[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 7 (Monday, January 12, 2009)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 1280-1453]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-29584]



[[Page 1279]]

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Part II





Department of Transportation





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Federal Aviation Administration



14 CFR parts 65, 119, 121 et al.



Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft 
Dispatchers; Proposed Rule

Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 7 / Monday, January 12, 2009 / 
Proposed Rules

[[Page 1280]]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR parts 65, 119, 121, 135 and 142

[Docket No. FAA-2008-0677; Notice No. 08-07]
RIN 2120-AJ00


Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft 
Dispatchers

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM).

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SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to amend the regulations for crewmember and 
dispatcher training programs in domestic, flag, and supplemental 
operations. The proposed regulations enhance traditional training 
programs by requiring the use of flight simulation training devices for 
flight crewmembers and including additional training requirements in 
areas that are critical to safety. The proposal also reorganizes and 
revises the qualification and training requirements. The proposed 
changes are intended to contribute significantly to reducing aviation 
accidents.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 12, 2009.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments identified by Docket Number FAA-2006-
26139 using any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://
www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions for sending your 
comments electronically.
     Mail: Send comments to the Docket Management Facility, 
U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., West 
Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590.
     Fax: Fax comments to the Docket Management Facility at 
202-493-2251.
     Hand Delivery: Bring comments to the Docket Management 
Facility in Room W12-140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, except Federal holidays.

For more information on the rulemaking process, see the SUPPLEMENTARY 
INFORMATION section of this document.
    Privacy: We will post all comments we receive, without change, to 
http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you 
provide. Using the search function of our docket Web site, anyone can 
find and read the comments received into any of our dockets, including 
the name of the individual sending the comment (or signing the comment 
for an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's 
complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on 
April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78).
    Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to 
http://www.regulations.gov at any time or to the Docket Management 
Facility in Room W12-140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, except Federal holidays.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For flight crewmember information 
contact Ed Cook, for flight attendant information contact Nancy Lauck 
Claussen, and for aircraft dispatcher information contact David Maloy, 
Air Carrier Training Branch (AFS-210), Flight Standards Service, 
Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., 
Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267-8166. For legal questions, 
contact Anne Bechdolt, Office of Chief Counsel (AGC-200), Federal 
Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 
20591; telephone (202) 267-7230; e-mail: Anne.Bechdolt@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Later in this preamble under the Additional 
Information section, we discuss how you can comment on this proposal 
and how we will handle your comments. Included in this discussion is 
related information about the docket, privacy, and the handling of 
proprietary or confidential business information. We also discuss how 
you can get a copy of this proposal and related rulemaking documents.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    The FAA's authority to issue rules on aviation safety is found in 
Title 49 of the United States Code. This rulemaking is promulgated 
under the authority described in 49 U.S.C. 44701(a)(5), which requires 
the Administrator to promulgate regulations and minimum standards for 
other practices, methods, and procedures necessary for safety in air 
commerce and national security.

Table of Contents

I. Summary of the Proposal
II. Qualification Performance Standards (QPS) Appendices
III. Background
    A. Current Qualification and Training Requirements
    B. Need for Safety Improvements and FAA Actions
    C. Qualification To Serve as a Required Crewmember or Aircraft 
Dispatcher
    D. Subparts N and O Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC)
    E. Training Program Vocabulary and Instructional Design
IV. The Proposal
    A. Major Changes Affecting Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers
    B. Major Changes Affecting Flight Crewmembers
    C. Major Changes Affecting Flight Attendants
    D. Major Changes Affecting Aircraft Dispatchers
V. Impact Statements

I. Summary of the Proposal

Purpose

    The primary purpose of this NPRM is to establish new requirements 
for traditional air carrier training programs to ensure that safety-
critical training is included. These changes are expected to make a 
significant contribution to the FAA's accident reduction goal. The 
secondary purpose of this rulemaking project is to reorganize, simplify 
and modernize all rule language associated with crewmember and aircraft 
dispatcher qualification and training under part 121. This proposal 
revises and recodifies the crewmember qualification and training 
requirements in subparts N and O into a new subpart BB of part 121 and 
revises and recodifies the aircraft dispatcher qualification and 
training requirements in subparts N and P into subpart CC of part 121.
    This rulemaking is part of the FAA's efforts to reduce fatal 
accidents in which human error was a major contributing cause. The 
proposed changes would reduce human error and improve performance among 
flight crewmembers, flight attendants, and aircraft dispatchers.
    The FAA is proposing the following safety improvements to its 
qualification and training requirements:
     Train and evaluate flight crewmembers in a complete flight 
crew environment.
     Require Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) to be 
administered to flight crewmembers in a full flight simulator (FFS) 
during recurrent training.
     Require the use of a qualified flight simulation training 
device (FSTD) for training, testing, and checking flight crewmembers.
     Require special hazard training for flight crewmembers, 
such as loss of control and Controlled Flight Into Terrain (CFIT).

[[Page 1281]]

     Require additional training and practice in the use of 
Crew Resource Management (CRM) principles.
     Require flight attendants to complete ``hands on'' 
performance drills using emergency equipment and procedures every 12 
months.
     Require flight attendants to complete operating experience 
by aircraft type for the certificate holder.
     Require trained and qualified flight attendant ground 
instructors and evaluators.
     Standardize the training and experience requirements for 
check dispatchers and dispatcher instructors.
     Implement supervised operating experience (SOE) 
requirements for aircraft dispatchers.
     Establish Requalification training for aircraft 
dispatchers and crewmembers.
     Require a continuous analysis process (CAP) for 
certificate holders.
    In addition, the FAA's recent ``Call to Action'' plan elevated 
short-, mid-, and long-term goals to address safety improvement at 
airport runways. This proposed rule states that the tasks listed in the 
rule, and the Flight Crewmember Operating Manual (FCOM) required by the 
rule, must be integrated with one another and must reflect the 
certificate holder's operations and the specific aircraft. The proposed 
rule also includes tasks that directly address the runway safety goals. 
Specifically, they include the following:
    (1) Using an airport diagram (surface movement) chart to aid in 
maintaining positional awareness.
    (2) Obtaining the appropriate clearance before crossing or entering 
active runways.
    (3) Observing runway hold lines, localizer and glide slope critical 
areas, beacons, and other surface movement guidance control markings 
and lighting.
    (4) Ensuring takeoff clearance is received and that the correct 
runway is being entered for takeoff prior to crossing the hold short 
line.
    The FAA is issuing this proposal under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, subpart i, 49 U.S.C. 44701. The FAA is charged 
with regulating air commerce in a way that best promotes safety.

Compliance Issues

    To help transition from the current regulations to the revised 
requirements for qualification, service, and use of crewmembers and 
aircraft dispatchers, the FAA is proposing to continue the current 
regulations under subparts N, O, and P, for 5 years after the effective 
date of the final rule. On the date the current regulations expire, all 
certificate holders, crewmembers, and aircraft dispatchers must be in 
compliance with the requirements in subparts BB and CC of part 121. 
Therefore, it will be necessary for certificate holders to begin 
training under subparts BB and CC in sufficient time to ensure that all 
crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers are trained, qualified, and meet 
the applicable look back provisions of subparts BB and CC, before the 
expiration of regulations pertaining to qualification, service, and use 
of crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers in subparts N, O, and P. 
Proposed 14 CFR121.1202 and 121.1402 require certificate holders to 
submit a transition plan that specifies the transition completion date, 
which must be before the expiration of the current regulations.
    The effective date of the final rule will be 120 days after 
publication in the Federal Register. Persons who have an approved 
training program before the effective date of the final rule or have 
submitted a training program for approval before the effective date of 
the final rule may comply with existing regulations, subparts BB and 
CC, or both. The proposed rule permits simultaneous compliance to allow 
the certificate holder to continue using its approved programs while 
transitioning to the new requirements. Although the rule allows the 
certificate holder to simultaneously comply with the existing 
regulations and the new rules, each individual crewmember or aircraft 
dispatcher must be trained and qualified under the requirements of 
either subparts BB and CC, or subparts N, O, and P.
    For example, during the transition period, the air carrier may 
decide to train all newly hired flight attendants in accordance with 
the proposed rules, while continuing to train existing flight 
attendants under the current requirements. However, individual flight 
attendants, in the above example, would be required to be fully in 
compliance with the requirements of the existing regulations or with 
the proposed regulations. If a certificate holder submits a training 
program for a new aircraft type after the effective date of the rule, 
the training program developed for this new aircraft type must be in 
compliance with and approved under proposed subparts BB and CC. 
Therefore, any flight attendants qualified on this new aircraft type 
would be trained in accordance with the new rules, while flight 
attendants qualified on aircraft types currently operated by the 
certificate holder could be trained in accordance with the existing 
regulations in subparts N, O, and P.
    Setting the effective date for 120 days after publication of the 
final rule and allowing use of the existing regulations for 5 years 
after this period provides existing certificate holders and the FAA 
time to smoothly transition to the new requirements. By using this 
approach, certificate holders seeking FAA approval for a new training 
program will not have to develop one training program to comply with 
the old regulations, then develop another training program to comply 
with the new regulations.
    The proposed rule also contemplates that when a new training 
program is submitted for approval after the rule's effective date, the 
training program must meet the requirements of subparts BB or CC, as 
applicable. The FAA does not intend that non-significant modifications 
that may be proposed to a current training program under the existing 
regulations would require the certificate holder to initiate 
development of a training program to comply with Subpart BB or CC any 
earlier than they had planned in accordance with their current business 
plan.
    The FAA has included a grandfather provision in proposed subpart BB 
to allow persons qualified for a crewmember duty position under the 
current rules to meet the requirements of the proposed rule without 
having to repeat certain categories of training they have already 
completed under the current rules. Proposed subpart CC contains a 
similar grandfather provision for aircraft dispatchers.
    In addition, the FAA is proposing to amend requirements in current 
Sec.  121.543 in proposed Sec.  121.1241(b)(3)(v). Proposed Sec.  
121.1241(b)(3)(v) requires that all flight crewmembers at the controls 
are current and qualified, including landing recency. Under the current 
rules, landing recency is not required for relief pilots. This proposal 
codifies current industry practice and ensures proficiency in all tasks 
necessary for safe operation of the aircraft.

II. Qualification Performance Standards (QPS) Appendices

    The FAA is proposing to add four QPS appendices in 14 CFR part 121: 
pilots, appendix Q; flight engineers, appendix R; flight attendants, 
appendix S; and aircraft dispatchers, appendix T. The QPS appendices 
contain minimum training and evaluation standards as well as procedures 
for crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers to become qualified and 
maintain qualification. The material in the proposed QPS appendices is 
based on the subjects and

[[Page 1282]]

tasks in subparts N, O, and P. In addition, the pilot QPS is based on 
current part 121 practical training and checking standards in 
appendices E and F, and flight simulation performance guidelines in 
appendix H. The FAA has separated the material in the QPS appendices 
into two sections: ``QPS Requirements'' and ``Information.'' The ``QPS 
Requirements'' sections are regulatory and are in addition to the 
requirements in part 121. The ``Information'' sections are advisory, 
and are not regulatory. Future changes and additions to the QPS 
Requirements would be subject to notice and comment rulemaking 
procedures under the Administrative Procedure Act, unless ``good 
cause'' (see 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B)) exists to justify proceeding without 
notice and comment.
    The FAA does not expect that many changes to the QPS appendices 
will justify the expenditure of time and resources at the highest 
levels of the agency that the standard procedures for final review of 
rulemakings require. The Administrator will delegate authority for 
final review and issuance of changes to the QPS appendices to the 
Director of the Flight Standards Service. This delegation of authority 
will be exercised with the concurrence of the Office of the Chief 
Counsel. This streamlined process will result in timely responses to 
incident and accident data, continuous analysis process (CAP) changes, 
and advances in aircraft or simulation technology. If at any time 
during the amendment process the Administrator or the Director of the 
Flight Standards Service determines that a proposed amendment is not 
appropriate for this streamlined process, the rulemaking project will 
proceed in accordance with the agency's standard rulemaking procedures.

III. Background

A. Current Qualification and Training Requirements

    The regulations governing certificate holder crewmember and 
aircraft dispatcher qualification and training requirements appear in 
14 CFR part 121 subparts N, O, and P. Subpart N contains the 
requirements for establishing and maintaining a training program for 
crewmembers, aircraft dispatchers, and other operations personnel. 
Subpart N also contains the requirements for the use of airplane 
simulators and other training devices. Subpart O contains crewmember 
qualification requirements. Subpart P contains aircraft dispatcher 
qualification requirements. Appendix E to part 121 establishes the 
flight training tasks required in pilot initial, transition, and 
upgrade training. Appendix F to part 121 establishes the flight 
checking tasks required in pilot proficiency checks. Appendix H to part 
121 provides guidelines and a means for using advanced airplane 
simulators in training and checking of flight crewmembers.

B. Need for Safety Improvements and FAA Actions

FAA Initiatives
    Among the leading causes of fatal accidents for U.S. air carriers 
from 1987 through 1996 were loss of control and CFIT. Human error was 
identified as a major contributing cause in a large percentage of these 
accidents. The FAA took immediate steps toward preventing these types 
of accidents by developing technological standards and encouraging 
simulator training in CFIT avoidance and to improve flight crewmember 
response in loss of control situations. The FAA also reviewed its 
regulations in 14 CFR part 121 subparts N, O, and P to identify 
improvements in training for flight crewmembers, flight attendants, and 
aircraft dispatchers.
    As part of the regulatory review, the FAA evaluated its experience 
with the Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) currently in place at 
many part 121 air carriers. AQP is an alternative method using advanced 
simulation equipment and objective performance standards for training 
and testing crewmembers.\1\ The FAA's review of AQP revealed the need 
to improve the traditional qualification and training programs 
conducted under subparts N, O, and P.
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    \1\ The FAA codified AQP in 14 CFR part 121 subpart Y (September 
16, 2005; 70 FR 54810).
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    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigations 
identified several areas of inadequate training that were the probable 
cause of an accident, such as Incomplete Manuals, Inadequate Standards/
Procedures, Lack of a Stabilized Approach Below 500 Feet, Crew Resource 
Management, Turbulence, Thunder Storms, Wind Shear, IFR Conditions, 
Cross Wind, and Tail Wind.
    During the 1985 through 2004 time period, the NTSB determined that 
inadequate training was the probable cause of 169 accidents involving 
the affected populations. We believe that many of these accidents could 
have been prevented if the proposed training initiatives were in place 
during that 20-year period. Of the 169 accidents, 43 (about 25%) 
involved one or more fatalities and 126 (about 75%) had no fatalities. 
These accidents resulted in 988 fatalities and 250 serious injuries. In 
addition to the injuries and fatalities, there was also significant 
damage or complete hull loss for these accidents. This proposal 
contains changes to address the causes and factors identified by the 
NTSB.
NTSB Recommendations
    The changes proposed in this NPRM also address several NTSB 
recommendations. The NTSB recommendations addressed Crewmember Resource 
Management (CRM) training (Recommendations A-88-71 and A-94-196); use 
of simulators to conduct LOFT (Recommendations A-94-191 through 194); 
TCAS RA training (Recommendation A-93-46); training of flight crews to 
respond to sudden, unusual or unexpected aircraft upsets 
(Recommendation A-96-120); flight attendant training (Recommendations 
A-92-67, A-92-70, A-92-71, A-92-74, and A-92-77); and training to 
respond to inflight fires (Recommendations A-01-83 through A-01-85).\2\
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    \2\ The NTSB Safety Recommendation Letters are available online 
at http://www.ntsb.gov/Recs/letters/letters.htm.
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    The FAA recognizes that the NTSB has already closed some of these 
recommendations. However, we reviewed NTSB recommendations concerning 
training to make the proposed training requirements as effective as 
possible. For specific information on how the FAA is responding to 
these NTSB recommendations, see section IV, ``The Proposal,'' later in 
this preamble.

C. Qualification To Serve as a Required Crewmember or Aircraft 
Dispatcher

    There are several requirements for a crewmember to become qualified 
to serve in part 121 operations. Just because an individual is 
``qualified'' under this proposal does not mean that he or she can 
serve in part 121 operations without meeting additional requirements. 
For example, pilots are ``qualified'' under this proposal when they 
hold the appropriate certificates and ratings and have completed the 
required curricula. However, to serve unsupervised in part 121 
operations they must also meet the operating experience, initial line 
check, crew pairing, operating limitations, and route and airport 
qualification requirements. In addition, when they first serve in part 
121 operations they must be supervised. Further, once they obtain their 
initial authorization to serve, they must continually meet a different 
set of requirements to retain that authorization. This is similar to 
current requirements.

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D. Subparts N and O Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC)

    On May 3, 2004, the FAA established the ARC as a forum for the FAA 
and the aviation community to discuss crewmember and aircraft 
dispatcher qualification and training. The ARC focused on changes to 
improve flight safety issues; the application of simulation to flight 
crewmember training, testing, or checking activities; and the 
implementation of technical changes in training and qualification 
standards. The ARC included participants from the FAA, Air Line Pilots 
Association, Air Transport Association, Airbus Training Center, Airline 
Dispatchers Federation, Alteon Training, America West Airlines, 
American Airlines, Association of Flight Attendants, Association of 
Professional Flight Attendants, Boeing, CAE, Independence Air, JetBlue 
Airways, Northwest Airlines, Omni Air International, Pan Am, Regional 
Airline Association, and Southwest Airlines. The ARC submitted 
recommendations to the Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety in 
April 2005. These recommendations focused on changes to the regulatory 
requirements, the development of QPS appendices specific to the needs 
of pilots, flight engineers, flight attendants, and aircraft 
dispatchers, and organization of the regulations.

E. Training Program Vocabulary and Instructional Design

    The purpose of a certificate holder's training program is to 
produce and maintain competency necessary for job performance. In this 
proposal, the FAA is introducing new terms associated with training 
programs.
    At the highest level, training programs have ``curricula'' to 
qualify a person for a duty position for an aircraft type. A pilot in 
command (PIC), second in command (SIC), flight engineer, or a flight 
attendant serving in operations under this part holds a ``crewmember 
duty position.'' A flight instructor (aircraft or simulator), flight 
engineer instructor (aircraft or simulator), flight attendant 
instructor, check person (check pilot, aircraft; check pilot, 
simulator; check flight engineer, aircraft; check flight engineer, 
simulator; or check flight attendant), or person authorized to 
administer flight attendant proficiency tests holds a ``training'' or 
``evaluation'' duty position. The curriculum for each crewmember duty 
position and training or evaluation duty position includes categories 
of training and the appropriate segments for each category.
    Within a curriculum, ``categories of training'' (also called 
``training categories'') relate to qualification experience levels, 
first time qualification for a certificate holder, first time 
qualification in type, configuration differences within type or series, 
maintaining and regaining qualification, and changes in operation. The 
categories of training within a curriculum include: New hire; initial; 
transition; conversion (full and core); upgrade (full and core); 
emergency; differences; recurrent; requalification; and special.
    Each category of training includes two ``segments of training''--
academic and job performance. Academic is training and evaluation that 
provides students with the required knowledge and cognitive skills 
necessary to perform the tasks required for the crewmember duty 
position or training or evaluation duty position. Academic training 
could be completed in either a classroom setting or through distance 
learning. Job performance is training and evaluation in the duty or job 
environment that provides students with the practical, hands on 
experience of integrating knowledge and skills and learning the related 
motor skills necessary to perform the job.
    For flight crewmembers, the proposed term ``academic training'' is 
currently known as ``ground training.'' For flight crewmembers, the 
proposed term ``job performance training'' is currently known as 
``flight training.'' The FAA has proposed these new terms in order to 
ensure they accurately apply to all training populations affected by 
the proposed rule, including those that do not conduct flight training, 
such as flight attendants and aircraft dispatchers.
    Segments of training have subsets called ``modules.'' Certificate 
holders create modules based on the task requirements in the applicable 
QPS. The FAA approves all modules as part of the approved training 
program.
    The following table compares the proposed terminology with the 
current usage.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Current rule                         Proposed rule
------------------------------------------------------------------------
TRAINING PROGRAM                                    TRAINING PROGRAM
    (Curriculum and Resources)                       (Curriculum and
                                                     Resources)
CURRICULUM                                          CURRICULUM
CATEGORIES OF TRAINING                              CATEGORIES OF
                                                     TRAINING


 
                                                                                                   Aircraft
                                                      Flight crewmember:   Flight attendant:     dispatchers:
 
    Basic Indoctrination                              New Hire             New Hire            Initial
    Initial                                           Initial              Initial             Transition
    Transition                                        Transition           Transition          Recurrent
    Upgrade                                           Conversion           Recurrent           Requalification
    Recurrent                                         Upgrade              Requalification     Differences
    Requalification                                   Recurrent            Differences         Special
    Differences                                       Requalification      Special
    Crewmember Emergency                              Differences          Emergency
                                                      Special
 


 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
CURRICULUM SEGMENTS                                 CURRICULUM SEGMENTS
    (Two Types--Ground and Flight)                   (Two Types--
                                                     Academic and Job
                                                     Performance)
MODULE                                              MODULE
LESSON                                              LESSON
ELEMENT                                             ELEMENT

IV. The Proposal

    This section addresses the major changes proposed in this document 
and includes a general description of each change and supporting 
rationale. You can find a detailed description of these and other 
proposed changes in the ``Section-by-Section Discussion'' in the docket 
for this rulemaking at http://

[[Page 1284]]

www.regulations.gov. In addition to the ``Section-by-Section 
Discussion'' document, the docket also contains ``Derivation and 
Distribution Tables'' for the proposed Subparts BB and CC. The 
``Derivation and Distribution Tables'' will help commenters track how 
the proposed sections relate to the current sections in part 121. The 
following table lists the major changes and their applicability to 
crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers.

    Major Changes and Their Applicability to Crewmembers and Aircraft
                               Dispatchers
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Major changes
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A. Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers
    1. Provide more accurate and complete operating procedures and
     crewmember and aircraft dispatcher duties.
    2. Integrate subparts N, O, and P into new subparts BB and CC.
    3. Require baseline and minimum programmed hours.
    4. Require integration of Crew Resource Management (CRM) and
     Dispatcher Resource Management (DRM).
    5. Add ``Special'' training category.
    6. Establish phased Requalification.
    7. Establish provisions for initial cadre.
    8. Continuous analysis process.
B. Flight Crewmembers
    1. Require the use of FSTD for job performance training and
     evaluation.
    2. Train and evaluate flight crewmembers in a full crew environment.
    3. Require Special Hazards training.
    4. Require Recurrent LOFT.
    5. Reduce the frequency of performance drills using emergency
     equipment and procedures.
C. Flight Attendants
    1. Establish qualification and training requirements for check
     flight attendants, flight attendant instructors, and evaluators.
    2. Require operating experience by aircraft type specific to the
     certificate holder.
    3. Increase the frequency of performance drills using emergency
     equipment and procedures.
D. Aircraft Dispatchers
    1. Establish dispatcher instructors and check dispatchers.
    2. Require supervised operating experience specific to the
     certificate holder.
    3. Establish optional aircraft dispatcher Combined Certification and
     Initial Curriculum.
    4. Establish qualification requirements for Dispatch Program
     Designees.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Major Changes Affecting Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers

1. Provide for More Accurate and Complete Operating Procedures and 
Crewmember and Aircraft Dispatcher Duties
    Training effectiveness is enhanced when operational procedures and 
crewmember duties are thoroughly and accurately defined for the type of 
operation. The FAA reviewed numerous accidents where a lack of properly 
defined procedures and duties were a direct or contributing factor. The 
following proposals will improve the completeness and accuracy of the 
duties and procedures for crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers.
     Add Standard Operating Procedures, Abnormal or Non-normal 
Procedures, Emergency Procedures, Weight and Balance (or Loading), and 
Performance sections to the Operating Limitations section of the FAA-
approved Flight Crew Operating Manual (FCOM) as mandatory instructions 
for all persons operating a civil aircraft in operations under this 
part.
     Require that training and evaluation of monitoring duties 
for the pilot not flying the aircraft be provided in addition to the 
traditional pilot flying (at the controls).
     Include procedures in the FCOM for executing the tasks 
authorized for the certificate holder. These procedures may come from 
the following: (1) The FAA-approved Airplane Flight Manual (AFM); (2) 
the generic procedures provided in the QPS; or other procedures as 
modified by the certificate holder and approved by the Principal 
Operations Inspector (POI), such as those contained in Operations 
Specifications (OpSpecs).
     Provide training in approved procedures in critical 
environments (e.g., windshear for takeoff and landing).
     Provide awareness performance statements relative to each 
task (e.g., be aware of the autoflight configuration at all times).
     Require that the material in the current certificate 
holder's manual (Sec. Sec.  121.133, 121.135, and 121.141) pertaining 
to crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers be contained in the Flight Crew 
Operating Manual (FCOM), Flight Attendant Operating Manual (FAOM), and 
Aircraft Dispatcher Procedures Manual (ADPM).
    The requirement for operating procedures and crewmember duties is 
not new. However, a thorough and accurate compilation of the 
information will improve safety of flight operations. It will also 
result in better training program definition and development.
2. Integrate Subparts N, O, and P Into New Subparts BB and CC
    Under the proposal, the current regulations governing drug and 
alcohol testing and hazardous material training would remain in 
subparts N and O. The crewmember qualification and training 
requirements in subparts N and O would be moved into subpart BB of part 
121 and the aircraft dispatcher qualification and training requirements 
in subparts N and P would be moved into subpart CC of part 121. Other 
changes include the addition of new appendices, Q, R, S, and T as QPS 
appendices for pilots, flight engineers, flight attendants, and 
aircraft dispatchers. The proposal also removes obsolete references to 
flight navigators.
3. Require Baseline and Minimum Programmed Hours
    This proposal prescribes programmed hour requirements for 
crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers. Programmed hours are the required 
academic and job performance training hours for categories of training. 
The proposed programmed hours are contained in the applicable QPS. The 
programmed hours consist of baseline and minimum hours for academic and 
job performance training segments. The term baseline hours refers to 
the starting point for determining the number of programmed

[[Page 1285]]

hours required for FAA approval. The FAA may allow a reduction from the 
baseline hours in certain circumstances. However, the FAA will not 
allow a reduction below the minimum number of hours prescribed in the 
QPS appendices.
    For example, in accordance with Table 1 of the Pilot QPS, the 
baseline for transition academic training is 92 hours. The FAA may 
allow a certificate holder to reduce the number of programmed hours if 
the certificate holder demonstrates that circumstances justify a lesser 
amount. However, the FAA will not approve a reduction below the minimum 
hours stated in the Pilot QPS, which is 62 hours for transition 
academic training. These proposed requirements would improve the 
consistency of reductions to training hours.
    The programmed hours do not include other required training, such 
as training for hazardous materials and security. In addition, periods 
of time when training is not occurring, such as lunch and travel 
between facilities, do not count toward required programmed hours. The 
proposed programmed hours give certificate holders flexibility in 
developing training programs. The proposed programmed hours also ensure 
that training programs have a sufficient number of hours for 
crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers to gain and maintain proficiency.
Flight Crewmember Programmed Hours
    Programmed hours consist of baseline and minimum hour requirements. 
The FAA bases the proposed baseline and minimum program training hours 
on national norms, FAA handbooks, traditional and AQP training 
programs, and problems routinely encountered by a POI. The baseline 
hours for flight training are not reducible. The baseline hours for 
academic training could be reduced to the minimum hours if the 
certificate holder applied for a reduction under proposed Sec.  
121.1335(b). The Administrator would consider the factors outline in 
proposed Sec.  121.1337(e) before granting a reduction in programmed 
hours. These factors are:
     The pass/fail rate in the curriculum.
     The quality and effectiveness of the teaching-learning 
process.
     The experience levels of the students, instructors, and 
check persons.
     The certificate holder's type and scope of operations.
     The complexity of make, model, and series of aircraft 
used.
    Current regulations prescribe minimum programmed hours for flight 
training. However, under Sec.  121.409(c), the minimum programmed hours 
do not apply if the training program includes a course of flight 
crewmember training in an FSTD. Since one of the purposes of this rule 
is to require all certificate holders to use FSTD in their job 
performance training programs, the FAA proposes to delete the exception 
in current Sec.  121.409(c). Under Sec.  121.1335 of this proposal, all 
training programs are required to have the programmed hours specified 
in the applicable QPS.
Flight Attendant Programmed Hours
    Similar to flight crewmember programmed hours, flight attendant 
programmed hours are also based on current regulatory and advisory 
material. In Recommendation A-92-67, the NTSB stated the FAA should 
establish procedures for reducing required hours of flight attendant 
Recurrent training. Specifically, the NTSB recommended the procedures 
be based on the following:
     The number of types of aircraft for which flight 
attendants are qualified.
     The accuracy and effectiveness of training devices and 
simulators.
     The methods used to test and evaluate proficiency.
    The FAA proposes to change the way it allocates flight attendant 
programmed hours for Initial training for each aircraft type. The FAA 
proposes to increase the number of baseline hours for Initial training 
on the first aircraft type. Under the proposal, the FAA requires 12 
hours of training on general subjects (such as CRM, passenger handling, 
and theory of flight) and 12 hours of aircraft type specific training. 
For each subsequent aircraft type, the FAA does not require the flight 
attendant to repeat training on the general subjects.
    The FAA also proposes a baseline of 24 hours for flight attendant 
emergency training. These hours may not be reduced for flight 
attendants qualified in overwater operations. For flight attendants not 
qualified in overwater operations, the required hours may be reduced to 
a minimum of 22 hours. This proposal codifies the national norms that 
the FAA has included in FAA Order 8400.10 Air Transportation Operations 
Inspector's Handbook (http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/examiners_
inspectors/8400/), and is consistent with industry practice and NTSB 
recommendations.
    In addition, the FAA is proposing new programmed hours for 
transition training. Transition training would allow a flight attendant 
to qualify on an aircraft type if the flight attendant has been 
qualified for at least 180 days and served in the previous 180 days on 
an aircraft as a flight attendant for that certificate holder.
    Under the proposal, the baseline programmed hours for transition 
training are 12 hours to ensure adequate training for flight 
attendants. The baseline may be reduced to a minimum of 8 hours.
Aircraft Dispatcher Programmed Hours
    The proposed aircraft dispatcher regulations contain programmed 
hour requirements similar to crewmember programmed hours, including 
authorizations for reductions. For example, the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS 
outlines a baseline programmed hour requirement of 8 hours for 
supervised operating experience. These programmed hours may not be 
reduced below the baseline.
4. Require Integration of Crew Resource Management (CRM) and Dispatcher 
Resource Management (DRM)
    CRM and DRM training is the incorporation of team management 
concepts in flight operations. Resource management training focuses on 
the interaction among flight crewmembers, flight attendants, aircraft 
dispatchers, maintenance personnel, air traffic controllers, and 
others. CRM and DRM activities include team building and maintenance, 
information transfer, problem solving, decision making, maintaining 
situational awareness, and using automated systems. This proposal 
revises current CRM and DRM requirements by integrating CRM and DRM 
proficiencies throughout the training and evaluation programs for 
crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers. These proposed changes address 
NTSB recommendations concerning CRM training (Recommendations A-88-71 
and A-94-196).
    The proposed requirements provide details about how certificate 
holders must include CRM and DRM training in specific subject areas. 
The QPS appendices describe specific CRM and DRM subject areas, such 
as: Communication processes and decisions, workload management, and 
situational awareness. The proposed Pilot and Flight Engineer QPS 
appendices require CRM training and evaluation during recurrent LOFT 
sessions and line checks. Training in these areas helps prevent errors 
such as taxiing on a wrong runway, misinterpreting tower controller 
information, and incompletely preparing for takeoff because of 
interruptions. The Flight Attendant QPS incorporates CRM proficiencies 
into performance drills. The Aircraft Dispatcher QPS requires that 
certificate

[[Page 1286]]

holders evaluate DRM indicators throughout the entire Proficiency Test 
or Check.
5. Add ``Special'' Training Category
    When certain changes are made to the certificate holder's 
operations or equipment, the certificate holder must make conforming 
changes to its training program. For example, a certificate holder may 
begin conducting Reduced Vertical Separation Minimums (RVSM) or 
Extended Operations (ETOPs) and would need to amend its training 
program to address these new operations. Another example is the 
addition of equipment to aircraft (e.g., Automated External 
Defibrillators). In these situations, it may be difficult to determine 
when specific crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers have been trained. 
To address this situation, some certificate holders have developed a 
``Special'' training category. The modules for this ``Special'' 
training category are temporary and used by the certificate holder to 
ensure that all crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers receive the new 
training. The certificate holder integrates the module for this 
``Special'' training into the existing training categories. The 
proposed language has adopted this strategy by codifying a ``Special'' 
category of training.
6. Establish Phased Requalification
Flight Crewmembers
    Proposed Sec.  121.1239 establishes Requalification requirements 
for flight crewmembers who become unqualified by not meeting Recurrent 
training requirements. The proposed changes clarify that an unqualified 
person may not necessarily be required to repeat all of the Initial 
training to regain qualification. Instead, the FAA has based the 
Requalification requirements on the amount of time that has elapsed 
since the person last served in the duty position in operations under 
this part.
    Proposed Sec.  121.1239(b) outlines three phases of 
Requalification:
     Phase I Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for less than 9 months.
     Phase II Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for at least 9 months, but less than 27 months.
     Phase III Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for 27 months or more.
    The specific tasks that the flight crewmember must complete for 
requalification are outlined in the appropriate QPS.
Flight Attendants
    Proposed Sec.  121.1309 establishes Requalification requirements 
for flight attendants who become unqualified by not meeting Recurrent 
training requirements. This rule is necessary because the current 
regulations imply that an unqualified person must repeat all required 
training. In some cases this is not necessary because a previously 
qualified flight attendant retains some of the knowledge and skills 
that he or she has learned. Thus, proposed Sec.  121.1309 establishes 
that, to be requalified, the person must meet either the basic 
qualification requirements (new hire, initial, transition, and 
emergency training, and differences training, if necessary), or 
requalification requirements based on the amount of time the person has 
been unqualified.
    Proposed Sec.  121.1309 outlines three phases of requalification:
     Phase I Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for less than 12 months.
     Phase II Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for at least 12 months, but not more than 24 months.
     Phase III Requalification program--the person has been 
unqualified for more than 24 months.
    The specific tasks that the flight attendant is required to 
complete for Requalification are outlined in the proposed Flight 
Attendant QPS.
Dispatchers
    Proposed Sec.  121.1419 contains aircraft dispatcher 
requalification requirements that are similar to crewmember 
requalification requirements.
    Proposed Sec.  121.1419 outlines five phases of requalification:
     Phase I Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for less than 6 months.
     Phase II Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for 6 months or more, but less than 12 months.
     Phase III Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for 12 months or more, but less than 24 months.
     Phase IV Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for 24 months or more, but less than 36 months.
     Phase V Requalification--the person has been unqualified 
for 36 months or more.
    The specific tasks that the dispatcher must accomplish for 
requalification are outlined in the appropriate QPS.
7. Establish Provisions for Initial Cadre
    A start-up part 119 certificate holder or an existing certificate 
holder starting-up operations using a new aircraft type is not able to 
meet all of the requirements for check pilots, check flight engineers, 
and check flight attendants. Those certificate holders lack qualified 
personnel to fill these duty positions. The FAA has over 40 years of 
experience authorizing check persons as the initial cadre. The existing 
practice has served the safety goals of the FAA for the following 
reasons: (1) The FAA requires highly qualified and recently experienced 
personnel to participate in the initial cadre; (2) the FAA directly 
oversees the evaluation and observation of the initial cadre; and (3) 
the FAA limits the duration of the initial cadre to a period not to 
exceed 24 months. Proposed Sec.  121.1257 codifies a long-standing FAA 
policy to allow initial cadre personnel to serve as check pilots or 
check flight engineers during the period of initial cadre status.
    Proposed Sec. Sec.  121.1425 and 121.1323 for check dispatchers and 
check flight attendants are similar to proposed Sec.  121.1257 for 
initial cadre check pilots and check flight engineers. These sections 
codify requirements for qualifying an initial cadre of check persons. 
Most of the proposed requirements are based on current industry 
practice and FAA policy.
8. Continuous Analysis Process
    The proposal adds a continuous analysis process for crewmember and 
aircraft dispatcher training programs. These new requirements are 
similar to the existing Sec.  121.373, which addresses continuing 
analysis and surveillance for maintenance programs. The proposal 
requires certificate holders to establish procedures for validating and 
maintaining the effectiveness of the continuous analysis process and 
the training program. Additionally, it requires certificate holders to 
analyze crewmember and aircraft dispatcher evaluations to identify 
areas that need to be addressed and training program improvements that 
need to be made. The continuous analysis process ensures that 
certificate holders identify and correct deficiencies in their training 
programs. The proposal also establishes a notification and appeal 
process that ensures the FAA approves any changes to the training 
program, consistent with the approval and amendment process.

[[Page 1287]]

B. Major Changes Affecting Flight Crewmembers

1. Require the Use of FSTD for Job Performance Training and Evaluation
    Current appendix H of part 121 permits certificate holders to use 
simulators for varying amounts of the training, testing, and checking 
required by the FAA. Appendix H is a voluntary alternative to training 
and checking in the airplane. The only required use of an FSTD in the 
current regulations is the windshear requirements in Sec.  121.409(d).
    The proposal requires that all creditable pilot and flight engineer 
training and evaluation be completed in a qualified FSTD approved by 
the POI for those tasks specified in the applicable QPS. Using FSTD, 
rather than airplanes, allows for more in-depth training in a safer 
environment, including the practice of critical emergency procedures. 
FSTD also provide benefits such as reducing noise, air pollution, and 
air traffic congestion, and conserving petroleum resources. This 
proposal addresses concerns raised by NTSB Recommendations A-94-191 
through 194, which stated that part 121 flight training and checking 
should be required in FSTD wherever possible.
    The FAA recognizes that in a few cases, certificate holders 
initially may not be able to comply with the requirements to use FSTD 
for all of their job performance training and evaluation. Accordingly, 
the proposed rule includes provisions for requesting a deviation in 
Sec.  121.1345(b) through (e). Proposed paragraph (b) describes the 
limited circumstances when a certificate holder may receive a deviation 
from the requirement in paragraph (a). Proposed paragraph (c) requires 
a person requesting a deviation to demonstrate to the FAA why the 
circumstances warrant a deviation from the requirement to use a 
qualified FSTD. The FAA does not intend that the deviation provide a 
loophole for certificate holders who want to continue training and 
evaluating in aircraft. Rather, the deviation is designed to 
accommodate those certificate holders who use aircraft for which there 
are no FSTD available (e.g., DC-6) or, for extraordinary reasons, do 
not have access to an FSTD for the aircraft type they operate.
2. Train and Evaluate Flight Crewmembers in a Full Crew Environment.
    The existing recurrent qualification and training requirements for 
a PIC and SIC differ in several respects. Current regulations require 
different tasks and events for PIC and SIC, and the training is 
separate. For example, PIC receive more training tasks and more 
frequent proficiency checks than SIC. In addition, PIC train on a 6-
month basis, and SIC train on a 12-month basis. The disparity between 
the training requirements for PIC and SIC is not consistent with actual 
line operations. During actual operations, pilots must work as a flight 
crew unit. Typically, today's flight operations involve PIC and SIC 
performing both pilot flying and monitoring duties.
    The proposed rule eliminates the differences in training for PIC 
and SIC. The training cycles for PIC and SIC are no longer separate. 
Under the proposal, PIC and SIC are required to complete Recurrent 
training on a 9-month basis. The requirement is such that each must 
complete all of the academic subjects and all of the job performance 
tasks listed in the applicable QPS where each subject, task, or 
environment may be required once each 9-month period; once each 18-
month period, or once each 36-month period. Proposed Sec.  121.1333 and 
the QPS require the same tasks and events for PIC and SIC. Both PIC and 
SIC must demonstrate proficiency in the flying and monitoring duties 
associated with the prescribed tasks and events. The QPS also requires 
the same number of programmed hours for PIC and SIC training. For 
example, there are 24 programmed hours for transition flight training. 
During that 24 hours of training, both the PIC and the SIC must 
demonstrate proficiency in flying and monitoring duties. The proposed 
changes facilitate training flight crewmembers in a complete crewmember 
environment.
    In addition to leveling the requirements regarding tasks and task 
performance between PIC and SIC, this proposal provides additional 
advantages. The change in frequency of training exposure provides an 
increase in the actual training exposure for both PIC and SIC over an 
equal time period. Additionally, while this proposal reduces the 
frequency with which PIC return for training, it increases the 
frequency with which SIC return for training. The FAA anticipates a 
reduction in previous piloting experience for pilots entering the air 
carrier industry in the near future; almost all of these new pilots 
will start their air carrier service as SIC. This proposal would 
provide these new, lesser experienced, pilots with more training at 
each training event and provide those training events more frequently 
than under today's regulations.
    In addition to integrating the training for PIC and SIC, the 
proposal will also integrate the training for flight engineers with the 
training for PIC and SIC, when applicable. Proficiency tests, 
proficiency checks, proficiency reviews, LOFT, and FSTD Course of 
Instruction require all flight crewmember duty positions to be occupied 
by a person who is qualified to serve in that crewmember duty position 
(including a qualified crewmember, instructor, check pilot, and aircrew 
program designee (APD)), or is in student status learning to serve in 
that crewmember duty position.
3. Require Special Hazards Training
    In 1996, the NTSB recommended the FAA require training to better 
prepare flight crewmembers to respond to sudden or unexpected aircraft 
upsets (Recommendation A-96-120). Also, the NTSB recommended the FAA 
develop CFIT training requirements for all pilots operating under part 
121.
    The QPS includes special hazard academic training subjects such as 
CFIT and Ground Proximity Escape maneuvers, upset and loss of control, 
and runway incursions. In addition to academic training in special 
hazards, the FAA is proposing to include job performance training 
during Initial, Conversion, Transition, Upgrade, Requalification, and 
Recurrent training. For pilots, this training includes inflight 
maneuvers in upset and disturbance recovery, low altitude windshear 
avoidance and escape, and ground proximity warning system (GPWS) and 
terrain awareness warning system (TAWS) alert recognition and escape 
maneuvers.
4. Require Recurrent LOFT
    LOFT is training in an FSTD with a complete flight crew. LOFT uses 
representative flight segments containing standard operating 
procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal procedures, and emergency 
procedures expected in line operations. LOFT used in Recurrent training 
is called ``recurrent LOFT.'' LOFT used to qualify for line operations 
is called ``qualification LOFT.''
    Proposed Sec.  121.1353 includes the general requirements for 
conducting LOFT. The proposed requirements are more specific than the 
current regulations and codify existing advisory material (AC 120-35C, 
Line Operational Simulations: Line Oriented Flight Training, Special 
Purpose Operational Training, Line Operational Evaluation). A LOFT is 
conducted as a line operation and allows for no interruption by the 
instructor during the session except for a non-disruptive acceleration 
of uneventful en route segments. Interruptions are not allowed in LOFT

[[Page 1288]]

sessions because they disrupt the flow and undermine the realistic 
nature of line operations.
    The proposal requires 4 hours of training in an FSTD, plus a 
briefing and debriefing. In addition, each duty position must be filled 
by a person who is qualified or in student status to serve in that 
position. This proposed requirement is needed because the training 
value of LOFT is diminished when inappropriate crew substitutions are 
made, such as using an SIC to substitute for a PIC. The certificate 
holder selects the tasks to be performed from the list provided in the 
applicable QPS, and the FAA approves the selected tasks. In this way, 
the FAA is certain the selected tasks are appropriate for the 
certificate holder's operations.
    Under proposed Sec.  121.1353, any person serving in a flight 
crewmember position during a LOFT who does not perform satisfactorily 
may not serve as a required crewmember or operate under part 121 
without receiving additional training to correct the deficiencies. This 
is common industry practice and consistent with FAA advisory material. 
The certificate holder must schedule a separate training session to 
correct the deficiencies. This additional training ensures that the 
substandard performance is corrected before the person performs line 
operations.
5. Reduce the Frequency of Performance Drills Using Emergency Equipment 
and Procedures
    The current rule requires all crewmembers to have recurrent 
emergency ``hands on'' performance drill training on the use of 
portable emergency equipment (e.g., fire extinguishers, protective 
breathing equipment, portable oxygen equipment, flotation equipment) 
and aircraft exits every 24 months. This proposal adjusts the frequency 
of flight crewmember ``hands on'' training from 24 months to 36 months. 
This matches the newly adjusted frequency for flight crewmember 
Recurrent training. It also addresses FAA guidance recommending that 
flight crewmembers land the aircraft as quickly as possible to minimize 
the effect of an on-board fire, and that flight crewmembers remain on 
the flight deck, consistent with the post-9/11 security procedures. In 
addition, current policy places increased responsibility on the flight 
attendant to respond to emergency situations in the aircraft cabin. 
While this proposal decreases the frequency of hands on drills for 
flight crewmembers, it increases the frequency of hands on drills for 
flight attendants. Although the FAA is proposing to reduce the 
frequency for flight crewmember emergency ``hands on'' drills, we are 
also proposing to add an unannunciated fire (fire in the aircraft 
cabin) drill to flight training.

C. Major Changes Affecting Flight Attendants

    The proposed rule and associated Flight Attendant QPS appendix 
would revise flight attendant requirements in several areas to address 
NTSB recommendations and to enhance flight attendant training and 
evaluation.
1. Establish Qualification and Training Requirements for Check Flight 
Attendants, Flight Attendant Instructors, and Evaluators
Check Flight Attendants
    The proposed rule includes eligibility, approval, qualification, 
and continuing qualification requirements for check flight attendants. 
These proposed requirements provide regulatory standards for initially 
qualifying a flight attendant to serve as a check flight attendant as 
well as continuing qualification for that flight attendant. The 
requirements ensure that check flight attendants are familiar with the 
certificate holder's operations as well as the aircraft type on which 
they will be conducting operating experience, that they are line-
qualified for the certificate holder before evaluating other flight 
attendants, and that they are qualified to evaluate flight attendants 
who are completing operating experience. The FAA is proposing to add 
these requirements to ensure that effective and qualified evaluators 
conduct the evaluation of the person completing operating experience.
Flight Attendant Instructors
    The proposed rule requires each flight attendant instructor to 
complete basic qualification or Recurrent training requirements, as 
appropriate, for the certificate holder. The FAA recognizes that a 
flight attendant instructor may not be physically able to perform 
certain performance drills due to injury, pregnancy, or disability. 
Therefore, the FAA also proposes to allow those individuals to complete 
the required training to qualify as a flight attendant instructor, with 
the exception of those performance drills the person cannot physically 
perform. However, the FAA only allows flight attendant instructors to 
teach performance drills that they are able to demonstrate at the time 
of instruction. In addition, the flight attendant instructors must have 
performed the drills within the past 12 months as part of their basic 
qualification or Recurrent flight attendant training. This requirement 
provides certificate holders with flight attendant instructor staffing 
flexibility, while ensuring that flight attendant training is delivered 
by knowledgeable instructors who have completed the FAA approved flight 
attendant training program for that certificate holder. The FAA based 
the proposed rule on current effective industry practices.

Persons Authorized To Administer Flight Attendant Proficiency Tests

    The FAA is proposing new requirements to ensure that an individual 
who evaluates flight attendant proficiency tests is approved by the 
Administrator and has appropriate training to administer the test. This 
ensures that effective and qualified evaluators administer the 
proficiency tests. The FAA based these requirements on current 
effective industry practice regarding qualification of instructors and 
evaluators in flight attendant training programs.
2. Require Operating Experience by Aircraft Type Specific to the 
Certificate Holder
    The proposed rule increases the requirements for flight attendants 
to complete operating experience on each aircraft type operated by the 
certificate holder prior to becoming qualified on that aircraft type. 
The proposed rule requires flight attendants to gain aircraft operating 
experience after completion of Initial training for each aircraft type. 
This is different from the current rule which only requires a flight 
attendant to complete operating experience on one aircraft type (Group 
I or Group II, as applicable) in part 121 operations during the flight 
attendant's career. The proposal ensures that a flight attendant 
qualified on a large number of different aircraft types has more 
extensive training on each aircraft type than under the current rules. 
The proposed rule also requires that a person receive operating 
experience on each aircraft type for each certificate holder for whom 
the person is employed. This requirement is necessary because flight 
attendant procedures can differ significantly between certificate 
holders, even for the same aircraft type.
    The proposed rule also gives certificate holders more flexibility 
than the current rule regarding the instructional design of basic 
qualification curricula. For example, under the current rule, a person 
must complete all Basic Qualification training before beginning 
operating experience. However, under the proposed rule, a person must 
only complete new hire

[[Page 1289]]

and Initial training on the aircraft type prior to beginning aircraft 
operating experience on that aircraft type. This approach allows 
certificate holders to incorporate the increased operating experience 
requirements into their training programs more efficiently.
    The proposed rule also requires flight attendants to complete 
aircraft operating experience within 90 days of completing Initial 
training on that aircraft type. This is consistent with the concept of 
consolidating knowledge and skills learned in Initial training on that 
aircraft type.
    The proposed rule also establishes new supervision requirements for 
aircraft operating experience and limits the number of persons who may 
receive or administer operating experience on any one operating cycle. 
For example, a check flight attendant cannot supervise more than four 
persons on any one operating cycle, and there can be no more than two 
check flight attendants supervising on any one operating cycle. These 
requirements help ensure a realistic operating environment where 
effective evaluation of the person receiving operating experience can 
occur, and are consistent with current effective industry practices and 
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recommendations for 
Cabin Attendant's Safety Training.
    The proposed rule also requires that when completing operating 
experience, a person perform the assigned duties of a flight attendant 
on at least two cycles on each aircraft type. This ensures that a 
person completing operating experience is actually gaining experience 
during takeoffs and landings, which are the most critical phases of 
flight. However, the person could not serve as a required crewmember, 
because the person is not a fully qualified flight attendant. The 
proposed rule continues the current requirement that a person receive 
aircraft operating experience for 5 hours. All operating experience 
must be gained during line operations. The proposal does not allow 
operating experience credit for training conducted in a full-scale 
cabin training device. The FAA considers experience gained in a ``line 
operations'' environment to be a significant training event that 
combines the demonstration of knowledge and skill. A ground based cabin 
training device is not considered an adequate substitute for operating 
experience gained during actual line operations with passengers 
onboard.
3. Increase the Frequency of Performance Drills Using Emergency 
Equipment and Procedures
    The proposed rule requires flight attendants to perform emergency 
procedure drills with the appropriate emergency equipment every 12 
months, as opposed to the 24-month interval in the current rule. These 
drills provide critical practice in the actions that flight attendants 
must take in an emergency. As stated in NTSB Report, Flight Attendant 
Training and Performance During Emergency Situations (NTSB/SIR-92/02),

    [e]mergency procedures, such as those required to prepare an 
airplane for an evacuation or a ditching, extinguish an in-flight 
fire, supervise the cabin following a decompression, handle a hijack 
situation, or manage passengers during an emergency evacuation, are 
rarely, if ever, used. Flight attendants must immediately change 
from passenger service oriented roles to their critical safety-
related roles in an emergency. Emergency situations typically 
require quick, assertive, and decisive action with little time for 
analysis of the situation. For most flight attendants, the only 
opportunity to practice skills needed in an emergency is during 
Initial and Recurrent training. These skills are perishable, and 
continuing and effective training is essential for maintaining them.

    In addition to responding to the NTSB, this proposal codifies 
current industry practice, as well as ICAO recommendations for Cabin 
Attendant's Safety Training.

D. Major Changes Affecting Aircraft Dispatchers

1. Establish Dispatcher Instructors and Check Dispatchers
    The proposal establishes qualification requirements for dispatcher 
instructors and check dispatchers. The new requirements are based on 
current FAA policy and industry practice. Codifying these requirements 
standardizes requirements for dispatcher instructors and check 
dispatchers.
    The proposal adds new requirements that a dispatcher instructor 
either hold an aircraft dispatcher certificate, maintain aircraft 
dispatcher currency, and meet certain instructor training requirements 
or be a subject matter expert. The proposal provides flexibility by 
allowing people who do not have an aircraft dispatcher certificate to 
be subject matter experts and instruct in specific subjects as approved 
by the Administrator (e.g., weather). The proposed requirements ensure 
that all dispatcher instructors (subject matter experts and 
certificated aircraft dispatchers) are knowledgeable in the subjects 
they are teaching. In addition, the proposal ensures that dispatcher 
instructors who are certificated aircraft dispatchers are knowledgeable 
in the certificate holder's facilities, equipment, and procedures, and 
use equipment and facilities specifically approved for the certificate 
holder's training program.
    The proposal also codifies check dispatcher qualification 
requirements. The proposed term ``check dispatcher'' replaces current 
terms ``supervisor or ground instructor'' used in Sec.  121.422(b). The 
proposal requires check dispatchers to hold an aircraft dispatcher 
certificate, maintain aircraft dispatcher currency, and meet certain 
training and experience requirements. For example, a check dispatcher 
must have performed the duties of an aircraft dispatcher for at least 8 
hours in a 24-hour period in the preceding 60 days, and be current and 
qualified as an aircraft dispatcher for a part 121 domestic or flag 
operation for at least 3 of the previous 5 years. The FAA believes that 
the proposed recency of experience requirement is necessary because 
currently dispatchers who administer competency checks are not required 
to have recent practical work experience. The FAA believes recent 
experience is necessary for check dispatchers to competently evaluate 
aircraft dispatchers. This is consistent with proposed subpart BB for 
crewmembers.
    The proposed new section also specifies curriculum requirements for 
Initial and Recurrent training for check dispatchers. These 
requirements are consistent with the proposed requirements in subpart 
BB for check pilots and check flight engineers and with current 
industry practice.
2. Require Supervised Operating Experience Specific to the Certificate 
Holder
    The proposal establishes a new requirement that aircraft 
dispatchers receive supervised operating experience for the certificate 
holder. This proposal improves safety by ensuring that aircraft 
dispatchers are familiar with the certificate holder's operations, and 
have an opportunity to practice knowledge and skills during actual 
operations. The proposal prescribes minimum hours of supervised 
operating experience that the aircraft dispatcher must meet before 
serving unsupervised.
    The proposal also imposes specific criteria for persons supervising 
operating experience. The supervising dispatcher does not need to be a 
check dispatcher. However, the supervising dispatcher must meet the 
same experience requirements as a check dispatcher. Requiring the 
supervising dispatcher to have the same experience as a check 
dispatcher provides adequate

[[Page 1290]]

safety for supervised operating experience and staffing flexibility for 
certificate holders.
    The proposed rule also clarifies that supervised operating 
experience may not begin until the person has completed Initial, 
Combined Certification and Initial, or Requalification training and 
operating familiarization. This new requirement ensures that supervised 
operating experience provides an opportunity to consolidate knowledge 
and skills acquired in training.
    The proposal also prohibits an aircraft dispatcher administering 
operating experience from supervising more than one person at a time. 
This ensures that the supervising aircraft dispatcher has a manageable 
workload.
3. Establish Optional Aircraft Dispatcher Combined Certification and 
Initial Curriculum
    Currently a person may obtain an aircraft dispatcher certificate 
only under the requirements in part 65 subpart C. After obtaining a 
certificate from the FAA, the aircraft dispatcher is then trained in 
the certificate holder's approved training program to become qualified 
to serve as an aircraft dispatcher in the certificate holder's 
operations.
    The proposed rule continues to allow certification of aircraft 
dispatchers under part 65, but it also integrates part 65 requirements 
into part 121 training programs to allow certification through a 
certificate holder's approved Combined Certification and Initial 
training curriculum (in-house).\3\ Under the proposal, a person could 
receive the necessary training, be tested by the certificate holder's 
dispatch program designee, and be issued an aircraft dispatcher 
certificate. The aircraft dispatcher's certificate would be issued 
under part 65, not part 121. Integrating a certification program into a 
certificate holder's training program allows a certificate holder to 
draw potential dispatchers from its pool of employees and train them 
``in-house'' to become aircraft dispatchers.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ ``In-house'' is used in this preamble to mean as part of the 
part 121 operator's FAA-approved training program. This option is 
described in detail in the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS as the ``combined 
certification & initial training curriculum.'' Use of the phrase 
``in-house'' does not mean that the training necessarily would only 
be conducted by the certificate holder or in the certificate 
holder's facility. Some training could still be out sourced to an 
FAA-approved training provider.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The requirements for obtaining an in-house dispatcher certificate 
are contained in the proposed Aircraft Dispatcher QPS. These proposed 
requirements are based on the requirements in Appendix A of part 65 and 
provide an equivalent level of training and safety. The proposed 
Aircraft Dispatcher QPS also contains training requirements for 
aircraft dispatchers who receive certificates through a traditional FAA 
approved part 65 program.
    Under the proposal, a certificate holder with a Combined 
Certification and Initial curriculum administers practical and 
proficiency tests to their dispatcher candidates. This process is 
illustrated in Flowchart 1 of the proposed Aircraft Dispatcher QPS. The 
dispatcher candidate completes the practical test, undergoes supervised 
operating experience, and then completes a proficiency test. A dispatch 
program designee for the certificate holder or the FAA must administer 
the practical test.
4. Establish Qualification Requirements for Dispatch Program Designees
    This proposed section establishes qualification requirements for a 
dispatch program designee. These requirements are consistent with those 
proposed for aircrew program designees in subpart BB. Part 65 currently 
allows designated aircraft dispatcher examiners to administer practical 
tests for certification to graduates from certain approved courses. The 
proposal would allow dispatch program designees to administer practical 
tests for certification to graduates of the specific certificate 
holder's in-house training program. The FAA has used designees for 
pilot, maintenance, and aircraft certification for decades and has been 
satisfied with designee performance. Therefore, the FAA proposes to 
extend the use of designees to aircraft dispatcher certification in 
part 121 operations to provide greater flexibility while maintaining 
the highest level of safety. Dispatch program designees evaluate 
aircraft dispatcher candidates based on the specific operational 
requirements of the certificate holder; therefore, the FAA believes it 
is in the best interest of safety for dispatch program designees to be 
limited to a specific certificate holder.

V. Impact Statements

Privacy Impact Statement for Proposed 14 CFR Part 121 Subparts BB and 
CC--Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft 
Dispatchers

Legal Requirements
    Section 522 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2005 
instructs DOT to conduct a privacy impact assessment (PIA) of proposed 
rules that will affect the privacy of individuals. The PIA should 
identify potential threats relating to the collection, handling, use, 
sharing and security of the data, the measures identified to mitigate 
these threats, and the rationale for the final decisions made for the 
rulemaking as a result of conducting the PIA.
Definitions
    Certificate holder means a person certificated under part 119 of 
this chapter that conducts operations under part 121 of this chapter, 
or a person certificated under part 119 of this chapter that conducts 
operations under part 135 of this chapter and is permitted or required 
by Sec.  135.3 of this chapter to conduct training curricula in 
compliance with this subpart.
    Individual means a living human being, especially a citizen of the 
United States or an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence.
    Personally Identifiable Information (PII) is any information that 
permits the identity of an individual to whom the information applies 
to be reasonably inferred by either direct or indirect means, singly or 
in combination with other data. Examples of PII include but are not 
limited to physical and online contact information, Social Security 
number and driver's license number.
    Privacy Impact Assessment is an analysis of how a rulemaking would 
impact the way information is handled in order to ensure data handling 
conforms to applicable legal, regulatory, and policy requirements 
regarding privacy, determine the risks and effects the rulemaking will 
have on collecting, maintaining and sharing PII, and examine and 
evaluate protections and alternative processes for handling information 
to mitigate potential privacy risks.
Requirements for the Submission and Retention of PII as Part of 
Compliance With Proposed 14 CFR Part 121 Subparts BB and CC--
Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers
    The FAA proposes to amend the training regulations for pilots, 
flight engineers, flight attendants and aircraft dispatchers serving in 
part 121 operations. There are 34,000 affected pilots in part 121 
operations, 1,600 flight engineers, 2,700 aircraft dispatchers, and 
106,600 flight attendants. Therefore, the total number of individuals 
that would be impacted by the proposed rule is approximately 150,000.
    Under the proposal, certificate holders are required to develop a 
record keeping system demonstrating that each

[[Page 1291]]

person has completed the required training and evaluation to serve in a 
particular duty position for the certificate holder. The proposed rule 
does not require a certificate holder to maintain PII. However, the FAA 
recognizes that certain PII may be contained in the certificate 
holder's records. This information may include the person's name, date 
of birth, address, telephone number, duty position, social security 
number, medical records, and type ratings. The FAA routinely reviews 
training records in the course of exercising its safety oversight 
authority and may request a certificate holder to disclose PII for 
investigation, compliance, or enforcement purposes.
    In addition to the certificate holders' records, the FAA also 
maintains PII for all certificated airmen, including pilots and 
aircraft dispatchers. The FAA records for certificated airmen include 
the name, date of birth, social security number, driver's license 
number, passport number, or government ID number, physical description 
(height, weight, hair and eye color, sex, and citizenship), address 
(airmen only), medical records, and airmen certificate number. The FAA 
also maintains PII for flight attendants who have obtained a 
Certificate of Demonstrated Proficiency.
    The FAA protects PII in its possession in accordance with ``Privacy 
Act Notice DOT/FAA 847--Aviation Records on Individuals (formerly 
General Air Transportation Records on Individuals).'' The Privacy Act 
Notice is available at http://cio.ost.dot.gov/DOT/OST/Documents/files/
records.html.
    The FAA did not conduct a PIA for this rulemaking because this 
proposed rule does not specifically require the collection of any PII. 
However, in August 2004, the FAA released a PIA for airmen 
certification records. The PIA addresses the methodology the agency 
uses to collect, store, distribute, and protect PII for certificated 
airmen and flight attendants. The PIA is available at http://
www.dot.gov/pia/faa_rms.htm.
    For more information or for comments and concerns on our privacy 
practices, please contact our Privacy Officer, Carla Mauney at 
carla.mauney@faa.gov, or by phone at (202) 267-9895.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    This proposal contains the following new information collection 
requirements. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 
U.S.C. 3507(d)), the FAA has submitted the information requirements 
associated with this proposal to the Office of Management and Budget 
for its review.
    Title: Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft 
Dispatchers.
    Summary: The FAA proposes to amend the regulations for crewmember 
and dispatcher training programs in domestic, flag, and supplemental 
operations. The proposed regulations enhance traditional training 
programs by requiring the use of flight simulation training devices for 
flight crewmembers and including additional training requirements in 
areas that are critical to safety. The proposal also reorganizes and 
revises the qualification and training requirements. The proposed 
changes are intended to contribute significantly to reducing aviation 
accidents.
    Use of: This project is in direct support of the Department of 
Transportation's Strategic Plan--Strategic Goal--SAFETY; i.e., to 
promote the public health and safety by working toward the elimination 
of transportation-related deaths and injuries. This request for 
clearance reflects requirements necessary under Title 14 CFR parts 65, 
119, 121, 135, and 142, to ensure safety-of-flight by making certain 
that complete and adequate training, testing, checking, and experience 
is obtained and maintained by those who operate under these parts of 
the regulation and that the use of flight simulation is utilized to its 
maximum practical extent in achieving these goals. The FAA will use the 
information it collects and reviews to ensure compliance and adherence 
to regulations and, where necessary, to take enforcement action on 
violators of the regulations.
    Respondents (including number of): The FAA estimates there are 118 
certificate holders who would be required to provide information in 
accordance with the proposed rule. The respondents to this proposed 
information requirement are certificate holders using the training 
requirements in 14 CFR part 121.
    Frequency: The FAA estimates certificate holders will have a one 
time information collection, then will collect or report information 
occasionally thereafter.
    Burden Estimate: This proposal would result in a 10-year 
recordkeeping and reporting burden as follows:
    Summary of time and costs (10-year) addressed in question 12:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Section                       Cost            Hours
------------------------------------------------------------------------
121.133/121.135:
Flight Crew Operating Manual............      $1,272,212        42,480.0
Flight Attendant and Aircraft Dispatcher         424,071        14,160.0
 Operating Manuals......................
121.1413................................          13,295           320.0
121.1421................................              83             2.0
121.1433
    (a)(i)..............................          13,273           355.0
    (b)(i)..............................         159,281         4,260.0
    (b)(ii).............................         159,281         4,260.0
    (b)(iii)............................         106,188         2,840.0
    (b)(iv).............................          42,475         1,136.0
121.1457................................          16,618           400.0
121.1459................................          16,618           400.0
121.1307................................         105,618         2,840.0
121.1331
    (a)(i)..............................         208,253          2124.0
    (a)(ii).............................       1,041,266         10620.0
    (b)(i)..............................           5,263           142.0
    (b)(ii).............................          39,469          1065.0
    (c)(i)(A)...........................         122,081          3195.0
    (c)(i)(B)...........................          16,277           426.0
    (c)(i)(C)...........................           8,139           213.0
    (c)(ii)(A)..........................         651,098        17,040.0
    (c)(ii)(B)..........................         542,582        14,200.0
    (c)(ii)(C)..........................         108,516         2,840.0

[[Page 1292]]

 
    (d).................................             601            35.5
121.1355
    Pilots and Flight Engineers.........         273,133          3068.0
    Flight Attendants...................          79,980         1,846.0
    Dispatchers.........................          76,693         1,846.0
                                         -------------------------------
        Total...........................       5,502,366       132,113.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The agency is soliciting comments to:
    (1) Evaluate whether the proposed information requirement is 
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility;
    (2) Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden;
    (3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to 
be collected; and
    (4) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those 
who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology.
    Individuals and organizations may submit comments on the 
information collection requirement by May 12, 2009, and should direct 
them to the address listed in the ADDRESSES section of this document. 
Comments also should be submitted to the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs, OMB, New Executive Building, Room 10202, 725 17th 
Street, NW., Washington, DC 20053, Attention: Desk Officer for FAA.
    According to the 1995 amendments to the Paperwork Reduction Act (5 
CFR 1320.8(b)(2)(vi)), an agency may not collect or sponsor the 
collection of information, nor may it impose an information collection 
requirement unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. 
The OMB control number for this information collection will be 
published in the Federal Register, after the Office of Management and 
Budget approves it.

International Compatibility

    In keeping with U.S. obligations under the Convention on 
International Civil Aviation, it is FAA policy to comply with 
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standards and 
Recommended Practices to the maximum extent practicable. The FAA has 
reviewed the corresponding ICAO Standards and Recommended Practices and 
has identified no differences with these proposed regulations.

Economic Assessment, Initial Regulatory Flexibility Determination, 
Trade Impact Assessment, and Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic 
analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 directs that each Federal agency 
shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination 
that the benefits of the intended regulation justify its costs. Second, 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) requires 
agencies to analyze the economic impact of regulatory changes on small 
entities. Third, the Trade Agreements Act (Pub. L. 96-39) prohibits 
agencies from setting standards that create unnecessary obstacles to 
the foreign commerce of the United States. In developing U.S. 
standards, this Trade Act requires agencies to consider international 
standards and, where appropriate, that they be the basis of U.S. 
standards. Fourth, the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 
104-4) requires agencies to prepare a written assessment of the costs, 
benefits, and other effects of proposed or final rules that include a 
Federal mandate likely to result in the expenditure by State, local, or 
tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 
million or more annually (adjusted for inflation with base year of 
1995). This portion of the preamble summarizes the FAA's analysis of 
the economic impacts of this proposed rule. We suggest readers seeking 
greater detail read the full regulatory evaluation, a copy of which we 
have placed in the docket for this rulemaking.
    In conducting these analyses, FAA has determined that this proposed 
rule: (1) Has benefits that justify its costs, (2) is a ``significant 
regulatory action'' as defined in section 3(f) of Executive Order 
12866, requiring review by the Office of Management and Budget, (3) is 
``significant'' as defined in DOT's Regulatory Policies and Procedures; 
(4) would have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of 
small entities; (5) would not create unnecessary obstacles to the 
foreign commerce of the United States; and (6) would not impose an 
unfunded mandate on State, local, or tribal governments, or on the 
private sector by exceeding the threshold identified above. These 
analyses are summarized below.
    The purpose of this rulemaking is to establish new requirements for 
air carrier training programs to enhance safety-critical training. 
These changes are expected to significantly reduce aviation accidents. 
The secondary purpose of this rulemaking project is to reorganize, 
simplify, and modernize all rule language associated with crewmember 
and aircraft dispatcher qualification and training under part 121. This 
proposal revises and recodifies the crewmember qualification and 
training requirements in subparts N and O into a new subpart BB of part 
121, and revises and recodifies the aircraft dispatcher qualification 
and training requirements in subparts N and P into subpart CC of part 
121. The rulemaking is necessary because the existing regulations have 
not been revised since 1970. They do not reflect current best practices 
or technological advances that have emerged over the last 30 years.
    Over a 10-year period, the total cost of the proposed rule would be 
approximately $372.7 million ($229.7 million, discounted). The total 
cost is composed of the costs of subparts BB and CC. The total the cost 
of subpart BB (crewmember training) would be approximately $368.1 
million ($226.3 million, discounted), and the cost of subpart CC 
(aircraft dispatcher training) would be approximately $4.6 million 
($3.4 million, discounted).
    Based on FAA analysis, the FAA believes the proposed training 
improvements, both in content and application, are expected to produce 
safety benefits (i.e., accidents avoided) of $1.11 billion and $2.46 
billion over the first 10 years. Presently, part 121 carriers may train 
crewmembers under existing subparts N and O to part 121 or under the 
Advanced Qualification Program (AQP), which is in subpart Y to part 
121. We believe that current AQP training programs already meet the 
safety improvements contained in this NPRM. Because the proposed rule 
would principally affect part 121 and

[[Page 1293]]

part 121/135 operators not conducting training under an Advanced 
Qualification Program (AQP) and because only 42.8 percent of the part 
121 and part 121/135 pilots are not trained under AQP, we only claim 
42.8 percent of these potential safety benefits. After this adjustment, 
the safety benefits would be between $476 million and $1.05 billion 
over the 10-year period. Several requirements of this proposed rule are 
phased-in over several years. Taking into account the phasing in of the 
proposed rule requirements, we believe the potential benefits of this 
rulemaking to be between $333 million and $737 million over the 10-year 
period, with an expected benefit value of $535 million. The proposed 
rule would also generate qualitative benefits for dispatchers, flight 
attendants, and flight engineers.

Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

A. Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for Subpart BB

A.1. Initial Regulatory Flexibility Determination for Subpart BB
    The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) (RFA) 
establishes ``as a principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall 
endeavor, consistent with the objectives of the rule and of applicable 
statutes, to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale 
of the businesses, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions 
subject to regulation. To achieve this principle, agencies are required 
to solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain 
the rationale for their actions to assure that such proposals are given 
serious consideration.'' The RFA covers a wide range of small entities, 
including small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and small 
governmental jurisdictions.
    Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a rule will 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. If the agency determines that it will, the agency must 
prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in the RFA.
    However, if an agency determines that a rule is not expected to 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities, section 605(b) of the RFA provides that the head of the 
agency may so certify and a regulatory flexibility analysis is not 
required. The certification must include a statement providing the 
factual basis for this determination, and the reasoning should be 
clear.
    The Small Business Administration size standard for ``small'' air 
carrier is 1,500 or fewer employees, as defined in 13 CFR 121.201, 
NAICS Code 48111. For subpart BB, the FAA identified a total of 73 out 
of 102 air carriers affected by this rule that meet this definition.
    For each of these entities, the FAA attempted to retrieve annual 
revenue data from Back Aviation Solutions. The FAA found revenue data 
for 17 of the 73 small entities that would be impacted by the rule. The 
FAA then compared this revenue data with the annualized compliance 
costs (see Appendix H, Table H.1, in the full regulatory evaluation 
available in the docket). Of the 17 entities, the FAA expects that the 
projected annualized cost per entity of the rule would be $104,000. The 
FAA also expects that the projected annualized costs of the rule would 
be 1% or higher than the annual revenue for five of them (29%), which 
we believe is a significant economic impact. For the remaining 56 small 
entities, we believe that the annualized cost of the rule would also be 
significant for 29%, or sixteen or more of them. Accordingly, the FAA 
concludes that Subpart BB of the proposed rule would have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.
A.2. Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for Subpart BB
    Under section 603(b) of the RFA (as amended), each initial 
regulatory flexibility analysis is required to address the following 
points: (1) Reasons why the agency considered the rule, (2) the 
objectives and legal basis for the rule, (3) the type and number of 
small entities to which the rule will apply, (4) the reporting, 
recordkeeping, and other compliance requirements of the rule, and (5) 
all Federal rules that may duplicate, overlap, or conflict with the 
rule. In addition, 5 U.S.C. 603(c) requires that the analysis also 
describe any significant alternatives to the proposed rule which 
accomplish the stated objectives of applicable statutes and which 
minimize any significant impact of the proposed rule on small entities.
Reasons Why the FAA Considered the Rule
    The FAA reviewed its crewmember and dispatcher training regulations 
in 14 CFR part 121 to identify improvements in training program content 
and application that would reduce human error among crewmembers and 
dispatchers, particularly in situations with special hazards. Based on 
this review, the FAA proposed improvements to the current rule, as 
discussed in the Background section of this Regulatory Evaluation 
(Section II.).
The Objectives and Legal Basis for the Rule
    The objective of the rule is to enhance crewmember and aircraft 
dispatcher training programs by including additional training 
requirements in areas that are critical to safety. The proposed changes 
are intended to contribute significantly to reducing aviation accidents 
and improving crewmember and dispatcher performance.
    The legal basis for the rule is 49 U.S.C. 44701 et seq., which 
provides that for regulations related to airmen certification, the FAA 
must consider the duty of an air carrier to provide service with the 
highest possible degree of safety in the public interest. The FAA must 
also consider, as a matter of policy, reducing or eliminating the 
possibility of recurrence of accidents in air transportation (49 U.S.C. 
44701(c)).
The Type and Number of Small Entities to Which the Rule Will Apply
    Of the 102 air carriers affected by the rule, there are 73 air 
carriers that meet the SBA size standard of small business. Of these 73 
air carriers, we retrieved net income and balance sheet data on 20 of 
these identified air carriers. A brief financial profile of these small 
entities is provided in Tables H.2 (net income) and H.3 (current 
assets, current liabilities, and financial solvency ratios) in the full 
regulatory evaluation available in the docket.
Federal Rules That May Duplicate, Overlap, or Conflict With the Rule
    The FAA is unaware of any Federal rules that duplicate, overlap, or 
conflict with the rule.
Other Considerations:
Affordability Analysis
    For the purpose of this analysis, the degree to which small 
entities can ``afford'' the cost of compliance is predicated on the 
availability of financial resources. Initial implementation costs can 
be paid from existing company assets, from borrowing, or from obtaining 
additional equity capital. Continuing annual costs of compliance may be 
accommodated by accepting reduced profits, raising ticket prices, or 
finding other ways to offset costs.
    Other means of assessing the affordability is the ability of each 
of the small entities to meet its short-term obligations, as shown in 
Tables H.2 (net income) and H.3 (working capital and financial solvency 
ratios) of the full

[[Page 1294]]

regulatory evaluation available in the docket. A company's short-term 
financial strength is substantially influenced by its working capital 
and its ability to pay short-term liabilities. Net working capital is 
the excess of current assets over current liabilities. It represents 
the margin of short-term debt-paying ability over existing short-term 
debt. In addition to the amount of net working capital, two other 
analytical indexes of current position are often computed: (1) Current 
ratio; and (2) quick ratio. The current ratio (i.e., current assets 
divided by current liabilities) helps put the amount of net working 
capital into perspective by showing the relationship between current 
assets and short-term debt. The quick ratio (sometimes called the acid 
test ratio) focuses on immediate liquidity (e.g., cash, marketable 
securities, accounts receivable) divided by current liabilities. A 
decline in net working capital, the current ratio, and the quick ratio 
over a period of time (such as 3 or 4 years) may indicate that a 
company is losing financial solvency. Negative net working capital is 
an indication of financial difficulty. If a company is experiencing 
financial difficulty, it is less likely to be able to afford additional 
costs.
    To assess the affordability of affected entities, we can also 
consider the amount of the annualized costs of the rule relative to net 
income. The lower the relative importance of the costs, the greater the 
likelihood that implementing offsetting cost-saving efficiencies or 
raising fares to cover increased costs will not substantially decrease 
the number of passengers.
    The financial information shown in Tables H.2 and H.3 of the full 
regulatory evaluation, available in the docket, suggest the following:
     Five of these entities appear to be generally profitable 
and solvent, as shown in Table H.2 and H.3, respectively, for most or 
all of the 5-year period examined. Therefore, they probably will have 
financial resources available to meet the requirements of this rule.
     For 10 entities, the FAA is unable to determine the 
ability to financially comply with the rule because of contradictory 
results (e.g., the companies were profitable, yet their net working 
capital has been negative, and their current and quick ratios have been 
below 1.00).
     The FAA has identified five small entities that may have 
trouble financing the expected compliance cost of this rule. Those 
entities had net losses as well as negative net working capital, 
current ratios, and quick ratios below 1.00 for most of the years 
examined. This amounts to 25% of the entities for which we found data.
     Additionally, there is little or no data in 53 cases to 
make any financial assessment. However, based on the information on the 
companies that we do have information on, we believe that 25%, or 
thirteen or more of these entities, also may have trouble financing the 
expected costs of the rule.
Competitiveness Analysis
    Due to the financial problems that certain aircraft operators are 
experiencing, there may be an impact on the relative competitive 
position of these carriers in the markets they serve.
Business Closure Analysis
    The FAA is unable to determine with certainty the extent to which 
those small entities that would be significantly impacted by this 
proposed rule would have to close their operations. However, the 
profitability information shown in Table H.2 in the full regulatory 
evaluation, available in the docket, and the affordability analysis can 
be indicators of the likelihood of a business closure.
    A number of these small entities are already in serious financial 
difficulty. To what extent the proposed rule makes the difference in 
whether these entities remain in business is difficult to determine. 
However, the FAA believes that the likelihood of business closure is 
high for three of the 20 (15%) entities for which financial data was 
available. (See Table H.2 in the full regulatory evaluation, available 
in the docket). Therefore, we believe that for the remaining 53 small 
entities, 15% or more may have similar difficulties.
Alternatives
    The FAA considered alternatives to the rule for the small air 
carriers. A discussion of these alternatives follows.
    Alternative 1--12-month recurrent training cycle for small 
entities.
    Currently, PICs train every 6 months and SICs train every 12 
months. The FAA could extend the recurrent training cycle for PICs 
working for small entities to 12 months to coincide with current SIC 
recurrent training cycles, instead of proposing to require PICs and 
SICs to attend recurrent training on a 9-month training cycle. This 
would result in cost savings for small entities. Again, in the proposal 
the FAA has required improvements that would reduce human error among 
crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers, particularly in situations with 
special hazards. Reducing the training cycle for PICs to a 12-month 
cycle is contrary to the purpose of this rulemaking.
    Conclusion. In the proposal, the FAA has required improvements that 
would reduce human error among crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers, 
particularly in situations with special hazards. Because these problems 
are equally incurred by all part 121 air carriers, regardless of size, 
it would be contrary to our policy for one high level of safety in all 
part 121 operations to exclude certain operators simply because they 
are small entities. Thus, the FAA does not consider this to be a 
significant alternative in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 603(d).
    Alternative 2--Extending the final compliance date to 7 years for 
small entities.
    Extending the final compliance date from 5 years to 7 years for 
small entities reduces the costs to the industry by approximately 40 
percent. Under this alternative, the FAA expects that the projected 
annualized cost of the rule would still be significant for 2 of the 20 
operators studied, or 10 percent of the small entities. Since there are 
73 known small operators impacted by this rule, this alternative not 
only does not eliminate the problem for a substantial number of small 
entities, but also it would be contrary to our policy for one level of 
safety.
    Conclusion: In the proposal, the FAA has required improvements that 
would reduce human error among crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers, 
particularly in situations with special hazards. Because these problems 
are equally incurred by all part 121 air carriers, regardless of size, 
it would be contrary to our policy for one high level of safety in all 
part 121 operations to exclude certain operators simply because they 
are small entities. Thus, the FAA does not consider this to be a 
significant alternative in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 603(d).
    Based on this analysis, the FAA expects that subpart BB may have a 
significant impact on small entities. Please provide comment on any or 
all provisions in the rule with regard to the impact of the provisions 
on small entities, including any benefits and costs, as well as any 
alternatives that would meet the FAA's safety objectives but also 
result in reducing the costs and burdens for these small entities. All 
comments must be accompanied with clear and detailed supporting data.

B. Initial Regulatory Flexibility Determination for Subpart CC

    In accordance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (RFA) the 
FAA reviewed subpart CC to determine

[[Page 1295]]

whether there would be a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities. Over a 10-year period, enactment of subpart 
CC would impose costs of $25,500 ($18,400, discounted) per small entity 
or applicant (see Appendix I in the full regulatory evaluation, 
available in the docket, for further details). The Small Business 
Administration size standard for ``small'' air carrier is 1,500 or 
fewer employees, as defined in 13 CFR 121.201, NAICS Code 48111 (2008). 
A review of the air carriers listed by the FAA concluded that 73 of the 
firms met this criterion, which employ on average 13 dispatchers. These 
dispatchers would incur a one-time cost for the initial and transition 
dispatchers' training and an annual cost for the recurrent training. 
Because the initial and transition training costs are different from 
the recurrent training cost, costs would vary on a per year basis, but 
the annualized cost per small entity would only be $2,600 ($18,400 x 
0.14238), which is less than 1% of the annual revenue of small 
entities. As a result, subpart CC would not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities. The FAA, however, 
invites industry comments and requests that all comments be accompanied 
with clear and detailed supporting data.

VII. International Trade Impact Assessment

    The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (Pub. L. 96-39) prohibits Federal 
agencies from establishing any standards or engaging in related 
activities that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of 
the United States. Legitimate domestic objectives, such as safety, are 
not considered unnecessary obstacles. The statute also requires 
consideration of international standards and, where appropriate, that 
they be the basis for U.S. standards. The FAA has assessed the 
potential effect of this proposed rule and has determined that it would 
have only a domestic impact and therefore no effect on any trade-
sensitive activity.

VIII. Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-
4) requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement 
assessing the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final 
agency rule that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more 
(adjusted annually for inflation with the base year 1995) in any one 
year by State, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by 
the private sector; such a mandate is deemed to be a ``significant 
regulatory action.'' The FAA currently uses an inflation-adjusted value 
of $136.1 million in lieu of $100 million.
    This proposed rule does not contain such a mandate.

Executive Order 13132, Federalism

    The FAA has analyzed this proposed rule under the principles and 
criteria of Executive Order 13132, Federalism. We determined this 
action would not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the 
relationship between the national Government and the States, or on the 
distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of 
government, and therefore would not have federalism implications.

Environmental Analysis

    FAA Order 1050.1E identifies FAA actions that are categorically 
excluded from preparation of an environmental assessment or 
environmental impact statement under the National Environmental Policy 
Act in the absence of extraordinary circumstances. The FAA has 
determined this proposed rulemaking action qualifies for the 
categorical exclusion identified in paragraph 312f and involves no 
extraordinary circumstances.

Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or 
Use

    The FAA has analyzed this NPRM under Executive Order 13211, Actions 
Concerning Regulations that Significantly Affect Energy Supply, 
Distribution, or Use (May 18, 2001). We have determined that it is not 
a ``significant energy action'' under the executive order because it is 
not likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, 
distribution, or use of energy.

Additional Information

Comments Invited
    The FAA invites interested persons to participate in this 
rulemaking by submitting written comments, data, or views. We also 
invite comments relating to the economic, environmental, energy, or 
federalism impacts that might result from adopting the proposals in 
this document. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion 
of the proposal, explain the reason for any recommended change, and 
include supporting data. To ensure the docket does not contain 
duplicate comments, please send only one copy of written comments, or 
if you are filing comments electronically, please submit your comments 
only one time.
    We will file in the docket all comments we receive, as well as a 
report summarizing each substantive public contact with FAA personnel 
concerning this proposed rulemaking. Before acting on this proposal, we 
will consider all comments we receive on or before the closing date for 
comments. We will consider comments filed after the comment period has 
closed if it is possible to do so without incurring expense or delay. 
We may change this proposal in light of the comments we receive.
Proprietary or Confidential Business Information
    Do not file in the docket information that you consider to be 
proprietary or confidential business information. Send or deliver this 
information directly to the person identified in the FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT section of this document. You must mark the 
information that you consider proprietary or confidential. If you send 
the information on a disk or CD-ROM, mark the outside of the disk or 
CD-ROM and also identify electronically within the disk or CD-ROM the 
specific information that is proprietary or confidential.
    Under 14 CFR 11.35(b), when we are aware of proprietary information 
filed with a comment, we do not place it in the docket. We hold it in a 
separate file to which the public does not have access, and we place a 
note in the docket that we have received it. If we receive a request to 
examine or copy this information, we treat it as any other request 
under the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). We process such a 
request under the DOT procedures found in 49 CFR part 7.
Availability of Rulemaking Documents
    You can get an electronic copy of rulemaking documents using the 
Internet by--
    1. Searching the Federal eRulemaking Portal (http://
www.regulations.gov);
    2. Visiting the FAA's Regulations and Policies Web page at http://
www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/; or
    3. Accessing the Government Printing Office's Web page at http://
www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html.
    You can also get a copy by sending a request to the Federal 
Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM-1, 800 Independence 
Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267-9680. Make 
sure to identify the docket number, notice number, or amendment number 
of this rulemaking.
    You may access all documents the FAA considered in developing this 
proposed rule, including economic analyses and technical reports, from 
the Internet through the Federal

[[Page 1296]]

eRulemaking Portal referenced in paragraph (1).

List of Subjects

14 CFR Part 65

    Aircraft, Airmen, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

14 CFR Part 119

    Administrative practice and procedure, Air carriers, Aircraft, 
Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

14 CFR Part 121

    Air carriers, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements, Safety, Transportation.

14 CFR Part 135

    Air taxis, Aircraft, Airmen, Aviation safety, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements.

14 CFR Part 142

    Administrative practice and procedure, Airmen, Educational 
facilities, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Schools, 
Teachers.

The Proposed Amendment

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration proposes to amend Chapter 1 of Title 14, Code of Federal 
Regulations (CFR) parts 65, 119, 121, 135, and 142, as follows:

PART 65--CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS

    1. The authority citation for part 65 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701-44703, 44707, 44709-
44711, 45102-45103, 45301-45302.

    2. Amend Sec.  65.57 by revising the introductory text and adding 
paragraph (c) to read as follows:


Sec.  65.57  Experience or training requirements.

    An applicant for an aircraft dispatcher certificate must present 
documentary evidence satisfactory to the Administrator that he or she 
has the experience prescribed in paragraph (a) of this section or has 
accomplished the training described in paragraph (b) of this section or 
has completed a dispatcher training program in accordance with 
paragraph (c) of this section as follows:
* * * * *
    (c) Successfully completed an aircraft dispatcher training program 
approved in accordance with subpart CC of part 121 of this chapter.
    3. Amend Sec.  65.70 by revising the introductory text of paragraph 
(a) to read as follows:


Sec.  65.70  Aircraft dispatcher certification courses: Records.

    (a) The operator of a part 65 appendix A aircraft dispatcher course 
must maintain a record for each student, including a chronological log 
of all instructors, subjects covered, and course examination and 
results. The record must be retained for at least 3 years after 
graduation. The course operator must also prepare for its records, and 
transmit to the Administrator not later than January 31 of each year, a 
report containing the following information for the previous year:
* * * * *

PART 119--CERTIFICATION: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS

    4. The authority citation for part 119 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 1153, 40101, 40102, 40103, 40113, 
44105, 44106, 44111, 44701-44717, 44722, 44901, 44903, 44904, 44906, 
44912, 44914, 44936, 44938, 46103, 46105.
    5. Amend Sec.  119.65 by adding new paragraph (a)(6) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  119.65  Management personnel required for operations conducted 
under part 121 of this chapter.

    (a) * * *
    (6) At least one line qualified check pilot, and, if appropriate, 
at least one check flight engineer, for each aircraft make and model 
and aircraft type for which the certificate holder has more than five 
pilots. A check pilot or check flight engineer may hold the additional 
position of Director of Safety, Director of Operations, or Chief Pilot, 
if the check pilot or check flight engineer meets the requirements of 
the additional position.
* * * * *
    6. Amend Sec.  119.67 by adding paragraph (f) to read as follows:


Sec.  119.67  Management personnel: Qualifications for operations 
conducted under part 121 of this chapter.

* * * * *
    (f) To serve as a Check Pilot or Check Flight Engineer for an 
aircraft type under Sec.  119.65(a) a person must be qualified in 
accordance with Sec. Sec.  121.1251, 121.1253, and 121.1255 of this 
chapter.
    7. Amend Sec.  119.69 by adding paragraph (a)(4) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  119.69  Management personnel required for operations conducted 
under part 135 of this chapter.

    (a) * * *
    (4) A line qualified check pilot or check flight engineer for each 
aircraft make and model and aircraft type for which the certificate 
holder has more than five pilots and is required to have, or elects to 
have, an approved training program under part 121 of this chapter. A 
check pilot or check flight engineer can hold the additional position 
of Director of Safety, Director of Operations, or Chief Pilot, if the 
check pilot or check flight engineer meets the requirements of the 
additional position.
* * * * *
    8. Amend Sec.  119.71 by redesignating paragraphs (e) and (f) as 
paragraphs (f) and (g) and adding a new paragraph (e) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  119.71  Management personnel: Qualifications for operations 
conducted under part 135 of this chapter.

* * * * *
    (e) To serve as a Check Pilot for an aircraft make and model and 
aircraft type under Sec.  119.69 a person must be qualified in 
accordance with Sec.  121.1251 of this chapter.
* * * * *

PART 121--OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL 
OPERATIONS

    9. The authority citation for part 121 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 40119, 44101, 44701-44702, 
44705, 44709-44711, 44713, 44716-44717, 44722, 44901, 44903-44904, 
44912, 46105.

    10. Revise Sec.  121.1(c) to read as follows:


Sec.  121.1  Applicability.

* * * * *
    (c) Each person who applies for initial or provisional approval of 
an Advanced Qualification Program curriculum, curriculum segment, or 
portion of a curriculum under subpart Y of this part and each person 
employed or used by a person authorized to conduct operations under 
this part to perform training, qualification, or evaluation functions 
in accordance with an Advanced Qualification Program under subpart Y of 
this part.
* * * * *
    11. Add new Sec.  121.9 to read as follows:


Sec.  121.9  Fraud, falsification, or incorrect statements.

    (a) No person may make, or cause to be made, any of the following:
    (1) A fraudulent or intentionally false statement in any 
application or any amendment thereto, or in any other record or test 
result required by this part or by any QPS associated with this part.

[[Page 1297]]

    (2) A fraudulent or intentionally false statement in, or a known 
omission from, any record or report that is kept, made, or used to show 
compliance with this part or with any QPS associated with this part, or 
to exercise any privileges under this chapter.
    (b) The commission by any person of any act prohibited under 
paragraph (a) of this section is a basis for any one or any combination 
of the following:
    (1) A civil penalty.
    (2) Suspension or revocation of any certificate held by that person 
that was issued under this chapter.
    (3) The denial of an application for approval of a training program 
established under this part.
    (4) The removal of approval for a training program established 
under this part.
    (c) The following may result in denial of an application or removal 
of approval for a training program established under this part:
    (1) An incorrect statement, upon which the FAA relied or could have 
relied, made in support of an application for approval of a training 
program.
    (2) An incorrect entry, on which the FAA relied or could have 
relied, made in any training records or test results required to be 
kept, made, or used to show compliance with any requirement of this 
part or with any QPS associated with this subpart.
    12. Revise Sec.  121.133 to read as follows:


Sec.  121.133  Preparation.

    (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a manual 
for the use and guidance of flight and ground operations, and 
management personnel in conducting its operations.
    (b) The certificate holder may prepare the manual, in whole or in 
part, in printed form or other form acceptable to the Administrator. 
The manual must include the instructions and information necessary to 
allow crewmembers or aircraft dispatchers to perform their required 
safety related duties and responsibilities with the highest possible 
degree of safety. The manual, and any changes, must be approved by the 
Administrator and contain the following:
    (1) A Flight Attendant Operating Manual (FAOM) for all of the 
aircraft types operated by the certificate holder in operations under 
this part.
    (2) A Flight Crewmember Operating Manual (FCOM) for each aircraft 
type operated by the certificate holder in operations under this part.
    (3) An Aircraft Dispatcher Procedures Manual (ADPM) for all types 
of operations and aircraft types, if required.
    13. Amend Sec.  121.135 by revising paragraph (b)(16), 
redesignating paragraph (b)(26) as (b)(28), and adding new paragraphs 
(b)(26) and (b)(27) to read as follows:


Sec.  121.135  Manual contents.

* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (16) Each training program curriculum required by Sec.  121.1333.
* * * * *
    (26) Each task specified in each of the crewmember and aircraft 
dispatcher Qualification Performance Standards (QPS) must be tailored 
to the specific aircraft type as provided in the FAOM, FCOM, or ADPM 
and must be trained or evaluated as indicated in the appropriate QPS.
    (27) Each FCOM must also include the contents described in Sec.  
23.1581(a)(1) or Sec.  25.1581(a)(1), as appropriate for the specific 
aircraft type.
* * * * *
    14. Revise Sec.  121.141 to read as follows:


Sec.  121.141  Airplane Flight Manual.

    Each certificate holder must keep a current approved Airplane 
Flight Manual for each type of airplane that it operates except for 
nontransport category aircraft certificated before January 1, 1965.
    15. Add new Sec.  121.392 to read as follows:


Sec.  121.392  Personnel identified as flight attendants.

    (a) Any person identified by the certificate holder as a flight 
attendant on an aircraft in operations under this part must be trained 
and qualified in accordance with subpart BB of this part. This 
includes:
    (1) Flight attendants provided by the certificate holder in excess 
of the number required by Sec.  121.391(a) and (b);
    (2) Flight attendants provided by the certificate holder on an 
aircraft having a passenger seating capacity of 9 or less; and
    (3) Flight attendants provided by the certificate holder on an 
aircraft with a payload capacity of 7,500 pounds or less and a 
passenger seating capacity of 19 or less.
    (b) Any person serving as a crewmember on an aircraft in operations 
under this part, who has not completed the requirements of Sec.  
121.1301(a)(1) and (a)(2) for the certificate holder, may not be 
identified to passengers as a flight attendant.


Sec.  121.393  [Amended]

    16. Amend Sec.  121.393(a) by removing the reference to ``Sec.  
121.417'' and adding in its place ``Sec.  121.1373 or 121.417, as 
applicable''.
    17. Amend Sec.  121.400 by adding paragraph (d) and a note to 
paragraph (d), to read as follows:


Sec.  121.400  Applicability and terms used.

* * * * *
    (d) Except for Sec.  121.429, the provisions of this subpart, and 
Appendices E, F, and H of this part, expire on [date 5 years and 120 
days after publication of the final rule]. After [date 5 years and 120 
days after publication of the final rule], all training programs must 
be established and maintained in accordance with the provisions in 
subparts BB and CC of this part, or in accordance with the certificate 
holder's approved Advanced Qualification Program under subpart Y of 
this part.

    Note to paragraph (d): See Sec. Sec.  121.1202 and 121.1402 for 
provisions outlining the process for transitioning from training 
programs established in accordance with subparts N, O, and P of this 
part, to the training program requirements provided in subparts BB 
and CC of this part.

    18. Amend Sec.  121.431 by adding paragraph (c), and a note to 
paragraph (c), to read as follows:


Sec.  121.431  Applicability.

* * * * *
    (c) Except for Sec. Sec.  121.455, 121.457, 121.458, and 121.459, 
the provisions of this subpart, and Appendices E, F, and H of this 
part, expire on [date 5 years and 120 days after publication of the 
final rule]. After [date 5 years and 120 days after publication of the 
final rule], all training programs must be established and maintained 
in accordance with the provisions in subparts BB and CC of this part, 
or in accordance with the certificate holder's approved Advanced 
Qualification Program under subpart Y of this part.

    Note to paragraph (c): See Sec. Sec.  121.1202 and 121.1402 for 
provisions outlining the process for transitioning from training 
programs established in accordance with subparts N, O, and P of this 
part, to the training program requirements provided in subparts BB 
and CC of this part.

Sec.  121.461  [Amended]

    19. Amend Sec.  121.461 by removing the words ``Qualifications 
and'' from paragraph (a).


Sec.  121.463  [Removed]

    20. Remove Sec.  121.463.

[[Page 1298]]

Sec.  121.465  [Amended]

    21. Amend Sec.  121.465 by removing paragraph (c).
    22. Add Sec.  121.540 to read as follows:


Sec.  121.540  Manual procedures requirements.

    Each crewmember must perform and each certificate holder must 
ensure that each crewmember performs the respective job function in 
accordance with the information, instructions, duties, and 
responsibilities contained in the manual required by Sec.  121.133. The 
information, instructions, duties, and responsibilities must include 
standard operating procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal 
procedures, emergency procedures, airplane performance, and airplane 
limitations.
    23. Amend Sec.  121.543 by adding paragraph (c), to read as 
follows:


Sec.  121.543  Flight crewmembers at controls.

* * * * *
    (c) The requirements of Sec.  121.543 will expire on [date 5 years 
and 120 days after publication of the final rule]. After [date 5 years 
and 120 days after publication of the final rule], the requirements of 
Sec.  121.1241 apply.
* * * * *
    24. Revise Sec.  121.683 to read as follows:


Sec.  121.683  Crewmember and dispatcher record.

    (a) Each certificate holder must maintain current records for each 
crewmember and dispatcher in accordance with the following 
requirements:
    (1) The records must show whether the crewmember or aircraft 
dispatcher complies with the applicable sections of this chapter, 
including proficiency and route checks, airplane and route 
qualifications, training, and all required physical examinations, 
flight time, and duty and rest periods.
    (2) Training records must include qualifications, instruction, 
certificate and ratings, and satisfactory proficiency evaluations. For 
flight crewmembers, the training records must also include both 
satisfactory and unsatisfactory performance evaluations and comments 
and evaluations made by an evaluator designated under Sec. Sec.  
121.1251, 121.1271, 125.295, or 135.337 of this chapter.
    (3) For flight crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers, records must 
show any disciplinary action that was taken with respect to the 
individual that was not later overturned.
    (4) For flight crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers, records must 
show any release from employment or resignation, termination, or 
disqualification with respect to employment.
    (b) Except for records on flight time, and duty and rest periods, 
crewmember and aircraft dispatcher records must be maintained for at 
least 5 years. Flight attendant records must be maintained for at least 
12 months. For aircraft dispatchers, records kept under paragraph 
(a)(4) of this section must be kept for 6 months.
    (c) Each certificate holder conducting supplemental operations must 
maintain the records required by this section at its principal base of 
operations, or at another location used by it and approved by the 
Administrator.
    (d) Computer record systems approved by the Administrator may be 
used in complying with the requirements of this section.
    25. Amend Sec.  121.805 by removing paragraph (b)(4), redesignating 
paragraph (b)(5) as paragraph (b)(4), and revising the newly 
redesignated paragraph paragraph (b)(4)(iii), to read as follows:


Sec.  121.805  Crewmember training for in-flight medical events.

* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (4) * * *
    (iii) Recurrent training, to include performance drills, in the 
proper use of an automated external defibrillator and in 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation at least once every 12 months.
* * * * *


Sec.  121.901  [Amended]

    26. Amend Sec.  121.901(b) by removing the reference to ``Sec.  
121.401'' and adding in its place ``Sec.  121.1331, or the provisions 
of subpart N and O of this part, as applicable''.


Sec.  121.909  [Amended]

    27. Amend Sec.  121.909(d) by removing the reference to ``Sec.  
121.405(e)'' and adding in its place ``Sec.  121.1337(e) or Sec.  
121.405, as applicable''.
    28. Add subpart BB to part 121 consisting of Sec. Sec.  121.1201 
through 121.1391 to read as follows:

Subpart BB--Requirements for Qualification, Service, and Use of 
Crewmembers

General

Sec.
121.1201 Applicability.
121.1202 Interim requirements for training programs transitioning 
from the requirements of subparts N and O.
121.1203 Certificate holder responsibility for compliance with this 
subpart.
121.1205 Definitions.
121.1207 Certification requirements: Crewmembers, flight 
instructors, check pilots, check captain, and check flight 
engineers.
121.1209 English language requirement.
121.1211 Medical certificate requirements.
121.1213 Pilot monitoring (not flying) duties.

Flight Crewmember

121.1221 Flight Crewmember: Training and evaluation.
121.1223 Flight Crewmember: Recurrent training and evaluation 
schedule for continuing qualification.
121.1225 Flight Crewmember: Operating experience.
121.1227 Pilot: Consolidation.
121.1229 Pilot: Recent experience.
121.1231 Flight engineer: Recent experience.
121.1233 Line checks.
121.1235 Pilot: Routes and airports.
121.1237 Pilot: Operating limitations and crew pairing.
121.1239 Flight crewmember: Requalification.
121.1241 Flight crewmembers at controls.

Check Pilot and Check Flight Engineer Qualification

121.1251 Eligibility: Check pilot, check flight engineer, Aircrew 
Program Designee (APD), and Flight instructor.
121.1253 Check pilot and check flight engineer: Training, 
evaluation, approval, and recent experience.
121.1255 Check captain: Additional training requirements.
121.1257 Check pilot, check captain, and check flight engineer: 
Initial cadre.

Aircrew Program Designee Qualification

121.1271 Aircrew Program Designee (APD): Training, evaluation, and 
recent experience.

Flight Instructor Qualification

121.1281 Flight instructor: Qualification and training.

Flight Attendant Instructor Qualification

121.1291 Flight attendant instructor: Qualification and training.

Flight Attendant

121.1301 Flight attendant: Training and evaluation.
121.1303 Flight attendant: Continuing qualification.
121.1305 Flight attendant: Aircraft operating experience.
121.1307 Flight attendant: Recent experience.
121.1309 Flight attendant: Requalification.

Check Flight Attendant Qualification

121.1321 Check flight attendant: Eligibility, approval, 
qualification, and continuing qualification.
121.1323 Check flight attendant: Initial cadre.

General Training Program Requirements

121.1331 Training program: General.
121.1333 Training program: General curriculum by aircraft type.
121.1335 Training program: Category of training programmed hours.

[[Page 1299]]

121.1337 Training program: Approval and amendment process.
121.1339 Training program: Special rules.
121.1341 Training program: Administering training, evaluation, and 
operating experience.
121.1343 Training program: Knowledge and comprehension assessment.
121.1345 Training program: Mandatory use of flight simulation 
training devices.
121.1347 Training program: Qualification and approval of qualified 
flight simulation training devices.
121.1349 Training program: Limitations on the use of flight 
simulation training devices.
121.1351 Training program: Training equipment other than flight 
simulation training devices.
121.1353 Training program: Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) and 
Flight Simulation Training Device (FSTD) Course of Instruction.
121.1355 Training program: Continuous analysis process.

Training Category Requirements

121.1361 Training category requirements: Standards used in academic 
and job performance training segments.
121.1363 Training category requirements: Crewmember new hire.
121.1365 Training category requirements: Pilot and flight engineer 
initial, conversion, transition, and upgrade, academic and job 
performance training.
121.1367 Training category requirements: Pilot and flight engineer 
recurrent academic, recurrent job performance, and recurrent 
aircraft emergency equipment training.
121.1369 Training category requirements: Flight attendant initial 
and transition training.
121.1371 Training category requirements: Flight attendant 
eligibility for transition training.
121.1373 Training category requirements: Flight attendant emergency 
training.
121.1375 Training category requirements: Flight attendant recurrent 
training.
121.1377 Training category requirements: Flight instructor initial, 
transition, and recurrent academic training.
121.1379 Training category requirements: Flight instructor initial 
and transition job performance training.
121.1381 Training category requirements: Check pilot, check flight 
engineer, or check flight attendant initial, transition, and 
recurrent academic training.
121.1383 Training category requirements: Check pilot and check 
flight engineer initial, transition, and recurrent job performance 
training.
121.1385 Qualification requirements: Check pilots authorized to 
conduct line checks.
121.1387 Training category requirements: Initial, transition, and 
recurrent academic training for persons authorized to administer 
flight attendant proficiency tests.

Other Training Requirements

121.1391 Differences training and evaluation.

Subpart BB--Requirements for Qualification, Service, and Use of 
Crewmembers

General


Sec.  121.1201  Applicability.

    (a) This subpart prescribes the following:
    (1) Requirements for qualification, service, and use for:
    (i) Persons who serve in operations under this part as crewmembers, 
flight instructors, check pilots, check flight engineers, aircrew 
program designees (APDs), flight attendant instructors, check flight 
attendants, or persons authorized to conduct flight attendant 
proficiency tests.
    (ii) Persons who serve in operations under part 135 of this chapter 
for a certificate holder that is permitted or required by Sec.  135.3 
of this chapter to conduct training curricula in compliance with this 
subpart.
    (2) Requirements applicable to each certificate holder for 
establishing, obtaining approval of, and maintaining a training 
program, for crewmembers, flight instructors, check pilots, check 
flight engineers, APDs, flight attendant instructors, check flight 
attendants, and persons authorized to conduct flight attendant 
proficiency tests, who serve under this part.
    (3) Requirements applicable to persons other than the certificate 
holder's employees who are used by the certificate holder to assist in 
meeting the certificate holder's responsibilities under this subpart.
    (b) Any person qualified in a duty position for the certificate 
holder before [date 120 days after publication of the final rule], or 
qualified under the provisions in subparts N and O of this part, may 
continue to serve in that duty position for that certificate holder 
without complying with new hire training under Sec.  121.1363, initial 
training under Sec.  121.1365 or Sec.  121.1369, operating experience 
under Sec.  121.1305, or emergency training under Sec.  121.1373.


Sec.  121.1202  Interim requirements for training programs 
transitioning from the requirements of subparts N and O.

    (a) Contrary provisions of this subpart notwithstanding, a person 
who has submitted a training program for approval before [date 120 days 
after publication of the final rule] that was constructed in accordance 
with the applicable provisions of subparts N and O of this part in 
effect on or before [date 119 days after publication of the final 
rule], may complete the approval and implementation process and conduct 
operations in compliance with the applicable provisions of subparts N 
and O of this part instead of the provisions of subpart BB of this 
part.
    (b) A certificate holder must submit a transition plan to the FAA 
no later than [date 4 years and 120 days after publication of the final 
rule]. The transition plan must include the following:
    (1) Subpart BB training program(s), as applicable.
    (2) Plan for transition for crewmembers from the provisions of 
subparts N and O to the provisions of subpart BB of this part.
    (3) A transition completion date that is before [date 5 years and 
120 days after the publication of the final rule].
    (c) During the transition, the certificate holder may use people to 
conduct operations under this part provided those people are trained 
under the applicable provisions of subparts N and O of this part, or 
subpart BB of this part. While a certificate holder may simultaneously 
operate training programs in compliance with the applicable provisions 
of subparts N and O of this part and subpart BB of this part, each 
individual (crewmember or aircraft dispatcher) must be trained and 
qualified under the requirements of either the applicable provisions of 
subparts N and O of this part, or the applicable provisions of subpart 
BB of this part.
    (d) The certificate holder may not use a crewmember, nor may a 
crewmember serve, in a duty position unless that person is current and 
qualified to perform the duties to which he or she is assigned. If, 
during the operation of the aircraft, one required crewmember is 
current and qualified in accordance with the appropriate provisions of 
subparts N and O of this part, and another required crewmember is 
current and qualified in accordance with subpart BB of this part, the 
lesser operating requirements apply for that duty position for that 
operation.


Sec.  121.1203  Certificate holder responsibility for compliance with 
this subpart.

    Responsibility for compliance with the requirements of this subpart 
applies as follows:
    (a) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that its 
approved training program, including all portions of the training 
program conducted by persons other than the part 119 certificate 
holder's employees, meets the requirements of this subpart.
    (b) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that all 
training program procedures, manuals, and other materials submitted for 
initial or final approval are kept up to date.

[[Page 1300]]

    (c) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that all 
training and evaluation is completed in accordance with the 
requirements of this subpart. Training or evaluation that does not meet 
the definition of complete, as used in this subpart, must be repeated 
to ensure that the requirements of this subpart are met.


Sec.  121.1205  Definitions.

    For the purpose of this subpart, the following terms and their 
definitions apply:
    Academic training. The structured training conducted on the ground 
in a classroom or other location for the purpose of acquiring 
knowledge, procedural skills, and cognitive skills needed to perform in 
operations under this part.
    Actual fire. A fire fueled by ignited combustible material, in 
controlled conditions, of sufficient magnitude and duration to complete 
crewmember training requirements for the firefighting drill as 
contained in the Pilot QPS, Flight Engineer QPS, and Flight Attendant 
QPS.
    Airplane Flight Manual (AFM). A document that contains aircraft 
operating limitations, operating procedures, and performance 
information. The FAA may review and approve amendments to the operating 
limitations section of the AFM. Amendments to the AFM that are adopted 
via Airworthiness Directives are enforceable by the FAA.
    Approved fire extinguisher device. A training device that has been 
approved by the Administrator for use in meeting crewmember training 
requirements for operation of a specific type of aircraft installed 
hand fire extinguisher as contained in the Pilot QPS, Flight Engineer 
QPS, and Flight Attendant QPS.
    Approved protective breathing equipment (PBE) device. A training 
device that has been approved by the Administrator for use in meeting 
crewmember training requirements for operation of a specific type of 
protective breathing equipment as contained in the Pilot, Flight 
Engineer and Flight Attendant QPS.
    Base month. The month in which a recurrent activity is due.
    Basic Qualification (flight attendant). All requirements that a 
person must complete prior to working his or her first flight for a 
certificate holder as a flight attendant. It includes new hire 
training, initial training, emergency training, and differences 
training, as applicable, as well as aircraft operating experience.
    Categories of training. Parts of a curriculum that relate to 
qualification experience levels, first time qualification for a 
certificate holder, first time qualification in group (applicable to 
flight crewmembers), configuration differences within type or series, 
maintaining and regaining qualification, and changes in operations. 
Categories of training include: New hire, initial, transition, 
conversion (full and core), upgrade (full and core), emergency, 
differences, recurrent, requalification, and special.
    Certificate holder. A person certificated under part 119 of this 
chapter that conducts operations under part 121, or a person 
certificated under part 119 of this chapter that conducts operations 
under part 135 of this chapter and is permitted or required by Sec.  
135.3 of this chapter to conduct training curricula in compliance with 
this subpart.
    Check captain. A person qualified as pilot in command who is 
current and qualified on the navigation system necessary for the route 
to be flown and the aircraft on which he or she will be supervising 
operating experience, and who is specifically approved by the Principal 
Operations Inspector for supervising operating experience.
    Check flight attendant. A person who meets the qualification and 
training requirements for a check flight attendant and is authorized to 
evaluate a person who is completing aircraft operating experience as 
required by the Flight Attendant QPS.
    Check person. A person who meets the training and qualification 
requirements to serve as an aircrew program designee, check pilot, 
check flight engineer, or check flight attendant.
    Combat. To properly fight an actual fire or simulated fire using an 
appropriate type of fire extinguisher until that fire is extinguished.
    Complete. To fully carry out the training or evaluation required by 
this subpart, including being eligible to receive or administer the 
training or evaluation, and demonstrating the required level of 
proficiency. In addition, for flight crewmembers, performing the 
training or evaluation in a flight simulation training device (FSTD) 
appropriately qualified in accordance with the requirements of part 60 
of this chapter.
    Consolidation. The process by which a person through practice and 
practical experience increases proficiency in newly acquired knowledge 
and skills.
    Conversion training. A category of training used to qualify a 
person as a flight crewmember for a certificate holder when the person 
has been previously qualified in the same crewmember duty position in 
the same aircraft type(s) for another certificate holder conducting 
operations under this part. Conversion training may be required to 
reestablish recency or for Requalification training for the certificate 
holder. Conversion training may be either ``core'' or ``full'' as 
specified in the QPS.
    Crewmember Duty Position. A crewmember duty position is a pilot in 
command, second in command, flight engineer, or flight attendant 
serving in operations under this part.
    Current. Current means satisfying the recency of experience 
requirements prescribed in Sec.  121.1229, Sec.  121.1231, or Sec.  
121.1307.
    Currently Serving. Currently serving means current and qualified as 
defined in this subpart.
    Curriculum. A curriculum is the training required to qualify a 
person for a crewmember duty position or a training or evaluation duty 
position for an aircraft type. The curriculum for each duty position 
includes categories of training and the appropriate segments for each 
category.
    Differences training. A category of training on a particular 
aircraft type when the Administrator finds additional training is 
necessary before that person serves in the same capacity on a 
particular variation within a series of an aircraft type or a different 
series within an aircraft type.
    Eligibility Period. The eligibility period consists of the month in 
which the recurrent activity is due (the ``base month''), the month 
before and the month after (the ``grace month'').
    Emergency training (flight attendant). A category of training that 
qualifies flight attendants to conduct emergency procedures, operate 
emergency equipment, and enhance passenger and crewmember 
survivability.
    Environment. A combination of external, physical, and surrounding 
conditions that affect aircraft performance, aircraft and equipment 
operation, and decisionmaking.
    Evaluation. Any testing, checking, proficiency review or 
observation activities in which a person's knowledge and skills are 
assessed by a person authorized to perform that evaluation.
    Exit device. Exit device means emergency exit doors, plugs, and 
hatches, including window exits, floor level exits, tailcone exits, 
ventral stairs, flight deck exits, and any other exit designed for 
passenger or crewmember egress from the aircraft.

[[Page 1301]]

    Flight Attendant Jumpseat. A flight attendant jumpseat is a seat 
located in the cabin of an aircraft that meets the requirements of 
Sec.  121.311(g).
    Flight Attendant Operating Manual (FAOM). An FAA-approved document 
that includes the instructions and information necessary to allow the 
flight attendant to perform his or her required safety related duties 
and responsibilities with the highest possible degree of safety. The 
FAOM contains standard operating procedures, abnormal or non-normal 
procedures, and emergency procedures.
    Flight Crewmember. A pilot in command, second in command, or flight 
engineer.
    Flight Crewmember Operating Manual (FCOM). An FAA-approved document 
that includes the instructions and information necessary to allow a 
flight crewmember to perform his or her required safety related duties 
and responsibilities with the highest possible degree of safety. The 
FCOM contains standard operating procedures, abnormal or non-normal 
procedures, and emergency procedures. The FCOM also contains 
information such as ground and flight operations tasks, flight deck 
checklists, systems descriptions, and evacuation procedures.
    Flight tasks. The maneuvers and procedures necessary to operate the 
aircraft in various phases of flight operations and environments.
    Group. A broad categorization of aircraft based on propulsion 
methods. Group I is propeller driven, including reciprocating powered 
and turbopropeller powered. Group II is turbojet powered.
    Initial Cadre. The specific persons approved by the FAA for the 
start-up time frame necessary, not to exceed 24 months, for a new part 
119 certificate holder to initiate operations under part 119 of this 
chapter, or for a current part 119 certificate holder to initiate 
operations of a new aircraft type not operated previously or to 
initiate a new type of operation.
    Initial training (flight attendant). A category of training 
required to qualify a person to serve as a flight attendant on an 
aircraft type when the person has not served as a flight attendant for 
at least 180 days in operations under this part for the certificate 
holder.
    Initial training (flight crewmembers). A category of training that 
is required to qualify a person to serve as a flight crewmember for the 
first time in group or for the first time in operations under this 
part.
    Initial training (flight instructors, check persons, flight 
attendant instructors, and persons authorized to conduct flight 
attendant proficiency tests). A category of training that is required 
to qualify a person to serve for the first time for the certificate 
holder as a flight instructor, check person, flight attendant 
instructor, and a person authorized to conduct flight attendant 
proficiency tests.
    Job performance training. The structured training conducted in an 
aircraft, in a flight simulation training device approved under part 60 
of this chapter, in another training device approved under this part, 
or in a classroom for the purpose of obtaining required psychomotor 
skills for crewmembers.
    Lesson. A part of a segment of training. A module could be a 
lesson, or a module could have several lessons.
    Line operating flight time. Flight time performed in operations 
under this part.
    Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT). Training in a simulator with 
a complete flight crew using representative flight segments that 
contain procedures that may be expected in line operations. A 
qualification LOFT is an approved flight simulator course of LOFT to 
transition from a structured flight training syllabus to representing 
line operations. A recurrent LOFT is an approved flight simulator 
course of LOFT that must be used to meet recurrent job performance 
training requirements.
    Line Qualified. Qualified to serve as a flight crewmember in 
operations under this part.
    Module. Modules of instruction are subsets of a training segment 
that include major subject areas for training and evaluation.
    Month. Calendar month.
    New Hire training. A category of training required to qualify a 
person to serve as a crewmember for the first time for the certificate 
holder under this part.
    Observation Drill. Observation drill means a drill where a person 
watches without actively participating in the training or evaluation.
    Observer Seat. An observer seat is a seat on the flight deck, or a 
forward passenger seat with headset or speaker, that provides adequate 
visibility of the flight controls, instruments, and external views that 
is used by the FAA for conducting en route inspections.
    Operating cycle. A complete flight segment consisting of the time 
from push back/power back, taxi out, takeoff, climb, en route portion, 
descent, landing, taxi in, parking, and shutdown.
    Practice. A physical or verbal exercise of skills in an instructor 
led environment that encourages interaction among participants for the 
specific area of knowledge.
    Procedure. A procedure is a step-by-step method used to complete a 
specific task. Types of procedures are:
    (1) Standard operating procedure. A procedure associated with 
systems that are functioning in their usual manner.
    (2) Abnormal or Non-normal operating procedure. A procedure 
associated with systems that are not functioning in their usual manner 
and that require crewmember action for continued safe flight and 
landing.
    (3) Emergency procedure. A procedure requiring immediate crewmember 
action to protect the aircraft and occupants from serious harm.
    Proficiency. Demonstrated sufficient awareness of existing 
circumstances, competence in the necessary knowledge and skill, and 
performance of the relevant task (maneuver or procedure) within the 
operating range of environments to the standards identified and 
required by the appropriate QPS.
    Proficiency check. An assessment of crewmember proficiency during 
which limited training or practice is allowed. The assessment is of 
knowledge and skill in tasks to the standards identified and required 
by the appropriate QPS. The proficiency check must be conducted by a 
check person.
    Proficiency review. An assessment of pilot or flight engineer 
proficiency during which limited training or practice is allowed. The 
assessment is of knowledge and skill in tasks to the standards 
identified and required by the appropriate QPS. The proficiency review 
must be conducted by a check person, or a flight instructor authorized 
to conduct proficiency reviews.
    Proficiency test. An assessment of crewmember proficiency during 
which additional training or practice is not allowed. The assessment is 
of knowledge and skill in tasks to the standards identified and 
required by the appropriate QPS. For flight crewmembers, when a 
proficiency test is not for the purpose of obtaining an airman 
certificate or rating, it must be conducted by a check pilot. When a 
proficiency test is conducted for the purpose of obtaining an airman 
certificate or rating, it must be conducted by an APD or an FAA 
Inspector. For flight attendants, the proficiency test may only be 
conducted by a person authorized to administer flight attendant 
proficiency tests or an FAA Inspector.
    Programmed hours. The required academic and job performance hours 
set forth in this subpart for categories of training.

[[Page 1302]]

    Protective Breathing Equipment (PBE) drill. An emergency drill in 
which a crewmember combats an actual fire or simulated fire while using 
PBE.
    Qualification Performance Standards (QPS). FAA standards providing 
all of the tasks and areas of training and evaluation, including 
activities, procedures, and knowledge needed to qualify a person to 
serve under this part. The QPSs are in part 121 appendices as follows: 
appendix Q: Pilot Qualification Performance Standards; appendix R: 
Flight Engineer Qualification Performance Standards; appendix S: Flight 
Attendant Qualification Performance Standards; and appendix T, Aircraft 
Dispatcher Qualification Performance Standards.
    Qualified. Qualified, when used in reference to an individual, 
means:
    (1) For a flight attendant crewmember duty position or a flight 
attendant training or evaluation duty position, an individual who has 
completed the certificate holder's FAA-approved curriculum for the 
aircraft type to serve in that position under this part.
    (2) For a flight crewmember duty position or a flight crewmember 
training or evaluation duty position, an individual who has completed 
the certificate holder's FAA-approved curriculum for the aircraft type 
to serve in that position under this part and holds the appropriate 
U.S. medical certificate and airman certificates and ratings.
    Recurrent Flight Attendant Training Cycle. The 12 month period in 
which required tasks are trained and evaluated in accordance with the 
Flight Attendant QPS.
    Recurrent training. A category of training that must be completed 
within the specified eligibility period to enable a qualified person to 
continue to serve in a crewmember duty position or a training or 
evaluation duty position for the certificate holder under this part.
    Requalification training. A category of training required to allow 
crewmembers to become qualified again to serve in a crewmember duty 
position for the certificate holder in operations under this part.
    Segments of training. Each category of training has two segments. 
One segment is ``academic.'' This is training and evaluation that 
provides students with the required knowledge and cognitive skills 
necessary to perform the tasks required for the crewmember duty 
position or training or evaluation duty position. The other segment is 
``job performance.'' This segment is training and evaluation in the 
duty or job setting. This segment provides students with the practical, 
hands on experience of integrating knowledge and skills and learning 
the related motor skills necessary to perform the job.
    Serve. To perform the duties and discharge the responsibilities 
required under this part.
    Simulated fire. An artificial duplication of smoke or flame used to 
create various aircraft firefighting scenarios, such as lavatory, 
galley oven, and aircraft seat fires.
    Simulator Only Instructors and Check Persons. Simulator Only 
Instructors and Check Persons are persons who have completed the 
training necessary to qualify as a crewmember and meet the recency of 
experience requirements prescribed in this subpart, as applicable, but 
may not serve as a required flight crewmember in operations under this 
part.
    Special training. A category of training necessary to address 
changes to the certificate holder's operations or to correct 
deficiencies identified by the certificate holder's continuous analysis 
process. Special training is temporary and is integrated into the 
approved training program.
    Training. Instruction and practice.
    Training center evaluator. An individual who meets the requirements 
of Sec.  142.55 of this chapter.
    Training or Evaluation Duty Position. Flight instructors, flight 
attendant instructors, check persons, check captains, and persons 
authorized to conduct flight attendant proficiency tests.
    Training program. A certificate holder's training curricula, 
personnel, facilities, equipment, and other resources used to meet the 
training requirements under this subpart.
    Transition training (check persons and persons authorized to 
conduct flight attendant proficiency tests). A category of training 
required to qualify check persons and persons authorized to conduct 
flight attendant proficiency tests to serve in a training or evaluation 
duty position on an aircraft type for the certificate holder when they 
have previously served in the same training or evaluation duty position 
on a different aircraft type in the same group for that certificate 
holder.
    Transition training (flight attendants). A category of training 
that allows a flight attendant to qualify on an aircraft type if the 
flight attendant has been qualified for at least 180 days and served in 
the previous 180 days on an aircraft as a flight attendant for that 
certificate holder.
    Transition training (flight crewmembers). A category of training 
required to qualify flight crewmembers who have qualified and served in 
the same duty position on a different aircraft type in the same group 
in operations under this part.
    Upgrade training. Refers to core upgrade or full upgrade training.
    (1) Core Upgrade: A category of training required to qualify flight 
crewmembers as either PIC or SIC in an aircraft type in which they have 
been previously qualified and served as SIC or flight engineer 
respectively for that certificate holder. A pilot may complete core 
upgrade when it has been 9 months or less since the person served as 
SIC or flight engineer for that certificate holder.
    (2) Full Upgrade. A category of training required to qualify flight 
crewmembers as either PIC or SIC in an aircraft type in which they have 
been previously qualified and served as SIC or flight engineer 
respectively. A pilot may complete full upgrade when it has been more 
than 9 months but less than 36 months since the person has qualified 
and served as SIC or flight engineer for that certificate holder, or 
when it has been 36 months or less since the person served as SIC or 
flight engineer for another certificate holder in operations under this 
part.


Sec.  121.1207  Certification requirements: Crewmembers, flight 
instructors, check pilots, check captain, and check flight engineers.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a crewmember, flight instructor, check pilot, check captain, 
or check flight engineer in a training program or in operations under 
this part, unless that person meets the following requirements, as 
applicable:
    (1) Pilots.
    (i) To act as pilot in command of an aircraft, or as second in 
command of an aircraft that requires three or more pilots in a flag or 
supplemental operation, a pilot must hold an airline transport pilot 
certificate and an appropriate type, category, and class rating for 
that aircraft.
    (ii) To act as a second in command of an aircraft that requires 
only two pilots in flag operations or in international supplemental 
operations, a pilot must hold at least a commercial pilot certificate 
with appropriate type, category, and class ratings for that aircraft, 
and an instrument rating.
    (iii) To act as a second in command in domestic operations, a pilot 
must hold at least a commercial pilot certificate with appropriate 
category and class ratings for that aircraft, and an instrument rating.
    (2) Flight Engineers. To serve as a flight engineer, a person must 
hold a flight engineer certificate with the appropriate aircraft class 
rating.

[[Page 1303]]

    (3) Flight Instructors, Check Pilots, Check Captains, and Check 
Flight Engineers. No person may use, nor may any person serve, as a 
flight instructor, check pilot, check captain, or check flight engineer 
in a training program or in operations under this part, with respect to 
the aircraft type involved, unless the person holds the airman 
certificates and ratings required to serve as a pilot in command or 
flight engineer, as applicable, in operations under this part.
    (4) Flight Attendant. A person is considered to hold a Certificate 
of Demonstrated Proficiency and is eligible to serve as a flight 
attendant once the Administrator is notified by a certificate holder 
that the person has the demonstrated proficiency to be a flight 
attendant.
    (b) A person who is currently serving as a pilot or flight engineer 
for the certificate holder or a person who is engaged in training and 
evaluation activities for the certificate holder (as described in Sec.  
121.1331(d)) may be issued the appropriate certificate or type rating 
if that person meets the following requirements:
    (1) The applicable eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, and 
experience required by part 61 or part 63 of this chapter.
    (2) The applicable training requirements of this subpart.
    (3) The proficiency test requirements of Sec.  121.1365(b)(1). The 
FAA or an APD must administer the proficiency test.


Sec.  121.1209  English language requirement.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a flight crewmember, flight attendant, or person acquiring flight 
attendant operating experience in operations under this part, unless 
that person has demonstrated to an individual qualified to conduct 
evaluations under this part, that he or she can:
    (a) Read, write, speak, and understand the English language.
    (b) Have his or her English language and writings understood.


Sec.  121.1211  Medical certificate requirements.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, on an aircraft as a required flight crewmember in operations 
under this part unless that person has a valid medical certificate 
required by Sec.  61.23 or Sec.  63.31 of this chapter, as appropriate 
for the duty being performed.
    (b) No medical certificate is required to serve in an FSTD.


Sec.  121.1213  Pilot monitoring (not flying) duties.

    Each pilot who is seated at the pilot controls of the aircraft or 
FSTD, while not flying the aircraft or FSTD, is required to accomplish 
pilot monitoring duties as appropriate in accordance with the FCOM. 
Pilot monitoring duties are subject to the same oversight and 
evaluation as pilot flying duties.

Flight Crewmember


Sec.  121.1221  Flight Crewmember: Training and evaluation.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a required flight crewmember in operations under this part unless 
that person has completed the required curriculum for that aircraft 
type and crewmember duty position.
    (a) A curriculum consists of the programmed hours, including 
training and evaluation, as specified in Sec.  121.1335 and in the 
appropriate QPS, and the following training categories.
    (1) New hire training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1363.
    (2) Initial, conversion, transition, or upgrade training as 
prescribed in Sec.  121.1365, as applicable.
    (3) Differences training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1391.
    (4) Recurrent training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1367, according 
to the schedule prescribed in Sec.  121.1223.
    (5) Requalification training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1239.
    (6) Special training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1337.
    (b) Continuity of training. Within 120 days of beginning first time 
qualification a person must have completed in the following order:
    (1) The required new hire training as described in paragraph (a)(1) 
of this section, if the person is qualifying for the first time for the 
certificate holder.
    (2) The required initial, conversion, transition, or upgrade 
training categories and academic and job performance training segments 
described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, as applicable; and 
differences training as described in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, 
if applicable.
    (3) A proficiency test as prescribed in Sec.  121.1365(b)(1).
    (4) A qualification LOFT as prescribed in Sec.  121.1365(b)(2).
    (c) Failure to complete training within 120 days. If a person fails 
to complete the required curriculum within the 120 days, as required by 
paragraph (b) of this section, the person must repeat the entire 
curriculum. No credit is given for any of the training previously 
completed if the entire curriculum is not completed within 120 days.
    (d) Complete Flight Crew. Except as provided in paragraph (d)(2) of 
this section, a complete flight crew is required for training under 
this part and each flight crewmember duty position must be filled by a 
person qualified to serve in the required duty position.
    (1) For aircraft certificated for 2 pilots: Each pilot duty 
position must be occupied by a person who is qualified to serve in that 
crewmember duty position (a line qualified crew member, a simulator-
only instructor, a flight instructor, a check pilot, a check captain, 
or an APD), or by a student training to serve in that crewmember duty 
position.
    (2) For aircraft certificated for 2 pilots and a flight engineer: 
Each pilot duty position and the Flight Engineer duty position must be 
occupied by a person who is qualified to serve in that crewmember duty 
position (a line qualified crew member, a simulator-only instructor, a 
flight instructor, a check pilot, a check captain, a check flight 
engineer, or an APD), or by a student training to serve in that 
crewmember duty position. After the minimum hours of job performance 
training have been completed, at the discretion of the instructor, 
training on specific piloting tasks may be conducted without the flight 
engineer duty position being filled. In these situations, the flight 
engineer's panel in the simulator must be properly set for the pilot 
training tasks and must not require further monitoring or adjustment.


Sec.  121.1223  Flight Crewmember: Recurrent training and evaluation 
schedule for continuing qualification.

    (a) To serve as a flight crewmember, a person must complete the 
recurrent academic and job performance training segments for each 
aircraft type, as prescribed in Sec.  121.1367, in accordance with the 
associated programmed hours specified in Sec.  121.1335. Each flight 
crewmember must complete all of the academic subjects and all of the 
job performance tasks and environments in accordance with the 
applicable QPS.
    (b) A flight crewmember must complete a recurrent academic training 
module, a recurrent job performance training module, and aircraft 
emergency equipment training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1367 and at the 
interval specified in the applicable QPS.
    (c) A flight crewmember must complete recurrent academic and job 
performance training modules by the end of the eligibility period. The 
eligibility period consists of the base month, the month before the 
base month and the month after the base month. The base month is the 
9th month following

[[Page 1304]]

the month during which the proficiency test required in Sec.  
121.1365(b)(1) is completed; the 9th month following the month in which 
the proficiency test authorized in Sec.  121.1239 is completed; or the 
9th month following the completion of the recurrent academic and job 
performance training modules when adjusting the base month in 
accordance with Sec.  121.1223(d).
    (d) The base month may be adjusted by completing the required 
recurrent academic and recurrent job performance training modules 
within the time frames described in Sec.  121.1223(f) at any time prior 
to the beginning of the eligibility period described in paragraph (c) 
of this section.
    (e) A flight crewmember who has not completed recurrent training by 
the end of the base month may continue to serve until the end of the 
eligibility period. However, if the recurrent requirements are not 
completed during the eligibility period and the base month is not 
adjusted forward as described in paragraph (d) of this section, the 
person is unqualified for that flight crewmember duty position on the 
first day of the month following the eligibility period. The 
unqualified person may not serve in that flight crewmember duty 
position until requalified. The person must complete the applicable 
phase of the requalification training category in accordance with Sec.  
121.1239 to become requalified.
    (f) Time required to complete recurrent training:
    (1) Academic Training. A flight crewmember must complete each 
required recurrent academic training and evaluation within the 
preceding number of months specified in the applicable QPS. The 
academic training must begin and end within the eligibility period, and 
end within 30 days from the beginning of the academic training.
    (2) Job Performance Training. A flight crewmember must complete 
required job performance training and evaluation within the preceding 
number of months specified in the applicable QPS. The job performance 
training must begin and end within the eligibility period, and end 
within 96 hours from the beginning of the training.


Sec.  121.1225  Flight Crewmember: Operating experience.

    (a) Except as provided in this section, no certificate holder may 
use any person, nor may any person serve, as a required flight 
crewmember on an aircraft, unless the person has completed the 
operating experience and operating cycles required by this section for 
that aircraft type and in that duty position in operations under this 
part. The certificate holder must ensure that the flight crewmember 
completing operating experience and operating cycles is current and 
qualified for the duty position in accordance with this part.
    (b) Pilots must complete operating experience and operating cycles 
as follows:
    (1) General. Operating experience must include at least four 
operating cycles and 21 hours in operations under this part. At least 
one cycle must be flown as the pilot monitoring the aircraft. At least 
two cycles must be flown as the pilot flying the aircraft, of which at 
least one must be flown with the automatic pilot disengaged after 
takeoff until departing the terminal area and prior to approach upon 
entering the terminal area. A pilot will receive one hour of credit 
towards the 21 hours required by this paragraph for each operating 
cycle completed in excess of the four operating cycles required. 
Operating experience must be started no later than 60 days and 
completed within 120 days of completing the proficiency test given at 
the end of initial, transition, upgrade, or conversion training. If 
operating experience is not started within 60 days or completed within 
120 days of completing the proficiency test, another proficiency test 
is required to re-initiate operating experience.
    (2) Pilot in command.
    (i) A qualifying pilot in command completing operating experience 
and operating cycles must complete all of the following:
    (A) Serve as the second in command of record.
    (B) Perform the duties of a pilot in command under the supervision 
of a check pilot or check captain, except as provided in paragraph (d) 
of this section.
    (C) Be given a line check conducted by an appropriately qualified 
check pilot during the final portion of operating experience. The line 
check must consist of at least two operating cycles. During one of the 
cycles the qualifying pilot in command must perform the duties of the 
pilot flying the aircraft. In the other cycle, the qualifying pilot in 
command must perform the pilot monitoring duties.
    (D) In addition to the requirements in paragraphs (b)(2)(i)(A) 
through (C) of this section, a qualifying pilot in command receiving 
operating experience after completing initial or upgrade training, must 
perform the duties of a pilot in command during at least one operating 
cycle under the observation of an APD authorized to conduct these 
observations or an FAA inspector.
    (ii) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, the check 
pilot or check captain supervising operating experience must serve as 
the pilot in command and occupy a pilot station under the following 
requirements:
    (A) While supervising the transitioning or converting pilot in 
command until the qualifying pilot in command has completed the 
following, at which time the check pilot or check captain may occupy 
the observer's seat for the remaining portion of the operating 
experience:
    (1) Made at least two takeoffs and landings in the aircraft type 
used.
    (2) Satisfactorily demonstrated to the check pilot or check captain 
the ability to perform the duties of a pilot in command of that 
aircraft type.
    (B) While supervising an initial or upgrading pilot in command.
    (3) Second in command. A second in command pilot must perform the 
duties of a second in command under the supervision of an appropriately 
qualified check pilot or check captain.
    (c) A flight engineer must perform the duties of a flight engineer 
for at least 10 hours of operating experience in operations under this 
part under the supervision of a check flight engineer, a check pilot, a 
check captain, or a flight engineer who is specifically authorized by 
the POI to supervise operating experience.
    (d) During operating experience following transition, conversion, 
or upgrade training, the check pilot or check captain may take a rest 
period during the en route cruise portion of flight, if the following 
conditions are met:
    (1) The pilot obtaining operating experience meets the requirements 
of paragraphs (b)(2)(ii)(A)(1) and (2) of this section.
    (2) The relief pilot meets the requirements in Sec.  
121.1241(b)(3).
    (e) In the case of an aircraft not previously used by the 
certificate holder in operations under this part, operating experience 
for pilots and flight engineers completed in the aircraft during 
proving flights or ferry flights may be used to meet this requirement.
    (f) Credit for operating experience hours may only be taken while 
the pilot or flight engineer is under the direct supervision of the 
check pilot or check captain.


Sec.  121.1227  Pilot: Consolidation.

    (a) Pilots completing the proficiency test given at the end of 
initial, transition, or conversion training must

[[Page 1305]]

complete at least 100 hours of LOFT for consolidation in that aircraft 
type for the certificate holder. The consolidation hours must be 
completed within 120 days after completing the proficiency test.
    (1) If the consolidation flight time in an aircraft type is 
interrupted by flight time in another aircraft type, the pilot must 
complete refresher training to refresh the pilot's knowledge and 
skills, as provided in the certificate holder's approved training 
program. The refresher training must be completed in the aircraft type 
in which consolidation was started before continuing the consolidation. 
The refresher training must be conducted by a flight instructor or 
check pilot qualified under this part.
    (2) Consolidation must be started no later than 60 days after 
completion of the proficiency test given at the end of initial, 
transition, or conversion training. If consolidation is not started 
within 60 days of completing the proficiency test, another proficiency 
test is required to re-initiate consolidation.
    (b) If consolidation is not completed within 120 days of completing 
the proficiency test given at the end of initial, transition, or 
conversion training, the certificate holder may extend the 120-day 
period to no more than 150 days if both of the following conditions are 
met:
    (1) The pilot continues to meet all other applicable requirements 
of this subpart.
    (2) On or before the 120th day the pilot completes refresher 
training conducted by an appropriately qualified and authorized 
instructor or check pilot to refresh the pilot's knowledge and skills, 
as provided in the certificate holder's approved training program, or a 
check pilot determines that the pilot has retained an adequate level of 
proficiency after observing that pilot in a supervised line operating 
flight.
    (c) If consolidation is not completed within 150 days of completing 
the proficiency test given at the end of initial, transition, or 
conversion training, the certificate holder may extend the 150-day 
period to no more than 210 days if both of the following conditions are 
met:
    (1) The pilot continues to meet all other applicable requirements 
of this subpart.
    (2) On or before the 150th day the pilot completes a proficiency 
check in a Level C or D full flight simulator qualified in accordance 
with part 60 of this chapter.
    (d) If consolidation is not completed within 210 days of completing 
the proficiency test given at the end of initial, transition, or 
conversion training, the remaining line operating flight time that is 
necessary to complete consolidation must be supervised by a check 
pilot.
    (e) If consolidation is not completed by the time the proficiency 
test required by Sec.  121.1223 is completed for the first recurrent 
period, consolidation must start over.


Sec.  121.1229  Pilot: Recent experience.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a required pilot unless the person has made, within the 
preceding 90 days, at least three takeoffs and landings as the pilot 
flying in the aircraft type in which the person is to serve. The three 
takeoffs and landings required by this paragraph must be satisfied by 
compliance with either paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, but not a 
combination of paragraph (b) and (c) of this section.
    (b) If a pilot satisfies the requirements of paragraph (a) of this 
section through the use of an aircraft, the pilot must complete three 
operating cycles in the aircraft type in which the pilot serves.
    (c) If a pilot satisfies the requirements of paragraph (a) of this 
section through the use of a full flight simulator (FFS), the FFS must 
be qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter and approved 
for takeoff and landing maneuvers. The pilot must complete in a single 
simulator session at least three takeoffs and landings and the 
maneuvers and procedures prescribed in the QPS. One takeoff and one 
landing must be included in a LOFT environment under Sec.  121.1353.
    (d) If it has been 90 days or less since the pilot's recency has 
lapsed, the pilot may regain recency by completing at least three 
takeoffs and landings using the maneuvers and procedures specified in 
the Pilot QPS in an FFS qualified for takeoffs and landings in 
accordance with part 60 of this chapter. All three takeoffs and 
landings must be conducted in a LOFT environment as provided in Sec.  
121.1353.
    (e) If it has been more than 90 days since the pilot's recency has 
lapsed, the pilot may only regain recency by completing the core 
conversion training category in accordance with the pilot QPS. 
Completing core conversion to reestablish recency of experience does 
not change the pilot's recurrent training base month.


Sec.  121.1231  Flight engineer: Recent experience.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a required flight engineer unless, within the preceding 90 
days, the person has performed the duties of a flight engineer during 
at least three takeoffs and landings in the aircraft type in which the 
person is to serve. The three takeoffs and landings required by this 
paragraph must be satisfied by compliance with either paragraph (b) or 
(c) of this section, but not a combination of paragraphs (b) and (c) of 
this section.
    (b) If a flight engineer satisfies the requirements of paragraph 
(a) of this section through the use of an aircraft, the flight engineer 
must complete three operating cycles in the aircraft type in which the 
flight engineer serves.
    (c) If a flight engineer satisfies the requirements of paragraph 
(a) of this section through the use of an FFS, the FFS must be 
qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter and approved for 
takeoff and landing maneuvers. When an FFS is used, the flight engineer 
must complete in a single simulator session at least three takeoffs and 
landings and the maneuvers and procedures prescribed in the QPS. One 
takeoff and one landing must be included in a LOFT environment under 
Sec.  121.1353.
    (d) If it has been 90 days or less since the flight engineer's 
recency has lapsed, the flight engineer may regain recency by 
completing a proficiency check in accordance with the Flight Engineer 
QPS. This proficiency check must be administered with a complete flight 
crew, with each crewmember duty position filled by a person who is 
qualified or in student status to serve in that crewmember duty 
position.
    (e) If it has been more than 90 days since the flight engineer's 
recency has lapsed, the flight engineer may only regain recency by 
completing the core conversion training category in accordance with the 
flight engineer QPS. Completing core conversion to reestablish recency 
of experience does not change the flight engineer's recurrent training 
base month.


