm 
to assume that target housing is the residence of a child under age 6 
unless the firm obtains a statement signed by the owner that the owner 
resides in the housing to be renovated and no child under age 6 also 
resides there. With this proposal, EPA would require a similar 
assumption on the part of the renovation firm with respect to whether 
target housing is also a child-occupied facility. A renovation firm 
would be required to assume that target housing is either the residence 
of a child under age 6 or a child-occupied facility unless the firm 
obtains a statement signed by the owner that the owner resides in the 
housing to be renovated, no child under age 6 also resides there, and 
the housing is not a child-occupied facility. The 2006 Proposal would 
cover rental target housing regardless of the presence of a child under 
age 6, so it is not necessary to require a similar assumption in that 
case. EPA believes that it is reasonable to require renovators to 
assume that a child-occupied facility exists in owner-occupied target 
housing.
    An alternative approach would merely require the renovation firm to 
give the owner an opportunity to inform the firm that child care for 
children under age 6 is provided in the housing. This is the approach 
that EPA is proposing to use with respect to children under age 6 with 
increased blood lead levels for the purpose of determining whether 
target housing or child-occupied facilities built between 1960 and 1978 
would be covered in the first phase of the rule. In the 2006 Proposal, 
EPA did not propose to require a renovation firm to assume that a child 
under age 6 with an increased blood lead level resides in all target 
housing. Rather, the renovation firm would only be required to provide 
the owner and occupant with an opportunity to inform the firm that such 
a child is in residence. Likewise, EPA is proposing to require a 
renovation firm to provide the owner and occupant of a child-occupied 
facility with an opportunity to inform the firm that a child under age 
6 with an increased blood lead level uses the facility. If the firm is 
so informed, the target housing or child-occupied facility would be 
covered during the first phase of the rule. If not, and the target 
housing or child-occupied facility was built between 1960 and 1978, it 
would not be covered until the second phase of the rule.
    However, EPA is not proposing to allow renovation firms to assume 
that a child-occupied facility is not present in owner-occupied target 
housing unless the owner informs the firm that such a facility is 
present. EPA is concerned that this approach for child care facilities 
in target housing would result in a large number of these facilities 
being eliminated from coverage by the proposed rule. As described in 
Unit VI.A. and in the document entitled ``Economic Analysis for the 
Supplemental Proposed Rule on Child-Occupied Facilities Under the TSCA 
Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program'' (``Supplemental 
Economic Analysis'', Ref. 6), EPA estimates that approximately 
1,559,000 of the child-occupied facilities across the country are 
located in target housing, of which an estimated 726,000 were covered 
by the 2006 Proposal (either because they are in rental housing or 
because they are in owner-occupied housing where a child under age 6 
resides). This supplemental proposal will cover an additional 833,000 
child-occupied facilities located in target housing (i.e., in owner-
occupied target housing where no child under age 6 resides). EPA 
requests comment on the proposed requirement that a renovation firm 
assume that owner-occupied target housing contains a child-occupied 
facility, and on other possible ways that a renovation firm could 
determine whether a child-occupied facility is present in target 
housing.
    As discussed in the 2006 Proposal, the Pre-Renovation Education 
Rule, promulgated under the authority of TSCA section 406(b) and 
codified at 40 CFR part 745, subpart E, requires owners and occupants 
of target housing to be informed of the potential risks from renovation 
projects by providing them with a lead hazard information pamphlet. 
Persons performing renovations covered by the existing regulations must 
already either obtain a signed acknowledgment from the owner indicating 
that the pamphlet has been received, or a certificate of mailing 
indicating that the pamphlet was mailed at least 7 days before the 
renovation. EPA has modified the sample acknowledgment form it 
developed for the 2006 Proposal to add information on child-occupied 
facilities. This sample could be used to not only record the owner's 
receipt of the lead hazard information pamphlet, but to obtain 
additional information on the housing to be renovated, its residents, 
and whether the housing is a child-occupied facility (Ref. 7). EPA 
seeks comment on this sample acknowledgment, a copy of which is 
available in the docket for this proposed rule and on the Agency's Web 
page athttp://www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/pre-renovationform.pdf.
    c. Child-occupied facilities in public or commercial buildings. 
This proposal would treat child-occupied facilities that are not in 
target housing somewhat differently. As discussed in Unit IV.D.2., EPA 
is proposing to require renovation firms working in child-occupied 
facilities in public or commercial buildings to distribute lead hazard 
information to owners and occupants and obtain acknowledgments, like 
those required under the Pre-Renovation Education Rule for target 
housing. However, EPA is not proposing to exempt only those projects in 
public or commercial buildings where the renovation firm has obtained a 
signed statement by the owner of the building indicating that no child-
occupied facility is present in the building. Rather, the firm would be 
able to determine whether or not a particular renovation in a public or 
commercial building involves a child-occupied facility. EPA chose this 
approach for two reasons. First, it should be much easier for the firm 
to determine whether it is renovating a child-occupied facility in a 
public or commercial building than it would be for the firm to 
determine whether the target housing it is to renovate is also a child-
occupied facility. A stand-alone day care center is likely to have a 
name that suggests that it provides day care, and the center's status 
as a child-occupied facility should be obvious upon entering the 
center. Day care centers in office buildings are likely to have 
informational signs posted and the centers are likely to be identified 
in the building directory. Elementary schools are likely to have 
kindergarten classrooms. The other reason for not imposing a 
requirement for firms to obtain a signed owner's statement for each 
public or commercial building they renovate is the burden of such a 
requirement. The alternative to allowing the firm to determine that a 
particular building does not contain a child-occupied facility is to 
require the firm to obtain signed statements from the owners of all 
public or commercial buildings renovated. These buildings would include 
factories, office

[[Page 31028]]

buildings, department stores, restaurants, and service stations, many 
of which do not contain child-occupied facilities.
    Under the proposed approach, the firm would have to take 
appropriate steps to determine whether or not a building is or contains 
a child-occupied facility, including asking the building's owner, or 
the person contracting for the renovation, whether a child-occupied 
facility is present. For example, if a renovation firm accepts a 
contract for a project in an elementary school, the firm would have to 
determine whether a kindergarten classroom was present, which common 
areas the kindergarten children used, and, for exterior projects, which 
exterior walls were immediately adjacent to the kindergarten classroom 
and associated common areas. Libraries and recreational facilities may 
have after-care programs that would cause these buildings to be 
considered child-occupied facilities; a renovation firm hired to 
renovate a building of this type would have to make inquiries about the 
use of the facility by children under age 6. EPA requests comment on 
its proposed approach, on the alternative of exempting only those 
public or commercial buildings for which the firm has obtained a signed 
statement from the owner indicating that there is no child-occupied 
facility present, and on any other methods for making the determination 
that a child-occupied facility is or is not present in a public or 
commercial building.
    d. Applicability based on age of building. For the purpose of 
determining applicability of the proposed rule, it is EPA's intention 
to treat child-occupied facilities, whether they are in target housing 
or public or commercial buildings, much the same as covered target 
housing. For example, if EPA retains the phase-in approach discussed 
previously, the first phase would cover:
     Target housing where a child under age 6 with an increased 
blood lead level resides.
     Rental target housing built before 1960.
     Owner-occupied target housing built before 1960 where a 
child under age 6 resides.
     Child-occupied facilities used by a child under age 6 with 
an increased blood lead level.
     Child-occupied facilities built before 1960.
    The second phase would add:
     Rental target housing built between 1960 and 1978.
     Owner-occupied target housing built between 1960 and 1978 
where a child under age 6 resides.
     Child-occupied facilities built between 1960 and 1978.
    As discussed in the Supplemental Economic Analysis (Ref. 6), EPA 
has estimated that there are approximately 833,000 child-occupied 
facilities in target housing that would be covered by this proposal. 
EPA assumes that the prevalence of lead-based paint in target housing 
where child care is provided is the same as the prevalence of lead-
based paint in target housing as a whole, so there is no reason to 
treat these child-occupied facilities differently. In addition, the 
First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care Centers 
indicates that 22% of non-home-based child care centers built between 
1960 and 1978 contain lead-based paint (Ref. 8). This is slightly less 
than the 24% of target housing built between 1960 and 1978 that 
contains lead-based paint, but this difference is not sufficient to 
justify a difference in regulatory applicability.
    e. Common areas. The 2006 Proposal would cover renovations in 
common areas in multi-family rental target housing. EPA requested 
comment on whether to exempt renovations in common areas in owner-
occupied multi-family target housing if the renovation firm has 
obtained the signature of every owner with access to the common area, 
stating that the units are owner-occupied and no child under age 6 is 
in residence. The term ``common area'' is defined in 40 CFR 745.223 as 
``a portion of a building that is generally accessible to all 
occupants. Such an area may include, but is not limited to, hallways, 
stairways, laundry and recreational rooms, playgrounds, community 
centers, garages, and boundary fences.'' In order to exempt from this 
supplemental proposal a renovation in a common area in owner-occupied 
multi-family target housing, EPA is proposing to require the renovation 
firm to obtain the signature of every owner with access to the common 
area, stating that, in addition to the units being owner-occupied with 
no children under age 6 in residence, no child care for children under 
age 6 is provided in the units.
    The lead-based paint activities regulations at 40 CFR part 745, 
subpart L, apply to common areas in multi-family target housing as well 
as to common areas in child-occupied facilities. With this supplemental 
proposal, EPA is not proposing to cover all common areas in public or 
commercial buildings that contain child-occupied facilities. Rather, 
EPA is most concerned with those common areas that are actually used by 
children under age 6, such as classrooms, bathrooms, and cafeterias, 
and not common areas that the children merely pass through. Similarly, 
EPA is not proposing to cover all exterior renovation projects on 
public or commercial buildings that contain child-occupied facilities. 
EPA is primarily concerned about the projects on the exteriors of 
public or commercial buildings that are most likely to affect the 
children visiting a child-occupied facility. An exterior renovation 
project on the opposite side of a large office building from the child-
occupied facility within the building is far less likely to affect the 
children at the facility than an exterior renovation project on the 
same side of the building as the children's outdoor playground. For 
this reason, EPA is proposing to cover only those exterior renovation 
projects that are performed on the same side or sides of the building 
as the child-occupied facility or common area. This proposal would, 
therefore, incorporate additional text into the definition of ``child-
occupied facility'' to clarify the scope of projects associated with 
child-occupied facilities in public or commercial buildings. This text 
would read:

    In public or commercial buildings that contain child-occupied 
facilities, the child-occupied facility encompasses only those 
common areas that are routinely used by children under age 6, such 
as restrooms and cafeterias. Common areas that children under age 6 
only pass through, such as hallways, stairways, and garages, are not 
included. In addition, for public or commercial buildings that 
contain child-occupied facilities, the child-occupied facility 
encompasses only the exterior sides of the building that are 
immediately adjacent to the child-occupied facility or the common 
areas routinely used by children under age 6.

EPA requests comment on the likelihood that renovation projects in 
hallways and stairways, or in rooms not used by children under age 6, 
will affect the children using a child-occupied facility in a public or 
commercial building. EPA also requests comment on whether all exterior 
projects on public or commercial buildings that contain child-occupied 
facilities should be covered, whether all common areas in such 
buildings should be covered and whether hallways, stairways, and other 
areas adjacent to rooms used by children under age 6 should be treated 
differently than more remote areas of the building. EPA is particularly 
interested in peer-reviewed studies or data that shed light on the 
potential exposures and hazards to children under age 6 presented by 
renovation projects in areas not used by the children. EPA also 
requests other comments on these limitations,

[[Page 31029]]

including the extent to which States, Territories, and Tribes with 
authorized lead-based paint activities programs might apply this term 
differently.

C. Activities Covered by this Proposal

    The 2006 Proposal would cover activities covered by the Pre-
Renovation Education Rule, those activities that meet the definition of 
``renovation'' in 40 CFR 745.83. In general, renovations are activities 
that modify an existing structure and that result in the disturbance of 
painted surfaces. In addition, like the Pre-Renovation Education Rule, 
the 2006 Proposal would cover only renovations performed for 
compensation. This includes renovations performed by renovation firms 
and their employees, as well as renovations performed by owners of 
rental property and their employees. Although the owner of rental 
property may not be compensated for maintenance and repair work at the 
time that the work is performed, tenants generally pay rent for the 
right to occupy a rental unit as well as for maintenance services in 
that unit. Therefore, EPA considers the payment of rent to be 
compensation to the owner of rental property for any renovations 
performed on the property.
    Likewise, this proposal would only cover activities that fit within 
the definition of ``renovation'' in 40 CFR 745.83 and that are 
performed for compensation in child-occupied facilities. Compensation 
includes pay for work performed, such as that paid to contractors; 
wages, such as those paid to employees of contractors, building owners, 
and child-occupied facility operators; and rent for target housing or 
public or commercial building space. Thus, renovations performed by 
renovation contractors and their employees in child-occupied facilities 
would be covered, as would be renovations by building owners in child-
occupied facilities, if the building owner receives rent for the child-
occupied facility's space. Renovations in child-occupied facilities 
that are performed by employees of the building owner or of the child-
occupied facility would be covered if the employees receive wages or 
other compensation for the work performed.
    EPA does not, however, consider child care payments to be 
compensation for renovations. EPA believes that an agreement to provide 
child care in exchange for a payment is not a contract for building 
maintenance services in the same way that a lease or other agreement 
between a landlord and a tenant generally is. If EPA were to consider 
payments for child care as compensation for the purposes of this 
regulation, this proposal would cover a great many do-it-yourself 
renovations by the owners of target housing in housing they own and 
occupy. In 1994, in Unit III.B. of the preamble to the proposed lead-
based paint activities regulations, EPA reviewed section 1021 of the 
Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992, the section 
that added Title IV to TSCA, and determined that the emphasis under 
section 402 of TSCA ought to be the certification and training of 
contractors, not homeowners. In the course of that review, EPA stated 
its belief that TSCA section 402(c)(3), the section under which this 
supplemental proposal is being issued, shows that ``Congress'' focus 
was on the need to regulate contractors doing renovation and remodeling 
activities, and not homeowners doing renovation and remodeling of their 
own homes'' (Ref. 2). Considering payments for child care to be 
compensation for renovations for the purpose of this supplemental 
proposal would make this proposal inconsistent with Congressional 
intent.
    This proposal would also cover renovations that are being performed 
in order to turn a public or commercial building, or part of such a 
building, into target housing or a child-occupied facility. EPA has 
always understood the lead-based paint activities regulations in 40 CFR 
part 745, subpart L, to apply to lead-based paint activities being 
conducted as part of the conversion of a building into target housing 
or a child-occupied facility. EPA believes that it is especially 
important to ensure that renovations done in preparation for use by 
children under age 6 are done in a lead-safe manner. Therefore, EPA 
proposes to add the following sentence at the end of the definition of 
``renovation'' in 40 CFR 745.83:
    A renovation performed for the purpose of converting a building, 
or part of a building, into target housing or a child-occupied 
facility is a renovation under this subpart.

