[Federal Register Volume 72, Number 206 (Thursday, October 25, 2007)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 60533-60537]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E7-21003]



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Rules and Regulations
                                                Federal Register
________________________________________________________________________

This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents 
having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed 
to and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations, which is published 
under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510.

The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. 
Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each 
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Federal Register / Vol. 72, No. 206 / Thursday, October 25, 2007 / 
Rules and Regulations

[[Page 60533]]



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

7 CFR Part 301

[Docket No. APHIS-2007-0114]


Imported Fire Ant; Additions to the List of Quarantined Areas

AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION: Interim rule and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are amending the imported fire ant regulations by 
designating as quarantined areas all or portions of 2 counties in 
Arkansas, 3 in North Carolina, and 3 in Tennessee, by expanding the 
quarantined area in 1 county in Arkansas and 15 in Tennessee, and by 
designating the entire State of South Carolina as a quarantined area. 
As a result of this action, the interstate movement of regulated 
articles from those areas will be restricted. This action is necessary 
to prevent the artificial spread of imported fire ant to noninfested 
areas of the United States.

DATES: This interim rule is effective October 25, 2007. We will 
consider all comments that we receive on or before December 24, 2007.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by either of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://
www.regulations.gov, select ``Animal and Plant Health Inspection 
Service'' from the agency drop-down menu, then click ``Submit.'' In the 
Docket ID column, select APHIS-2007-0114 to submit or view public 
comments and to view supporting and related materials available 
electronically. Information on using Regulations.gov, including 
instructions for accessing documents, submitting comments, and viewing 
the docket after the close of the comment period, is available through 
the site's ``User Tips'' link.
     Postal Mail/Commercial Delivery: Please send four copies 
of your comment (an original and three copies) to Docket No. APHIS-
2007-0114, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-
03.8, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737-1238. Please state 
that your comment refers to Docket No. APHIS-2007-0114.
    Reading Room: You may read any comments that we receive on this 
docket in our reading room. The reading room is located in room 1141 of 
the USDA South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue SW., 
Washington, DC. Normal reading room hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except holidays. To be sure someone is there to 
help you, please call (202) 690-2817 before coming.
    Other Information: Additional information about APHIS and its 
programs is available on the Internet at http://www.aphis.usda.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Charles L. Brown, Imported Fire 
Ant Quarantine Program Manager, Pest Detection and Management Programs, 
PPQ, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 134, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236; (301) 
734-4838.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    The imported fire ant regulations (contained in 7 CFR 301.81 
through 301.81-10 and referred to below as the regulations) quarantine 
infested States or infested areas within States and restrict the 
interstate movement of regulated articles to prevent the artificial 
spread of the imported fire ant.
    The imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren, Solenopsis 
richteri Forel, and hybrids of these species) is an aggressive, 
stinging insect that, in large numbers, can seriously injure and even 
kill livestock, pets, and humans. The imported fire ant, which is not 
native to the United States, feeds on crops and builds large, hard 
mounds that damage farm and field machinery. The regulations are 
intended to prevent the imported fire ant from spreading throughout its 
ecological range within the country.
    The regulations in Sec.  301.81-3 provide that the Administrator of 
the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will list as a 
quarantined area each State, or each portion of a State, that is 
infested with the imported fire ant. The Administrator will designate 
less than an entire State as a quarantined area only under the 
following conditions: (1) The State has adopted and is enforcing 
restrictions on the intrastate movement of the regulated articles 
listed in Sec.  301.81-2 that are equivalent to the interstate movement 
restrictions imposed by the regulations; and (2) designating less than 
the entire State will prevent the spread of the imported fire ant. The 
Administrator may include uninfested acreage within a quarantined area 
due to its proximity to an infestation or its inseparability from an 
infested locality for quarantine purposes.
    In Sec.  301.81-3, paragraph (e) lists quarantined areas. We are 
amending Sec.  301.81-3(e) by:
     Adding all of Lonoke and Yell Counties, AR, to the 
quarantined area;
     Expanding the quarantined area in Faulkner County, AR, to 
include the entirety of the county;
     Adding portions of Iredell, Lincoln, and Rutherford 
Counties, NC, to the list of quarantined areas;
     Expanding the quarantined areas in Cherokee, Greenville, 
and Spartanburg Counties, SC, to include the entirety of each county, 
with the result that the entire State of South Carolina is now 
designated as a quarantined area;
     Adding portions of Crockett, Morgan, and Warren Counties, 
TN, to the list of quarantined areas;
     Expanding the quarantined areas in Anderson, Coffee, 
Cumberland, Haywood, Knox, and Williamson Counties, TN; and
     Expanding the quarantined areas in Bedford, Benton, 
Bledsoe, Blount, Carroll, Grundy, Hickman, Rutherford, and Van Buren 
Counties, TN, to include the entirety of each county.
    We are taking these actions because recent surveys conducted by 
APHIS and State and county agencies revealed that the imported fire ant 
has spread to these areas. See the regulatory text at the end of this 
document for specific descriptions of the new and revised quarantined 
areas.