Sec.  121.1233  Line checks.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a pilot in command, unless, within the preceding 24 months, 
that person has completed a line check for that certificate holder in 
one of the aircraft types in which he or she is to serve. During the 
line check, the person must perform the duties and responsibilities of 
a pilot in command.
    (b) A pilot in command line check for domestic and flag operations 
must be administered by a check pilot or APD who is current and 
qualified on both the route and the aircraft type. A pilot in command 
line check for supplemental operations must be administered by a check 
pilot or APD who is current and

[[Page 1306]]

qualified in the aircraft type and must be conducted on an instrument 
flight rules flight plan.
    (c) A line check conducted under this part must consist of at least 
two operating cycles during operations under this part. In one of the 
cycles the pilot in command must perform the duties of the pilot flying 
the aircraft. In the other cycle, the pilot in command must perform the 
pilot monitoring duties.
    (d) The check pilot or APD conducting the line check must evaluate 
the entire flight crew in the performance of their duties during the 
line check of the pilot in command required by paragraph (a) of this 
section. The check pilot or APD will record the evaluation of the pilot 
in command and any other required flight crewmember that demonstrates a 
lack of proficiency. If any required flight crewmember performs below 
standard on any tasks, that person may not serve as a required flight 
crewmember in operations under this part until he or she receives 
training on such tasks, and completes a proficiency test in those 
tasks.
    (e) Check pilots or APDs conducting line checks must conduct a 
debriefing of the flight crew that includes technical and resource 
management competencies.
    (f) On flights with a flight engineer as a required crewmember, 
check pilots or APDs who meet the qualification requirements of this 
subpart to conduct pilot in command line checks will evaluate flight 
engineer performance during the line check. The check pilot or APD is 
not required to hold a flight engineer certificate to conduct flight 
engineer evaluations during line checks.
    (g) If a pilot does not receive the line check required by 
paragraph (a) of this section, the pilot may not serve as pilot in 
command in operations under this part until he or she completes the 
following:
    (1) If it has been more than 24 months, but less than 30 months 
since the pilot received his or her last line check, the pilot must 
complete a line check. The check pilot or APD must serve as the pilot 
in command during the line check and must occupy a pilot duty station.
    (2) If it has been 30 months or more since the pilot received his 
or her last line check, the pilot must complete the core conversion 
training category in accordance with the pilot QPS and complete a line 
check. The check pilot or APD must serve as the pilot in command during 
the line check and must occupy a pilot duty station. Completing core 
conversion to satisfy the line check requirement does not change the 
pilot's recurrent training base month.
    (h) If a pilot in command fails the line check required by 
paragraph (a) of this section, the pilot may not serve in operations 
under this part until he or she successfully completes within 60 days 
of the date of failure all of the following:
    (1) Recurrent academic training without adjusting the recurrent 
base month.
    (2) A proficiency check.
    (3) A qualification LOFT, consisting of at least two operating 
cycles, one under normal conditions, and one that includes abnormal or 
emergency issues.
    (4) Two operating cycles during line operations under the 
supervision of a check pilot or APD, followed by a line check. The 
check pilot or APD must serve as the pilot in command and occupy a 
pilot duty station during the operating cycles required by this section 
and the line check.
    (i) If a pilot in command fails to meet the requirements of 
paragraph (h) of this section within 60 days of the date of the failed 
line check, the pilot in command may not serve in operations under this 
part until the pilot in command completes the following:
    (1) Full conversion training without adjusting the recurrent base 
month.
    (2) A proficiency check.
    (3) A qualification LOFT, consisting of at least two operating 
cycles, one under normal conditions, and one that includes abnormal or 
emergency issues.
    (4) Two operating cycles during line operations under the 
supervision of a check pilot or APD, followed by a line check. The 
check pilot or APD must serve as the pilot in command and occupy a 
pilot duty station during the operating cycles required by this section 
and the line check.


Sec.  121.1235  Pilot: Routes and airports.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a pilot, unless that pilot has current information provided 
by the certificate holder regarding routes, airports and terminal areas 
into which that pilot operates. The certificate holder must ensure that 
each pilot has adequate knowledge and skill to use the information. The 
certificate holder must provide information on at least the following 
subjects:
    (1) Weather.
    (2) Navigation facilities.
    (3) Communication procedures, including airport visual aids.
    (4) Terrain and obstructions.
    (5) Minimum safe flight levels.
    (6) En route and terminal area arrival and departure procedures, 
holding procedures and authorized instrument approach procedures for 
the airports involved.
    (7) Congested areas and physical layout of each airport in the 
terminal area in which the pilot will operate.
    (8) Notices to Airmen.
    (b) Each certificate holder must provide a system acceptable to the 
Administrator for disseminating the information required by paragraph 
(a) of this section to the pilots and appropriate flight operations 
personnel. The system must also provide an acceptable means for showing 
compliance with pilot qualification for special areas, routes, and 
airports.
    (c) The Administrator may determine that certain airports (due to 
items such as surrounding terrain, obstructions, or complex approach or 
departure procedures) are special airports requiring special airport 
qualifications and that certain areas or routes require a special type 
of navigation qualification.
    (d) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a pilot in special airport operations unless, within the 
preceding 18 months, the pilot has met one of the following 
requirements:
    (1) Made a takeoff and landing at the special airport while serving 
as a pilot flying the aircraft.
    (2) Qualified by using photographs and diagrams approved by the 
Administrator for the special airport.
    (3) Qualified by using written descriptions and diagrams of the 
special characteristics of the airport only in those cases where the 
country in which the airport is located does not allow photographs to 
be taken of the airport. The written descriptions and diagrams must be 
approved by the Administrator.


Sec.  121.1237  Pilot: Operating limitations and crew pairing.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a pilot in operations under this part unless either the pilot 
in command or the second in command has at least 75 hours of line 
operating flight time for that aircraft type, either as pilot in 
command or second in command. The Administrator may, upon application 
by the certificate holder, authorize deviations from the requirements 
of this paragraph by an appropriate amendment to the operations 
specifications in any of the following circumstances:
    (1) A new certificate holder does not employ any pilots who meet 
the minimum requirements of this paragraph (a).

[[Page 1307]]

    (2) An existing certificate holder adds an aircraft type that was 
not previously proven for use in its operations.
    (3) An existing certificate holder establishes a new domicile to 
which it assigns pilots who will be required to become qualified on the 
aircraft operated from that domicile.
    (b) If the second in command has fewer than 100 hours of flight 
time as second in command in operations under this part in the aircraft 
type being flown, and the pilot in command is not an appropriately 
qualified check pilot, the pilot in command must make all takeoffs and 
landings in any of the following conditions:
    (1) The prevailing visibility value in the latest weather report 
for the airport is below \3/4\ mile.
    (2) The runway visual range for the runway to be used is below 
4,000 feet.
    (3) The runway to be used has water, snow, slush or similar 
conditions that may adversely affect aircraft performance.
    (4) The braking action on the runway to be used is reported to be 
less than ``good.''
    (5) The crosswind component for the runway to be used is in excess 
of 15 knots.
    (6) Windshear is reported in the vicinity of the airport.
    (7) Any time the pilot in command determines it to be prudent to 
make the takeoffs and landings.
    (c) Except for check pilots, newly qualifying PIC in the aircraft 
type, and as described in paragraph (d) of this section, no certificate 
holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as a PIC or SIC in 
operations under this part unless the PIC has been trained for, is 
assigned to, and operates the aircraft from the left hand pilot's seat, 
and the SIC has been trained for, is assigned to, and operates the 
aircraft from the right hand seat.
    (d) A certificate holder may authorize an assigned PIC to operate 
the aircraft from the right hand pilot seat and to authorize the 
assigned SIC to operate the aircraft from the left hand pilot seat 
provided the pilots have completed either a training program for that 
pilot seat or the seat dependent task training for that pilot seat in 
accordance with the Pilot QPS. The responsibilities of the PIC and SIC 
who exchange operating seats as described in this paragraph, remain 
unchanged regardless of the pilot seat being occupied. Duties and 
functions of the pilot flying and the pilot monitoring will change only 
due to the limitations and requirements imposed by occupying the 
opposite pilot seat.


Sec.  121.1239  Flight crewmember: Requalification.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a pilot or flight engineer if that person has become 
unqualified by failing to complete recurrent academic or job 
performance training segments including proficiency tests, proficiency 
checks, and proficiency reviews, as required by Sec.  121.1223.
    (b) If a person fails to meet any of the requirements of paragraph 
(a) of this section, then the person must complete the initial training 
requirements of Sec.  121.1365 in accordance with the Pilot QPS, 
including operating experience and proficiency test, or the person must 
meet the requirements of this paragraph in accordance with the 
appropriate requalification phase to be requalified. The 
requalification phases are based on the person being unqualified and 
the number of months after the month in which the person last served in 
a crewmember duty position for the aircraft type in operations under 
this part.
    (1) Phase I Requalification.
    (i) Eligibility for Phase I Requalification. An unqualified flight 
crewmember may requalify by completing the Phase I Requalification 
program if it has been less than 9 months since the month the person 
last served in a crewmember duty position for the aircraft type.
    (ii) Phase I Requalification program. The flight crewmember must 
complete all of the recurrent training modules or any modules that were 
not completed. These requirements must be completed within 30 days of 
beginning requalification training and less than 9 months from the 
month the person last served in a crewmember duty position for the 
aircraft type in operations under this part. The flight crewmember's 
base month for recurrent training will not change.
    (2) Phase II Requalification.
    (i) Eligibility for Phase II Requalification. An unqualified flight 
crewmember may requalify by completing the Phase II Requalification 
program if it has been 9 months or more, but less than 27 months since 
the month the person last served in a crewmember duty position for the 
aircraft type in operations under this part.
    (ii) Phase II Requalification program. The flight crewmember must 
complete the following Phase II Requalification requirements within 60 
days of beginning requalification training and less than 27 months from 
the month the person last served in a crewmember duty position for the 
aircraft type in operations under this part:
    (A) The flight crewmember must complete the core conversion 
training category. The Principal Operations Inspector will decide, on a 
case by case basis, the number of programmed hours for academic and job 
performance training. For academic training, the required programmed 
hours may be more or less than the core conversion training hours. For 
the job performance training segment, the programmed hours will be no 
less than the minimum job performance programmed hours for the core 
conversion training category required by the applicable QPS. A pilot in 
command must also complete a line check.
    (B) The flight crewmember's recurrent base month must be changed as 
appropriate to correspond to the month in which the proficiency test 
was completed.
    (3) Phase III Requalification.
    (i) Eligibility for Phase III Requalification. An unqualified 
flight crewmember must complete the Phase III Requalification program 
if it has been 27 months or more since the month the person last served 
in a crewmember duty position for the aircraft type in operations under 
this part.
    (ii) Phase III Requalification program. The flight crewmember must 
complete the following Phase III Requalification requirements within 90 
days of beginning requalification training:
    (A) The flight crewmember must complete the full conversion 
training category, except the programmed hours specified in the QPS do 
not apply. The Principal Operations Inspector will decide, on a case by 
case basis, the number of hours for academic and job performance 
training. For job performance training, the programmed hours will be no 
less than the minimum job performance programmed hours for the full 
conversion training category required by the applicable QPS. A pilot 
must also complete a qualification LOFT, and a pilot in command must 
also complete a line check.
    (B) The flight crewmember's recurrent base month must be changed as 
appropriate to correspond to the month in which the proficiency test 
was completed.


Sec.  121.1241  Flight crewmembers at controls.

    (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each 
required flight crewmember on flight deck duty must remain at the 
assigned duty station with seat belt fastened while the aircraft is 
taking off or landing, and while it is en route.

[[Page 1308]]

    (b) A required flight crewmember may leave the assigned duty 
station only in the following situations:
    (1) If the crewmember's absence is necessary for the performance of 
duties in connection with the operation of the aircraft.
    (2) If the crewmember's absence is in connection with physiological 
needs.
    (3) If the crewmember (PIC or SIC) is taking a rest period, and 
relief is provided during the en route cruise portion of the flight by 
a pilot who meets all of the following:
    (i) Holds an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating 
on the aircraft.
    (ii) Is qualified as pilot in command or second in command on the 
aircraft.
    (iii) Has completed operating experience in accordance with Sec.  
121.1225.
    (iv) Has completed line operating flight time for consolidation, if 
applicable, within the time prescribed in Sec.  121.1227.
    (v) Has completed either of the following:
    (A) Training for the duty station to be occupied.
    (B) Training for the opposite duty station and the seat dependent 
task training described in the pilot QPS for the duty station to be 
occupied.
    (vi) Is maintaining recency in accordance with Sec.  121.1229.
    (4) If the pilot in command is taking a rest period in accordance 
with paragraph (b)(3) of this section, the pilot in command must 
designate an acting pilot in command on the flight deck.

Check Pilot And Check Flight Engineer Qualification


Sec.  121.1251  Eligibility: Check pilot, check flight engineer, 
Aircrew Program Designee (APD), and Flight Instructor.

    To be eligible to enter training as a check pilot, check flight 
engineer, APD, or Flight Instructor, a person must meet the following 
requirements:
    (a) For pilots:
    (1) Have an ATP certificate and a rating for the aircraft type in 
which they are to serve.
    (2) Have served in one of the following capacities for at least 1 
year in an aircraft of the same group in which that person is 
authorized to instruct or evaluate:
    (i) A flight instructor in a certificate holder's approved training 
program.
    (ii) A pilot in command.
    (iii) A Training Center Evaluator (TCE).
    (iv) A second in command.
    (3) Have completed the certificate holder's academic and job 
performance training segments for pilot in command, in accordance with 
Sec. Sec.  121.1365 and 121.1367, for the aircraft type on which they 
are to serve as an instructor, check pilot, or APD.
    (b) For flight engineers:
    (1) Have a flight engineer certificate and a rating for the 
aircraft type in which they are to serve.
    (2) Have served as a flight engineer for at least 1 year in an 
aircraft of the same group in which that person is authorized to 
instruct or evaluate.
    (3) Have completed the certificate holder's academic and job 
performance training segments for flight engineer in accordance with 
Sec. Sec.  121.1365 and 121.1367, for the aircraft type on which they 
are to serve as an instructor, check flight engineer, or APD.


Sec.  121.1253  Check pilot and check flight engineer: Training, 
evaluation, approval, and recent experience.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a check pilot or check flight engineer in a training program 
established under this subpart, with respect to the aircraft type 
involved, unless the person has satisfied the requirements of this 
section.
    (a) Training:
    (1) For check pilots, the following:
    (i) The certificate holder's approved academic and job performance 
training for check pilots, as required by Sec. Sec.  121.1381 and 
121.1383.
    (ii) The seat dependent task training from both seats, in 
accordance with the QPS.
    (2) For check flight engineers, the certificate holder's approved 
academic and job performance training for check flight engineers, as 
required by Sec. Sec.  121.1381 and 121.1383.
    (b) Evaluation:
    (1) For check pilots, the following observation checks:
    (i) To be authorized to conduct proficiency tests or proficiency 
checks, the person must be observed conducting a proficiency test or 
proficiency check in an FFS by an FAA inspector or an APD, and the 
pilot undergoing the proficiency test or proficiency check for this 
observation must be signed off by the FAA inspector or the APD as the 
evaluator of record.
    (ii) To be authorized to conduct line checks, the person must be 
observed conducting a line check by an FAA inspector or an APD, and the 
pilot undergoing the line check for this observation must be signed off 
by the FAA inspector or the APD as the evaluator of record.
    (2) For check flight engineers, to be authorized to conduct 
proficiency tests or proficiency checks, the person must be observed 
conducting a proficiency test or proficiency check in an FFS by an FAA 
inspector or an APD, and the flight engineer undergoing the proficiency 
test or proficiency check for this observation must be signed off by 
the FAA inspector or the APD as the evaluator of record.
    (c) Approval:
    (1) For check pilots, after completing the requirements of 
paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the check pilot may be issued 
an FAA letter of authorization to conduct the following, as applicable:
    (i) Proficiency tests, proficiency checks, or proficiency reviews, 
or any combination.
    (ii) Line checks.
    (2) For check flight engineers, after completing the requirements 
of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the check flight engineer 
may be issued an FAA letter of authorization to conduct proficiency 
tests, proficiency checks, or proficiency reviews, or any combination.
    (3) Check pilots and check flight engineers may conduct only those 
activities listed on the FAA letter of authorization.
    (d) Recent experience:
    (1) Check pilots and check flight engineers must maintain recency 
as a pilot or flight engineer as required by Sec.  121.1229 or Sec.  
121.1231, as applicable. Check pilots and check flight engineers who 
use the authorizations of Sec.  121.1229(c) or Sec.  121.1231(c), as 
applicable, to maintain this recency of experience requirement, must 
also, within 90 days before performing the duties of a check pilot or 
check flight engineer, satisfy the following requirements:
    (i) The check pilot must have made at least five takeoffs and 
landings in an FFS qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter 
and approved for performing takeoffs and landings.
    (ii) The check flight engineer must have served as a flight 
engineer on five takeoffs and landings in an FFS qualified in 
accordance with part 60 of this chapter and approved for performing 
takeoffs and landings.
    (2) After a person has been a check pilot or a check flight 
engineer for 12 months:
    (i) The person may not serve as a check pilot or a check flight 
engineer unless in the preceding 12 months the person has completed at 
least eight evaluation activities for the certificate holder. The 
minimum of eight activities must include at least one of each activity 
he or she is authorized to conduct in accordance with the applicable 
QPS. If the check pilot or check flight engineer fails to conduct at

[[Page 1309]]

least eight activities, that person may not serve as a check pilot or 
check flight engineer until the person is re-observed by an FAA 
inspector or an APD while conducting a proficiency test or proficiency 
check. If the person has conducted eight activities but one or more of 
the authorized activities have not been conducted:
    (A) The check pilot or check flight engineer may not serve as a 
check pilot or check flight engineer until re-observed by an FAA 
inspector or an APD while conducting a proficiency test or proficiency 
check; or
    (B) The certificate holder must request that the FAA update the 
check pilot's or check flight engineer's letter of authorization by 
removing the non-conducted activities from the authorizations.
    (ii) Within the 12 months preceding performing the duties of a 
check pilot or check flight engineer, the check pilot or check flight 
engineer must have completed the following:
    (A) Attended all standardization meetings (required by Sec.  
121.1355(a)(2)) for each aircraft type in which the person is 
authorized to conduct check pilot or check flight engineer duties; and
    (B) If the check pilot or check flight engineer meets the 
requirements of paragraph (d)(1) of this section by completing Sec.  
121.1229(b) or Sec.  121.1231(b) through aircraft operations other than 
line operations under this part, or by completing Sec.  121.1229(c) or 
Sec.  121.1231(c) in a qualified and approved FFS, the check pilot or 
check flight engineer must have observed the line operations of at 
least one of the certificate holders for whom the check pilot or check 
flight engineer performs evaluations. This observation must be part of 
a Principal Operations Inspector approved line-observation program.


Sec.  121.1255  Check Captain: Additional training requirements.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a check captain in operations under this part with respect to the 
aircraft type involved, unless the person is current and qualified as a 
pilot in command and has done the following in an FSTD:
    (a) Learned the safety measures to be taken from either pilot seat 
for emergency situations that are likely to develop during flight 
operations.
    (b) Learned the potential consequences of improper, untimely or 
unexecuted safety measures during flight operations.
    (c) Completed the seat dependent task training described in the 
QPS.


Sec.  121.1257  Check pilot, check captain, and check flight engineer: 
Initial cadre.

    (a) A certificate holder may use a person as a check pilot, check 
captain, or check flight engineer even though the person does not meet 
the experience, recency, crew pairing, or consolidation requirements of 
the subpart, if the person meets the initial cadre requirements of this 
section. The FAA will determine the period of initial cadre status and 
may terminate initial cadre status entirely or for an individual check 
pilot, check captain, or check flight engineer, if necessary. In no 
case will initial cadre status exceed a period of 24 months.
    (b) To be an initial cadre check pilot, check captain, or check 
flight engineer for a part 119 certificate holder and to continue to 
serve in that capacity for the authorized period, a person must meet 
all of the following requirements:
    (1) Be employed by the part 119 certificate holder.
    (2) Have served at least 3 years in the past 6 years as a pilot in 
command or as a flight engineer, as applicable, on an aircraft of the 
same group in which the person is to perform duties as an initial cadre 
check pilot, check captain, or check flight engineer.
    (3) Have the appropriate certificates and ratings for the aircraft 
type and pilot or flight engineer position.
    (4) Have completed the academic and job performance training 
segments of the applicable training categories, as approved by the 
Principal Operations Inspector for the part 119 certificate holder that 
are required to serve as a pilot in command or flight engineer, as 
applicable. For initial cadre check pilots, these requirements must be 
completed for both pilot seats.
    (5) Perform each of the duties to be accomplished as a check pilot, 
check captain, or check flight engineer under the observation of an FAA 
inspector. When an observed activity must be made part of a training 
record, the people undergoing the observed activities must be signed 
off by the FAA inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (6) Be approved by the Principal Operations Inspector for the 
specific duties to be performed.
    (c) Initial cadre check pilots, check captains, and check flight 
engineers may obtain aircraft operating experience while supervising or 
being supervised by other initial cadre check pilots, check captains, 
and check flight engineers, and while being observed by the FAA. 
Operating experience for initial cadre personnel may be obtained during 
revenue passenger operations or during aircraft delivery flights, ferry 
flights, repositioning flights, or proving flights.
    (d) An initial cadre check pilot, check captain, or check flight 
engineer may not gain operating experience in operations under this 
part unless there is at least one initial cadre check pilot on that 
flight who has the following experience in the aircraft type:
    (1) Has at least 5 hours of operating experience at the pilot 
controls; and
    (2) Has made at least two takeoffs and landings within the previous 
60 days.
    (e) The part 119 certificate holder must propose for approval by 
the Principal Operations Inspector, current employees, employees of 
part 142 certificate holders, employees of other part 119 certificate 
holders, or aircraft manufacturers as instructors, check pilots, and 
aircrew program designees (APDs) for initial cadre duties. The FAA must 
complete all evaluation of initial cadre check pilots and check flight 
engineers.
    (f) Notwithstanding contrary provisions of Sec.  121.1227 for 
consolidation of knowledge and skills (including operating experience 
required under Sec.  121.1225), an initial cadre check pilot or check 
captain may delay initiating line operating flight time for 
consolidation. The initiation of consolidation may be delayed until 180 
days after completing the proficiency test at the end of the initial or 
transition training category, or until 10 days after the initial cadre 
status is terminated by the Principal Operations Inspector, whichever 
is sooner. Once consolidation is initiated, the pilot must acquire 100 
hours of line operating experience within 120 days. If consolidation is 
not completed as required by this paragraph, the pilot must restart 
consolidation in accordance with Sec.  121.1227.
    (g) Notwithstanding contrary provisions of Sec.  121.1229 for 
recent takeoff and landing experience, an initial cadre check pilot or 
check captain may perform the duties of a pilot in command or second in 
command in operations under this part if the initial cadre check pilot 
or check captain has satisfied the following two requirements:
    (1) Has accumulated at least 5 hours of operating experience as the 
pilot flying in the aircraft type.
    (2) Has made at least two takeoffs and landings as the pilot flying 
within the previous 60 days in the aircraft type.
    (h) Notwithstanding contrary provisions of Sec.  121.1237 for crew 
pairing, an initial cadre check pilot or check captain may perform the 
duties of a pilot in command or second in command in operations under 
this part without respect to the minimum number of hours of line 
operating flight

[[Page 1310]]

time in that aircraft type accumulated by the pilot occupying the other 
pilot position if the initial cadre check pilot or check captain has 
satisfied the following two requirements:
    (1) Has accumulated at least 5 hours of operating experience as the 
pilot flying in the aircraft type.
    (2) Has made at least two takeoffs and landings as the pilot flying 
within the previous 60 days in the aircraft type.

Aircrew Program Designee Qualification


Sec.  121.1271  Aircrew Program Designee (APD): Training, evaluation, 
and recent experience.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a pilot APD or a flight engineer APD in a training program 
established under this subpart, with respect to the aircraft type 
involved, unless the person meets the requirements of Sec.  121.1251 
and has satisfied the requirements of this section.
    (a) Training:
    (1) For pilot APDs, the following:
    (i) The certificate holder's approved academic and job performance 
training for check pilots, as required by Sec. Sec.  121.1381 and 
121.1383.
    (ii) The seat dependent task training from both seats, in 
accordance with the QPS.
    (2) For flight engineer APDs, the certificate holder's approved 
academic and job performance training for check flight engineers, as 
required by Sec. Sec.  121.1381 and 121.1383.
    (b) Evaluation:
    (1) For pilot APDs, the following observation checks:
    (i) To be authorized to conduct proficiency tests, the APD must be 
observed conducting a proficiency test in an FFS by an FAA inspector, 
and the pilot undergoing the proficiency test for this observation must 
be signed off by the FAA inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (ii) To be authorized to conduct line checks, the APD must be 
observed conducting a line check by an FAA inspector, and the pilot 
undergoing the line check for this observation must be signed off by 
the FAA inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (2) For flight engineer APDs, to be authorized to conduct 
proficiency tests, the person must be observed conducting a proficiency 
test in an FFS by an FAA inspector, and the flight engineer undergoing 
the proficiency test for this observation must be signed off by the FAA 
inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (c) Approval:
    (1) For pilot APDs, after completing the requirements of paragraphs 
(a) and (b) of this section, the pilot APD may be issued an FAA letter 
of authorization and a certificate of designation to conduct the 
following, as applicable:
    (i) Proficiency tests, or
    (ii) Line checks.
    (2) For flight engineer APDs, after completing the requirements of 
paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, the flight engineer APD may be 
issued an FAA letter of authorization and a certificate of designation 
to conduct proficiency tests.
    (3) APDs may conduct only those activities listed on the FAA letter 
of authorization.
    (d) Recent experience:
    (1) APDs must maintain recency as a pilot or flight engineer as 
required by Sec.  121.1229 or Sec.  121.1231, as applicable. APDs who 
use the authorizations of Sec.  121.1229(c) or Sec.  121.1231(c), as 
applicable, to maintain this recency requirement, must also, within 90 
days before performing the duties of an APD, satisfy the following 
requirements:
    (i) The pilot APD must have made at least five takeoffs and 
landings in an FFS qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter 
and approved for performing takeoffs and landings.
    (ii) The flight engineer APD must have served as a flight engineer 
on five takeoffs in an FFS qualified in accordance with part 60 of this 
chapter and approved for performing takeoffs and landings.
    (2) After a person has been an APD for 12 months, within the 12 
months preceding performing the duties of a pilot or flight engineer 
APD, the APD must:
    (i) Have attended all standardization meetings (required by Sec.  
121.1355(a)(2)) for each aircraft type in which the person is 
authorized to conduct APD duties; and
    (ii) If the APD has met the requirements of paragraph (d)(1) of 
this section by completing Sec.  121.1229(c) or Sec.  121.1231(c), 
complete a Principal Operations Inspector approved line-observation 
program by observing the certificate holder's line operations from the 
observer seat.

Flight Instructor Qualification


Sec.  121.1281  Flight instructor: Qualification and training.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a flight instructor in a training program established under this 
subpart, with respect to the aircraft type involved, unless the person 
meets the requirements of Sec.  121.1251 and has satisfied the 
requirements of this section.
    (a) Training:
    (1) For a pilot flight instructor, the following:
    (i) The FAA-approved training program for the certificate holder in 
the appropriate category of academic and job performance training for 
pilots, as required by Sec.  121.1365; and, when applicable, the 
recurring academic and job performance training for pilots, as required 
by Sec.  121.1367.
    (ii) The part 119 certificate holder's approved academic training 
for pilot flight instructors, as required by Sec.  121.1377, and the 
part 119 certificate holder's job performance training for pilot flight 
instructors, as required by Sec.  121.1379.
    (iii) The seat-dependent task training from both seats, in 
accordance with the QPS.
    (2) For a flight engineer flight instructor, the following:
    (i) The FAA-approved training program for the certificate holder in 
the appropriate category of academic and job performance training for 
flight engineers, as required by Sec.  121.1365; and, when applicable, 
the recurring academic and job performance training for flight 
engineers, as required by Sec.  121.1367.
    (ii) The part 119 certificate holder's approved academic training 
for flight engineer flight instructors, as required by Sec.  121.1377, 
and the part 119 certificate holder's job performance training for 
flight engineer flight instructors, as required by Sec.  121.1379.
    (b) Evaluation:
    (1) For pilot flight instructors, the following observation checks:
    (i) To be authorized to conduct flight training:
    (A) The flight instructor must be observed conducting flight 
training in an FFS by a check pilot; and
    (B) The pilot undergoing the flight training for this observation 
must be signed off by the check pilot as the instructor of record.
    (ii) To be authorized to conduct proficiency reviews:
    (A) The flight instructor must be observed conducting a proficiency 
review by a check pilot; and
    (B) The pilot undergoing the proficiency review for this 
observation must be signed off by the check pilot as the evaluator of 
record.
    (2) For flight engineer flight instructors, to be authorized to 
conduct flight training:
    (i) The flight instructor must be observed conducting flight 
training in an FFS by a check flight engineer; and
    (ii) The flight engineer undergoing the flight training for this 
observation must

[[Page 1311]]

be signed off by the check flight engineer as the instructor of record.
    (c) Acceptance and approval:
    (1) Acceptance of flight instructors: The certificate holder must 
submit a list of all flight instructors and authorized activities to 
the Principal Operations Inspector. The flight instructors must be 
acceptable to the FAA.
    (2) Approval of flight instructors to conduct proficiency reviews: 
The flight instructor must receive a letter of authorization from the 
Principal Operations Inspector to conduct proficiency reviews.
    (d) Recent experience:
    (1) Flight instructors must maintain recency as a pilot or flight 
engineer as required by Sec.  121.1229 or Sec.  121.1231, as 
applicable. Flight instructors who use the authorizations of Sec.  
121.1229(c) or Sec.  121.1231(c), as applicable, to maintain this 
recency requirement, must also, within 90 days before performing the 
duties of a flight instructor, satisfy the following requirements:
    (i) The pilot flight instructor must have made at least five 
takeoffs and landings and the maneuvers and procedures prescribed in 
the QPS in an FFS qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter 
and approved for performing takeoffs and landings.
    (ii) The flight engineer flight instructor must have served as a 
flight engineer on five takeoffs in an FFS qualified in accordance with 
part 60 of this chapter and approved for performing takeoffs and 
landings.
    (2) After a person has been a flight instructor for 12 months:
    (i) The person may not serve as a flight instructor unless in the 
preceding 12 months the person has completed at least eight instructor 
activities for the certificate holder. The minimum of eight instructor 
activities must include at least one period of job performance 
training, one LOFT, and, if authorized, one proficiency review. If the 
person fails to conduct at least eight activities within the previous 
12-month period, that person may not serve as a flight instructor 
until:
    (A) The person is observed conducting job performance training or 
LOFT by a check pilot or check flight engineer. This observation will 
allow the person to conduct job performance training or LOFT.
    (B) The person is observed conducting a proficiency review by a 
check pilot or check flight engineer. This observation will allow the 
person to conduct job performance training, LOFT, or proficiency 
reviews.
    (C) During the observation required by paragraph (d)(2)(i)(A) or 
(d)(2)(i)(B) of this section, the check pilot or check flight engineer 
must be the instructor or evaluator of record.
    (ii) If the person conducts at least eight activities within the 
previous 12-month period, but one or more of the authorized activities 
was not conducted within that period:
    (A) Before conducting the job performance training, LOFT, or 
proficiency reviews, the person must be observed by a check pilot or 
check engineer, as described in paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section, as 
appropriate; or
    (B) The certificate holder must revise the list of authorized 
activities described in paragraph (c)(1) of this section to eliminate 
the activities that were not conducted. If the person fails to conduct 
a proficiency review, the certificate holder must advise the Principal 
Operations Inspector and the letter of authorization will be rescinded.
    (iii) Within the 12 months preceding performing the duties of a 
pilot or flight engineer flight instructor, the flight instructor must 
have attended all standardization meetings (required by Sec.  
121.1355(a)(2)) for each aircraft type and for each certificate holder 
for which the person is authorized to conduct flight instructor duties.
    (e) If the flight instructor is authorized to conduct proficiency 
reviews, the flight instructor must, within the preceding 24 months, 
conduct a proficiency review under the observation of a check pilot or 
check flight engineer approved by the Principal Operations Inspector to 
conduct the observation. The proficiency review must be accomplished in 
an FFS qualified under part 60 of this chapter as prescribed in the 
applicable QPS.

Flight Attendant Instructor Qualification


Sec.  121.1291  Flight attendant instructor: Qualification and 
training.

    (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no 
certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, as a 
flight attendant instructor in a training program established under 
this subpart unless that person meets the following requirements:
    (1) Within the past 12 months, completed basic qualification or 
recurrent flight attendant training for the certificate holder, except 
those performance drills that the person cannot physically perform. A 
person may provide instruction only in those performance drills that 
the person can perform at the time of instruction and that the person 
has completed within the past 12 months as part of the person's basic 
qualification or recurrent flight attendant training for the 
certificate holder.
    (2) Within the past 12 months completed initial or recurrent flight 
attendant instructor training as follows:
    (i) Training policies and procedures.
    (ii) Instructor duties, functions and responsibilities.
    (iii) The applicable regulations of this chapter and the 
certificate holder's policies and procedures.
    (iv) Appropriate methods, procedures and techniques for conducting 
academic training to include performance drills.
    (v) Evaluation of student performance.
    (vi) Appropriate action in the case of unsatisfactory performance.
    (vii) The approved methods, procedures and limitations for 
instructing and evaluating in the required normal, abnormal and 
emergency procedures applicable to the aircraft.
    (viii) Curriculum review.
    (b) A person who is a subject matter expert with specific technical 
knowledge on a subject may be used to conduct flight attendant training 
in accordance with the Flight Attendant QPS.

Flight Attendant


Sec.  121.1301  Flight attendant: Training and evaluation.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a required flight attendant in operations under this part unless 
that person has completed the required curriculum for that aircraft 
type and crewmember duty position.
    (a) A curriculum consists of the programmed hours, including 
training and evaluation, as specified in Sec.  121.1335 and in the 
flight attendant QPS, and the following training categories.
    (1) New hire training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1363.
    (2) Initial training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1369.
    (3) Emergency training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1373.
    (4) Differences training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1391.
    (5) Transition training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1369 for flight 
attendants eligible under Sec.  121.1371.
    (6) Recurrent training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1375, according 
to the schedule prescribed in Sec.  121.1303.
    (7) Requalification training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1309.
    (8) Special training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1337.
    (b) Continuity of training. Within 120 days of beginning first time 
qualification

[[Page 1312]]

for the certificate holder, a person must have completed in the 
following order:
    (1) New hire training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1363.
    (2) Initial training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1369.
    (3) Emergency training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1373.
    (c) Failure to complete training within 120 days. If a person fails 
to complete the required curriculum within the 120 days, as required by 
paragraph (b) of this section, the person must repeat the required 
training categories. No credit is given for any of the training 
previously completed if the entire curriculum is not completed within 
120 days.


Sec.  121.1303  Flight attendant: Continuing qualification.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a flight attendant unless the person has completed the training 
required by paragraph (a), (b), or (c) of this section within the 
previous 12 months:
    (a) New hire training, initial training, transition training, 
emergency training, and differences training, as applicable, as 
described in Sec.  121.1301(a)(1) through (5).
    (b) Recurrent training as required by Sec.  121.1375.
    (1) A flight attendant must complete recurrent academic and job 
performance training modules by the end of the eligibility period. The 
eligibility period consists of the base month, the month before the 
base month and the month after the base month.
    (2) A flight attendant who has not completed recurrent training by 
the end of the base month may continue to serve until the end of the 
eligibility period.
    (c) Requalification training as prescribed in Sec.  121.1309.


Sec.  121.1305  Flight attendant: Aircraft operating experience.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a flight attendant, unless that person has completed, for the 
certificate holder, the aircraft operating experience required by this 
section and the Flight Attendant QPS.
    (a) A person must complete aircraft operating experience for the 
aircraft type on which the person is to serve as a flight attendant 
within 90 days of completing initial training on that aircraft type.
    (b) A person receiving aircraft operating experience may not serve 
as a required crewmember on that aircraft type.
    (c) Aircraft operating experience must be completed in passenger 
carrying operations under this part or in proving flights conducted 
under part 91 of this chapter.
    (d) A person may not begin aircraft operating experience for a 
specific aircraft type until the person has completed initial training 
for the aircraft type.
    (e) A check flight attendant qualified under this part must 
supervise aircraft operating experience. In addition the following 
requirements apply:
    (1) A check flight attendant may not supervise more than four 
persons receiving aircraft operating experience on any one operating 
cycle.
    (2) Not more than two check flight attendants may supervise 
aircraft operating experience on any one operating cycle.
    (3) The number of persons receiving aircraft operating experience 
on a particular aircraft may not exceed twice the number of flight 
attendants required by Sec.  121.391 for that aircraft.
    (f) A person receiving aircraft operating experience must perform 
the duties of a flight attendant on at least two operating cycles in 
the aircraft type with a check flight attendant on board.
    (g) A person receiving aircraft operating experience must perform 
the assigned duties of a flight attendant for a combined total of at 
least 5 hours of aircraft operating experience.
    (h) Flight attendants completing transition training are not 
subject to the aircraft operating experience requirements of this 
section.


Sec.  121.1307  Flight attendant: Recent experience.

    (a) After a flight attendant has served for the first time in 
operations under this part for the certificate holder, no certificate 
holder may use that flight attendant, nor may any flight attendant 
continue to serve as a flight attendant, unless within the preceding 6 
months the person has served as a flight attendant for at least one 
operating cycle for the certificate holder.
    (b) If a person has not met the recent experience requirements of 
paragraph (a) of this section, the person must reestablish recent 
experience as follows:
    (1) If it has been more than 6 months, but less than 36 months, 
since the person served as a flight attendant for at least one 
operating cycle for the certificate holder, the person must participate 
in a ground-based briefing on all policies, procedures, and security 
requirements pertinent to flight attendants that have been updated, 
modified, or implemented since the last time the person served as a 
flight attendant for the certificate holder. The briefing must be 
conducted by a knowledgeable person employed by the certificate holder.
    (2) If it has been 36 months or more since the person served as a 
flight attendant for at least one operating cycle for the certificate 
holder, the person must do the following:
    (i) Meet the briefing requirements of paragraph (b)(1) of this 
section.
    (ii) Serve as a flight attendant for one operating cycle on any 
aircraft type for that certificate holder, but not as a required 
crewmember.


Sec.  121.1309  Flight attendant: Requalification.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as a flight attendant if that person has become unqualified by failing 
to meet the recurrent training requirements of Sec.  121.1303(b). The 
requalification requirements for each phase must be completed before 
the end of the applicable phase of requalification. To be requalified 
the person must repeat the training required by Sec.  121.1301(a)(1), 
(a)(3), (a)(4), and (a)(5), or satisfy one of the following 
requirements:
    (a) Phase I Requalification program. If less than 12 months have 
elapsed since the end of the person's base month for recurrent 
training, the person may be requalified by completing either of the 
following:
    (1) If the part 119 certificate holder is presently conducting the 
recurrent flight attendant training cycle that the person missed, the 
person must complete that training. The base month for recurrent 
training does not change.
    (2) If the part 119 certificate holder is not presently conducting 
the recurrent flight attendant training cycle that the person missed, 
the person must complete the requirements of paragraphs (a)(2)(i) and 
(a)(2)(ii) of this section, and if applicable paragraph (a)(2)(iii) of 
this section. The base month for recurrent training may be changed.
    (i) The current recurrent flight attendant training cycle.
    (ii) All missed training, including all study materials and 
evaluations from the previous recurrent flight attendant training 
cycle, which is still applicable but is not included in the current 
recurrent flight attendant training cycle.
    (iii) Flight attendants qualified in extended overwater operations 
must participate in a cabin preparation and evacuation drill (water), 
if not part of the current recurrent flight attendant training cycle.
    (b) Phase II Requalification program. If 12 months or more, but 
less than 24 months, have elapsed since the end of the person's base 
month for recurrent

[[Page 1313]]

training, the person may be requalified by completing the requirements 
of this paragraph. The base month may be changed.
    (1) The current recurrent flight attendant training cycle.
    (2) All missed training, including all study materials and 
evaluations from the previous recurrent flight attendant training 
cycle(s), which is still applicable but is not included in the current 
recurrent flight attendant training cycle.
    (3) Flight attendants qualified in extended overwater operations 
must participate in a cabin preparation and evacuation drill (water), 
if not part of the current recurrent flight attendant training cycle.
    (4) Attend a ground-based briefing to review all new policies, 
procedures, and security requirements, applicable to flight attendant 
duties that have been implemented since the last time the flight 
attendant completed recurrent training. The briefing must be conducted 
by a knowledgeable person employed by the certificate holder. The 
briefing must include all policies, procedures, and security 
requirements applicable to flight attendants that have been updated, 
modified, or implemented since the person last served as a flight 
attendant for that certificate holder.
    (c) Phase III Requalification program. If 24 months or more have 
elapsed since the end of the person's base month for recurrent 
training, the person may be requalified by completing the requirements 
of this paragraph. The flight attendant's recurrent base month may be 
changed to correspond to the month in which the Phase III requirements 
were completed.
    (1) New hire training, transition training, emergency training, and 
differences training, as applicable, as described in Sec.  121.1301.
    (2) The flight attendant must receive 5 hours of aircraft operating 
experience and two operating cycles on at least one aircraft type in 
accordance with the Phase III Requalification requirements in the 
Flight Attendant QPS.
    (3) The Administrator determines the number of programmed hours 
required for each training category, but in no case will the programmed 
hours be less than the minimum hours required in the Flight Attendant 
QPS.

Check Flight Attendant Qualification


Sec.  121.1321  Check flight attendant: Eligibility, approval, 
qualification, and continuing qualification.

    (a) Eligibility for Training. To be eligible for training as a 
check flight attendant for an aircraft type, a person must meet the 
following requirements:
    (1) Have served as a flight attendant for at least the previous 12 
months for the part 119 certificate holder.
    (2) Be current and qualified to serve as a flight attendant on that 
aircraft type for the part 119 certificate holder.
    (b) Approval by the Administrator. A check flight attendant must be 
approved by the Administrator for the specific duties to be performed 
on the aircraft type. To be approved as a check flight attendant, the 
flight attendant must meet the following requirements:
    (1) Continue to meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this 
section.
    (2) Complete the check flight attendant training requirements in 
accordance with Sec.  121.1381.
    (c) Initial qualification. No certificate holder may use any 
person, nor may any person serve, as a check flight attendant for the 
first time on the aircraft type, unless the person meets the following 
requirements for the part 119 certificate holder:
    (1) Meets the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this 
section.
    (2) Supervises operating experience for at least one operating 
cycle on the aircraft type under the observation of a check flight 
attendant or an FAA inspector. The person undergoing operating 
experience must be signed off by the check flight attendant or the FAA 
inspector conducting the observation.
    (3) Meets the recent experience requirements of Sec.  121.1307(a) 
to serve as a flight attendant.
    (d) Continuing qualification. No certificate holder may use a check 
flight attendant, nor may any check flight attendant serve as a check 
flight attendant, unless the check flight attendant meets the following 
requirements for the part 119 certificate holder:
    (1) Maintains approval by the Administrator to perform specific 
duties of a check flight attendant, as specified in paragraph (b) of 
this section.
    (2) Meets the recent experience requirements of Sec.  121.1307(a) 
to serve as a flight attendant.
    (3) Within the preceding 12 months, has completed recurrent check 
flight attendant training in accordance with Sec.  121.1381(c)(1) and 
(c)(3).
    (4) Within the preceding 12 months, has completed at least one 
operating cycle as a flight attendant or check flight attendant on that 
aircraft type.
    (5) Within the preceding 12 months, supervised aircraft operating 
experience for at least one operating cycle.
    (e) Reestablishing recent experience. If the requirements of 
paragraphs (d)(4) or (d)(5) of this section are not met, the person may 
not serve as a check flight attendant until the person is observed 
supervising aircraft operating experience in the aircraft type for at 
least one cycle by another check flight attendant or an FAA inspector.


Sec.  121.1323  Check flight attendant: Initial cadre.

    (a) A certificate holder may use a person as a check flight 
attendant even though the person does not meet the experience or 
recency requirements of the subpart, if the person meets the initial 
cadre requirements of this section. The FAA will determine the period 
of initial cadre status and may terminate initial cadre status entirely 
or for an individual check flight attendant, if necessary. In no case 
will initial cadre status exceed a period of 24 months.
    (b) To be an initial cadre check flight attendant for a part 119 
certificate holder, and to continue to serve in that capacity for the 
authorized period, a person must meet all of the following 
requirements:
    (1) Be employed by the part 119 certificate holder.
    (2) Have served at least 3 years in the past 6 years as a flight 
attendant on an aircraft of the same group in which the person is to 
perform duties as an initial cadre check flight attendant.
    (3) Have completed the training as specified in Sec.  
121.1301(a)(1) through (6), as appropriate.
    (4) Be approved by the FAA for the specific duties to be performed.
    (c) To be an initial cadre check flight attendant for a part 119 
certificate holder, a person must:
    (1) Meet all of the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section; 
and
    (2) Perform the duties of a check flight attendant for the new part 
119 certificate holder or a certificate holder transitioning to a new 
aircraft type under the observation of an FAA inspector. This 
observation check can be conducted during operations under this part or 
during proving flights conducted under part 91 of this chapter. When an 
observed activity must be made part of a training record, the people 
undergoing the observed activities must be signed off by the FAA 
inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (d) If the certificate holder wants FAA approval for a person to be 
an initial cadre check flight attendant but that person has not met the 
requirements of Sec.  121.1305, he or she can satisfy those 
requirements by meeting the following:
    (1) Being observed by the FAA while supervising other flight 
attendants, while supervising other check flight attendants, or while 
performing the duties of a flight attendant; and

[[Page 1314]]

    (2) During operations conducted under this part or during proving 
flights conducted under part 91 of this chapter.
    (e) Only employees of a part 142 certificate holder, part 119 
certificate holder, or the aircraft manufacturer may administer the 
training and evaluation activities for initial cadre check flight 
attendants, in accordance with the Flight Attendant QPS and as approved 
by the FAA. In addition, current and qualified check flight attendants 
for the part 119 certificate holder that is adding a new aircraft type 
do not need to meet the observation requirements of paragraph (c)(2) of 
this section for the new aircraft type.

General Training Program Requirements


Sec.  121.1331  Training program: General.

    (a) Each certificate holder must establish and maintain a current 
training program for each aircraft type used. Each curriculum in a 
training program must be kept current with respect to any changes in 
the requirements of this chapter or the certificate holder's policies 
and operation. Each certificate holder must obtain initial and final 
approval of its training program, as specified in Sec.  121.1337.
    (b) The training program must contain all of the following:
    (1) The requirements of this subpart.
    (2) The requirements of the crewmember QPS, as applicable.
    (3) The operating procedures for each required task in the 
crewmember's QPS. These operating procedures are contained in the 
information, duties, and responsibilities of crewmembers that are 
contained in the manual required by Sec.  121.133.
    (4) For flight crewmembers, the procedures, limitations, and 
performance information from the Flight Crew Operating Manual required 
by Sec. Sec.  121.133 and 121.135.
    (c) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that its 
crewmembers are adequately trained and crewmember training and 
evaluation is conducted in accordance with the certificate holder's 
approved training program.
    (d) Persons other than employees of the certificate holder may be 
trained by the certificate holder for the purpose of instructing in the 
certificate holder's training program, conducting evaluations in the 
certificate holder's training program, or conducting evaluations of the 
certificate holder's training program.
    (e) A certificate holder's training program must provide the 
following, as applicable:
    (1) Curricula, categories of training, segments of training, 
modules, and lessons applicable for use for the specific certificate 
holder as required by this subpart and approved by the Administrator.
    (2) A sufficient number of academic and job performance 
instructors, trained and qualified in accordance with this subpart, to 
provide the approved training and evaluation.
    (3) A sufficient number of check pilots, check flight engineers and 
check flight attendants, trained and qualified in accordance with this 
subpart, to complete the training and evaluations required by this 
subpart.
    (4) Flight simulation training devices required by this subpart, 
qualified under part 60 of this chapter, and approved for use by the 
Principal Operations Inspector responsible for approving the 
certificate holder's training program. Flight simulation training 
devices must be available in sufficient quantity to conduct the 
training program as approved.
    (5) Training equipment other than flight simulation training 
devices in accordance with Sec.  121.1351. This training equipment must 
be available in sufficient quantity to conduct the training program as 
approved.
    (6) Adequate academic and job performance training facilities.
    (7) Current training materials, examinations, forms, instructions, 
and procedures for use in conducting the training and evaluation 
required by this part with respect to each aircraft type, and if 
applicable, the particular variations within that aircraft type.
    (f) No certificate holder may use a person as a crewmember, unless 
the person responsible for instructing or evaluating an academic 
training subject or job performance training task or environment, has 
certified in writing or electronically that the crewmember is 
knowledgeable and proficient in the specific subject, task, or 
environment.
    (1) The documentation required by this paragraph must be made a 
part of the crewmember's record required by subpart V of this part.
    (i) For flight attendants, the record must show if the individual 
satisfactorily or unsatisfactorily completed each of the training 
categories in Sec.  121.1301, as appropriate.
    (ii) For flight crewmembers, the record must show if the individual 
satisfactorily or unsatisfactorily completed each of the training 
categories in Sec.  121.1221, as appropriate. In addition, the record 
must show if the individual satisfactorily or unsatisfactorily 
completed each of the proficiency tests, proficiency checks, or 
proficiency reviews required by this part. Records of unsatisfactory 
results must include the specific items for which performance was 
unsatisfactory.
    (2) When the record of certification required by this paragraph is 
made by an entry in a computerized recordkeeping system, the identity 
of the certifying instructor, check pilot, check flight engineer, or 
check flight attendant must be recorded, and the record of the 
certification must be completed by a means approved by the 
Administrator.


Sec.  121.1333  Training program: General curriculum by aircraft type.

    (a) Each certificate holder must establish and maintain a current 
written training program curriculum for each aircraft type operated by 
that certificate holder under this part. Curricula must be available 
for each crewmember position required for that aircraft type. Each 
curriculum must include categories of training with segments containing 
the appropriate subjects, tasks, and environments required by this 
subpart and the appropriate QPS. The curriculum will be provided for 
approval in accordance with paragraphs (c)(1) through (c)(7) of this 
section.
    (b) Each training program curriculum must provide training and 
evaluation as necessary to ensure that each crewmember:
    (1) Remains trained and proficient with respect to each aircraft 
type, crewmember position, and type of operation in which the 
crewmember serves.
    (2) Remains trained and proficient in the duties and 
responsibilities for the aircraft type that are contained in the manual 
required by Sec.  121.133 as outlined in Sec.  121.135.
    (3) For each flight crewmember, remains trained and knowledgeable 
in the current operating limitations, procedures, loading, and 
performance sections of the current Flight Crew Operating Manual or any 
FAA approved alternative.
    (4) Qualifies in new equipment, facilities, procedures, and 
techniques, including modifications to aircraft. Pilots must also 
qualify in designated special airports and navigation routes and areas 
as required by Sec.  121.1235.
    (5) Understands the nature and effects of safety hazards, and for 
flight crewmembers, periodic weather extremes and their effect on 
operations.
    (6) Knows and is able to apply, through all phases of flight, crew 
resource management skills identified in the QPS.
    (c) Each training program curriculum must include all of the 
following:

[[Page 1315]]

    (1) A list of academic training and evaluation modules including 
the subjects that are provided.
    (2) A list of all job performance training and evaluation modules 
including the tasks and environments. The list must include the 
level(s) of FSTD in which each job performance task must be performed 
and in which each environment may be encountered, unless the 
certificate holder has been granted a deviation from the FSTD 
requirements of this subpart in accordance with Sec.  121.1345.
    (3) Detailed descriptions or pictorial displays of the approved 
standard operating procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal 
procedures, and emergency procedures that will be performed during job 
performance training and evaluation. For a certificate holder that has 
been granted a deviation under Sec.  121.1345, detailed descriptions or 
pictorial displays of the approved normal, abnormal, and emergency 
maneuvers, procedures, and functions that will be performed during each 
job performance training module or during each proficiency test, check, 
or review, indicating those maneuvers, procedures and functions that 
are to be performed during job performance training and during each 
proficiency test, check, or review.
    (4) An outline of the curriculum that includes academic and job 
performance training and evaluation modules by subject, task, and 
environment, as applicable.
    (5) Differences that relate to the variations of a particular 
aircraft type to be included in all academic and job performance 
training segments for purposes of training and evaluation.
    (6) A list of all the FSTD, and other training and evaluation 
equipment that the certificate holder will use, including approval for 
particular tasks or functions.
    (7) The approved programmed hours for each training segment.
    (8) A copy of each statement issued by the Administrator under 
Sec.  121.1335(c) for reduction of baseline programmed hours.


Sec.  121.1335  Training program: Category of training programmed 
hours.

    (a) Each certificate holder's training program submitted for 
initial approval under this subpart must have at least the programmed 
baseline hours of training as specified in the applicable crewmember 
QPS. Training programmed hours include training and evaluation.
    (1) Academic training hours must be in a classroom provided by the 
certificate holder unless otherwise approved by the Administrator. 
Proposals for a training environment other than a classroom provided by 
the certificate holder must be accompanied by a plan for assessing the 
knowledge and cognitive skill requirements to be supported by the 
proposed alternative environment, and for providing the testing of each 
student to ensure the knowledge and skill requirements are met.
    (2) Programmed hours for flight crewmember job performance training 
are for FSTD lessons for a specific duty position.
    (3) Programmed hours for flight attendant job performance training 
must be completed in an environment that complies with the requirements 
of the Flight Attendant QPS.
    (b) The certificate holder must have programmed hours approved by 
the Principal Operations Inspector. A certificate holder may apply for 
a reduction of training programmed hours based on the factors outlined 
in Sec.  121.1337(f). The Administrator will not approve a reduction of 
programmed hours below the minimum hours set forth in the applicable 
crewmember QPS.
    (c) If approval of a reduction in training programmed hours is 
granted, the Administrator provides the certificate holder with a 
statement of the basis for the approval.
    (d) The Administrator may grant a deviation to certificate holders 
described in Sec.  135.3 (b) and (c) of this chapter to allow reduced 
programmed hours of academic training if the Administrator determines 
that a reduction is warranted based on the certificate holder's 
operations and the complexity of the make, model, and series of the 
aircraft used.
    (e) The certificate holder must have the required programmed hours 
approved by the Principal Operations Inspector for initial, transition, 
and recurrent academic training for flight instructors, check pilots, 
check flight engineers, check flight attendants, flight attendant 
instructors, and persons authorized to conduct flight attendant 
proficiency checks.


Sec.  121.1337  Training program: Approval and amendment process.

    (a) Each training program described in this subpart must be 
approved by the Administrator. To obtain initial or final approval of a 
training program, or to request a revision to an approved training 
program, each certificate holder must provide the Administrator the 
following information in a form acceptable to the Administrator:
    (1) An outline of the proposed program or revision, including an 
outline of the proposed or revised curriculum required in Sec.  
121.1333, that provides all of the information needed for a preliminary 
evaluation of the proposed training program or revised training 
program.
    (2) Curricula, categories of training, and segments of training 
applicable for use by the certificate holder as required by this 
subpart.
    (3) The number of academic and job performance instructors trained 
and qualified in accordance with this subpart to provide the approved 
training and evaluation.
    (4) The number of check pilots, check flight engineers, and check 
flight attendants, trained and qualified in accordance with this 
subpart to conduct the required evaluations.
    (5) A list of the FSTD that are to be used in the training program.
    (6) A list of training equipment, other than FSTD, that is to be 
used in the training program.
    (7) A description of the academic and job performance training 
facilities.
    (8) A synopsis of the materials, examinations, forms, instructions, 
and procedures to be used for the training and evaluation required by 
this subpart with respect to each aircraft type, and if applicable, the 
particular variations within that aircraft type.
    (9) A statement as to whether training will be provided by persons 
other than the part 119 certificate holder's employees in accordance 
with Sec.  121.1339.
    (10) A copy of the Flight Crew Operating Manual and Flight 
Attendant Operating Manual for each aircraft type to be included in the 
training program. The Flight Crew Operating Manual and Flight Attendant 
Operating Manual must be current at the time of submission. Amendments 
must be made as required.
    (11) A copy of the current manual required by Sec.  121.133 as 
outlined in Sec.  121.135.
    (12) Additional relevant information requested by the 
Administrator.
    (b) If the proposed training program or proposed revision complies 
with this subpart, the Administrator grants initial approval in 
writing, after which the certificate holder may conduct the training 
and evaluation in accordance with that program. The Administrator then 
evaluates the effectiveness of the initially approved training program 
and advises the certificate holder of any deficiencies that must be 
corrected.
    (c) A revision to an approved training program may be proposed as a 
special training category that reflects changes to

[[Page 1316]]

the certificate holder's operation, or as a differences training 
category that reflects differences in configuration within an aircraft 
type.
    (1) The proposed special training category will include modules of 
training and evaluation for training segments within existing training 
categories. These modules will be initially approved and evaluated. 
Upon satisfactory evaluation, the special training category modules 
will receive final approval and be integrated into the training 
segments of the existing training categories. Once integrated, it will 
no longer be called a special training category, but will be part of 
the approved training program. The Principal Operations Inspector will 
determine the number of programmed hours.
    (2) The proposed differences training category will include modules 
of training and evaluation for applicable segments of training. These 
modules will be initially approved, evaluated and upon satisfactory 
evaluation, added to the previously approved differences training. The 
Principal Operations Inspector will determine the number of programmed 
hours.
    (d) The Administrator grants final approval of a training program 
if the certificate holder shows that the training and evaluation 
conducted under the initial approval obtained under paragraph (b) of 
this section ensures that each person who completes the training and 
evaluation is adequately trained to perform his or her assigned duties.
    (e) The Administrator may require revisions to an approved training 
program anytime the FAA finds that revisions are necessary in the 
interest of safety or security. If the FAA finds that revisions are 
necessary for the continued adequacy of a training program that has 
been granted initial or final approval, the certificate holder must, 
after notification by the FAA, make all changes in the program that the 
FAA finds necessary.
    (1) Within 30 days after the certificate holder receives a notice 
to revise the program, it may file a petition with the Director of 
Flight Standards to reconsider the notice. The filing of a petition to 
reconsider stays the notice pending a decision by the Director of 
Flight Standards.
    (2) If the FAA finds that there is an emergency that requires 
immediate action in the interest of safety or security, the FAA may, 
upon a statement of the reasons, require a change effective without 
stay.
    (f) The Administrator considers the following factors in approving 
revisions or requiring revisions to a training program:
    (1) The pass and fail rate in the curriculum under consideration.
    (2) The quality and effectiveness of the teaching-learning process 
(e.g., quality of instructors, training equipment, methods, and 
procedures listed in the certificate holder's curriculum required by 
Sec.  121.1333).
    (3) The experience levels of the student population.
    (4) The experience levels of the instructors and check persons.
    (5) The type and scope of operations conducted by the certificate 
holder.
    (6) The complexity of make, model, and series of aircraft used.


Sec.  121.1339  Training program: Special rules.

    A certificate holder may contract with, or otherwise arrange to use 
the services of, another certificate holder certificated under part 119 
of this chapter or a training center certificated under part 142 of 
this chapter as allowed by this subpart if all of the following 
conditions are satisfied:
    (a) The curriculum, categories of training, segments, modules, 
lessons, programmed hours, manuals, and checklists are approved by the 
Administrator of the certificate holder seeking training services in 
accordance with this subpart.
    (b) The facilities, personnel, FSTD, other training equipment, and 
courseware meet the applicable requirements of this subpart.
    (c) The instructors and check persons selected by the certificate 
holder must meet the following criteria:
    (1) Qualified under this subpart.
    (2) Approved by the Administrator for specific training and 
evaluation duties.


Sec.  121.1341  Training program: Administering training, evaluation, 
and operating experience.

    (a) No certificate holder may use a person to administer, nor may 
any person administer, training, evaluation, or operating experience, 
except:
    (1) In accordance with this section; or
    (2) If applicable, as provided in the initial cadre requirements of 
Sec. Sec.  121.1257 and 121.1323.
    (b) Persons who administer academic or job performance training 
must be knowledgeable in the facilities, equipment, and procedures.
    (c) Persons who administer academic training, job performance 
training, or evaluation must use only the equipment and the facilities 
that are specifically approved for the certificate holder's training 
program.
    (d) Training and evaluation for crewmembers must be administered as 
follows:
    (1) In accordance with this subpart, including the appropriate QPS.
    (2) In accordance with the approved training program.
    (e) Operating experience for crewmembers and observation of check 
pilots, check flight engineers, check flight attendants, and aircrew 
program designees must be administered as follows:
    (1) In accordance with this subpart, including the appropriate QPS.
    (2) In accordance with the approved training program.
    (f) Training and evaluation activities must be administered by the 
persons listed in the appropriate QPS.
    (g) For flight crewmembers, the certificate holder must maintain a 
record of failures of proficiency tests, proficiency checks, and 
proficiency reviews. This record must be maintained for a period of 2 
years.
    (h) Credit will not be given for any training, evaluation, 
observation, or supervision activities when the certificate holder--
    (1) Uses facilities, equipment, and materials that are not 
specifically approved for that activity as part of the certificate 
holder's approved training program; or
    (2) Uses persons to administer the activity who are not authorized 
in accordance with the applicable crewmember QPS or who do not meet the 
requirements of this subpart.
    (i) A person will not be given credit for completing a proficiency 
test or proficiency check if the person did not complete all required 
portions of the training curriculum before taking the proficiency test 
or proficiency check.


Sec.  121.1343  Training program: Knowledge and comprehension 
assessment.

    (a) The certificate holder must develop a knowledge and 
comprehension assessment program that is approved by the Administrator 
as part of the approved training program. The knowledge and 
comprehension assessment program must include development and 
maintenance of the examination, methods to establish the validity of 
the examination, required student remediation, and adjustment of 
instruction when required.
    (b) The QPS provides job tasks and related areas of required 
instruction. Each area of instruction is provided with subjects that 
must be trained and evaluated. A knowledge and comprehension assessment 
examination must include the minimum number of questions indicated in 
the QPS for each

[[Page 1317]]

subject. Students must achieve a performance of 100% in each area of 
instruction. Student performance of at least 80% in an area of 
instruction must be corrected to 100%, but the student is not required 
to undergo retraining and reevaluation. Student performance below 80% 
in an area of instruction must be corrected to 100% after the student 
is retrained and reevaluated in each area of instruction where the 
student missed one or more questions.
    (c) An examination question repository must be developed to include 
a minimum number of questions for each subject, as required by the QPS.
    (d) The certificate holder must use the repository to create tests 
that allow random selection of questions from which alternative 
examinations will be created.
    (e) The certificate holder must ensure that each student receives a 
different test each time the student is tested on an area of 
instruction.


Sec.  121.1345  Training program: Mandatory use of flight simulation 
training devices.

    (a) All flight training and evaluation must be completed in FSTD 
approved by the Administrator in accordance with the applicable Pilot 
or Flight Engineer QPS. No credit will be given in the QPS for training 
and evaluation conducted in an aircraft.
    (b) A certificate holder may request a deviation from paragraph (a) 
of this section to conduct training and evaluation activities in an 
aircraft only if one of the following applies:
    (1) The certificate holder has an approved program or has submitted 
a training program for review and approval prior to [date 120 days 
after publication of final rule]. The certificate holder must request 
the deviation no later than [date 40 months after the publication date 
of the final rule].
    (2) The certificate holder requests the deviation as part of a 
request for approval of an initial cadre program. If approved, the 
deviation will become effective at the same time as the initial cadre 
program.
    (c) Deviation requests must be submitted to the FAA for review and 
approval, and must include:
    (1) The number of FSTD training hours the certificate holder's 
flight crewmembers would need to meet the training requirements in this 
part.
    (2) An FSTD availability assessment, including hours by specific 
FSTD and location of the FSTD.
    (3) An FSTD shortfall analysis that includes the tasks and 
environments that cannot be completed in an FSTD qualified at the level 
specified in the applicable QPS.
    (4) Proposed alternative means to address the shortfall in task and 
environment training and evaluation. The requester must identify the 
tasks and environments the requester believes:
    (i) Can be completed in an FSTD qualified at a lower level than 
that specified in the applicable QPS.
    (ii) Can be completed in the aircraft.
    (5) An alternative training program for using the airplane instead 
of an FSTD or using an airplane in combination with an FSTD, including 
methods of achieving an acceptable level of safety.
    (d) A certificate holder may request an extension of a deviation 
issued under this section.
    (e) Deviations or extensions to deviations will be issued for a 
period not to exceed 12 months.


Sec.  121.1347  Training program: Qualification and approval of flight 
simulation training devices.

    (a) Each aircraft flight simulation training device used in an 
approved training program required under this part must be evaluated, 
qualified, and maintained in accordance with part 60 of this chapter 
and approved by the Administrator for training or evaluating tasks 
required by the applicable QPS.
    (b) The qualification level of the FSTD required to be used by an 
applicant to demonstrate flight crewmember task proficiency is 
specified in the applicable QPS.
    (c) The level of FSTD that may be used for initial training and 
evaluation is dependent on the pilot's experience requirements as 
specified in the Pilot QPS.


Sec.  121.1349  Training program: Limitations on the use of flight 
simulation training devices.

    (a) An FSTD may not be used for credit for the following:
    (1) The pilot-in-command line check required by Sec.  121.1233.
    (2) Exterior preflight checks.
    (3) The pilot and flight engineer operating experience required by 
Sec.  121.1225.
    (4) Consolidation required by Sec.  121.1227.
    (b) To receive credit for training and evaluation of required tasks 
and LOFT, the flight crewmember must complete these activities in FSTD 
that are approved for those tasks and LOFT as part of the certificate 
holder's training program.


Sec.  121.1351  Training program: Training equipment other than flight 
simulation training devices.

    Training equipment, other than FSTD qualified under part 60 of this 
chapter, used in an approved training program required under this part 
must be approved and used in accordance with the following:
    (a) The FAA must approve training equipment used to functionally 
replicate aircraft equipment or furnishings for the certificate holder 
and the crewmember duty or procedure involved.
    (b) The certificate holder must demonstrate that the training 
equipment meets all of the following:
    (1) The form, fit, function, and weight, as appropriate, of the 
equipment as installed in the aircraft, including all equipment and 
furnishings that may affect the operation of that equipment.
    (2) Normal operation (and abnormal and emergency operation, if 
appropriate) including the following:
    (i) The required force and travel of the equipment.
    (ii) Variations in equipment operated by the certificate holder, if 
applicable.
    (3) Operation of the equipment under adverse conditions, if 
appropriate.
    (c) Training equipment must be modified to ensure that it maintains 
the performance and function of the aircraft type or aircraft equipment 
replicated.
    (d) All training equipment must have a discrepancy log in close 
proximity. The discrepancy log must be readily available for review by 
each instructor or check person prior to conducting training or 
evaluation with that equipment.
    (1) Each instructor or check person conducting training or 
evaluation, and each person conducting an inspection of the equipment 
who discovers a discrepancy, including any missing, malfunctioning, or 
inoperative components, must write or cause to be written a description 
of that discrepancy into the discrepancy log at the end of the 
inspection or the training session.
    (2) All corrections to discrepancies must be recorded when the 
corrections are made, and the dates of the discrepancies and 
corrections must be recorded.
    (3) A discrepancy log must be maintained for at least 60 days.
    (e) No person may use, allow the use of, or offer the use of 
training equipment with a missing, malfunctioning, or inoperative 
component to meet the crewmember training or evaluation requirements of 
this chapter for tasks that require the use of the correctly operating 
component.


Sec.  121.1353  Training program: Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) 
and Flight Simulation Training Device (FSTD) Course of Instruction.

    (a) Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT). Qualification and 
recurrent

[[Page 1318]]

LOFT must meet the following requirements:
    (1) The LOFT must be administered by a pilot flight instructor or a 
check pilot qualified in accordance with this subpart. A flight 
engineer flight instructor or a check flight engineer may assist the 
pilot flight instructor or check pilot.
    (2) LOFT must be accomplished in an FFS that is qualified in 
accordance with part 60 of this chapter and that has the qualification 
level specified in the applicable QPS.
    (3) Each LOFT must include at least two operating cycles. Each 
cycle must be representative of the certificate holder's operation.
    (4) LOFT must be conducted with a complete flight crew, with each 
duty position filled by a person who is qualified or in student status 
to serve in that duty position.
    (5) LOFT must be conducted as a line operation without interruption 
by the instructor during the session, except for a non-disruptive 
acceleration of uneventful en route segments.
    (6) Any person serving in a flight crewmember position during a 
LOFT who does not perform satisfactorily, may not serve as a required 
crewmember in operations under this part without receiving training to 
correct the deficiencies and demonstrating that the deficiencies have 
been corrected. The training must occur during a separate training 
session.
    (7) The LOFT must include at least 4 hours of training. For pilots, 
2 hours of the training must be with the pilot flying and 2 hours of 
the training must be with the pilot monitoring, plus briefing(s) before 
or after the training.
    (b) Flight Simulation Training Device (FSTD) Course of Instruction.
    (1) An FSTD course of instruction must be administered by a pilot 
flight instructor or a check pilot qualified in accordance with this 
subpart. A flight engineer flight instructor or a check flight engineer 
may assist the pilot flight instructor or check pilot.
    (2) An FSTD course of instruction must be accomplished in an FFS or 
FTD that is qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter and 
that has the qualification level specified in the applicable QPS.
    (3) An FSTD course of instruction must be conducted with a complete 
flight crew, with each duty position filled by a person who is 
qualified or in student status to serve in that duty position.
    (4) Any person serving in a flight crewmember position during an 
FSTD course of instruction who does not perform satisfactorily, may not 
serve as a required crewmember in operations under this part without 
receiving training to correct the deficiencies and demonstrating that 
the deficiencies have been corrected. The training must occur during a 
separate training session.
    (5) An FSTD course of instruction must provide an opportunity to 
practice the tasks and operate in the environments addressed in the 
pilot QPS, and to demonstrate or practice tasks identified as areas of 
concern related to fleet operations, route structure, environmental 
conditions, aircraft type operations, or other circumstances.
    (6) An FSTD course of instruction must include at least 4 hours of 
training. For pilots, 2 hours of the training must be with the pilot 
flying and 2 hours of the training must be with the pilot monitoring, 
plus briefing(s) before or after the training.


Sec.  121.1355  Training program: Continuous analysis process.