    EPA is proposing to apply the same exemptions proposed for target 
housing in 2006 to child-occupied facilities. This proposal would 
exempt renovations in child-occupied facilities that affect components 
that have been determined to be free of lead-based paint by a certified 
lead-based paint inspector or risk assessor, or by a certified 
renovator using an EPA-approved test kit. Likewise, minor maintenance 
and repair activities in child-occupied facilities would be exempt. The 
2006 Proposal would limit minor maintenance and repair activities to 
those activities that affect 2 square feet or less of painted surface 
per component, the current limitation in the Pre-Renovation Education 
Rule. However, comment was requested on whether a different exemption 
for small projects should be used, such as the small project exception 
from EPA's lead-based paint activities regulations at 40 CFR 745.65(d) 
and HUD's Lead-Safe Housing Rule at 24 CFR 35.1350(d), which exempt 
activities that disturb less than 2 square feet of painted surface per 
room or 20 square feet of painted exterior surfaces. Finally, under 
this proposal, EPA would apply the same standard to emergency 
renovation operations in child-occupied facilities as it would under 
the 2006 Proposal to target housing. The 2006 Proposal would require 
emergency renovations to be performed in compliance with the 
notification, training, certification, and work practice requirements 
to the extent practicable. EPA is still evaluating the numerous 
comments it received on this aspect of the 2006 Proposal, but it is 
EPA's intention to cover emergency renovations in child-occupied 
facilities in the same manner that such renovations in target housing 
would be covered. EPA requests comment on whether emergency renovation 
operations should be treated differently in child-occupied facilities 
than in target housing.

D. Requirements for Renovations in Child-Occupied Facilities

    1. Training, certification, accreditation, work practice, and 
recordkeeping requirements. With this proposal, EPA would extend the 
training, certification, accreditation, and work practice standard 
requirements of the 2006 Proposal to renovations for compensation in 
child-occupied facilities. The 2006 Proposal would require that 
renovators be trained in the use of lead safe work practices, that 
renovators and firms be certified, that providers of renovation 
training be accredited, and that renovators follow renovation work 
practice standards. The work practices in the 2006 Proposal included 
the posting of warning signs, isolation of the work area, containment 
of waste, cleaning, and post-renovation cleaning verification. The 2006 
Proposal also would establish a dust sampling technician discipline and 
would allow certified dust sampling technicians to collect optional 
dust clearance samples after renovations. Consult the 2006 Proposal for 
more information on each of these proposed requirements (Ref. 1).
    The 2006 Proposal described how the proposed training elements for 
renovators as well as most of the proposed work practice standards were 
developed with reference to the EPA-HUD model curriculum entitled 
``Lead

[[Page 31030]]

Safety for Remodeling, Repair, & Painting'' and the technical documents 
used to develop the curriculum, including the ``Guidelines for the 
Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing'' (HUD 
Guidelines) developed by HUD as directed by the Residential Lead-Based 
Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992 (Ref. 1 at 1608). As discussed in 
the Supplemental Economic Analysis for this proposal (Ref. 6), EPA has 
determined that approximately 90% of the child-occupied facilities that 
would be covered by this proposal are located in target housing. 
(Roughly half of the child-occupied facilities in target housing were 
covered by the 2006 Proposal either because they are in rental housing 
or because they are in owner-occupied housing where a child under age 6 
resides.) EPA knows of no reason why the requirements for renovations 
conducted in target housing that is also a child-occupied facility 
should be different from the requirements in the 2006 Proposal for 
renovations in rental target housing and target housing where children 
under age 6 reside.
    EPA also believes that the training, certification, accreditation, 
work practice, and recordkeeping requirements of the 2006 Proposal are 
equally applicable to renovations conducted in child-occupied 
facilities in public or commercial buildings. The HUD Guidelines were 
also used to develop the required training elements in 40 CFR 745.225 
for certified lead-based paint activities professionals, such as 
abatement supervisors and workers. These individuals, after completing 
the required training and being certified by EPA, may perform 
abatements in child-occupied facilities as well as in target housing. 
Likewise, EPA specifically referenced the HUD Guidelines in 40 CFR 
745.227(a)(3) in describing the methods that certified professionals 
must follow in performing lead-based paint activities in target housing 
or in child-occupied facilities. Thus, EPA did not distinguish between 
target housing and child-occupied facilities in designing the training, 
certification, and accreditation requirements of the lead-based paint 
activities regulations. In addition, the only way that EPA 
distinguished between child-occupied facilities and multi-family target 
housing in the work practice requirements of 40 CFR 745.227 was in 
incorporating special instructions at 40 CFR 745.227(d)(7) for dust 
sampling in child-occupied facilities when performing a risk 
assessment. In promulgating the lead-based paint activities regulations 
under TSCA section 402(a), EPA determined that the same training, 
certification, and accreditation requirements would apply in target 
housing and child-occupied facilities. In addition, EPA found that the 
same work practice requirements would be equally reliable, effective 
and safe in target housing and child-occupied facilities. EPA noted 
that commenters did not support the development of different sets of 
work practices for target housing and child-occupied facilities.
    In late 2006, EPA conducted an additional renovation study, which 
was designed to characterize dust lead levels at various stages of 
renovation projects. As part of this study, renovation projects were 
performed in child-occupied facilities in public or commercial 
buildings. In a March 16, 2007 Notice of Availability (Ref. 9), EPA 
described its intention to consider the results of its Dust Study (Ref. 
10), along with the NAHB Survey (Ref. 11), in the development of the 
final rule. In the March 2007 notice, EPA requested comment from the 
public on the work practice provisions of the 2006 Proposal in light of 
the results of these studies.
    TSCA section 402(a)(1) directs EPA to promulgate regulations that, 
among other things, contain standards for performing lead-based paint 
activities, taking into account reliability, effectiveness, and safety. 
In revising those regulations to apply to renovation activities in 
child-occupied facilities, EPA is proposing to find that the same work 
practice requirements would be equally reliable, effective, and safe in 
target housing and child-occupied facilities. EPA therefore is 
proposing to extend the work practice standards of the 2006 Proposal to 
firms and individuals performing renovations in child-occupied 
facilities. This proposal would also impose the training, 
certification, accreditation, work practice and recordkeeping 
requirements of the 2006 Proposal on firms and individuals performing 
renovations in child-occupied facilities, because EPA has determined 
that the same requirements should apply in child-occupied facilities 
and target housing. EPA requests comment on these proposed findings. 
EPA also invites commenters to identify peer-reviewed studies and data, 
of which EPA may not be aware, that shed light on potential differences 
between renovations in target housing and renovations in child-occupied 
facilities.
    EPA remains concerned about the potential exposures to lead hazards 
that may be created by untrained homeowners doing work in the presence 
of lead-based paint. EPA specifically requests comment on whether any 
aspects of the proposed requirements, such as training, certification, 
work practices, or recordkeeping, should be modified to make compliance 
more feasible for target housing owner-occupants who provide child care 
for compensation and who choose to undertake their own renovations.
    2. Information distribution requirements. TSCA section 406(b) 
directs EPA to promulgate regulations requiring that every person who 
performs renovations for compensation in target housing provide a lead-
hazard information pamphlet to the owner and the occupant of the 
housing before the renovation commences. The Pre-Renovation Education 
Rule, which implements this directive, was promulgated in 1998 and 
codified at 40 CFR part 745, subpart E. Much of the proposed regulatory 
text in the 2006 Proposal would be codified in that subpart along with 
the existing information distribution regulations.
    Under today's proposal, firms and individuals performing 
renovations for compensation in target housing, whether or not the 
target housing contains a child-occupied facility, would still be 
required to provide the lead-hazard information pamphlet as required by 
TSCA section 406(b) and its implementing regulations. Today's proposal 
would also require a similar information distribution for renovation 
projects in child-occupied facilities in public or commercial 
buildings. EPA has previously used the authority of TSCA section 407 to 
impose notification requirements for lead-based paint training course 
providers and for firms performing lead-based paint abatements (Ref. 
12). TSCA section 407 authorizes EPA to promulgate recordkeeping or 
reporting requirements as necessary for the effective implementation of 
TSCA Title IV. EPA finds that the distribution of lead hazard 
information, before renovation projects begin, to the owners and 
occupants of child-occupied facilities as well as the owners of public 
or commercial buildings that contain child-occupied facilities is 
necessary to ensure effective implementation of this proposed 
regulation. Information on lead hazards, and lead safe work practices 
that minimize the creation of hazards, will stimulate interest on the 
part of child-occupied facilities and public or commercial building 
owners in these work practices and increase the demand for their use. 
In addition, providing information to the parents and guardians of 
children frequenting child-occupied facilities will enable the

[[Page 31031]]

parents and guardians to make decisions regarding their children's 
welfare.
    Under this proposal, unless they own the building being renovated, 
firms and individuals performing renovation projects in child-occupied 
facilities would be required to provide a lead hazard information 
pamphlet to the owner of the building and either obtain a signed 
acknowledgment that the owner received the pamphlet or document through 
a certificate of mailing that the pamphlet was mailed to the owner at 
least 7 days, but no more than 60 days, before the date that the 
renovation begins. In addition, if the renovation is not being 
performed by the entity that operates the child-occupied facility, a 
lead hazard information pamphlet must be provided to an adult 
representative of the child-occupied facility and a signed 
acknowledgment obtained, the reason for the lack of a signed 
acknowledgment documented, or a certificate of mailing obtained. EPA is 
also proposing to require that the renovation firm either distribute 
the pamphlet and general information on the renovation project to the 
parents or guardians of children using the facility or post, while the 
project is ongoing, informational signs describing the general nature 
and locations of the project and the anticipated completion date. These 
signs must be posted in areas where they can be seen by the parents or 
guardians of the children frequenting the child-occupied facility. The 
signs must be accompanied by a posted copy of the lead hazard 
information pamphlet or information on how interested parents and 
guardians can review a copy of the pamphlet or obtain a copy from the 
renovation firm at no cost to the parents or guardians. EPA requests 
comment on the utility of this kind of information for child-occupied 
facilities and public or commercial building owners, and on the 
usefulness of informational signs for parents and guardians of children 
visiting the child-occupied facility.

E. State Renovation Model Program and Authorization Process

    As described in Unit IV.F. of the 2006 Proposal, EPA would give 
interested States, Territories, and Indian Tribes the opportunity to 
apply for, and receive authorization to administer and enforce all of 
the elements of the revised 40 CFR part 745, subpart E (Ref. 1 at 
1616). This would include the existing elements of subpart E, the Pre-
Renovation Education Rule, as well as the new training, certification, 
accreditation, work practice, and recordkeeping requirements of the 
proposed renovation, repair, and painting program. The 2006 Proposal 
would allow States, Territories and Tribes to choose to administer and 
enforce just the existing requirements of subpart E, the pre-renovation 
education elements, or all of the requirements of the proposed subpart 
E, as amended. EPA did not propose to allow States, Territories, and 
Tribes to seek authorization to administer and enforce only the 
training, certification, accreditation, work practice, and 
recordkeeping requirements of the 2006 Proposal and not the pre-
renovation education provisions of existing subpart E.
    This supplemental proposal would not fundamentally change the 
authorization scheme in the 2006 Proposal. Interested States, 
Territories, and Indian Tribes would still be given the opportunity to 
apply for, and receive authorization to, administer and enforce just 
the pre-renovation education provisions of revised 40 CFR part 745, 
subpart E, or both the pre-renovation education provisions and the 
training, certification, accreditation, work practice, and 
recordkeeping provisions of subpart E, as amended. However, this 
supplemental proposal would mean that States, Territories, and Tribes 
that wish to administer and enforce the pre-renovation education 
provisions of subpart E, as amended, would have to include both target 
housing and child-occupied facilities within the scope of their 
program. Similarly, States, Territories, and Tribes that are also 
interested in obtaining authorization to administer and enforce the 
training, certification, accreditation, work practice, and 
recordkeeping elements of subpart E, as amended, would have to include 
both target housing and child-occupied facilities within the scope of 
their program. States with existing authorized pre-renovation education 
programs would be required to demonstrate that they have modified their 
programs to include child-occupied facilities. These States would have 
to provide this demonstration in the first report that they submit 
pursuant to 40 CFR 745.324(h) more than one year after the final rule 
is promulgated.

V. References

    1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Lead; Renovation, 
Repair, and Painting Program: Proposed Rule. Federal Register (71 FR 
1587, January 10, 2006).
    2. USEPA. Lead; Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities: 
Proposed Rule. Federal Register (59 FR 45872, September 2, 1994).
    3. USEPA. Lead; Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in 
Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities: Final Rule. Federal 
Register (61 FR 45778, August 29, 1996).
    4. USEPA. Lead; Identification of Dangerous Levels of Lead: Final 
Rule. Federal Register (66 FR 1206, January 5, 2001).
    5. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). National 
Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing, Volume I: Analysis of Lead 
Hazards, Final Report, Revision 7.1. (October 31, 2002).
    6. USEPA, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT). 
Economic Analysis for the Supplemental Proposed Rule on Child-Occupied 
Facilities Under the TSCA Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program 
(January 2007).
    7. USEPA, OPPT. Sample acknowledgment form (2007).
    8. HUD. First National Environmental Health Survey of Child Care 
Centers, Volume I: Analysis of Lead Hazards, Final Report. (July 15, 
2003).
    9. USEPA. Lead; Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program; Notice of 
Availability. Federal Register (72 FR 12582, March 16, 2007).
    10. USEPA, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT). 
Characterization of Dust Lead Levels after Renovation, Repair, and 
Painting Activities; Draft Final Report (January 2007).
    11. National Association of Home Builders. Lead Safe Work Practice 
Survey Project Report (November 2006).
    12. USEPA. Lead; Notification Requirements for Lead-Based Paint 
Abatement Activities and Training: Final Rule. Federal Register (69 FR 
18489, April 8, 2004).
    13. USEPA, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT). 
Economic Analysis for the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program 
Proposed Rule (February 2006).
    14. USEPA. Second Proposed Rule Related Addendum to Existing EPA 
ICR entitled: TSCA section 402/404 Training and Certification, 
Accreditation, and Standards for Lead-Based Paint Activities (January 
2007).
    15. ASTM International. Standard Practice for Clearance 
Examinations Following Lead Hazard Reduction Activities in Single-
Family Dwellings and Child-Occupied Facilities (E 2271-05).
    16. ASTM International. Standard Guide for Evaluation, Management, 
and Control of Lead Hazards in Facilities (E 2052-99).
    17. ASTM International. Standard Practice for Evaluating the 
Performance

[[Page 31032]]

Characteristics of Qualitative Chemical Spot Test Kits for Lead in 
Paint (E 1828-01).