[[Page 60534]]

Emergency Action

    This rulemaking is necessary on an emergency basis to prevent the 
spread of imported fire ant into noninfested areas of the United 
States. Under these circumstances, the Administrator has determined 
that prior notice and opportunity for public comment are contrary to 
the public interest and that there is good cause under 5 U.S.C. 553 for 
making this rule effective less than 30 days after publication in the 
Federal Register.
    We will consider comments we receive during the comment period for 
this interim rule (see DATES above). After the comment period closes, 
we will publish another document in the Federal Register. The document 
will include a discussion of any comments we receive and any amendments 
we are making to the rule.

Executive Order 12866 and Regulatory Flexibility Act

    This rule has been reviewed under Executive Order 12866. For this 
action, the Office of Management and Budget has waived its review under 
Executive Order 12866.
    We are amending the imported fire ant regulations by designating as 
quarantined areas all or portions of 2 counties in Arkansas, 3 in North 
Carolina, and 3 in Tennessee, by expanding the quarantined area in 1 
county in Arkansas and 15 in Tennessee, and by designating the entire 
State of South Carolina as a quarantined area. We are taking this 
action because surveys conducted by APHIS and State and county agencies 
revealed that imported fire ant has spread to these areas. Agricultural 
activities in these imported fire ant-infested areas are at risk due to 
the potential of imported fire ants to directly or indirectly damage 
crops and agricultural machinery and harm livestock.
    This interim rule will affect businesses such as nurseries, 
landscaping operations, and timber companies that are located within 
the newly expanded quarantined areas and that transport regulated 
articles interstate.
    Table 1 summarizes the 2002 Census of Agriculture data according to 
three commodity groups that will be affected by the interim rule. These 
commodity groups are: (1) Nursery, greenhouse, floriculture, and sod; 
\1\ (2) other crops and hay; \2\ and (3) cut Christmas trees and short 
rotation woody crops.
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    \1\ In the 2002 Census, data include sales of bedding plants, 
bulbs, cut flowers, flower seeds, foliage plants, mushrooms, nursery 
potted plants, shrubbery, nursery stock, live Christmas trees, 
tobacco transplants, sod, etc.
    \2\ In the 2002 Census, data are for the total market value of 
all crops not categorized elsewhere. This includes crops such as 
grass seed, hay and grass silage, haylage, greenchop, hops, maple 
syrup, mint for oil, ginseng root, peanuts, sugarcane, sugar beets, 
etc.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Since no clear-cut method exists to disaggregate these commodity 
groups to the specific imported fire ant-regulated articles, the 
entirety of these commodity groups is used to approximate the number 
and size of the entities that may be affected by the interim rule.
    In 2002, there were 1,193 nurseries, greenhouses, floriculture 
producers, and sod producers, 4,098 producers of other crops and hay, 
and 98 producers of cut Christmas trees and short rotation woody crops 
in the affected counties. Sales \3\ of all agricultural products sold 
in the counties were more than $1 billion in 2002, of which about $172 
million can be attributed to the three commodity groups affected by the 
quarantine restrictions imposed by this rule.
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    \3\ The value of sales represents the gross market value before 
taxes and production expenses of all agricultural products sold or 
removed from the place in 2002 regardless of who received the 
payment.