    (a) Each certificate holder must establish and maintain a process 
for the continuous analysis of the performance and effectiveness of its 
training program and operation that will allow the certificate holder 
the ability to evaluate the effectiveness of the training program. This 
process must:
    (1) Incorporate procedures to ensure that the training program and 
the standards of qualification for each duty position are documented, 
and provide a means for updating as changes are required.
    (2) Provide for the review of training program content, 
application, and results through semiannual standardization meetings 
for each aircraft type.
    (3) Continually measure and monitor the outcome of the training 
program in terms of crewmember's performance and qualification, and 
provide a means to identify and correct deficiencies in the crewmember 
performance and qualification and in the training program and 
operation. Procedures must include correction of deficiencies by the 
certificate holder(s) or by persons providing training and evaluation 
in the certificate holder's training program and operation.
    (b) The FAA will notify the certificate holder in writing when it 
finds that the continuous analysis process described in paragraph (a) 
of this section does not contain adequate procedures and standards to 
meet the requirements of this section. The certificate holder must make 
any changes that are necessary to meet the requirements of this 
section.
    (c) A certificate holder may petition the FAA to reconsider the 
notice to make a change to the continuous analysis process. The 
petition must be filed with the FAA certificate holding district office 
charged with the overall inspection of the certificate holder's 
operations within 30 days after the certificate holder receives the 
notice. Except in the case of an emergency requiring immediate action 
in the interest of safety, the filing of the petition stays the notice 
pending a decision by the FAA.

Training Category Requirements


Sec.  121.1361  Training category requirements: Standards used in 
academic and job performance training segments.

    The certificate holder must include the training, evaluation, and 
qualification requirements set forth in the applicable QPS for academic 
and job performance training segments.


Sec.  121.1363  Training category requirements: Crewmember new hire.

    (a) Each training program must include new hire training for all of 
the following:
    (1) Each person who is qualifying for the first time as a pilot or 
flight engineer for the certificate holder.
    (2) Each person who is qualifying for the first time as flight 
attendant for the certificate holder.
    (3) Each person who is required to complete Flight Attendant Phase 
III Requalification training in accordance with Sec.  121.1309(c) and 
the Flight Attendant QPS.
    (b) The content of the new hire training category must include the 
following:
    (1) The subjects required in the applicable QPS.
    (2) A knowledge and comprehension assessment of the new hire 
training subjects administered in accordance with the applicable QPS.


Sec.  121.1365  Training category requirements: Pilot and flight 
engineer initial, conversion, transition, and upgrade, academic and job 
performance training.

    (a) Academic training. Initial, conversion, transition, and upgrade 
academic training segments for flight crewmember must include training 
in all of the subjects specified in the applicable QPS for a flight 
crewmember's assigned duties.
    (b) Job performance training. Initial, conversion, transition, and 
upgrade job performance training segments for pilots and flight 
engineers must include all of the following:
    (1) Training and evaluation in the tasks and environments set forth 
in the applicable QPS. Following training, the pilot or flight engineer 
must

[[Page 1319]]

demonstrate the knowledge and skills required for the aircraft type and 
duty position. The demonstration must be accomplished by a proficiency 
test that also may be used for airman certification or type rating. 
This proficiency test must be conducted by a check pilot, a check 
flight engineer, a pilot APD, or a flight engineer APD, as appropriate, 
who is an employee of the certificate holder and who is a line 
qualified pilot or line qualified flight engineer, as appropriate, for 
the certificate holder.
    (2) Qualification LOFT is conducted after a person completes the 
proficiency test at the end of initial, conversion, transition, or 
upgrade training. Qualification LOFT must meet the requirements of 
Sec.  121.1353 and must contain at least two operating cycles with 
routes and airports approved by the Principal Operations Inspector. 
These cycles must meet the following requirements:
    (i) One cycle contains normal line operations and the other cycle 
contains abnormal, non-normal, and emergency flight operations.
    (ii) The pilot in command and second in command share pilot flying 
and pilot monitoring duties during each cycle.
    (c) A pilot or flight engineer is qualified after completing the 
proficiency test prescribed in paragraph (b)(1) of this section and the 
Qualification LOFT.


Sec.  121.1367  Training category requirements: Pilot and flight 
engineer recurrent academic, recurrent job performance, and recurrent 
aircraft emergency equipment training.

    (a) Each recurrent academic training module must include:
    (1) Training in the subjects prescribed in the applicable QPS for 
the training category last completed.
    (2) A knowledge and comprehension assessment of the flight 
crewmember's knowledge of the subjects in which training has occurred.
    (b) Each recurrent job performance training module must include at 
least 8 hours for pilots, and at least 4 hours for flight engineers, of 
job performance training in the tasks and environments, and at the 
intervals specified in the applicable QPS. The FSTD used must be 
qualified in accordance with part 60 of this chapter and approved at 
the level required by the applicable QPS. This job performance training 
must:
    (1) Include a recurrent LOFT or an FSTD course of instruction as 
prescribed in Sec.  121.1353 addressing the applicable tasks and 
environments in accordance with the applicable QPS. The first recurrent 
job performance training module following the proficiency test required 
by Sec.  121.1365(b)(1) must include a recurrent LOFT. Subsequent 9-
month recurrent job performance training modules may include either a 
recurrent LOFT or an FSTD course of instruction. After the second 
recurrent job performance training module, neither the recurrent LOFT 
nor the FSTD course of instruction may be repeated in 2 successive 9-
month recurrent job performance training modules.
    (2) Include a proficiency test, a proficiency check, or a 
proficiency review addressing the applicable tasks and environments in 
accordance with the applicable QPS. The first recurrent job performance 
training module following the proficiency test required by Sec.  
121.1365(b)(1) must include a proficiency test. Subsequent 9-month 
recurrent job performance training modules may include a proficiency 
test, a proficiency check, or a proficiency review. After the second 
job performance training module, a proficiency review may not be 
repeated in 2 successive 9-month recurrent job performance training 
modules.
    (3) Be conducted with a complete flight crew. Each person assigned 
a duty position in the FSTD must be qualified to serve in that duty 
position in the aircraft.
    (c) Each recurrent aircraft emergency equipment training drill must 
be completed once every 36 months.


Sec.  121.1369  Training category requirements: Flight attendant 
initial and transition training.

    Initial and transition training for flight attendants must include 
all of the following:
    (a) Training in the subjects and tasks specified in the Flight 
Attendant QPS.
    (b) A test of the flight attendant's knowledge with respect to the 
aircraft and crewmember duty position.
    (c) Practice in the performance of specific tasks in accordance 
with the Flight Attendant QPS to determine ability to perform assigned 
duties and responsibilities for each aircraft type on which the flight 
attendant is to serve.
    (d) For newly hired flight attendants, the initial training 
required by this section may not begin until the new hire training 
required by Sec.  121.1363 is complete.


Sec.  121.1371  Training category requirements: Flight attendant 
eligibility for transition training.

    No person is eligible for flight attendant transition training 
unless that person has been qualified for at least 180 days and served 
in the previous 180 days on an aircraft as a flight attendant for that 
certificate holder.


Sec.  121. 1373  Training category requirements: Flight attendant 
emergency training.

    Each emergency training program given after new hire training and 
initial training must include the following:
    (a) The emergency training requirements as specified in the Flight 
Attendant QPS with respect to each aircraft type, model, and 
configuration, and each kind of operation conducted by the certificate 
holder.
    (b) A test of the flight attendant's knowledge with respect to the 
aircraft type and crewmember duty position involved.
    (c) Completion of proficiency tests to determine the flight 
attendant's ability to perform assigned duties and responsibilities for 
each aircraft type on which the flight attendant is to serve.


Sec.  121.1375  Training category requirements: Flight attendant 
recurrent training.

    Recurrent training for flight attendants must include the 
following:
    (a) Training in the subjects and tasks specified in the Flight 
Attendant QPS.
    (b) A test of the flight attendant's knowledge with respect to the 
aircraft type and crewmember duty position involved.
    (c) Completion of proficiency tests in accordance with the Flight 
Attendant QPS to determine the flight attendant's ability to perform 
assigned duties and responsibilities for each aircraft type on which 
the flight attendant is to serve.


Sec.  121.1377  Training category requirements: Flight instructor 
initial, transition, and recurrent academic training.

    (a) Initial flight instructor academic training. A 4-hour block of 
instruction that includes the following:
    (1) Training policies and procedures.
    (2) Flight instructor duties, functions, and responsibilities.
    (3) Appropriate provisions of the regulations of this chapter and 
the certificate holder's policies and procedures.
    (4) The appropriate methods, procedures, and techniques for 
conducting flight instruction.
    (5) Proper evaluation of student performance including the 
detection of the following:
    (i) Improper or insufficient training.
    (ii) Student behaviors that could adversely affect safety.
    (6) The corrective action in the case of unsatisfactory training 
progress.
    (7) The approved methods, procedures, and limitations for 
instructing in the required standard

[[Page 1320]]

operating procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal procedures, and 
emergency procedures applicable to the aircraft.
    (8) Except for holders of a flight instructor certificate, the 
following:
    (i) The fundamental principles of the teaching-learning process.
    (ii) Teaching methods and procedures.
    (iii) The instructor-student relationship.
    (9) Use of FSTD for training and evaluation.
    (i) Operation of FSTD controls.
    (ii) FSTD limitations.
    (iii) Minimum FSTD equipment required for each task and 
environment.
    (b) Transition flight instructor academic training. Transition 
academic training for flight instructors must include the approved 
methods, procedures, and limitations for instructing in the required 
standard operating procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal 
procedures, and emergency procedures applicable to the aircraft to 
which the flight instructor is transitioning.
    (c) Recurrent flight instructor academic training. The recurrent 
flight instructor academic training must be a 4-hour block of 
instruction completed every 18 months and must include the following:
    (1) The subjects required in paragraph (a) of this section, if 
applicable.
    (2) FSTD operations, limitations, and minimum required equipment.
    (3) Changes in crewmember qualification curricula.


Sec.  121.1379  Training category requirements: Flight instructor 
initial and transition job performance training.

    Initial and transition job performance training for flight 
instructors must include training to ensure competence in conducting 
flight instruction as required by this part and the applicable QPS.
    (a) For pilot flight instructors, the methods for conducting the 
required training from either pilot seat and the instructor's operating 
station (IOS), as well as the operation of the FSTD from the IOS or 
either pilot seat if the FSTD is so equipped.
    (b) For flight engineer flight instructors, the methods for 
conducting the required training from the IOS, as well as the operation 
of the FSTD from the IOS.


Sec.  121.1381  Training category requirements: Check pilot, check 
flight engineer, or check flight attendant initial, transition, and 
recurrent academic training.

    (a) The initial academic training for check pilots, check flight 
engineers, or check flight attendants must include the following:
    (1) Evaluation policies and procedures.
    (2) Check pilot, check flight engineer, or check flight attendant 
duties, functions, and responsibilities, as applicable.
    (3) The applicable regulations of this chapter and the certificate 
holder's policies and procedures.
    (4) The appropriate methods, procedures, and techniques for 
conducting the required evaluations.
    (5) Proper evaluation of student performance including the 
detection of:
    (i) Improper or insufficient training; and
    (ii) Student behaviors that could adversely affect safety.
    (6) The appropriate action in the case of unsatisfactory 
performance.
    (7) The approved methods, procedures, and limitations for 
performing the required standard operating procedures, abnormal 
procedures, non-normal procedures, and emergency procedures applicable 
to the aircraft type.
    (8) FSTD and other training equipment, as applicable, operations, 
limitations, and minimum equipment required for tasks and environments.
    (b) The transition academic training for check pilots, check flight 
engineers, or check flight attendants must include approved methods, 
procedures, and limitations for performing the required standard 
operating procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal procedures, and 
emergency procedures applicable to the aircraft type to which the check 
person is transitioning.
    (c) The recurrent academic training for check pilots and check 
flight engineers must be completed every 18 months. The recurrent 
academic training for check flight attendants must be completed every 
12 months. The recurrent academic training for check pilots, check 
flight engineers, and check flight attendants must include the 
following:
    (1) The subjects required in paragraph (a) of this section, as 
applicable.
    (2) FSTD and other training equipment, as applicable, operations, 
limitations, and minimum equipment required for tasks and environments.
    (3) Changes in crewmember qualification curricula.


Sec.  121.1383  Training category requirements: Check pilot and check 
flight engineer initial, transition, and recurrent job performance 
training.

    Initial, transition, and recurrent job performance training for 
check pilots and check flight engineers must include the following:
    (a) Training to ensure competence in conducting job performance 
evaluation in each of the tasks specified in the applicable QPS.
    (b) Each check pilot must have completed the following:
    (1) The requirements for qualification and training for flight 
instructors described in Sec.  121.1379(a).
    (2) Training on the methods for conducting required evaluations in 
an FSTD, including conducting the evaluation from either pilot seat and 
from the IOS, as well as operation of the FSTD from the IOS or either 
pilot seat if the FSTD is so equipped.
    (c) Check pilots authorized to conduct operating experience or line 
checks, must do the following in an FSTD:
    (1) Learn the safety measures to be taken from either pilot seat 
for emergency situations that are likely to develop during flight 
operations.
    (2) Learn the potential consequences of improper, untimely or 
unexecuted safety measures during flight operations.
    (3) Complete the seat dependent task training described in the QPS.
    (d) Each check flight engineer must have been trained on the 
methods for conducting the flight engineer evaluation described in 
paragraph (a) of this section in an FSTD from either the IOS or a 
flight engineer operating station if the FSTD is so equipped.


Sec.  121.1385  Qualification requirements: Check pilots authorized to 
conduct line checks.

    Prior to authorizing a person to become a check pilot authorized to 
conduct line checks from one of the pilot operating seats, the person 
must, initially, and thereafter once each 24 months, complete the 
following qualification requirements:
    (a) At least two operating cycles in the aircraft during line 
operations, one operating cycle in each pilot seat, under the 
supervision of a check pilot authorized to conduct operating experience 
and line checks, who must occupy the opposite pilot seat.
    (b) At least one operating cycle in the aircraft during line 
operations under the supervision of an FAA inspector or an APD 
designated to conduct the observation of a check pilot conducting PIC 
line checks.


Sec.  121.1387  Training category requirements: Initial, transition, 
and recurrent academic training for persons authorized to administer 
flight attendant proficiency tests.

    (a) Initial academic training instruction for persons authorized to 
administer flight attendant proficiency tests must include the 
following:
    (1) Training policies and procedures.

[[Page 1321]]

    (2) Duties, functions, and responsibilities of persons authorized 
to administer flight attendant proficiency tests.
    (3) The applicable regulations of this chapter and the certificate 
holder's policies and procedures.
    (4) The appropriate methods, procedures, and techniques for 
conducting the required checks.
    (5) Proper evaluation of student performance including the 
detection of--
    (i) Improper and insufficient training; and
    (ii) Student behaviors that could adversely affect safety.
    (6) The appropriate corrective action in the case of unsatisfactory 
tests.
    (7) The approved methods, procedures, and limitations for 
instructing and evaluating in the required normal, abnormal, and 
emergency procedures applicable to the aircraft.
    (8) Simulator and trainer operations, limitations, and minimum 
required equipment, as appropriate.
    (b) Transition academic training instruction for persons authorized 
to administer flight attendant proficiency tests must include approved 
methods, procedures, and limitations for evaluating the required 
normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures applicable to the aircraft 
to which the person authorized to conduct proficiency tests is in 
transition.
    (c) The recurrent academic training for persons authorized to 
administer proficiency tests must be completed every 12 months. 
Recurrent academic training instruction for persons authorized to 
administer proficiency tests must include the following:
    (1) The subjects, as necessary, required in paragraph (a) of this 
section.
    (2) Simulator and trainer operations, limitations, and minimum 
required equipment, as appropriate.
    (3) Changes in crewmember qualification curricula.

Other Training Requirements


Sec.  121.1391  Differences training and evaluation.

    (a) A difference category of training must be included in each 
curriculum when the Administrator finds that differences between 
aircraft of the same type operated by the certificate holder 
necessitate additional training, evaluation, or both to ensure that 
each crewmember is adequately trained to perform their assigned duties.
    (b) A certificate holder must consider the differences between two 
or more aircraft of the same type and report such differences to the 
Administrator with recommendations for the training needed to provide 
for these differences.
    (c) Differences training and evaluation for all variations of a 
particular aircraft type must be included in paragraph (c)(1) or (c)(2) 
of this section as follows:
    (1) Initial, transition, conversion, upgrade, and recurrent 
training categories for the aircraft, and flight attendant emergency 
training curricula for the aircraft if applicable.
    (2) Academic and job performance training segments as required for 
each differences training category.
    (d) Differences training and evaluation for crewmembers must 
consist of at least the following as applicable to their assigned 
duties and responsibilities:
    (1) Each appropriate subject or task required for the academic 
training segment for the aircraft unless the Administrator finds that 
particular subjects are not necessary.
    (2) Each appropriate maneuver or procedure required for the job 
performance training segment for the aircraft unless the Administrator 
finds that particular maneuvers or procedures are not necessary.
    (3) The number of programmed hours of academic and job performance 
training and evaluation determined by the Administrator to be necessary 
for the aircraft, the operation, and the duty position. The programmed 
hours required for differences training and evaluation are in addition 
to other required programmed hours.
    29. Add subpart CC of part 121 to read as follows:
Subpart CC--Aircraft Dispatcher Qualifications

General

Sec.
121.1401 Applicability.
121.1402 Interim requirements for training programs transitioning 
from the requirements of subparts N and O.
121.1403 Certificate holder responsibility for compliance with this 
subpart.
121.1405 Definitions.
121.1407 English language requirement.
121.1409 Acceptable time for completing recurrent requirements.

Qualification

121.1411 Aircraft dispatcher: Employment and certificate.
121.1413 Aircraft dispatcher: Training and evaluation.
121.1415 Aircraft dispatcher: Operating familiarization.
121.1417 Aircraft dispatcher: Supervised operating experience.
121.1419 Aircraft dispatcher: Requalification.
121.1421 Dispatcher instructor and check dispatcher: Eligibility, 
training, and evaluation.
121.1423 Dispatch program designee: Eligibility and qualification.
121.1425 Check dispatcher: Initial cadre.

General Training Program Requirements

121.1431 Training program: General.
121.1433 Training program: General curriculum by aircraft type and 
operation.
121.1435 Training program: Curriculum programmed hours.
121.1437 Training program: Approval and amendment process.
121.1439 Training program: Administering training and evaluation.
121.1441 Training program: Continuous analysis process.

Training Category Requirements

121.1451 Training category requirements: Standards used in aircraft 
dispatcher training.
121.1453 Training category requirements: Aircraft dispatcher 
initial, combined certification and initial, and transition 
training.
121.1455 Training category requirements: Aircraft dispatcher 
recurrent training.
121.1457 Training category requirements: Dispatcher instructor 
initial and recurrent training.
121.1459 Training category requirements: Check dispatcher initial 
and recurrent training.

Other Training Requirements

121.1471 Differences training and evaluation.

Subpart CC--Aircraft Dispatcher Qualifications

General


Sec.  121.1401  Applicability.

    (a) This subpart provides the following:
    (1) Qualification requirements for aircraft dispatchers for 
certificate holders conducting domestic or flag operations.
    (2) Requirements applicable to each certificate holder for 
establishing, obtaining approval of, and maintaining a training program 
to qualify certificated aircraft dispatchers and an optional program to 
certificate aircraft dispatcher candidates.
    (b) Any person qualified in a duty position for the certificate 
holder before [date 120 days after publication of the final rule] or 
under the provisions of subparts N and O of this part in effect on or 
before [date 119 days after publication of the final rule] may continue 
to serve in that duty position for that certificate holder without 
complying with initial training under Sec.  121.1453.

[[Page 1322]]

Sec.  121.1402  Interim requirements for training programs 
transitioning from the requirements of subparts N and O.

    (a) Contrary provisions of this subpart notwithstanding, a person 
who has submitted a training program for approval before [date 120 days 
after publication of the final rule] that was constructed in accordance 
with the applicable provisions of subparts N and P of this part in 
effect on or before [date 119 days after publication of the final 
rule], may complete the approval and implementation process and conduct 
operations in compliance with the applicable provisions of subparts N 
and P of this part instead of the provisions of this subpart.
    (b) A certificate holder must submit a transition plan to the FAA 
no later than [date 4 years and 120 days after publication of the final 
rule]. The transition plan must include the following:
    (1) Subpart CC training program(s), as applicable;
    (2) Plan for transition for crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers 
from the applicable provisions of subparts N and P of this part to the 
provisions of this subpart; and
    (3) A transition completion date that is before [date 5 years and 
120 days after the publication of the final rule].
    (c) During the transition, the certificate holder may use people to 
conduct operations under this part provided those people are trained 
under the applicable provisions of subparts N and P of this part, or 
this subpart. While a certificate holder may simultaneously operate 
training programs in compliance with the applicable provisions of 
subparts N and P of this part and this subpart, each aircraft 
dispatcher must be trained and qualified.
    (d) A certificate holder may not use an aircraft dispatcher, nor 
may an aircraft dispatcher serve, in a duty position unless that person 
is current and qualified to perform the duties to which he or she is 
assigned. If more than one aircraft dispatcher is required for an 
operation, and one aircraft dispatcher is current and qualified in 
accordance with the applicable provisions of subparts N and P of this 
part, and the other aircraft dispatcher is current and qualified in 
accordance with this subpart, then the lesser operating requirements 
apply for that operation.


Sec.  121.1403  Certificate holder responsibility for compliance with 
this subpart.

    (a) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that its 
approved training program, including all portions of the training 
program that are conducted by individuals other than employees of the 
part 119 certificate holder, meets the requirements of this subpart.
    (b) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that all 
procedures, manuals, and other materials submitted to obtain initial or 
final approval of a training program are kept up to date and followed.


Sec.  121.1405  Definitions.

    For the purpose of this subpart, the following terms and their 
definitions apply:
    Base month. The month in which a recurrent activity is due.
    Categories of training or training categories. Within a curriculum, 
categories of training relate to aircraft dispatcher certification 
requirements, first time qualification for a certificate holder, 
configuration differences within aircraft type or series, maintaining 
and regaining qualification, and to changes in operations. Categories 
include: initial, combined certification and initial, recurrent, 
requalification, transition, special, and differences.
    (1) Initial training. A category of training that must be 
successfully completed to qualify an aircraft dispatcher to serve as an 
aircraft dispatcher for a certificate holder in operations under this 
part.
    (2) Combined Certification and Initial training. An optional 
category specifically approved under part 121 that integrates an 
approved certificate holder's initial training category with part 65 
requirements. The category allows for both the issuance of an aircraft 
dispatcher certificate and qualification of the individual to serve as 
an aircraft dispatcher for the certificate holder. The aircraft 
dispatcher's certificate is issued under 14 CFR part 65, not part 121.
    (3) Recurrent training. A category of training that must be 
successfully completed within the eligibility period to maintain 
aircraft dispatcher qualification.
    (4) Requalification training. A category of training that must be 
successfully completed to restore qualified status to an aircraft 
dispatcher previously qualified for the certificate holder when 
qualification is lost due to failure to meet recurrent training 
requirements.
    (5) Transition training. A category of training to be completed by 
an aircraft dispatcher who is presently qualified on an aircraft type 
in operations under this part for the certificate holder to allow that 
aircraft dispatcher to serve as an aircraft dispatcher for a different 
aircraft type.
    (6) Special training. A category of training necessary to address 
changes to the certificate holder's operations or to correct 
deficiencies identified by the certificate holder's continuous analysis 
process. Special training is temporary and is integrated into the 
approved training program.
    (7) Differences training. A category of training on a particular 
aircraft type and operation when the Administrator finds additional 
training is necessary before that aircraft dispatcher serves in the 
same capacity on a particular variation within a series of an aircraft 
type or a different series within an aircraft type.
    Certificate holder. A person certificated under part 119 of this 
chapter that conducts operations under part 121.
    Combined certification and initial training. See definition of 
Category of Training.
    Current. Current means satisfying the initial training and 
evaluation requirements prescribed in Sec.  121.1453 or the recurrent 
training and evaluation requirements prescribed in Sec.  121.1455, as 
applicable.
    Curriculum. A curriculum is the training agenda to qualify a person 
for an aircraft dispatcher duty position or a training or evaluation 
duty position for an aircraft type or operation. The curriculum for 
each duty position includes categories of training.
    Differences training. See definition of Category of Training.
    Duty Position. A duty position is the position held by an Aircraft 
Dispatcher that requires unique qualification and currency requirements 
to serve in operations under this part. The term duty position includes 
the variations within a position, such as check dispatcher, dispatcher 
instructor, or dispatch program designee.
    Eligibility Period. The eligibility period consists of the month in 
which the recurrent activity is due (the ``base month''), the month 
before and the month after (the ``grace month'').
    Environment. A combination of external, physical, and surrounding 
conditions that affect aircraft performance, aircraft and equipment 
operation, and decisionmaking.
    Evaluation. Any testing, checking, or observation activities in 
which a person's skills and knowledge are assessed by a person 
authorized to perform that evaluation.
    Initial Cadre. The specific persons approved by the FAA for the 
time frame necessary, not to exceed 24 months, for a new part 119 
certificate holder to initiate operations under part 119, or for a 
current part 119 certificate holder to initiate operations of a new 
aircraft type

[[Page 1323]]

not operated previously or to initiate a new type of operation.
    Initial training. See definition of Category of Training.
    Module. Modules of instruction are subsets of a training segment 
that include major subject areas for training and evaluation.
    Month. Calendar month.
    Practical test: The final test required for certification of a 
person as an aircraft dispatcher.
    Proficiency: Demonstrated awareness of existing circumstances, 
competence in the necessary knowledge and skills, and performance of 
the relevant task within the operating range of environments to the 
established standards of performance identified and required by the 
Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    Proficiency check. An assessment of dispatcher proficiency during 
which limited training or practice is allowed. The assessment is of 
knowledge and skill in tasks to the standards identified and required 
by the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    Proficiency test. An assessment of dispatcher proficiency during 
which additional training or practice is not allowed. The assessment is 
of knowledge and skill in tasks to the standards identified and 
required by the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    Programmed hours. The required number of hours (baseline and 
minimum) set forth in this subpart for categories of training 
identified and required by the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    Qualification Performance Standards (QPS). FAA standards providing 
all of the tasks, areas of instruction, and evaluation, including 
activities, procedures, and knowledge needed to certify, qualify, 
retain currency, and requalify dispatchers for performing in operations 
under this part. The QPS for dispatchers is part 121 appendix T: 
Aircraft Dispatcher Qualification Performance Standards.
    Qualified. When used in reference to an individual, means an 
individual who has completed the certificate holder's FAA-approved 
curriculum under this part and holds an aircraft dispatcher 
certificate.
    Recurrent training. See definition of Category of Training.
    Requalification training. See definition of Category of Training.
    Serve. Performing the duties of an aircraft dispatcher, dispatcher 
instructor, check dispatcher, or dispatch program designee for a 
certificate holder.
    Special training. See definition of Category of Training.
    Supervised Operating Experience (SOE). Training and other 
supervised activities conducted for the purpose of demonstrating the 
ability to perform the duties of an aircraft dispatcher prior to the 
proficiency test or proficiency check.
    Training. Instruction and practice.
    Training program. A certificate holder's training curricula, 
personnel, facilities, equipment, and other resources used to meet the 
training requirements of this subpart.
    Transition training. See definition of Category of Training.


Sec.  121.1407  English language requirement.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as an aircraft dispatcher under this part, unless that person has 
demonstrated to an individual qualified to conduct evaluations under 
this part, the ability to do the following:
    (a) Read, write, speak, and understand the English language.
    (b) Have their English language and writings understood.


Sec.  121.1409  Acceptable time for completing recurrent requirements.

    (a) An aircraft dispatcher must complete recurrent training, 
evaluation or operating familiarization during the eligibility period.
    (b) An aircraft dispatcher who has not completed recurrent training 
by the end of the base month may continue to perform dispatcher duties 
until the end of the eligibility period.

Qualification


Sec.  121.1411  Aircraft dispatcher: Employment and certificate.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as an aircraft dispatcher in domestic or flag operations, unless that 
person is an employee of the part 119 certificate holder and has in his 
or her possession an aircraft dispatcher certificate issued to the 
person by the FAA without limitations, in accordance with part 65 
subpart C of this chapter.


Sec.  121.1413  Aircraft dispatcher: Training and evaluation.

    No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person serve, 
as an aircraft dispatcher in domestic or flag operations, unless that 
person meets the following requirements:
    (a) Training and evaluation. The person has successfully completed, 
in a training program approved under this subpart for the certificate 
holder, the following:
    (1) Training in accordance with the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS, and 
the associated programmed hours required by Sec.  121.1435, as follows:
    (i) Within the preceding 12 months, initial, combined certification 
and initial, transition, or recurrent training categories as prescribed 
in Sec.  121.1453 or Sec.  121.1455 as applicable.
    (A) An aircraft dispatcher is eligible for transition training only 
if the aircraft dispatcher is otherwise qualified as an aircraft 
dispatcher for the certificate holder on another aircraft type in 
operations under this part.
    (B) To be eligible for recurrent training, an aircraft dispatcher 
must be otherwise qualified and have successfully completed the 
initial, combined certification and initial, or transition training for 
the certificate holder.
    (ii) Differences training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1471.
    (iii) Requalification training, if necessary, as prescribed in 
Sec.  121.1419.
    (iv) Special training, if necessary, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1437.
    (2) A proficiency test or check in accordance with Sec.  
121.1453(a)(2), Sec.  121.1453(b)(2), or Sec.  121.1455(c), as 
applicable.
    (3) Supervised operating experience, as prescribed in Sec.  
121.1417.
    (b) Continuity of training.
    (1) Initial for certificated dispatchers. A certificated aircraft 
dispatcher must successfully complete all of the required initial 
training category, including the proficiency test, prescribed in Sec.  
121.1453(a)(2) within 120 days of beginning the initial training 
category.
    (2) Combined certification and initial for non-certificated person. 
A non-certificated person must successfully complete all of the 
required combined certification and initial training category, 
including the practical test and proficiency test, prescribed in Sec.  
121.1453(b)(2) within 180 days of beginning the combined certification 
and initial category.
    (c) Failure to complete training. If a person fails to successfully 
complete the training in the time required by paragraph (b) of this 
section, the person must repeat the initial training, or combined 
certification and initial training, as required by paragraph (a) of 
this section within the time period required in paragraph (b) of this 
section.
    (d) Operating familiarization. The person has successfully 
completed operating familiarization every 12 months in accordance with 
Sec.  121.1415. For domestic operations, the operating familiarization 
must be conducted within a geographic area into which the person 
dispatches. For flag operations, the operating familiarization must be 
conducted within a flag area of operation for which the person

[[Page 1324]]

dispatches in accordance with the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (1) If the person dispatches in either domestic operations or flag 
operations, but not both, the person must have completed operating 
familiarization in the type of operation, domestic or flag, and in an 
aircraft type that the person dispatches within the preceding 12 
months.
    (2) If the person dispatches in both domestic and flag operations, 
the person must have completed operating familiarization in both 
domestic and flag operations in an aircraft type that the person 
dispatches within the preceding 24 months.
    (3) If the person dispatches both propeller driven (including 
reciprocating powered and turbopropeller powered) and turbojet powered 
aircraft, the person must have completed operating familiarization in 
both propeller driven and turbojet powered aircraft within the 
preceding 24 months.


Sec.  121.1415  Aircraft dispatcher: Operating familiarization.

    (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, 
the operating familiarization required by Sec.  121.1413(d) must 
consist of at least 5 hours of observing operations under this part 
from the flight deck. This observation must be made from the flight 
deck or, for airplanes without an observer seat on the flight deck, 
from a forward passenger seat with headset or speaker. This requirement 
may be reduced by one hour for each additional takeoff and landing, but 
the reduction must not exceed 2\1/2\ hours.
    (b) The requirement of paragraph (a) of this section may be 
satisfied by observation of simulated flight time during a Line 
Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) session required by subpart BB of this 
part. The observation must occur in a Full Flight Simulator (FFS) 
approved in accordance with part 60 of this chapter for the aircraft 
type and operation. The actual observed simulated flight time must not 
be reduced below 5 hours.
    (c) If the requirement of paragraph (a) and (b) of this section 
cannot be met, the certificate holder may request a deviation to 
complete operating familiarization through a ground training program 
approved by the Administrator.
    (d) A person may serve as an aircraft dispatcher for a new type of 
operation (domestic or flag) without meeting the requirements of this 
section for 90 days after the certificate holder introduces a new type 
of operation.


Sec.  121.1417  Aircraft dispatcher: Supervised operating experience.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as an aircraft dispatcher unless that person meets all of the 
following requirements:
    (1) The person has been supervised by a current and qualified 
dispatcher who meets the experience requirements of Sec.  
121.1421(b)(1) through (4).
    (2) The person has been supervised for the minimum hours prescribed 
in the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS for each type of operation (domestic or 
flag) in which the person serves.
    (3) The person has successfully completed a proficiency test or 
check, as appropriate.
    (b) No person is eligible to receive the supervised operating 
experience required in paragraph (a) of this section unless that person 
has satisfactorily completed initial, combined certification and 
initial, requalification training, and operating familiarization, as 
applicable, in accordance with the requirements listed in the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS.
    (c) An aircraft dispatcher administering operating experience may 
not supervise more than one person at a time.
    (d) During the supervised operating experience session, the 
supervising dispatcher must be the dispatcher of record for each flight 
dispatched or released.


Sec.  121.1419  Aircraft dispatcher: Requalification.

    (a) No certificate holder may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as an aircraft dispatcher if that person has become unqualified 
by not satisfactorily completing recurrent training, including 
proficiency checks as required by Sec.  121.1413(a).
    (b) To be requalified, the person must complete:
    (1) The initial training requirements of Sec.  121.1453(a) in 
accordance with the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS, including supervised 
operating experience, operating familiarization, and proficiency test, 
or
    (2) All missed recurrent training modules that were not completed 
by the end of the person's eligibility period and the additional 
requirements for the applicable phase of requalification training in 
accordance with the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS, including all applicable 
proficiency checks or proficiency tests.
    (c) The requalification requirements for each phase must be 
completed:
    (1) Within 60 days of beginning the requalification training; and
    (2) Before the end of the applicable phase of requalification.
    (d) To qualify for:
    (1) Phase I Requalification. A person may requalify under the Phase 
I Requalification program if less than 6 months have elapsed since the 
end of the person's base month for recurrent training. The aircraft 
dispatcher's base month for recurrent training does not change.
    (2) Phase II Requalification. A person may requalify under the 
Phase II Requalification program if at least 6 months, but less than 12 
months, have elapsed since the end of the person's base month for 
recurrent training. The aircraft dispatcher's base month for recurrent 
training does not change.
    (3) Phase III Requalification. A person may requalify under the 
Phase III Requalification program if at least 12 months, but less than 
24 months, have elapsed since the end of the person's base month for 
recurrent training. The aircraft dispatcher's base month for recurrent 
training must change to the month in which the requalification 
proficiency check is successfully completed.
    (4) Phase IV Requalification. A person may requalify under the 
Phase IV Requalification program if at least 24 months, but less than 
36 months, have elapsed since the end of the person's base month for 
recurrent training. The aircraft dispatcher's base month for recurrent 
training must change to the month in which the requalification 
proficiency check is successfully completed.
    (5) Phase V Requalification. A person may requalify under the Phase 
V Requalification program if 36 months or more have elapsed since the 
end of the person's base month for recurrent training. The aircraft 
dispatcher's base month for recurrent training must change to the month 
in which the requalification proficiency test is successfully 
completed.


Sec.  121.1421  Dispatcher instructor and check dispatcher: 
Eligibility, training, and evaluation.

    (a) Dispatcher Instructor. No certificate holder conducting 
domestic or flag operations may use any person, nor may any person 
serve, as a dispatcher instructor in a training program established 
under this part unless the person meets one of the following:
    (1) The person must meet the applicable requirements of Sec.  
121.1439 and hold an aircraft dispatcher certificate. The person must 
maintain aircraft dispatcher currency in accordance with the 
certificate holder's approved training program. Within the preceding 12 
months, the person has

[[Page 1325]]

successfully completed an initial training curriculum or a recurrent 
training curriculum in accordance with Sec.  121.1457.
    (2) A person who does not meet the requirements of paragraph (a)(1) 
of this section, but who is a subject matter expert with specific 
technical knowledge on a subject may be used to conduct training in the 
subjects specified in the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS. The subject matter 
expert must be acceptable to the FAA.
    (b) Check dispatcher. No certificate holder conducting domestic or 
flag operations may use any person, nor may any person serve, as a 
check dispatcher in a training program established under this subpart 
unless the person has been approved by the FAA and meets the following 
requirements:
    (1) The person meets the applicable requirements of Sec.  121.1439 
and holds an aircraft dispatcher certificate. The person must maintain 
aircraft dispatcher currency in accordance with the certificate 
holder's approved training curriculum.
    (2) The person has performed the duties of an aircraft dispatcher 
for at least 8 hours within a 24-hour period in the preceding 60 days.
    (3) Within the preceding 12 months, the person has successfully 
completed an initial training curriculum or a recurrent training 
curriculum in accordance with Sec.  121.1459.
    (4) The person has been current and qualified as an aircraft 
dispatcher for a part 121 domestic or flag operation for at least 3 of 
the previous 5 years.


Sec.  121.1423  Dispatch program designee: Eligibility and 
qualification.

    If the certificate holder elects to establish a combined 
certification and initial training category, the FAA may approve one or 
more dispatch program designees to represent the FAA for the purpose of 
issuing aircraft dispatcher certificates.
    (a) To be eligible to become a dispatch program designee and to 
remain qualified to serve as a dispatch program designee, a person must 
meet the following requirements:
    (1) Be an employee of the certificate holder.
    (2) Be a check dispatcher in accordance with Sec.  121.1421 and be 
currently serving as an aircraft dispatcher for the certificate holder 
for the aircraft type and operation.
    (3) Be a designated aircraft dispatcher examiner in accordance with 
Sec.  183.25 of this chapter.
    (4) Conduct a practical test under the observation of the FAA and 
be designated as a dispatch program designee by the FAA. The person 
undergoing the practical test for this purpose must be signed off by 
the FAA inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (5) A designee may continue to conduct practical tests if, within 
the preceding 12 months, the designee has done one of the following 
under the observation of the FAA:
    (i) Conducted a practical test.
    (ii) Conducted a proficiency test.
    (iii) Conducted a proficiency check.
    (b) The dispatch program designee is only approved to perform the 
duties of a dispatch program designee for the certificate holder.


Sec.  121.1425  Check dispatcher: Initial cadre.

    (a) Purpose of this section. This section is used to qualify an 
initial cadre of check dispatchers in lieu of the experience and 
recency requirements of Sec. Sec.  121.1417 and 121.1421. A certificate 
holder may use a person as a check dispatcher even though the person 
does not meet the experience or recency requirements of the subpart, if 
the person meets the initial cadre requirements of this section.
    (b) Duration of initial cadre status. The FAA will determine the 
period of initial cadre status, and may terminate initial cadre status 
for the certificate holder or for an individual check dispatcher, if 
necessary. In no case will initial cadre status exceed a period of 24 
months.
    (c) Eligibility for initial cadre status for check dispatcher. To 
be eligible to become an initial cadre check dispatcher for a part 119 
certificate holder, and to continue to serve in that capacity for the 
authorized period, a person must meet all of the following 
requirements:
    (1) Be an employee of the part 119 certificate holder (or 
applicant).
    (2) Have served at least 3 years in the past 6 years as a 
dispatcher for the aircraft type for which the person is to perform 
duties as an initial cadre check dispatcher.
    (3) Have an aircraft dispatch certificate without restrictions.
    (4) Have successfully completed initial, transition, or differences 
training, as appropriate, as approved by the FAA for the part 119 
certificate holder (or applicant) that is required to serve as an 
aircraft dispatcher.
    (5) Have conducted activities for which the person is to perform 
duties as a check dispatcher under the observation of an FAA inspector. 
When an observed activity must be made part of a training record, the 
people undergoing the observed activities must be signed off by the FAA 
inspector as the evaluator of record.
    (6) Be approved by the FAA for the specific duties to be performed.
    (d) Operating experience for initial cadre check dispatchers.
    (1) An initial cadre check dispatcher may receive credit for his or 
her own operating experience while administering operating experience 
to another initial cadre check dispatcher.
    (2) Initial cadre check dispatchers may obtain operating experience 
only if at least one of the other initial cadre check dispatchers has:
    (i) Experience with the aircraft type on which the person is to 
perform duties as a check dispatcher or has received training for the 
aircraft type in accordance with the QPS.
    (ii) Experience within the type of operation, domestic or flag, in 
which the person is to perform duties as a check dispatcher or has the 
received training for the type of operation in accordance with the QPS.
    (e) Persons authorized to administer training and evaluation. As 
approved by the FAA:
    (1) Employees of a part 142 certificate holder, another part 119 
certificate holder, or the aircraft manufacturer may administer the 
training for initial cadre check dispatchers.
    (2) Only a person who holds an aircraft dispatcher certificate 
issued under part 65 who is an employee of the part 119 certificate 
holder, or the FAA, may administer the evaluation for initial cadre 
check dispatchers.
    (3) Check dispatchers who are employees of an existing part 119 
certificate holder that is adding a new aircraft type or operation may 
continue to serve as check dispatchers for the new aircraft type or 
operation during the initial cadre period.

General Training Program Requirements


Sec.  121.1431  Training program: General.

    (a) Each certificate holder must establish and keep current an 
aircraft dispatcher training program. Each curriculum in a training 
program must be current and must be kept current with respect to any 
changes in the certificate holder's policies, operations, and 
requirements of this chapter. Each certificate holder must obtain the 
appropriate initial and final approval of its training program, as 
specified in Sec.  121.1437.
    (b) The aircraft dispatcher training program must address all of 
the following:
    (1) The requirements of this subpart.
    (2) The requirements of the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (c) Each certificate holder is responsible for ensuring that its 
aircraft

[[Page 1326]]

dispatchers are adequately trained and that aircraft dispatcher 
training and evaluation is conducted in accordance with the certificate 
holder's approved training program.
    (d) As part of its training program, a certificate holder must 
provide to each student, as applicable, the following:
    (1) Curricula, categories of training, and segments of training 
applicable for use by the certificate holder as required by this 
subpart and approved by the Administrator.
    (2) A sufficient number of dispatcher instructors, trained and 
qualified in accordance with this subpart, to provide the approved 
training.
    (3) A sufficient number of check dispatchers trained and qualified 
in accordance with this subpart, to complete the applicable evaluation 
of knowledge and skills in tasks in accordance with the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS.
    (4) Adequate training facilities.
    (5) Appropriate and current training materials, examinations, 
forms, instructions, and procedures for use in conducting the training, 
evaluation, and supervised operating experience required by this part 
with respect to each aircraft type and operation, and if applicable, 
the particular variations within that aircraft type.
    (e) No certificate holder may use a person as an aircraft 
dispatcher unless each dispatcher instructor or check dispatcher who is 
responsible for a training curriculum, training category, or evaluation 
under this part has certified in writing or electronically the 
proficiency and knowledge of the individual being trained or evaluated.
    (1) The certification required by this paragraph must be made a 
part of the aircraft dispatcher's record required by subpart V of this 
part. The record must indicate whether the individual successfully 
completed each of the training and evaluation requirements for the 
specific curriculum listed in this paragraph.
    (2) When the record of the certification required by this paragraph 
is made by an entry in a computerized recordkeeping system, the 
dispatcher instructor or check dispatcher making the certification must 
be identified with that entry, and the record must be in a form 
approved by the Administrator.


Sec.  121.1433  Training program: General curriculum by aircraft type 
and operation.

    (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a 
training curriculum for each aircraft type and operation conducted by 
that certificate holder under this part. The curriculum must be 
available to each aircraft dispatcher required for that aircraft type 
and operation. Each curriculum must include the categories of training 
and the ground training modules required by this subpart and the 
Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (b) Each training category must provide training and evaluation as 
necessary to ensure that each aircraft dispatcher meets the following 
requirements:
    (1) Maintains proficiency with respect to each aircraft type and 
operation (domestic and flag operations) in which the aircraft 
dispatcher serves.
    (2) Maintains proficiency in the duties and responsibilities for 
the aircraft type and operation that are contained in the Sec.  121.133 
manual as outlined in Sec.  121.135.
    (3) Is trained and knowledgeable as to the current operating 
limitations sections of the applicable FCOM.
    (4) Remains trained and knowledgeable on the procedures and 
performance sections of the applicable FCOM.
    (5) Qualifies in new equipment, facilities, procedures, techniques, 
computer applications, and technology required to perform the duties of 
an aircraft dispatcher.
    (6) Understands the nature and effects of safety hazards, weather 
extremes, and the effects of these on operations.
    (7) Knows and is able to apply Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) 
skills identified in the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (c) Each training category must include the following:
    (1) The areas of instruction with subjects and the tasks required 
by the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (2) A list of all equipment used by the certificate holder for 
training and evaluation.
    (3) An outline of the training category that includes ground 
training and evaluation modules by subject matter.
    (4) The approved programmed hours of training that will be applied 
to each required training category.
    (5) Differences that relate to the variations of a particular 
aircraft type to be included in all ground training modules for 
purposes of training and evaluation, as applicable.
    (6) A copy of each statement issued by the Administrator under 
Sec.  121.1435 for a reduction of baseline programmed hours of training 
and evaluation.
    (7) A list of qualified instructors and the letter of authorization 
from the FAA for the check dispatcher and dispatch program designee.


Sec.  121.1435  Training program: Curriculum programmed hours.

    (a) Each certificate holder's training program submitted for 
initial approval under this subpart must have at least the baseline 
programmed hours specified in the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS. Programmed 
hours include training and evaluation.
    (b) The Administrator will not approve a reduction in the baseline 
programmed hours specified in this subpart during the initial approval 
of training programs. For a training program that has final approval, a 
certificate holder may apply for a reduction of programmed hours based 
on the factors outlined in Sec.  121.1437(e). The Administrator will 
not approve a reduction of programmed hours below the minimum hours in 
the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (c) When the Administrator approves a reduction in programmed 
hours, the Administrator will provide the certificate holder with a 
statement of the basis for the approval.
    (d) The Administrator will determine the required programmed hours 
for the requalification training category as specified in the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS.


Sec.  121.1437  Training program: Approval and amendment process.

    (a) Each training program described in this subpart must be 
approved by the Administrator. To obtain initial or final approval of a 
training program, or to request a revision to an approved training 
program, each certificate holder must provide the Administrator the 
following information in a form acceptable to the Administrator:
    (1) An outline of the proposed program or proposed revision, 
including an outline of the proposed or revised curriculum required in 
Sec.  121.1433, that provides all the information needed for a 
preliminary evaluation of the proposed program or proposed revision.
    (2) Curricula, categories of training, and segments of training 
applicable for use by the certificate holder as required by this 
subpart.
    (3) The number of dispatcher instructors trained and qualified in 
accordance with Sec.  121.1421(a)(1) to provide the approved training 
and evaluation, and the number of dispatcher instructors used in 
accordance with Sec.  121.1421(a)(2), to provide the approved training.
    (4) The number of check dispatchers trained and qualified in 
accordance with this subpart, to complete the evaluations and 
observations that are required by this subpart.

[[Page 1327]]

    (5) A description of the ground training facilities.
    (6) A synopsis of the materials, examinations, forms, instructions, 
and procedures to be used for the training and evaluation required by 
this subpart with respect to each aircraft type, and if applicable, the 
particular variations within that aircraft type.
    (7) A statement as to whether training will be provided by persons 
other than the certificate holder's employees in accordance with Sec.  
121.1439.
    (8) A copy of the Flight Crew Operating Manual for each aircraft 
type to be included in the training program. The Flight Crew Operating 
Manual must be current at the time of submission. Amendments must be 
made as required.
    (9) A copy of the current Sec.  121.133 manual as outlined in Sec.  
121.135.
    (10) Documentation of the certificate holder's continuous analysis 
process established in accordance with Sec.  121.1441.
    (11) Additional relevant information required by the Administrator.
    (b) If the proposed training program or proposed revision complies 
with this subpart, the Administrator grants initial approval in 
writing, after which the certificate holder may conduct the training 
and evaluation in accordance with that program. The Administrator then 
evaluates the effectiveness of the initially approved training program 
and advises the certificate holder of any deficiencies that must be 
corrected.
    (c) A revision to an approved training program may be proposed as a 
special training category that reflects changes to the certificate 
holder's operation, or as a differences training category that reflects 
differences in configuration within an aircraft type.
    (1) The proposed special training category will include modules of 
training and evaluation for training segments within existing training 
categories. These modules will be initially approved and evaluated. 
Upon satisfactory evaluation, the special training category modules 
will receive final approval and be integrated into the training 
segments of the existing training categories. Once integrated, it will 
no longer be called a special training category, but will be part of 
the approved training program. The Principal Operations Inspector will 
determine the number for programmed hours.
    (2) The proposed differences training category will include modules 
of training and evaluation for applicable segments of training. These 
modules will be initially approved, evaluated, and upon satisfactory 
evaluation, added to the previously approved differences training. The 
Principal Operations Inspector will determine the number of programmed 
hours.
    (d) The Administrator grants final approval of a training program 
if the certificate holder shows that the training and evaluation 
conducted under the initial approval obtained under paragraph (b) of 
this section ensures that each person who completes the training and 
evaluation is adequately trained to perform his or her assigned duties.
    (e) The Administrator may require revisions to an approved training 
program anytime the FAA finds that revisions are necessary in the 
interest of safety or security. If the Administrator finds that 
revisions are necessary for the continued adequacy of a training 
program that has been granted initial or final approval, the 
certificate holder must, after notification by the Administrator, make 
all changes in the program that the Administrator finds necessary.
    (1) Within 30 days after the certificate holder receives a notice 
to revise the program, it may file a petition with the Director of 
Flight Standards to reconsider the notice. The filing of a petition to 
reconsider stays the notice pending a decision by the Director of 
Flight Standards.
    (2) If the Administrator finds that there is an emergency that 
requires immediate action in the interest of safety or security, the 
Administrator may, upon a statement of the reasons, require a change 
effective without stay.
    (f) The Administrator considers the following factors in approving 
revisions or requiring revisions to a training program:
    (1) The pass and fail rate in the curriculum under consideration.
    (2) The quality and effectiveness of the teaching-learning process 
(e.g., quality of instructors, training equipment, methods, and 
procedures listed in the certificate holder's curriculum required by 
Sec.  121.1433).
    (3) The experience levels of the student population.
    (4) The experience levels of the instructors and check persons.
    (5) The type and scope of operations conducted by the certificate 
holder.
    (6) The complexity of make, model, and series of aircraft used.


Sec.  121.1439  Training program: Administering training and 
evaluation.

    (a) Persons administering training must be acceptable to the FAA.
    (b) Persons who administer evaluation must be approved by the FAA 
and knowledgeable about the certificate holder's facilities, equipment, 
and procedures.
    (c) Persons who administer training or evaluation must use only the 
equipment and the facilities that are specifically approved for the 
certificate holder's training program.
    (d) Training, proficiency tests, proficiency checks, and practical 
tests for aircraft dispatchers must be administered in accordance with 
the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (e) A dispatch program designee or the FAA must administer the 
aircraft dispatcher practical test.
    (f) The certificate holder must report a failure of a proficiency 
test, practical test, or proficiency check to the FAA.
    (g) A proficiency test, proficiency check, or practical test is not 
successfully completed if the individual did not successfully complete 
all required portions of the training curriculum before taking the 
proficiency test, proficiency check, or practical test.
    (h) Training and evaluation is not successfully completed, even if 
the individual successfully completed the activity, when the 
certificate holder does one of the following:
    (1) Uses facilities, equipment, and materials that are not 
specifically approved for that activity as part of the certificate 
holder's approved training program.
    (2) Uses persons who are not authorized to administer the activity 
as specified in the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS, or who do not meet the 
requirements of this subpart.


Sec.  121.1441  Training program: Continuous analysis process.

    (a) Each certificate holder must establish and maintain a process 
for the continuous analysis of the performance and effectiveness of its 
training program and operation that will allow the certificate holder 
the ability to recognize where improvements are needed. This process 
must:
    (1) Incorporate procedures to ensure that the training program and 
the standards of qualification for each duty position are documented, 
and provide a means for updating as changes are required.
    (2) Provide for the review of training program content, 
application, and results for each aircraft type and operation.
    (3) Continually measure and monitor the outcome of the training 
program and operation in terms of the aircraft dispatcher's performance 
and qualification, and provide a means to identify and correct 
deficiencies in the aircraft dispatcher's performance and qualification 
and in the training program and operation. Procedures must include 
correction of deficiencies

[[Page 1328]]

by the certificate holder or by persons providing training and 
evaluation in the certificate holder's training program and operation.
    (b) The FAA will notify the certificate holder in writing when it 
finds that the continuous analysis process described in paragraph (a) 
of this section does not contain adequate procedures and standards to 
meet the requirements of this section. The certificate holder must make 
any changes in the training program that are necessary to meet the 
requirements of this section.
    (c) A certificate holder may petition the FAA to reconsider the 
notice to make a change in the continuous analysis process. The 
petition must be filed with the FAA certificate holding district office 
charged with the overall inspection of the certificate holder's 
operations within 30 days after the certificate holder receives the 
notice. Except in the case of an emergency requiring immediate action 
in the interest of safety, the filing of the petition stays the notice 
pending a decision by the FAA.

Training Category Requirements


Sec.  121.1451  Training category requirements: Standards used in 
aircraft dispatcher training.

    (a) The certificate holder must include in the training categories 
the subjects, tasks, and standards set forth in the Aircraft Dispatcher 
QPS.
    (b) The QPS requirements for aircraft dispatcher training and 
evaluation include all of the following:
    (1) The subjects and areas of instruction listed in the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS for initial, combined certification and initial, 
recurrent, transition, differences, and requalification training.
    (2) The Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) skills listed in the 
Aircraft Dispatcher QPS.
    (3) The requirements for administering specific evaluations.
    (4) The requirements and performance standards for each task and 
environment.


Sec.  121.1453  Training category requirements: Aircraft dispatcher 
initial, combined certification and initial, and transition training.

    (a) Initial and transition training for aircraft dispatchers must 
include all of the following:
    (1) Training and evaluation in the subjects listed in the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS.
    (2) Successful completion of a proficiency test in accordance with 
the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS for each aircraft type and operation, and 
the particular variations within the aircraft type.
    (b) Combined certification and initial training must include all of 
the following:
    (1) Training and evaluation in the subjects listed in the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS.
    (2) Successful completion of a practical test and proficiency test 
in accordance with the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS for each aircraft type 
and operation, and the particular variations within the aircraft type. 
The FAA or dispatch program designee must administer the practical 
test.


Sec.  121.1455  Training category requirements: Aircraft dispatcher 
recurrent training.

    Recurrent training for aircraft dispatchers must include all of the 
following:
    (a) Instruction in the subjects specified in the Aircraft 
Dispatcher QPS.
    (b) An evaluation of the aircraft dispatcher's knowledge with 
respect to the aircraft type and operation involved.
    (c) Successful completion of a proficiency check in accordance with 
the Aircraft Dispatcher QPS for each aircraft type and operation, and 
the particular variations within the aircraft type.


Sec.  121.1457  Training category requirements: Dispatcher instructor 
initial and recurrent training.

    (a) Initial training. Initial training for a dispatcher instructor 
must consist of a 4-hour block of instruction that includes the 
following subjects:
    (1) Aircraft dispatcher instructor duties, functions, and 
responsibilities.
    (2) Appropriate provisions of the regulations of this chapter and 
the certificate holder's policies and procedures.
    (3) Appropriate methods, procedures, and techniques for conducting 
aircraft dispatcher instruction.
    (4) Evaluation of student performance, including recognition of the 
following:
    (i) Improper and insufficient training; and
    (ii) Personal characteristics of a student that could adversely 
affect safety.
    (5) Corrective action in the case of unsatisfactory training 
progress.
    (6) Approved methods, procedures, and limitations for performing 
the required normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures in the dispatch 
facility.
    (7) Principles of the teaching-learning process.
    (8) Teaching methods and procedures.
    (9) Instructor-student relationship.
    (b) Recurrent training. Recurrent training for a dispatcher 
instructor must consist of a 2-hour block of instruction every 12 
months that includes the following:
    (1) Subjects required in paragraph (a) of this section.
    (2) Instructional and evaluation methods and techniques.
    (3) Changes in aircraft dispatcher qualification curricula.
    (4) Continuous analysis process review based on the factors 
addressed in Sec.  121.1441.


Sec.  121.1459  Training category requirements: Check dispatcher 
initial and recurrent training.

    (a) Initial training. Initial training for a check dispatcher must 
consist of a 4-hour block of instruction that includes the following 
subjects:
    (1) Check dispatcher duties, functions, and responsibilities.
    (2) Appropriate provisions of the regulations of this chapter and 
the certificate holder's policies and procedures.
    (3) Appropriate methods, procedures, and techniques for conducting 
the required tests and checks.
    (4) Evaluation of student performance, including recognition of the 
following:
    (i) Improper and insufficient training; and
    (ii) Personal characteristics of a student that could adversely 
affect safety.
    (5) Corrective action in the case of unsatisfactory evaluations.
    (6) Approved methods, procedures, and limitations for performing 
the required normal, abnormal, and emergency procedures in the dispatch 
facility.
    (b) Recurrent training. Recurrent training for a check dispatcher 
must consist of a 2-hour block of instruction every 12 months that 
includes the following:
    (1) Subjects required in paragraph (a) of this section.
    (2) Instructional and evaluation methods and techniques.
    (3) Changes in aircraft dispatcher qualification curricula.
    (4) Continuous analysis process review based on the factors 
addressed in Sec.  121.1441.

Other Training Requirements


Sec.  121.1471  Differences training and evaluation.

    Each aircraft dispatcher training program must provide differences 
training if the Administrator finds that, due to differences between 
aircraft of the same type operated by the certificate holder, 
additional training is necessary to ensure that each aircraft 
dispatcher is adequately trained to perform the

[[Page 1329]]

assigned duties. The Administrator will determine the number of 
additional training hours and subjects necessary for the aircraft type 
and operation.
    31. Add appendix Q of part 121 to read as follows:

Appendix Q to Part 121--Pilot, Qualification Performance Standards

    Table of Contents
    Introduction
    A. What is contained in the Pilot QPS?
    B. Can the reader rely solely on this document for pilot 
qualification and related training requirements?
    C. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?
    D. Why do we need a QPS for pilots?
    E. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?
    F. [Reserved]
    G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?
    H. What references are recommended?
    I. What training aids and guides should be used to develop 
instructional materials?
    J. How must Crew Resource Management (CRM) training be 
administered?
    K. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it 
incorporated in this QPS?(see Sec.  121.1355)
Attachment 1. Programmed Hour Requirements For New Hire, Initial, 
Transition, Conversion, Upgrade, Differences, Requalification, 
Recurrent, and Special Training Categories (see Sec. Sec.  121.1205; 
121.1239; 121.1331; 121.1333; 121.1335; 121.1337; 121.1367; and 
121.1391)
Attachment 2. Academic Training Segment Requirements--Subjects and 
Tests--For New Hire, Initial Transition, Conversion, Upgrade, 
Requalification, Recurrent, Differences, and Special Training 
Categories (see Sec. Sec.  121.1221; 121.1223; 121.1225; 121.1227; 
121.1229; 121.1333; 121.1335; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 
121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1381; and 121.1391)
Attachment 3. Job Performance Training Requirements for All 
Categories of Training (see Sec. Sec.  121.1205; 121.133; 121.135; 
121.1221; 121.1223; 121.1225; 121.1227; 121.1229; 121.1233; 
121.1251; 121.1253; 121.1255; 121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 
121.1333; 121.1335; 121.1337; 121.1339; 121.1341; 121.1343; 
121.1345; 121.1347; 121.1349; 121.1351; 121.1353; 121.1361; 
121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 
121.1383; 121.1385; 121.1387; and 121.1391)
Attachment 4. Generic Pilot Performance Standards for Each Task and 
Environment (see Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1201; 121.1203; 
121.1205; 121.1221; 121.1221; 121.1233; 121.1253; 121.1255; 
121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1333; 121.1337; 121.1351; 
121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 
121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 121.1385; and 121.1391)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

Introduction

A. What is contained in the Pilot QPS?

    This QPS contains Information and QPS Requirements.
    1. Information: Explanations that clarify or support regulatory 
requirements found in the Code of Federal Regulations or in this Pilot 
QPS. Explanations are provided as guidance and are not regulatory. This 
guidance appears under the heading ``BEGIN INFORMATION'' and uses the 
terms ``should'' or ``may'' to indicate that it is not mandatory.
    2. QPS Requirements: Pilot Qualification Performance Standards 
contained in this appendix are regulatory and mandatory. These 
requirements appear under the heading ``BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENTS'' and 
use the terms ``must,'' ``may not,'' and ``will.''

B. Can the reader rely solely on this document for pilot qualification 
and training requirements?

    No, do not rely solely on this document for regulatory requirements 
in these areas. The reader must also use 14 CFR part 91 and part 121, 
subparts G, T, V, X, and BB.

C. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?

    1. You may mail questions to: U.S. Department of Transportation, 
Federal Aviation Administration, Flight Standards Service, Air 
Transportation Division, AFS-210,800 Independence Avenue, SW., 
Washington, DC 20591,Telephone: (202) 267-816, Fax: (202) 267-5229.
    2. You may find answers to questions on the Flight Standards 
Internet Web Site address is: ``http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/
headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afs/.'' On this Web Site you will 
find Flight Standards Programs, Aviation Safety Inspector Handbooks and 
Documents, the current Aviation Regulations (14 CFR), Advisory 
Circulars, and other sources of FAA information.

D. Why do we need a QPS for pilots?

    1. To provide objective standards for pilot performance and for 
relating these standards to simulation equipment qualification levels.
    2. To provide routine and periodic update capability. This 
capability is needed to respond to accidents, incidents, or rapidly 
occurring changes to equipment and operations. All changes made to this 
appendix will be subject to public notice and comment, unless good 
cause exists to support a finding that notice and comment would be 
impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.
    3. To provide the certificate holder with a minimum set of 
standards for developing the following:
    (a) Training and certification programs,
    (b) Performance standards, and
    (c) Evaluation criteria as they relate to the pilot job function.

E. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?

    1. Attachment 1 contains the programmed hour requirements for new 
hire, initial, transition, conversion, upgrade, differences, 
requalification, recurrent, and special training categories.
    2. Attachment 2 contains the academic training requirements for new 
hire, initial, transition, conversion, upgrade, requalification, 
recurrent, differences, and special training categories.
    3. Attachment 3 contains:
    (a) The job performance training requirements for initial, 
transition, upgrade, conversion, requalification, recurrent, 
difference, and special categories of training.
    (b) How evaluations are administered.
    (c) What level FSTD must be used for each task or environment.
    4. Attachment 4 contains the generic pilot performance standards 
for each task and environment.

F. [Reserved]

G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?

    You can find definitions in Sec.  121.1205. Acronyms are as 
follows:

AFD Airport Facility Directory
AFE Above field elevation
AFS-210 Air Carrier Training Branch, Air Transportation 
Division,Flight Standards Service
AFM Airplane Flight Manual
AGL Above Ground Level
AIM Aeronautical Information Manual
APD Aircrew Program Designee
ASAP Aviation Safety Action Program
ASR Airport Surveillance Radar
ASRS Aviation Safety Reporting System
ATC Air Traffic Control
ATIS Automated Terminal Information System
ATP Airline Transport Pilot
CDI Course Deviation Indicator
CDL Critical Design List
CFIT Controlled Flight into Terrain
COM Crewmember Operating Manual
CRM Crew Resource Management
DA Decision Altitude
DH Decision Height
DME Distance Measurement Equipment
EFIS Electronic Flight Indicating Systems
EGPWS Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System

[[Page 1330]]

EGT Exhaust Gas Temperature
ETOPS Extended Operations (replaces EROPS) (Extended Range 
Operations)
EFVS Enhanced Flight Vision System
EVAS Emergency Vision Assurance System
FAF Final Approach Fix
FDC Flight Data Center
FE Flight Engineer
FFS Full Flight Simulator
FMS Flight Management System
FOQA Flight Operational Quality Assurance
FSTD Flight Simulation Training Device
FTD Flight Training Device
GPS Global Positioning System
GPWS Ground Proximity Warning System
GS Ground Speed
HUD Head-Up Display
IAP Initial Approach Point
ICAO International Civil Aviation Organization
INS Inertial Navigation System
IOS Instructor's Operating Station
LAHSO Land and Hold Short Operations
LOFT Line Operational Flight Training
LORAN Long Range Navigation
MEA Minimum Enroute Altitude
MEL Minimum Equipment List
MDA Minimum Descent Altitude
METAR Aviation Routine Weather Report
PAR Precision Approach Radar
PBE Protective Breathing Equipment
PF Pilot Flying
PIC Pilot in Command
PM Pilot Monitoring
POI Principal Operations Inspector
PRM Precision Radar Monitor(used as part of a Simultaneous Close 
Parallel approach)
PTS Practical Test Standards
QFE Corrected Barometric Altitude relative to field elevation
QNE Barometric pressure used for standard altimeter setting(29.92 
inHg or 1013 hPa)
QNH Corrected Barometric Altitude relative to sea level
QPS Qualification Performance Standards
QRH Quick Reference Handbook
RA Resolution Alert
RMI Radio Magnetic Indicator
RNAV Area Navigation
RNP Required Navigation Performance
RPM Revolutions Per Minute
SAR Search and Rescue
SIC Second In Command
SID Standard Instrument Departure
SOIR Simultaneous Operations on Intersecting Runways
STAR Standard Terminal Arrival
TA Traffic Alert
TAA Terminal Arrival Area
TAS True Airspeed
TAWS Terrain Avoidance Warning System
TCAS Traffic Collision Avoidance System
TCE Training Center Evaluator
TSA Transportation Security Administration
V1 Takeoff Decision Speed
V2 Takeoff Safety Speed
VMCA Minimum Control Speed Air
VMCG Minimum Control Speed Ground
VR Rotation Speed
VREF Reference Speed
VSO Stall Speed, Landing Configuration
VS1 Stall Speed, Specific Configuration
XLS Other Landing System

H. What references are recommended?

    The following references (as amended) support the knowledge and 
skill standards for tasks. They are strongly recommended for providing 
further details for lesson development. To find 14 CFR parts go to 
http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov; to find Advisory Circulars go to: http://
www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/advisory_circulars; and to find FAA 
handbooks go to: http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/
airline_operators/handbooks/.
1. 14 CFR part 1, Definitions and Abbreviations
2. 14 CFR part 60, Qualification of Flight Simulation Devices
3. 14 CFR part 61, Certification: Pilots, Flight Instructors, and 
Ground Instructors
4. 14 CFR part 91, General Operating and Flight Rules
5. 14 CFR part 121, Operating Requirements: Domestic, Flag, and 
Supplemental Operations
6. AC 00-6, Aviation Weather
7. AC 0045, Aviation Weather Services
8. AC 25.1581-1, Airplane Flight Manual
9. AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making
10. AC 60-28, English Language Skill Standards
11. AC 61-21, Flight Training Handbook
12. AC 61-27, Instrument Flying Handbook
13. AC 61-84, Role of Preflight Preparation
14. AC 120-28, Criteria for Approval of Category III Landing Weather 
Minima for Takeoff, Landing, and Rollout
15. AC 120-29, Criteria for Approving Category I and Category II 
Landing Minima for Approach
16. AC 120-51, Crew Resource Management Training
17. AC 120-53, Crew Qualification and Pilot Type Rating Requirements 
for Transport Category Aircraft Operated Under part 121
18. AC 120-54, Advanced Qualification Program
19. AC 120-55, TCAS II Operational Approval for Air Carriers
20. AC 120-59, Air Carrier Internal Evaluation Programs
21. AC 120-71, Standard Operating Procedures for Flight Deck 
Crewmembers
22. Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM)
23. AC 120-88, Preventing Injuries Caused by Turbulence
24. FAA H-8083-15, Instrument Flying Handbook
25. En Route Low and High Altitude Charts
26. Profile Descent Charts
27. Standard Instrument Departure (SID)
28. Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR)
29. Airport Facility Directory (AFD) and Standard Instrument Approach 
Procedure Charts (SIAP)
30. National Flight Data Center Notices to Airmen (FDC NOTAM)
31. Integrated Measurement of Crew Resource Management and Technical 
Flying Skills, DOT/FAA/RD-93/26
32. Transportation Security Regulations (TSRs)
33. HMR 175, Hazardous Materials Regulations, Carriage by Aircraft
34. FAA Order 8040.4, Safety Risk Management
35. Air Transportation Operations Inspector's Handbook, 8400.10

I. What training aids and guides should be used to develop 
instructional materials?

    The FAA and the industry periodically publish training aids and 
guides in specific technical performance areas (http://www.faa.gov/
other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/training/index.cfm 
and http://www.faa.gov/education_research/training/). These aids and 
guides are accepted as the industry standard for their specific 
technical area. The following training aids and guides are not 
regulatory, but contain valuable information about safety of flight 
operations that should be considered when developing instructional 
materials for the tasks to which each apply.
    1. Takeoff Safety Training Aid.
    2. Wake Vortex Training Aid.
    3. Windshear Training Aid.
    4. Upset Recovery Training Aid.
    5. Winter Operations Guide to Air Carriers.
    6. Controlled Flight Into Terrain.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

J. How must Crew Resource Management (CRM) training be administered?

    The pilot must demonstrate knowledge and skills in the technical 
and CRM competencies for each particular task.
    1. Certain CRM-related procedures must be associated with flight 
tasks and their related pilot performance requirements, as shown in 
Attachment 4 of this appendix. These procedures must be evaluated 
during job performance training programs.
    2. In addition to the CRM-related procedures, situational awareness 
must

[[Page 1331]]

be evaluated as an integral part of each flight task and environment. A 
task is not completed unless the evaluator has determined that the 
pilot has demonstrated knowledge and skills in the technical and CRM 
competencies.
    3. Additionally, the following CRM behaviors are required knowledge 
to be taught and tested during academic training, as shown in 
Attachment 2 of this appendix:
    (a) Task: Authority of the Pilot In Command
    (1) The Captain's authority, including responsibility for the 
safety of flight in routine and emergency conditions
    (2) Chain of command and importance of chain of command
    (b) Task: Communication Processes and Decisions
    (1) Briefing
    (2) Inquiry, advocacy, and assertiveness
    (3) Self-critique
    (4) Communication with appropriate personnel
    (5) Decisionmaking
    (6) Conflict resolution
    (c) Task: Building and Maintenance of a Flight Team
    (1) Leading and following, including the importance of crewmembers 
functioning as a team
    (2) Use of interpersonal skills and leadership styles in a way that 
fosters crew effectiveness
    (3) Significance of cultural differences
    (d) Task: Workload Management and Situational Awareness
    (1) Preparation and planning
    (2) Vigilance
    (3) Workload distribution
    (4) Distraction avoidance
    (e) Task: Communication and Coordination
    (1) Flight deck and cabin chimes and interphone signals for routine 
situations
    (2) Flight attendant notification to flight crew that aircraft is 
ready for movement on the surface.
    (3) Flight crew notification to flight attendant to be seated prior 
to take-off
    (4) Flight attendant recognition of critical phases of flight
    (5) Crewmember coordination and notification regarding access to 
flight deck
    (6) Notification to flight attendants of turbulent air conditions
    (7) Notification between flight crew and flight attendants of 
emergency or unusual situations
    (8) Notification between flight crew and flight attendants of 
inoperative equipment that is pertinent to flight attendant duties and 
responsibilities
    (9) Normal and emergency communication procedures to be used in the 
event of inoperative communication equipment
    (f) Task: Crewmember Briefing
    (1) Crewmember responsibilities regarding briefings
    (2) Flight crew briefing
    (3) Flight crew to flight attendant(s) briefings
    (4) Flight attendant to flight attendant(s) briefings
    (5) Required information
    (6) Security procedures
    (7) Communication procedures
    (8) Emergency procedures
    (9) MELs affecting flight operations and cabin safety equipment and 
procedures
    (10) Flight information
    (g) Task: Communication and Coordination During a Passenger 
Interference Situation
    (1) Certificate holder's written program regarding the handling of 
passenger interference, including crewmember communication and 
coordination
    (2) Techniques for diffusing a passenger interference situation
    (3) Importance of crewmembers and other employees working as a team
    (4) Role of management and crewmember in follow-up
    (5) Actions to report an occurrence of passenger interference
    (h) Task: Communication and Coordination During an Emergency 
Situation
    (1) Actions for each emergency situation
    (2) Importance of notification and who must be notified
    (3) Alternate actions if unable to notify
    (4) Communication during preparation for a planned emergency 
evacuation, including the time available, type of emergency, signal to 
brace, and special instructions

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    4. CRM refers to the effective use of all available resources, 
including, human resources, hardware, and information. Human resources 
include all other groups routinely working with the flight crewmembers 
who are involved in decisions that are required to operate a flight 
safely. CRM is not a single task. CRM is a set of competencies that 
must be evident in all tasks in this QPS as applied to the individual 
and the multi-crew operation.
    5. CRM deficiencies usually contribute to the unsatisfactory 
technical performance of a task. Therefore, the CRM competencies are 
valuable for debriefing. For debriefing purposes, an amplified list of 
these competencies, expressed as behavioral markers, is in AC 120-51, 
as amended.
    6. Certificate holders should conduct flight crewmember and flight 
attendant CRM scenarios together. When this is not possible, 
certificate holders should include information in flight crewmember 
training that addresses the roles of flight attendants during emergency 
situations.

K. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it incorporated 
in this QPS? (see Sec.  121.1355)

    1. The continuous analysis process is a certificate holder internal 
evaluation and improvement process. The continuous analysis process 
will enable the certificate holder to maintain and refine the training 
process by continually monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of 
the process. Various assessment tools (testing, checking, inspection, 
documenting, evaluation, and analysis) will be used to validate the 
effectiveness of a training program or the need to change a training 
program.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    2. A continuous analysis process is incorporated in this QPS 
through integration with the qualification and training program. The 
certificate holder is responsible for designating responsibility for 
the process. The certificate holder must ensure appropriate and 
adequate assessment tools (testing, checking, critique, inspection, 
observation, documenting, evaluation, and analysis) are utilized to 
enable the certificate holder to validate the effectiveness of the 
qualification and training program, or the need to change that program. 
The certificate holder must describe the attributes of the continuous 
analysis process in the certificate holder's FAA approved training 
program.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. Components of a Continuous Analysis Process.
    (a) Qualification and training program as approved by the 
Administrator. Attributes of the continuous analysis process:
    (1) Who is responsible?
    (2) Who has authority to change the process?
    (3) Description of the process.
    (4) Controls. policy, procedure, training, evaluation.

[[Page 1332]]

    (5) Documenting and measurement.
    (6) Interfaces between Departments. Consistency (policy, 
procedures, manuals):
    (i) Across Departments
    (ii) Across Divisions
    (b) Assessment tools (adequate and appropriate)
    (1) Testing
    (2) Checking
    (3) Critique
    (4) Inspection and observation
    (6) Documenting
    (7) Evaluation and analysis
    (c) Modification and adjustment of the qualification and training 
program
    (d) Approval for modification and adjustment

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 1 of Appendix Q to Part 121

Programmed Hour Requirements for New Hire, Initial, Transition, 
Conversion, Upgrade, Differences, Requalification, Recurrent, and 
SpecialTraining Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Programmed Hour Requirements: Pilots (PIC and SIC). (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1205; 121.1331; 121.1333; 121.1335)

    1. Baseline and Minimum Programmed Hours. Table 1A sets out the 
baseline and minimum programmed hours for each category of training by 
segment (academic and job performance). The FAA may approve a reduction 
in baseline programmed hours if the certificate holder demonstrates 
that the reduction is warranted. The FAA will not approve a reduction 
in the programmed hours below the minimum programmed hours.
    2. Required hours for requalification training. The hours 
established for requalification training (Sec.  121.1239) are for 
individuals in specific circumstances. Therefore, there are no 
programmed hours in Table 1A for requalification training.
    3. Required hours for differences and special training. The hours 
established for differences and special training are in addition to the 
previously approved programmed hours for the approved training program. 
For differences training (Sec.  121.1391), the hours remain in the 
differences training category. For special training (Sec.  
121.1337(c)), the certificate holder integrates the training into the 
existing categories in Table 1A. Therefore, there are no programmed 
hours in Table 1A for differences and special training.

                          Table 1A--Programmed Hour Requirements: Pilots (PIC and SIC)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Training segments
                                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Academics                          Job performance
         Training categories          --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           Emergency equipment
                                           Ground training          Flight training             drills and
                                                                                              demonstrations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEW HIRE.............................  Baseline 116...........  N/A....................  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 20.............  .......................  Minimum 4.
INITIAL..............................  Baseline 116...........  Baseline 36............  Baseline 8.
                                       Minimum 80.............  Minimum 36.............  Minimum 8.
FULL CONVERSION......................  Baseline 68............  Baseline 20............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 52.............  Minimum 20.............  Minimum 4.
CORE CONVERSION......................  Baseline 52............  Baseline 20............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 36.............  Minimum 20.............  Minimum 4.
TRANSITION...........................  Baseline 92............  Baseline 24............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 62.............  Minimum 24.............  Minimum 4.
FULL UPGRADE.........................  Baseline 68............  Baseline 20............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 52.............  Minimum 20.............  Minimum 4.
CORE UPGRADE.........................  Baseline 52............  Baseline 20............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 36.............  Minimum 20.............  Minimum 4.
RECURRENT............................  Baseline 18............  Baseline 8.............  Baseline 8.
                                       (each 9-month Recurrent  (each 9-month Recurrent  (each 36-month period).
                                        training period).        training period).
                                       Minimum 14.............  Minimum 8..............  Minimum 8.
REQUALIFICATION......................  Determined by            Determined by            Determined by
                                        Administrator.           Administrator.           Administrator.
DIFFERENCES..........................  Determined by            Determined by            Determined by
                                        Administrator.           Administrator.           Administrator.
SPECIAL..............................  Developed by             Developed by             Determined by
                                        Certificate Holder,      Certificate Holder,      Administrator.
                                        Approved by the          Approved by the
                                        Administrator.           Administrator.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

B. Recurrent Training (see Sec.  121.1367)

    Recurrent training modules are required each 9 months. Recurrent 
training modules also will contain academic subjects, job performance 
tasks and environments, and emergency drills and demonstrations that 
may be required once each 9 months, once each 18 months, or once each 
36 months. The certificate holder may distribute these recurrent 
training requirements in a manner that best suits its training program 
structure while ensuring that the required items are included at the 
appropriate intervals.

    Example 1: A 9-month recurrent period includes all of the 
academic subjects and job performance tasks and environments that 
are required at each 9-month interval. The certificate holder may 
decide to include one-half of those academic subjects and job 
performance tasks and environments that are required every 18 months 
during this particular 9-month training period, and leave the 
balance to be completed at the next 9-month period. Also, the 
certificate holder may decide to include one-fourth of the emergency 
equipment drills and demonstrations during this 9-month interval, 
and leave the other three-fourths of those drills and demonstrations 
to be completed during subsequent 9-month periods.
    Example 2: A 9-month recurrent period includes all of the 
academic subjects and job performance tasks and environments that 
are required every 9 months. During the next 9-month recurrent 
period, the certificate holder must include all of the academic 
subjects and

[[Page 1333]]

job performance tasks and environments that are required every 9 
months, as well as all of the academic subjects and job performance 
tasks and environments that are required every 18 months. At the 
following 9-month interval (27-month point), the certificate holder 
must include all those academic subjects and job performance tasks 
and environments that are required every 9 months. Then, at the 36-
month point, the certificate holder must include all of the academic 
subjects and job performance tasks and environments that are 
required every 9 months, all of the academic subjects and job 
performance tasks and environments that are required every 18 
months, and all of the academic subjects, job performance tasks, and 
all the emergency equipment drills and demonstrations that are 
required every 36 months.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 2 of Appendix Q to part 121

Academic Training Segment Requirements--Subjects and Tests--for New 
Hire, Initial Transition, Conversion, Upgrade, Requalification, 
Recurrent, Differences, and Special Training Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

A. Required Academic Training Subjects by Category of Training.

    (See Sec. Sec.  121.1221; 121.1223; 121.1225; 121.1227; 121.1229; 
121.1333; 121.1335; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 
121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1381; and 121.1391)
    1. Attachment 2 contains the Academic Training Segment 
requirements.
    2. When differences and special training are required for academic 
training, they will be additional training modules or new subjects. For 
more information about differences and special training categories see 
attachment 1 of this appendix.
    3. How to read Table 2A:
    (a) Table 2A contains the Required Academic Training Subjects by 
Category of Training. In the table, an ``X'' indicates that the subject 
must be included in the category of training. A ``9'' indicates that 
the subject must be trained every 9 months. An ``18'' indicates that 
the subject must be trained every 18 months.
    (b) Table 2A item (c)(3) addresses the training subject 
``Coordination, communication, and methodology for the performance of 
each normal, abnormal, and emergency procedure contained in the FCOM.'' 
For core upgrade, core conversion, phase I requalification, and 
recurrent training all abnormal and emergency procedures are required. 
However, only selected normal procedures are required. The selection of 
normal procedures should be based on procedural changes, feedback from 
observed procedural irregularities, and system safety initiatives.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

                                          Table 2A--Required Academic Training Subjects by Category of Training
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       Full upgrade,       Core upgrade,
                                                                  Initial and  phase                 full conversion,    core conversion,
                                                      New hire            III          Transition      and phase II         and phase I       Recurrent
                                                                    requalification                   requalification     requalification
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      Subject
(a) General Subjects:
    (1) Duties and responsibilities of flight                 X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     crewmembers..................................
    (2) Appropriate requirements of the Federal     ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     Aviation Regulations.........................
    (3) General relationship of FAA to the                    X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     certificate holder...........................
    (4) General overview of the contents of the               X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     certificate holder's Operating Certificate
     and Operations Specifications................
    (5) Meteorology to ensure a practical                     X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     knowledge of weather phenomena, including the
     principles of frontal systems, icing, fog,
     thunderstorms, and high altitude weather
     situations. Recognizing and avoiding severe
     weather situations and other hazards.........
    (6) Air traffic control systems, airspace,                X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     procedures, and phraseology..................
    (7) Navigation and the use of navigation aids,  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     including instrument approach procedures
     including how to use the information
     available on approach charts and maps and on
     airport diagrams.............................
    (8) Development of and operating in the                   X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     National Airspace System.....................

[[Page 1334]]

 
    (9) General Concepts of TCAS Operation........  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
        (i) The meaning of Traffic Alerts (TAs).
        (ii) The meaning of preventive Resolution
         Advisories (RAs).
        (iii) The meaning of corrective RAs. TCAS
         equipment components controls, displays,
         audio alerts, and annunciations;
         interfaces and compatibility with other
         aircraft systems; TCAS surveillance range
         versus display range; altitude ceiling
         operators; when an intruder will not be
         displayed; and TCAS performance on the
         ground.
    (10) High Altitude Physiology--Operations                 X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     above 10,000 ft.--Aircraft Decompression;
     Causes and Recognition of cabin pressure
     loss; Physiological Effects and time of
     useful consciousness; Immediate Actions;
     Altitude and Flight Level requiring the
     wearing of oxygen masks......................
    (11) Mechanical and Incident Reporting                    X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     Procedures...................................
    (12) Voluntary Safety Program and                         X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     Participation, including ASAP, FOQA, LOSA,
     and other government and industry accident
     prevention programs..........................
    (13) Normal and emergency communications......            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
    (14) General content, control, and maintenance            X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     of applicable portions of the certificate
     holder's operating manual, including the
     Flight Crewmember Operating Manual (FCOM).
     Relationship of FCOM to the Airplane Flight
     Manual.......................................
    (15) Dispatch and flight release procedures.              X                   X   ............  ..................     X (Upgrade and   ............
     Flight planning as applicable................                                                                                       Conversion
                                                                                                                           training only)
(b) Crew Resource Management (CRM):
    (1) Task: Authority of the Pilot In Command...            X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
        (i) The Captain's Authority, including
         responsibility for the safety of flight
         in routine and emergency conditions.
        (ii) Chain of command and importance of
         chain of command.
    (2) Task: Communication Processes and                     X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     Decisions....................................
        (i) Briefing.

[[Page 1335]]

 
        (ii) Inquiry, advocacy, and assertiveness.
        (iii) Self-critique.
        (iv) Communication with available
         personnel.
        (v) Decisionmaking.
        (vi) Conflict resolution.
    (3) Task: Building and Maintenance of a Flight            X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     Team.........................................
        (i) Leading and following, including the
         importance of crewmembers functioning as
         a team.
        (ii) Use of interpersonal skills and
         leadership styles in a way that fosters
         crew effectiveness.
        (iii) Significance of cultural
         differences.
    (4) Task: Workload Management and Situational             X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     Awareness....................................
        (i) Preparation and planning.
        (ii) Vigilance.
        (iii) Workload distribution.
        (iv) Distraction avoidance.
    (5) Task: Communication and Coordination......            X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
        (i) Flight deck and cabin chimes and
         interphone signals for routine
         situations.
        (ii) Flight attendant notification to
         flight crew that aircraft is ready for
         movement on the surface.
        (iii) Flight crew notification to flight
         attendant to be seated prior to take-off.
        (iv) Flight attendant recognition of
         critical phases of flight.
        (v) Crewmember coordination and
         notification regarding access to flight
         deck.
        (vi) Notification to flight attendants of
         turbulent air conditions.
        (vii) Notification between flight crew and
         flight attendants of emergency or unusual
         situations.
        (viii) Notification between flight crew
         and flight attendants of inoperative
         equipment that is pertinent to flight
         attendant duties and responsibilities.
        (ix) Normal and emergency communication
         procedures to be used in the event of
         inoperative communication equipment.
    (6) Task: Crewmember Briefing.................            X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
        (i) Crewmember responsibilities regarding
         briefings.
        (ii) Flight crew briefing.
        (iii) Flight crew to flight attendant(s)
         briefings.

[[Page 1336]]

 
        (iv) Flight attendant to flight
         attendant(s) briefings.
        (v) Required information.
        (vi) Security procedures.
        (vii) Communication procedures.
        (viii) Emergency procedures.
        (ix) MELs affecting flight operations and
         cabin safety equipment and procedures.
        (x) Flight information.
    (7) Task: Communication and Coordination                  X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     During a Passenger Interference Situation....
        (i) Certificate holder's written program
         regarding the handling of passenger
         interference, including crewmember
         communication and coordination.
        (ii) Techniques for diffusing a passenger
         interference situation.
        (iii) Importance of crewmembers and other
         employees working as a team.
        (iv) Role of management and crewmember in
         follow-up.
        (v) Actions to report an occurrence of
         passenger interference.
    (8) Task: Communication and Coordination                  X                   X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
     During an Emergency Situation................
        (i) Actions for each emergency situation.
        (ii) Importance of notification and who
         must be notified.
        (iii) Alternate actions if unable to
         notify.
        (iv) Communication during preparation for
         a planned emergency evacuation, including
         the time available, type of emergency,
         signal to brace, and special
         instructions.
(c) Aircraft Type Specific:
    (1) Contents of the certificate holder's        ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     operating manual, including the FCOM. Use of
     any FCOM-based quick reference handbook (QRH)
    (2) Operating limitations.....................  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
    (3) Coordination, communication, and            ............                  X             X                   X               \1\ X        \1\ 18
     methodology for the performance of each
     normal, abnormal, and emergency procedure
     contained in the FCOM........................
    (4) Aircraft systems as described in the FCOM.  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
    (5) Instrument procedures and low visibility    ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     operations...................................

[[Page 1337]]

 
    (6) Aircraft performance determinations and     ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     flight planning for all phases of flight,
     including takeoff and landing requirements
     considering aircraft, crew, airport, and
     weather requirements for takeoff, departure,
     and landing..................................
    (7) Operations Specifications authorizations    ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     and limitations..............................
    (8) MMEL, MEL, CDL............................  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
    (9) Emergency communications with passengers              X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
     and other crewmembers........................
    (10) Storage of and how to administer                     X   ..................  ............                  X   ..................           18
     medicinal oxygen.............................
    (11) The certificate holder's policy and FCOM   ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     procedures on the use of command and control
     automation and criteria for selecting and
     deselecting appropriate levels of automation
     (including manual control of flight) must be
     included in the lateral and vertical modes of
     takeoff, approach, and landing...............
(d) Special Hazards:
    (1) Preventing controlled flight into terrain   ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     (CFIT) and approach and landing accidents....
    (2) Recovery from loss of control due to        ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     airplane design, airplane malfunction, human
     performance, and atmospheric conditions......
    (3) Low altitude windshear....................  ............                  X             X                   X                   X             9
        (i) Recognition and avoidance.
        (ii) Recovery from inadvertent encounter.
    (4) Takeoff safety: Decisionmaking and high     ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     speed aborts, including propulsion system
     malfunction analysis, causes, symptoms,
     recognition, and the effects on aircraft
     performance and handling.....................
    (5) Airport surface movement safety and runway  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     incursion prevention.........................
    (6) Hazards of operating in or near             ............                  X             X   ..................  ..................  ............
     thunderstorms, turbulent air, icing, hail,
     volcanic ash, and other potentially hazardous
     conditions...................................
    (7) Land and hold short operations (LAHSO)....  ............                  X             X                   X                   X             9
    (8) Ground anti-icing and deicing.............  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
    (9) Ice accumulation in flight................  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
(e) Special Operations Areas:
    (1) Close simultaneous parallel precision       ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
     approach operations with Precision Radar
     Monitor (PRM)................................
    (2) Special routes, areas and airports........  ............                  X             X                   X                   X            18
(f) International Operations:
    (1) Area and route characteristics............            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18

[[Page 1338]]

 
    (2) Flight planning, charts, course plotting,             X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
     and tables...................................
    (3) Class II Navigation.......................            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
    (4) Communications............................            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
    (5) ETOPS or EROS, as applicable..............            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
    (6) International rules and regulations.......            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
    (7) Abnormal Operations.......................            X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
(g) Emergency Equipment Training:
    (1) Emergency communications with passengers              X                   X             X                   X                   X            18
     and other crewmembers........................
    (2) Crewmember-specific roles in dealing with             X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................            9
     crewmember and passenger injury and illness,
     and disruptive passengers....................
    (3) Location and familiarization of contents    ............                  X             X                   X   ..................            9
     for first aid and medical kits...............
    (4) Location and use of defibrillator.........  ............                  X             X                   X   ..................  ............
    (5) Certificate holders blood-borne pathogen              X   ..................  ............  ..................  ..................            9
     awareness program............................
    (6) Location and use of emergency exits.......  ............                  X             X                   X   ..................           18
    (7) Location and use of emergency equipment.    ............                  X             X                   X   ..................           18
     Equipment must include:......................
        (i) For over water operations: life         ............                  X             X                   X   ..................           18
         preservers, flotation seat cushions, life
         rafts, slides, and slide rafts...........
        (ii) For ground or water evacuation:        ............                  X             X                   X   ..................           18
         escape ropes, megaphones, flashlight,
         emergency lighting, emergency locator
         transmitters, first aid kit, slides,
         slide rafts, fire extinguishers (each
         type used), smoke and fume protection
         (such as PBE and smoke goggles),
         megaphones, oxygen (portable, passenger
         oxygen system, flight crew masks),
         supplemental (flight deck key,
         demonstration equipment, smoke detectors,
         trash containers, seat belt extensions)..
    (8) Fires--in flight and on the ground........  ............  ..................  ............  ..................  ..................  ............
        (i) Procedures and strategies for fire      ............                  X             X   ..................  ..................  ............
         prevention...............................
        (ii) Classes of fires and correct methods   ............                  X   ............  ..................  ..................  ............
         of extinguishing each....................
        (iii) Flight attendant role in exterior,    ............                  X             X                   X   ..................           18
         APU, jetway, and ramp fire...............
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ All abnormal and emergency procedures are required. Only selected normal procedures are required. See paragraph A.(3)(b) of this attachment for
  information about selecting normal procedures.


[[Page 1339]]

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END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

B. Knowledge Assessment. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1341 and 121.1343)

    1. Knowledge and understanding of each subject within each area of 
instruction must be evaluated by written or computer based testing at 
the end of academic training. When written or computer based methods 
are used:
    (a) A score of 80% or better on each instructional area is required 
to be satisfactory.
    (b) A minimum of 5 questions must be developed for each subject.
    (c) Two questions for each subject must be randomly selected for 
each test.
    (d) The form and content of each test must be approved by the 
Administrator.
    (e) The test must be corrected to 100% by a person administering 
the test.
    (f) Correction of missed questions must include a discussion of 
which answer is correct and why, and why the person's original answer 
was incorrect.
    (g) Retraining is required for each instructional area in which a 
score of 80% or better is not achieved.
    (h) Examination after retraining of the student is required for 
each instructional area in which retraining was completed.
    2. The knowledge assessment for the specific aircraft subjects of 
limitations, systems, and performance and loading may be used for the 
oral portion of the proficiency test if completed no more than 60 days 
prior to the flight portion of the proficiency test (see attachment 3, 
E.2.(a) of this appendix).
    3. The following standards are for evaluating the pilot performance 
in limitation, systems, and performance and loading subjects.
    (a) Limitations--The pilot must know all of the limitations 
appropriate to the aircraft with respect to:
    (1) Systems and components.
    (2) Performance.
    (b) Systems--The pilot must understand and be knowledgeable about 
the following subjects (systems and components) and be able to explain 
their operation as described in the FCOM and their applicability, as 
appropriate, to the Minimum Equipment List (MEL), Configuration 
Deviation List (CDL), and the operations specifications:
    (1) Landing gear: including, as appropriate, extension and 
retraction system(s), indicators, brakes, anti-skid, tires, nose-wheel 
steering, and shock absorbers.
    (2) Engine(s): including controls and indications, induction 
system, carburetor and fuel injection, turbo-charging, cooling, fire 
detection and protection, mounting points, turbine wheels, compressors, 
deicing, anti-icing, and other related components.
    (3) Propellers (if appropriate): including type, controls, 
feathering and unfeathering, auto feather, negative torque sensing, 
synchronizing, and synchro-phasing.
    (4) Fuel system: including capacity, drains, pumps, controls, 
indicators, cross-feeding, transferring, jettison, fuel grade, color 
and additives, fueling and de-fueling procedures, and allowable fuel 
substitutions, if applicable.
    (5) Oil system: including capacity, grade, quantities, and 
indicators.
    (6) Hydraulic system: including capacity pumps, pressure, 
reservoirs, grade, and regulators.
    (7) Electrical system: including alternators, generators, battery, 
circuit breakers and protection devices, controls, indicators, and 
external and auxiliary power sources and ratings.
    (8) Environmental systems: including heating, cooling, ventilation, 
oxygen and pressurization, controls, indicators, and regulating 
devices.
    (9) Avionics and communications: including autopilot; flight 
director; Electronic Flight Indicating Systems (EFIS); Flight 
Management System(s) (FMS); Long Range Navigation (LORAN) systems; 
Doppler Radar, Inertial Navigation Systems (INS); Global Positioning 
System (GPS/DGPS/WGPS); VOR, NDB, ILS/MLS, RNAV systems and components; 
indicating devices; transponder; and emergency locator transmitter.
    (10) Ice protection (anti-ice and de-ice): including pitot-static 
system, propeller (if appropriate), windshield, wing and tail surfaces.
    (11) Crewmember and passenger emergency equipment and procedures: 
including oxygen system, survival gear, emergency exits, evacuation 
procedures with crew duties, and quick donning oxygen mask for 
crewmembers and passengers.
    (12) Flight controls: including ailerons, elevator(s), rudder(s), 
control tabs, balance tabs, stabilizer, flaps, spoilers, leading edge 
flaps and slats, and trim systems.
    (13) Flightdeck automation: including the certificate holder's 
written automation policy and written operating procedures for 
selecting and deselecting appropriate levels of automation. This must 
include the certificate holder's policy for conducting CAT II and CAT 
III approaches when authorized.
    (14) Pneumatic system.
    (c) Performance and loading--The pilot must understand and be 
proficient in the use of (as appropriate to the aircraft) performance 
charts, tables, graphs, and other data relating to items such as:
    (1) Accelerate--stop distance.
    (2) Accelerate--go distance.
    (3) Balanced field.
    (4) Takeoff performance, all engines and with engine(s) 
inoperative, as appropriate.
    (5) Climb performance including segmented climb performance; with 
all engines operating; with one or more engines inoperative; and with 
other engine malfunctions as appropriate.
    (6) Service ceiling, all engines, with engines(s) inoperative, 
including drift down, if appropriate.
    (7) Cruise performance.
    (8) Fuel consumption, range, and endurance.
    (9) Descent performance.
    (10) Go-around from rejected landings.
    (11) The effects of meteorological conditions on performance 
characteristics with correct application of these factors to a specific 
chart, table, graph or other performance data.
    (12) How to determine longitudinal and lateral center-of-gravity 
location for a specific load condition, including how to add, remove, 
or shift weight to meet longitudinal (forward and aft), and lateral 
balance limits for takeoff, cruise, and landing.
    (13) Correct planning and knowledge of procedures in applying 
operational factors affecting airplane performance.
    (14) Meteorological effects on performance.
    (15) METAR and ATIS weather data.
    (16) Planning and application of operational factors affecting 
aircraft performance such as high altitude airports, cluttered and 
contaminated runways, ground and inflight icing.
    (17) Other performance data (appropriate to the aircraft).

END QPS REQUIREMENTS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 3 of Appendix Q to part 121

Job Performance Training Requirements for All Categories of Training 
(Tasks, Environments, Drills, and Observations With Instruction, 
Evaluation, and Simulation Credits)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 1340]]

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Determining the Job Performance (Flight Training) Tasks and 
Environments Required for Instruction and Evaluation for Each Category 
of Training

    (see Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1221; 121.1223; 121.1225; 
121.1227; 121.1229; 121.1333; 121.1335; 121.1337; 121.1339; 121.1341; 
121.1343; 121.1345; 121.1347; 121.1349; 121.1351; 121.1353; 121.1361; 
121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 
121.1385; and 121.1391)
    1. Certificate holder responsibilities with respect to the FCOM and 
Table 3A.
    (a) The certificate holder must use Table 3A of this Attachment to 
determine the tasks and environments on which each pilot must be 
instructed and evaluated for each training category in accordance with 
an FAA approved job performance (flight operations) training program. 
The tasks listed in the FCOM must reflect the tasks included in the 
table, as amended and include standard operating procedures, abnormal 
procedures, non-normal procedures, and emergency procedures, as well as 
the authorizations contained in the certificate holder's operations 
specifications.
    (b) If the certificate holder adds tasks or environments to those 
listed in Table 3A, it must further develop the tasks or environments 
to include the requirement and frequency for training and evaluation in 
each additional task or environment. These changes must be submitted to 
the POI for approval.
    (c) If the certificate holder's operation does not permit, or the 
operation of the aircraft flown by the certificate holder does not 
require one or more of the tasks listed in Table 3A, those tasks must 
not be included in the FCOM.
    (d) The recurrent requirements in Table 3A also include the 
frequency during which each pilot must be trained and evaluated in each 
task and environment.
    (e) Changes to the FCOM must be submitted to the POI for approval.
    2. Job Performance Training Requirements.
    When differences and special training are required for job 
performance training, they will be additional training modules or new 
tasks or environments. For more information about differences and 
special training categories see attachment 1 of this appendix.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. Deviation from Sec.  121.1345 Training program: Mandatory use of 
flight simulation training devices. If a certificate holder receives a 
deviation in accordance with Sec.  121.1345, and the certificate holder 
wants to extend the deviation, the certificate holder should submit the 
request for an extension at least 60 days before the termination date 
of the deviation.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

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BILLING CODE 4910-13-C

B. Aircraft Emergency Equipment Training Requirements. Aircraft 
Emergency Procedures Drills and Observations. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1205; 
121.1233; 121.1255; 121.1333; 121.1337; 121.1351; 121.1365; 121.1367; 
121.1337; 121.1381; 121.1383; 121.1387; and 121.1391)

    1. An individual performance drill is a hands on training and 
evaluation demonstration that is performed by each flight crewmember 
using the specified emergency equipment.
    2. A group performance drill allows a flight crewmember to 
participate as part of a group of persons completing a specific drill. 
During these situations, it is not necessary for each flight crewmember 
to complete each task in the performance drill. However, each flight 
crewmember participant must observe the actions and activities of the 
other persons who are completing the performance drill tasks.
    3. An observation drill is one during which a flight crewmember 
observes a specific procedural drill being conducted by other persons 
in a live setting or through an audio-visual medium.
    4. Table 3B provides a list of the drills and observations that are 
required in each training curriculum. The frequency for recurrent 
drills and observations is every 36 months. Attachment 4 of this 
appendix contains the performance standards for each drill and 
observation.
    5. Each flight crewmember must operate each exit on each aircraft 
type on which the flight crewmember is to serve in both the normal and 
emergency modes, including the actions and forces required in the 
deployment of emergency evacuation slides.
    6. Each flight crewmember must complete the required emergency 
training drills during the specified training periods, using those 
items of installed emergency equipment for each aircraft type on which 
the flight crewmember is to serve.
    7. Each piece of emergency equipment and training device must be in 
its fully secured, pinned, bracketed, or stowed condition, as installed 
on the aircraft, prior to being operated by each flight crewmember 
during each performance drill. The removal and stowage of each piece of 
emergency equipment may be completed separately from the performance 
drill as part of the equipment mountings drill.
    8. Flight crewmembers must demonstrate proficiency by completing 
each performance drill without reference to any guidance material or 
instruction.
    9. Individual evaluations of each flight crewmember's performance 
by an instructor is required. Flight crewmembers who do not complete 
emergency training drills must be retrained in accordance with the 
certificate holder's approved training program prior to reevaluation.

                          Table 3B--Aircraft Emergency Equipment Training Requirements
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               Initial,
                                                                              transition,
                                                                              conversion,     Recurrent every 36
         Emergency equipment training drills               New hire       upgrade, and Phase        months
                                                                              II and III
                                                                            requalification
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
No certificate holder may use nor may any person serve as a flight crewmember unless the following training has
 been completed by that person.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(a) Performance Drills
 
                     Individual
 
    (1) Fire Extinguishers..........................  ..................                  X                   X
    (2) Oxygen Systems..............................  ..................                  X
    (3) Equipment Mountings.........................  ..................   X (only required
                                                                               if mountings
                                                                                  differ by
                                                                                 equipment)
    (4) Flight Deck Oxygen Systems..................  ..................                  X                   X
    (5) Firefighting (Actual Fire)..................                  X
    (6) Emergency Exits.............................  ..................                  X                   X
    (7) Emergency Evacuation (with Escape Slide)....  ..................                  X                   X
    (8) Emergency Evacuation (without Escape Slide).  ..................                  X                   X
    (9) Flotation Devices...........................  ..................                  X                   X
 
                        Group
 
    (10) Ditching Survival (Dry Training              ..................                  X                   X
     Environment)...................................
    (11) Ditching Survival (Wet Training                              X
     Environment)...................................
(b) Observation Drills
    (1) Preparation of Emergency Exits in Emergency   ..................                  X                   X
     Mode...........................................
    (2) Emergency Evacuation Using an Escape Slide..  ..................                  X                   X
    (3) Deployment, Inflation, and Detachment of      ..................                  X                   X
     Slide, Raft, or Slide-Raft.....................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
See attachment 4 for the Performance Standards for the Emergency Equipment Training Drills.

C. Determining the Level of Flight Simulation Training Device That Must 
Be Used for Training, Evaluation, and Recent Experience (See Sec. Sec.  
121.1345; 121.1347; 121.1349; and 121.1351)

    To use an FSTD for training, evaluation, and recent experience the 
following general requirements must be met. The code shown in Table 3C 
for the task or environment indicates the lowest FSTD qualification 
level that may be used.
    1. General Requirements. In addition to the approval of the POI 
required by part 121, to be used for any task or environment, an FSTD 
must:
    (a) Have a qualification level assigned in accordance with part 60 
of this chapter.
    (b) Be maintained in accordance with part 60 of this chapter.
    (c) Have all of the aircraft and FSTD systems installed and 
operating that are necessary to complete the task or environment.

[[Page 1348]]

    (d) Be operated in accordance with Sec.  60.25 of this chapter. 
Operation with missing, malfunctioning, or inoperative components.
    (e) Have the qualification level indicated in Table 3C, or a higher 
qualification level, for the task or environment and the category of 
training indicated. Certain tasks may be trained in an FSTD at a 
different level than required for evaluating that specific task. The 
instructor must observe the pilot perform the task to proficiency in 
the level of FSTD required for the evaluation prior to the evaluation 
by a check person.
    2. Loft Requirements. For Qualification LOFT, a level C or D FFS is 
required. For Recurrent LOFT, a level B, C, or D may be used.
    3. Takeoff and Landing 90-Day Recency of Experience. The three 
takeoffs and three landings required for maintaining or regaining 90-
day recency of experience must include at least one takeoff with a 
simulated failure of the most critical engine, at least one landing 
from a precision category approach to the lowest minimums authorized 
for the certificate holder, at least one landing to a full stop, and at 
least one visual traffic pattern and landing. For maintaining recency 
of experience in a FFS, a level B, C, or D must be used. For regaining 
recency of experience, a level C or D is required.
    4. FSTD Requirements for the Proficiency Test, Check, or Review.
    (a) The proficiency test administered at the conclusion of initial, 
transition, conversion, upgrade, or requalification training must be 
conducted in no more than two levels of FSTD.
    (b) The proficiency test, check, or review administered as part of 
the recurrent qualification requirements may only be conducted in a 
Level B or higher FFS.
    5. Experience Requirements for Allowing Credit for Level C Full 
Flight Simulators. Where a Level D FFS is indicated in Table 3C, a 
Level C FFS may be used to complete the training and the proficiency 
test if the pilot applicant meets the following prerequisite experience 
requirements:
    (a) For first time qualification in group, the pilot must have a 
minimum of 1500 hours of flight time as a pilot in an aircraft, 
including a minimum of 750 hours of multiengine time.
    (b) For upgrade to PIC, the pilot must have a minimum of 200 hours 
in the aircraft type.
    (c) For SIC training and evaluation, the pilot must have a minimum 
of 1500 hours as a pilot, 500 hours of multiengine time, and 500 hours 
in the aircraft type as a flight crewmember.
    6. Seat Dependent Task Training. Seat dependent task training must 
be provided for all check pilots, check captains, pilot flight 
instructors, and for PIC and SIC if a certificate holder authorizes the 
PIC to operate the aircraft from the right hand pilot seat and the SIC 
to operate the aircraft from the left hand pilot seat. Seat dependent 
task training must include all of the following:
    (a) At least one LOFT scenario operating from the opposite pilot 
seat with qualified flight crewmember(s) occupying the remaining flight 
deck positions.
    (b) The use of systems that involve the flight path or speed of the 
aircraft; or
    (c) The use of systems that have controls not centrally located, or 
are accessible or operable from only the left or from the right pilot 
seat.
    (d) Each of the following tasks in the opposite pilot seat.
    (1) Preflight, including engine start.
    (2) Push back or power back, as appropriate for the certificate 
holder.
    (3) Taxi.
    (4) Normal takeoff.
    (5) Rejected takeoff.
    (6) Takeoff with the failure of an engine.
    (7) Climb to, cruise at, or descent from an intermediate operating 
altitude.
    (8) Precision instrument approach and landing.
    (9) Non-precision instrument approach and landing with an engine 
failed.
    (10) Parking at a gate or jetway if appropriate for the certificate 
holder.
    (11) For check pilots and pilot flight instructors authorized to 
conduct training or evaluation functions, training and practice in 
conducting flight training or flight checks from the left hand and 
right hand pilot seats, including the required standard operating 
procedures, abnormal procedures, non-normal procedures, and emergency 
procedures sufficient to ensure competence to conduct the pilot 
training and flight checks required by this sub-part; and
    (12) For check pilots and check captains who are authorized to 
conduct operating experience or line checks in the airplane during 
flight, the safety measures to be taken from either pilot seat for 
emergency situations that are likely to develop during flight 
operations.
    (13) Training and evaluation in the airplane is limited to 
certificate holders operating in accordance with the deviation 
described in Sec.  121.1345(b) through (e).
    7. The level of FSTD authorized for each of the tasks described in 
paragraph C.6 of this attachment is the same as the level of FSTD 
authorized for the same tasks during the proficiency test, check, or 
review as outlined in Table 3C in this appendix.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    8. Tasks or environments that are not dependent on the pilot's seat 
occupied, that do not use systems involved with the flight path or 
speed of the aircraft, and have controls that are centrally located and 
completely accessible and operable from both the left and right pilot 
seats, are not required to be addressed in seat dependent task 
training.
    9. If the certificate holder adds tasks or environments to those 
listed in Table 3C, it must further develop the tasks or environments 
to include the requirement and frequency for training and evaluation in 
each specific category of training listed in the table. These changes 
must be submitted to the POI for approval.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

[[Page 1349]]



                                   Table 3C--Minimum FSTD Required for Credit
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Training category                        Initial, transition,              Recurrent
---------------------------------------------------------  conversion, upgrade, and  ---------------------------
                                                                requalification
                                                         ----------------------------
                                                                        At least one                 Proficiency
   Tasks Each task may be performed in the FSTD level                     training                  test, check,
         specified or any higher level of FSTD.                          session and  Training \1\    or review
                                                          Training \1\       the                         \3\
                                                                         proficiency
                                                                          test \2\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.0 General
    1.1 Operation of Systems and Controls at the Flight             4             A             4             B
     Engineer's Panel...................................
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    1.2 Human Factors and CRM...........................       Must be incorporated throughout training and
                                                                                evaluation.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    1.3 Aircraft Handling Standards.....................        As authorized for each task or environment.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    1.4 ATC Communications and Procedures...............        As authorized for each task or environment.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    1.5 Seat Dependent Training.........................   Each task as authorized under the ``Proficiency Test,
                                                           Check, or Review'' column set out in this table. See
                                                                     paragraph C.6 of this attachment.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
2.0 Preflight Procedures
    2.1 Flight Deck (Inspection or Preflight)...........            4             A             4             B
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    2.2 Cabin Inspection................................           Aircraft or approved pictorial means.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    2.3 Exterior Inspection.............................           Aircraft or approved pictorial means.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
    2.4 Navigation System Setup.........................            4             A             4             B
3.0 Ground Operations
    3.1 Engine Start....................................            4             A             4             B
    3.2 Pushback and Powerback..........................            A             A             A             B
    3.3 Taxi............................................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    3.4 Pre-Takeoff Procedures..........................            4             A             4             B
    3.5 After Landing...................................            4             A             4             B
    3.6 Parking and Securing............................            A             A             A             B
4.0 Takeoff
    4.1 Normal and Crosswind--All Engines Operating.....            A             D             A             B
    4.2 Instrument with Lowest Authorized RVR...........            A             A             A             B
    4.3 With Engine Failure.............................            A             A             A             B
    4.4 Rejected With Lowest Authorized RVR.............            A             A             A             B
5.0 Departure, Climb, Cruise, Descent, and Arrival
    5.1 Instrument Departure............................            6         \4\ D             6             B
    5.2 Climb...........................................            6             A             6             B
    5.3 One Engine Inoperative En Route.................            6             A             6             B
    5.4 En Route Navigation.............................            6             A             6             B
    5.5 Descent.........................................            6             A             6             B
    5.6 Instrument Arrival..............................            6         \4\ D             6             B
    5.7 Holding.........................................            6             A             6             B
    5.8 Approach Transition.............................            6         \4\ D             6             B
6.0 Aircraft Handling
    6.1 Recognition of, and Recovery from, Approach to
     Stall..............................................
    6.1.1 Clean configuration...........................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    6.1.2 Takeoff or maneuvering configuration..........            A         \4\ D             A             B
    6.1.3 Landing configuration.........................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    6.1.4 Landing configuration with autopilot engaged..            A             D             A             B
    6.2 Asymmetric Thrust...............................            A             A             A             B
    6.3 Runaway Trim and Stabilizer.....................            A             A             A             B
    6.4 Jammed Trim and Stabilizer......................            A             A             A             B
    6.5 Upset Recognition and Recovery..................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    6.6 Slow Flight.....................................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    6.7 Turns With and Without Spoilers.................            A             A             A             B
    6.8 Stability Augmentation Inoperative..............            A             A             A             B
    6.9 Mach Tuck and Mach Buffet.......................            A             A             A             B
    6.10 High Sink Rate.................................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    6.11 Flight Envelope Protection Demonstration.......            A             A             A             B
    6.12 Windshear Avoidance and Encounter..............            A             A             A             B
    6.13 Traffic Avoidance (TCAS).......................      # \5\ 6             A       # \5\ 6             B
7.0 Instrument Approaches
    7.1 All Engines Operating--Autopilot Coupled........            5         \4\ D             5             B
    7.2 All Engines Operating--Manually Flown...........            5         \4\ D             5             B
    7.3 One Engine Inoperative--Manually Flown..........            A         \4\ D             A             B
    7.4 Approach Type

[[Page 1350]]

 
    7.4.1 Category II and III...........................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    7.4.2 Precision Groups..............................            A             A             A             B
    7.4.3 Non-Precision Groups..........................            A             A             A             B
    7.4.4 Ground Based Radar Approach (ASR and PAR).....            6             6             6             B
8.0 Visual Approach
    8.1 All Engines Operating (Normal)..................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    8.2 One Engine Inoperative..........................            A             A             A             B
    8.3 Two Engines Inoperative (3 and 4 Engine                     A         \4\ D             A             B
     Aircraft)..........................................
9.0 Missed Approach
    9.1 All Engines Operating...........................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    9.2 One Engine Inoperative..........................            A             A             A             B
    9.3 From a Circling Approach........................            A             A             A             B
    9.4 Descending Break-Out Maneuver from PRM Approach.            A             A             A             B
10.0 Landing
    10.1 All Engines Operating..........................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    10.2 Crosswind......................................            A             B             A             B
    10.3 Engine(s) Inoperative..........................            A         \4\ D             A             B
    10.4 Landing Transition.............................            A             B             A             B
    10.5 Rejected Landing...............................            A             A             A             B
    10.6 Zero or Partial Flaps..........................            A             A             A             B
    10.7 Auto-Land......................................         ** 6           * A          ** 6             B
    10.8 EFVS...........................................          * A           * A           * A             B
    10.9 HUD............................................          * A           * A           * A             B
11.0 Abnormal Procedures \6\
    11.1 Un-annunciated.................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.0 Systems (ATA Code)
    11.2.1 Air Conditioning (21)........................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.2 APU (49).....................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.3 Autopilot (22)...............................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.4 Brakes (32)..................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.5 Communications (23)..........................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.6 Doors (52)...................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.7 Electrical Power (24)........................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.8 Emergency Equipment (25).....................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.9 Engine (72)..................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.10 Fire Protection (26)........................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.11 Flaps (27)..................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.12 Flight Controls (27)........................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.13 Fuel (28)...................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.14 EGPWS or TAWS (34)..........................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.15 HUD.........................................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.16 Hydraulic Power (29)........................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.17 Ice and Rain Protection (30)................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.18 Instruments (31)............................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.19 Landing Gear (32)...........................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.20 Navigation (34).............................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.21 Oxygen (35).................................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.22 Pneumatic (36)..............................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.23 Propellers (61).............................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.24 Stall Warning (27)..........................            5             A             5             B
    11.2.25 Thrust Reversers (78).......................            4             A             4             B
    11.2.26 Warning Systems (various)...................            4             A             4             B
12.0 Emergency Procedures
    12.1 Fire or Smoke in Aircraft......................            4             A             4             B
    12.2 Un-annunciated Fire in Flight..................            4             A             4             B
    12.3 Ditching.......................................            4             A             4             B
    12.4 Emergency Descent (Maximum Rate)...............            5             A             5             B
    12.5 Rapid Decompression............................            4             A             4             B
    12.6 Emergency Evacuation...........................            4             A             4             B
    12.7 Engine Fire, Severe Damage, or Separation......            A             A             A             B
    12.8 Landing with Degraded Flight Controls..........          * A           * A           * A           * B
    12.9 Pilot Incapacitation...........................            5             A             5             B
    12.10 All other emergencies in accordance with the              5           * A             5           * B
     FCOM...............................................
13.0 Line Oriented Operations Environments
    13.1 Anti-Icing and Deicing Before Takeoff..........            4             A             4             B

[[Page 1351]]

 
    13.2 Structural Icing, Airborne.....................            A             A             A             B
    13.3 Thunderstorm Avoidance.........................            A             A             A             B
    13.4 Contaminated Runway Operations.................            A             A             A             B
    13.5 Low Air Density, High Altitude Runway                      A             A             A             B
     Operations.........................................
    13.6 CFIT and Terrain Avoidance.....................            6             A             6             B
    13.7 ETOPS Procedures...............................            6             A             6             B
    13.8 Altimeter settings (U.S. and International                 6             A             6             B
     operations)........................................
    13.9 Air Hazard Avoidance...........................      \5\ # 6             A       \5\ # 6             B
    13.10 Terrain Avoidance (EGPWS or TAWS).............            4             A             4             B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Footnotes:
\1\ Where Level 4 or 5 FTD is shown, all systems (and systems interoperability) necessary for the task must be
  installed in the FTD and operating correctly.
\2\ A maximum of 2 levels of FSTD may be used to complete the proficiency test following initial, transition,
  conversion, upgrade, or requalification training.
\3\ A maximum of 1 level of FFS may be used to complete the recurrent proficiency test, check, or review.
\4\ See paragraph C.6 of this attachment for requirements to use Level C FFS in place of Level D FFS.
\5\ Interactive Computer Based Instruction is an acceptable method for training.
\6\ The pilot must demonstrate the proper use of as many of the systems and devices listed as the person
  administering the test, check, or review finds are necessary to determine that the pilot has a practical
  knowledge of the use of the systems and devices installed on the aircraft.
 
Legend:
* Check for appropriate system installation and for FSTD qualification for this task.
** The FTD may be used, but a visual system meeting Level C FFS requirements must be installed and working
  properly.
# The FTD may be used, but a visual system meeting Level A FFS requirements must be installed and working
  properly.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

D. Persons Authorized To Administer Pilot Training, Evaluation, and 
Observation Activities Under Subpart BB. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1347; 
121.1349; 121.1251; 121.1253; 121.1255; 121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 
121.1341; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 121.1385; and 
121.1391)

    Table 3D identifies who must administer certain required training 
and evaluation for pilots, and who must supervise and observe 
instructors and check pilots.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

   Table 3D--Persons Eligible To Be Authorized To Administer Pilot Training, Evaluation, and Observation Activities Under Subpart BB for the Part 119
                                                                  Certificate Holder *
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Affiliation and Position
                                         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Contractor                                    The part 119 certificate holder
                                         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Other than   Part 142 or other part 119
     Pilot training, evaluation, and       part 142 or      certificate holder
 observation activities under subpart BB   other part  ----------------------------
           (by aircraft type)                  119                                                                               Aircrew
                                           certificate                                 Ground        Flight      Check pilot     program        Check
                                             holder        Ground        Flight      instructor    instructor                   designee       captain
                                         --------------  instructor    instructor
                                             Ground
                                           instructor
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic (Ground School) Training.......            X             X             X             X
Job Performance (Flight) Training.......  ............  ............            X   ............            X
Certificate or Rating Examination.......  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
Proficiency Test (Initial, Transition,    ............  ............  ............  ............  ............        X \1\             X
 Conversion, Upgrade, Recurrent,
 Requalification).......................

[[Page 1352]]

 
Qualification LOFT......................  ............  ............  ............  ............        X \2\             X
Supervision of Operating Experience.....  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X   ............            X
PIC Initial Line Observation............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
PIC Line Check (all flight crew           ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
 observed)..............................
Proficiency Check.......................  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
Proficiency Review......................  ............  ............  ............  ............        X \2\             X
Observation of:
     Flight Instructor--Initial.  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
     Flight Instructor--          ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
     Recurring..........................
     Check Pilot--Initial.......  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............        X \3\
     Check Pilot--Recurring.....  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X         X \3\
     Check Pilot--PIC Line Check  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............        X \3\
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* See Sec.   121.1343 for special limited authorizations for Initial Cadre Personnel. When POI authorization is required, the designation will
  specifically state the authorizations granted to the instructor, check pilot, or APD. Part 142 TCEs and other part 119 certificate holders' check
  pilots may be qualified and authorized as check pilots or APDs by the part 119 certificate holders' POI in accordance with subpart BB of this part.
  When qualified and authorized, these check pilots and APDs are considered a component of the part 119 certificate holders' training program resources.
\1\ When the proficiency test does not involve the issuance of a certificate or rating, a check pilot may conduct a Proficiency Test.
\2\ With POI authorization, employees of the part 119 certificate holder who are specifically designated flight instructors may conduct Qualification
  LOFT and Proficiency Reviews.
\3\ With POI authorization, employees of the part 119 certificate holder who are designated as APDs and specifically designated to do so, may conduct
  the Initial or Recurring Check Pilot Observation.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

E. Administering Evaluations. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1221; 121.1253; 
121.1255; 121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 
121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 
121.1385; and 121.1391)

    The following requirements apply to the evaluation activity 
indicated. Refer to Table 3D of this attachment for who may administer 
each type of evaluation.
    1. Line Checks. A line check must be completed in accordance with 
Sec.  121.1233.
    2. Proficiency Tests.
    (a) Proficiency tests must be administered for first time 
qualification in a duty position. They also must be administered at the 
end of the first 9-month recurrent training period following the 
proficiency test required by Sec.  121.1365(b)(1), and for phase II and 
III requalification. Employees of the certificate holder who are used 
or will be used in the certificate holder's operations and who have 
completed all of the required training may use the proficiency test 
obtain a certificate or rating.
    (b) When conducting a proficiency test, the evaluator (FAA, APD, or 
check pilot), must evaluate the success of each task as it is 
performed. If the proficiency test is a second attempt, and the first 
attempt was within the previous 60 days, the only tasks the evaluator 
is required to assess are those that were failed or were not assessed 
on the first attempt. However, during this retest, and at the 
discretion of the evaluator, any task may be reevaluated, including 
those previously judged satisfactory.
    (c) During a proficiency test, a task is judged as either 
satisfactory or unsatisfactory. However, in limited circumstances, the 
evaluator may judge a task to be incomplete or may not be certain about 
the outcome of the task. In these limited circumstances, the evaluator 
may require the applicant to repeat that task, or portions of that 
task; however, this provision does not authorize instruction or 
practice. The remaining tasks of the proficiency test must be completed 
before repeating the questionable task. If the second attempt to 
perform a questionable task is not clearly satisfactory, the evaluator 
must consider it unsatisfactory.
    (d) Unsatisfactory performance is demonstrated by consistently 
exceeding the parameters set out for the specific task, consistently 
exceeding the parameters for aircraft handling standards, or failing to 
take prompt, corrective action when those parameters are exceeded. If 
the pilot fails a task, the evaluator must decide if the entire test 
must be repeated or if the test can continue. If the entire proficiency 
test must be repeated, the evaluation must be terminated. If a single 
task has been judged unsatisfactory, and both the pilot and the 
evaluator agree, the test may continue, but only the tasks that have 
not been evaluated may be attempted. If

[[Page 1353]]

the pilot fails a second task, the evaluator must terminate the test.
    (e) If the proficiency test must be terminated for unsatisfactory 
performance, the FAA notification (and notice of disapproval, if 
appropriate) must list the tasks or areas of operation that have not 
been evaluated and which tasks or areas of operation that have been 
found unsatisfactory. These tasks and areas of operation must be 
evaluated, or re-evaluated, on any subsequent proficiency test.
    (f) If a proficiency test is discontinued for reasons other than 
unsatisfactory performance (e.g., equipment failure, weather, 
sickness), the evaluator must complete one of the following:
    (1) If the test is part of an application for an FAA-issued 
certificate or rating, the evaluator must appropriately annotate FAA 
Form 8710-1, ``Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application.'' The 
evaluator must return FAA Form 8710-1 and, if applicable, AC Form 8080-
2, Airman Written Test Report to the pilot. The evaluator must also 
issue a Letter of Discontinuance to the pilot. The Letter of 
Discontinuance must identify the portions of the test that were 
successfully completed. The pilot must present the Letter of 
Discontinuance to the evaluator when the test is resumed. The Letter of 
Discontinuance must become part of the certification file.
    (2) If the test is not part of an application for an FAA-issued 
certificate or rating, the evaluator must properly annotate the pilot's 
training record to indicate the tasks and areas of operation that were 
satisfactorily completed and the tasks and areas of operation that were 
not evaluated.
    (g) If the proficiency test is conducted as part of an application 
for an FAA-issued certificate or rating the pilot must have completed 
training for and demonstrated satisfactory performance on the rejected 
takeoff task as the pilot flying from either the left-hand or right-
hand pilot's seat and satisfactorily completed the training for and 
demonstrated satisfactory performance on the remaining required tasks 
and environments listed in this QPS for a proficiency test.
    (h) If the proficiency test is conducted as part of an application 
for an FAA-issued certificate or rating, and the pilot has not 
completed training for and demonstrated satisfactory performance on the 
circle to land task as the pilot flying from either the left-hand or 
right-hand pilot's seat, but has satisfactorily completed the training 
for and demonstrated satisfactory performance on the remaining required 
tasks and environments listed in this QPS for a proficiency test, the 
evaluator must annotate any certificate or rating issued with one of 
the following limitations:
    (1) If the airline transport pilot certificate is issued coincident 
with a type rating, the certificate must be annotated, ``ATP CIRC. 
APCH. VMC ONLY, (insert aircraft type) CIRC. APCH-VMC ONLY.''
    (2) If the airplane type rating is added to an airline transport 
pilot certificate, the certificate must be annotated, ``(insert 
aircraft type) CIRC. APCH-VMC ONLY.''
    (i) The evaluator must submit FAA Form 8081.5C, ``Airman 
Performance Report, Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating 
for Airplane,'' to the FAA for all tests administered under subpart BB 
of part 121.
    3. Proficiency Checks and Reviews.
    (a) Proficiency checks and reviews must include job performance 
evaluation of the tasks identified in Table 3B and an equipment 
knowledge assessment outlined in section B of Attachment 2 of this 
appendix. The equipment knowledge assessment may be replaced by the 
academic knowledge test as outlined in Attachment 2 of this appendix if 
the pilot completes the proficiency test within 60 days of the 
knowledge test. If the pilot does not complete the academic knowledge 
test in these areas within 60 days of the proficiency test, the pilot 
must complete a test of these knowledge areas in conjunction with the 
proficiency check or review. This test may be completed with oral, 
written, or computer based methodology. A passing score of 80% is 
required in each of the three areas of:
    (1) Aircraft systems;
    (2) Handbooks, manuals, MEL, CDL, and operations specifications; 
and
    (3) Aircraft performance and limitations.
    (b) Evaluators who conduct proficiency checks and reviews and 
instructors who conduct proficiency reviews may provide limited 
training to a pilot. The limits are:
    (1) No more than two tasks may be trained, and no more than a total 
of three attempts (including the first unsatisfactory, a rehearsal, and 
a final assessment) in each of the two tasks is allowed.
    (2) The pilot has not satisfactorily completed the check or review 
if the pilot has three or more unsatisfactory tasks, or fails to 
demonstrate satisfactory performance in three attempts at any one task.
    (3) The check or review must be completed within the approved 
scheduled time period.
    4. Other Assessments.
    (a) After qualification, the pilot's performance in all job 
performance training activities (including LOFT) must be assessed for a 
satisfactory level of task proficiency based upon this QPS.
    (b) During a scheduled FSTD course of instruction, if a task is 
performed unsatisfactorily the pilot may retrain on the unsatisfactory 
task; however, all scheduled tasks, including any retraining, must be 
completed within the approved scheduled time period.
    (c) Unsatisfactory task performance during LOFT may not be 
retrained and reevaluated during that scheduled time period.
    5. Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory Performance.
    (a) No evaluator or instructor may assess the pilot's performance 
as satisfactory unless that pilot:
    (1) Performs the tasks in accordance with the standards and 
tolerances established in the QPS.
    (2) Demonstrates mastery of the aircraft or simulated aircraft with 
the successful outcome of each task never in doubt.
    (3) Demonstrates performance such that no corrective or instructive 
action is required by another pilot to maintain safe flight.
    (4) Demonstrates CRM competencies in accordance with duties 
outlined in the FCOM requiring crew interactions, including in a crew 
briefing before each takeoff and before each approach.
    (5) Demonstrates sound judgment.
    (b) The evaluator or instructor must assess a pilot's performance 
as unsatisfactory if the pilot consistently exceeds tolerances 
established in this QPS or fails to take prompt corrective action when 
tolerances are exceeded.
    6. Recording, Reporting and Correcting Unsatisfactory Performance. 
The certificate holder must report a failure of a test, check, or 
review to the FAA in accordance with Sec.  121.1331(f)(1). The pilot 
must be retrained and reevaluated to a satisfactory level before the 
pilot may begin or be returned to line operations.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 4 of Appendix Q to Part 121

Generic Pilot Performance Standards for Each Task and Environment

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 1354]]

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Developing Pilot Performance Requirements for Each Task and 
Environment. (see Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1201; 121.1203; 
121.1205; 121.1221; 121.1253; 121.1255; 121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 
121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 
121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 121.1385; and 121.1391)

    1. General Requirements.
    (a) Certificate holders must develop training curricula and 
performance requirements for each required task and environment that 
include:
    (1) Conditions: Environmental conditions and circumstances, 
including those that compound the difficulty of the task when 
encountered.
    (2) Awareness criteria: Identify specific aspects of the task and 
environment that indicate proper operation, a need to seek further 
information, or a need to take action to prevent encountering a hazard 
or compounding the difficulty unnecessarily.
    (3) Action criteria: Procedures for completing a task, including 
operations in or near a critical environment, when appropriate. Provide 
relevant parameters with tolerances to reflect satisfactory levels of 
performance.
    (b) This attachment describes performance requirements and generic 
procedures for completing a task or operating in or near a critical 
environment. The certificate holder must tailor these performance 
requirements to the specific aircraft type and the certificate holder's 
approved operations. The FAA approved procedures for each task must 
include duties that apply to the pilot flying (PF) the aircraft and the 
pilot monitoring (PM) the aircraft in accordance with the procedures 
the certificate holder uses in operations under this part. The 
certificate holder must include the PF and PM procedures in the FCOM 
required by Sec.  121.133(c).
    2. [Reserved]

B. Generic Tasks and Environments. (see Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 
121.1201; 121.1203; 121.1205; 121.1221; 121.1253; 121.1255; 121.1257; 
121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 
121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 121.1385; and 
121.1391)

1.0 AREA: All Operations
    The pilot must demonstrate the awareness criteria and action 
criteria under the prescribed conditions. The certificate holder must 
train pilots in all authorized conditions. Any selected condition may 
be evaluated unless a particular condition is specified.
1.1 Task: Normal, Abnormal, and Emergency Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Maintain situational awareness of the events and circumstances 
at all times.
    (2) Demonstrate ability to continuously monitor and to identify any 
potential hazards or threats to the safety of the flight.
    (3) Demonstrate ability to communicate and manage available 
resources.
    (4) Maintain adequate lookout and traffic avoidance for the 
conditions.
    (5) Maintain awareness of aircraft position relative to a ``nearest 
suitable airport.''
    (6) Monitor system indications to ensure normal operation or 
identify abnormal situations.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Ensure operation of the aircraft within the limitations 
established by the FCOM.
    (2) Comply with the provisions of the FCOM, SOP, and MEL (if 
appropriate) as they pertain to the particular aircraft, through all 
phases of flight and all operations.
    (3) Make correct use of instruments, flight director, autopilot, 
and navigation and communication equipment as prescribed by the FCOM 
and as appropriate to the phase of flight.
    (4) Plan and brief automation modes and configurations.
    (5) Follow guidelines for PF and PM duties for operation of 
automated systems.
    (6) Plan workload and allow sufficient time for programming FMS.
    (7) Verbalize entries and changes made to automated systems. The 
pilot not making changes must ask for these verbalizations and 
verbalize that crosscheck is completed.
    (8) Change level of automation to correspond to situational 
awareness and workload requirements.
    (9) Call for and complete the proper normal, abnormal, or emergency 
checklist(s).
    (10) Alert ATC and the certificate holder as necessary and obtain 
appropriate level of service.
    (11) Ensure proper crew and passenger briefings are completed.
    (12) The PF must conduct the takeoff briefing according to the FCOM 
prior to taking the active runway.
    (13) The PF must ensure that the approach is briefed according to 
the FCOM prior to initial descent.
    (14) Ensure potential terrain or obstacle threats are included in 
departure and arrival briefings.
    (15) Ensure that passengers, crew, and cargo are properly secured 
for take-off or landing.
    (16) Locate and proceed to the nearest suitable airport when 
necessary.
    (17) Determine the best course of action when an immediate landing 
is required, but not possible.
1.2 Task: Operation of Systems and Controls at the Flight Engineer's 
Panel
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria
    (1) Demonstrate an understanding and proper use of the systems, 
controls and displays represented on the flight engineer's panel.
    (2) Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of the 
aircraft's phase of flight, how to assess the status of the aircraft's 
systems, and when to take necessary corrective actions.
    (c) Action criteria. Properly exercise the controls and systems 
represented at the flight engineer's panel during all phases of flight.
1.3 Task: Human Factors and CRM
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria
    (1) Demonstrate terrain awareness.
    (2) Demonstrate orientation, division of attention, and proper 
planning.
    (3) Observe indication of situation, condition, or problem.
    (4) Consider the risks of alternate courses of action.
    (5) Demonstrate an awareness of environmental factors that are 
potentially hazardous to safety of flight operations.
    (c) Action criteria
    (1) Demonstrate sound judgment and operating practices in those 
instances where specific instructions or checklist items are not 
published.
    (2) Confirm fault diagnosis with crew and review possible causes.
    (3) Identify alternative course(s) of action; discuss with crew; 
monitor the course of action selected by evaluating progress toward a 
goal.
    (4) Involve other crewmembers, aircraft dispatchers, and 
maintenance control personnel in option analysis.
    (5) Demonstrate effective communications with other crewmembers.
    (6) Coordinate actions with other crewmembers prior to execution, 
except where safety of flight would be in jeopardy.
    (7) Ensure that coordination with flight or ground crew is 
completed where necessary.

[[Page 1355]]

    (8) Acknowledge any ATC clearance (after it has been read back) or 
crew callout.
    (9) Demonstrate the necessary flight crew coordination required for 
the tasks being completed.
1.4 Task: Aircraft Handling Standards
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Demonstrates awareness of the aircraft's trim condition.
    (2) Demonstrates awareness of the aircraft's configuration.
    (3) Demonstrates awareness of the auto-flight mode when in use.
    (4) Demonstrates awareness of the aircraft's flight path and speed 
with respect to the horizon.
    (5) Demonstrates awareness of the dangerous combinations of 
sideslip angles, rudder positions, or other flight parameters resulting 
from maximum, indiscriminate, uncoordinated, or rapid deflection of the 
rudder.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) General.
    (i) Maintain smooth, positive aircraft attitude control in pitch, 
roll, and yaw to achieve and maintain appropriate flight path.
    (ii) Maintain an airspeed appropriate to the aircraft configuration 
and flight conditions.
    (iii) Use the appropriate aircraft configuration for normal and 
abnormal situations and procedures.
    (iv) Properly trim for the configuration or condition, if not 
automatic.
    (v) The outcome of a procedure or maneuver must never be in doubt.
    (vi) Continuously correct back to the target parameter.
    (2) Speed. Maintain the appropriate airspeed within 10 
knots, but never less than V2-5 knots during takeoff or 
VREF-5 knots during approach.
    (3) Pitch attitude must not exceed the maximum established in the 
FCOM (if applicable).
    (4) Roll (Bank).
    (i) The angle of bank must not exceed 30[deg] +5[deg].
    (ii) The bank angle must be limited to 15[deg] until an airspeed is 
reached that will safely permit bank angles larger than 15[deg].
    (iii) With an engine inoperative, if appropriate and recommended by 
the FCOM, establish a bank of approximately 5[deg] toward the operating 
engine(s).
    (5) Altitude.
    (i) Maintain altitude within 100 feet (30 meters), when 
a constant altitude is specified and is within the capability of the 
aircraft.
    (ii) An error of more than 100 feet, but less than 200 feet, which 
is promptly corrected, is acceptable.
    (6) Rate of Descent.
    (i) Maintain a stabilized rate of descent not to exceed 2,000 feet 
per minute below an altitude of 2,000 feet AGL.
    (ii) Maintain a stabilized rate of descent not to exceed 1,000 feet 
per minute below an altitude of 1,000 feet AGL.
    (iii) Maintain a stabilized rate of descent not to exceed 1,000 
feet per minute unless the instrument approach procedure or an abnormal 
condition requires a higher descent rate, and the approach is briefed 
accordingly.
    (7) Maintain heading within 10[deg] of the specified 
heading.
    (8) Course. Maintain the specified course within one-quarter scale 
deflection of the CDI, 5[deg] on the RMI or bearing 
pointer, 1 Nm on a DME arc, or RNAV course within a cross-
track error not to exceed the specified RNP.
    (9) Track (Ground track flown without electronic navigation aid 
guidance). Maintain the specified track within 5[deg].
    (10) Final approach segment, maintain a stabilized approach.
    (i) Have the aircraft in the desired configuration for landing with 
the engines spooled and stable.
    (ii) Maintain a constant pitch attitude.
    (iii) Maintain a constant heading (within 10[deg]) or 
maintain electronic navigation indication with no more than one-quarter 
scale deviation vertically and laterally.
    (iv) Maintain a constant airspeed within +5 and - 0 knots.
    (v) Maintain a constant rate of descent (not to exceed 2,000 fpm 
below 2,000 ft AGL or 1,000 fpm below 1,000 ft AGL).
    (vi) Keep the aircraft trimmed.
    (vii) Maintain altitude at MDA, when reached within +50 to - 0 ft.
    (viii) For constant angle non-XLS approaches, execute a missed 
approach when reaching the MDA, DA, or DH (as appropriate).
    (ix) Except where the required visual references for the runway are 
distinctly visible and identifiable, going below the MDA, DA, or DH 
prior to the initiation of the missed approach procedure, is 
unsatisfactory performance.
1.5 Task: ATC Communication and Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Interpret all ATC clearances received and, when necessary, 
request clarification, verification, or change.
    (2) Recognize the indication(s) of navigational station or waypoint 
passage.
    (3) Recognize navigation signal loss or RNP-related alerting.
    (4) Demonstrate the necessary flight crew coordination required for 
the tasks.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Select and use the appropriate communication frequencies.
    (2) Establish communications with ATC, using proper phraseology or 
data link procedures.
    (3) Comply with all ATC clearances, instructions, or airspace 
restrictions.
    (4) Advise ATC when unable to comply with a clearance.
    (5) Comply with ATC reporting requirements.
    (6) Demonstrate competency in two-way radio communications or ATC 
data link failure procedures.
    (7) Use the current and appropriate navigation publications for the 
proposed flight.
    (8) Identify the navigation aids associated with non-XLS approach 
procedures.
    (9) Select and correctly identify the appropriate navigation 
frequencies and facilities associated with navigation if not using 
RNAV.
    (10) Select, tune, identify, and confirm the operational status of 
ground and aircraft navigation equipment to be used for the approach. 
Low frequency (NDB) identification must be continuously monitored when 
used as the primary navigation reference. Where applicable, check 
automatic navigational aid identification on the navigation display.
    (11) Set the correct RNP reference prior to any procedure where the 
default RNP is not appropriate.
    (12) Locate the aircraft position using radials, bearing, DME 
range, coordinates, or navigation displays, as appropriate.
    (13) Adhere to airspeed restrictions and adjustments.
    (14) Intercept all courses, radials, bearings, or DME arcs 
appropriate to the procedure, route, and clearance in a timely manner.
    (15) Comply with the procedures for the instrument or circling 
approach (terminal instrument procedures chart).
    (16) Perform correct altimetry procedures, in accordance with the 
regulations, FCOM operational procedures, and ATC requirements.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) The AIM is a reference to the generally accepted practices of 
basic flight rules and instrument flight operations.