VI. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

A. Executive Order 12866

    Under Executive Order 12866, entitled ``Regulatory Planning and 
Review'' (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), it has been determined that 
this supplemental proposed rule is a ``significant regulatory action'' 
under section 3(f)(1) of the Executive Order because EPA estimates 
that, when considered in conjunction with the 2006 proposal, it will 
have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more. 
Accordingly, this action was submitted to the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) for review under Executive Order 12866 and any changes 
made based on OMB recommendations have been documented in the public 
docket for this rulemaking as required by section 6(a)(3)(E) of the 
Executive Order.
    In addition, EPA has prepared an analysis of the potential costs 
and benefits associated with this proposed rulemaking. This analysis is 
contained in the Supplemental Economic Analysis (Ref. 6), which is 
available in the docket for this action and is briefly summarized here.
    1. Types of facilities. This supplemental proposed rule applies to 
an estimated 930,000 child-occupied facilities, of which approximately 
833,000 are in target housing where child care is provided. The 2006 
Proposal covered child-occupied facilities in rental housing and in 
owner-occupied housing where a child under age 6 resides. This 
supplemental proposed rule covers additional child-occupied facilities 
that were not covered by the 2006 Proposal because they are located in 
target housing where no child under age 6 resides. This supplemental 
proposal also applies to child-occupied facilities in public or 
commercial buildings.
    2. Options evaluated. EPA considered a variety of options for 
addressing the risks presented by renovation, repair, and painting 
actions where lead-based paint is present. The Supplemental Economic 
Analysis analyzed several different options for the rule. Option A 
applies to renovation, repair, and painting activities performed for 
compensation in all child-occupied facilities built before 1978. Option 
B has 2 phases. The first phase applies to child-occupied facilities 
built before 1960 as well as child-occupied facilities built between 
1960 and 1978 that are used by a child under age 6 with an increased 
blood lead level. The second phase, which takes effect a year after the 
first phase, adds the remaining child-occupied facilities built between 
1960 and 1978. Option C also has 2 phases. The first phase applies to 
child-occupied facilities built before 1950, and the second phase, 
which takes effect a year after the first phase, applies to child-
occupied facilities built before 1978. Option D covers the same 
facilities and phases as Option B, and differs only in the amount of 
flexibility allowed a certified renovator in selecting appropriate work 
practices for each individual job. Option D prescribes the practices to 
be followed, so does not provide flexibility. Option E has the same 
phases as Option B, but considers child care payments to be 
compensation for renovations. Thus, for example, this option covers a 
renovation by a homeowner in owner-occupied target housing if the 
housing qualifies as a child-occupied facility and the homeowner 
provides paid child care. The proposed rule is Option B.
    3. Number of events and individuals affected. Under the 
supplemental proposal, in Phase 1 there will be 243,000 events in 
child-occupied facilities where lead-safe work practices will be used 
due to the rule. As a result, there will be approximately 633,000 
exposures avoided in children under age 6. In Phase 2, lead-safe work 
practices will be used in about 140,000 events as a result of the 
supplemental proposed rule. About 916,000 exposures will be avoided in 
children under age 6 each year as a result. There will also be about 
166,000 exposures avoided in adults in Phase 1, and about 224,000 per 
year in Phase 2. The affected adults are the staff of child-occupied 
facilities in public or commercial buildings (such as schools and day 
care centers) and the residents of target housing where child care is 
provided.
    4. Benefits. The Supplemental Economic Analysis describes the 
estimated benefits of the proposed rulemaking in qualitative and 
quantitative terms. Benefits result from the prevention of adverse 
health effects attributable to lead exposure. These health effects 
include impaired cognitive function in children and several illnesses 
in children and adults. One of the stated purposes of Title X is to 
prevent childhood lead poisoning. EPA considered the potential benefits 
to children separately from adults, because the reduction in the threat 
of childhood lead poisoning is a focus of Title X, and because of 
uncertainties about the exposure of adults to lead in dust from 
renovation, repair, and painting activities in these facilities, and 
the resulting health effects. The Agency specifically seeks comment on 
its consideration of potential benefits to both children and adults, as 
well as comments and information about the potential uncertainties 
associated with adult exposures and health effects.
    Quantifying the adverse health effects associated with renovation, 
repair, and painting projects involves 4 steps: first, estimating the 
amount of lead contamination due to the renovation project under 
various assumptions about cleaning; second, estimating the blood-lead 
levels resulting from this contamination; third, estimating the adverse 
health effects (such as loss in IQ points) due to increased blood-lead 
levels using dose-response functions; and fourth, assigning medical 
costs, reduced income, or another proxy for willingness-to-pay to avoid 
the adverse health effects.
    The Supplemental Economic Analysis estimates the benefits of 
avoided incidence of IQ loss due to reduced lead exposure to children. 
The analysis was limited to the avoided incidence of IQ loss because 
there are not sufficient data at this time to develop dose-response 
functions for other health effects in children. The Supplemental 
Economic Analysis provides six alternative estimates of children's 
benefits, depending on which of two models is used to relate exposure 
to blood-lead levels, which of two age groups the model is applied to, 
and which of two exposure metrics is used. Furthermore, benefits are 
estimated using two different scenarios for cleaning assumptions. The 
range of benefits estimates described below reflects the minimum and 
maximum of the six alternative blood-lead estimates and the two 
cleaning scenarios. The benefits of avoided exposure to adults were not 
quantified due to uncertainties about the estimation of such exposure.
    Depending on which blood-lead model and exposure assumptions are 
used, the quantified IQ benefits to children for the supplemental 
proposed rule range from $64 million to $257 million per year when 
annualized using a 3% discount rate, and from $68 million to $272 
million per year when using a 7% discount rate. The estimated benefits 
for the other options range from $64 million to $386 million using a 3% 
discount rate and from $67 million to $408 million using a 7% discount 
rate. There are additional unquantified benefits, including avoided 
health effects in adults.
    5. Costs. The Supplemental Economic Analysis estimates the 
potential costs of complying with the training,

[[Page 31033]]

certification, and work practice requirements in the supplemental 
proposed rule. Costs may be incurred by child-occupied facilities that 
use their own staff for renovation, repair, and painting events; 
landlords that use their own staff for renovation, repair, and painting 
events in public or commercial buildings that they lease to child-
occupied facilities; and contractors that perform renovation, repair, 
and painting work for compensation in child-occupied facilities.
    The supplemental proposed rule, if finalized as proposed, is 
estimated to result in a total potential cost of $53 million in Phase 
1. The 50-year annualized costs provide a measure of the steady-state 
cost. Annualized costs of the supplemental proposed rule are estimated 
to be $39 million per year using a 3% discount rate and $43 million per 
year using a 7% discount rate. Annualized costs for the other options 
range from $39 million to $92 million per year using a 3% discount rate 
and $42 million to $102 million per year using a 7% discount rate.
    6. Net benefits. Net benefits are the difference between benefits 
and costs. The supplemental proposed rule, if finalized as proposed, is 
estimated to result in potential net benefits of $1 million to $157 
million in Phase 1 based on children's benefits alone. The 50-year 
annualized net benefits for the proposed rule based on children's 
benefits are estimated to be $25 million to $218 million per year using 
a 3% discount rate and $25 million to $229 million per year using a 7% 
discount rate. The net benefits for the other options range from -$8 
million to $293 million per year using a 3% discount rate and -$12 
million to $306 million per year using a 7% discount rate. There are 
additional unquantified benefits, including avoided health effects in 
adults, that are not included in the net benefits estimates.
    7. Request for comment. To improve the analysis for the final rule, 
the Agency conducted a number of sensitivity analyses in its 
Supplemental Economic Analysis (Ref. 6). These analyses examined the 
sensitivity of the overall costs and benefits of the rule to selected 
parameters which appear to be important and for which relatively few 
supporting data are available. These include alternative assumptions 
regarding compliance with this rule, the effectiveness of daily 
cleaning, areas of schools other than pre-kindergarten and kindergarten 
classrooms that are routinely used by children under age 6, the number 
of unscheduled maintenance events in child-occupied facilities in 
public or commercial buildings, the effectiveness of current work 
practices in child-occupied facilities in public or commercial 
buildings, and how lead loadings from renovation events may vary with 
the age of a building. The Agency is specifically interested in 
comments on these sensitivity analyses and supporting information, 
particularly peer-reviewed studies and data, on the following questions 
related to the Agency's analysis:
     How often are unplanned maintenance activities that would 
be covered by this supplemental proposal performed in child care 
centers and schools?
     How often are classrooms in child-occupied facilities in 
public or commercial buildings swept and how often are they mopped? Do 
janitorial staff use single bucket mopping or the two bucket mopping 
method required by the rule and how frequently do they change the 
water? What are the efficiencies of the various cleaning methods?
     What share of the renovations in schools and child care 
centers use work practices required by this supplemental proposal, and 
which particular work practices do they use?
     How do renovations performed by contractors and those 
performed by homeowners differ, particularly with respect to the 
frequency with which work practices required by this proposal are 
already being used and the expected compliance rates if homeowner 
renovations were covered by the regulation? (This supplemental proposal 
would not cover persons who perform renovations in housing that they 
own and occupy, but one of the regulatory options evaluated in EPA's 
Supplemental Economic Analysis covered renovations by homeowners who 
provide child care for compensation in their homes.)
     When estimating the lead loadings from renovations, how 
should EPA's analysis take into account variations in the amount of 
lead in paint by component type and building age?

B. Paperwork Reduction Act

    The information collection requirements contained in this proposed 
rule have been submitted for approval to the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 USC 3501 et seq. An 
Information Collection Request (ICR) document prepared by EPA, an 
amendment to an existing ICR and referred to as the Second ICR Addendum 
(EPA ICR No. 1715.08, OMB Control Number 2070-0155) has been placed in 
the public docket for this proposed rule (Ref. 14).
    An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required 
to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a 
currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA's 
regulations codified in Chapter 40 of the CFR, after appearing in the 
preamble of the final rule, are listed in 40 CFR part 9, are displayed 
either by publication in the Federal Register or by other appropriate 
means, such as on the related collection instrument or form, if 
applicable. The display of OMB control numbers in certain EPA 
regulations is consolidated in 40 CFR part 9.
    The new information collection activities contained in this 
supplemental proposed rule are designed to assist the Agency in meeting 
the core objectives of TSCA section 402, including ensuring the 
integrity of accreditation programs for training providers, providing 
for the certification of renovators, and determining whether work 
practice standards are being followed. EPA has carefully tailored the 
proposed recordkeeping and recordkeeping requirements so they will 
permit the Agency to achieve statutory objectives without imposing an 
undue burden on those firms that choose to be involved in renovation, 
repair, and painting activities.
    Burden under the PRA means the total time, effort, or financial 
resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, disclose 
or provide information to or for a Federal agency. This includes the 
time needed to review instructions; develop, acquire, install, and 
utilize technology and systems for the purposes of collecting, 
validating, and verifying information, processing and maintaining 
information, and disclosing and providing information; adjust the 
existing ways to comply with any previously applicable instructions and 
requirements; train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of 
information; search data sources; complete and review the collection of 
information; and transmit or otherwise disclose the information.
    Under this supplemental proposal, the new information collection 
requirements may affect training providers and firms that perform 
renovation, repair, or painting for compensation in child-occupied 
facilities. Although these firms have the option of choosing to engage 
in the covered activities, once a firm chooses to do so, the 
information collection activities contained in this rule become 
mandatory for that firm.
    The ICR document provides a detailed presentation of the estimated 
burden and costs for 3 years of the program. The

[[Page 31034]]

aggregate burden varies by year due to changes in the number of firms 
that will seek certification each year. The burden and cost to training 
providers and firms engaged in renovation, repair, and painting 
activities is summarized in this section.
    There are an average of 145 training providers that are estimated 
to incur burden to notify EPA (or an authorizing State, Tribe, or 
Territory) before and after training courses. The average burden for 
training provider notifications as a result of the supplemental 
proposed rule is estimated at 7 to 18 hours per year, depending on the 
number of additional training courses provided. Total training provider 
burden is estimated to average 1,700 hours per year.
    There are an average of 38,000 firms estimated to become certified 
to engage in renovation, repair, or painting activities in child-
occupied facilities under the supplemental proposed rule. The average 
certification burden is estimated to be 3.5 hours per firm in the year 
a firm is initially certified, and 0.5 hours in years that it is re-
certified (which occurs every 3 years). Firms must also distribute lead 
hazard information to the owners and occupants of public or commercial 
buildings that contain child-occupied facilities. Finally, firms must 
keep records of the work they perform in child-occupied facilities; 
this recordkeeping is estimated to typically take approximately 5 hours 
per year. Total burden for these firms is estimated to average 280,000 
hours per year.
    Total respondent burden as a result of the supplemental proposed 
rule during the period covered by the ICR is estimated to average 
approximately 281,000 hours per year.
    There are also government costs to administer the program. States, 
Tribes, and Territories are allowed, but are under no obligation, to 
apply for and receive authorization to administer these proposed 
requirements. EPA will directly administer programs for States, Tribes, 
and Territories that do not become authorized. Because the number of 
States, Tribes, and Territories that will become authorized is not 
known, administrative costs are estimated assuming that EPA will 
administer the program everywhere. To the extent that other government 
entities become authorized, EPA's administrative costs will be lower.
    Direct your comments on the Agency's need for this information, the 
accuracy of the provided burden estimates, and any suggested methods 
for minimizing respondent burden, including the use of automated 
collection techniques, to EPA using the public docket that has been 
established for this proposed rule (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OPPT-2005-
0049). In addition, send a copy of your comments about the ICR to OMB 
at: Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management 
and Budget, 725 17th St., NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention: Desk 
Office for EPA. Since OMB is required to complete its review of the ICR 
between 30 and 60 days after June 5, 2007, please submit your ICR 
comments for OMB consideration to OMB by July 5, 2007.
    The Agency will consider and address comments received on the 
information collection requirements contained in this proposal when it 
develops the final rule.

C. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    In accordance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), 5 
U.S.C.601 et seq., and the Agency's long-standing policy of always 
considering whether there may be a potential for adverse impacts on 
small entities, the Agency has evaluated the potential small entity 
impacts of its 2006 Proposal and this supplemental proposal. The 
Agency's analysis of the potentially adverse economic impacts of this 
supplemental proposal is contained in the Supplemental Economic 
Analysis (Ref. 6). The analysis of the potentially adverse economic 
impacts of the 2006 Proposal is contained in the document entitled 
``Economic Analysis for the Renovation, Repair, and Painting Program 
Proposed Rule'' (Ref. 13). Because EPA intends to promulgate a single 
final rule that encompasses both the 2006 Proposal and this 
supplemental proposal, EPA has evaluated the small entity impacts for 
the combined effects of the two proposals. The initial regulatory 
flexibility analysis was reviewed in the preamble to the 2006 Proposal. 
This analysis has been revised to include information on this 
supplemental proposal. The following is an overview of the revised 
analysis.
    1. Legal basis and objectives for the proposed rule. As discussed 
in Unit IV.A. of this preamble, TSCA section 402(c)(2) directs EPA to 
study the extent to which persons engaged in renovation, repair, and 
painting activities are exposed to lead or create lead-based paint 
hazards regularly or occasionally. After concluding this study, TSCA 
section 402(c)(3) further directs EPA to revise its lead-based paint 
activities regulations under TSCA section 402(a) to apply to renovation 
or remodeling activities that create lead-based paint hazards. Because 
EPA's study found that activities commonly performed during renovation 
and remodeling create lead-based paint hazards, EPA is proposing to 
revise the TSCA section 402(a) regulatory scheme to apply to 
individuals and firms engaged in renovation, repair, and painting 
activities. The primary objective of the combined proposals is to 
prevent the creation of new lead-based paint hazards from renovation, 
repair, and painting activities in housing where children under age 6 
reside and in housing or other buildings frequented by children under 
age 6.
    2. Potentially affected small entities. Small entities include 
small businesses, small organizations, and small governmental 
jurisdictions. For purposes of assessing the impacts of this proposed 
rule on small entities, small entity is defined in accordance with 
section 601 of the RFA as:
    (1) A small business as defined by the Small Business 
Administration's (SBA) regulations at 13 CFR 121.201; (2) a small 
governmental jurisdiction that is a government of a city, county, 
town, school district, or special district with a population of less 
than 50,000; and (3) a small organization that is any not-for-profit 
enterprise which is independently owned and operated and is not 
dominant in its field.