                                          Table 1.--Summary of Three Commodity Groups in the Affected Counties
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                   Nursery, greenhouse,     Other crops and hay     Cut-Christmas trees       Subtotal of the        All agricultural
                                   floriculture, and sod ------------------------   and short rotation       commodity groups            products
                                 ------------------------                               woody crops           affected by the    -----------------------
   Number of affected counties                                                   ------------------------       quarantine
                                   Number of     Sales     Number of     Sales                           ------------------------  Number of     Sales
                                     farms     ($1,000)      farms     ($1,000)    Number of     Sales     Number of     Sales       farms     ($1,000)
                                                                                     farms     ($1,000)      farms     ($1,000)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3 (AR)..........................          15       1,366         399       3,095           3  ..........         417       4,461       2,923     231,180
3 (NC)..........................          75       3,701         450       1,912           7          27         532       5,640       2,533     172,680
3 (SC)..........................         130      18,946         399       1,749          18          54         547      20,749       2,751      67,410
18 (TN).........................         973     131,192       2,850       9,001          70         593       3,893     140,786      17,046     538,125
27 (total)......................       1,193     155,205       4,098      15,757          98       7,439       5,389     171,636      25,253  1,009,412
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: USDA, NASS, 2002 Census of Agriculture, State and County Level Data. Table 2. Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold Including Direct and
  Organic in 2002.

    Table 2 summarizes the percentage shares of sales and number of 
farms for those 3 commodity groups relative to the total agricultural 
product sales and number of farms in the 27 counties. Sales shares of 
nursery, greenhouse, floriculture, and sod in the newly quarantined 
counties of South Carolina and Tennessee are substantially higher (28 
percent and 24 percent, respectively) than in the newly quarantined 
counties in Arkansas and North Carolina (less than 1 percent and 2 
percent, respectively). An average of 16 percent of farms in the 
affected counties sell other crops and hay, but these products comprise 
less than 2 percent of all agricultural products sold in these 
counties. Overall, based on 2002 Census of Agriculture data, 21 percent 
of the farms (5,389 out of 25,253 farms) and 17 percent of agricultural 
product sales in the 27 counties may be affected by this interim rule.

                                     Table 2.--Percentage Shares of Three Commodity Groups in the Affected Counties
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                   Nursery, greenhouse,     Other crops and hay     Cut-Christmas trees    Sum of three affected     All agricultural
                                   floriculture, and sod ------------------------   and short rotation      commodity groups by          products
                                 ------------------------                               woody crops           the quarantine     -----------------------
       Number of counties                                  Number of             ------------------------------------------------
                                   Number of     Sales       farms       Sales     Number of               Number of               Number of     Sales
                                     farms     (percent)   (percent)   (percent)     farms       Sales       farms       Sales       farms     (percent)
                                   (percent)                                       (percent)   (percent)   (percent)   (percent)   (percent)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3 (AR)..........................         0.5         0.6        13.7         1.3         0.1  ..........        14.3         1.9         100         100
3 (NC)..........................         3.0         2.1        17.8         1.1         0.3         0.0        21.0         3.3         100         100
3 (SC)..........................         4.7        28.1        14.5         2.6         0.7         0.1        19.9        30.8         100         100

[[Page 60535]]

 
18 (TN).........................         5.7        24.4        16.7         1.7         0.4         0.1        22.8        26.2         100         100
27 (total)......................         4.7        15.4        16.2         1.6         0.4         0.1        21.3        17.0         100        100
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: USDA, NASS, 2002 Census of Agriculture, State and County Level Data. Table 2. Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold Including Direct and
  Organic in 2002.