[[Page 1356]]

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

1.6 Seat Dependent Task Training
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Demonstrate awareness of the restrictions, 
limitations or modifications to procedures or maneuvers due to seat-
dependency.
    (c) Action criteria. Complete seat-dependent procedures or 
maneuvers.
1.7 Task: MEL Relief
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand MEL application.
    (2) Consider factors that restrict aircraft operation.
    (c) Action criteria. Apply the provisions of the appropriate MEL 
entry for operation restrictions.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) The purpose of this task is to require specific training that 
addresses safe operation of the aircraft while carrying an MEL item 
that requires training to take advantage of the relief.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

2.0 AREA: Preflight Procedures
2.1 Task: Planning
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Consider factors such as wind, wake turbulence, aircraft gross 
weight, temperature, obstructions, pressure altitude, density altitude, 
possible windshear, runway surface condition and length, and other 
related factors in calculating or selecting proper performance data.
    (2) Consider factors to be applied to the approach and landing such 
as displaced thresholds, meteorological conditions, NOTAMs, and ATC 
instructions.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Apply the provisions of the appropriate operations 
specifications, operating limitations, FCOM, MEL or CDL, weight and 
balance data, and the maintenance logbook as they pertain to the 
planned operation described in the dispatch release.
    (2) Apply the necessary adjustments to the published DA or DH and 
visibility criteria for the aircraft approach category as required:
    (i) FDC NOTAMS.
    (ii) Inoperative aircraft and ground navigation equipment.
    (iii) Inoperative visual aids associated with the landing 
environment.
    (iv) Weather service reporting factors and criteria.
2.2 Task: Flight deck (Inspection or Preflight)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Coordinate with ground crew and ensure adequate clearance prior 
to supplying power to, or operating, any devices such as doors, 
hatches, or flight control surfaces.
    (2) Know the maintenance or system tests that the pilot or other 
designated crewmember must perform.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Demonstrate proper operation of applicable aircraft systems.
    (2) Note any discrepancies and take proper corrective action.
    (3) Determine that the aircraft is airworthy and safe for flight.
    (4) Locate the documents required for flight, including 
airworthiness and registration certificates, operations specifications 
(if appropriate), FCOM, MEL, CDL, weight and balance data, and the 
maintenance logbook.
    (d) The pilot must verify that the aircraft is safe for flight by 
examining and, if appropriate, servicing items such as:
    (1) Engine(s), including controls and indicators.
    (2) Fuel quantity (if interior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (3) Oil quantity (if interior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (4) Hydraulic fluid quantity (if interior inspection is appropriate 
to the aircraft).
    (5) Oxygen quantity and pressures for crew and passengers (if 
interior inspection is appropriate to the aircraft).
    (6) Fire protection and detection systems for proper operation, 
pressures, and discharge indications.
    (7) Pneumatic system pressures (if interior inspection is 
appropriate to the aircraft).
    (8) Ground environmental systems for proper operation.
    (9) Auxiliary power unit (APU).
    (10) Anti-ice and de-ice systems.
2.3 Task: Cabin Inspection
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) The pilot must prepare the cabin for a positioning flight with 
no cabin crew aboard. The pilot is not required to prepare the cabin 
for passenger safety in revenue service.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Awareness of emergency equipment location 
and stowage, emergency exit location and operation, and noticeable 
inoperative cabin equipment.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Visually inspect the aircraft cabin to ensure the aircraft is 
safe for flight.
    (2) Take necessary actions prescribed by the FCOM for safe flight 
or crew evacuation.
2.4 Task: Exterior Inspection
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) An approved pictorial must realistically portray the location 
and detail of inspection items, and may be used instead of the aircraft 
to conduct an actual exterior inspection.
    (3) Flight Instructors, Check Pilots, and Check Captains may be 
approved to certify a pilot's proficiency in exterior inspections.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (4) The exterior inspection is a demonstration of a pilot's ability 
to perform appropriate safety checks. It is not an extension of the 
systems knowledge evaluation.
    The person conducting the evaluation should limit questions to 
those necessary to determine if a pilot can properly conduct the 
inspection and recognize an unsafe condition.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (b) Awareness criteria. Check the general area around the aircraft 
for hazards to the safety of the aircraft and personnel.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Note any discrepancies and take proper corrective action.
    (2) Determine that the aircraft is airworthy and safe for flight.
    (d) The pilot must verify that the aircraft is safe for flight by 
examining and, if appropriate, servicing items such as:
    (1) Engines, for closed and latched access panels, leaks other than 
normal drainage, intake and exhaust areas for freedom from FOD hazards, 
and pylon alignment marks, as appropriate.
    (2) Fuel quantity (if exterior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (3) Oil quantity (if exterior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (4) Hydraulic fluid quantity (if exterior inspection is appropriate 
to the aircraft).
    (5) Oxygen quantity and pressures for crew and passengers (if 
exterior inspection is appropriate to the aircraft).

[[Page 1357]]

    (6) Landing gear, brakes, and steering system.
    (7) Tires for condition, inflation, and correct mounting, where 
applicable.
    (8) Fire protection and detection systems for pressures and absence 
of discharge indications (if exterior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (9) Pneumatic system pressures (if exterior inspection is 
appropriate to the aircraft).
    (10) Auxiliary power unit (APU).
    (11) Flight control systems including trim, spoilers, ailerons, 
leading and trailing edge slats and flaps, elevator, stabilizer, and 
rudder, as appropriate.
    (12) Anti-ice and de-ice systems.
    (13) General airframe and structural integrity, including 
scratches, tears, holes, or dents and the fit and security of panels, 
doors, and hatches.
2.5 Task: Navigation System Setup
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) This includes, but is not limited to, FMC, INS, and GPS 
navigation systems.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor the navigation system for fault indication, or for the 
results of self-tests.
    (2) Ensure the system is operating normally.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Verify aircraft, engine, and other data for accuracy.
    (2) Enter or recall the planned route of flight.
    (3) Enter performance-related data, such as thrust levels, planned 
speeds and other vertical navigation profile information.
    (4) Perform crosschecks and crew verification procedures in 
accordance with the FCOM.
3.0 AREA: Ground Operations
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Maintain constant vigilance and lookout of the general area 
around the aircraft for hazards to the safety of the aircraft, 
personnel, other aircraft, vehicles, equipment, and structures.
    (2) Properly divide attention inside and outside flight deck.
    (3) Consider effect of jet blast on personnel, other aircraft, 
vehicles, ground equipment, and structures.
    (4) Use airport diagram (surface movement) chart to aid in 
maintaining positional awareness.
    (5) Comply with sterile flight deck requirements.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Use the minimum thrust necessary to breakaway and to maintain 
taxi speed.
    (2) Maintain proper spacing from other aircraft, obstructions, and 
personnel.
    (3) Obtain appropriate clearance before crossing or entering active 
runways.
    (4) Observe runway hold lines, localizer and glide slope critical 
areas, beacons, and other surface movement guidance control markings 
and lighting.
    (d) The certificate holder must provide crewmembers with specific 
requirements for unique parking situations, or unique crewmember 
responsibilities that must be completed before the door closes or after 
it is opened in accordance with the FCOM. The certificate holder must 
also submit these unique requirements to the FAA for acceptance or 
approval as required.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (e) Ground operations begin when the aircraft door is closed and 
includes all activities until the brakes are released for the takeoff 
roll. Ground operations resume again when the landing roll has been 
completed to a safe taxi speed just as the aircraft exits the landing 
runway, and continues until the aircraft has been parked and the door 
opened.
    END INFORMATION
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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

3.1 Task: Engine Start
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Includes hot or cold weather, tailwinds, icing conditions, low 
density altitude.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Ensure the ground safety procedures are 
followed during the before-start, start, and after-start phases of 
ground operations.
    (c) Action criteria. Use required ground crew personnel during the 
before-start, start, and after-start phases (as appropriate).
3.1.1 Task: Engine Start--Normal
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor appropriate RPM and EGT indicators.
    (2) Be able to identify abnormal RPM and EGT indications.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Start the engine(s):
    (2) Under varying environmental conditions;
    (3) Using normal, auxiliary power unit, external power, pneumatic 
sources, or cross-bleed, as appropriate.
3.1.2 Task: Engine Start--Abnormal
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor appropriate RPM and EGT indicators.
    (2) Be able to identify abnormal RPM and EGT indications.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Start the engine(s):
    (2) Take appropriate action in the event of a malfunction during 
the start process.
3.2 Task: Pushback or Powerback
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Maintain communications with ground crew.
    (2) Avoid use of brakes unless requested by ground crew.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Exhibit adequate knowledge of pushback or powerback procedures 
(as appropriate to the aircraft).
    (2) [Reserved]
3.3 Task: Taxi
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Training must be conducted in taxi operations at the lowest 
visibility (RVR) authorized. Evaluation can be in any conditions.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Comply with low visibility procedures, as applicable.
    (2) [Reserved]
    (c) Action criteria. Demonstrate safe taxi procedures.
3.4 Task: Pre-Takeoff Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Be aware of the operational factors that 
could affect the takeoff such as takeoff warning inhibit systems or 
other aircraft characteristics, runway length, surface conditions, 
wind, wake turbulence, obstructions, and other related factors that 
could adversely affect safety.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Interpret information and clearances received and ensure all 
instrument references, flight director and autopilot controls, and 
navigation and communications equipment have been set.
    (2) Confirm that the aircraft trim and wing high lift devices are 
configured properly.
    (3) Obtain (or acknowledge, as appropriate) the takeoff and 
departure clearance as issued by ATC.
3.5 Task: After Landing
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Promptly clear the runway, avoiding an 
incursion on any other runway in the process.
    (c) Action criteria. Take no other action until the aircraft is 
clear of the

[[Page 1358]]

runway and a suitable ATC clearance has been received.
3.6 Task: Parking and Securing
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Be aware of or acknowledge other aircraft 
and ground vehicles that might be a hazard to your operation.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Use available visual docking system and marshaller to properly 
park the aircraft.
    (2) Complete the post-flight entries in the maintenance logbook, 
including any discrepancies encountered during the flight.
4.0 AREA: Takeoff
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor engine and other aircraft controls, settings, and 
instruments during takeoff to ensure all predetermined parameters are 
maintained.
    (2) Monitor aircraft airspeed to determine normal acceleration 
during take-off ground roll.
    (3) Assess take-off and climb hazards particularly those related to 
obstacles.
    (4) Consider the effect of LAHSO or SOIR if conducted on a runway 
that crosses the takeoff runway.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) The flight crewmembers must ensure takeoff clearance is 
received and that the correct runway is being entered for takeoff prior 
to crossing the hold short line.
    (2) Taxi into position to maximize the available runway.
    (3) Align the aircraft on the runway centerline.
    (4) Apply the controls correctly to maintain longitudinal alignment 
on the centerline of the runway prior to and during the takeoff.
    (5) Maintain aircraft alignment with the runway centerline during 
the takeoff roll.
    (6) Adjust the engine controls for the existing conditions and 
verify the expected engine performance.
    (7) Maintain a wings-level attitude during the takeoff roll and 
during the rotation to proper pitch attitude.
    (8) Rotate at the proper airspeed, at the proper rate, to the 
proper pitch attitude for the aircraft configuration.
    (9) Maintain a positive rate of climb throughout the takeoff and 
initial climb.
    (10) Adjust to the desired pitch attitude at the predetermined 
airspeed or V-speed to attain the desired performance for the 
particular takeoff segment.
    (11) Use the applicable noise abatement and wake turbulence 
avoidance procedures, as required.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Takeoff begins at brake release (or the application of thrust 
with the intention of flight for those aircraft not using brakes). 
Takeoff ends when the aircraft is airborne, or in the event of a 
rejected takeoff, when the aircraft has reached a safe taxi speed.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

4.1 Task: Normal and Crosswind--With All Engines Operating
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Takeoffs must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency 
during training at the maximum demonstrated crosswind for the aircraft. 
For evaluation purposes the crosswind component need not exceed 12 
knots.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria listed in Area 4.0(b), Takeoff.
    (2) Assess the changing effect of the crosswind component to make 
control corrections as required.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria listed in Area 4.0(c), Takeoff.
    (2) Transition smoothly and accurately into a stabilized climb.
    (3) After liftoff, maintain required ground track or heading, as 
appropriate, until a turn is required.
4.2 Task: Instrument With Lowest Authorized RVR
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Takeoff must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency in 
training under the lowest visibility authorized for takeoff.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria listed in Area 
4.0(b), Takeoff.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Transition smoothly and accurately from outside visual 
reference(s) to instrument meteorological conditions.
    (2) Transition smoothly and accurately into a stabilized climb.
    (3) After liftoff maintain required heading or assigned navigation 
radial, as appropriate, until a turn is required.
4.3 Task: With Engine Failure
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Takeoff must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency in 
training with the failure of the most critical engine.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Observe flight and engine instruments or divergence from the 
runway centerline to assess loss of thrust.
    (2) Identify those situations that require a rejected takeoff and 
make timely decision to continue the takeoff or reject the takeoff.
    (3) Identify the side of the aircraft on which the failure has 
occurred.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Apply rudder as required to counteract asymmetric thrust, 
keeping the inclinometer reference (``the ball'') centered.
    (2) Maintain wings level.
    (3) Maintain the aircraft alignment with the runway.
4.3.1 Task: Takeoff With Engine Failure Between V1 and VR
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Takeoff must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency in 
training with the engine failure after V1 and prior to V2; or as close 
as possible after V1 when V1 and V2, or V1 and VR are identical.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria in Task 4.3.Takeoff with Engine Failure.
    (2) [Reserved]
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria in Task 4.3. Takeoff with Engine Failure.
    (2) Continue the takeoff if abnormality or emergency (in accordance 
with FCOM procedures) occurs at or after V1 speed.
    (3) Transition smoothly and accurately into a stabilized climb.
    (4) Maintain required ground track (or heading) and attitude 
appropriate for climb performance and terrain clearance as appropriate, 
until a turn is required.
    (5) Make suitable decision to return to airport or divert, as 
appropriate.
4.3.2 Task: Takeoff with Engine Failure Between VR and 500 ft Above 
Field Elevation
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Takeoff must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency in 
training with the failure after VR such that nosewheel steering 
provides no directional control assistance and that visual cues for 
lateral direction are not available.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 4.3. Takeoff 
with Engine Failure.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria in Task 4.3. Takeoff with Engine Failure.
    (2) Maintain a stabilized climb with wings level.
    (3) Maintain required ground track (or heading) and attitude 
appropriate for

[[Page 1359]]

climb performance and terrain clearance as appropriate, until a turn is 
required.
    (4) Make suitable decision to return to airport or divert, as 
appropriate.
4.4 Task: Rejected With Lowest Authorized RVR
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) The takeoff must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency 
in training with the cause (for the decision to reject) presented so 
that the decision may be made prior to V1 speed.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria in Task 4.3.Takeoff with Engine Failure.
    (2) Abort the takeoff if abnormality or emergency (in accordance 
with FCOM procedures) occurs prior to V1 speed.
    (3) Identify critical situation and make timely decision to reject 
the take-off.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Reduce the power promptly to idle and simultaneously apply 
maximum wheel brakes when an engine failure or other cause for aborting 
the takeoff is recognized.
    (2) Use spoilers, thrust or propeller reverse, and other drag or 
braking devices, as appropriate, to bring the aircraft to a safe stop 
on the runway or stopway surface.
5.0 AREA: Departure, Climb, Cruise, Descent, and Arrival
5.1 Task: Instrument Departure
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Understand the requirements of the climb 
profile, departure profile, or any other authorized departure 
procedure(s).
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Maintain assigned heading, course, or track, or comply with ATC 
clearance.
    (2) Comply with the provisions of the climb profile, departure 
profile, or any other authorized departure procedure(s).
    (3) Conduct the departure to a point where the transition to the en 
route environment is complete.
5.2 Task: Climb
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor the climb profile to ensure intermediate crossing 
altitudes and the ATC clearance can be met.
    (2) Understand speed restrictions as dictated by airspace, 
procedure, or ATC.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Select and maintain an airspeed (best angle, best rate, best 
economy, or cost index) suitable for the conditions and in compliance 
with speed and crossing restrictions as dictated by airspace, 
procedure, or ATC.
    (2) Perform correct altimetry procedures, setting QNE at the 
transition altitude or as dictated by airspace or ATC.
5.3 Task: One Engine Inoperative En route
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Review route segments for proximity of high terrain and the 
MEA.
    (2) Compare climb capability with MEA and high terrain.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Maintain an appropriate thrust setting in the remaining 
engine(s).
    (2) Maintain the airspeed for drift-down or engine-out (cruise) 
climb.
    (3) Select the proper flight altitude for the configuration and 
environmental conditions (e.g., icing, thunderstorms, terrain).
5.4 Task: En route Navigation
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor fuel burn, cruise speed, and thrust to achieve planned 
performance.
    (2) Monitor navigation system performance.
    (3) Understand maximum operating altitude and optimum cruise 
altitude.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Use Class I or Class II navigation procedures as authorized by 
the operations specifications and prescribed by the FCOM.
    (2) Navigate to the degree of accuracy required by the airspace in 
which the aircraft is being operated.
    (3) Conduct required navigation system crosschecks.
    (4) Perform correct altimetry procedures and monitor flight level 
or altitude clearances.
    (5) Report equipment failure that may degrade navigation as 
dictated by airspace or regional differences.
    (6) Determine the optimum cruise altitude for a given gross weight 
and desired airspeed or Mach.
    (7) Use appropriate on-board reference to determine the maximum 
cruise altitude for the gross weight that affords the required maneuver 
buffet margin.
    (8) Determine the correct airspeed for both maximum endurance and 
maximum range for the gross weight and altitude.
5.5 Task: Descent
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria. Monitor the descent profile to ensure 
crossing altitudes, speed restrictions, and ATC clearances can be met.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) At the appropriate point, begin a rate of descent consistent 
with safe aircraft operating characteristics and company procedures.
    (2) Maintain or adjust rate of descent, airspeed, and aircraft 
configuration for the conditions and to comply with speed and crossing 
restrictions as dictated by airspace, procedure, or ATC.
    (3) Perform correct altimetry procedures, setting QNH (or QFE, as 
required or appropriate) at the transition level or as dictated by 
airspace or regional differences.
5.6 Task: Instrument Arrival
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor the descent profile to ensure crossing altitudes, speed 
restrictions, and ATC clearances can be met.
    (2) Comply with the provisions of the profile descent, STAR, or 
other arrival procedure(s).
    (c) Action criteria. Conduct the arrival to a point where the 
transition from the en route environment to the terminal environment is 
complete.
5.7 Task: Holding
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Recognize arrival at the clearance limit or holding fix.
    (2) Be aware of winds as they affect wind-drift correction 
techniques to maintain the desired radial, track, or bearing.
    (3) Apply knowledge of holding endurance, including fuel on board, 
fuel flow while holding, and fuel required to alternate.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Select holding airspeed appropriate for the aircraft 
configuration and holding altitude.
    (2) Adjust airspeed to cross the holding fix at or below maximum 
holding airspeed.
    (3) Follow appropriate entry procedures for a standard, non-
standard, published, or non-published holding pattern.
    (4) Use the proper timing criteria required by the holding altitude 
and ATC, or comply with the navigation system holding procedure, as 
appropriate.
    (5) Comply with the holding pattern leg length when a DME distance 
is specified.
    (6) Arrive over the holding fix as close as possible to the Expect 
Further Clearance (EFC) time.
5.8 Task: Approach Transition
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Monitor the navigation instruments and 
ensure that airspeeds, aircraft configurations,

[[Page 1360]]

crossing altitudes will meet approach procedures or ATC clearance 
requirements.
    (c) Action criteria. Complete a procedure turn, DME arc, RNAV 
transition, TAA, or follow ATC radar vectors to align with the 
intermediate or final approach course as applicable.
6.0 AREA: Aircraft Handling
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Recognize the deviation from normal flight (such as buffeting, 
stick shaker, visual or aural flight deck annunciations or warnings, 
decay of control effectiveness, or any other cues related to the 
specific aircraft design characteristics).
    (2) Practice maneuvering the aircraft and experience how the 
aircraft performs and responds to flight control inputs in various 
pitch, power, and configuration combinations.
    (c) Action criteria. Return the aircraft to a safe state.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) The purpose of these maneuvers is to provide familiarity with 
the handling behavior of the aircraft, including operations outside the 
normal flight envelope. The intent is to teach the pilot to recognize 
the deviation from normal flight, and to practice the return of the 
aircraft to a safe state. In this context a safe state is considered an 
aircraft attitude (pitch, bank, yaw), airspeed, trim, and thrust 
setting appropriate for the aircraft configuration, altitude, and 
geographic location, and at which the pilot is able to maintain control 
of the aircraft. The pilot should not be expected to execute the 
procedures to enter a maneuver. If the instructor requires the 
assistance of the pilot to maneuver or configure the aircraft, to fly a 
particular airspeed, or to set a particular power or trim setting, the 
instructor should provide progressive instructions to the student to 
achieve the desired ``set up'' position for the task. Additionally, 
recoveries from such situations should not be taught or practiced as 
regimented procedures. Returning the aircraft to a safe state requires 
that the pilot continue to control the aircraft away from attitudes and 
airspeeds that are outside of the normal flight envelope without 
exceeding critical performance parameters (e.g., engine temperature or 
RPM limits and ``g'' loading) until that safe state is reached. The 
only meaningful criterion for satisfactory demonstration of these tasks 
is the return of the aircraft to a safe state without exacerbating the 
condition.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.1 Task: Recognition of and Recovery From Approach to Stall
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) At least one recovery from Approach-to-Stall must be completed 
while in a turn using a bank angle of 15[deg] to 30[deg].
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Recognize the first indication of an impending stall.
    (2) Awareness of the current position and circumstance:
    (i) The immediately preceding change in aircraft configuration, 
trim, or attitude.
    (ii) The potential of sacrificing altitude for airspeed.
    (iii) The proximity of terrain, laterally and vertically.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Announce the first indication of an impending stall.
    (2) Adjust pitch, bank, and thrust to recover from the approach-to-
stall.
    (3) Maintain heading control throughout the recovery, including:
    (i) At low altitudes (traffic pattern altitude and below), minimum 
airspeed and altitude loss.
    (ii) At intermediate and higher altitudes, loss of airspeed or 
altitude not necessary for the safe and expeditious recovery must be 
avoided.
    (4) Recover to an airspeed appropriate for the configuration and 
establish the appropriate altitude and heading.
    (5) Recovery is complete when straight and level, un-accelerated 
flight is achieved.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) It is preferable to conduct slow flight training tasks in 
section 6.6 prior to training recovery from approaches to stall (stall 
avoidance) in section 6.1.2 through 6.1.4. The clean configuration 
scenario in section 6.1.1 should be used to practice the cruise 
configuration or holding pattern stall, typically at intermediate and 
higher altitudes, where there is usually more altitude available to use 
for recovery. The configuration scenarios in sections 6.1.2 through 
6.1.4 should be used to practice the low energy and high drag 
configurations, typically at very low altitudes, where there is very 
little altitude available to use for recovery. One or more of these 
should be practiced at an altitude between 300 and 500 feet AGL.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.1.1 Task: Clean Configuration
    (a) Condition(s). Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configurations, 
and environmental conditions representative of normal operations 
outside of departures or arrivals, including en route portion of 
flight.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.1. Recognition of and Recovery from Approach to Stall.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria described in Task 6.1. 
Recognition of and Recovery from Approach to Stall.
6.1.2 Task: Takeoff or Maneuvering Configuration
    (a) Condition(s). Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configurations, 
and environmental conditions representative of normal operations during 
departures or arrivals.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.1. Recognition of and Recovery from Approach to Stall.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria described in Task 6.1. 
Recognition of and Recovery from Approach to Stall.
6.1.3 Task: Landing Configuration
    (a) Condition(s). Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configuration, and 
environmental conditions representative of normal operations 
immediately after takeoff or inside the final approach fix prior to 
landing.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.1. Recognition of and Recovery from Approach to Stall.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria described in Task 6.1. 
Recognition of and Recovery from, Approach to Stall.
6.1.4 Task: Landing Configuration With Auto Pilot Engaged
    (a) Condition(s). Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configuration, and 
environmental conditions representative of normal operations inside the 
final approach fix prior to landing, with the autopilot engaged.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.1. Recognition of and Recovery from, Approach to Stall.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria described in Task 6.1. 
Recognition of and Recovery from, Approach to Stall.

[[Page 1361]]

6.2 Task: Asymmetric Thrust
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) The most critical engine must be shut down and a restart must 
be demonstrated.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Exhibit adequate knowledge of the flight characteristics and 
controllability associated with maneuvering with engine(s) inoperative 
(as appropriate to the aircraft).
    (2) Maintain the operating engine(s) within acceptable operating 
limits.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Establish the proper configuration, and properly set all engine 
controls for the conditions, taking into account, wind, turbulence, and 
icing conditions.
    (2) Maintain straight and level flight at the required speed 
throughout the shutdown and restart.
    (3) Experience the roll and yaw handling change(s) due to the 
engine shutdown and startup transient(s).
6.2.1 Task: Engine Shutdown
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.2., Asymmetric Thrust.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria described in Task 6.2., Asymmetric Thrust.
    (2) Use the prescribed FCOM procedures for identifying, verifying, 
and securing the engine that should be shut down.
6.2.2 Task: Maneuvering With One Engine Inoperative
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configurations, and 
environmental conditions representative of engine inoperative 
operations after departure or prior to arrival.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.2., Asymmetric Thrust.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria described in Task 6.2., Asymmetric Thrust.
    (2) Practice maneuvering in the clean, approach and landing 
configurations, with normal turns, thrust and speed changes, and climbs 
and descents.
6.2.3 Task: Engine Restart
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configurations, and 
environmental conditions representative of engine inoperative 
operations after departure or prior to arrival.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Determine if it is appropriate to attempt a restart.
    (2) [Reserved]
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Demonstrate proper restart procedures in accordance with FCOM.
    (2) [Reserved]
6.3 Task: Runaway Trim or Stabilizer
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Experience the pitch handling qualities of the aircraft with 
runaway stabilizer or runaway pitch trim, and pitch mistrim during 
takeoff or landing and during cruise flight.
    (2) Observe the effects of early versus late detection and de-
activation or correction.
    (c) Action criteria. Practice the prescribed FCOM procedures for 
recovery.
6.4 Task: Jammed Trim or Stabilizer
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Experience the pitch handling qualities of the aircraft with 
jammed stabilizer or pitch trim during cruise flight and carry the 
scenario through to landing.
    (2) Observe the effect of an increase and decrease in airspeed.
    (3) Recognize the insidious nature of the failure during periods of 
un-accelerated flight.
    (c) Action criteria. Practice operating the aircraft without the 
availability of a movable stabilizer or pitch trim, following the 
procedures described in the FCOM.
6.5 Task: Upset Recognition and Recovery
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Altitudes, airspeeds, aircraft configurations, and 
environmental conditions representative of normal operations including 
departures, arrivals, and en route portion of flight.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Recognize situations that may lead to aircraft upsets so they 
can be prevented.
    (2) Recognize aircraft upset.
    (3) Apply flight control knowledge about pitch, roll and yaw rates, 
and the interrelationship with thrust, particularly for under-wing-
mounted engines.
    (4) Understand the risk of catastrophic damage caused by rapidly 
reversing controls, including rapidly reversing controls at speeds 
below the design maneuvering speed.
    (5) Understand that as speed increases, the maximum available 
rudder deflection can be obtained with comparatively light pedal forces 
and comparatively small pedal movements.
    (6) Assess the energy and ``G''-loading.
    (7) Control the aircraft before seeking to determine the cause of 
the upset.
    (8) Recognize the relationship between what is seen outside the 
aircraft and the instrument indications, to help better understand the 
actual attitude of the aircraft and overcome the possibly counter-
intuitive vestigial sense.
    (9) Understand the proper direction (and magnitude) of control and 
thrust input necessary to recover.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Callout the situation.
    (2) Disengage the autopilot and autothrottle.
    (3) Confirm attitude by reference to other instruments.
    (4) Deliberately and promptly use up to full control inputs, as may 
be required to regain control of each axis.
    (5) Practice recovering from a nose-high aircraft upset.
    (6) Practice recovering from a nose-low aircraft upset.
    (7) Practice recovering from low-speed and high-speed accelerated 
stall.
    (8) Practice recovering from a nose-high, low-energy aircraft 
upset.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Reference the most current version of the Industry's Airplane 
Upset Recovery Training Aid. An aircraft upset is almost universally 
described as exceeding one or more of the following:
    (1) Pitch attitude greater than 25[deg] nose up.
    (2) Pitch attitude greater than 10[deg] nose down.
    (3) Bank angle greater than 45[deg].
    (4) Pilots completing any training category, except recurrent 
training, should train and practice maneuvers such as:
    (i) Roll rate with full aileron and spoiler input.
    (ii) Roll rate with rudder input.
    (iii) Pitch change with use of only stabilizer trim.
    (iv) Pitch change with the use of thrust adjustments.
    (v) Pitch change with the use of speedbrakes.
    (vi) Yaw motion and resultant roll due to asymmetric thrust with 
autopilot.
    (vii) Yaw motion and resultant roll due to asymmetric thrust 
without autopilot.
    (viii) Approach to stall recovery using only pitch control.

END INFORMATION

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[[Page 1362]]

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.6 Task: Slow Flight
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) The pilot must demonstrate slow flight in the landing 
configuration at maximum landing gross weight, with minimum maneuvering 
airspeed for the configuration and weight.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Recognize the low energy or high drag 
configuration and the slow response to flight control and thrust 
inputs.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) While maintaining altitude, slowly establish the pitch attitude 
(using trim or elevator or stabilizer), bank angle, and power setting 
that will allow a controlled reduction to establish the desired, target 
airspeed.
    (2) Maneuver in straight and level flight to stabilize speed and 
trim.
    (3) Turn through 90[deg] left and right, using only 15[deg] of 
bank.
    (4) Climb and descend at 500 FPM while in a turn.
    (5) Recover to an airspeed appropriate for the configuration and 
establish the appropriate altitude and heading.
    (6) Recovery is complete when straight and level un-accelerated 
flight is achieved.
    (d) This task is required only for pilots completing initial, 
transition, or conversion categories of training on the aircraft type. 
Performing this task during other categories of training is optional.
    (e) Target speeds must be below the speeds that are appropriate for 
the various configurations, ending with a speed below VREF. 
The maximum speed must not exceed 20% above VSO to avoid 
stick shaker.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (f) This training should be conducted from a clean configuration, 
slowing to landing configuration, and illustrating the concept on 
minimum maneuvering speed for the configuration along the way.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.7 Task: Turns with and without Spoilers
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Experience the handling qualities of the 
aircraft without spoilers.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Make turns left and right with a normal flight control 
configuration.
    (2) Deploy the spoilers to a position one-half extended and make 
turns left and right.
    (3) Deploy the spoilers to a fully deployed position and make turns 
left and right.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) This training should focus on the turning characteristics of 
some aircraft with partial in-flight spoilers (speedbrakes) deployed, 
rather than on the remote mechanical failure leading to loss of the 
spoilers. The pilot should experience an increase in spoiler deployment 
on the down wing and a decrease in spoiler deployment on the up wing, 
which causes a markedly different roll characteristic than with full or 
no spoiler deployment.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.8 Task: Stability Augmentation System Inoperative
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness of the mechanical and aerodynamic circumstances 
involved in the phenomenon known as ``Dutch Roll.''
    (2) This maneuver is only applicable to swept wing, turbojet 
powered, transport category aircraft.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) If Dutch roll is encountered and the yaw dampers are off, 
rather than inoperative, the pilot must turn on the damper(s). The 
pilot must be able to stop the rolling tendency without prolonging the 
Dutch roll or aggravating the yaw.
    (2) If Dutch roll is encountered and the yaw dampers are 
inoperative, the pilot must:
    (i) ``Freeze'' the rudder pedals in position and give one firm 
correction on the aileron control against the upcoming wing.
    (ii) Move the aileron correction immediately to the neutral 
position.
    (3) If Dutch roll is still present, maintain the rudder pedals in a 
constant position and again apply one firm aileron control input 
against the upcoming wing and immediately move the aileron control to 
the neutral position. Apply this correction in this manner until the 
Dutch roll is corrected.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) This maneuver is designed to acquaint the pilot with the 
adverse characteristics of a swept wing turbojet transport category 
aircraft at relatively high altitudes and airspeeds; e.g., at or above 
FL250 at an appropriate cruise airspeed for the altitude selected. 
Typically, a Dutch roll would only be experienced when (all) the yaw 
damper(s) is (are) inoperative or turned off, and could be initiated as 
a result of an uncoordinated roll or an adverse yaw input. Recovery 
from a Dutch roll may be accomplished by turning on the yaw damper or 
executing the aileron technique described here. The aileron technique 
involves more advanced skills and additional practice. This method 
ensures that the proper control inputs will be applied to stop the 
rolling motion. In addition to practicing the task at relatively high 
altitudes, the task should be demonstrated at an intermediately low 
altitude and airspeed; e.g., between 10,000 and 15,000 feet at an 
airspeed of 250 to 300 knots.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.9 Task: Mach Tuck and Mach Buffet
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Experience the handling qualities of the 
aircraft at high MACH numbers.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Increase airspeed slowly.
    (2) Observe the performance of the compensating device or system, 
if installed.
    (3) Disable the compensating device or system, if installed, and 
continue to accelerate until the tuck or buffet occurs.
    (4) Observe the airframe vibration or flight instrument 
indications.
    (5) Make small aileron inputs and feel for the increase in buffet.
6.10 Task: High Sink Rate
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Experience the handling qualities of the 
aircraft at high sink rates.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) The pilot must demonstrate a hazardous landing approach 
profile, conducted as close to maximum gross landing weight as 
possible. The descent must be entered at sufficient altitude to 
stabilize airspeed and vertical speed. The maneuver must be performed 
at normal approach altitudes.
    (2) The pilot must use the following configuration: flaps or slats 
(as

[[Page 1363]]

appropriate) set to landing configuration; landing gear down; throttles 
at idle; establish and maintain threshold airspeed. When configuration 
is established, the pilot must trim and maintain proper airspeed with 
power at idle thrust and a high rate of descent.
    (3) The pilot must perform the following two separate recoveries 
from a high rate of descent:
    (i) After descent rate is established, the instructor will announce 
the designated altitude at which level off is to occur. When the 
designated altitude is reached, the pilot must initiate recovery to 
level flight in the landing configuration using maximum permissible 
thrust while maintaining threshold airspeed. At the completion of the 
maneuver, the instructor must discuss with the pilot the loss of 
altitude during recovery.
    (ii) The second recovery must be initiated in the same manner as in 
paragraph (a) of this section to the point of reaching the designated 
altitude. When the designated altitude is reached, the pilot must 
initiate recovery to level flight in the landing configuration and 
leaving the throttles at idle. The pilot must observe loss of airspeed 
below threshold airspeed. The pilot must recover using FCOM recommended 
stall recovery procedures. At the completion of the maneuver, the 
instructor must discuss with the pilot the loss of altitude during 
recovery.
    (4) The pilot must demonstrate a basic understanding and knowledge 
of the hazards associated with the high sink rates near the ground on 
the landing approach.
6.11 Task: Flight Envelope Protection Demonstration
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Awareness of aircraft programming for 
attitudes outside of the protected envelope.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Practice maneuvering the aircraft and experience how the 
aircraft performs and responds to flight control inputs in various 
pitch, power and configuration combinations that are beyond the 
protected envelope.
    (2) Release control to observe aircraft return to within protected 
envelope.
    (3) Hold control beyond protected limits to observe control input 
required to maintain attitude.
    (4) Return the aircraft to a safe state.
6.12 Task: Windshear Avoidance and Encounter--
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Know the sources of information that indicate the possible 
presence of windshear or turbulence.
    (2) Observe the visual indications that usually indicate the 
presence of windshear or turbulence.
    (3) Understand the effect of windshear or turbulence on the 
performance of the aircraft during low altitude operations.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Avoid indicated areas of possible windshear or turbulence, if 
possible.
    (2) Be able to recognize the indications of windshear or turbulence 
during takeoff and landing profiles.
    (3) Execute the FCOM procedure for avoiding windshear; and, if not 
possible to avoid, execute the FCOM procedure for escaping windshear or 
turbulence during low altitude operations.
    (4) Practice avoiding and escaping windshear or turbulence during 
low altitude operations to include:
    (i) Takeoff.
    (ii) Departure.
    (iii) Approach.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Refer to the most current version of the FAA Windshear Training 
Aid. Demonstrations and practice are primarily for the purpose of 
enabling pilots to avoid windshear encounters. However, this practice 
will also enable pilots to execute the proper escape maneuver should 
windshear be encountered.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

6.12.1 Task: Takeoff
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.12., Windshear Avoidance and Encounter.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria described in Task 6.12., 
Windshear Avoidance and Encounter.
6.12.2 Task: Departure
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.12., Windshear Avoidance and Encounter.
    (c) Action criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.12., Windshear Avoidance and Encounter.
6.12.3 Task: Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.12., Windshear Avoidance and Encounter.
    (c) Action criteria. All awareness criteria described in Task 
6.12., Windshear Avoidance and Encounter.
6.13 Task: Traffic Avoidance (TCAS)
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) The pilot must demonstrate each type of Traffic Alert (TA) and 
Resolution Alerts (RA) described in the FCOM.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Understand the capabilities and limitations 
of TCAS equipment.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Use TCAS equipment to determine the proximity of other 
aircraft.
    (2) Respond immediately to RAs by quickly executing the proper 
evasive maneuver within 5 seconds of displayed command.
7.0 AREA: Instrument Approaches
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness of the gross weight of the aircraft, the aircraft 
condition, the appropriate configuration for that condition, and the 
proper airspeeds for the approach.
    (2) Awareness of the weather conditions, including winds (and the 
potentials for wind shifts or windshear) and limitations to forward and 
lateral visibility.
    (3) Awareness of the requirements for navigation aid tuning, 
identifying, and monitoring; including proper and complete instrument 
set up for the approach.
    (4) Awareness of the requirements for determining which pilot is to 
fly and which pilot is to monitor, and of the respective duties and 
responsibilities of the PF and the PM.
    (5) Awareness of the approach profile, including the method(s) used 
to determine the missed approach point and the requirements for 
complete crew briefing (including missed approach procedures) prior to 
initiation of the approach.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Select and comply with the appropriate precision instrument 
approach procedure to be performed.
    (2) Select and correctly identify the appropriate navigation 
frequencies and facilities associated with the arrival.
    (3) Establish the appropriate aircraft configuration and airspeed 
or V-speed considering turbulence, windshear, microburst conditions, or 
other meteorological and operating conditions.
    (4) Apply the necessary adjustments to the published DH or DA and 
visibility criteria for the aircraft approach category.
    (5) Apply the necessary adjustments to the published MDA and 
visibility criteria for the aircraft approach category as required.

[[Page 1364]]

    (6) Cross the final approach fix, or the point at which the final 
approach begins, at the proper altitude, in the proper aircraft 
configuration, with the proper airspeed for the approach.
    (7) Maintain a stabilized final approach through transition to 
missed approach or transition to landing.
    (8) Insure a timely decision at DA or DH to either initiate a 
missed approach or proceed to a landing with suitable visual reference.
    (9) Initiate the missed approach procedure, when at the DH or DA, 
and the required visual references for the runway, or the intended 
landing area, are not distinctly visible or identifiable.
    (10) Transition to a normal landing approach only when the required 
visual references for the runway, or the intended landing area, are 
distinctlyvisible and identifiable, and the aircraft is in a position 
from which a descent to a landing on the runway, or the intended 
landing area, can be at a normal rate of descent using normal 
maneuvering.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Instrument approaches begin when the aircraft is over the 
initial approach fix for the procedure being used and end when the 
aircraft touches down on the runway or landing area, or when transition 
to a missed approach configuration is completed.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

7.1 Task: All Engines Operating--Autopilot Coupled
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria listed in Task 7.0, Instrument 
Approaches.
    (2) Awareness of the requirements and limitations for an Autopilot 
Coupled approach.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria listed in Task 7.0, Instrument Approaches.
    (2) Engage (and disengage, if appropriate) the flight director(s) 
and autopilot(s) at the appropriate points during the approach.
7.2 Task: All Engines Operating--Manually Flown
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria listed in Task 7.0., Instrument 
Approaches.
    (2) Awareness of the requirements and limitations for a manually 
flown instrument approach.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria listed in Task 7.0., Instrument Approaches.
    (2) Engage (and disengage, if appropriate) the flight director(s) 
at the appropriate points during the approach.
7.3 Task: One Engine Inoperative--Manually Flown
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria listed in Task 7.0, Instrument 
Approaches.
    (2) Awareness of the requirements and limitations for a manually 
flown instrument approach with an engine inoperative.
    (3) Monitor the operating engine(s) and make adjustments as 
necessary.
    (4) Maintain coordinated flight with thrust changes.
    (5) Coordinate between PF and PM regarding rudder trim application 
and removal.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria listed in Task 7.0., Instrument Approaches.
    (2) Establish and maintain the recommended flight attitude and 
configuration for optimum performance during all maneuvering necessary 
for the instrument approach procedure.
7.4 Task: Approach Type
7.4.1 Task: Category II or III
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria for Task 7.1, All 
Engines Operating--Autopilot Coupled, or, if appropriate, Task 7.2, All 
Engines Operating--Manually Flown.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria for Task 7.1, All Engines 
Operating--Autopilot Coupled, or, if appropriate, Task 7.2, All Engines 
Operating--Manually Flown.
7.4.2 Task: Precision Group
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Use aircraft navigational aid equipment for centerline and 
glideslope guidance.
    (3) Two precision approaches must be completed in simulated 
instrument conditions to the minimums appropriate for the type of 
approach being flown.
    (4) When the precision instrument approach is flown with an engine 
failure, the engine failure must occur before initiating the final 
approach segment and must continue to touchdown or throughout the 
missed approach procedure.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria for Task 7.1, All 
Engines Operating--Autopilot Coupled, or, if appropriate, Task 7.2, All 
Engines Operating--Manually Flown.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria for Task 7.1, All Engines Operating--
Autopilot Coupled, or, if appropriate, Task 7.2, All Engines 
Operating--Manually Flown.
    (2) Establish a rate of descent at the point where the electronic 
glide slope begins which approximates that required for the aircraft to 
follow the glide slope.
7.4.3 Task: Non-Precision Group
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Non-precision instrument approaches must be completed in 
simulated instrument conditions to the minimums appropriate for the 
type of approach being flown.
    (3) When the non-precision instrument approach is flown with a 
failure of one engine, the engine failure must occur before initiating 
the final approach segment and must continue to touchdown or throughout 
the missed approach procedure.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria listed in Task 7.0, Instrument 
Approaches.
    (2) Awareness of the requirements and limitations for Task 7.1, 
Autopilot Coupled instrument approach, or of the requirements and 
limitations for Task 7.2, Manually Flown instrument approach, as 
appropriate.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Cross the final approach fix at the appropriate altitude, 
airspeed, and configuration.
    (2) After passing the final approach fix, establish a stabilized 
rate of descent that will ensure arrival at MDA at, or prior to, a 
point from which a descent to a landing on the intended runway or 
landing area can be made at a normal rate using normal maneuvering.

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) The rate of descent should be established as soon as possible 
(immediately) after passing the final approach fix. Final approach fix 
passage may be determined by radial passage, radar fix, marker beacon, 
or navigation aid passage (e.g. VOR, NDB). This will help ensure that 
the pilot does not have to descend at a much higher rate or execute a 
missed approach.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (4) Maintain the MDA, when reached, to the missed approach point or 
until descent is initiated toward the runway of intended landing.

[[Page 1365]]

    (5) Execute the missed approach procedure if the required visual 
references for the intended runway are not distinctly visible and 
identifiable at the missed approach point.
7.4.4 Task: Ground-Based Radar Approaches (ASR and PAR)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All the awareness criteria in Task 7.0., 
Instrument Approaches; and
    (1) For ASR, all the awareness criteria in Task 7.4.3., Non-
Precision Group.
    (2) For PAR, all the awareness criteria in Task 7.4.2., Precision 
Group.
    (c) Action criteria. All the action criteria in Task 7.0., 
Instrument Approaches; and
    (1) For ASR, all the action criteria in Task 7.4.3., Non-Precision 
Group.
    (2) For PAR, all the action criteria in Task 7.4.2., Precision 
Group.
8.0 AREA: Visual Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand and apply wake turbulence and traffic separation 
requirements.
    (2) Understand and apply altitude, airspeed, configuration, and 
associated requirements and limitations for the airport of intended 
landing as applied to the aircraft being flown.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Establish the aircraft on downwind, base leg, or straight-in 
final approach at the proper altitude, at the proper airspeed, and in 
the proper configuration, making appropriate adjustments to all three 
factors as the approach continues to landing.
    (2) Maintain a ground track that ensures the desired traffic 
pattern is flown, accounting for any obstructions, other traffic, and 
ATC instructions.
    (3) Use XLS, RNAV, and other guidance, including visual guidance 
(as available), to maintain a normal vertical descent path to the 
runway.
    (4) The visual approach ends in the landing transition phase, 
described in Task 10.4.3, when the landing is assured. The pilot must 
use all available lateral and vertical approach aids, and the pilot 
must be prepared to transition to flight using flight instruments due 
to darkness or other restrictions to visibility.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (5) The visual approach phase begins after reporting the airport or 
traffic to follow as ``in sight,'' and receiving clearance for a visual 
approach.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

8.1 Task: All Engines Operating (Normal)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria for Task 8.0, Visual 
Approach.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria for Task 8.0, Visual 
Approach.
8.2 Task: One Engine Inoperative
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria for Task 8.0, Visual 
Approach.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria for Task 8.0, Visual 
Approach.
8.3 Task: Two Engines Inoperative (3 and 4 Engine Aircraft)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria for Task 8.0, Visual 
Approach.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria for Task 8.0, Visual 
Approach.
9.0 AREA: Missed Approach
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) The pilot must perform at least one missed approach from an XLS 
approach.
    (3) The pilot must perform at least one missed approach from a non-
XLS approach.
    (4) The pilot must perform at least one complete, published missed 
approach procedure.
    (5) The pilot must perform at least one missed approach with an 
engine inoperative.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) If a stabilized approach is not achieved by the required 
height, initiate a go-around without prompting from another crewmember.
    (2) Comply with the appropriate missed approach procedure or ATC 
clearance.
    (3) Know the aircraft position with respect to the missed approach 
point (MAP).
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Initiate the missed approach procedure promptly.
    (2) Apply go-around thrust promptly; establish the proper pitch 
attitude; and reconfigure the aircraft for the missed approach in 
accordance with the approved procedures.
    (3) Follow the published missed approach procedure (or follow the 
assigned clearance), maintaining proper airspeed and altitude for the 
configuration.
    (4) Request clearance for another approach, to a holding fix, or to 
the alternate airport.
    (5) If the approach is abandoned prior to reaching the MAP, begin a 
climb, but continue to navigate to the MAP before complying with the 
published procedure.
    (6) Certificate holders must train to proficiency using all 
instrument approaches for which they hold Operations Specification 
approval.

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) The missed approach phase begins when the decision to abandon 
the approach is made, and ends when the aircraft has been reconfigured 
to allow maneuvering for a second approach or a return to the en route 
environment.
    (e) Certificate holders are required to train on all instrument 
approaches for which they hold operations specification approval, but 
this does not need to be done during each recurrent training period.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

9.1 Task: All Engines Operating
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria for Task 9.0., 
Missed Approach.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria for Task 9.0., Missed 
Approach.
9.2 Task: One Engine Inoperative
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) All awareness criteria for Task 9.0., Missed Approach.
    (2) Monitor the operating engine(s) and make adjustments as 
necessary.
    (3) Establish and maintain the recommended flight attitude and 
configuration for optimum performance during all necessary maneuvering.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All action criteria for Task 9.0., Missed Approach.
    (2) As the power is advanced for the missed approach, maintain 
coordinated flight with rudder as required to counter asymmetric 
thrust, and maintain wings level.
9.3 Task: From a Circling Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Maintain awareness of the positional 
relationship between the MAP, the aircraft, and the center of the 
airport.
    (c) Action criteria. If a missed approach is needed after starting 
the circle-to-land maneuver, turn in the appropriate direction and 
climb according to the published missed approach procedure.

[[Page 1366]]

9.4 Task: Descending Break-Out Maneuver From Instrument Landing System 
and Precision Radar Monitor (PRM) Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness of the prerequisite PRM training to accept a PRM 
approach.
    (2) Understand the requirements when issued a ``breakout'' command 
from ATC.
    (i) Understand that when another aircraft penetrates the ``no 
transgression zone,'' the threatened aircraft will be instructed to 
``breakout.''
    (ii) Understand that ``descent'' commands issued as part of a 
``breakout'' instruction will not be issued to fly below an altitude 
that provides a minimum of 1,000 feet of obstacle clearance protection.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) All PRM ``breakouts'' must be hand flown.
    (2) Initiate a ``breakout'' immediately on receiving breakout 
instructions and follow the turn and climb or descent commands issued 
by ATC.
10.0 Area: Landing
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) When a proficiency test will result in issuance of an airline 
transport pilot certificate or a type rating, the pilot must make at 
least three landings.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Apply gust and wind factors, and take into account 
meteorological phenomena such as windshear, microburst, and other 
related safety of flight factors.
    (2) Verify existing wind conditions, make proper corrections for 
drift, and maintain a precise ground track.
    (3) Use the appropriate aircraft configuration for normal and 
abnormal situations and procedures, including becoming airborne again 
after touching down.
    (4) Consider the takeoff traffic aspects of LAHSO or SOIR.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Establish the approach and landing configuration appropriate 
for the runway and meteorological conditions, and adjust the engine 
controls as required.
    (2) Maintain a stabilized approach; see Task 1.4(c)(10) of this 
attachment.
    (3) Touchdown must be 500 to 3,000 feet (150 to 900 meters) past 
the runway threshold, not to exceed one-third of the runway length, 
with the runway centerline between the main gear, and with the airplane 
tracking parallel to the runway centerline.
    (4) Use spoilers, propeller reverse or thrust reverse, and wheel 
brakes in a manner that ensures bringing the aircraft to a safe speed 
considering the point of touchdown and the runway remaining.
    (5) Maintain positive directional control and crosswind correction 
during the after-landing roll.
10.1 Task: All Engines Operating (Normal)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Area 10.0., 
Landing.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Area 10.0., Landing.
10.2 Task: Crosswind
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Landings must be demonstrated and practiced to proficiency 
during training at the maximum demonstrated crosswind for the aircraft. 
For evaluation purposes, the crosswind component must not exceed 12 
knots.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Assess the changing effect of the crosswind component and 
adjust controls as required.
    (2) Assess the relationship between the aircraft limitation(s), 
performance data and any surface contaminant(s).
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Maintain positive directional control using an approved means 
of controlling the effects of the crosswind.
    (2) Touchdown with the airplane tracking parallel to the runway 
centerline. Maximum bank angles must not be exceeded.
10.3 Task: Engine Inoperative
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Monitor the operating engine(s) and make 
adjustments as necessary.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Maneuver with inoperative engine(s).
    (2) Maintain coordinated flight by application of rudder as 
required to counter asymmetric thrust.
    (3) Maintain wings level.
    (4) Use reverse thrust symmetrically, or as described in the FCOM.
10.3.1 Task: One Engine Inoperative (2 Engine Aircraft)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 10.3., 
Engine Inoperative.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 10.3., Engine 
Inoperative.
10.3.2 Task: Two Engines Inoperative (3 and 4 Engine Aircraft)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 10.3., 
Engine Inoperative.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 10.3., Engine 
Inoperative.
10.4 Task: Landing Transition
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Decide to reject or continue the landing.
    (2) Ensure an aircraft or vehicle does not occupy the runway.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Transition to outside visual references.
    (2) Determine that a landing is assured.
    (3) Complete a smooth, positively controlled transition from 
descent flight path to touchdown.
    (i) Achieve and maintain the longitudinal axis of the aircraft 
parallel with the runway centerline and the centerline between the main 
landing gear.
    (ii) At the flare initiation point, begin to increase the pitch 
attitude to that necessary to achieve level flight in the present 
circumstances.
    (iii) Reduce power to bring the throttles to the idle position as 
the main landing gear touch the runway.
    (iv) As the aircraft slows, apply additional backpressure to 
maintain the level flight attitude, allowing the aircraft to continue a 
shallow rate of descent and a shallow rate of airspeed reduction.
    (v) As touchdown occurs, ensure that the throttles are at idle; 
ensure that the spoilers have deployed; and without delay, fly the nose 
gear onto the runway.
    (vi) Apply wheel brakes, select reverse thrust as appropriate for 
the conditions, maintain directional control with aerodynamic controls 
throughout the landing roll, until the ground speed allows directional 
control with rudder pedal steering or nose wheel steering, as 
appropriate.
10.4.1 Task: From a Precision Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 10.4., 
Landing Transition.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 10.4., Landing 
Transition.
10.4.2 Task: From a Non-Precision Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 10.4., 
Landing Transition.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 10.4., Landing 
Transition.
10.4.3 Task: From a Visual Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.

[[Page 1367]]

    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 10.4., 
Landing Transition.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 10.4., Landing 
Transition.
10.4.4 Task: From a Circling Approach
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Consider the environmental, operational, and meteorological 
factors that affect landing from a circling approach.
    (2) Respect the circling maneuvering area for the category of 
aircraft and do not exceed the associated visibility criteria.
    (3) All awareness criteria in Task 10.4., Landing Transition.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Avoid excessive maneuvering.
    (2) Avoid descent below the appropriate circling MDA until in a 
position from which a descent to a normal landing can be made.
    (3) All awareness criteria in Task 10.4., Landing Transition.
10.5 Task: Rejected Landing
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Decide to reject the landing, if 
appropriate.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Apply the appropriate thrust setting for the flight condition 
and establish the correct pitch attitude necessary to obtain the 
desired performance, assuming the aircraft may touch down.
    (2) Establish a positive rate of climb.
    (3) Retract the landing gear and wing flaps (and other drag devices 
if appropriate), in the correct sequence and at a safe altitude and 
airspeed.
    (4) Maintain the proper ground track or heading during the rejected 
landing procedure.
    (5) Combined with instrument, circling, or missed approach 
procedures.
    (6) Initiate between 30 feet and 50 feet above the runway.
10.6 Task: Zero or Partial Flaps
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Use runway of sufficient length for the zero or partial flap 
condition.
    (2) Use the correct airspeeds or V-speeds for this configuration.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Maintain the proper aircraft pitch attitude and flight path for 
the configuration, gross weight, and other applicable operational 
considerations.
    (2) Adjust the attitude for touchdown only as prescribed by the 
FCOM.
10.7 Task: Auto-Land
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Demonstrate awareness of auto-flight 
annunciation(s).
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Guard flight controls throughout the maneuver.
    (2) Respond to cues from the auto-flight annunciation(s).
10.8 Task: EFVS
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness of the training requirements prior to initiating an 
approach and landing or takeoff using EFVS.
    (2) Awareness of the existing weather conditions and the 
limitations of the EFVS system.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Practice with the proper use of the system in visual conditions 
and in weather limiting conditions, including all instrument approach 
procedures authorized using the EFVS.
    (2) Practice the transition to instrument flight due to 
interruption or malfunction of the EFVS system.
10.9 Task: HUD
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Demonstrate awareness of HUD symbology, 
including normal and failure annunciation(s).
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Respond to cues depicted in the HUD.
    (2) Practice the transition to instrument flight due to 
interruption or malfunction of the HUD system.
11.0 Area: Abnormal Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Consider the impact of the abnormal 
condition on the safety of the flight and on the need to turn back, or 
continue to destination airport or another suitable airport.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Complete immediate action (memory) items, if appropriate.
    (2) Follow checklist requirements.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Operation of the systems, devices, and equipment in the 
aircraft through normal and abnormal procedures are concurrent tasks 
that may occur at some time during the tasks in any of the other areas 
of operation. These systems, devices, and equipment, with related 
normal and abnormal procedures, are contained in the FCOM. Crews should 
not ``troubleshoot.'' They are expected to observe, identify, use the 
FCOM, apply systems knowledge, and resolve the situation to the safest 
possible outcome.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

11.1 Task: Un-Annunciated
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 11.0, 
Abnormal Procedures.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 11.0, Abnormal 
Procedures.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Unannunciated abnormal conditions include: Vibration, tailpipe 
fire, loss of engine thrust control, engine severe damage, volcanic 
ash, window damage, tail strike, various smoke or fumes, rapid 
depressurization, evacuation, jammed stabilizer, jammed or restricted 
flight controls, fuel leak on the engine, and engine stall.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

11.2.0 Task: System (ATA Code)
    The following criteria apply to system tasks 11.2.1 through 
11.2.26:
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 11.0, 
Abnormal Procedures.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 11.0, Abnormal 
Procedures.
11.2.1 Air Conditioning (21)
11.2.2 APU (49)
11.2.3 Autopilot (22)
11.2.4 Brakes (32)
11.2.5 Communications (23)
11.2.6 Doors (52)
11.2.7 Electrical Power (24)
11.2.8 Emergency Equipment (25)
11.2.9 Engine (72)
11.2.10 Fire Protection (26)
11.2.11 Flaps (27)
11.2.12 Flight Controls (27)
11.2.13 Fuel (28)
11.2.14 EGPWS and TAWS (34)
11.2.15 HUD
11.2.16 Hydraulic Power (29)
11.2.17 Ice and Rain Protection (30)
11.2.18 Instruments (31)
11.2.19 Landing Gear (32)
11.2.20 Navigation (34)
11.2.21 Oxygen (35)
11.2.22 Pneumatic (36)
11.2.23 Propellers (61)
11.2.24 Stall Warning (27)
11.2.25 Thrust Reversers (78)
11.2.26 Warning Systems (various)

[[Page 1368]]

12.0 Area: Emergency Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Consider the impact of the emergency 
condition on the safety of the flight and on the need to turn back, or 
continue to destination airport or another suitable airport.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Complete the immediate action (memory) items in proper 
sequence, if appropriate.
    (2) Land as soon as possible.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) An emergency condition that requires execution of a 
procedure(s) is a concurrent task(s) that may occur at some time during 
the normal tasks in any of the other areas of operation. These 
emergency procedures are contained in the FCOM. Crews should not 
``troubleshoot.'' They are expected to observe, identify, use the FCOM, 
and apply systems knowledge only as required and resolve the emergency 
to the safest possible outcome.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

12.1 Task: Fire or Smoke in Aircraft
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Initiate emergency descent, diversion, or evacuation, as 
appropriate.
    (2) Apply knowledge of fire detection and extinguishing systems, as 
necessary.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Promptly acknowledge the smoke, fumes, or fire event.
    (2) Direct the use of oxygen and smoke goggles or EVAS to keep crew 
functioning, and establish crew communications.
    (3) Identify the source of smoke, fumes, or fire, if possible.
    (4) Initiate correct procedure or checklist for the type of smoke, 
fumes, or fire.
    (5) Descend, land, and evacuate as quickly as possible.
12.2 Task: Unannunciated Fire in Flight
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 12.0, 
Emergency Procedures.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 12.0, Emergency 
Procedures.
12.3 Task: Ditching
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness of the time requirements for cabin crew to prepare 
the cabin.
    (2) Awareness and application of the procedures to be used to ditch 
the aircraft.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Follow the appropriate descent and before landing checklists.
    (2) Follow the appropriate ditching checklist, if available.
    (3) Touch down:
    (i) Between the crests of any wave activity, parallel to the wave 
crest:
    (ii) At the slowest speed possible.
    (iii) Tail first, if controllability allows.
    (iv) With the landing gear retracted.
    (4) Evacuate the aircraft.
12.4 Task: Emergency Descent (Maximum Rate)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Consider the appropriate configuration for descent if aircraft 
damage is known or suspected.
    (2) Choose an altitude for level-off suitable to the terrain and 
conditions.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Apply knowledge of the descent maneuvering capabilities of the 
aircraft.
    (2) Perform emergency descent in a smooth, positive, and timely 
manner without exceeding limitations.
12.5 Task: Rapid Decompression
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Promptly acknowledge the rapid decompression event.
    (2) Consider the altitude of the aircraft and the need for an 
emergency descent or an alternative course of action, including the 
need for crew or passenger oxygen.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Determine whether cabin pressure control can be regained.
    (2) Direct use of oxygen by crew as necessary.
    (3) Establish crew communications.
12.6 Task: Emergency Evacuation
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Consider the need for evacuation against the inherent risk of 
injury during its conduct.
    (2) Consider the area around the aircraft and the direction from 
which SAR responders are approaching.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Ensure the aircraft is depressurized before directing 
evacuation.
    (2) Direct evacuation to the safest area in relation to the 
aircraft through exits with the minimum likelihood of post-evacuation 
injury.
12.7 Task: Engine Fire, Severe Damage or Separation
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. All awareness criteria in Task 12.0, 
Emergency Procedures.
    (c) Action criteria. All action criteria in Task 12.0, Emergency 
Procedures.
12.8 Task: Landing with Degraded Flight Controls
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Recognize the degraded control condition.
    (2) Demonstrate and apply knowledge of the maneuvering capabilities 
of the aircraft in a non-standard or degraded configuration.
    (c) Action criteria. Maintain speeds suitable for the degraded 
conditions or configurations.
12.9 Task: Pilot Incapacitation
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Maintain focus on the flying task and a safe flight path.
    (2) Ensure the crewmember is clear of flight controls.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Promptly acknowledge the incapacitation event.
    (2) [Reserved]
12.10 Task: All Other Tasks described in the FCOM
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. As described in the FCOM.
    (c) Action criteria. As required in the FCOM.
13.0 Area: Line Oriented Operations Environments
    The specific operational environments below must be integrated into 
instruction modules for initial, conversion, transition, upgrade, 
recurrent, and requalification training.
13.1 Task: Anti-Icing and Deicing Before Takeoff
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand the certificate holder's ground anti-icing and 
deicing program.
    (2) Be able to determine the need for anti-icing or deicing prior 
to takeoff.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Inspect the aircraft to ensure all surfaces are free of ice 
before flight.
    (2) Correctly operate anti-icing and de-icing systems or equipment.
    (3) Coordinate the application of a proper mix of anti-icing or 
deicing fluid.
    (4) Determine hold over time.
    (5) Comply with the hold over time restrictions for takeoff.

[[Page 1369]]

13.2 Task: Structural Icing, Airborne
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Know the conditions that can lead to structural ice.
    (2) Understand the effects of structural icing on aircraft 
performance.
    (3) Plan and execute ice avoidance if necessary.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Know when and how to apply the procedures in the FCOM for 
operating in icing conditions or conditions that may lead to structural 
icing.
    (2) Determine when structural icing is present.
    (3) Monitor ice accretion during flight.
    (4) Correctly operate anti-icing and de-icing systems and 
equipment.
13.3 Task: Thunderstorm Avoidance, Departure, and Arrival
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Know the weather information available to 
determine the probability of thunderstorm activity and its location.
    (c) Action criteria. Use weather radar to identify thunderstorm 
activity and to avoid departing into the threat or circumnavigate in 
flight.
13.4 Task: Contaminated Runway Operations
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Identify runway conditions (standing water, 
slush, snow or ice) that require the use of contaminated runway 
procedures.
    (c) Action criteria. Apply weight or other performance penalties or 
adjustments, as required.
13.5 Task: Low Air Density, High Altitude Runway Operations
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Recognize the higher TAS and GS, and the effect on maneuvering, 
takeoff, and landing techniques.
    (2) Consider the effect on all facets of aircraft performance.
    (c) Action criteria. Maneuver to compensate for the higher speeds, 
greater turn radius, and increased rate of descent.
13.6 Task: CFIT and Terrain Avoidance
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Recognize the alert modes (audio and 
visual) of the GPWS.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Promptly acknowledge and react to ground proximity warnings.
    (2) Execute the escape maneuver prescribed by the FCOM.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Refer to the most current version of the FAA CFIT Training Aid 
for generic escape maneuvers that may be used when the FCOM does not 
contain specific escape maneuvers.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

13.7 Task: ETOPS Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness of the basis for ETOPS operations.
    (2) Understand the definition of ``ETOPS portion of flight'' for 
aircraft with two engines and for aircraft with three or four engines.
    (3) Understand the definition of and requirements for designation 
as an ``ETOPS Alternate'' airport.
    (c) Action criteria. Practice at cruise altitude selection, 
including computing and achieving maximum range altitudes with an 
engine inoperative, including ``drift-down.''
13.8 Task: Altimeter Settings (US and International Operations)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Awareness that QFE altimeter setting is the actual surface 
pressure, uncorrected for sea level.
    (2) Awareness that QNH altimeter setting (always 29.92 inches of 
mercury or 1013 hectoPascals) is used when operating at, climbing 
through, or operating above the transition altitude.
    (c) Action criteria. Practice operating with correct altimeter 
settings and demonstrate operations with incorrect altimeter settings.
13.9 Task: Air Hazard Avoidance
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) When FSTD equipped with functional TCAS simulation.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand the parameters of the TCAS system installed in the 
aircraft.
    (2) Understand the appropriate responses to aural and visual alerts 
for both TAs and RAs.
    (c) Action criteria. Practice response according to the warning 
received.
    (1) For operations in normal airspace.
    (2) For operations in RVSM airspace.
13.10 Task: Terrain Avoidance (EGPWS or TAWS)
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) When FSTD equipped with functional EGPWS or TAWS simulation.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Recognize the predictive alert modes (audio 
and visual) of the EGPWS or TAWS.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Promptly acknowledge terrain avoidance alerts.
    (2) Execute maneuvers appropriate to the conditions to avoid a GPWS 
or TAWS warning.

C. Performance Standards for the Emergency Training Drills (see 
Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1201; 121.1203; 121.1205; 121.1233; 
121.1255; 121.1333; 121.1337; 121.1351; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1337; 
121.1381; 121.1383; and 121.1391)

    1. Emergency training equipment must be identical to that installed 
in the certificate holder's aircraft on which the flight crewmember is 
to be qualified with respect to weight, dimensions, appearance, 
features and operation. Equipment may be substituted when it is similar 
with respect to weight, dimensions, appearance, features, and 
operations, and the pilot has been provided with training on 
differences between the training equipment and the actual aircraft 
equipment.
    2. Performance Drills--Individuals
    (a) Fire extinguishers
    (1) Environment: The hand fire extinguisher must be charged; but 
does not have to contain the actual extinguishing agent.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill for each type of installed hand fire 
extinguisher:
    (i) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., rotate handle to 
pressurize, break tamper seals, pull pin, release safety latch).
    (ii) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism.
    (iii) Aim and discharge extinguisher at the base of the fire 
(actual or simulated) using proper discharge pattern, bottle position, 
and flight crewmember body position (appropriate to the location of the 
fire).

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) Effective training scenarios for firefighting should include 
realistic drills with emphasis on combating hidden fires. To provide 
realistic training, drills should simulate locations of hidden fires 
such as behind sidewall panels, in overhead areas and panels, or in air 
conditioning vents. The intent of the training is to provide

[[Page 1370]]

crewmembers with the typical obstacles that they would encounter 
onboard the aircraft, but it is not intended to have each student tear 
apart sidewall panels. A training program should incorporate a method 
to assess and combat a hidden fire, such as locating the exact source 
of the fire before applying an extinguishing agent. Depending on the 
sophistication of the training device, the flight crewmember could use 
a manual release tool that is designed to open the enclosed area to 
gain access to a fire that is suspected in that region.
    (4) The hand fire extinguisher does not have to be positioned in 
the same location as installed in the aircraft. This drill is not 
required for the type of hand fire extinguisher used in the 
firefighting drill that is completed during the same training period.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (b) Oxygen Systems
    (1) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill for each type of installed oxygen system 
equipment:
    (i) Don and activate the oxygen and test for flow, position, seal, 
and security of the mask or hood to the face or head.
    (ii) Demonstrate proper precautions.
    (iii) Secure the oxygen bottle, canister, or cartridge (as 
appropriate) and position it to monitor the supply.
    (iv) Demonstrate proper handling techniques if using portable solid 
state units.
    (v) Deactivate and stow equipment.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (2) This drill is not required for the type of protective breathing 
equipment used in the firefighting drill that is completed during the 
same training period.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (c) Equipment Mountings
    (1) Environment: Each piece of emergency equipment must be in its 
fully secured or pinned condition using the identical bracketing or 
mounting system that is used on the aircraft in which the equipment is 
installed.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill:
    (i) Completely remove each piece of emergency equipment from its 
bracketing or securing system.
    (ii) Secure each piece of emergency equipment in its bracketing and 
securing system or properly stow according to certificate holder 
procedures.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) Unless otherwise specified, it is not necessary to have the 
emergency equipment installed within locations or compartments as 
installed in the actual aircraft.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (d) Flight Deck Oxygen Systems
    (1) Environment: This drill must provide the flight crewmember with 
practice in donning and using the flight deck supplemental oxygen 
systems or related vision protection equipment as it would be used in a 
smoke-filled or fume-filled flight deck. The flight deck supplemental 
oxygen systems equipment must be identical to that installed in the 
aircraft with respect to dimensions, appearance, features, controls, 
charge duration, and operation.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill for each type of installed oxygen system 
equipment:
    (i) Remove the bottle, canister, hood, or mask from the bracket or 
stowage.
    (ii) Don and activate the oxygen and test for flow, position, seal, 
and security of the mask or hood to the face or head. Additionally, if 
smoke goggles are separate from oxygen, they must be donned.
    (iii) Demonstrate proper precautions.
    (iv) Secure the oxygen bottle, canister, or cartridge (as 
appropriate) and position it to monitor the supply.
    (v) Demonstrate proper handling techniques if using portable solid 
state units.
    (vi) Deactivate and stow equipment.
    (e) Firefighting (actual fire)
    (1) Environment: The flight crewmember must complete the 
firefighting drill while combating an actual fire. The flight 
crewmember must combat the fire using at least one type of hand fire 
extinguisher that is appropriate for the type of fire being fought, 
while using the type of installed PBE.
    (i) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
crewmember must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight crewmember is employed.
    (ii) For the purpose of this drill, protective breathing equipment 
and the hand fire extinguisher must be installed in the appropriate 
bracket or stowage compartment or stowage pouch (if not completed 
during the equipment mountings drill).
    (iii) The hand fire extinguisher must be charged; but does not have 
to contain the actual extinguishing agent.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (iv) A self-contained PBE may be substituted with a training smoke 
hood which is not operational.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill:
    (i) Recognize the type of fire.
    (ii) Locate source of fire or smoke.
    (iii) Remove PBE from stowage container and pouch (as appropriate).
    (iv) Don the PBE and activate oxygen in proper sequence (activation 
of oxygen may be simulated).
    (v) Verify seal.
    (vi) Select appropriate hand fire extinguisher for the class of 
fire.
    (vii) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., rotate handle to 
pressurize, break tamper seals, pull pin, release safety latch).
    (viii) Approach fire or smoke.
    (ix) Combat fire using proper techniques.
    (x) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism properly.
    (xi) Aim and discharge extinguisher at the base of the fire using 
proper discharge pattern, bottle position, and flight crewmember body 
position.
    (xii) Maintain an appropriate distance from the fire in order to 
complete the task and maintain personal safety.
    (xiii) Be aware of PBE oxygen duration.
    (xiv) Be aware of signals that PBE is no longer generating oxygen 
to wearer.
    (xv) Use protective techniques to back away.
    (xvi) Ensure fire is extinguished.
    (xvii) Use proper techniques for PBE removal.
    (xviii) Properly secure equipment.
    (f) Emergency Exits.
    (1) Task (Normal Operation): The flight crewmember must complete 
the following drill, with respect to the normal operation of each 
flight crewmember emergency exit:
    (i) Identify conditions under which each exit should be opened or 
closed, if appropriate.