    The small entities that are potentially directly regulated by this 
proposed rule include: small businesses (including contractors and non-
residential property owners and managers); small non-profits (certain 
daycare centers and private schools); and small governments (school 
districts).
    In determining the number of small businesses affected by the 
proposed rule, the Agency applied U.S. Economic Census data to the 
SBA's definition of small business. However, applying the U.S. Economic 
Census data requires either under or overestimating the number of small 
businesses affected by the proposed rule. For example, for many 
construction establishments, the SBA defines small businesses as having 
revenues of less than $13 million. With respect to those 
establishments, the U.S. Economic Census data groups all establishments 
with revenues of $10 million or more into one revenue bracket. On the 
one hand, using data for the entire industry would overestimate the 
number of small businesses affected by the proposed rule and would 
defeat the purpose of estimating impacts on small business. It would 
also underestimate the proposed rule's impact on small businesses 
because the impacts would be calculated using the revenues of large 
businesses in addition to small businesses. On the other hand, applying 
the closest, albeit lower,

[[Page 31035]]

revenue bracket would underestimate the number of small businesses 
affected by the proposed rule while at the same time overestimating the 
impacts.
    Similar issues arose in estimating the fraction of non-residential 
commercial property owners and managers that are small businesses. For 
other sectors (non-profits operating daycare centers or private 
schools), EPA assumed that all affected firms are small, which may 
overestimate the number of small entities affected by the rule. The 
Agency requests comments and information regarding available data to 
better estimate the number of small entities affected by the rule.
    The vast majority of entities in the industries affected by this 
rule are small. Using EPA's estimates, when the supplemental proposal 
is combined with the 2006 Proposal, the renovation, repair, and 
painting program will affect an average of approximately 186,000 small 
entities.
    3. Potential economic impacts on small entities. EPA evaluated two 
factors in its analysis of the rule's requirements on small entities, 
the number of firms that would experience the impact, and the size of 
the impact. Annual compliance costs as a percentage of annual revenues 
were used to assess the potential impacts of the rule on small 
businesses and small governments. This ratio is a good measure of 
entities' ability to afford the costs attributable to a regulatory 
requirement, because comparing compliance costs to revenues provides a 
reasonable indication of the magnitude of the regulatory burden 
relative to a commonly available measure of economic activity. Where 
regulatory costs represent a small fraction of a typical entity's 
revenues (for example, less than 1%, and not greater than 3%), the 
financial impacts of the regulation on such entities may be considered 
as not significant. For non-profit organizations, impacts were measured 
by comparing rule costs to the organization's annual expenditures. When 
expenditure data were not available, however, revenue information was 
used as a proxy for expenditures. It is appropriate to calculate the 
impact ratios using annualized costs, because these costs are more 
representative of the continuing costs entities face to comply with the 
rule.
    EPA estimates that there are an average of 186,000 small entities 
that would be affected by the combined renovation, repair, and painting 
activities program. Of these, there are an estimated 163,000 small 
businesses with an average impact of 0.9%, 17,000 small non-profits 
with an average impact of 0.1%, and 6,000 small governments with an 
average impact of 0.004%.
    4. Relevant Federal rules. The proposed requirements in this 
rulemaking will fit within an existing framework of other Federal 
regulations that address lead-based paint.
    The Pre-Renovation Education Rule, discussed in Unit IV.A.2. of 
this preamble, requires renovators to distribute a lead hazard 
information pamphlet to owners and occupants before conducting a 
renovation in target housing. This proposal has been carefully crafted 
to harmonize with the existing pre-renovation education requirements.
    Disposal of waste from renovation projects that would be regulated 
by this proposal is covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery 
Act (RCRA) regulations for solid waste. This proposal does not contain 
specific requirements for the disposal of waste from renovations.
    HUD has extensive regulations that address the conduct of interim 
controls, as well as other lead-based paint activities, in Federally 
assisted housing. Some of HUD's interim controls would be regulated 
under this proposal as renovations, depending upon whether the 
particular interim control measure disturbs more than the threshold 
amount of paint. In most cases, the HUD regulations are comparable to, 
or more stringent than this proposal. In general, persons performing 
HUD-regulated interim controls must have taken a course in lead-safe 
work practices, which is also a requirement of this proposal. However, 
this proposal would not require dust clearance testing, a process 
required by HUD after interim control activities that disturb more than 
a minimal amount of lead-based paint.
    Finally, OSHA's Lead Exposure in Construction standard covers 
potential worker exposures to lead during many construction activities, 
including renovation, repair, and painting activities. Although this 
standard may cover many of the same projects as today's proposal, the 
requirements themselves do not overlap. The OSHA rule addresses the 
protection of the worker, this EPA proposal addresses the protection of 
the building occupants, particularly children under age 6.
    5. Skills needed for compliance. This proposal would establish 
requirements for training renovators and dust sampling technicians; 
certifying renovators, dust sampling technicians, and entities engaged 
in renovation, repair, and painting activities; accrediting providers 
of renovation and dust sampling technician training; and for renovation 
work practices. Renovators and dust sampling technicians would have to 
take a course to learn the proper techniques for accomplishing the 
tasks they will perform during renovations. These courses are intended 
to provide them with the information they would need to comply with the 
rule based on the skills they already have. Entities would be required 
to apply for certification to perform renovations; this process does 
not require any special skills other than the ability to complete the 
application. They would also need to document the work they have done 
during renovations. This does not require any special skills. Training 
providers must be knowledgeable about delivering technical training. 
Training providers would be required to apply for accreditation to 
offer renovator and dust sampling technician courses. They would also 
be required to provide prior notification of such courses and provide 
information on the students trained after each such course. Completing 
the accreditation application and providing the required notification 
information does not require any special skills.
    6. Small Business Advocacy Review Panel. Since the earliest stages 
of planning for this regulation under Section 402(c)(3) of TSCA, EPA 
has been concerned with potential small entity impacts. EPA conducted 
outreach to small entities, and, in 1999, convened a Small Business 
Advocacy Review Panel to obtain advice and recommendations of 
representatives of the small entities that would potentially be subject 
to this regulation's requirements. At that time, EPA was planning an 
initial regulation that would apply to renovations in target housing, 
with requirements for public and commercial building renovations, 
including child-occupied facility renovations, to follow at a later 
date. The small entity representatives (SERs) chosen for consultation 
reflect that initial emphasis. They included maintenance and renovation 
contractors, painting and decorating contractors, multi-family housing 
owners and operators, training providers/consultants, and 
representatives from several national contractor associations, the 
National Multi-Housing Council, and the National Association of Home 
Builders.
    After considering the existing lead-based paint activities 
regulations, and taking into account preliminary stakeholder feedback, 
EPA identified eight key elements of a potential renovation and 
remodeling regulation for the Panel's consideration. These elements 
were:
     Applicability and scope.

[[Page 31036]]

     Firm certification.
     Individual training and certification.
     Accreditation of training courses.
     Work practice standards.
     Prohibited practices.
     Exterior clearance.
     Interior clearance.
    EPA also developed several options for each of these key elements. 
Although the scope and applicability options specifically presented to 
the Panel covered only target housing, background information presented 
to the SERs and to the Panel members shows that EPA was also 
considering a regulation covering child-occupied facilities. More 
information on the Panel, its recommendations, and how EPA implemented 
them in the development of the program, are provided in Unit VIII.C.6 
of the preamble to the 2006 Proposal (Ref. 1).
    EPA invites comments on all aspects of the supplemental proposal 
and its impacts on small entities.

D. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act

    Under Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) (Public 
Law 104-4), EPA has determined that when this supplemental proposed 
rule is considered by itself, it does not contain a Federal mandate 
that may result in expenditures that exceed the inflation-adjusted UMRA 
threshold of $100 million in any 1 year by the private sector or by 
State, local, and Tribal governments in the aggregate. (When adjusted 
for inflation, the value of the UMRA threshold is over $118 million.) 
However, when considered in conjunction with the 2006 Proposal, the 
combined requirements will result in annual expenditures by the private 
sector above the UMRA threshold. Accordingly, EPA has prepared a 
written statement under section 202 of the UMRA which has been placed 
in the public docket for this rulemaking and is summarized here.
    1. Authorizing legislation. This proposal is issued under the 
authority of TSCA sections 402(c)(3) and 404.
    2. Cost-benefit analysis. EPA has prepared an analysis of the costs 
and benefits associated with this supplemental proposal, a copy of 
which is available in the docket for this rulemaking (Ref. 6). The 
Supplemental Economic Analysis presents the costs of the proposal as 
well as various regulatory options and is summarized in Unit VII.A. of 
this preamble. EPA has estimated that the total annualized costs of 
this supplemental proposal when using a 3% discount rate are $39 
million per year, and that benefits are $64 million to $257 million per 
year. Using a 7% discount rate, costs are $43 million per year and 
benefits are $68 million to $272 million per year.
    3. State, local, and Tribal government input. EPA has sought input 
from State, local and Tribal government representatives throughout the 
development of the renovation, repair, and painting program. EPA's 
experience in administering the existing lead-based paint activities 
program under TSCA section 402(a) suggests that these governments will 
play a critical role in the successful implementation of a national 
program to reduce exposures to lead-based paint hazards associated with 
renovation, repair, and painting activities. Consequently, as discussed 
in Unit III.C.2. of the preamble to the 2006 Proposal (Ref. 1), the 
Agency has met with State, local, and Tribal government officials on 
numerous occasions to discuss renovation issues.
    4. Least burdensome option. EPA considered a wide variety of 
options for addressing the risks presented by renovation activities 
where lead-based paint is present. The Supplemental Economic Analysis 
analyzed several different options for the scope of the supplemental 
rule. As part of the development of the renovation, repair, and 
painting program, EPA has considered different options for the scope of 
the rule, various combinations of training and certification 
requirements for individuals who perform renovations, various 
combinations of work practice requirements, and various methods for 
ensuring that no lead-based paint hazards are left behind by persons 
performing renovations. Additional information on the options 
considered is available in Unit VIII.C.6. of the preamble for the 2006 
Proposal (Ref. 1), and in the Supplemental Economic Analysis (Ref. 6). 
EPA has determined that the proposed option is the least burdensome 
option available that achieves the objective of this supplemental rule, 
which is to prevent the creation of new lead-based paint hazards from 
renovation, repair, and painting activities in child-occupied 
facilities.
    This rule does not contain a significant Federal intergovernmental 
mandate as described by section 203 of UMRA. Based on the definition of 
``small government jurisdiction'' in RFA section 601, no State 
governments can be considered small. Small Territorial or Tribal 
governments could apply for authorization to administer and enforce 
this program, which would entail costs, but these small jurisdictions 
are under no obligation to do so.
    EPA has determined that this rule contains no regulatory 
requirements that might significantly or uniquely affect small 
governments. Small governments operate schools that are child-occupied 
facilities. EPA generally measures a significant impact under UMRA as 
being expenditures, in the aggregate, of more than 1% of small 
government revenues in any one year. As explained in Unit VI.C.3., the 
rule is expected to result in small government impacts well under 1% of 
revenues. So EPA has determined that the rule does not significantly 
affect small governments.
    Nor does the rule uniquely affect small governments, as the rule is 
not targeted at small governments, does not primarily affect small 
governments, and does not impose a different burden on small 
governments than on other entities that operate child-occupied 
facilities.

E. Federalism

    Pursuant to Executive Order 13132, entitled ``Federalism'' (64 FR 
43255, August 10, 1999), EPA has determined that this proposed rule 
does not have ``federalism implications,'' because it will not have 
substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between 
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government, as 
specified in Executive Order 13132. Thus, Executive Order 13132 does 
not apply to this proposed rule.
    States would be able to apply for, and receive authorization to 
administer these proposed requirements, but would be under no 
obligation to do so. In the absence of a State authorization, EPA will 
administer these requirements.
    Nevertheless, in the spirit of the objectives of this Executive 
Order, and consistent with EPA policy to promote communications between 
the Agency and State and local governments, EPA has consulted with 
representatives of State and local governments in developing the 
renovation, repair, and painting program. These consultations are as 
described in the preamble to the 2006 Proposal (Ref. 1).
    EPA specifically solicits additional comment on this proposed rule 
from State and local officials. EPA is particularly interested in 
information on the number of public housing agencies who own or operate 
detached or off-site child-occupied facilities and this regulation's 
potential impacts on those agencies.

F. Tribal Implications

    As required by Executive Order 13175, entitled ``Consultation and

[[Page 31037]]

Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments'' (59 FR 22951, November 6, 
2000), EPA has determined that this proposed rule does not have tribal 
implications because it will not have substantial direct effects on 
tribal governments, on the relationship between the Federal government 
and the Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and 
responsibilities between the Federal government and Indian tribes, as 
specified in the Order. Tribes would be able to apply for, and receive 
authorization to administer these proposed requirements on Tribal 
lands, but Tribes would be under no obligation to do so. In the absence 
of a Tribal authorization, EPA will administer these requirements. 
While Tribes may operate child-occupied facilities covered by the rule 
such as kindergartens, pre-kindergartens, and daycare facilities, EPA 
has determined that this proposal would not have substantial direct 
effects on the tribal governments that operate these facilities.
    Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this rule. Although 
Executive Order 13175 does not apply to this rule, EPA consulted with 
Tribal officials and others by discussing potential renovation 
regulatory options for the renovation, repair, and painting program at 
several national lead program meetings hosted by EPA and other 
interested Federal agencies.
    EPA specifically solicits additional comment on this proposed rule 
from Tribal officials.

G. Children's Health Protection

    Executive Order 13045, entitled ``Protection of Children from 
Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks'' (62 FR 19885, April 23, 
1997) applies to this supplemental rule because, when considered in 
conjunction with the 2006 Proposal, the combination would be designated 
as an ``economically significant regulatory action'' as defined by 
Executive Order 12866, and because the environmental health or safety 
risk addressed by this action have a disproportionate effect on 
children. Accordingly, EPA has evaluated the environmental health or 
safety effects of renovation, repair, and painting projects on 
children. Various aspects of this evaluation are discussed in the 
preamble to the 2006 Proposal (Ref. 1).
    The primary purpose of this supplemental proposed rule is to 
prevent the creation of new lead-based paint hazards from renovation, 
repair, and painting activities in child-occupied facilities. In the 
absence of this regulation, adequate lead-safe work practices are not 
likely to be employed during renovation, repair, and painting 
activities. EPA's analysis indicates that there will be approximately 
916,000 exposures avoided per year to children under age 6 as a result 
of the rule. These children are projected to receive considerable 
benefits due to this regulation.

H. Energy Effects

    This rule is not a ``significant energy action'' as defined in 
Executive Order 13211, entitled ``Actions concerning Regulations that 
Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use'' (66 FR 
28355, May 22, 2001) because it is not likely to have any adverse 
effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy.