    Table 3 summarizes sales and number of farms in the 27 counties and 
their respective 4 States. The market value of all agricultural 
products sold in these counties was more than $1 billion, about 61 
percent (or $615 million) of which were sales attributable to 
livestock, poultry, and animal products, with the remaining 39 percent 
(or $394 million) attributable to crop sales, including nursery and 
greenhouse crops. The market value of the 3 affected commodity groups 
sold in the 27 counties was about $172 million, or about 14 percent of 
the $1.2 billion in total sales for the 3 affected commodity groups in 
the 4 States. Within these States and in neighboring States, there is a 
large agricultural economy at risk due to the potential of imported 
fire ant to damage crops and injure livestock.

                                 Table 3.--Sales and Number of Farms in the Newly Quarantined Counties and Their States
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Sum of three affected   All crops, including     Livestock, poultry,      All agricultural
                                                           commodity groups and   nursery and greenhouse    and their products           products
                                                                State total      -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Number of counties                    ------------------------
                                                           Number of     Sales     Number of     Sales     Number of     Sales     Number of     Sales
                                                             farms     ($1,000)      farms     ($1,000)      farms     ($1,000)      farms     ($1,000)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Arkansas:
    3...................................................         417       4,461         738      79,256       1,868     151,925       2,923     231,180
    Total AR............................................       6,287      81,986      12,995   1,620,384      30,956   3,330,014      47,483   4,950,397
North Carolina:
    3...................................................         532       5,640         762      13,417       1,553     159,263       2,533     172,680
    Total NC............................................      12,030     566,104      24,587   2,008,634      26,948   4,953,052      53,930   6,961,686
South Carolina:
    3...................................................         547      20,749         785      33,071       1,207      34,338       2,751      67,409
    Total SC............................................       6,131     244,090       7,869     593,245      10,133     896,505      24,541   1,489,750
Tennessee:
    18..................................................       3,893     140,786       5,154     268,543      10,124     269,582      17,046     538,125
    Total TN............................................      17,266     333,023      29,143   1,072,548      51,367   1,127,266      87,595   2,199,814
27 newly infested counties total........................       5,389     171,636       7,439     394,287      14,752     615,108      25,253   1,009,394
Four States (AR, NC, SC, TN) total......................      41,714   1,225,203      74,594   5,294,811     119,404  10,306,837     213,549  15,601,647
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: USDA, NASS, 2002 Census of Agriculture, State and County Level Data. Table 2. Market Value of Agricultural Products Sold Including Direct and
  Organic in 2002.

    According to Small Business Administration criteria, a business 
engaged in crop production (North American Industry Classification 
System [NAICS] Subsector 111) is considered to be a small entity if its 
annual receipts are not more than $750,000. A business engaged in 
support activities for agriculture and forestry (NAICS Subsector 115) 
is considered small if its annual receipts are not more than $6 
million. Agricultural entities in the newly quarantined areas are 
predominantly, if not entirely, small entities.
    The aforementioned three commodity groups, as well as farm 
equipment dealers, construction companies, and those who sell, process, 
or move regulated articles from and through quarantined areas, may be 
affected by this rule. Such operations will now be required to treat 
restricted articles before moving them interstate. Only regulated 
articles moved interstate outside of the quarantined areas will be 
affected. However, adverse economic effects of the rule on affected 
entities that move regulated articles interstate are mitigated by the 
availability of various treatments. In most cases these treatments 
permit the movement of regulated articles with only a small additional 
cost. For example, the treatment cost of an average shipment of nursery 
plants on a standard trailer truck ranges between 0.04 percent and 1 
percent \4\ of the value of the plants transported, given a treatment 
cost per shipment of around $200. The estimated annual compliance costs 
for these entities is small in comparison to the benefit gained through 
reduced human-assisted spread of imported fire ant to noninfested areas 
of the United States.
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    \4\ An average nursery plant (i.e., potted) costs between $2 and 
$50, so that the value of a load for a standard tractor trailer 
transporting up to 10,000 plants ranges between $20,000 and 
$500,000; $200/$20,000 = 1 percent, and $200/$500,000 = 0.04 
percent.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Under these circumstances, the Administrator of the Animal and 
Plant Health Inspection Service has determined that this action will 
not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities.