[[Page 1371]]

    (ii) Assess the exterior and interior conditions for obstacles or 
hazards to persons or the exit during the opening or closing (e.g., 
jetway, stairs, barrier straps).
    (iii) Follow procedure to ensure flight crewmember awareness at 
armed boarding door prior to aircraft pushback (if applicable to the 
exit).
    (iv) Identify signal for arming and disarming.
    (v) Coordinate and communicate with other crewmembers.
    (vi) Properly arm and disarm the exit.
    (vii) Verify girt bar is armed or disarmed as appropriate.
    (viii) Verify exit is in the correct mode for intended operation.
    (ix) Use proper techniques for the operating mechanism (such as 
handles to open exit and secure in locked position).
    (x) Install safety strap. Stow safety strap.
    (xi) Release locking mechanism and properly use control handles to 
close exit and secure in locked position.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (2) Environment: The operation of each type of flight crewmember 
emergency exit may be conducted as an observation drill that includes 
the following tasks as applicable.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (3) Task (Emergency Operation): The flight crewmember must complete 
the following drill, with respect to the emergency operation of each 
flight crewmember emergency exit:
    (i) Position escape device (if applicable).
    (ii) Verify that girt bar is armed or disarmed as appropriate.
    (iii) Verify the exit is in the correct mode.
    (iv) Identify conditions under which the exit is to be opened in 
the emergency mode.
    (v) Use proper voice commands to passengers (as appropriate).
    (vi) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine the exit 
usability (e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (vii) Open the exit in the armed mode (as applicable) and secure or 
stow the exit (as applicable) to ensure a fully open and unobstructed 
exit.
    (viii) Hold onto assist handle (if applicable).
    (ix) As applicable, pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify 
deployment, inflation (e.g., ramp, slide).
    (x) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (xi) Follow crew coordination procedures (as appropriate).
    (xii) Access release handle(s) (e.g., Slide disconnect, jettison 
tailcone, ventral stairs).
    (xiii) Recognize when it is appropriate to exit the aircraft.
    (xiv) Access escape tapes or escape ropes (if applicable).
    (g) Emergency evacuation (with slide).
    (1) Environment: This drill is required when the flight crewmember 
is qualifying on an aircraft that is equipped with emergency escape 
slides.
    (i) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
crewmember must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight crewmember is employed.
    (ii) Each flight crewmember must complete an emergency evacuation 
by egressing the aircraft or approved training device using at least 
one type of installed emergency escape slide from an aircraft on which 
the flight crewmember will be qualified to serve.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill:
    (i) Observe the airplane exit(s) being opened in the emergency mode 
and the associated exit slide, or slide raft being deployed and 
inflated or perform the tasks resulting in the completion of these 
actions.
    (ii) Egress the aircraft or approved training device and descend 
the slide while using the proper method and technique.
    (h) Emergency evacuation (without slide)
    (1) Environment: This drill is required when the flight crewmember 
is qualifying on an aircraft that is not equipped with an emergency 
escape slide on any emergency exit.
    (i) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
crewmember must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight crewmember will serve.
    (ii) Each flight crewmember must complete an emergency evacuation 
by egressing the aircraft or approved training device through an 
emergency exit that is not designed to have an escape slide installed 
and is representative of the aircraft on which the flight crewmember 
will be qualified to serve.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must 
satisfactorily accomplish the following during the drill:
    (i) Observe the airplane exit(s) being opened in the emergency 
mode.
    (ii) Egress the aircraft or approved training device while using 
the proper method and technique.
    (i) Flotation devices
    (1) Environment: The individual flotation means used for this drill 
must be identical to each type of life preserver, flotation device, and 
seat cushion installed in the aircraft with respect to weight, 
dimensions, controls, types and method of operation.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember must complete 
the following during the drill:
    (i) Life preservers:
    (A) Recognize removal procedures for individual flotation devices 
and also recognize any equipment or furnishings that may complement or 
hinder the removal of the flotation device or seat cushion.
    (B) Don and secure life preserver, and inflate using automatic 
inflation (if appropriate) of at least one chamber.
    (C) Demonstrate proper arm placement and use of the life preserver,
    (D) Partially inflate, or simulate inflation of, a second chamber 
(if appropriate) of life preserver orally.
    (E) Practice deflation technique.
    (F) Locate and describe light activation.
    (ii) Flotation devices:
    (A) Recognize removal procedures for flotation devices or seat 
cushions, and also recognize any equipment or furnishings that may 
complement or hinder the removal of the flotation device or seat 
cushion.
    (B) Demonstrate proper arm placement and use of the flotation 
device or seat cushion.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) The individual flotation means installed may consist of life 
preservers, flotation devices, and seat cushions.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (j) Ditching survival (wet and dry training environments)
    (1) Environment:
    (i) Ditching survival drill in a dry training environment must be 
conducted on a surface with sufficient space to conduct the drill 
without interference from nearby objects or structures.
    (ii) Ditching survival drill in a wet training environment must be 
conducted in water with sufficient

[[Page 1372]]

depth and width under and around the slide, raft or slide-raft that 
does not allow participants the ability to touch the bottom or sides of 
the water containment structure.
    (A) Ditching survival drill in a wet training environment is a one-
time emergency drill requirement that the flight crewmember must 
complete for the certificate holder for which the flight crewmember is 
to serve.
    (B) Raft boarding and subsequent activities must be done in water 
for ditching survival drill in a wet training environment.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must participate 
in the following ditching survival drill for both wet and dry training 
environments as applicable to the certificate holder's procedures and 
approved extended overwater operations:
    (i) Identify boarding station and board raft.
    (ii) Review the need to crawl and stay low.
    (iii) Distribute the load.
    (iv) Review the need to stay attached to the aircraft as long as 
possible, and operation of the quick disconnect.
    (v) Review the need to get clear of fuel-covered water and debris.
    (vi) Locate and deploy the sea anchor.
    (vii) Discuss the importance of upwind and downwind.
    (viii) Retrieve the survival kit and review contents.
    (ix) Identify inflation valve and review operation of inflation 
pump and raft repair kit.
    (x) Identify equipment for bailing raft dry (e.g., bailing bucket 
or sponge).
    (xi) Install the canopy and discuss methods for collecting rain 
water and water purification techniques.
    (xii) Demonstrate how canopy can be used in both hot and cold 
climates.
    (xiii) Review the use of signaling devices located in survival 
kits.
    (xiv) Discuss the cautions associated with flares and sea dye 
marker and proper use.
    (xv) Point out raft lights.
    (xvi) Review alternate signaling devices (e.g., mirrors).
    (xvii) Locate and demonstrate use of heaving line. Review 
techniques to retrieve survivors.
    (xviii) Review raft maintenance techniques.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) Activities prior to raft boarding for both wet and dry training 
environments may be done in classroom, aircraft, or aircraft mockup.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    3. Observation Drills--During the observation drill, the flight 
crewmember observes the specific procedural drill being conducted by 
other persons in a live setting or through an audio-visual medium.
     (a) Preparation of Emergency Exits In Emergency Mode. Crewmember 
Performance: Each flight crewmember must observe the preparation of 
each type of installed flight crewmember emergency exit in the 
emergency mode, as follows:
    (1) Position escape device (if applicable).
    (2) Verify that girt bar is armed or disarmed (as appropriate).
    (3) Verify the exit is in the correct mode.
    (4) Identify conditions under which the exit is to be opened in the 
emergency mode.
    (5) Use proper voice commands to passengers (as appropriate).
    (6) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine the exit 
usability (e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (7) Open the exit in the armed mode (as applicable) and secure and 
stow the exit (as applicable) to ensure a fully open and unobstructed 
exit.
    (8) Hold onto assist handle (if applicable).
    (9) Pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify deployment and 
inflation (e.g., ramp, slide).
    (10) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (11) Follow crew coordination procedures (as appropriate).
    (12) Access release handle(s) (e.g., slide disconnect, jettison 
tailcone, ventral stairs).
    (13) Recognize when it is appropriate to exit the aircraft.
    (14) Access escape tapes or escape ropes (if applicable).
    (b) Emergency Evacuation Utilizing an Escape Slide (if applicable).
    Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember qualifying on an 
aircraft equipped with evacuation slides must observe the evacuation of 
an aircraft with passengers using a slide. The observation must 
include:
    (1) Correct methods of evacuation.
    (2) Correct methods of entering the slide.
    (3) Necessity for helpers at the bottom of slide.
    (c) Deployment, inflation, and detachment of slide, raft, or slide-
raft.
    Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember must observe the 
deployment, inflation, and detachment from the airplane of each type of 
installed slide, raft, or slide-raft. This observation must include:
    (1) Proper use of the exit operating handle.
    (2) Location and color of the inflation handle.
    (3) Demonstration of forces required to inflate slide or slide-
raft.
    (4) Attachment to aircraft (if applicable).
    (5) Sound of inflating slide, raft, or slide-raft.
    (6) Proper inflation and position of the slide, raft, or slide-
raft.
    (7) Location of the ditching handle or laces.
    (8) Launching points (if required).
    (9) Procedure to pull ditching handle including secondary actions 
that may be required.
    (10) Lanyard and the removal or cutting of lanyard.
    (11) Righting overturned rafts (if applicable).

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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    32. Add appendix R of part 121 to read as follows:

Appendix R to Part 121--Flight Engineer, Qualification Performance 
Standards

Table of Contents

Introduction
    A. What is contained in the Flight Engineer QPS?
    B. Can the reader rely solely on this document for pilot 
qualification and related training requirements?
    C. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?
    D. Why do we need a QPS for flight engineers?
    E. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?
    F. [Reserved]
    G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?
    H. What references are recommended?
    I. What training aids and guides should be used to develop 
instructional materials?
    J. How must Crew Resource Management (CRM) training be 
administered?
    K. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it 
incorporated in this QPS? (See Sec.  121.1355.)
Attachment 1. Programmed Hour Requirements for New Hire, Initial, 
Transition, Conversion, Differences, Requalification, Recurrent, and 
Special Training Categories (see Sec. Sec.  121.1205; 121.1331; 
121.1333; 121.1335; 121.1337; 121.1367; 121.1239; and 121.1391)
Attachment 2. Academic Training Segment Requirements--Subjects and 
Tests--for New Hire, Initial, Transition, Conversion, 
Requalification, Recurrent, Differences, and Special Training 
Categories (see Sec. Sec.  121.1221; 121.1223;

[[Page 1373]]

121.1225; 121.1331; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 
121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1381; and 121.1391)
Attachment 3. Job Performance Training Requirements for All 
Categories of Training (see Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1205; 
121.1221; 121.1223; 121.1221; 121.1225; 121.1253; 121.1255; 
121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1331; 121.1333; 121.1337; 
121.1339; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1345; 121.1347; 121.1349; 
121.1351; 121.1353; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 
121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 121.1385; 121.1387; and 
121.1391)
Attachment 4. Generic Flight Engineer Performance Standards for Each 
Task, Environment, Drill, and Demonstration (see Sec. Sec.  121.133; 
121.135; 121.1201; 121.1203; 121.1205; 121.1221; 121.1253; 121.1257; 
121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 
121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; and 
121.1391)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

Introduction

A. What is contained in the Flight Engineer QPS?

    This QPS contains Information and QPS Requirements.
    1. Information: Explanations that clarify or support regulatory 
requirements found in the Code of Federal Regulations or in this Flight 
Engineer QPS. Explanations are provided as guidance and are not 
regulatory. This guidance appears under the heading ``BEGIN 
INFORMATION'' and uses the terms ``should'' or ``may'' to indicate that 
it is not mandatory.
    2. QPS Requirements: Flight Engineer Qualification Performance 
Standards contained in this appendix are regulatory and mandatory. 
These requirements appear under the heading ``BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENTS'' 
and use the terms ``must,'' ``may not,'' and ``will.''

B. Can the reader rely solely on this document for pilot qualification 
and related training requirements?

    No, do not rely solely on this document for regulatory requirements 
in these areas. The reader must also use 14 CFR part 91 and part 121, 
subparts G, T, V, X, and BB.

C. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?

    1. You may mail questions to:
    U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, 
Flight Standards Service, Air Transportation Division, AFS-210,800 
Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591,Telephone: (202) 267-
8166,Fax: (202) 267-5229.
    2. You may find answers to questions on the Flight Standards 
Internet Web Site address is: ``http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/
headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afs/.'' On this Web Site you will 
find Flight Standards Programs, Aviation Safety Inspector Handbooks and 
Documents, the current Aviation Regulations (14 CFR), Advisory 
Circulars, and other sources of FAA information.

D. Why do we need a QPS for flight engineers?

    1. To provide objective standards for flight engineer performance 
and for relating these standards to simulation equipment qualification 
levels.
    2. To provide routine and periodic update capability. This 
capability is needed to respond to accidents, incidents, or rapidly 
occurring changes to equipment and operations. All changes made to this 
appendix will be subject to public notice and comment, unless good 
cause exists to support a finding that notice and comment would be 
impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.
    3. To provide the certificate holder with a minimum set of 
standards for developing the following:
    (a) Training and certification programs,
    (b) Performance standards, and
    (c) Evaluation criteria as they relate to the flight engineer job 
function.

E. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?

    1. Attachment 1 contains the programmed hour requirements for new 
hire, initial, transition, conversion, differences, requalification, 
recurrent, and special training categories.
    2. Attachment 2 contains the academic training requirements for new 
hire, initial, transition, conversion, requalification, recurrent, 
differences, and special training categories.
    3. Attachment 3 contains:
    (a) The job performance training requirements for initial, 
transition, conversion, upgrade, requalification, recurrent, 
differences, and special categories of training.
    (b) How evaluations are administered.
    (c) What level FSTD must be used for each task or environment.
    4. Attachment 4 contains the generic flight engineer performance 
standards for each task and environment.

F. [Reserved]

G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?

    You can find definitions in Sec.  121.1205. Acronyms are as 
follows:

AFD Airport Facility Directory
AFE Above Field Elevation
AFS-210 Air Carrier Training Branch, Air Transportation Division, 
Flight Standards Service
AFM Airplane Flight Manual
AGL Above Ground Level
AIM Aeronautical Information Manual
APD Aircrew Program Designee
ASR Airport Surveillance Radar
ATC Air Traffic Control
ATIS Automated Terminal Information System
ATP Airline Transport Pilot
CDI Course Deviation Indicator
CDL Critical Design List
CFIT Controlled Flight into Terrain
COM Crewmember Operating Manual
CRM Crew Resource Management
DA Decision Altitude
DH Decision Height
DME Distance Measurement Equipment
EFIS Electronic Flight Indicating Systems
EGPWS Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System
EGT Exhaust Gas Temperature
ETOPS Extended Operations(replaces EROPS)
EFVS Enhanced Flight Vision System
EVAS Emergency Vision Assurance System
FAF Final Approach Fix
FDC Flight Data Center
FE Flight Engineer
FFS Full Flight Simulator
FMS Flight Management System
FSTD Flight Simulation Training Device
FTD Flight Training Device
GPS Global Positioning System
GPWS Ground Proximity Warning System
GS Ground Speed
HUD Head-Up Display
IAP Initial Approach Point
ICAO International Civil Aviation Organization
INS Inertial Navigation System
LAHSO Land and Hold Short Operations
LOFT Line Operational Flight Training
LORAN Long Range Navigation
MEA Minimum En route Altitude
MEL Minimum Equipment List
MDA Minimum Descent Altitude
METAR Aviation Routine Weather Report
PAR Precision Approach Radar
PBE Protective Breathing Equipment
PF Pilot Flying
PIC Pilot in Command
PMPOI Pilot Monitoring Principal Operations Inspector
PRM Precision Radar Monitor (used as part of a Simultaneous Close 
Parallel approach)
PTS Practical Test Standards
QFE Corrected Barometric Altitude relative to field elevation
QNE Barometric pressure used for standard altimeter setting (29.92 
inHg or 1013 hPa)
QNH Corrected Barometric Altitude relative to sea level
QPS Qualification Performance Standards
QRH Quick Reference Handbook
RA Resolution Alert
RMI Radio Magnetic Indicator
RNAV Area Navigation
RNP Required Navigation Performance
RPM Revolutions Per Minute
SAR Search and Rescue
SIC Second In Command
SID Standard Instrument Departure

[[Page 1374]]

SOIR Simultaneous Operations on Intersecting Runways
STAR Standard Terminal Arrival
TA Traffic Alert
TAA Terminal Arrival Area
TAS True Airspeed
TAWS Terrain Avoidance Warning System
TCAS Traffic Collision Avoidance System
TSA Transportation Security Administration
V1 Takeoff Decision Speed
V2 Takeoff Safety Speed
VMCA Minimum Control Speed Air
VMCG Minimum Control Speed Ground
VR Rotation Speed
VREF Reference Speed
VSO Stall Speed, Landing Configuration
VS1 Stall Speed, Specific Configuration
XLS Other Landing System

H. What references are recommended?

    The following references (as amended) support the knowledge and 
skill standards for tasks. They are strongly recommended for providing 
further details for lesson development. To find 14 CFR parts go to 
http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov; to find Advisory Circulars go to: http://
www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/advisory_circulars; and to find FAA 
handbooks go to: http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/
airline_operators/.
    1. 14 CFR part 1, Definitions and Abbreviations
    2. 14 CFR part 60, Qualification of Flight Simulation Devices
    3. 14 CFR part 61, Certification: Pilots, Flight Instructors, and 
Ground Instructors
    4. 14 CFR part 63, Certification: Flight Crewmembers Other Than 
Pilots
    5. 14 CFR part 91, General Operating and Flight Rules
    6. 14 CFR part 121, Operating Requirements: Domestic, Flag and 
Supplemental Operations
    7. AC 00-6, Aviation Weather
    8. AC 0045, Aviation Weather Services
    9. AC 25.1581-1, Airplane Flight Manual
    10. AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making
    11. AC 60-28, English Language Skill Standards
    12. AC 61-21, Flight Training Handbook
    13. AC 61-27, Instrument Flying Handbook
    14. AC 61-84, Role of Preflight Preparation
    15. AC 120-28, Criteria for Approval of Category III Landing 
Weather Minima
    16. AC 120-29, Criteria for Approving Category I and Category II 
Landing Minima for Approach
    17 AC 120-51, Crew Resource Management Training
    18. AC 120-53, Crew Qualification and Pilot Type Rating 
Requirements for Transport Category Aircraft Operated Under part 121
    19. AC 120-54, Advanced Qualification Program
    20. AC 120-55, TCASII Operational Approval for Air Carriers
    21. AC 120-59, Air Carrier Internal Evaluation Programs
    22. AC 120-71, Standard Operating Procedures for Flight Deck 
Crewmembers
    23. Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM)
    24. En Route Low and High Altitude Charts
    25. Profile Descent Charts
    26. Standard Instrument Departure (SID)
    27. Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR)
    28. Airport Facility Directory (AFD) and Instrument Approach 
Procedure Charts (IAP)
    29. National Flight Data Center Notices to Airmen (FDC NOTAM)
    30. Integrated Measurement of Crew Resource Management and 
Technical Flying Skills, DOT/FAA/RD-93/26
    31. Transportation Security Regulations (TSRs)
    32 HMR 175, Hazardous Materials Regulations, Carriage by Aircraft
    33. FAA Order 8040.4, Safety Risk Management
    34. Air Transportation Operations Inspector's Handbook, 8400.10

I. What training aids and guides should be used to develop 
instructional materials?

    The FAA and the industry periodically publish training aids and 
guides in specific technical performance areas (http://www.faa.gov/
other_visit/aviation_industry/airline_operators/training/index.cfm 
and http://www.faa.gov/education_research/training/). These aids and 
guides are accepted as the industry standard for their specific 
technical area. The following training aids and guides are not 
regulatory, but contain valuable information about safety of flight 
operations that should be considered when developing instructional 
materials for the tasks to which each apply.
    1. Takeoff Safety Training Aid.
    2. Wake Vortex Training Aid.
    3. Windshear Training Aid.
    4. Upset Recovery Training Aid.
    5. Winter Operations Guide to Air Carriers.
    6. Controlled Flight Into Terrain.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

J. How must Crew Resource Management (CRM) training be administered?

    The flight engineer must demonstrate knowledge and skills in the 
technical and CRM competencies for each particular task.
    1. Certain CRM-related procedures must be associated with flight 
tasks and their related flight engineer performance requirements, as 
shown in Attachment 4 of this appendix. These procedures must be 
evaluated during job performance training programs.
    2. In addition to the CRM-related procedures, situational awareness 
must be evaluated as an integral part of each flight task and 
environment. A task is not completed unless the evaluator has 
determined that the flight engineer has demonstrated knowledge and 
skills in the technical and CRM competencies.
    3. Additionally, the following CRM behaviors are required knowledge 
to be taught and tested during academic training, as shown in 
Attachment 2 of this appendix:
    (a) Task: Authority of the Pilot In Command
    (1) The Captain's authority, including responsibility for the 
safety of flight in routine and emergency conditions
    (2) Chain of command and importance of chain of command
    (b) Task: Communication Processes and Decisions
    (1) Briefing
    (2) Inquiry, advocacy, and assertiveness
    (3) Self-critique
    (4) Communication with appropriate personnel
    (5) Decisionmaking
    (6) Conflict resolution
    (c) Task: Building and Maintenance of a Flight Team
    (1) Leading and following, including the importance of crewmembers 
functioning as a team
    (2) Use of interpersonal skills and leadership styles in a way that 
fosters crew effectiveness
    (3) Significance of cultural differences
    (d) Task: Workload Management and Situational Awareness
    (1) Preparation and planning
    (2) Vigilance
    (3) Workload distribution
    (4) Distraction avoidance
    (e) Task: Communication and Coordination
    (1) Flight deck and cabin chimes and interphone signals for routine 
situations
    (2) Flight attendant notification to flight crew that aircraft is 
ready for movement on the surface
    (3) Flight crew notification to flight attendant to be seated prior 
to take-off

[[Page 1375]]

    (4) Flight attendant recognition of critical phases of flight
    (5) Crewmember coordination and notification regarding access to 
flight deck
    (6) Notification to flight attendants of turbulent air conditions
    (7) Notification between flight crew and flight attendants of 
emergency or unusual situations
    (8) Notification between flight crew and flight attendants of 
inoperative equipment that is pertinent to flight attendant duties and 
responsibilities
    (9) Normal and emergency communication procedures to be used in the 
event of inoperative communication equipment
    (f) Task: Crewmember Briefing
    (1) Crewmember responsibilities regarding briefings
    (2) Flight crew briefing
    (3) Flight crew to flight attendant(s) briefings
    (4) Flight attendant to flight attendant(s) briefings
    (5) Required information
    (6) Security procedures
    (7) Communication procedures
    (8) Emergency procedures
    (9) MELs affecting flight operations and cabin safety equipment and 
procedures
    (10) Flight information
    (g) Task: Communication and Coordination During a Passenger 
Interference Situation
    (1) Certificate holder's written program regarding the handling of 
passenger interference, including crewmember communication and 
coordination
    (2) Techniques for diffusing a passenger interference situation
    (3) Importance of crewmembers and other employees working as a team
    (4) Role of management and crewmember in follow-up
    (5) Actions to report an occurrence of passenger interference
    (h) Task: Communication and Coordination During an Emergency 
Situation
    (1) Actions for each emergency situation
    (2) Importance of notification and who must be notified
    (3) Alternate actions if unable to notify
    (4) Communication during preparation for a planned emergency 
evacuation, including the time available, type of emergency, signal to 
brace, and special instructions

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    4. CRM refers to the effective use of all available resources, 
including, human resources, hardware, and information. Human resources 
include all other groups routinely working with the flight crewmembers 
who are involved in decisions that are required to operate a flight 
safely. CRM is not a single task. CRM is a set of competencies that 
must be evident in all tasks in this QPS as applied to the individual 
and the multi-crew operation.
    5. CRM deficiencies usually contribute to the unsatisfactory 
technical performance of a task. Therefore, the CRM competencies are 
valuable for debriefing. For debriefing purposes, an amplified list of 
these competencies, expressed as behavioral markers, is in AC 120-51, 
as amended.
    6. Certificate holders should conduct flight crewmember and flight 
attendant CRM scenarios together. When this is not possible, 
certificate holders should include information in flight crewmember 
training that addresses the roles of flight attendants during emergency 
situations.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

K. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it incorporated 
in this QPS? (see Sec.  121.1355)

    1. The continuous analysis process is a certificate holder internal 
evaluation and improvement process. The continuous analysis process 
will enable the certificate holder to maintain and refine the training 
process by continually monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of 
the process. Various assessment tools (testing, checking, inspection, 
documenting, evaluation, and analysis) will be used to validate the 
effectiveness of a training program or the need to change a training 
program.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    2. A continuous analysis process is incorporated in this QPS 
through integration with the qualification and training program. The 
certificate holder is responsible for designating responsibility for 
the process. The certificate holder must ensure appropriate and 
adequate assessment tools (testing, checking, critique, inspection, 
observation, documenting, evaluation, and analysis) are utilized to 
enable the certificate holder to validate the effectiveness of the 
qualification and training program, or the need to change that program. 
The certificate holder must describe the attributes of the continuous 
analysis process in the certificate holder's FAA approved training 
program.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. Components of a Continuous Analysis Process.
    (a) Qualification and training program as approved by the 
Administrator.
    (1) Attributes of the continuous analysis process.
    (2) [Reserved]
    (i) Who is responsible?
    (ii) Who has authority to change the process?
    (iii) Description of the process.
    (iv) Controls. Policy, procedure, training, evaluation.
    (v) Documenting and measurement.
    (vi) Interfaces between Departments. Consistency (policy, 
procedures, manuals):
    (A) Across Departments.
    (B) Across Divisions.
    (b) Assessment tools (adequate and appropriate).
    (1) Testing.
    (2) Checking.
    (3) Critique.
    (4) Inspection and observation.
    (6) Documenting.
    (7) Evaluation and analysis.
    (c) Modification and adjustment of the qualification and training 
program.
    (d) Approval for modification and adjustment.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 1 of Appendix R to part 121

Programmed Hour Requirements for New Hire, Initial, Transition, 
Conversion, Differences, Requalification, Recurrent, and Special 
Training Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Programmed Hour Requirements: Flight Engineers (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1205; 121.1331; 121.1333; 121.1335)

    1. Baseline and Minimum Programmed Hours. Table 1A sets out the 
baseline and minimum programmed hours for each category of training by 
segment (academic and job performance). The FAA may approve a reduction 
in baseline programmed hours if the certificate holder demonstrates 
that the reduction is warranted. The FAA will not approve a reduction 
in the programmed hours below the minimum programmed hours.
    2. Required hours for requalification training. The hours 
established for

[[Page 1376]]

requalification training (Sec.  121.1239) are for individuals in 
specific circumstances. Therefore, there are no programmed hours in 
Table 1A for requalification training.
    3. Required hours for differences and special training. The hours 
established for differences and special training are in addition to the 
previously approved programmed hours for the approved training program. 
For differences training (Sec.  121.1391), the hours remain in the 
differences training category. For special training (Sec.  
121.1337(c)), the certificate holder integrates the training into the 
existing categories in Table 1A. Therefore, there are no programmed 
hours in Table 1A for differences and special training.

                            Table 1A--Programmed Hour Requirements: Flight Engineers
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Training segments
                                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Academics                          Job performance
         Training categories          --------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           Emergency equipment
                                           Ground training          Flight training             drills and
                                                                                              demonstrations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NEW HIRE.............................  Baseline 24............  N/A....................  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 20.............                           Minimum 4.
INITIAL..............................  Baseline 116...........  Baseline 8.............  Baseline 8.
                                       Minimum 80.............  Minimum 8..............  Minimum 8.
FULL CONVERSION......................  Baseline 68............  Baseline 6.............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 52.............  Minimum 6..............  Minimum 4.
CORE CONVERSION......................  Baseline 52............  Baseline 6.............  Baseline 4.
                                       Minimum 36.............  Minimum 6..............  Minimum 4.
TRANSITION...........................  Baseline 76............  Baseline 6.............  Baseline 6.
                                       Minimum 58.............  Minimum 6..............  Minimum 6.
                                       Baseline 18............  Baseline 4.............  Baseline 8.
RECURRENT............................  (each 9-month recurrent  (each 9-month recurrent  (each 36-month period).
                                        training period).        training period).
                                       Minimum 14.............  Minimum 4..............  Minimum 8.
REQUALIFICATION......................  Determined by            Determined by            Determined by
                                        Administrator.           Administrator.           Administrator.
DIFFERENCES..........................  Determined by            Determined by            Determined by
                                        Administrator.           Administrator.           Administrator.
SPECIAL..............................  Developed by             Developed by             Determined by
                                        Certificate Holder,      Certificate Holder,      Administrator.
                                        Approved by the          Approved by the
                                        Administrator.           Administrator.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

B. Recurrent Training (see Sec.  121.1367)

    Recurrent training modules are required each 9 months. Recurrent 
training modules also will contain academic subjects, job performance 
tasks and environments, and emergency drills and demonstrations that 
may be required once each 9 months, once each 18 months, or once each 
36 months. The certificate holder may distribute these recurrent 
training requirements in a manner that best suits its training program 
structure while ensuring that the required items are included at the 
appropriate intervals.

    Example 1: A 9-month recurrent period includes all of the 
academic subjects and job performance tasks and environments that 
are required at each 9-month interval. The certificate holder may 
decide to include one-half of those academic subjects and job 
performance tasks and environments that are required every 18 months 
during this particular 9-month training period, and leave the 
balance to be completed at the next 9-month period. Also, the 
certificate holder may decide to include one-fourth of the emergency 
equipment drills and demonstrations during this 9-month interval, 
and leave the other three-fourths of those drills and demonstrations 
to be completed during subsequent 9-month periods.
    Example 2: A 9-month recurrent period includes all of the 
academic subjects and job performance tasks and environments that 
are required every 9-months. During the next 9-month recurrent 
period, the certificate holder must include all of the academic 
subjects and job performance tasks and environments that are 
required every 9-months, as well as all of the academic subjects and 
job performance tasks and environments that are required every 18 
months. At the following 9-month interval (27-month point), the 
certificate holder must include all those academic subjects and job 
performance tasks and environments that are required every 9-months. 
Then, at the 36-month point, the certificate holder must include all 
of the academic subjects and job performance tasks and environments 
that are required every 9-months, all of the academic subjects and 
job performance tasks and environments that are required every 18 
months, and all of the academic subjects, job performance tasks, and 
all the emergency equipment drills and demonstrations that are 
required every 36 months.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 2 of Appendix R to Part 121

Academic Training Segment Requirements--Subjects and Tests--for New 
Hire, Initial, Transition, Conversion, Requalification, Recurrent, 
Differences, and Special Training Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

A. Required Academic Training Subjects by Category of Training (See 
Sec. Sec.  121.1221; 121.1223; 121.1225; 121.1331; 121.1343; 121.1361; 
121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1381; and 121.1391)

    1. Attachment 2 contains the academic training segment 
requirements.
    2. When differences and special training are required for academic 
training, they will be additional training modules or new subjects. For 
more information about differences and special training categories see 
attachment 1 of this appendix.
    3. How to read Table 2A.
    (a) Table 2A contains the required academic training subjects by 
category of training. In the table, an ``X'' indicates that the subject 
must be included in the category of training. A ``9'' indicates that 
the subject must be

[[Page 1377]]

trained every 9 months. An ``18'' indicates that the subject must be 
trained every 18 months.
    (b) Table 2A item (c)(3) addresses the training subject 
``Coordination, communication, and methodology for the performance of 
each normal, abnormal, and emergency procedure contained in the FCOM.'' 
For core conversion, phase I requalification, and recurrent training 
all abnormal and emergency procedures are required. However, only 
selected normal procedures are required. The selection of normal 
procedures should be based on procedural changes, feedback from 
observed procedural irregularities, and system safety initiatives.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

                                          Table 2A--Required Academic Training Subjects by Category of Training
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Initial and                   Full coversion
                  Subject                      New hire       phase III      Transition     and phase II     Core conversion and phase I      Recurrent
                                                           requalification                requalification          requalification
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(a) General Subjects
(1) Duties and responsibilities of flight              X
 crewmembers.
(2) Appropriate requirements of the Federal  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 Aviation Regulations.
(3) General relationship of FAA to the                 X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
 certificate holder.
(4) General overview of the contents of the            X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
 certificate holder's Operating Certificate
 and Operations Specifications.
(5) Meteorology to ensure a practical                  X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
 knowledge of weather phenomena, including
 the principles of frontal systems, icing,
 fog, thunderstorms, and high altitude
 weather situations. Recognizing and
 avoiding severe weather situations and
 other hazards.
(6) Air traffic control systems, airspace,             X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
 procedures, and phraseology.
(7) Navigation and the use of navigation     ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 aids, including instrument approach
 procedures.
(8) Development of and operating in the                X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
 National Airspace System.
(9) General Concepts of TCAS Operation
    (i) The meaning of Traffic Alerts (TAs)
    (ii) The meaning of preventive
     Resolution Advisories (RAs).
    (iii) The meaning of corrective RAs.     ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
     TCAS equipment components controls,
     displays, audio alerts, and
     annunciations; interfaces and
     compatibility with other aircraft
     systems; TCAS surveillance range
     versus display range; altitude ceiling
     operators; when an intruder will not
     be displayed; and TCAS performance on
     the ground.
(10) High Altitude Physiology--Operations              X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................           18
 above 10,000 feet--Aircraft Decompression;
 Causes and Recognition of cabin pressure
 loss; Physiological Effects and time of
 useful consciousness; Immediate Actions;
 Altitude and Flight Level requiring the
 wearing of oxygen masks.
(11) Mechanical and Incident Reporting       ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 Procedures.
(12) Voluntary Safety Program and                      X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................           18
 Participation, including ASAP, FOQA, LOSA,
 and other government and industry accident
 prevention programs.
(13) Normal and emergency communications...            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
(14) General content, control, and                     X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
 maintenance of applicable portions of the
 certificate holder's operating manual, to
 include the Flight Crewmember Operating
 Manual (FCOM). Relationship of FCOM to the
 Airplane Flight Manual.
(15) Dispatch and flight release                       X               X              X               X    X (Conversion training only)...           18
 procedures. Flight planning as applicable.
(b) Crew resource management (CRM).........
(1) Task: Authority of the Pilot In Command
    (i) The Captain's Authority, including             X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     responsibility for the safety of
     flight in routine and emergency
     conditions.
    (ii) Chain of command and importance of
     chain of command.

[[Page 1378]]

 
(2) Task: Communication Processes and
 Decisions
    (i) Briefing...........................
    (ii) Inquiry, advocacy, and
     assertiveness.
    (iii) Self-critique....................            X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
    (iv) Communication with available
     personnel.
    (v) Decisionmaking.....................
    (vi) Conflict resolution...............
(3) Task: Building and Maintenance of a
 Flight Team
    (i) Leading and following, including               X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     the importance of crewmembers
     functioning as a team.
    (ii) Use of interpersonal skills and
     leadership styles in a way that
     fosters crew effectiveness.
    (iii) Significance of cultural
     differences.
(4) Task: Workload Management and
 Situational Awareness
    (i) Preparation and planning...........
    (ii) Vigilance.........................            X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
    (iii) Workload distribution............
    (iv) Distraction avoidance.............
(5) Task: Communication and Coordination
    (i) Flight deck and cabin chimes and
     interphone signals for routine
     situations.
    (ii) Flight attendant notification to
     flight crew that aircraft is ready for
     movement on the surface.
    (iii) Flight crew notification to
     flight attendant to be seated prior to
     take-off.
    (iv) Flight attendant recognition of               X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     critical phases of flight.
    (v) Crewmember coordination and
     notification regarding access to
     flight deck.
    (vi) Notification to flight attendants
     of turbulent air conditions.
    (vii) Notification between flight crew
     and flight attendants of emergency or
     unusual situations.
    (viii) Notification between flight crew
     and flight attendants of inoperative
     equipment that is pertinent to flight
     attendant duties and responsibilities.
    (ix) Normal and emergency communication
     procedures to be used in the event of
     inoperative communication equipment.
(6) Task: Crewmember Briefing
    (i) Crewmember responsibilities
     regarding briefings.
    (ii) Flight crew briefing..............
    (iii) Flight crew to flight
     attendant(s) briefings.
    (iv) Flight attendant to flight                    X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     attendant(s) briefings..
    (v) Required information...............
    (vi) Security procedures...............
    (vii) Communication procedures.........
    (viii) Emergency procedures............
    (ix) MELs affecting flight operations
     and cabin safety equipment and
     procedures.
    (x) Flight information.................
(7) Task: Communication and Coordination
 During a Passenger Interference Situation
    (i) Certificate holder's written                   X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     program regarding the handling of
     passenger interference, including
     crewmember communication and
     coordination.
    (ii) Techniques for diffusing a
     passenger interference situation.
    (iii) Importance of crewmembers and
     other employees working as a team.
    (iv) Role of management and crewmember
     in follow-up.
    (v) Actions to report an occurrence of
     passenger interference.

[[Page 1379]]

 
(8) Task: Communication and Coordination
 During an Emergency Situation
    (i) Actions for each emergency
     situation.
    (ii) Importance of notification and who
     must be notified.
    (iii) Alternate actions if unable to               X               X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     notify.
    (iv) Communication during preparation
     for a planned emergency evacuation,
     including the time available, type of
     emergency, signal to brace, and
     special instructions.
(c) Aircraft type specific.................
(1) Contents of the certificate holder's     ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 operating manual to include the FCOM. Use
 of any FCOM-based quick reference handbook
 (QRH).
(2) Operating limitations..................  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
(3) Coordination, communication, and         ............              X              X               X    X \1\..........................       18 \1\
 methodology for the performance of each
 normal, abnormal, and emergency procedure
 contained in the FCOM.
(4) Aircraft systems as described in the     ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 FCOM.
(5) Instrument procedures and low            ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 visibility operations.
(6) Airplane performance determinations and  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 flight planning for all phases of flight.
(7) Operations Specifications                ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 authorizations and limitations.
(8) MMEL, MEL, CDL.........................  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
(9) Emergency communications with                      X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
 passengers and other crewmembers.
(10) Storage of and how to administer                  X   ...............  ............              X    ...............................           18
 medicinal oxygen.
(11) The certificate holder's policy and     ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 FCOM procedures on the use of command and
 control automation and criteria for
 selecting and deselecting appropriate
 levels of automation (including manual
 control of flight) must be included in the
 lateral and vertical modes of takeoff,
 approach, and landing.
(d) Special Hazards........................
(1) Preventing controlled flight into        ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 terrain (CFIT) and approach and landing
 accidents.
(2) Recovery from loss of control due to     ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 airplane design, airplane malfunction,
 human performance, and atmospheric
 conditions (or combinations thereof).
(3) Low altitude windshear.
    (i) Recognition and avoidance..........  ............              X              X               X    X..............................            9
    (ii) Recovery from inadvertent
     encounter.
(4) Takeoff safety: Decisionmaking and high  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 speed aborts, including propulsion system
 malfunction analysis, causes, symptoms,
 recognition, and the effects on aircraft
 performance and handling.
(5) Airport surface movement safety and      ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 runway incursion prevention.
(6) Hazards of operating in or near          ............              X              X   ...............  ...............................  ............
 thunderstorms, turbulent air, icing, hail,
 volcanic ash, and other potentially
 hazardous conditions.
(7) Land and hold short operations (LAHSO).  ............              X              X               X    X..............................            9
(8) Ground anti-icing, deicing.............  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
(9) Ice accumulation in flight.............  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
(e) Special Operations Areas...............
(1) Close simultaneous parallel precision    ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
 approach operations with Precision Radar
 Monitor (PRM).
(2) Special routes, areas, and airports....  ............              X              X               X    X..............................           18
(f) International Operations...............
(1) Area and route characteristics.........            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
(2) Flight planning, charts, course                    X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
 plotting, and tables.
(3) Class II Navigation....................            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
(4) Communications.........................            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
(5) ETOPS or EROS, as applicable...........            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
(6) International rules and regulations....            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
(7) Abnormal Operations....................            X               X              X               X    X..............................           18

[[Page 1380]]

 
(g) Emergency Equipment Training...........
(1) Emergency communications with                      X               X              X               X    X..............................           18
 passengers and other crewmembers.
(2) Crewmember-specific roles in dealing               X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................            9
 with crewmember and passenger injury and
 illness, and disruptive passengers.
(3) Location and familiarization of          ............              X              X               X    ...............................            9
 contents for first aid and medical kits.
(4) Location and use of defibrillator......  ............              X              X               X
(5) Certificate holders blood-borne                    X   ...............  ............  ...............  ...............................            9
 pathogen awareness program.
(6) Location and use of emergency exits....  ............              X              X               X    ...............................           18
(7) Location and use of emergency            ............              X              X               X    ...............................           18
 equipment. Equipment must include:.
    (i) For over water operations: life      ............              X              X               X    ...............................           18
     preservers, flotation seat cushions,
     life rafts, slides, and slide rafts.
    (ii) For ground or water evacuation:     ............              X              X               X    ...............................           18
     escape ropes, megaphones, flashlight,
     emergency lighting, emergency locator
     transmitters, first aid kit, slides,
     slide rafts, fire extinguishers (each
     type used), smoke and fume protection
     (such as PBE and smoke goggles),
     megaphones, oxygen (portable,
     passenger oxygen system, flight crew
     masks), supplemental (flight deck key,
     demonstration equipment, smoke
     detectors, trash containers, seat belt
     extensions).
(8) Fires--in flight and on the ground.....
    (i) Procedures and strategies for        ............              X              X   ...............  ...............................  ............
     prevention.
    (ii) Classes of fires and correct        ............              X    ............  ...............  ...............................  ............
     methods of extinguishing each.
    (iii) Flight attendant role in           ............              X              X               X    ...............................           18
     exterior, APU, jetway, and ramp fire.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ All abnormal and emergency procedures are required. Only selected normal procedures are required. See paragraph A.(3)(b) of this attachment for
  information about selecting normal procedures.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

B. Knowledge Assessment (See Sec. Sec.  121.1341 and 121.1343)

    1. Knowledge and understanding of each subject within each area of 
instruction must be evaluated by written or computer based testing at 
the end of academic training. When written or computer based methods 
are used:
    (a) A score of 80% or better on each instructional area is required 
to be satisfactory.
    (b) A minimum of 5 questions must be developed for each subject.
    (c) Two questions for each subject must be randomly selected for 
each test.
    (d) The form and content of each test must be approved by the 
Administrator.
    (e) The test must be corrected to 100% by a person administering 
the test.
    (f) Correction of missed questions must include a discussion of 
which answer is correct and why, and why the person's original answer 
was incorrect.
    (g) Retraining is required for each instructional area in which a 
score of 80% or better is not achieved.
    (h) Examination after retraining of the student is required for 
each instructional area in which retraining was completed.
    2. The knowledge assessment for the specific aircraft subjects of 
limitations, systems, and performance and loading may be used for the 
oral portion of the proficiency test if completed no more than 60 days 
prior to the flight portion of the proficiency test (see attachment 3, 
E.1.(a) of this appendix).
    3. The following standards are for evaluating the flight engineer 
performance in limitation, systems, and performance and loading 
subjects.
    (a) Limitations--The flight engineer must know all of the 
limitations appropriate to the airplane with respect to:
    (1) Systems and components.
    (2) Performance.
    (b) Systems--The flight engineer must understand and be 
knowledgeable about the following subjects (systems and components) and 
be able to explain their operation as described in the FCOM and their 
applicability, as appropriate, to the Minimum Equipment List (MEL), 
Configuration Deviation List (CDL), and the operations specifications:
    (1) Landing gear: Including, as appropriate, extension and 
retraction system(s), indicators, brakes, anti-skid, tires, nose-wheel 
steering, and shock absorbers.
    (2) Engine(s): Including controls and indications, induction 
system, carburetor and fuel injection, turbo-charging, cooling, fire 
detection and protection, mounting points, turbine wheels, compressors, 
deicing, anti-icing, and other related components.
    (3) Propellers (if appropriate): Including type, controls, 
feathering and unfeathering, auto feather, negative torque sensing, 
synchronizing, and synchro-phasing.
    (4) Fuel system: Including capacity, drains, pumps, controls, 
indicators, cross-feeding, transferring, jettison, fuel grade, color 
and additives, fueling and

[[Page 1381]]

de-fueling procedures, and allowable fuel substitutions, if applicable.
    (5) Oil system: Including capacity, grade, quantities, and 
indicators.
    (6) Hydraulic system: Including capacity pumps, pressure, 
reservoirs, grade, and regulators.
    (7) Electrical system: Including alternators, generators, battery, 
circuit breakers and protection devices, controls, indicators, and 
external and auxiliary power sources and ratings.
    (8) Environmental systems: Including heating, cooling, ventilation, 
oxygen and pressurization, controls, indicators, and regulating 
devices.
    (9) Avionics and communications: Including autopilot; flight 
director; Electronic Flight Indicating Systems (EFIS); Flight 
Management System(s) (FMS); Long Range Navigation (LORAN) systems; 
Doppler Radar, Inertial Navigation Systems (INS); Global Positioning 
System (GPS/DGPS/WGPS); VOR, NDB, ILS/MLS, RNAV systems and components; 
indicating devices; transponder; and emergency locator transmitter.
    (10) Ice protection (anti-ice and de-ice): Including pitot-static 
system, propeller (if appropriate), windshield, wing and tail surfaces.
    (11) Crewmember and passenger emergency equipment and procedures: 
Including oxygen system, survival gear, emergency exits, evacuation 
procedures with crew duties, and quick donning oxygen mask for 
crewmembers and passengers.
    (12) Flight controls: Including ailerons, elevator(s), rudder(s), 
control tabs, balance tabs, stabilizer, flaps, spoilers, leading edge 
flaps and slats, and trim systems.
    (13) Flightdeck automation: Including the certificate holder's 
written automation policy and written operating procedures for 
selecting and deselecting appropriate levels of automation. This must 
include the certificate holder's policy for conducting CAT II and CAT 
III approaches when authorized.
    (14) Pneumatic system.
    (c) Performance and Loading--The flight engineer must understand 
and be proficient in the use of (as appropriate to the airplane) 
performance charts, tables, graphs, and other data relating to items 
such as:
    (1) Accelerate--stop distance.
    (2) Accelerate--go distance.
    (3) Balanced field.
    (4) Takeoff performance, all engines and with engine(s) 
inoperative, as appropriate.
    (5) Climb performance including segmented climb performance; with 
all engines operating; with one or more engines inoperative; and with 
other engine malfunctions as appropriate.
    (6) Service ceiling, all engines, with engines(s) inoperative, 
including drift down, if appropriate.
    (7) Cruise performance.
    (8) Fuel consumption, range, and endurance.
    (9) Descent performance.
    (10) Go-around from rejected landings.
    (11) The effects of meteorological conditions on performance 
characteristics with correct application of these factors to a specific 
chart, table, graph or other performance data.
    (12) How to determine longitudinal and lateral center-of-gravity 
location for a specific load condition, including how to add, remove, 
or shift weight to meet longitudinal (forward and aft), and lateral 
balance limits for takeoff, cruise, and landing.
    (13) Correct planning and knowledge of procedures in applying 
operational factors affecting airplane performance.
    (14) Meteorological effects on performance.
    (15) METAR and ATIS weather data.
    (16) Planning and application of operational factors affecting 
aircraft performance such as high altitude airports, cluttered and 
contaminated runways, ground and inflight icing.
    (17) Other performance data (appropriate to the aircraft).

END QPS REQUIREMENTS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 3 of Appendix R to Part 121

Job Performance Training Requirements for All Categories of Training

(Tasks, Environments, Drills, and Observations With Instruction, 
Evaluation, and Simulation Credits)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Determining the Job Performance (Flight Training) Tasks and 
Environments Required for Instruction and Evaluation for Each Category 
of Training. (See Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1221; 121.1223; 
121.1225; 121.1331; 121.1339; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1345; 121.1347; 
121.1349; 121.1351; 121.1353; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 
121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; and 121.1391)

    1. Certificate holder responsibilities with respect to the FCOM and 
Table 3A.
    (a) The certificate holder must use Table 3A of this Attachment to 
determine the tasks and environments on which each flight engineer must 
be instructed and evaluated for each training category in accordance 
with an FAA approved job performance (flight operations) training 
program. The tasks listed in the FCOM must reflect the tasks included 
in the table, as amended, and include standard operating procedures, 
abnormal procedures, non-normal procedures, and emergency procedures, 
as well as the authorizations contained in the certificate holder's 
operations specifications.
    (b) If the certificate holder adds tasks or environments to those 
listed in Table 3A, it must further develop the tasks or environments 
to include the requirement and frequency for training and evaluation in 
each additional task or environment. These changes must be submitted to 
the POI for approval.
    (c) If the certificate holder's operation does not permit, or the 
operation of the aircraft flown by the certificate holder does not 
require one or more of the tasks listed in Table 3A, those tasks must 
not be included in the FCOM.
    (d) The recurrent requirements in Table 3A also include the 
frequency during which each flight engineer must be trained and 
evaluated in each task and environment.
    (e) Changes to the FCOM must be submitted to the POI for approval.
    2. Job Performance Training Requirements.
    When differences and special training are required for job 
performance training, they will be additional training modules or new 
tasks or environments. For more information about differences and 
special training categories see attachment 1 of this appendix.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. Deviation from Sec.  121.1345 Training program: Mandatory use of 
flight simulation training devices.
    If a certificate holder receives a deviation in accordance with 
Sec.  121.1345, and the certificate holder wants to extend the 
deviation, the certificate holder should submit the request for an 
extension at least 60 days before the termination date of the 
deviation.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

[[Page 1382]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP12JA09.013

B. Airplane Emergency Equipment Training Requirements. Airplane 
Emergency Procedures Drills and Observations (See Sec. Sec.  121.1205; 
121.1333; 121.1337; 121.1351; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1337; 121.1381; 
121.1383; 121.1387; and 121.1391)

    1. An individual performance drill is a hands on training and 
evaluation demonstration that is performed by each flight crewmember 
using the specified emergency equipment.
    2. A group performance drill allows a flight crewmember to 
participate as part of a group of persons completing a specific drill. 
During these situations, it is not necessary for each flight crewmember 
to complete each task in the performance drill. However, each flight 
crewmember participant must observe the actions and activities of the 
other persons who are completing the performance drill tasks.
    3. An observation drill is one during which a flight crewmember 
observes a specific procedural drill being conducted by other persons 
in a live setting or through an audio-visual medium.
    4. Table 3B provides a list of the drills and observations that are 
required in each training curriculum. The frequency for recurrent 
drills and observations is every 36 months. Attachment 4 contains the 
performance standards for each drill and observation.
    5. Each flight crewmember must operate each exit on each aircraft 
type on which the flight crewmember is to serve in both the normal and 
emergency modes, including the actions and forces required in the 
deployment of emergency evacuation slides.
    6. Each flight crewmember must complete the required emergency 
training drills during the specified training periods, using those 
items of installed emergency equipment for each aircraft type on which 
the flight crewmember is to serve.
    7. Each piece of emergency equipment and training device must be in 
its fully secured, pinned, bracketed, or stowed condition, as installed 
on the aircraft, prior to being operated by each flight crewmember 
during each performance drill. The removal and stowage of each piece of 
emergency equipment may be completed separately from the performance 
drill as part of the equipment mountings drill.
    8. Flight crewmembers must demonstrate proficiency by completing 
each performance drill without reference to any guidance material or 
instruction.
    9. Individual evaluation of each flight crewmember's performance by 
an instructor is required. Flight crewmembers who do not complete 
emergency training drills must be retrained in accordance with the 
certificate holder's approved training program prior to reevaluation.

[[Page 1383]]



                          Table 3B--Aircraft Emergency Equipment Training Requirements
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 No certificate holder may use nor may any person serve as a flight crewmember unless the following training has
                                         been completed by that  person
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                    Initial,
                                                                                  transition,
                                                                                conversion, and  Recurrent every
             Emergency equipment training drills                   New hire       phase II and      36 months
                                                                                      III
                                                                                requalification
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(a) Performance Drills:
                          Individual
    (1) Fire Extinguishers...................................  ...............               X                X
    (2) Oxygen Systems.......................................  ...............               X   ...............
    (3) Equipment Mountings..................................  ...............           \1\ X   ...............
    (4) Flight Deck Oxygen Systems...........................  ...............               X                X
    (5) Firefighting (Actual Fire)...........................               X   ...............  ...............
    (6) Emergency Exits......................................  ...............               X                X
    (7) Emergency Evacuation (with Escape Slide).............  ...............               X                X
    (8) Emergency Evacuation (without Escape Slide)..........  ...............               X                X
    (9) Flotation Devices....................................  ...............               X                X
                            Group
    (10) Ditching Survival (Dry Training Environment)........  ...............               X                X
    (11) Ditching Survival (Wet Training Environment)........               X   ...............  ...............
(b) Observation Drills:
    (1) Preparation of Emergency Exits in Emergency Mode.....  ...............               X                X
    (2) Emergency Evacuation Using an Escape Slide...........  ...............               X                X
    (3) Deployment, Inflation, and Detachment of Slide, Raft,  ...............               X                X
     or Slide-Raft...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Only required if mountings differ by equipment.

    See attachment 4 for the Performance Standards for the Emergency 
Equipment Training Drills.

C. Determining the Level of Flight Simulation Training Device That Must 
Be Used for Training, Evaluation, and Recent Experience (See Sec. Sec.  
121.1345; 121.1347; 121.1349; and 121.1351)

    To use an FSTD for training, evaluation, and recent experience the 
following general requirements must be met. The code shown in Table 3C 
for the task or environment indicates the lowest FSTD qualification 
level that may be used.
    1. General Requirements.
    In addition to the approval of the POI required by part 121, to be 
used for any task or environment, an FSTD must:
    (a) Have a qualification level assigned in accordance with part 60 
of this chapter.
    (b) Be maintained in accordance with part 60 of this chapter.
    (c) Have all of the aircraft and FSTD systems installed and 
operating that are necessary to complete the task or environment.
    (d) Be operated in accordance with Sec.  60.25 of this chapter, 
Operation with Missing, Malfunctioning, or Inoperative Components.
    (e) Have the qualification level indicated in Table 3C, or a higher 
qualification level, for the task or environment and the category of 
training indicated. Certain tasks may be trained in an FSTD at a 
different level than required for evaluating that specific task. The 
instructor must observe the flight engineer perform the task to 
proficiency in the level of FSTD required for the evaluation prior to 
the evaluation by a check person.
    2. Loft Requirements.
    For Qualification LOFT, a level C or D FFS is required. For 
Recurrent LOFT, a level B, C, or D may be used.
    3. Takeoff and Landing 90 Day Recency of Experience.
    The three takeoffs and three landings required for maintaining or 
regaining 90 day recency of experience must include at least one 
takeoff with a simulated failure of the most critical engine, at least 
one landing from a precision category approach to the lowest minimums 
authorized for the certificate holder, at least one landing to a full 
stop, and at least one visual traffic pattern and landing. For 
maintaining recency of experience in a FFS, a level B, C, or D must be 
used. For regaining recency of experience, a level C or D is required.
    4. FSTD Requirements for the Proficiency Test, Check, or Review.
    (a) The proficiency test administered at the conclusion of initial, 
transition, conversion, or requalification training must be conducted 
in no more than two levels of FSTD.
    (b) The proficiency test, check, or review administered as part of 
the recurrent qualification requirements may only be conducted in a 
Level B or higher FFS.

                                   Table 3C--Minimum FSTD Required for Credit
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Training category                        Initial, transition,              Recurrent
---------------------------------------------------------       converson, and       ---------------------------
                                                                requalification
   Tasks Each task may be performed in the FSTD level    ----------------------------                Proficiency
         specified or any higher level of FSTD.                          Proficiency    Training    test, check,
                                                            Training        test                      or review
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.0 General
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
1.1 Human Factors and CRM...............................       Must be incorporated throughout training and
                                                                                evaluation.
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 1384]]

 
2.0 Preflight Procedures
2.1 Flight Deck (Inspection or Preflight)...............            4             A             4             B
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
2.2 Cabin Inspection....................................           Aircraft or approved pictorial means
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
2.3 Exterior Inspection.................................           Aircraft or approved pictorial means
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
3.0 Ground Operations
3.1 Engine Start........................................            4             A             4             B
3.2 Pushback and Powerback..............................            A             A             A             B
3.3 Taxi................................................            A             A             A             B
3.4 Pre-Takeoff Procedures..............................            4             A             4             B
3.5 After Landing.......................................            4             A             4             B
3.6 Parking and Securing................................            A             A             A             B
4.0 Normal, Abnormal, and Emergency Procedures
4.1 Takeoff.............................................            6             A             6             B
4.2 Inflight............................................            6             A             6             B
4.3 Approach and Landing................................            6             A             6             B
4.4 Engine and Systems Monitoring.......................            4             A             4             B
5.0 Line Oriented Environments
5.1 Anti-icing, Deicing Before Takeoff..................            4             A             4             B
5.2 Structural Icing Airborne...........................            6             A             6             B
5.3 Thunderstorm Avoidance for departure and arrival....            6             A             6             B
5.4 Windshear Avoidance and Encounter...................            6             A             6             B
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

D. Persons Authorized To Administer Flight Engineer Training, 
Evaluation, and Observation Activities Under Subpart BB. (see 
Sec. Sec.  121.1347; 121.1349; 121.1251; 121.1253; 121.1255; 121.1257; 
121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1341; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; 
121.1385; and 121.1391)

    Table 3D identifies who must administer certain required training 
and evaluation for flight engineers, and who must supervise and observe 
instructors and check flight engineers.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

      Table 3D--Persons Eligible To Be Authorized To Administer Flight Engineer Training, Evaluation, and Observation Activities Under Subpart BB*
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                            Affiliation and Position
                                                       -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Contractor                             The part 119 certificate holder
                                                       -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Other than   Part 142 or other Part 119
                                                         part 142 or      certificate holder
 Flight engineer training, evaluation, and observation   other part  ----------------------------
    activities under Subpart BB (by aircraft type)           119                                                                               Aircrew
                                                         certificate                                 Ground        Flight     Check flight     program
                                                           holder        Ground        Flight      instructor    instructor     engineer      designee
                                                       --------------  instructor    instructor
                                                           Ground
                                                         instructor
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic (Ground School) Training.....................            X             X             X             X   ............  ............  ............
Job Performance (Flight) Training.....................  ............  ............            X   ............            X   ............  ............
Certificate or Rating Examination.....................  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X
Proficiency Test (Initial, Transition, Conversion,      ............  ............  ............  ............  ............        \1\ X             X
 Recurrent, Requalification)..........................
Qualification LOFT....................................  ............  ............  ............  ............        \2\ X             X   ............
Supervision of Operating Experience...................  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............        \3\ X   ............
Proficiency Check.....................................  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X   ............
Proficiency Review....................................  ............  ............  ............  ............        \4\ X             X   ............
Observation of:
     Flight Engineer Instructor--Initial......  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X   ............

[[Page 1385]]

 
     Flight Engineer Instructor--Recurring....  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X   ............
     Check Flight Engineer--Initial...........  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............        \5\ X
     Check Flight Engineer--Recurring.........  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X         \5\ X
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
See Sec.   121.1343 for special limited authorizations for Initial Cadre Personnel. When POI authorization is required, the designation will
  specifically state the authorizations granted to the instructor, check flight engineer, or APD. Part 142 TCEs and other part 119 certificate holders'
  check flight engineers may be qualified and authorized as check flight engineers or APDs by the part 119 certificate holders' POI in accordance with
  subpart BB of this part. When qualified and authorized, these check flight engineers and APDs are considered a component of the part 119 certificate
  holders' training program resources.
\1\ When the proficiency test does not involve the issuance of a certificate or rating, a check flight engineer may conduct a Proficiency Test.
\2\ With POI authorization, employees of the part 119 certificate holder who are specifically designated flight engineer instructors may conduct
  Qualification LOFT and Proficiency Reviews.
\3\ In addition to the Check Flight Engineer, supervision of flight engineer operating experience may also be conducted by a Check Pilot, a Check
  Captain, or a Flight Engineer who has been specifically authorized by the POI.
\4\ With POI authorization, employees of the part 119 certificate holder who are specifically designated flight engineer instructors may conduct the
  flight engineer portion of Qualification LOFT and flight engineer Proficiency Reviews.
\5\ With POI authorization, employees of the part 119 certificate holder who are designated as APDs and specifically designated to do so, may conduct
  the Initial or Recurring Check Flight Engineer Observation.

E. Administering Evaluations. (See Sec. Sec.  121.1221; 121.1253; 
121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 
121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; and 
121.1391)

    The following requirements apply to the evaluation activity 
indicated. Refer to Table 3D of this attachment for who may administer 
each type of evaluation.
    1. Proficiency Tests.
    (a) Proficiency tests must be administered for first time 
qualification in a duty position. They also must be administered at the 
end of the first 9-month recurrent period following the proficiency 
test required by Sec.  121.1365(b)(1), and for phase II and III re-
qualification. Employees of the certificate holder who are used or will 
be used in the certificate holder's operations and who have completed 
all of the required training may use the proficiency test to obtain a 
certificate or rating.
    (b) When conducting a proficiency test, the evaluator (FAA, APD, or 
check flight engineer), must evaluate the success of each task as it is 
performed. If the proficiency test is a second attempt, and the first 
attempt was within the previous 60 days, the only tasks the evaluator 
is required to assess are those that were failed or were not assessed 
on the first attempt. However, during this retest, and at the 
discretion of the evaluator, any task may be reevaluated, including 
those previously judged satisfactory.
    (c) During a proficiency test, a task is judged as either 
satisfactory or unsatisfactory. However, in limited circumstances, the 
evaluator may judge a task to be incomplete or may not be certain about 
the outcome of the task. In these limited circumstances, the evaluator 
may require the applicant to repeat that task, or portions of that 
task; however, this provision does not authorize instruction or 
practice. The remaining tasks of the proficiency test must be completed 
before repeating the questionable task. If the second attempt to 
perform a questionable task is not clearly satisfactory, the evaluator 
must consider it unsatisfactory.
    (d) Unsatisfactory performance is demonstrated by consistently 
exceeding the parameters set out for the specific task, consistently 
exceeding the parameters for aircraft handling standards, or failing to 
take prompt, corrective action when those parameters are exceeded. If 
the flight engineer fails a task, the evaluator must decide if the 
entire test must be repeated or if the test can continue. If the entire 
proficiency test must be repeated, the evaluation must be terminated. 
If a single task has been judged unsatisfactory, and both the flight 
engineer and the evaluator agree, the test may continue, but only the 
tasks that have not been evaluated may be attempted. If the flight 
engineer fails a second task, the evaluator must terminate the test.
    (e) If the proficiency test must be terminated for unsatisfactory 
performance, the FAA notification (and notice of disapproval, if 
appropriate) must list the tasks or areas of operation that have not 
been evaluated and which tasks or areas of operation that have been 
found unsatisfactory. These tasks and areas of operation must be 
evaluated, or re-evaluated, on any subsequent proficiency test.
    (f) If a proficiency test is discontinued for reasons other than 
unsatisfactory performance (e.g., equipment failure, weather, 
sickness), the evaluator must complete one of the following:
    (1) If the test is part of an application for an FAA-issued 
certificate or rating, the evaluator must appropriately annotate FAA 
Form 8710-1, ``Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application.'' The 
evaluator must return FAA Form 8710-1 and, if applicable, AC Form 8080-
2, Airman Written Test Report to the flight engineer. The evaluator 
must also issue a Letter of Discontinuance to the flight engineer. The 
Letter of Discontinuance must identify the portions of the test that 
were successfully completed. The flight engineer must present the 
Letter of Discontinuance to the evaluator when the test is resumed. The 
Letter of Discontinuance must become part of the certification file.

[[Page 1386]]

    (2) If the test is not part of an application for an FAA-issued 
certificate or rating, the evaluator must properly annotate the flight 
engineer's training record to indicate the tasks and areas of operation 
that were satisfactorily completed and the tasks and areas of operation 
that were not evaluated.
    (g) The evaluator must annotate any certificate or rating issued as 
a result of a part 121, subpart BB proficiency test, with ``LIMITED TO 
AIR CARRIER OPERATIONS.''
    (h) The evaluator must submit FAA Form 8081.5C, ``Airman 
Performance Report, Airline Transport Pilot and Aircraft Type Rating 
for Airplane,'' to the FAA for all tests administered under subpart BB 
of part 121.
    2. Proficiency Checks and Reviews.
    (a) Proficiency checks and reviews must include job performance 
evaluation of the tasks identified in Table 3B and an equipment 
knowledge assessment outlined in section B of Attachment 2. The 
equipment knowledge assessment may be replaced by the academic 
knowledge test as outlined in Attachment 2 if the flight engineer 
completes the proficiency test within 60 days of the knowledge test. If 
the flight engineer does not complete the academic knowledge test in 
these areas within 60 days of the proficiency test, the flight engineer 
must complete a test of these knowledge areas in conjunction with the 
proficiency check or review. This test may be completed with oral, 
written, or computer based methodology. A passing score of 80% is 
required in each of the three areas of:
    (1) Aircraft Systems;
    (2) Handbooks, manuals, MEL, CDL, and operations specifications; 
and
    (3) Aircraft performance and limitations.
    (b) Evaluators who conduct proficiency checks and reviews and 
instructors who conduct proficiency reviews may provide limited 
training to a flight engineer. The limits are:
    (1) No more than two tasks may be trained, and no more than a total 
of three attempts (including the first unsatisfactory, a rehearsal, and 
a final assessment) in each of the two tasks is allowed.
    (2) The flight engineer has not satisfactorily completed the check 
or review if the flight engineer has three or more unsatisfactory 
tasks, or fails to demonstrate satisfactory performance in three 
attempts at any one task.
    (3) The check or review must be completed within the approved 
scheduled time period.
    3. Other Assessments.
    (a) After qualification, the flight engineer's performance in all 
job performance training activities (including LOFT) must be assessed 
for a satisfactory level of task proficiency based upon this QPS.
    (b) During a scheduled FSTD course of instruction (other than 
LOFT), if a task is performed unsatisfactorily the flight engineer may 
retrain on the unsatisfactory task; however, all scheduled tasks, 
including any retraining, must be completed within the approved 
scheduled time period.
    (c) Unsatisfactory task performance during LOFT may not be 
retrained and reevaluated during that scheduled time period.
4. Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory Performance
    (a) No evaluator or instructor may assess the flight engineer's 
performance as satisfactory unless that flight engineer:
    (1) Performs the tasks in accordance with the standards and 
tolerances established in the QPS.
    (2) Demonstrates mastery of the aircraft or simulated aircraft with 
the successful outcome of each task never in doubt.
    (3) Demonstrates performance such that no corrective or instructive 
action is required by another flight crewmember to maintain safe 
flight.
    (4) Demonstrates CRM competencies in accordance with duties 
outlined in the FCOM requiring crew interactions, including in a crew 
briefing before each takeoff and before each approach.
    (5) Demonstrates sound judgment.
    (b) The evaluator or instructor must assess a flight engineer's 
performance as unsatisfactory if the flight engineer consistently 
exceeds tolerances established in this QPS or fails to take prompt 
corrective action when tolerances are exceeded.
5. Recording, Reporting and Correcting Unsatisfactory Performance
    The certificate holder must report a failure of a test, check, or 
review to the FAA in accordance with Sec.  121.1331(f)(1). The flight 
engineer must be retrained and reevaluated to a satisfactory level 
before the flight engineer may begin or be returned to line operations.

Attachment 4 of Appendix R to Part 121

Generic Flight Engineer Performance Standards for Each Task, 
Environment, Drill, and Demonstration

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Developing Flight Engineer Performance Requirements for Each Task 
and Environment. (See Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1201; 121.1203; 
121.1205; 121.1221; 121.1253; 121.1257; 121.1271; 121.1281; 121.1341; 
121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1377; 121.1379; 
121.1381; 121.1383; and 121.1391)

1. General Requirements
    (a) Certificate holders must develop training curricula and flight 
engineer performance requirements for each required task and 
environment that include:
    (1) Conditions: Environmental conditions and circumstances, 
including those that compound the difficulty of the task when 
encountered.
    (2) Awareness criteria: Identify specific aspects of the task and 
environment that indicate proper operation, a need to seek further 
information, or a need to take action to prevent encountering a hazard 
or compounding the difficulty unnecessarily.
    (3) Action criteria: Procedures for completing a task, including 
operations in or near a critical environment, when appropriate. Provide 
relevant parameters with tolerances to reflect satisfactory levels of 
performance.
    (b) This attachment describes performance requirements and generic 
procedures for completing a task or operating in or near a critical 
environment. The certificate holder must tailor these performance 
requirements to the specific aircraft type and the certificate holder's 
approved operations.
2. [Reserved]

B. Generic Tasks and Environments (See Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 
121.1201; 121.1203; 121.1205; 121.1221; 121.1253; 121.1257; 121.1271; 
121.1281; 121.1341; 121.1343; 121.1361; 121.1363; 121.1365; 121.1367; 
121.1377; 121.1379; 121.1381; 121.1383; and 121.1391)

1.0 Area: All Operations
    The flight engineer must demonstrate the awareness criteria and 
action criteria under the prescribed conditions. The certificate holder 
must train flight engineers in all authorized conditions. Any selected 
condition may be evaluated unless a particular condition is specified.
1.1 Task: Normal, Abnormal, and Emergency Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.