I. Technology Standards

    Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement 
Act of 1995 (NTTAA), Public Law No. 104-113, 12(d) (15 U.S.C. 272 
note), directs EPA to use voluntary consensus standards in its 
regulatory activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with 
applicable law or otherwise impractical. Voluntary consensus standards 
are technical standards (e.g., materials specifications, test methods, 
sampling procedures, and business practices) that are developed or 
adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. The NTTAA directs EPA 
to provide Congress, through OMB, explanations when the Agency decides 
not to use available and applicable voluntary consensus standards.
    In the 2006 Proposal, EPA proposed to adopt a number of work 
practice requirements that could be considered technical standards for 
performing renovation projects in residences that contain lead-based 
paint. This supplemental proposal would extend those work practice 
requirements to child-occupied facilities that contain lead-based 
paint. As discussed in Unit VIII.I. of the 2006 Proposal, EPA 
identified two potentially-applicable voluntary consensus standards 
(Ref. 1 at 1626). ASTM International (formerly the American Society for 
Testing and Materials) has developed 2 potentially-applicable 
documents: ``Standard Practice for Clearance Examinations Following 
Lead Hazard Reduction Activities in Single-Family Dwellings and Child-
Occupied Facilities'' (Ref. 15), and ``Standard Guide for Evaluation, 
Management, and Control of Lead Hazards in Facilities'' (Ref. 16). With 
respect to the first document, EPA did not propose to require 
traditional clearance examinations, including dust sampling, following 
renovation projects. However, EPA did propose to require that a visual 
inspection for dust, debris, and residue be conducted after cleaning 
and before post-renovation cleaning verification is performed. The 
first ASTM document does contain information on conducting a visual 
inspection before collecting dust clearance samples. The second ASTM 
document is a comprehensive guide to identifying and controlling lead-
based paint hazards. Some of the information in this document is 
relevant to the work practices that EPA proposed to require. Each of 
these ASTM documents represents state-of-the-art knowledge regarding 
the performance of these particular aspects of lead-based paint hazard 
evaluation and control practices and EPA continues to recommend the use 
of these documents where appropriate. However, because each of these 
documents is extremely detailed and encompasses many circumstances 
beyond the scope of this rulemaking, EPA determined that it would not 
be practical to incorporate these voluntary consensus standards into 
the 2006 Proposal.
    In addition, the 2006 Proposal contained a provision for EPA to 
recognize test kits that could be used by certified renovators to 
determine whether components to be affected by a renovation contain 
lead-based paint. Under that proposal, EPA would recognize those kits 
that meet certain performance standards for limited false positives and 
negatives. Further, EPA would also recognize only those kits that have 
been properly validated by a laboratory independent of the kit 
manufacturer. Although EPA did not propose to establish a particular 
method to be used for validating kits, for chemical spot test kits, EPA 
announced its intention to look to the ASTM document entitled 
``Standard Practice for Evaluating the Performance Characteristics of 
Qualitative Chemical Spot Test Kits for Lead in Paint'' (Ref. 17) to 
determine whether a particular kit's validation is adequate.
    The provisions discussed here would apply equally to renovation 
projects in child-occupied facilities. EPA welcomes comments from 
entities potentially regulated by this supplemental proposal on this 
aspect of the proposed rulemaking. EPA specifically invites these 
entities to identify potentially applicable voluntary consensus 
standards and to explain why such standards should be used in this 
regulation.

J. Environmental Justice

    Under Executive Order 12898, entitled ``Federal Actions to Address

[[Page 31038]]

Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income 
Populations'' (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994), the Agency has assessed 
the potential impact of this proposal on minority and low-income 
populations. The results of this assessment are presented in the 
Supplemental Economic Analysis for this proposal, which is available in 
the public docket for this rulemaking (Ref. 6). The rule will not have 
disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental 
effects on minority populations and low-income populations.

List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 745

    Child-occupied facility, Environmental protection, Housing 
renovation, Lead, Lead-based paint, Renovation, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements.


    Dated: May 24, 2007.
Stephen L. Johnson,
Administrator.
    Therefore, it is proposed that 40 CFR chapter I be amended as 
follows:

PART 745--[AMENDED]

    1. The authority citation for part 745 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 15 U.S.C. 2605, 2607, 2681-2692 and 42 U.S.C. 4852d.

    2. Section 745.80 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  745.80  Purpose.

    This subpart contains regulations developed under sections 402 and 
406 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2682 and 2686) and 
applies to all renovations performed for compensation in target housing 
and child-occupied facilities. The purpose of this subpart is to ensure 
the following:
    (a) Owners and occupants of target housing and child-occupied 
facilities receive information on lead-based paint hazards before these 
renovations begin; and
    (b) Persons performing renovations regulated in accordance with 
Sec.  745.82 are properly trained; renovators, dust sampling 
technicians, and firms performing these renovations are certified; and 
lead-safe work practices are followed during these renovations.
    3. Section 745.81 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  745.81  Effective dates.

    (a) Training, certification and accreditation requirements and work 
practice standards. The training, certification and accreditation 
requirements and work practice standards in this subpart are applicable 
as of [insert date 1 year after date of publication of the final rule 
in the Federal Register] in any State or Indian Tribal area that does 
not have a renovation program that is authorized under subpart Q of 
this part. The training, certification and accreditation requirements 
and work practice standards in this subpart will become effective as 
follows:
    (1) Training programs. Effective [insert date 60 days after date of 
publication of the final rule in the Federal Register], no training 
program may provide, offer, or claim to provide training or refresher 
training for EPA certification as a renovator or a dust sampling 
technician without accreditation from EPA under Sec.  745.225. Training 
programs may apply for accreditation under Sec.  745.225 beginning 
[insert date 1 year after date of publication of the final rule in the 
Federal Register].
    (2) Firms. Firms may apply for certification under Sec.  745.89 
beginning [insert date 18 months after date of publication of the final 
rule in the Federal Register].
    (i) No firm may perform, offer, or claim to perform renovations, as 
defined in this subpart, without certification from EPA under Sec.  
745.89 on or after [insert date 2 years after date of publication of 
the final rule in the Federal Register]:
    (A) In any target housing where the firm obtains information 
indicating that a child under age 6 with a blood lead level greater 
than or equal to 10 [mu]g/dL or the applicable State or local 
government level of concern, if lower, resides there, or in any target 
housing where the firm has not provided the owners and occupants with 
the opportunity to inform the firm that a child under age 6 with such a 
blood lead level resides there;
    (B) In any child-occupied facility where the firm obtains 
information indicating that the facility is used by a child under age 6 
with a blood lead level greater than or equal to 10 [mu]g/dL or the 
applicable State or local government level of concern, if lower, or in 
any child-occupied facility where the firm has not provided the owners 
and occupants with the opportunity to inform the firm that the facility 
is used by a child under age 6 with such a blood lead level; or
    (C) In target housing or child-occupied facilities constructed 
before 1960, unless, in the case of owner-occupied target housing, the 
firm has obtained a statement signed by the owner that the renovation 
will occur in the owner's residence and no child under age 6 resides or 
is provided child care there.
    (ii) No firm may perform, offer, or claim to perform renovations, 
as defined in this subpart, without certification from EPA under Sec.  
745.89 on or after [insert date 3 years after date of publication of 
the final rule in the Federal Register] in any target housing or child-
occupied facility, unless, in the case of owner-occupied target 
housing, the firm has obtained a statement signed by the owner that the 
renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no child under age 6 
resides or is provided child care there.
    (3) Individuals. (i) All renovations, as defined in this subpart, 
must be directed by renovators certified in accordance with Sec.  
745.90(a) and performed by certified renovators or individuals trained 
in accordance with Sec.  745.90(b)(2) on or after [insert date 2 years 
after date of publication of the final rule in the Federal Register]:
    (A) In any target housing where the firm performing the renovation 
obtains information indicating that a child under age 6 with a blood 
lead level greater than or equal to 10 [mu]g/dL or the applicable State 
or local government level of concern, if lower, resides there, or in 
any target housing where the firm has not provided the owners and 
occupants with the opportunity to inform the firm that a child under 
age 6 with such a blood lead level resides there;
    (B) In any child-occupied facility where the firm obtains 
information indicating that the facility is used by a child under age 6 
with a blood lead level greater than or equal to 10 [mu]g/dL or the 
applicable State or local government level of concern, if lower, or in 
any child-occupied facility where the firm has not provided the owners 
and occupants with the opportunity to inform the firm that the facility 
is used by a child under age 6 with such a blood lead level; or
    (C) In target housing or child-occupied facilities constructed 
before 1960, unless, in the case of owner-occupied target housing, the 
firm performing the renovation has obtained a statement signed by the 
owner that the renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no 
child under age 6 resides or is provided child care there.
    (ii) All renovations, as defined in this subpart, must be directed 
by renovators certified in accordance with Sec.  745.90(a) and 
performed by certified renovators or individuals trained in accordance 
with Sec.  745.90(b)(2) on or after [insert date 3 years after date of 
publication of the final rule in the Federal Register] in any target 
housing or child-occupied

[[Page 31039]]

facility, unless, in the case of owner-occupied target housing, the 
firm performing the renovation has obtained a statement signed by the 
owner that the renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no 
child under age 6 resides or is provided child care there.
    (4) Work practices. (i) All renovations, as defined in Sec.  
745.83, must be performed in accordance with the work practice 
standards in Sec.  745.85 and the associated recordkeeping requirements 
in Sec.  745.86(b)(6) and (b)(7) on or after [insert date 2 years after 
date of publication of the final rule in the Federal Register]:
    (A) In any target housing where the firm performing the renovation 
obtains information indicating that a child under age 6 with a blood 
lead level greater than or equal to 10 [mu]g/dL or the applicable State 
or local government level of concern, if lower, resides there, or in 
any target housing where the firm has not provided the owners and 
occupants with the opportunity to inform the firm that a child under 
age 6 with such a blood lead level resides there;
    (B) In any child-occupied facility where the firm obtains 
information indicating that the facility is used by a child under age 6 
with a blood lead level greater than or equal to 10 [mu]g/dL or the 
applicable State or local government level of concern, if lower, or in 
any child-occupied facility where the firm has not provided the owners 
and occupants with the opportunity to inform the firm that the facility 
is used by a child under age 6 with such a blood lead level; or
    (C) In target housing or child-occupied facilities constructed 
before 1960, unless, in the case of owner-occupied target housing, the 
firm performing the renovation has obtained a statement signed by the 
owner that the renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no 
child under age 6 resides or is provided child care there.
    (ii) All renovations, as defined in this subpart, must be performed 
in accordance with the work practice standards in Sec.  745.85 and the 
associated recordkeeping requirements in Sec.  745.86(b)(6) and (b)(7) 
on or after [insert date 3 years after date of publication of the final 
rule in the Federal Register] in any target housing or child-occupied 
facility, unless, in the case of owner-occupied target housing, the 
firm performing the renovation has obtained a statement signed by the 
owner that the renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no 
child under age 6 resides or is provided child care there.
    (5) The suspension and revocation provisions in Sec.  745.91 are 
effective [insert date 2 years after date of publication of the final 
rule in the Federal Register].
    (b) Renovation-specific pamphlet. Before [insert date 8 months 
after date of publication of the final rule in the Federal Register], 
renovators or firms performing renovations in States and Indian Tribal 
areas without an authorized program may provide owners and occupants 
with either of the following EPA pamphlets: Protect Your Family From 
Lead in Your Home or Protect Your Family from Lead During Renovation, 
Repair & Painting. After that date, Protect Your Family from Lead 
During Renovation, Repair & Painting must be used exclusively.
    (c) Pre-Renovation Education Rule. With the exception of the 
requirement to use the pamphlet titledProtect Your Family from Lead 
During Renovation, Repair & Painting, the provisions of the Pre-
Renovation Education Rule in this subpart have been in effect since 
June 1999.
    4. Section 745.82 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  745.82  Applicability.

    (a) This subpart applies to all renovations performed for 
compensation in target housing and child-occupied facilities, except 
for the following:
    (1) Minor repair and maintenance activities (including minor 
electrical work and plumbing) that disrupt 2 square feet or less of 
painted surface per component.
    (2) Renovations in target housing or child-occupied facilities in 
which a written determination has been made by an inspector (certified 
pursuant to either Federal regulations at Sec.  745.226 or a State or 
Tribal certification program authorized pursuant to Sec.  745.324) that 
the components affected by the renovation are free of paint or other 
surface coatings that contain lead equal to or in excess of 1.0 
milligrams/per square centimeter (mg/cm2) or 0.5% by weight, 
where the firm performing the renovation has obtained a copy of the 
determination.
    (3) Renovations in target housing or child-occupied facilities in 
which a certified renovator, using an acceptable test kit and following 
the kit manufacturer's instructions, has determined that the components 
affected by the renovation are free of paint or other surface coatings 
that contain lead equal to or in excess of1.0 mg/cm2 or 0.5% 
by weight.
    (b) The information distribution requirements in Sec.  745.84 do 
not apply to emergency renovation operations, which are renovation 
activities that were not planned but result from a sudden, unexpected 
event (such as non-routine failures of equipment) that, if not 
immediately attended to, presents a safety or public health hazard, or 
threatens equipment and/or property with significant damage. Interim 
controls performed in response to an elevated blood lead level in a 
resident child are also emergency renovation operations. The work 
practice, training, and certification requirements in Sec. Sec.  
745.85, 745.89, 745.90 and the recordkeeping requirements in Sec.  
745.86(b)(6) and (b)(7) apply to emergency renovation operations to the 
extent practicable.
    (c) The work practice standards for renovation activities in Sec.  
745.85 apply to all renovations covered by this subpart, except for 
renovations in target housing for which the firm performing the 
renovation has obtained a statement signed by the owner that the 
renovation will occur in the owner's residence and no child under age 6 
resides or is provided child care there. For the purposes of this 
section, a child resides in the primary residence of his or her 
custodial parents, legal guardians, and foster parents. A child also 
resides in the primary residence of an informal caretaker if the child 
lives and sleeps most of the time at the caretaker's residence.
    5. Section 745.83 is amended as follows:
    a. Remove the definition of ``Emergency renovation operations.''
    b. Revise the definition of ``Pamphlet'' and the definition of 
``Renovator.''
    c. Add 13 definitions in alphabetic order.