Executive Order 12372

    This program/activity is listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance under No. 10.025 and is subject to Executive Order 12372, 
which requires intergovernmental consultation with State and local 
officials. (See 7 CFR part 3015, subpart V.)

Executive Order 12988

    This rule has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil 
Justice Reform. This rule: (1) Preempts all State and local laws and 
regulations that are inconsistent with this rule; (2) has no 
retroactive effect; and (3) does not require administrative proceedings

[[Page 60536]]

before parties may file suit in court challenging this rule.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    This rule contains no new information collection or recordkeeping 
requirements under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 
et seq.).

List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 301

    Agricultural commodities, Plant diseases and pests, Quarantine, 
Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Transportation.

0
Accordingly, we are amending 7 CFR part 301 as follows:

PART 301--DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

0
1. The authority citation for part 301 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772 and 7781-7786; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, 
and 371.3.
    Section 301.75-15 issued under Sec. 204, Title II, Public Law 
106-113, 113 Stat. 1501A-293; sections 301.75-15 and 301.75-16 
issued under Sec. 203, Title II, Public Law 106-224, 114 Stat. 400 
(7 U.S.C. 1421 note).


0
2. In Sec.  301.81-3, paragraph (e) is amended as follows:
0
a. Under the heading Arkansas, by adding, in alphabetical order, new 
entries for Lonoke and Yell Counties, and by revising the entry for 
Faulkner County to read as set forth below.
0
b. Under the heading North Carolina, by adding, in alphabetical order, 
new entries for Iredell, Lincoln, and Rutherford Counties, as set forth 
below.
0
c. By revising the entry for South Carolina to read as set forth below.
0
d. Under the heading Tennessee, by adding, in alphabetical order, new 
entries for Crockett, Morgan, and Warren Counties, and by revising the 
entries for Anderson, Bedford, Benton, Bledsoe, Blount, Carroll, 
Coffee, Cumberland, Grundy, Haywood, Hickman, Knox, Rutherford, Van 
Buren, and Williamson Counties to read as set forth below.


Sec.  301.81-3  Quarantined areas.