Sec.  745.83  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Acceptable test kit means a commercially available kit recognized 
by EPA pursuant to section 405 of TSCA as being capable of allowing a 
user to accurately determine the presence of lead at levels equal to or 
in excess of 1.0 milligrams per square centimeter, or more than 0.5% 
lead by weight, in a paint chip, paint powder, or painted surface.
* * * * *
    Child-occupied facility means a building, or portion of a building, 
constructed prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same child, under 6 
years of age, on at least two different days within any week (Sunday 
through Saturday period), provided that each day's visit lasts at least 
3 hours and the combined weekly visits last at least 6 hours, and the 
combined annual visits

[[Page 31040]]

last at least 60 hours. Child-occupied facilities may include, but are 
not limited to, day care centers, preschools and kindergarten 
classrooms. Child-occupied facilities may be located in target housing 
or in public or commercial buildings. In public or commercial buildings 
that contain child-occupied facilities, the child-occupied facility 
encompasses only those common areas that are routinely used by children 
under age 6, such as restrooms and cafeterias. Common areas that 
children under age 6 only pass through, such as hallways, stairways, 
and garages are not included. In addition, for public or commercial 
buildings that contain child-occupied facilities, the child-occupied 
facility encompasses only the exterior sides of the building that are 
immediately adjacent to the child-occupied facility or the common areas 
routinely used by children under age 6.
    Cleaning verification card means a card developed and distributed, 
or otherwise approved, by EPA for the purpose of determining, through 
comparison of disposable cleaning cloths with the card, whether post-
renovation cleaning has been properly completed.
    Component or building component means specific design or structural 
elements or fixtures of a building or residential dwelling that are 
distinguished from each other by form, function, and location. These 
include, but are not limited to, interior components such as: Ceilings, 
crown molding, walls, chair rails, doors, door trim, floors, 
fireplaces, radiators and other heating units, shelves, shelf supports, 
stair treads, stair risers, stair stringers, newel posts, railing caps, 
balustrades, windows and trim (including sashes, window heads, jambs, 
sills or stools and troughs), built in cabinets, columns, beams, 
bathroom vanities, counter tops, and air conditioners; and exterior 
components such as: Painted roofing, chimneys, flashing, gutters and 
downspouts, ceilings, soffits, fascias, rake boards, cornerboards, 
bulkheads, doors and door trim, fences, floors, joists, lattice work, 
railings and railing caps, siding, handrails, stair risers and treads, 
stair stringers, columns, balustrades, window sills or stools and 
troughs, casings, sashes and wells, and air conditioners.
    Dry disposable cleaning cloth means a commercially available dry, 
electrostatically charged, white disposable cloth designed to be used 
for cleaning hard surfaces such as uncarpeted floors or counter tops.
* * * * *
    Firm means a company, partnership, corporation, sole proprietorship 
or individual doing business, association, or other business entity; a 
Federal, State, Tribal, or local government agency; or a nonprofit 
organization.
    HEPA-equipped vacuum means a vacuum equipped with a high efficiency 
particulate air filter.
    Interim controls means a set of measures designed to temporarily 
reduce human exposure or likely exposure to lead-based paint hazards, 
including specialized cleaning, repairs, maintenance, painting, 
temporary containment, ongoing monitoring of lead-based paint hazards 
or potential hazards, and the establishment and operation of management 
and resident education programs.
* * * * *
    Pamphlet means the EPA pamphlet titled Protect Your Family from 
Lead During Renovation, Repair & Painting developed under section 
406(a) of TSCA for use in complying with section 406(b) of TSCA, or any 
State or Tribal pamphlet approved by EPA pursuant to 40 CFR 745.326 
that is developed for the same purpose. This includes reproductions of 
the pamphlet when copied in full and without revision or deletion of 
material from the pamphlet (except for the addition or revision of 
State or local sources of information). Before [insert date 8 months 
after date of publication of the final rule in the Federal Register], 
the term ``pamphlet'' also means any pamphlet developed by EPA under 
section 406(a) of TSCA or any State or Tribal pamphlet approved by EPA 
pursuant to Sec.  745.326.
* * * * *
    Renovation means the modification of any existing structure, or 
portion thereof, that results in the disturbance of painted surfaces, 
unless that activity is performed as part of an abatement as defined by 
this part (40 CFR 745.223). The term renovation includes (but is not 
limited to): The removal or modification of painted surfaces or painted 
components (e.g., modification of painted doors, surface preparation 
activity (such as sanding, scraping, or other such activities that may 
generate paint dust)); the removal of large structures (e.g., walls, 
ceiling, large surface replastering, major re-plumbing); and window 
replacement. A renovation performed for the purpose of converting a 
building, or part of a building, into target housing or a child-
occupied facility is a renovation under this subpart.
    Renovator means a person who either performs or directs uncertified 
workers who perform renovations. A certified renovator is a renovator 
who has successfully completed a renovator course accredited by EPA or 
an EPA-authorized State or Tribal program.
    Training hour means at least 50 minutes of actual learning, 
including, but not limited to, time devoted to lecture, learning 
activities, small group activities, demonstrations, evaluations, and 
hands-on experience.
    Wet disposable cleaning cloth means a commercially available, pre-
moistened white disposable cloth designed to be used for cleaning hard 
surfaces such as uncarpeted floors or counter tops.
    Wet mopping system means a device with the following 
characteristics: A long handle, a mop head designed to be used with 
disposable absorbent cleaning pads, a reservoir for cleaning solution, 
and a built-in mechanism for distributing or spraying the cleaning 
solution onto a floor.
    Work area means the area that the certified renovator establishes 
to contain all of the dust and debris generated by a renovation, based 
on the certified renovator's evaluation of the extent and nature of the 
activity and the specific work practices that will be used.

Sec.  745.84 [Removed]

    6. Section 745.84 is removed.

Sec.  745.85 [Redesignated]

    7. Section 745.85 is redesignated as Sec.  745.84.
    8. Newly designated Sec.  745.84 is amended as follows:
    a. Revise the introductory text of paragraph (a) and revise 
paragraph (a)(2)(i).
    b. Revise the introductory text of paragraph (b) and revise 
paragraphs (b)(2) and (b)(4).
    c. Redesignate paragraph (c) as paragraph (d).
    d. Add a new paragraph (c).
    c. Revise the introductory text of newly designated paragraph (d).


Sec.  745.84  Information distribution requirements.

    (a) Renovations in dwelling units. No more than 60 days before 
beginning renovation activities in any residential dwelling unit of 
target housing, the firm performing the renovation must:
    (1) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) Obtain, from the adult occupant, a written acknowledgment that 
the occupant has received the pamphlet; or certify in writing that a 
pamphlet has been delivered to the dwelling and that the firm 
performing the renovation has been unsuccessful in obtaining a written 
acknowledgment from an adult

[[Page 31041]]

occupant. Such certification must include the address of the unit 
undergoing renovation, the date and method of delivery of the pamphlet, 
names of the persons delivering the pamphlet, reason for lack of 
acknowledgment (e.g., occupant refuses to sign, no adult occupant 
available), the signature of a representative of the firm performing 
the renovation, and the date of signature.
* * * * *
    (b) Renovations in common areas. No more than 60 days before 
beginning renovation activities in common areas of multi-unit target 
housing, the firm performing the renovation must:
    (1) * * *
    (2) Notify in writing, or ensure written notification of, each 
affected unit and make the pamphlet available upon request prior to the 
start of renovation. Such notification shall be accomplished by 
distributing written notice to each affected unit. The notice shall 
describe the general nature and locations of the planned renovation 
activities; the expected starting and ending dates; and a statement of 
how the occupant can obtain the pamphlet, at no charge, from the firm 
performing the renovation.
    (3) * * *
    (4) If the scope, locations, or expected starting and ending dates 
of the planned renovation activities change after the initial 
notification, the firm performing the renovation must provide further 
written notification to the owners and occupants providing revised 
information on the ongoing or planned activities. This subsequent 
notification must be provided before the firm performing the renovation 
initiates work beyond that which was described in the original notice.
    (c) Renovations in child-occupied facilities. (1) No more than 60 
days before beginning renovation activities in any child-occupied 
facility, the firm performing the renovation must:
    (i) Provide the owner of the building with the pamphlet, and comply 
with one of the following:
    (A) Obtain, from the owner, a written acknowledgment that the owner 
has received the pamphlet.
    (B) Obtain a certificate of mailing at least 7 days prior to the 
renovation.
    (ii) If the child-occupied facility is not the owner of the 
building, provide an adult representative of the child-occupied 
facility with the pamphlet, and comply with one of the following:
    (A) Obtain, from the adult representative, a written acknowledgment 
that the adult representative has received the pamphlet; or certify in 
writing that a pamphlet has been delivered to the facility and that the 
firm performing the renovation has been unsuccessful in obtaining a 
written acknowledgment from an adult representative. Such certification 
must include the address of the child-occupied facility undergoing 
renovation, the date and method of delivery of the pamphlet, names of 
the persons delivering the pamphlet, reason for lack of acknowledgment 
(e.g., representative refuses to sign), the signature of a 
representative of the firm performing the renovation, and the date of 
signature.
    (B) Obtain a certificate of mailing at least 7 days prior to the 
renovation.
    (2) Provide the parents and guardians of children using the child-
occupied facility with the pamphlet and information describing the 
general nature and locations of the renovation and the anticipated 
completion date by complying with one of the following:
    (i) Mail or hand-deliver the pamphlet and the renovation 
information to each parent or guardian of a child using the child-
occupied facility.
    (ii) While the renovation is ongoing, post informational signs 
describing the general nature and locations of the renovation and the 
anticipated completion date. These signs must be posted in areas where 
they can be seen by the parents or guardians of the children 
frequenting the child-occupied facility. The signs must be accompanied 
by a posted copy of the pamphlet or information on how interested 
parents or guardians can review a copy of the pamphlet or obtain a copy 
from the renovation firm at no cost to the parents or guardians.
    (d) Written acknowledgment. The written acknowledgments required by 
paragraphs (a)(1)(i), (a)(2)(i), (b)(1)(i), (c)(1)(i)(A), and 
(c)(1)(ii)(A) of this section must:
* * * * *
    9. Section 745.85 is added to subpart E to read as follows:


Sec.  745.85  Work practice standards.

    (a) Standards for renovation activities. Renovations must be 
performed by certified firms using certified renovators as directed in 
Sec.  745.89.
    (1) Occupant protection. Firms must post signs clearly defining the 
work area and warning occupants and other persons not involved in 
renovation activities to remain outside of the work area. These signs 
must be posted before beginning the renovation and must remain in place 
and readable until the renovation and the post-renovation cleaning 
verification have been completed. If warning signs have been posted in 
accordance with 24 CFR 35.1345(b)(2) or 29 CFR 1926.62(m), additional 
signs are not required by this section.
    (2) Containing the work area. Before beginning the renovation, the 
firm must isolate the work area so that no visible dust or debris 
leaves the work area while the renovation is being performed.
    (i) Interior renovations. The firm must:
    (A) Remove all objects from the work area, including furniture, 
rugs, and window coverings, or cover them with plastic sheeting or 
other impermeable material with all seams and edges taped or otherwise 
sealed.
    (B) Close and cover all ducts opening in the work area with taped-
down plastic sheeting or other impermeable material.
    (C) Close windows and doors in the work area. Doors must be covered 
with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material. Doors used as an 
entrance to the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting or 
other impermeable material in a manner that allows workers to pass 
through while confining dust and debris to the work area.
    (D) Cover the floor surface of the work area with plastic sheeting 
or other impermeable material with all seams taped and all edges 
secured at the perimeter of the work area.
    (E) Ensure that all personnel, tools, and other items including 
waste are free of dust and debris when leaving the work area. 
Alternatively, the paths used to reach the exterior of the building 
must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material to 
prevent the spread of lead contaminated dust and debris outside the 
work area.
    (ii) Exterior renovations. The firm must:
    (A) Close all doors and windows within 20 feet of the renovation. 
On multi-story buildings, close all doors and windows within 20 feet of 
the renovation on the same floor as the renovation, and close all doors 
and windows on all floors below that are the same horizontal distance 
from the renovation.
    (B) Ensure that doors within the work area that must be used while 
the job is being performed are covered with plastic sheeting or other 
impermeable material in a manner that allows workers to pass through 
while confining dust and debris to the work area.
    (C) Cover the ground with plastic sheeting or other disposable 
impermeable material extending out from the edge of the structure a 
sufficient distance to collect falling paint debris.

[[Page 31042]]

    (3) Waste from renovations. (i) Waste from renovation activities 
must be contained to prevent releases of dust and debris before the 
waste is removed from the work area for storage or disposal. If a chute 
is used to remove waste from the work area, it must be covered.
    (ii) At the conclusion of each work day and at the conclusion of 
the renovation, waste that has been collected from renovation 
activities must be stored under containment, in an enclosure, or behind 
a barrier that prevents release of dust and debris out of the work area 
and prevents access to dust and debris.
    (iii) When the firm transports waste from renovation activities, 
the firm must contain the waste to prevent identifiable releases of 
dust and debris.
    (4) Cleaning the work area. After the renovation has been 
completed, the firm must clean the work area until no visible dust, 
debris or residue remains.
    (i) Interior and exterior renovations. The firm must:
    (A) Pick up all paint chips and debris.
    (B) Remove the protective sheeting. Mist the sheeting before 
folding it, fold the dirty side inward, and either tape shut to seal or 
seal in heavy-duty bags. Sheeting used to isolate contaminated rooms 
from non-contaminated rooms must remain in place until after the 
cleaning and removal of other sheeting. Dispose of the sheeting as 
waste.
    (ii) Additional cleaning for interior renovations. The firm must 
clean all objects and surfaces in and around the work area in the 
following manner, cleaning from higher to lower:
    (A) Walls. Clean walls starting at the ceiling and working down to 
the floor by either vacuuming with a HEPA-equipped vacuum or wiping 
with a damp cloth.
    (B) Remaining surfaces. Thoroughly vacuum all remaining surfaces 
and objects in the work area, including furniture and fixtures, with a 
HEPA-equipped vacuum. The HEPA-equipped vacuum must be equipped with a 
beater bar when vacuuming carpets and rugs. Where feasible, floor 
surfaces underneath a rug or carpeting must also be thoroughly vacuumed 
with a HEPA-equipped vacuum.
    (C) Wipe all remaining surfaces and objects in the work area, 
except for carpeted or upholstered surfaces, with a damp cloth. Mop 
uncarpeted floors thoroughly, using a 2-bucket mopping method that 
keeps the wash water separate from the rinse water, or using a wet 
mopping system.
    (b) Standards for post-renovation cleaning verification. (1) 
Interiors. (i) A certified renovator must perform a visual inspection 
to determine whether visible amounts of dust, debris or residue are 
still present. If visible amounts of dust, debris or residue are 
present, these conditions must be eliminated by re-cleaning and another 
visual inspection must be performed.
    (ii) After a successful visual inspection, a certified renovator 
must:
    (A) Verify that each windowsill in the work area has been 
adequately cleaned, using the following procedure.
    (1) Wipe the windowsill with a wet disposable cleaning cloth that 
is damp to the touch. If the cloth matches the cleaning verification 
card, the windowsill has been adequately cleaned.
    (2) If the cloth does not match the cleaning verification card, re-
clean the windowsill as directed in paragraphs (a)(4)(ii)(B) and 
(a)(4)(ii)(C) of this section, then either use a new cloth or fold the 
used cloth in such a way that an unused surface is exposed, and wipe 
the windowsill again. If the cloth matches the cleaning verification 
card, that windowsill has been adequately cleaned.
    (3) If the cloth does not match the cleaning verification card, 
clean that windowsill again as directed in paragraphs (a)(4)(ii)(B) and 
(a)(4)(ii)(C) of this section and wait for 1 hour or until the 
windowsill has dried completely, whichever is longer.
    (4) After waiting for the windowsill to dry, wipe the windowsill 
with dry disposable cleaning cloths until a cloth, or section of cloth, 
used to wipe the windowsill matches the cleaning verification card.
    (B) Wipe uncarpeted floors within the work area with a wet 
disposable cleaning cloth, using an application device with a long 
handle and a head to which the cloth is attached. The cloth must remain 
damp at all times while it is being used to wipe the floor for post-
renovation cleaning verification. If the floor surface within the work 
area is greater than 40 square feet, the floor within the work area 
must be divided into roughly equal sections that are each less than 40 
square feet. Wipe each such section separately with a new wet 
disposable cleaning cloth. If the cloth used to wipe each section of 
the floor within the work area matches the cleaning verification card, 
the floor has been adequately cleaned.
    (1) If the cloth used to wipe a particular floor section does not 
match the cleaning verification card, re-clean that section of the 
floor as directed in paragraphs (a)(4)(ii)(B) and (a)(4)(ii)(C) of this 
section, then use a new wet disposable cleaning cloth to wipe that 
section again. If the cloth matches the cleaning verification card, 
that section of the floor has been adequately cleaned.
    (2) If the cloth used to wipe a particular floor section does not 
match the cleaning verification card after the floor has been re-
cleaned, clean that section of the floor again as directed in 
paragraphs (a)(4)(ii)(B) and (a)(4)(ii)(C) of this section and wait for 
1 hour or until the entire floor within the work area has dried 
completely, whichever is longer.
    (3) After waiting for the entire floor within the work area to dry, 
wipe those sections of the floor that have not yet achieved post-
renovation cleaning verification with dry disposable cleaning cloths 
until a cloth that has wiped those sections of the floor matches the 
cleaning verification card. This wiping must also be performed using an 
application device with a long handle and a head to which the cloths 
are attached.
    (iii) Dust clearance sampling may be performed instead of, or in 
addition to, the procedures identified in paragraph (b)(1)(ii) of this 
section. If dust clearance sampling is performed, it must be performed 
in accordance with Sec.  745.227(e)(8) through (e)(9), except that a 
dust sampling technician certified in accordance with this subpart may 
collect and report the results of the required samples.
    (iv) When the work area passes the post-renovation cleaning 
verification or dust clearance sampling, remove the warning signs.
    (2) Exteriors. A certified renovator must perform a visual 
inspection to determine whether visible amounts of dust, debris or 
residue are still present. If visible amounts of dust, debris or 
residue are present, these conditions must be eliminated and another 
visual inspection must be performed. When the area passes the visual 
inspection, remove the warning signs.
    (c) Activities conducted after post-renovation cleaning 
verification. Activities that do not disturb paint, such as applying 
paint to walls that have already been prepared, are not regulated by 
this subpart if they are conducted after post-renovation cleaning 
verification has been performed.
    10. Section 745.86 is amended by revising paragraph (a) and adding 
new paragraphs (b)(6) and (b)(7) to read as follows:


Sec.  745.86  Recordkeeping requirements.

    (a) Firms performing renovations or conducting dust sampling must 
retain and, if requested, make available to EPA all records necessary 
to demonstrate compliance with this subpart for a

[[Page 31043]]

period of 3 years following completion of the renovation or dust 
sampling activities. This 3-year retention requirement does not 
supersede longer obligations required by other provisions for retaining 
the same documentation, including any applicable State or Tribal laws 
or regulations.
    (b) * * *
    (6) Any signed and dated statements received from owner-occupants 
that no children under age 6 reside or are provided child care in 
housing being renovated which document that the requirements of Sec.  
745.85 do not apply. These statements must include a declaration that 
the renovation will occur in the owner's residence, a declaration that 
no children under age 6 reside or are provided child care there, the 
address of the unit undergoing renovation, the owner's name, the 
signature of the owner, and the date of signature. These statements 
must be written in the same language as the text of the renovation 
contract, if any. This requirement includes any statements received 
from owners or occupants that a child under age 6 with a blood lead 
level that equals or exceeds 10 [mu]g/dL, or an applicable State or 
local government level of concern, if lower, resides or is provided 
child care there.
    (7) Documentation of compliance with the requirements of Sec.  
745.85, including documentation that a certified renovator was assigned 
to the project, the certified renovator provided on-the-job training 
for uncertified workers used on the project, the certified renovator 
performed or directed uncertified workers who performed all of the 
tasks described in Sec.  745.85(a), and the certified renovator 
performed the post-renovation cleaning verification described in Sec.  
745.85(b). This documentation must include a copy of the certified 
renovator's or dust sampling technician's training certificate, and 
signed and dated descriptions of how activities performed by the 
certified renovator or dust sampling technician, including worker 
training activities, sign posting, work area containment, waste 
handling, cleaning, and post-renovation cleaning verification or 
clearance were conducted in compliance with this subpart. The 
descriptions of these activities must include a certification by the 
record preparer that the descriptions are complete and accurate.
    11. Section 745.87 is amended by revising paragraph (e) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  745.87  Enforcement and inspections.

* * * * *
    (e) Lead-based paint is assumed to be present at renovations 
covered by this subpart. EPA may conduct inspections and issue 
subpoenas pursuant to the provisions of TSCA section 11 (15 U.S.C. 
2610) to ensure compliance with this subpart.

Sec.  745.88 [Removed]

    12. Section 745.88 is removed.
    13. Section 745.89 is added to subpart E to read as follows:


Sec.  745.89  Firm certification.

    (a) Initial certification. (1) Firms that perform renovations for 
compensation must apply to EPA for certification to perform renovations 
or dust sampling. To apply, a firm must submit to EPA a completed 
``Application for Firms,'' signed by an authorized agent of the firm, 
and pay at least the correct amount of fees. If a firm pays more than 
the correct amount of fees, EPA will reimburse the firm for the excess 
amount.
    (2) After EPA receives a firm's application, EPA will take one of 
the following actions within 90 days of the date the application is 
received:
    (i) EPA will approve a firm's application if EPA determines that it 
is complete and that the environmental compliance history of the firm, 
its principals, or its key employees does not show an unwillingness or 
inability to maintain compliance with environmental statutes or 
regulations. An application is complete if it contains all of the 
information requested on the form and includes at least the correct 
amount of fees. When EPA approves a firm's application, EPA will issue 
the firm a certificate with an expiration date not more than 3 years 
from the date the application is approved. EPA certification allows the 
firm to perform renovations covered by this section in any State or 
Indian Tribal area that does not have a renovation program that is 
authorized under subpart Q of this part.
    (ii) EPA will request a firm to supplement its application if EPA 
determines that the application is incomplete. If EPA requests a firm 
to supplement its application, the firm must submit the requested 
information or pay the additional fees within 30 days of the date of 
the request.
    (iii) EPA will not approve a firm's application if the firm does 
not supplement its application in accordance with paragraph (a)(2)(ii) 
of this section or if EPA determines that the environmental compliance 
history of the firm, its principals, or its key employees demonstrates 
an unwillingness or inability to maintain compliance with environmental 
statutes or regulations. EPA will send the firm a letter giving the 
reason for not approving the application. EPA will not refund the 
application fees. A firm may reapply for certification at any time by 
filing a new, complete application that includes the correct amount of 
fees.
    (b) Re-certification. To maintain its certification, a firm must be 
re-certified by EPA every 3 years.
    (1) Timely and complete application. To be re-certified, a firm 
must submit a complete application for re-certification. A complete 
application for re-certification includes a completed ``Application for 
Firms'' which contains all of the information requested by the form and 
is signed by an authorized agent of the firm, noting on the form that 
it is submitted as a re-certification. A complete application must also 
include at least the correct amount of fees. If a firm pays more than 
the correct amount of fees, EPA will reimburse the firm for the excess 
amount.
    (i) An application for re-certification is timely if it is 
postmarked 90 days or more before the date the firm's current 
certification expires. If the firm's application is complete and 
timely, the firm's current certification will remain in effect until 
its expiration date or until EPA has made a final decision to approve 
or disapprove the re-certification application, whichever is later.
    (ii) If the firm submits a complete re-certification application 
less than 90 days before its current certification expires, and EPA 
does not approve the application before the expiration date, the firm's 
current certification will expire and the firm will not be able to 
conduct renovations until EPA approves its re-certification 
application.
    (iii) If the firm fails to obtain recertification before the firm's 
current certification expires, the firm must not perform renovations or 
dust sampling until it is certified anew pursuant to paragraph (a) of 
this section.
    (2) EPA action on an application. After EPA receives a firm's 
application for re-certification, EPA will review the application and 
take one of the following actions within 90 days of receipt:
    (i) EPA will approve a firm's application if EPA determines that it 
is timely and complete and that the environmental compliance history of 
the firm, its principals, or its key employees does not show an 
unwillingness or inability to maintain compliance with environmental 
statutes or regulations. When EPA approves a firm's application for re-
certification, EPA will issue the firm a new certificate with an 
expiration date 3 years from the date that the firm's current 
certification

[[Page 31044]]

expires. EPA certification allows the firm to perform renovations or 
dust sampling covered by this section in any State or Indian Tribal 
area that does not have a renovation program that is authorized under 
subpart Q of this part.
    (ii) EPA will request a firm to supplement its application if EPA 
determines that the application is incomplete.
    (iii) EPA will not approve a firm's application if it is not 
received or is not complete as of the date that the firm's current 
certification expires, or if EPA determines that the environmental 
compliance history of the firm, its principals, or its key employees 
demonstrates an unwillingness or inability to maintain compliance with 
environmental statutes or regulations. EPA will send the firm a letter 
giving the reason for not approving the application. EPA will not 
refund the application fees. A firm may reapply for certification at 
any time by filing a new application and paying the correct amount of 
fees.
    (c) Amendment of certification. A firm must amend its certification 
within 45 days of the date a change occurs to information included in 
the firm's most recent application. If the firm fails to amend its 
certification within 45 days of the date the change occurs, the firm 
may not perform renovations or dust sampling until its certification is 
amended.
    (1) To amend a certification, a firm must submit a completed 
``Application for Firms,'' signed by an authorized agent of the firm, 
noting on the form that it is submitted as an amendment and indicating 
the information that has changed. The firm must also pay at least the 
correct amount of fees.
    (2) If additional information is needed to process the amendment, 
or the firm did not pay the correct amount of fees, EPA will request 
the firm to submit the necessary information or fees. The firm's 
certification is not amended until the firm complies with the request.
    (3) Amending a certification does not affect the certification 
expiration date.
    (d) Firm responsibilities. Firms performing renovations or dust 
sampling must ensure that:
    (1)(i) All persons performing renovation activities on behalf of 
the firm are either certified renovators or have been trained by a 
certified renovator in accordance with Sec.  745.90.
    (ii) All persons performing dust sampling on behalf of the firm are 
certified as either risk assessors, inspectors, or dust sampling 
technicians.
    (2) A certified renovator is assigned to each renovation performed 
by the firm and discharges all of the certified renovator 
responsibilities identified in Sec.  745.90; and
    (3) All renovations performed by the firm are performed in 
accordance with the work practice standards in Sec.  745.85.
    14. Section 745.90 is added to subpart E to read as follows:


Sec.  745.90  Renovator and dust sampling technician certification.

    (a) Renovator and dust sampling technician certification. (1) To 
become a certified renovator or dust sampling technician, a person must 
successfully complete the appropriate course accredited by EPA under 
Sec.  745.225 or by a State or Tribal program that is authorized under 
subpart Q of this part. The course completion certificate serves as 
proof of certification. EPA renovator certification allows the 
certified individual to perform renovations covered by this section in 
any State or Indian Tribal area that does not have a renovation program 
that is authorized under subpart Q of this part. EPA dust sampling 
technician certification allows the certified individual to perform 
dust sampling covered by this section in any State or Indian Tribal 
area that does not have a renovation program that is authorized under 
subpart Q of this part.
    (2) To maintain renovator or dust sampling technician 
certification, a person must complete a renovator or dust sampling 
technician refresher course accredited by EPA under Sec.  745.225 or by 
a State or Tribal program that is authorized under subpart Q of this 
part within 3 years of the date the person completed the initial course 
described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. If the person does not 
complete a refresher course within this time, the person must re-take 
the initial course to become certified again.
    (3) Persons who have a valid lead-based paint abatement supervisor 
or worker certification issued by EPA under Sec.  745.226 or by a State 
or Tribal program authorized under subpart Q of this part are also 
deemed to be certified renovators.
    (4) Persons who have a valid lead-based paint inspector or risk 
assessor certification issued by EPA under Sec.  745.226 or by a State 
or Tribal program authorized under subpart Q of this part are also 
deemed to be certified dust sampling technicians.
    (b) Renovator responsibilities. Certified renovators are 
responsible for ensuring compliance with Sec.  745.85 at all 
renovations to which they are assigned. A certified renovator:
    (1) Must perform all of the tasks described in Sec.  745.85(b) and 
must either perform or direct uncertified workers who perform all of 
the tasks described in Sec.  745.85(a).
    (2) Must provide training to uncertified workers on the lead-safe 
work practices they will be using in performing their assigned tasks, 
how to isolate the work area and maintain the integrity of the 
containment barriers, and how to avoid spreading dust or debris beyond 
the work area.
    (3) Must be physically present at the work site when the signs 
required by Sec.  745.85(a)(1) are posted, while the work area 
containment required by Sec.  745.85(a)(2) is being established, and 
while the work area cleaning required by Sec.  745.85(a)(4) is 
performed.
    (4) Must direct work being performed by uncertified persons to 
ensure that lead-safe work practices are being followed, the integrity 
of the containment barriers is maintained, and dust or debris is not 
spread beyond the work area.
    (5) Must be available, either on-site or by telephone, at all times 
that renovations are being conducted.
    (6) When requested by the entity contracting for renovation 
services, must use an acceptable test kit to determine whether 
components to be affected by the renovation contain lead-based paint.
    (7) Must have with them at the work site copies of their initial 
course completion certificate and their most recent refresher course 
completion certificate.
    (c) Dust sampling technician responsibilities. A certified dust 
sampling technician:
    (1) Must collect dust samples in accordance with Sec.  
745.227(e)(8), must send the collected samples to a laboratory 
recognized by EPA under TSCA section 405(b), and must compare the 
results to the clearance levels in accordance with Sec.  745.227(e)(8).
    (2) Must have with them at the work site copies of their initial 
course completion certificate and their most recent refresher course 
completion certificate.
    15. Section 745.91 is added to subpart E to read as follows:


Sec.  745.91  Suspending, revoking, or modifying an individual's or 
firm's certification.

    (a)(1) Grounds for suspending, revoking or modifying an 
individual's certification. EPA may suspend, revoke, or modify an 
individual's certification if the individual fails to comply with 
Federal lead-based paint statutes or regulations. EPA may also suspend, 
revoke, or modify a certified renovator's certification if the 
renovator fails to ensure that all assigned renovations

[[Page 31045]]

comply with Sec.  745.85. In addition to an administrative or judicial 
finding of violation, execution of a consent agreement in settlement of 
an enforcement action constitutes, for purposes of this section, 
evidence of a failure to comply with relevant statutes or regulations.
    (2) Grounds for suspending, revoking or modifying a firm's 
certification. EPA may suspend, revoke, or modify a firm's 
certification if the firm:
    (i) Submits false or misleading information to EPA in its 
application for certification or re-certification.
    (ii) Fails to maintain or falsifies records required in Sec.  
745.86.
    (iii) Fails to comply, or an individual performing a renovation on 
behalf of the firm fails to comply, with Federal lead-based paint 
statutes or regulations. In addition to an administrative or judicial 
finding of violation, execution of a consent agreement in settlement of 
an enforcement action constitutes, for purposes of this section, 
evidence of a failure to comply with relevant statutes or regulations.
    (b) Process for suspending, revoking, or modifying certification. 
(1) Prior to taking action to suspend, revoke, or modify an 
individual's or firm's certification, EPA will notify the affected 
entity in writing of the following:
    (i) The legal and factual basis for the proposed suspension, 
revocation, or modification.
    (ii) The anticipated commencement date and duration of the 
suspension, revocation, or modification.
    (iii) Actions, if any, which the affected entity may take to avoid 
suspension, revocation, or modification, or to receive certification in 
the future.
    (iv) The opportunity and method for requesting a hearing prior to 
final suspension, revocation, or modification.
    (2) If an individual or firm requests a hearing, EPA will:
    (i) Provide the affected entity an opportunity to offer written 
statements in response to EPA's assertions of the legal and factual 
basis for its proposed action.
    (ii) Appoint an impartial official of EPA as Presiding Officer to 
conduct the hearing.
    (3) The Presiding Officer will:
    (i) Conduct a fair, orderly, and impartial hearing within 90 days 
of the request for a hearing.
    (ii) Consider all relevant evidence, explanation, comment, and 
argument submitted.
    (iii) Notify the affected entity in writing within 90 days of 
completion of the hearing of his or her decision and order. Such an 
order is a final agency action which may be subject to judicial review.
    (4) If EPA determines that the public health, interest, or welfare 
warrants immediate action to suspend the certification of any 
individual or firm prior to the opportunity for a hearing, it will:
    (i) Notify the affected entity in accordance with paragraph 
(b)(1)(i) through (b)(1)(iii) of this section, explaining why it is 
necessary to suspend the entity's certification before an opportunity 
for a hearing.
    (ii) Notify the affected entity of its right to request a hearing 
on the immediate suspension within 15 days of the suspension taking 
place and the procedures for the conduct of such a hearing.
    (5) Any notice, decision, or order issued by EPA under this 
section, any transcript or other verbatim record of oral testimony, and 
any documents filed by a certified individual or firm in a hearing 
under this section will be available to the public, except as otherwise 
provided by section 14 of TSCA or by part 2 of this title. Any such 
hearing at which oral testimony is presented will be open to the 
public, except that the Presiding Officer may exclude the public to the 
extent necessary to allow presentation of information which may be 
entitled to confidential treatment under section 14 of TSCA or part 2 
of this title.
    (6) EPA will maintain a publicly available list of entities whose 
certification has been suspended, revoked, modified or reinstated.
    16. Section 745.220 is amended by revising paragraph (a) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  745.220  Scope and applicability.