* * * * *
    (e) * * *
* * * * *
Arkansas
* * * * *
    Faulkner County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Lonoke County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Yell County. The entire county.
* * * * *
North Carolina
* * * * *
    Iredell County. That portion of the county lying south of State 
Highway 150.
* * * * *
    Lincoln County. That portion of the county lying east of State 
Highway 321.
* * * * *
    Rutherford County. That portion of the county lying south of State 
Highway 74.
* * * * *
South Carolina
    The entire State.
* * * * *
Tennessee
    Anderson County. That portion of the county lying east and south of 
a line beginning at the intersection of the Roane/Anderson County line 
and Tennessee Highway 330; then northeast on Tennessee Highway 330 to 
Tennessee Highway 116; then north on Tennessee Highway 116 to 
Interstate 75; then southeast on Interstate 75 to the Anderson/Knox 
County line.
    Bedford County. The entire county.
    Benton County. The entire county.
    Bledsoe County. The entire county.
    Blount County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Carroll County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Coffee County. That portion of the county lying west and south of a 
line beginning at the intersection of the Cannon/Coffee County line and 
Tennessee Highway 53; then south on Tennessee Highway 53 to Riddle 
Road; then southeast on Riddle Road to Keele Road; then northeast on 
Keele Road to Tennessee Highway 55; then northeast on Tennessee Highway 
55 to Swann Road; then east on Swann Road to Wiser Road; then north on 
Wiser Road to Rock Road; then east on Rock Road to Pleasant Knoll Road; 
then north on Pleasant Knoll Road to Marcrom Road; then east on Marcrom 
Road to the Coffee/Warren County line.
    Crockett County. That portion of the county lying east of a line 
beginning at the intersection of the Haywood/Crockett County line and 
U.S. Highway 70A/79; then northeast on U.S. Highway 70A/79 to Tennessee 
Highway 88; then north on Tennessee Highway 88 to Tennessee Highway 54; 
then northeast on Tennessee Highway 54 to the Crockett/Gibson County 
line.
    Cumberland County. That portion of the county lying southeast of a 
line beginning at the intersection of the White/Cumberland County line 
and U.S. Highway 70; then east on U.S. Highway 70 to Market Street (in 
Crab Orchard); then north on Market Street to Main Street; then west on 
Main Street to Chestnut Hill Road; then northeast on Chestnut Hill Road 
to Westchester Drive; then north on Westchester Drive to Peavine Road; 
then east on Peavine Road to Hebbertsburg Road; then northeast on 
Hebbertsburg Road to the Cumberland/Morgan County line.
* * * * *
    Grundy County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Haywood County. That portion of the county lying southeast of 
Tennessee Highway 54.
* * * * *
    Hickman County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Knox County. That portion of the county lying southwest of a line 
beginning at the intersection of the Union/Knox County line and 
Tennessee Highway 33; then south on Tennessee Highway 33 to the 
Tennessee River; then northeast along the Tennessee River to the French 
Broad River; then east along the French Broad River to the Knox/Sevier 
County line.
* * * * *
    Morgan County. That portion of the county lying south of a line 
beginning at the intersection of the Cumberland/Morgan County line and 
Tennessee Highway 298; then northeast on Tennessee Highway 298 to 
Tennessee Highway 62; then southeast on Tennessee Highway 62 to the 
Morgan/Roane County line.
* * * * *
    Rutherford County. The entire county.
* * * * *
    Van Buren County. The entire county.
    Warren County. That portion of the county lying southeast of a line 
beginning at the intersection of the Coffee/Warren County line and 
Marcrom Road; then east on Marcrom Road to Fred Hoover Road; then north 
on Fred Hoover Road to Tennessee Highway 287; then northwest on 
Tennessee Highway 287 to Vervilla Road; then northeast on Vervilla Road 
to Swan Mill Road; then east on Swan Mill Road to Grove Road; then 
southeast on Grove Road to Tennessee Highway 108/127; then northeast on 
Tennessee Highway 108/127 to the split between Tennessee Highway 108 
and Tennessee Highway 127; then northeast on Tennessee Highway 127 to 
Tennessee Highway 56; then southeast on Tennessee Highway 56 to 
Fairview Road; then northeast on Fairview Road to Tennessee Highway 8; 
then southeast on Tennessee Highway 8 to Dark

[[Page 60537]]

Hollow Road; then north on Dark Hollow Road to Tennessee Highway 30; 
then northeast on Tennessee Highway 30 to the Warren/Van Buren County 
line.
* * * * *
    Williamson County. That portion of the county lying northeast of a 
line beginning at the intersection of the Davidson/Williamson County 
line and U.S. Highway 31; then southwest on U.S. Highway 31 to U.S. 
Highway Business 431; then southeast on U.S. Highway Business 431 to 
Mack Hatcher Parkway; then north on Mack Hatcher Parkway to South Royal 
Oaks Boulevard; then northeast on South Royal Oaks Boulevard to 
Tennessee Highway 96; then east on Tennessee Highway 96 to Clovercroft 
Road; then northeast on Clovercroft Road to Wilson Pike; then north on 
Wilson Pike to Clovercroft Road; then northeast on Clovercroft Road to 
Rocky Fork Road; then east on Rocky Fork Road to the Rutherford/
Williamson County line. Also, that portion of the county enclosed by a 
line beginning at the intersection of the Maury/Williamson County line 
and Tennessee Highway 246; then north on Tennessee Highway 246 to 
Thompson Station Road West; then east on Thompson Station Road West to 
Thompson Station Road East; then east on Thompson Station Road East to 
Interstate 65; then south on Interstate 65 to the Williamson/Maury 
County line.
* * * * *

    Done in Washington, DC, this 19th day of October 2007.
Kevin Shea,
Acting Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
[FR Doc. E7-21003 Filed 10-24-07; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-34-P