    (a) This subpart contains procedures and requirements for the 
accreditation of training programs for lead-based paint activities and 
renovations, procedures and requirements for the certification of 
individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities, and work 
practice standards for performing such activities. This subpart also 
requires that, except as discussed below, all lead-based paint 
activities, as defined in this subpart, be performed by certified 
individuals and firms.
* * * * *
    17. Section 745.225 is amended as follows:
    a. Revise paragraph (a).
    b. Revise the introductory text of paragraph (b), revise paragraph 
(b)(1)(ii), and add paragraph (b)(1)(iv)(C).
    c. Revise the introductory text of paragraph (c), add paragraphs 
(c)(6)(vi), (c)(6)(vii), and (c)(8)(vi), and revise 
paragraphs(c)(8)(iv) and (c)(10).
    d. Amend paragraph (c)(13) by replacing the phrase ``lead-based 
paint activities'' with the phrase ``renovator, dust sampling 
technician, or lead-based paint activities'' wherever it appears in the 
paragraph.
    e. Add paragraphs (d)(6) and (d)(7).
    f. Revise the introductory text of paragraph (e).
    g. Amend paragraph (e)(1) by removing the word ``activities'' 
wherever it appears in the paragraph.
    h. Revise paragraph (e)(2).


Sec.  745.225  Accreditation of training programs; target housing and 
child-occupied facilities.

    (a) Scope. (1) A training program may seek accreditation to offer 
courses in any of the following disciplines: Inspector, risk assessor, 
supervisor, project designer, abatement worker, renovator, and dust 
sampling technician. A training program may also seek accreditation to 
offer refresher courses for each of the above listed disciplines.
    (2) Training programs may first apply to EPA for accreditation of 
their lead-based paint activities courses or refresher courses pursuant 
to this section on or after August 31, 1998. Training programs may 
first apply to EPA for accreditation of their renovator or dust 
sampling technician courses or refresher courses pursuant to this 
section on or after [insert date 1 year after date of publication of 
the final rule in the Federal Register].
    (3) A training program must not provide, offer, or claim to provide 
EPA-accredited lead-based paint activities courses without applying for 
and receiving accreditation from EPA as required under paragraph (b) of 
this section on or after March 1, 1999. A training program must not 
provide, offer, or claim to provide EPA-accredited renovator or dust 
sampling technician courses without applying for and receiving 
accreditation from EPA as required under paragraph (b) of this section 
on or after [insert date 60 days after date of publication of the final 
rule in the Federal Register].
    (b) Application process. The following are procedures a training 
program must follow to receive EPA accreditation to offer lead-based 
paint activities courses, renovator courses, or dust sampling 
technician courses:
    (1) * * *
    (ii) A list of courses for which it is applying for accreditation. 
For the purposes of this section, courses taught in different languages 
are considered different courses, and each must

[[Page 31046]]

independently meet the accreditation requirements.
* * * * *
    (iv) * * *
    (C) When applying for accreditation of a course in a language other 
than English, a signed statement from a qualified, independent 
translator that they had compared the course to the English language 
version and found the translation to be accurate.
* * * * *
    (c) Requirements for the accreditation of training programs. For a 
training program to obtain accreditation from EPA to offer lead-based 
paint activities courses, renovator courses, or dust sampling 
technician courses, the program must meet the following requirements:
* * * * *
    (6) * * *
    (vi) The renovator course must last a minimum of 8 training hours, 
with a minimum of 2 hours devoted to hands-on training activities. The 
minimum curriculum requirements for the renovator course are contained 
in paragraph (d)(6) of this section. Hands-on training activities must 
cover renovation methods that minimize the creation of dust and lead-
based paint hazards, interior and exterior containment and cleanup 
methods, and post-renovation cleaning verification.
    (vii) The dust sampling technician course must last a minimum of 8 
training hours, with a minimum of 2 hours devoted to hands-on training 
activities. The minimum curriculum requirements for the dust sampling 
technician course are contained in paragraph (d)(7) of this section. 
Hands on training activities must cover dust sampling methodologies.
* * * * *
    (8) * * *
    (iv) For initial inspector, risk assessor, project designer, 
supervisor, or abatement worker course completion certificates, the 
expiration date of interim certification, which is 6 months from the 
date of course completion.
* * * * *
    (vi) The language in which the course was taught.
* * * * *
    (10) Courses offered by the training program must teach the work 
practice standards contained in Sec.  745.85 or Sec.  745.227, as 
applicable, in such a manner that trainees are provided with the 
knowledge needed to perform the renovations or lead-based paint 
activities they will be responsible for conducting.
* * * * *
    (d) * * *
    (6) Renovator. (i) Role and responsibility of a renovator.
    (ii) Background information on lead and its adverse health effects.
    (iii) Background information on Federal, State, and local 
regulations and guidance that pertains to lead-based paint and 
renovation activities.
    (iv) Procedures for using acceptable test kits to determine whether 
paint is lead-based paint.
    (v) Renovation methods to minimize the creation of dust and lead-
based paint hazards.
    (vi) Interior and exterior containment and cleanup methods.
    (vii) Methods to ensure that the renovation has been properly 
completed, including clean-up verification, and clearance testing.
    (viii) Waste handling and disposal.
    (7) Dust sampling technician. (i) Role and responsibility of a dust 
sampling technician.
    (ii) Background information on lead and its adverse health effects.
    (iii) Background information on Federal, State, and local 
regulations and guidance that pertains to lead-based paint and 
renovation activities.
    (iv) Dust sampling methodologies.
    (v) Clearance standards and testing.
    (vi) Report preparation.
* * * * *
    (e) Requirements for the accreditation of refresher training 
programs. A training program may seek accreditation to offer refresher 
training courses in any of the following disciplines: Inspector, risk 
assessor, supervisor, project designer, abatement worker, renovator, 
and dust sampling technician. To obtain EPA accreditation to offer 
refresher training, a training program must meet the following minimum 
requirements:
* * * * *
    (1) * * *
    (2) Refresher courses for inspector, risk assessor, supervisor, and 
abatement worker must last a minimum of 8 training hours. Refresher 
courses for project designer, renovator, and dust sampling technician 
must last a minimum of 4 training hours.
* * * * *
    18. Section 745.320 is amended by revising paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  745.320  Scope and purpose.

* * * * *
    (c) A State or Indian Tribe may seek authorization to administer 
and enforce all of the provisions of subpart E of this part or just the 
pre-renovation education provisions of subpart E of this part. The 
provisions of Sec. Sec.  745.324 and 745.326 apply for the purposes of 
such program authorizations.
* * * * *
    19. Section 745.324 is amended as follows:
    a. Revise paragraph (a)(1).
    b. Delete the phrase ``lead-based paint training accreditation and 
certification'' from the second sentence of paragraph (b)(1)(iii).
    c. Revise paragraph (b)(2)(ii).
    d. Revise paragraphs (e)(2)(i) and (e)(4).
    e. Revise paragraph (f)(2).
    f. Revise paragraph (i)(8).


Sec.  745.324  Authorization of State or Tribal programs.

    (a) Application content and procedures. (1) Any State or Indian 
Tribe that seeks authorization from EPA to administer and enforce the 
provisions of subpart E or subpart L of this part must submit an 
application to the Administrator in accordance with this paragraph.
* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) * * *
    (ii) An analysis of the State or Tribal program that compares the 
program to the Federal program in subpart E or subpart L of this part, 
or both. This analysis must demonstrate how the program is, in the 
State's or Indian Tribe's assessment, at least as protective as the 
elements in the Federal program at subpart E or subpart L of this part, 
or both. EPA will use this analysis to evaluate the protectiveness of 
the State or Tribal program in making its determination pursuant to 
paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section.
* * * * *
    (e) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) The State or Tribal program is at least as protective of human 
health and the environment as the corresponding Federal program under 
subpart E or subpart L of this part, or both; and
* * * * *
    (4) If the State or Indian Tribe applies for authorization of State 
or Tribal programs under both subpart E and subpart L, EPA may, as 
appropriate, authorize one program and disapprove the other.
* * * * *
    (f) * * *
    (2) If a State or Indian Tribe does not have an authorized program 
to administer and enforce the pre-renovation education requirements of 
subpart E of this part by August 31, 1998, the Administrator will, by 
such date, enforce those provisions of subpart

[[Page 31047]]

E of this part as the Federal program for that State or Indian Country. 
If a State or Indian Tribe does not have an authorized program to 
administer and enforce the training, certification and accreditation 
requirements and work practice standards of subpart E of this part by 
[insert date 1 year after date of publication of the final rule in the 
Federal Register], the Administrator will, by such date, enforce those 
provisions of subpart E of this part as the Federal program for that 
State or Indian Country.
* * * * *
    (i) * * *
    (8) By the date of such order, the Administrator will establish and 
enforce the provisions of subpart E or subpart L of this part, or both, 
as the Federal program for that State or Indian Country.
    20. Section 745.326 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  745.326  Renovation: State and Tribal program requirements.

    (a) Program elements. To receive authorization from EPA, a State or 
Tribal program must contain the following program elements:
    (1) For pre-renovation education programs, procedures and 
requirements for the distribution of lead hazard information to owners 
and occupants of target housing and child-occupied facilities before 
renovations for compensation.
    (2) For renovation training, certification, accreditation, and work 
practice standards programs:
    (i) Procedures and requirements for the accreditation of renovation 
and dust sampling technician training programs.
    (ii) Procedures and requirements for the certification of 
renovators and dust sampling technicians.
    (iii) Procedures and requirements for the certification of 
individuals and/or firms.
    (iv) Requirements that all renovations be conducted by 
appropriately certified individuals and/or firms.
    (v) Work practice standards for the conduct of renovations.
    (3) For all renovation programs, development of the appropriate 
infrastructure or government capacity to effectively carry out a State 
or Tribal program.
    (b) Pre-renovation education. To be considered at least as 
protective as the Federal program, the State or Tribal program must:
    (1) Establish clear standards for identifying renovation activities 
that trigger the information distribution requirements.
    (2) Establish procedures for distributing the lead hazard 
information to owners and occupants of housing and child-occupied 
facilities prior to renovation activities.
    (3) Require that the information to be distributed include either 
the pamphlet titled Protect Your Family from Lead During Renovation, 
Repair & Painting, developed by EPA under section 406(a), or an 
alternate pamphlet or package of lead hazard information that has been 
submitted by the State or Tribe, reviewed by EPA, and approved by EPA 
for that State or Tribe. Such information must contain renovation-
specific information similar to that in Protect Your Family from Lead 
During Renovation, Repair & Painting, must meet the content 
requirements prescribed by section 406(a) of TSCA, and must be in a 
format that is readable to the diverse audience of housing and child-
occupied facility owners and occupants in that State or Tribe.
    (i) A State or Tribe with a pre-renovation education program 
approved before [insert date 60 days after date of publication of the 
final rule in the Federal Register] must demonstrate that it meets the 
requirements of this section no later than the first report that it 
submits pursuant to Sec.  745.324(h) of this subpart on or after 
[insert date 1 year after date of publication of the final rule in the 
Federal Register].
    (ii) A State or Tribe with an application for approval of a pre-
renovation education program submitted but not approved before [insert 
date 60 days after date of publication of the final rule in the Federal 
Register] must demonstrate that it meets the requirements of this 
section either by amending its application or in the first report that 
it submits pursuant to Sec.  745.324(h) of this part on or after 
[insert date 1 year after date of publication of the final rule in the 
Federal Register].
    (iii) A State or Indian Tribe submitting its application for 
approval of a pre-renovation education program on or after [insert date 
60 days after date of publication of the final rule in the Federal 
Register] must demonstrate in its application that it meets the 
requirements of this section.
    (c) Accreditation of training programs. To be considered at least 
as protective as the Federal program, the State or Tribal program must 
meet the requirements of either paragraph (c)(1) or (c)(2) of this 
section:
    (1) The State or Tribal program must establish accreditation 
procedures and requirements, including:
    (i) Procedures and requirements for the accreditation of training 
programs, including, but not limited to:
    (A) Training curriculum requirements.
    (B) Training hour requirements.
    (C) Hands-on training requirements.
    (D) Trainee competency and proficiency requirements.
    (E) Requirements for training program quality control.
    (ii) Procedures and requirements for the re-accreditation of 
training programs.
    (iii) Procedures for the oversight of training programs.
    (iv) Procedures and standards for the suspension, revocation, or 
modification of training program accreditations; or
    (2) The State or Tribal program must establish procedures and 
requirements for the acceptance of renovation training offered by 
training providers accredited by EPA or a State or Tribal program 
authorized by EPA under this subpart.
    (d) Certification of renovators. To be considered at least as 
protective as the Federal program, the State or Tribal program must:
    (1) Establish procedures and requirements for individual 
certification that ensure that certified renovators are trained by an 
accredited training program.
    (2) Establish procedures and requirements for re-certification.
    (3) Establish procedures for the suspension, revocation, or 
modification of certifications.
    (e) Work practice standards for renovations. To be considered at 
least as protective as the Federal program, the State or Tribal program 
must establish standards that ensure that renovations are conducted 
reliably, effectively, and safely. At a minimum, the State or Tribal 
program must contain the following requirements:
    (1) Renovations must be conducted only by certified contractors.
    (2) Renovations are conducted using lead-safe work practices that 
are at least as protective to occupants as the requirements in Sec.  
745.85.
    (3) Certified contractors must retain appropriate records.
    21. Section 745.327 is amended by revising paragraphs (b)(1)(iv) 
and (b)(2)(ii) to read as follows:


Sec.  745.327  State or Indian Tribal lead-based paint compliance and 
enforcement programs.

* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (1) * * *
    (iv) Requirements that regulate the conduct of renovation 
activities as described at Sec.  745.326.
    (2) * * *
    (ii) For the purposes of enforcing a renovation program, State or 
Tribal

[[Page 31048]]

officials must be able to enter a firm's place of business or work 
site.
* * * * *
    22. Section 745.339 is revised to read as follows:


Sec.  745.339  Effective dates.

    States and Indian Tribes may seek authorization to administer and 
enforce subpart L of this part pursuant to this subpart at any time. 
States and Indian Tribes may seek authorization to administer and 
enforce subpart E of this part pursuant to this subpart effective 
[insert date 60 days after date of publication of the final rule in the 
Federal Register].

[FR Doc. E7-10797 Filed 6-4-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-S