[[Page 1387]]

    (1) Maintain situational awareness of the events and circumstances 
at all times.
    (2) Demonstrate ability to continuously monitor and to identify any 
potential hazards or threats to the safety of the flight.
    (3) Demonstrate ability to communicate and manage available 
resources.
    (4) Maintain adequate lookout and traffic avoidance for the 
conditions.
    (5) Maintain awareness of aircraft position relative to a ``nearest 
suitable airport.''
    (6) Monitor system indications to ensure normal operation or 
identify abnormal situations.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Ensure operation of the aircraft within the limitations 
established by the FCOM.
    (2) Comply with the provisions of the FCOM, SOP, and MEL (if 
appropriate) as they pertain to the particular aircraft, through all 
phases of flight and all operations.
    (3) Make correct use of instruments, flight director, autopilot, 
and navigation and communication equipment as prescribed by the FCOM, 
and as appropriate to the phase of flight.
    (4) Plan workload.
    (5) Complete the proper normal, abnormal, or emergency 
checklist(s).
    (6) Alert ATC and the certificate holder as necessary and obtain 
appropriate level of service.
    (7) Ensure proper crew and passenger briefings are completed.
    (8) Ensure the takeoff briefing is conducted according to the FCOM 
prior to taking the active runway.
    (9) Ensure that the approach is briefed prior to initial descent 
and conducted according to the FCOM.
    (10) Ensure potential terrain or obstacle threats are included in 
departure and arrival briefings.
    (11) Ensure that passengers, crew, and cargo are properly secured 
for take-off or landing.
    (12) Assist PIC in determining the best course of action when an 
immediate landing is required, but not possible.
1.2 Task: Human Factors and CRM
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Demonstrate terrain awareness.
    (2) Demonstrate orientation, division of attention, and proper 
planning.
    (3) Observe indication of situation, condition, or problem.
    (4) Consider the risks of alternate courses of action.
    (5) Demonstrate an awareness of environmental factors that are 
potentially hazardous to safety of flight operations.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Demonstrate sound judgment and operating practices in those 
instances where specific instructions or checklist items are not 
published.
    (2) Confirm fault diagnosis with crew and review possible causes.
    (3) Identify alternative course(s) of action; discuss with crew; 
monitor the course of action selected by evaluating progress toward a 
goal.
    (4) Involve other crewmembers, aircraft dispatchers, and 
maintenance control personnel in option analysis.
    (5) Demonstrate effective communications with other crewmembers.
    (6) Coordinate actions with other crewmembers prior to execution, 
except where safety of flight would be in jeopardy.
    (7) Ensure that coordination with flight or ground crew is 
completed where necessary.
    (8) Demonstrate the necessary flight crew coordination required for 
the tasks being completed.
1.3 Task: MEL Relief
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand MEL application.
    (2) Consider factors that restrict aircraft operation.
    (c) Action criteria. Apply the provisions of the appropriate MEL 
entry for operation restrictions.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) The purpose of this task is to require specific training that 
addresses safe operation of the aircraft while carrying an MEL item 
that requires training to take advantage of the relief.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

2.0 Area: Preflight Procedures
2.1 Task: Flight deck (Inspection or Preflight)
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Coordinate with ground crew and ensure adequate clearance prior 
to supplying power to, or operating, any devices such as doors, 
hatches, or flight control surfaces.
    (2) Know the maintenance or system tests that must be performed.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Demonstrate proper operation of applicable aircraft systems.
    (2) Note any discrepancies and take proper corrective action.
    (3) Determine that the aircraft is airworthy and safe for flight.
    (4) Locate the documents required for flight, including 
airworthiness and registration certificates, operations specifications 
(if appropriate), FCOM, MEL, CDL, weight and balance data, and the 
maintenance logbook.
    (d) Verify that the aircraft is safe for flight by examining and, 
if appropriate, servicing items such as:
    (1) Engine(s), including controls and indicators.
    (2) Fuel quantity (if interior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (3) Oil quantity (if interior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (4) Hydraulic fluid quantity (if interior inspection is appropriate 
to the aircraft).
    (5) Oxygen quantity and pressures for crew and passengers (if 
interior inspection is appropriate to the aircraft).
    (6) Fire protection and detection systems for proper operation, 
pressures, and discharge indications.
    (7) Pneumatic system pressures (if interior inspection is 
appropriate to the aircraft).
    (8) Ground environmental systems for proper operation.
    (9) APU.
    (10) Anti-ice and de-ice systems.
2.2 Task: Cabin Inspection
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) The flight engineer must prepare the cabin for a positioning 
flight with no cabin crew aboard. The flight engineer is not required 
to prepare the cabin for passenger safety in revenue service.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Awareness of emergency equipment location 
and stowage, emergency exit location and operation, and noticeable 
inoperative cabin equipment.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Visually inspect the aircraft cabin to ensure the aircraft is 
safe for flight.
    (2) Take necessary actions prescribed by the FCOM for safe flight 
or crew evacuation.
2.3 Task: Exterior Inspection
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) An approved pictorial must realistically portray the location 
and detail of inspection items, and may be used instead of the aircraft 
to conduct an actual exterior inspection.
    (3) Flight Instructors, Check Flight engineers, and Check Captains 
may be approved to certify an flight engineer's proficiency in exterior 
inspections.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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[[Page 1388]]

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (4) The exterior inspection is a demonstration of a flight 
engineer's ability to perform appropriate safety checks. It is not an 
extension of the systems knowledge evaluation.
    (5) The person conducting the evaluation should limit questions to 
those necessary to determine if a flight engineer can properly conduct 
the inspection and recognize an unsafe condition.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (b) Awareness criteria. Check the general area around the aircraft 
for hazards to the safety of the aircraft and personnel.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Note any discrepancies and take proper corrective action.
    (2) Determine that the aircraft is airworthy and safe for flight.
    (d) The flight engineer must verify that the aircraft is safe for 
flight by examining and, if appropriate, servicing items such as:
    (1) Engines, for closed and latched access panels, leaks other than 
normal drainage, intake and exhaust areas for freedom from FOD hazards, 
and pylon alignment marks, as appropriate.
    (2) Fuel quantity (if exterior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (3) Oil quantity (if exterior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (4) Hydraulic fluid quantity (if exterior inspection is appropriate 
to the aircraft).
    (5) Oxygen quantity and pressures for crew and passengers (if 
exterior inspection is appropriate to the aircraft).
    (6) Landing gear, brakes, and steering system.
    (7) Tires for condition, inflation, and correct mounting, where 
applicable.
    (8) Fire protection and detection systems for pressures and absence 
of discharge indications (if exterior inspection is appropriate to the 
aircraft).
    (9) Pneumatic system pressures (if exterior inspection is 
appropriate to the aircraft).
    (10) Auxiliary power unit (APU).
    (11) Flight control systems including trim, spoilers, ailerons, 
leading and trailing edge slats and flaps, elevator, stabilizer, and 
rudder, as appropriate.
    (12) Anti-ice and de-ice systems.
    (13) General airframe and structural integrity, including 
scratches, tears, holes, or dents and the fit and security of panels, 
doors, and hatches.
3.0 Area: Ground Operations
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Properly divide attention inside and outside flight deck.
    (2) Assist PIC in maintaining (surface movement) positional 
awareness.
    (3) Comply with sterile flight deck requirements.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Monitor and confirm clearance before crossing or entering 
active runways.
    (2) Observe runway hold lines, localizer and glide slope critical 
areas, beacons, and other surface movement guidance control markings 
and lighting.
    (d) The certificate holder must provide crewmembers with specific 
requirements for unique parking situations, or unique crewmember 
responsibilities that must be completed before the door closes or after 
it is opened in accordance with the FCOM. The certificate holder must 
also submit these unique requirements to the FAA for acceptance or 
approval as required.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (e) Ground operations begin when the aircraft door is closed and 
includes all activities until the brakes are released for the takeoff 
roll. Ground operations resume again when the landing roll has been 
completed to a safe taxi speed just as the aircraft exits the landing 
runway, and continues until the aircraft has been parked and the door 
opened.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

3.1 Task: Engine Start
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Includes hot or cold weather, tailwinds, icing conditions, low 
density altitude.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Ensure the ground safety procedures are 
followed during the before-start, start, and after-start phases of 
ground operations.
    (c) Action criteria. Use required ground crew personnel during the 
before-start, start, and after-start phases (as appropriate).
3.1.1 Task: Engine Start--Normal
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor appropriate RPM and EGT indicators.
    (2) Be able to identify abnormal RPM and EGT indications.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Start the engine(s):
    (2) Under varying environmental conditions;
    (3) Using normal, auxiliary power unit, external power, pneumatic 
sources, or cross-bleed, as appropriate.
3.1.2 Task: Engine Start--Abnormal
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor appropriate RPM and EGT indicators.
    (2) Be able to identify abnormal RPM and EGT indications.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Start the engine(s):
    (2) Take appropriate action in the event of a malfunction during 
the start process.
3.2 Task: Pushback or Powerback
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Maintain communications with ground crew.
    (2) Avoid use of brakes unless requested by ground crew.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Exhibit adequate knowledge of pushback or powerback procedures 
(as appropriate to the aircraft).
    (2) [Reserved]
3.3 Task: Taxi
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All.
    (2) Training must be conducted in taxi operations at the lowest 
visibility (RVR) authorized. Evaluation can be in any conditions.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Comply with low visibility procedures, as applicable.
    (2) Be aware of the operational factors that could affect the 
takeoff such as takeoff warning inhibit systems or other aircraft 
characteristics, runway length, surface conditions, wind, wake 
turbulence, obstructions, and other related factors that could 
adversely affect safety.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Monitor and confirm clearances received and ensure all 
instrument references, flight director and autopilot controls, and 
navigation and communications equipment have been set.
    (2) Confirm that the aircraft trim and wing high lift devices are 
configured properly.
    (3) Monitor and confirm the takeoff and departure clearance as 
issued by ATC.
3.4 Task: Pre-Takeoff Procedures
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Be aware of the operational factors that 
could affect the takeoff such as takeoff warning inhibit systems or 
other aircraft characteristics, runway length, surface conditions,

[[Page 1389]]

wind, wake turbulence, obstructions, and other related factors that 
could adversely affect safety.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Interpret information and clearances received and ensure all 
instrument references, flight director and autopilot controls, and 
navigation and communications equipment have been set.
    (2) Confirm that the aircraft trim and wing high lift devices are 
configured properly.
    (3) Obtain (or acknowledge, as appropriate) the takeoff and 
departure clearance as issued by ATC.
3.5 Task: After Landing
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Promptly clear the runway, avoiding an 
incursion on any other runway in the process.
    (c) Action criteria. Take no other action until the aircraft is 
clear of the runway and a suitable ATC clearance has been received.
3.6 Task: Parking and Securing
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Be aware of or acknowledge other aircraft 
and ground vehicles that might be a hazard to your operation.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Use available visual docking system and marshaller to properly 
park the aircraft.
    (2) Complete the post-flight entries in the maintenance logbook, 
including any discrepancies encountered during the flight.
4.0 Area: Normal, Abnormal, and Emergency Procedures
4.1 Task: Takeoff
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor engine and other aircraft controls, settings, and 
instruments during takeoff to ensure all predetermined parameters are 
maintained.
    (2) Monitor aircraft airspeed to determine normal acceleration 
during take-off ground roll.
    (3) Assess take-off and climb hazards particularly those related to 
obstacles.
    (4) Consider the effect of LAHSO or SOIR if conducted on a runway 
that crosses the takeoff runway.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) The flight crewmembers must ensure takeoff clearance is 
received and that the correct runway is being entered for takeoff.
    (2) Monitor correct alignment on the centerline of the runway prior 
to and during the takeoff.
    (3) Adjust the engine controls for the existing conditions and 
verify the expected engine performance.
    (4) Monitor rotation at the proper airspeed, at the proper rate, to 
the proper pitch attitude for the aircraft configuration.
    (5) Complete after takeoff checklists.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Takeoff begins at brake release (or the application of thrust 
with the intention of flight for those aircraft not using brakes). 
Takeoff ends when the aircraft is airborne, or in the event of a 
rejected takeoff, when the aircraft has reached a safe taxi speed.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

4.2 Task: Inflight
    (a) Condition(s).
    (1) All
    (2) Normal aircraft systems, controls, indications, and procedures.
    (3) High altitude operations.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand the requirements of the climb profile, normal 
cruise, and normal descent.
    (2) Aware of high altitude performance and specific flight 
characteristics.
    (3) Aware of aircraft systems, subsystems, and devices (e.g., fuel 
heat, air conditioning systems, hydraulic systems, pressurization).
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Complete appropriate checklists.
    (2) Demonstrate or use aircraft systems, subsystems, and devices, 
appropriate to the aircraft, such as:
    (i) Engines.
    (ii) Fuel system.
    (iii) Electrical system.
    (iv) Hydraulic system.
    (v) Environmental and pressurization systems.
    (vi) Fire detection and extinguishing systems.
    (vii) Navigation and avionics systems.
    (viii) Automatic flight control system, electronic flight 
instrument system, and related subsystems.
    (ix) Flight control systems.
    (x) Anti-ice and deice systems.
    (xi) Aircraft and personal emergency equipment.
    (xii) Other systems, subsystems, and devices specific to the 
aircraft type, including make, model, and series.
    (xiii) Pneumatic system(s).
4.3 Task: Approach and Landing
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Monitor the navigation instruments and be aware of correct 
airspeeds, aircraft configurations, crossing altitudes, and ATC 
clearance requirements.
    (2) Awareness of other crewmembers and their activities during 
approach and landing.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Correctly compute approach and landing performance 
requirements.
    (2) Adjust engine controls and aircraft systems, as necessary.
    (3) Complete appropriate checklist items, interacting with other 
crewmembers to ensure procedures are complete and aircraft systems are 
operating properly.
4.4 Task: Engine and Systems Monitoring
    (a) Condition (s). Engine systems, controls and indications.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Aware of aircraft systems within normal 
range, normal procedures, and checklists.
    (c) Action criteria
    (1) Adjust the engine controls and aircraft systems, as necessary.
    (2) Complete appropriate checklist items, interacting with other 
crewmembers to ensure procedures are complete and aircraft systems are 
operating properly.
5.0 Area: Line Oriented Operations Environments
    The specific operational environments below must be integrated into 
instruction modules for initial, conversion, transition, recurrent, and 
requalification training.
5.1 Task: Anti-Icing and Deicing Before Takeoff
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Understand the certificate holder's ground anti-icing and de-
icing program.
    (2) Be able to determine the need for anti-icing or de-icing prior 
to takeoff.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Inspect the aircraft to ensure all surfaces are free of ice 
before flight.
    (2) Correctly operate anti-icing and de-icing systems or equipment.
    (3) Coordinate the application of a proper mix of anti-icing or 
deicing fluid.
    (4) Determine hold over time.
    (5) Comply with the hold over time restrictions for takeoff.
5.2 Task: Structural Icing, Airborne
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Know the conditions that can lead to structural ice.
    (2) Understand the effects of structural icing on aircraft 
performance.

[[Page 1390]]

    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Know when and how to apply the procedures in the FCOM for 
operating in icing conditions or conditions that may lead to structural 
icing.
    (2) Determine when structural icing is present.
    (3) Monitor ice accretion during flight.
    (4) Correctly operate anti-icing and de-icing systems and 
equipment.
5.3 Task: Thunderstorm Avoidance, Departure, and Arrival
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria. Know the weather information available to 
determine the probability of thunderstorm activity and its location.
    (c) Action criteria. Use weather radar to identify thunderstorm 
activity and to avoid departing into the threat or circumnavigate in 
flight.
5.4 Task: Windshear Avoidance and Encounter
    (a) Condition(s). All.
    (b) Awareness criteria.
    (1) Know the sources of information that indicate the possible 
presence of windshear or turbulence.
    (2) Observe the visual indications that usually indicate the 
presence of windshear or turbulence.
    (3) Understand the effect of windshear or turbulence on the 
performance of the aircraft during low altitude operations.
    (c) Action criteria.
    (1) Avoid indicated areas of possible windshear or turbulence, if 
possible.
    (2) Be able to recognize the indications of windshear or turbulence 
during takeoff and landing profiles.
    (3) Execute the FCOM procedure for avoiding windshear; and, if not 
possible to avoid, execute the FCOM procedure for escaping windshear or 
turbulence during low altitude operations.
    (4) Practice avoiding and escaping windshear or turbulence during 
low altitude operations to include:
    (i) Takeoff.
    (ii) Departure.
    (iii) Approach.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Refer to the most current version of the FAA Windshear Training 
Aid. Demonstrations and practice are primarily for the purpose of 
enabling pilots to avoid windshear encounters. This practice will also 
enable pilots to execute the proper escape maneuver should windshear be 
encountered.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

C. Performance Standards for the Emergency Training Drills (See 
Sec. Sec.  121.133; 121.135; 121.1201; 121.1203; 121.1205; 121.1333; 
121.1337; 121.1351; 121.1365; 121.1367; 121.1381; 121.1383; and 
121.1391)

    1. Emergency training equipment must be identical to that installed 
in the certificate holder's aircraft on which the flight crewmember is 
to be qualified with respect to weight, dimensions, appearance, 
features and operation. Equipment may be substituted when it is similar 
with respect to weight, dimensions, appearance, features, and 
operations, and the pilot has been provided with training on 
differences between the training equipment and the actual aircraft 
equipment.
2. Performance Drills--Individuals
    (a) Fire Extinguishers
    (1) Environment: The hand fire extinguisher must be charged; but 
does not have to contain the actual extinguishing agent.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill for each type of installed hand fire 
extinguisher:
    (i) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., rotate handle to 
pressurize, break tamper seals, pull pin, release safety latch).
    (ii) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism.
    (iii) Aim and discharge extinguisher at the base of the fire 
(actual or simulated) using proper discharge pattern, bottle position, 
and flight crewmember body position (appropriate to the location of the 
fire).

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) Effective training scenarios for firefighting should include 
realistic drills with emphasis on combating hidden fires. To provide 
realistic training, drills should simulate locations of hidden fires 
such as behind sidewall panels, in overhead areas and panels, or in air 
conditioning vents. The intent of the training is to provide 
crewmembers with the typical obstacles that they would encounter 
onboard the aircraft, but it is not intended to have each student tear 
apart sidewall panels. A training program should incorporate a method 
to assess and combat a hidden fire, such as locating the exact source 
of the fire before applying an extinguishing agent. Depending on the 
sophistication of the training device, the flight crewmember could use 
a manual release tool that is designed to open the enclosed area to 
gain access to a fire that is suspected in that region.
    (4) The hand fire extinguisher does not have to be positioned in 
the same location as installed in the aircraft. This drill is not 
required for the type of hand fire extinguisher used in the 
firefighting drill that is completed during the same training period.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (b) Oxygen Systems
    (1) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill for each type of installed oxygen system 
equipment:
    (i) Don and activate the oxygen and test for flow, position, seal, 
and security of the mask or hood to the face or head.
    (ii) Demonstrate proper precautions.
    (iii) Secure the oxygen bottle, canister, or cartridge (as 
appropriate) and position it to monitor the supply.
    (iv) Demonstrate proper handling techniques if using portable solid 
state units.
    (v) Deactivate and stow equipment.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (2) This drill is not required for the type of protective breathing 
equipment used in the firefighting drill that is completed during the 
same training period.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (c) Equipment Mountings.
    (1) Environment: Each piece of emergency equipment must be in its 
fully secured or pinned condition using the identical bracketing or 
mounting system that is used on the aircraft in which the equipment is 
installed.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill:
    (i) Completely remove each piece of emergency equipment from its 
bracketing or securing system.
    (ii) Secure each piece of emergency equipment in its bracketing and 
securing system or properly stow according to certificate holder 
procedures.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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[[Page 1391]]

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) Unless otherwise specified, it is not necessary to have the 
emergency equipment installed within locations or compartments as 
installed in the actual aircraft.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (d) Flight Deck Oxygen Systems.
    (1) Environment: This drill must provide the flight crewmember with 
practice in donning and using the flight deck supplemental oxygen 
systems or related vision protection equipment as it would be used in a 
smoke-filled or fume-filled flight deck. The flight deck supplemental 
oxygen systems equipment must be identical to that installed in the 
aircraft with respect to dimensions, appearance, features, controls, 
charge duration, and operation.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill for each type of installed oxygen system 
equipment:
    (i) Remove the bottle, canister, hood, or mask from the bracket or 
stowage.
    (ii) Don and activate the oxygen and test for flow, position, seal, 
and security of the mask or hood to the face or head. Additionally, if 
smoke goggles are separate from oxygen, they must be donned.
    (iii) Demonstrate proper precautions.
    (iv) Secure the oxygen bottle, canister, or cartridge (as 
appropriate) and position it to monitor the supply.
    (v) Demonstrate proper handling techniques if using portable solid 
state units.
    (vi) Deactivate and stow equipment.
    (e) Firefighting (Actual Fire).
    (1) Environment: The flight crewmember must complete the 
firefighting drill while combating an actual fire. The flight 
crewmember must combat the fire using at least one type of hand fire 
extinguisher that is appropriate for the type of fire being fought, 
while using the type of installed PBE.
    (i) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
crewmember must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight crewmember is employed.
    (ii) For the purpose of this drill, protective breathing equipment 
and the hand fire extinguisher must be installed in the appropriate 
bracket or stowage compartment or stowage pouch (if not completed 
during the equipment mountings drill).
    (iii) The hand fire extinguisher must be charged; but does not have 
to contain the actual extinguishing agent.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (iv) A self-contained PBE may be substituted with a training smoke 
hood which is not operational.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill:
    (i) Recognize the type of fire.
    (ii) Locate source of fire or smoke.
    (iii) Remove PBE from stowage container and pouch (as appropriate).
    (iv) Don the PBE and activate oxygen in proper sequence (activation 
of oxygen may be simulated).
    (v) Verify seal.
    (vi) Select appropriate hand fire extinguisher for the class of 
fire.
    (vii) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., rotate handle to 
pressurize, break tamper seals, pull pin, release safety latch).
    (viii) Approach fire or smoke.
    (ix) Combat fire using proper techniques.
    (x) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism properly.
    (xi) Aim and discharge extinguisher at the base of the fire using 
proper discharge pattern, bottle position, and flight crewmember body 
position.
    (xii) Maintain an appropriate distance from the fire in order to 
complete the task and maintain personal safety.
    (xiii) Be aware of PBE oxygen duration.
    (xiv) Be aware of signals that PBE is no longer generating oxygen 
to wearer.
    (xv) Use protective techniques to back away.
    (xvi) Ensure fire is extinguished.
    (xvii) Use proper techniques for PBE removal.
    (xviii) Properly secure equipment.
    (f) Emergency Exits.
    (1) Task (Normal Operation): The flight crewmember must complete 
the following drill, with respect to the normal operation of each 
flight crewmember emergency exit:
    (i) Identify conditions under which each exit should be opened or 
closed, if appropriate.
    (ii) Assess the exterior and interior conditions for obstacles or 
hazards to persons or the exit during the opening or closing (e.g., 
jetway, stairs, barrier straps).
    (iii) Follow procedure to ensure flight crewmember awareness at 
armed boarding door prior to aircraft pushback (if applicable to the 
exit).
    (iv) Identify signal for arming and disarming.
    (v) Coordinate and communicate with other crewmembers.
    (vi) Properly arm and disarm the exit.
    (vii) Verify girt bar is armed or disarmed as appropriate.
    (viii) Verify exit is in the correct mode for intended operation.
    (ix) Use proper techniques for the operating mechanism (such as 
handles to open exit and secure in locked position).
    (x) Install safety strap. Stow safety strap.
    (xi) Release locking mechanism and properly use control handles to 
close exit and secure in locked position.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (2) Environment: The operation of each type of flight crewmember 
emergency exit may be conducted as an observation drill that includes 
the following tasks as applicable.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (3) Task (Emergency Operation): The flight crewmember must complete 
the following drill, with respect to the emergency operation of each 
flight crewmember emergency exit:
    (i) Position escape device (if applicable).
    (ii) Verify that girt bar is armed or disarmed as appropriate.
    (iii) Verify the exit is in the correct mode.
    (iv) Identify conditions under which the exit is to be opened in 
the emergency mode.
    (v) Use proper voice commands to passengers (as appropriate).
    (vi) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine the exit 
usability (e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (vii) Open the exit in the armed mode (as applicable) and secure or 
stow the exit (as applicable) to ensure a fully open and unobstructed 
exit.
    (viii) Hold onto assist handle (if applicable).
    (ix) As applicable, pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify 
deployment, inflation (e.g., ramp, slide).
    (x) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (xi) Follow crew coordination procedures (as appropriate).

[[Page 1392]]

    (xii) Access release handle(s) (e.g., Slide disconnect, jettison 
tailcone, ventral stairs)
    (xiii) Recognize when it is appropriate to exit the aircraft.
    (xiv) Access escape tapes or escape ropes (if applicable).
    (g) Emergency Evacuation (With Slide)
    (1) Environment: This drill is required when the flight crewmember 
is qualifying on an aircraft that is equipped with emergency escape 
slides.
    (i) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
crewmember must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight crewmember is employed.
    (ii) Each flight crewmember must complete an emergency evacuation 
by egressing the aircraft or approved training device using at least 
one type of installed emergency escape slide from an aircraft on which 
the flight crewmember will be qualified to serve.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must complete the 
following during the drill:
    (i) Observe the airplane exit(s) being opened in the emergency mode 
and the associated exit slide, or slide raft being deployed and 
inflated or perform the tasks resulting in the completion of these 
actions.
    (ii) Egress the aircraft or approved training device and descend 
the slide while using the proper method and technique.
    (h) Emergency Evacuation (Without Slide)
    (1) Environment: This drill is required when the flight crewmember 
is qualifying on an aircraft that is not equipped with an emergency 
escape slide on any emergency exit.
    (i) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
crewmember must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight crewmember will serve.
    (ii) Each flight crewmember must complete an emergency evacuation 
by egressing the aircraft or approved training device through an 
emergency exit that is not designed to have an escape slide installed 
and is representative of the aircraft on which the flight crewmember 
will be qualified to serve.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must 
satisfactorily accomplish the following during the drill:
    (i) Observe the airplane exit(s) being opened in the emergency 
mode.
    (ii) Egress the aircraft or approved training device while using 
the proper method and technique.
    (i) Flotation Devices
    (1) Environment: The individual flotation means used for this drill 
must be identical to each type of life preserver, flotation device, and 
seat cushion installed in the aircraft with respect to weight, 
dimensions, controls, types and method of operation.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember must complete 
the following during the drill:
    (i) Life preservers:
    (A) Recognize removal procedures for individual flotation devices 
and also recognize any equipment or furnishings that may complement or 
hinder the removal of the flotation device or seat cushion.
    (B) Don and secure life preserver, and inflate using automatic 
inflation (if appropriate) of at least one chamber.
    (C) Demonstrate proper arm placement and use of the life preserver.
    (D) Partially inflate, or simulate inflation of, a second chamber 
(if appropriate) of life preserver orally.
    (E) Practice deflation technique.
    (F) Locate and describe light activation.
    (ii) Flotation devices:
    (A) Recognize removal procedures for flotation devices or seat 
cushions, and also recognize any equipment or furnishings that may 
complement or hinder the removal of the flotation device or seat 
cushion.
    (B) Demonstrate proper arm placement and use of the flotation 
device or seat cushion.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) The individual flotation means installed may consist of life 
preservers, flotation devices, and seat cushions.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (j) Ditching Survival (Wet and Dry Training Environments)
    (1) Environment:
    (a) Ditching survival drill in a dry training environment must be 
conducted on a surface with sufficient space to conduct the drill 
without interference from nearby objects or structures.
    (b) Ditching survival drill in a wet training environment must be 
conducted in water with sufficient depth and width under and around the 
slide, raft or slide-raft that does not allow participants the ability 
to touch the bottom or sides of the water containment structure.
    (i) Ditching survival drill in a wet training environment is a one-
time emergency drill requirement that the flight crewmember must 
complete for the certificate holder for which the flight crewmember is 
to serve.
    (ii) Raft boarding and subsequent activities must be done in water 
for ditching survival drill in a wet training environment.
    (2) Crewmember Performance: The flight crewmember must participate 
in the following ditching survival drill for both wet and dry training 
environments as applicable to the certificate holder's procedures and 
approved extended overwater operations:
    (i) Identify boarding station and board raft.
    (ii) Review the need to crawl and stay low.
    (iii) Distribute the load.
    (iv) Review the need to stay attached to the aircraft as long as 
possible, and operation of the quick disconnect.
    (v) Review the need to get clear of fuel-covered water and debris.
    (vi) Locate and deploy the sea anchor.
    (vii) Discuss the importance of upwind and downwind.
    (viii) Retrieve the survival kit and review contents.
    (ix) Identify inflation valve and review operation of inflation 
pump and raft repair kit.
    (x) Identify equipment for bailing raft dry (e.g., bailing bucket 
or sponge).
    (xi) Install the canopy and discuss methods for collecting rain 
water and water purification techniques.
    (xii) Demonstrate how canopy can be used in both hot and cold 
climates.
    (xiii) Review the use of signaling devices located in survival 
kits.
    (xiv) Discuss the cautions associated with flares and sea dye 
marker and proper use.
    (xv) Point out raft lights.
    (xvi) Review alternate signaling devices (e.g., mirrors).
    (xvii) Locate and demonstrate use of heaving line. Review 
techniques to retrieve survivors.
    (xviii) Review raft maintenance techniques.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (3) Activities prior to raft boarding for both wet and dry training 
environments may be done in classroom, aircraft, or aircraft mockup.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    3. Observation Drills--During the observation drill, the flight 
crewmember observes the specific procedural drill

[[Page 1393]]

being conducted by other persons in a live setting or through an audio-
visual medium.
    (a) Preparation of Emergency Exits in Emergency Mode.
    (1) Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember must observe the 
preparation of each type of installed flight crewmember emergency exit 
in the emergency mode, as follows:
    (i) Position escape device (if applicable).
    (ii) Verify that girt bar is armed or disarmed (as appropriate).
    (iii) Verify the exit is in the correct mode.
    (iv) Identify conditions under which the exit is to be opened in 
the emergency mode.
    (v) Use proper voice commands to passengers (as appropriate).
    (vi) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine the exit 
usability (e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (vii) Open the exit in the armed mode (as applicable) and secure 
and stow the exit (as applicable) to ensure a fully open and 
unobstructed exit.
    (viii) Hold onto assist handle (if applicable).
    (ix) Pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify deployment and 
inflation (e.g., ramp, slide).
    (x) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (xi) Follow crew coordination procedures (as appropriate).
    (xii) Access release handle(s) (e.g., slide disconnect, jettison 
tailcone, ventral stairs).
    (xiii) Recognize when it is appropriate to exit the aircraft.
    (xiv) Access escape tapes or escape ropes (if applicable).
    (b) Emergency Evacuation Utilizing an Escape Slide (if applicable).
    (1) Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember qualifying on an 
aircraft equipped with evacuation slides must observe the evacuation of 
an aircraft with passengers using a slide. The observation must 
include:
    (i) Correct methods of evacuation.
    (ii) Correct methods of entering the slide.
    (iii) Necessity for helpers at the bottom of slide.
    (c) Deployment, inflation, and detachment of slide, raft, or slide-
raft.
    (1) Crewmember Performance: Each flight crewmember must observe the 
deployment, inflation, and detachment from the airplane of each type of 
installed slide, raft, or slide-raft. This observation must include:
    (i) Proper use of the exit operating handle.
    (ii) Location and color of the inflation handle.
    (ii) Demonstration of forces required to inflate slide or slide-
raft.
    (v) Attachment to aircraft (if applicable).
    (v) Sound of inflating slide, raft, or slide-raft.
    (vi) Proper inflation and position of the slide, raft, or slide-
raft.
    (vii) Location of the ditching handle or laces.
    (viii) Launching points (if required).
    (ix) Procedure to pull ditching handle including secondary actions 
that may be required.
    (x) Lanyard and the removal or cutting of lanyard.
    (xi) Righting overturned rafts (if applicable).

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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    33. Add appendix S of part 121 to read as follows:

Appendix S to Part 121--Flight Attendant Qualification Performance 
Standards

Table of Contents

Introduction
A. What is contained in the Flight Attendant QPS?
B. Can the reader rely solely on this document for flight attendant 
qualification and related training requirements?
C. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?
D. Why do we need a QPS for flight attendants?
E. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?
F. [Reserved]
G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?
H. What references are recommended?
I. How must Crew Resource Management (CRM) training be administered?
J. How are these standards used to develop training and evaluation 
requirements for flight attendants?
K. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it 
incorporated in this QPS? (See Sec.  121.1355.)
Attachment 1. Flight Attendant Training--Evaluation Requirements and 
Programmed Hours (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301; 121.1331; 121.1335; 
121.1341; 121.1343; and 121.1361)
Attachment 2. Tasks for Flight Attendant Training--Task Requirements 
and Performance Standards by Area of Instruction (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1301; 121.1331; 121.1333; 121.1341; and 121.1361)
Attachment 3. Training and Evaluation Requirements for Flight 
Attendant Training Curricula (Basic Qualification), Categories (New 
Hire, Initial, Transition, Emergency, Recurrent, and 
Requalification), and Aircraft Operating Experience (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1301; 121.1303; 121.1309; 121.1331; 121.1341; 121.1361; 
121.1363; 121.1369; 121.1373; and 121.1375)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

Introduction

A. What is contained in the Flight Attendant QPS?

    This QPS contains Information and QPS Requirements.
    1. Information: Explanations that clarify or support regulatory 
requirements found in the Code of Federal Regulations or in this Flight 
Attendant QPS. Explanations are provided as guidance and are not 
regulatory. This guidance appears under the heading ``BEGIN 
INFORMATION'' and uses the terms ``should'' or ``may'' to indicate that 
it is not mandatory.
    2. QPS Requirements: Flight Attendant Qualification Performance 
Standards, contained in this appendix, are regulatory and mandatory. 
These requirements appear under the heading ``BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENTS'' 
and use the terms ``must,'' and ``may not.''

B. Can the reader rely solely on this document for flight attendant 
qualification and related training requirements?

    No, do not rely solely on this document for regulatory requirements 
in these areas. The reader must also use 14 CFR part 91 and part 121, 
subparts G, T, V, X, and BB.

C. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?

    1. You may contact: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal 
Aviation Administration Flight Standards Service, Air Transportation 
Division, AFS-210, 800 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20591, 
Telephone:(202) 267-8166, Fax: (202) 267-5229.
    2. You may find answers to questions on the:
    (a) Flight Standards Internet Web Site: ``http://www.faa.gov/about/
office_org/headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afs/.'' On this Web Site 
you will find Flight Standards Programs, Aviation Safety Inspector 
Handbooks, the current Aviation Regulations (14 CFR), Advisory 
Circulars, and other sources of FAA information.
    (b) Flight Standards Cabin Safety Web Site: http://www.faa.gov/
safety/programs_initiatives/aircraft_aviation/cabin_safety/. On this 
Web Site you will find links to FAA rules and guidance documents, legal 
interpretations and other sources of FAA information that are pertinent 
to cabin safety. Also linked from this site are additional Department 
of Transportation information sources.

[[Page 1394]]

D. Why do we need a QPS for flight attendants?

    1. To provide an objective means of establishing performance based 
standards for flight attendant training and qualification.
    2. To provide routine and periodic update capability. This 
capability is needed to respond to accidents, incidents, or rapidly 
occurring changes to equipment and operations. All changes made to this 
appendix will be subject to public notice and comment, unless good 
cause exists to support a finding that notice and comment would be 
impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.
    3. To provide the certificate holder with a minimum set of 
standards for developing the following:
    (a) Training programs,
    (b) Performance standards, and
    (c) Evaluation criteria as they relate to the flight attendant job 
function.

E. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?

    1. Attachment 1 contains general evaluation requirements and 
programmed hours for flight attendant training.
    2. Attachment 2 contains tasks for flight attendant training by 
area of instruction.
    3. Attachment 3 contains specific instruction and evaluation 
requirements for flight attendant training curricula (basic 
qualification), categories (new hire, initial, transition, emergency, 
recurrent, and requalification), and aircraft operating experience.

F. [Reserved]

G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?

    You can find definitions in Sec.  121.1205. Acronyms are as 
follows:

Acronyms

AED Automated External Defibrillator
AFS 200 Air Transportation Division, Flight Standards Service
ASAP Aviation Safety Action Program
ASRS Aviation Safety Reporting System
CIA Central Intelligence Agency
CPR Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
CRM Crew Resource Management
CRS Child Restraint System
CSI Aviation Safety Inspector--Cabin Safety
DOT Department of Transportation
ELT Emergency Locator Transmitter
EMK Emergency Medical Kit
FAOM Flight Attendant Operating Manual
FBI Federal Bureau of Investigations
FOQA Flight Operational Quality Assurance
NTSB National Transportation Safety Board
MEL Minimum Equipment List
PBE Protective Breathing Equipment
PED Portable Electronic Devices
PIC Pilot in Command
POC Portable Oxygen Concentrator
POI Principal Operations Inspector
QPS Qualification Performance Standards
TSA Transportation Security Administration

H. What references are recommended?

    The following references (as amended) support the knowledge and 
skill standards for tasks. They are strongly recommended for providing 
further details for lesson development. To find 14 CFR parts go to 
http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov; to find Advisory Circulars go to: http://
www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/advisory_circulars; and to find FAA 
handbooks go to: http://www.faa.gov/other_visit/aviation_industry/
airline_operators/handbooks/.
    1. 14 CFR part 1, Definitions and Abbreviations
    2. 14 CFR part 121, Operating Requirements: Domestic, Flag, and 
Supplemental Operations
    3. FAA Order 8400.10, Volume 3, Air Transportation Operations 
Inspector's Handbook
    4. AC 60-28, English Language Skill Standards
    5. AC 120-51, Crew Resource Management Training
    6. AC 120-54, Advanced Qualification Program
    7. AC 120-44A, Air Carrier First Aid Programs
    8. AC 120-47, Survival Equipment for Use in Overwater Operations
    9. AC 120-59, Air Carrier Internal Evaluation Programs
    10. AC 121-29B, Carry-On Baggage
    11. AC121-24B, Passenger Safety Information Briefing and Briefing 
Cards
    12. AC 121-33B, Emergency Medical Equipment
    13. AC 121-34B, Emergency Medical Equipment Training
    14. AC 121-35, Management of Passengers During Ground Operations 
Without Cabin Ventilation
    15. AC 121-36, Management of Passengers Who May Be Sensitive to 
Allergens
    16. AC 120-87, Use of Child Restraint Systems on Aircraft
    17. AC 120-88 A, Preventing Injuries Caused by Turbulence

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

I. How must Crew Resource Management (CRM) training be administered?

    The flight attendant must demonstrate knowledge and skills in the 
technical and CRM competencies for each particular task.
    1. Certain CRM-related knowledge and skills must be associated with 
one or more flight attendant performance tasks and must be evaluated 
during flight attendant training as shown in Attachment 2 of this 
appendix.
    2. The flight attendant must demonstrate knowledge and skills in 
both the technical and CRM competencies for each task. A task is not 
completed unless the evaluator has determined that the flight attendant 
has demonstrated knowledge and skills in the technical and CRM 
competencies.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. CRM refers to the effective use of all available resources, 
including human resources, hardware, and information. Human resources 
include all other groups routinely working with the flight crew who are 
involved in decisions that are required to operate a flight safely. CRM 
is not a single task. CRM is a set of competencies that must be evident 
in all tasks in this QPS as applied to the individual and the multi-
crew operation.
    4. CRM deficiencies usually contribute to the unsatisfactory 
technical performance of a task. Therefore, the CRM competencies are 
valuable for debriefing. For debriefing purposes, an amplified list of 
these competencies, expressed as behavioral markers, is in AC 120-51, 
as amended.
    5. Certificate holders should conduct flight crewmember and flight 
attendant CRM scenarios together. When this is not possible, 
certificate holders should include information in flight attendant 
training that addresses the role of flight crewmembers during emergency 
situations.

J. How are these standards used to develop training and evaluation 
requirements for flight attendants?

    Training categories provide the framework for the lessons and 
modules necessary to train and evaluate flight attendants.
    1. Knowledge (Academic): New hire training and portions of initial, 
transition, emergency, requalification, and recurrent training are for 
the purpose of acquiring and maintaining the knowledge required for 
safe operations. The required areas of instruction, including the CRM 
competencies, are combined with the information and procedures 
contained in the certificate holder's Flight Attendant Operating Manual 
(FAOM),

[[Page 1395]]

and other pertinent references to create the knowledge requirements. 
Curricula are then developed to support these knowledge requirements 
and ensure that knowledge is obtained and maintained.
    2. Cognitive, Procedural, and Motor Skills (Job Performance): The 
job performance tasks in basic qualification, requalification, and 
recurrent training are for the purpose of combining the knowledge 
obtained in the academic training with cognitive, procedural, and motor 
skills. The cognitive, procedural, and motor skill requirements should 
be developed from the tasks, hazards, and environments required in this 
QPS, from the generic flight attendant performance standards, the 
certificate holder's FAOM and from other references that directly 
address specific tasks, hazards, or environments. Curricula should be 
developed to support acquiring these skills and ensuring that knowledge 
is maintained.
    3. Training categories contain requirements for two different 
segments of training within that training category. These two segments 
are ``academic'' training and ``job performance'' training. For 
example, a flight attendant receives academic training on a certificate 
holder's procedures regarding the preflight crewmember briefing, and 
receives a knowledge test on those procedures. In addition, the flight 
attendant receives job performance training in the form of ``practice'' 
of his or her ability to actually perform a preflight crewmember 
briefing. In another example, a flight attendant receives academic 
training on a certificate holder's procedures regarding opening an 
aircraft exit door in the emergency mode, and receives a knowledge test 
on those procedures. In addition, the flight attendant receives job 
performance training in the form of ``practice'' and a proficiency test 
of his or her ability to open the aircraft exit door in the emergency 
mode.

K. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it incorporated 
in this QPS? (see Sec.  121.1355)

    1. The continuous analysis process is a certificate holder internal 
evaluation and improvement process. The continuous analysis process 
will enable the certificate holder to maintain and refine the training 
process by continually monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of 
the process. Various assessment tools (testing, checking, inspection, 
documenting, evaluation, and analysis) will be used to validate the 
effectiveness of a training program or the need to change a training 
program.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    2. A continuous analysis process is incorporated in this QPS 
through integration with the qualification and training program. The 
certificate holder is responsible for designating responsibility for 
the process. The certificate holder must ensure appropriate and 
adequate assessment tools (testing, checking, critique, inspection, 
observation, documenting, evaluation, and analysis) are utilized to 
enable the certificate holder to validate the effectiveness of the 
qualification and training program, or the need to change that program. 
The certificate holder must describe the attributes of the continuous 
analysis process in the certificate holder's FAA approved training 
program.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. Components of a Continuous Analysis Process.
    (a) Qualification and training program as approved by the 
Administrator.
    (1) Attributes of the continuous analysis process.
    (i) Who is responsible?
    (ii) Who has authority to change the process?
    (iii) Description of the process.
    (iv) Controls. Policy, procedure, training, evaluation.
    (v) Documenting and Measurement.
    (vi) Interfaces between Departments. Consistency (policy, 
procedures, manuals).
    (A) Across Departments.
    (B) Across Divisions.
    (b) Assessment tools (adequate and appropriate).
    (1) Testing.
    (2) Checking.
    (3) Critique.
    (4) Inspection and observation.
    (5) Documenting.
    (6) Evaluation and analysis.
    (c) Modification and adjustment of the qualification and training 
program.
    (d) Approval for modification and adjustment.

END INFORMATION

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Attachment 1 of Appendix S to part 121

Flight Attendant Training Evaluation Requirements and Programmed Hours 
(Sec.  121.1331)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Evaluation Requirements (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331, 
121.1341, 121.1343, 121.1361)

    1. Proficiency Checks.
    If an evaluator conducting proficiency checks provides training, 
the training must be conducted as follows:
    (a) No more than two tasks may be trained and no more than a total 
of three attempts (including the first unsatisfactory, a rehearsal, and 
a final assessment) in each of the tasks are permitted.
    (b) Three or more unsatisfactory tasks, or failure to demonstrate 
satisfactory performance in three attempts at any one task, makes the 
check unsatisfactory.
    2. Proficiency Tests.
    (a) Evaluators who conduct proficiency tests may not provide 
training to the flight attendant during the test.
    (b) If, in the judgment of the evaluator, the flight attendant's 
performance of any task during a proficiency test is unsatisfactory, 
the test in that task is failed.
    (c) When a flight attendant fails a proficiency test, the flight 
attendant must be retrained in the task and reevaluated on the schedule 
specified in the certificate holder's approved training program.
    3. Knowledge Checks.
    Evaluators who conduct knowledge checks during aircraft operating 
experience may provide training to the flight attendant during the 
knowledge check as follows:
    (a) No more than two tasks may be trained, and no more than a total 
of three attempts to complete a knowledge check in each of the tasks is 
allowed.
    (b) Three or more unsatisfactory tasks, or failure to 
satisfactorily complete a knowledge check in three attempts at any one 
task, makes the check unsatisfactory.
    4. Qualified Evaluators.
    Evaluations may only be conducted by those persons as outlined in 
Table 3A of this Attachment.

B. Programmed Hours (see Sec. Sec.  121.1335, 121.1361)

    1. Baseline and Minimum Programmed Hours (see Sec. Sec.  121.1335, 
121.1361). Table 1A sets out the baseline and Table 1B sets out the 
minimum programmed hours for each category of training by segment 
(academic and job performance). The baseline programmed hours may be 
reduced after demonstration that the reduction is warranted and 
approved by the Administrator. The FAA may

[[Page 1396]]

approve a reduction in baseline programmed hours if the certificate 
holder demonstrates that the reduction is warranted. The FAA will not 
approve a reduction in the programmed hours below the minimum 
programmed hours.
    2. Required hours for requalification training (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1309, 121.1361). The hours established for requalification training 
(Sec.  121.1309) are for individuals in specific circumstances. 
Therefore, there are no programmed hours in Table 1A and 1B for 
requalification training.
    3. Required hours for differences and special training (see 
Sec. Sec.  121.1337, 121.1361). The hours established for differences 
and special training are in addition to the previously approved 
programmed hours for the approved training program. For differences 
training (Sec.  121.1391), the programmed hours remain in the 
differences category of training. For special training (Sec.  
121.1337(c)), the certificate holder integrates the training into the 
existing categories in Table 1A. Therefore, there are no programmed 
hours in Table 1A or Table 1B for differences and special training.
    4. Security training. Security training programmed hours required 
for crewmembers by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) may 
not be included in the required programmed hours contained in Tables 1A 
and 1B.

                           Table 1A--Flight Attendants Baseline Programmed Hours* by Category of Training and Training Segment
                                                                  [See Sec.   121.1335]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Category of training
                                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Initial                        Transition                       Recurrent
          Training segment                       --------------------------                 (each    ---------------------------------------------------
                                       New hire                    Each      Emergency    additional                  2 to 5       6 to 9      10 to 13
                                                    General      aircraft     training     aircraft      1 type       types        types        types
                                                     topics        type                     type)       aircraft     aircraft     aircraft     aircraft
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic...........................           20            8            8          8**            8            8            8            8            8
Job Performance....................           20            4            4         16**            4            4            5            6            7
                                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total..........................           40           12           12         24**           12           12           13           14           15
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Programmed hours do not include differences training, as required in Sec.   121.1391.
**Academic and job performance programmed hours are each reducible by 1 hour if the flight attendant is not qualified to serve in extended overwater
  operations.


                           Table 1B--Flight Attendants Minimum Programmed Hours* by Category of Training and Training Segment
                                                                  [See Sec.   121.1335]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Category of training
                                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Initial                        Transition                       Recurrent
          Training segment                       --------------------------                 (each    ---------------------------------------------------
                                       New hire                    Each      Emergency    additional                  2 to 5       6 to 9      10 to 13
                                                    General      aircraft     training     aircraft      1 type       types        types        types
                                                     topics        type                     type)       aircraft     aircraft     aircraft     aircraft
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic...........................           16                         6                         6
Job Performance....................           16          Not            2          Not            2                    Not reducible.
                                                    reducible                 reducible
    Total..........................           32                         8                         8
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 *Programmed hours do not include differences training, as required in Sec.   121.1391.

    5. Periods of time when training is not occurring, such as lunch or 
travel between facilities, do not count toward required programmed 
hours.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    6. Programmed hours for flight attendants are divided into academic 
and job performance segments for each training category. These segments 
are specifically designed to allow flexibility in instructional design 
regarding integration of academic and job performance programmed hour 
requirements. The job performance segment includes the practice and 
proficiency requirements in Attachment 3 of this appendix.
    7. A reduction to the 8 hour minimum of initial training on 
aircraft types may be appropriate for several reasons. For example, a 
certificate holder may operate several types of aircraft from the same 
manufacturer with similar cabin configurations and equipment, or a 
certificate holder may carefully design a training approach that 
incorporates the use of extensive training on a ``base'' aircraft type 
upon which training on other aircraft types is based. The 12 and 8 
hours apply to each aircraft type. Aircraft operating experience is 
required on each aircraft type for which a flight attendant receives 
initial training.
    8. If the flight attendant has already served in an active duty 
status as a flight attendant for the certificate holder for at least 
180 days, that flight attendant is eligible for transition training on 
a new aircraft type. Aircraft operating experience is not required for 
each aircraft type for which a flight attendant receives transition 
training. A flight attendant does not have to be a required flight 
attendant in accordance with Sec.  121.391 to ``serve,'' the flight 
attendant only needs to ``perform the duties of a required flight 
attendant.'' Transition training has the same required number of hours 
and subjects for aircraft specific training as initial training, a 12-
hour baseline required for each aircraft type which can be reduced to 
an 8-hour minimum. A reduction to the 8-hour minimum of transition 
training on aircraft types may be appropriate. For example, the new 
aircraft type may be very similar to a different aircraft type on which 
the flight attendant is already qualified.
    9. If the flight attendant has not served as a flight attendant for 
the certificate holder for at least 180 days, including days off or 
days on reserve, and the certificate holder wants to qualify the flight 
attendant on a new aircraft type, then the flight attendant must have 
initial training on that aircraft type and the associated aircraft 
operating experience by type.

[[Page 1397]]

Attachment 2 of Appendix S to Part 121

Tasks for Flight Attendant Training Task Requirements and Performance 
Standards by Area of Instruction

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

I. Introduction (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331,121.1333, 
121.1341, 121.1361)
II. General Task Requirements (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331, 
121.1333, 121.1341, 121.1361, 121.1373)
    A. Area of Instruction: Flight Attendant Duties and 
Responsibilities--Normal Operations (see Sec.  121.1363)
    1. Subject: Preflight
    2. Subject: Pre-Movement on the Surface
    3. Subject: Ground Movement
    4. Subject: Inflight
    5. Subject: Arrival
    6. Subject: During Stops
    7. Subject: Federal Aviation Regulations
    8. Subject: General Contents, Control and Maintenance of 
Applicable Portions of the Certificate Holder's Manual
    9. Subject: Contents of the Certificate Holder's Operations 
Specifications
    10. Subject: Crew Resource Management
    11. Subject: Theory of Flight
    B. Area of Instruction: Flight Attendant Duties and 
Responsibilities--Abnormal Situations (see Sec.  121.1369)
    1. Subject: Handling Passengers Whose Conduct May Jeopardize 
Safety
    2. [Reserved]
    C. Flight Attendant Duties and Responsibilities--Emergency (see 
Sec.  121.1373)
    1. Subject: Emergency Equipment
    2. Subject: Emergency Situations
III. Aircraft Specific Task Requirements (see Sec.  121.1369)
    A. For Each Aircraft Type
    1. Subject: A General Description of the Aircraft
    2. [Reserved]
    B. [Reserved]
IV. Emergency Training Drill Requirements (see Sec.  121.1373)
V. Emergency Training Drills--General (see Sec.  121.1373)
    A. Subject: Job Performance Drills
    B. Subject: One Time Job Performance Drills
    C. Subject: Observation Drills
VI. Emergency Training Drills--Aircraft Specific. Subject: Exit 
Device Operation (see Sec.  121.1373)

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

I. Introduction (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331, 121.1333, 121.1361)

    A. This attachment establishes task requirements and performance 
standards. Sections II. General Task Requirements and III. Aircraft 
Specific Task Requirements of this attachment list the academic 
requirements to the subtask level. Sections IV. Emergency Training 
Drills Requirements, V. Emergency Training Drills--General, and VI. 
Emergency Training Drills--Aircraft Specific list the performance 
requirements to the subtask level. Attachment 3 lists the tasks that 
must be trained and evaluated for each training category. Attachment 3 
includes tables that contain the various combinations of academic and 
job performance tasks taken from attachment 2, that, when combined, 
make up the requirements for training in each of the required training 
categories. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331, 121.1333, 121.1341, 
121.1361)
    B. Each certificate holder must have a training program that 
includes the areas of instruction, subjects, tasks, subtasks, and 
performance standards in this attachment. The certificate holder must 
use this Attachment to determine the tasks on which each flight 
attendant must be trained and evaluated for each training category in 
accordance with their FAA approved training program. The tasks listed 
in the FAOM must reflect the tasks included in this attachment, as 
amended and include standard operating procedures, abnormal procedures, 
non-normal procedures, and emergency procedures, as well as the 
authorizations contained in the certificate holder's operations 
specifications. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331)
    C. Training under each task is required except when a particular 
piece of equipment is not on an aircraft in which the flight attendant 
is to serve or a procedure is not applicable to operations conducted by 
the certificate holder for the aircraft on which the flight attendant 
serves. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301,121.1361)
    D. The flight attendant must demonstrate that he or she is able to 
meet the academic and job performance standards in this QPS. (see 
Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1335, 121.1341, 121.1343, 121.1361)
    E. In Attachment 3, training is required in all areas for persons 
who are qualifying for the first time in a flight attendant duty 
position for a certificate holder, and selected portions are required 
for persons required to complete requalification, transition, and 
recurrent training. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1303, 121.1309, 
121.1341, 121.1361, 121.1363, 121.1369, 121.1373, 121.1375)
    F. Recurrent training job performance segments must include 
training and evaluation at the subtask level. Recurrent training 
academic segments must include training and evaluation at the task 
level. Recurrent training academic subjects are identified on table 3E 
of Attachment 3 by a ``T.'' (see Sec. Sec.  121.1303, 121.1361, 
121.1375)

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    1. The FAA anticipates that recurrent training academic tasks will 
be developed through an analysis of events, reports, feedback, issues, 
or changes to certificate holder safety policies, procedures, 
regulations, or FAA guidance that has occurred in the previous year to 
determine what should be incorporated in the appropriate training 
programs.
    2. This gives certificate holders the flexibility to determine what 
will be included at the subtask level for recurrent academic tasks. The 
certificate holder may choose to use the subtasks listed in the Flight 
Attendant QPS as a guide, but the certificate holder is not required to 
use these specific subtasks for training and evaluation.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    G. Recurrent training must include all changes made to the subject 
matter in the training categories in the basic qualification curriculum 
since the person received basic qualification training. Each subject in 
recurrent training must be covered every year. Certain tasks, as 
indicated in table 3E, must be trained and evaluated at least once 
every 3 years. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1303, 121.1361,121.1375)
    H. A knowledge test must be in the form of a written, oral, or 
computer administered test in each area of instruction. The form, 
content and method of administration must be approved by the 
Administrator in each area of instruction. Each test must contain at 
least one question on each task within a subject. The certificate 
holder must develop an examination question repository that includes a 
minimum number of 2 questions for each required question. (see 
Sec. Sec.  121.1341, 121.1343, 121.1361)

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    I. This repository will allow random selection of questions when 
creating examinations. This allows students in a particular examination 
to receive a different set of exam questions or the same exam questions 
in a different order. This also permits students to be retested with 
questions that are different from questions they received on a prior 
examination.

[[Page 1398]]

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    J. An individual must complete the knowledge test. To complete the 
knowledge test, a score of 80% or better in each area of instruction is 
required and the test must be corrected to 100% by a person qualified 
to administer the examination. Correction of incorrect answers must 
include a discussion of which answer is correct and why, and why the 
person's original answer was incorrect. Retraining is required in each 
area of instruction for which a score of 80% or better is not achieved. 
Retraining is followed by reevaluation of the flight attendant in each 
retrained area of instruction. The form and content of the reevaluation 
must be approved by the Administrator. (see Sec. Sec.  121.1341, 
121.1343, 121.1361)
    K. The certificate holder must conduct a proficiency test so that 
the flight attendant physically performs the required task and meets 
the performance standards in Attachment 2 of the Flight Attendant QPS. 
(see Sec. Sec.  121.1341,121.1361)

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    L. Section 121.1209 of this part requires a flight attendant to be 
able to read, write, and understand the English language. The flight 
attendant may demonstrate English language proficiency in several ways. 
For example, an individual's successful completion of approved 
crewmember training conducted solely in English would be a successful 
demonstration of the flight attendant's ability to read, write, and 
understand the English language.
    M. If there is doubt about a flight attendant's ability to read 
English, the flight attendant should read aloud a short paragraph from 
an appropriate source, such as a safety related announcement. If there 
is doubt about the flight attendant's ability to write in English, the 
person evaluating the flight attendant should read a short statement 
and have the flight attendant write it in English. The certificate 
holder should have in place a process to ensure a final determination 
of whether the applicant meets the English language requirement for 
those times when the test indicates to the person evaluating the flight 
attendant that the flight attendant is not able to read, write, 
understand, or speak the English language.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

II. General Task Requirements (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 121.1331, 
121.1333, 121.1341, 121.1361, 121.1373)

A. Area of Instruction: Flight Attendant Duties and Responsibilities--
Normal Operations

1. Subject: Preflight
(a) Task: General (Preflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Review all certificate holder issued memorandums and orders.
    (2) Verify currency of FAOM.
    (3) Ensure presence of certificate holder required items.
    (4) Attend or provide crewmember briefing.
    (5) Stow crew baggage and personal carry-on baggage properly.
    (6) Stow the FAOM properly so it is accessible when performing 
duties.
    (7) Identify seats with movable aisle armrests for seating of 
passengers with disabilities.
    (8) Adjust cabin lighting in accordance with certificate holder's 
procedures.
    (9) Report safety discrepancies to the PIC.
    (10) Report any discrepancies in the aircraft cabin, systems, and 
equipment in accordance with certificate holder procedures.
    (11) Cabin position specific duties as defined in the FAOM.
(b) Task: Crewmember Briefing (Preflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Security procedures.
    (2) Communication procedures.
    (3) Emergency procedures.
    (4) MELs with any effect on cabin safety equipment or procedures.
    (5) Flight information.
    (6) Review and follow procedures concerning supernumerary 
personnel.
(c) Task: Cabin and Galley Security (Preflight)
    Subtask: Implement cabin and galley security procedures in 
accordance with certificate holder's security program.
(d) Task: Check of Emergency Equipment (Preflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Proper preflight techniques.
    (2) Procedures to be followed if equipment fails to meet preflight 
requirements.
    (3) Check the flight attendant jumpseat and restraint system, 
including automatic seat retraction, proper operation, no missing or 
broken components on flight attendant jump seat, and presence of 
jumpseat headrest.
    (4) Check flight attendant panel to ensure switches, controls, and 
indicators are working.
    (5) Verify no abnormal indications are present on any panels or 
gauges.
    (6) Check portable oxygen equipment.
    (7) Check fire extinguishers.
    (8) Check first aid kits.
    (9) Check EMK.
    (10) Check AEDs.
    (11) Check megaphones.
    (12) Check PBEs.
    (13) Check ELTs.
    (14) Visual check of crash ax.
    (15) Check emergency lighting system.
    (16) Check emergency flashlights.
    (17) Check survival kits.
    (18) Verify position of circuit breakers.
    (19) Check communication systems, including passenger address and 
interphone systems.
    (20) Ensure chimes, chime indicator lights, and associated 
annunciator panel indicators are working.
    (21) Check general condition of emergency exits in the passenger 
and galley areas.
    (22) Check assist handles.
    (23) Check lavatory fire detection system, flapper doors, ashtrays, 
and placards.
    (24) Check for flotation equipment, as required.
    (25) Check that class B cargo compartments are clear for crew fire 
fighting.
    (26) Check emergency equipment stowage areas for unapproved items.
(e) Task: Check of Safety Equipment (Preflight).
    Subtasks:
    (1) Check presence of and prepare demonstration equipment.
    (2) Check audio/visual safety demonstration equipment.
    (3) Verify that the universal precaution kit and CPR masks, or the 
kit that contains these items, is onboard.
    (4) Verify that onboard wheelchair is present and properly secured.
(f) Task: Galley Check (Preflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure all latches, locks, and flapper doors work properly.
    (2) Ensure only approved items are stowed in ovens.
    (3) Check circuit breakers located in the galley.
    (4) Ensure lower lobe galley lift works properly.
(g) Task: Check of Cabin and Cabin Systems (Preflight)
    Subtasks:

[[Page 1399]]

    (1) Check circuit breakers located in the cabin.
    (2) Check temperature and ventilation controls.
    (3) Check lighting systems to ensure proper working condition.
    (4) Check photo luminescent emergency pathway lighting systems, and 
preflight and charging procedures.
    (5) Ensure all lock-out mechanisms are engaged on emergency exit 
seats.
    (6) Stow inflight service and entertainment items.
2. Subject: Pre-Movement on the Surface
(a) Task: General (Pre-Movement on the Surface)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure minimum required number of flight attendants are onboard 
during the entire boarding process.
    (2) Assume proper station during passenger boarding.
    (3) Identify possible able bodied passengers.
    (4) Provide all required announcements to passengers.
    (5) Provide all required individual passenger briefings.
(b) Task: Passenger Boarding (Pre-Movement on the Surface)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Observe passengers for acceptance according to regulation and 
certificate holder policy (e.g., intoxicated passengers and 
unaccompanied minors).
    (2) Monitor carry-on baggage for excessive size, quantity, or 
evidence of hazardous materials.
    (3) Monitor exit seat occupants according to certificate holders 
approved exit seat program.
    (4) Monitor passenger behavior and maintain situational awareness.
    (5) Report passengers who appear to be intoxicated or are otherwise 
disruptive immediately to the PIC and customer service personnel.
    (6) Ensure certificate holder procedures are followed regarding the 
passenger use of Portable Oxygen Concentrators (POC).
    (7) Ensure certificate holder procedures are followed regarding 
child restraint systems.
    (8) Ensure certificate holder procedures are followed regarding lap 
held children.
    (9) Ensure lap held children are distributed with regard to oxygen 
availability.
    (10) Comply with certificate holder procedures for child and infant 
flotation equipment.
    (11) Ensure certificate holder procedures are followed regarding 
passenger count.
    (12) Conduct compliance check to ensure carry-on baggage is 
properly stowed.
    (13) Ensure that use of portable electronic devices is in 
compliance with certificate holder's procedures.
    (14) Conduct appropriate passenger briefing for exit seat 
occupants.
    (15) Verify (must be verified by the assigned required crewmember) 
that all exit seat occupants meet exit seat criteria, prior to aircraft 
movement on the surface.
    (16) Ensure proper handling of passengers with additional needs, 
such as armed passengers, prisoners, escorts, passengers with personal 
oxygen, and unaccompanied minors.
    (17) Ensure any medical oxygen being used by a passenger was 
supplied by the certificate holder and follow appropriate procedures 
for use.
    (18) Ensure the PIC is notified that medical oxygen or POC is in 
use.
    (19) Ensure the passenger using medical oxygen or POC is seated per 
the certificate holder's procedures.
    (20) Ensure the medical oxygen bottles or POC are properly located 
and secured when they are being used and before and after use.
    (21) Ensure no persons are allowed to smoke within 10 feet of any 
oxygen or POC in use.
    (22) Apply weight and balance procedures as directed by the PIC.
    (23) Ensure compartment restraints are secured for compliance with 
carry-on baggage regulation.
    (24) Ensure all items carried on by the passenger are properly 
stowed (e.g., purses and assistive devices).
    (25) Ensure unusual items (e.g., organs for transplant) are stowed 
in accordance with certificate holder's approved carry-on baggage 
program.
    (26) Follow approved method for removing carry-on baggage that 
cannot be stowed.
    (27) Verify (must be verified by assigned required crewmember) that 
all carry-on baggage is stowed prior to closing last passenger entry 
door.
(c) Task: Passengers With Disabilities (Pre-Movement on the Surface)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Review part 382 of 14 CFR, Nondiscrimination on the Basis of 
Disability in Air Travel.
    (2) Review certificate holder responsibilities regarding compliance 
with 14 CFR 382, including the role of the compliance resolution 
official (CRO).
    (3) Review crewmember responsibilities regarding compliance with 14 
CFR 382.
    (4) Review cabin accommodations, such as onboard wheelchairs, 
accessible lavatories, movable armrests, and collapsible armrests.
    (5) Review types of service animals, including unique service 
animals, lap-held service animals, and emotional support service 
animals.
    (6) Review location and placement of service animals.
    (7) Review types of assistive devices that are designed for, and 
used by, people with disabilities.
    (8) Review location and placement of assistive devices, including 
specific certificate holder procedures regarding stowage of a 
passenger's folding wheelchair in the cabin.
    (9) Review exclusion of assistive devices from the number of carry-
on items that each passenger is allowed to bring onboard.
    (10) Review use of orthotic positioning devices by people with 
disabilities.
    (11) Review passenger briefings for people with disabilities.
    (12) Review procedures for handling passenger disputes regarding 
compliance with 14 CFR 382.
(d) Task: Galley Security (Pre-Movement on the Surface)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure all catering and galley supplies are stowed properly.
    (2) Ensure latches and locks are positioned properly.
    (3) Ensure secondary locking mechanisms are engaged.
    (4) Ensure carts are secured on permanent tie downs for surface 
movement and take-off.
    (5) Ensure curtains and doors are properly secured.
(e) Task: Preparation of Exits (Pre-Movement on the Surface)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure doors are closed.
    (2) Ensure timely arming of exits, including positioning of warning 
devices and cross check requirements.
    (3) Ensure passengers are seated with seat belts fastened.
    (4) Ensure no items are improperly stowed at jumpseats, passenger 
seats, lavatories or galleys.
    (5) Signal or communicate with flight crew regarding cabin 
readiness for aircraft movement.
(f) Task: Compliance Check (Pre-Movement on the Surface)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure that a normal or emergency means of egress is available 
when passengers are on board the aircraft.
    (2) Ensure proper closure of overhead compartments and closets.
    (3) Ensure that all carry on baggage is properly stowed.

[[Page 1400]]

    (4) Ensure that all passengers, except those meeting lap child 
criteria, are seated with seat belts fastened.
    (5) Ensure that seat belt extensions have been provided to all 
passengers who need them.
3. Subject: Ground Movement
(a) Task: General (Ground Movement)
    Subtask:
    (1) Flight attendants must occupy assigned jumpseats during taxi 
unless performing safety related duties.
    (2) Flight attendants must understand the impact of conducting non-
safety related duties during taxi.
(b) Task: Passenger Information (Ground Movement)
    Subtask:
    (1) Use public address system properly.
    (2) Provide appropriate information:
    (i) Compliance with Fasten Seat Belt and No Smoking signs.
    (ii) Stowage of tray tables.
    (iii) Positioning seat backs in the upright position (leg rests 
retracted).
    (iv) Location of emergency exits.
    (v) Proper use of portable electronic devices.
    (vi) Stowage of carry-on baggage.
    (vii) Smoking restrictions.
    (viii) Use of oxygen (if applicable).
    (ix) Availability of flotation devices.
    (3) Use safety video correctly.
    (4) Ensure safety demonstration is coordinated with announcement.
    (5) Give safety demonstration from approved location.
    (6) Assume proper position during the safety demonstration to 
ensure even distribution of flight attendants.
    (7) Give safety demonstration at individual seats if passengers' 
view is obstructed.
    (8) Ensure additional information regarding extended over water 
flights is provided.
    (9) Ensure that any passengers needing the assistance of another to 
move quickly to an exit during an emergency and any attendants are 
briefed on the routes to each appropriate exit, the most appropriate 
time to begin moving to the exit, and inquire as to the most 
appropriate way to assist that person.
(c) Task: Sterile Flight Deck Procedures (Ground Movement)
    Subtask:
    Comply with sterile flight deck procedures.
(d) Task: Compliance Check (Ground Movement)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure that all exits are accessible.
    (2) Ensure carry-on baggage is stowed.
    (3) Ensure that certificate holder procedures are followed 
regarding child restraint systems.
    (4) Ensure that portable electronic devices are turned off and 
stowed.
    (5) Ensure that overhead bins are closed and latched.
    (6) Ensure tray tables are stowed and secured.
    (7) Ensure seat backs are in the upright position (leg rests 
retracted).
    (8) Ensure seat belts are fastened.
    (9) Ensure lap seated infants and children are held or secured in a 
seat.
    (10) Ensure all galley service items have been picked up and 
stowed.
    (11) Ensure galley equipment is secured.
    (12) Ensure that all cabin divider systems are secured open.
    (13) Ensure that all video screens are retracted.
    (14) Ensure that all lavatories are vacant.
    (15) Ensure that cabin lighting is adjusted as per certificate 
holder procedures.
    (16) Return to flight attendant jumpseat.
    (17) Secure barrier strap.
    (18) Don seat belt and shoulder harness.
    (19) Signal or communicate with flight crew regarding cabin 
readiness for take-off.
    (20) Perform silent review.
    (21) Assume flight attendant protective brace position.
4. Subject: Inflight
(a) Task: General (Inflight)
    Subtask:
    Secure flight attendant restraint system upon leaving jumpseat in 
accordance with certificate holder procedures.
(b) Task: Inflight Procedures (Inflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Review flight deck entry and communication procedures.
    (2) Review procedures for flight attendants to enter and secure 
flight deck door, including requesting a briefing on the location, 
donning and use of the fixed oxygen system available for the flight 
attendant's emergency use when one flight crewmember has to leave the 
flight deck.
    (3) Check cabin and passengers periodically throughout the flight.
    (4) Check lavatories periodically throughout the flight for 
potential fire hazards, overly filled trash receptacles, flapper doors 
that will not close, evidence of smoking or tampering with smoke 
detectors.
    (5) Collect and stow service items properly.
(c) Task: Passenger Information (Inflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Provide after take-off announcement(s).
    (2) Provide seat belt announcement when seat belt sign is turned on 
or off according to certificate holder procedures.
    (3) Coordinate proper timing of passenger removal of shoulder 
harnesses.
(d) Task: Passenger Handling Procedures (Inflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Follow proper certificate holder's alcohol procedures.
    (2) Ensure passengers seated in exit seats meet exit seat criteria.
    (3) Follow proper certificate holder's passenger handling and 
reporting procedures.
    (4) Follow the certificate holder's program outlining flight 
attendant duties regarding the use of portable electronic devices 
(PED).
    (5) Ensure passengers are given information about times, 
conditions, and limitations on PED use.
    (6) Understand the regulations regarding PEDs, including the 
effects of the use of PEDs on aircraft avionics during critical phases 
of flight.
    (7) Ensure passengers terminate the use of any devices suspected of 
causing interference.
    (8) Coordinate between cabin and flight deck with regard to PED 
use.
(e) Task: Proper Use of Service Carts and Service Equipment (Inflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Secure unattended carts properly.
    (2) Engage permanent tie-downs or pop-up tie-downs correctly.
    (3) Secure galley compartments when not in use.
    (4) Secure food and beverage items when not in use.
    (5) Comply with galley lift restrictions.
    (6) Ensure that at least one flight attendant is not more than 10 
feet away from service cart when in use.
    (7) Stow service carts properly.
    (8) Set brakes properly.
    (9) Latch cart doors and utilize secondary locks.
    (10) Report any malfunctioning galley equipment including 
restraints and brakes.
(f) Task: Communication and Coordination Procedures (Inflight)
    Subtasks:

[[Page 1401]]

    (1) Communicate with flight crew regarding turbulence.
    (2) Communicate with flight crew regarding potential security 
threats or disruptive passengers.
    (3) Communicate with flight crew regarding any abnormal or 
emergency situation.
    (4) Report maintenance discrepancies (airworthiness and non-
airworthiness).
(g) Task: Pre-landing (Inflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Provide appropriate pre-landing announcements for initial 
descent.
    (2) Perform lavatory vacancy check.
    (3) Adjust cabin lighting.
    (4) Collect all service items.
    (5) Close and secure galley compartments properly.
    (6) Set primary and secondary locks.
    (7) Ensure carts are secured on permanent tie downs for landing and 
surface movement.
    (8) Ensure curtains and doors are properly secured.
    (9) Turn off electrical appliances not in use.
    (10) Comply with Fasten Seat Belt signs.
    (11) Re-verify that passengers seated in exit seats meet exit seat 
criteria.
    (12) Reengage lock out mechanism at exit seats.
    (13) Ensure only approved child restraint systems are in use and 
are properly positioned.
    (14) Ensure lap infants are held or secured in seat.
    (15) Ensure tray tables are stowed and secured.
    (16) Place seat backs in the upright position (leg rests 
retracted).
    (17) Discontinue use of PEDs.
    (18) Stow carry-on baggage.
(h) Task: Sterile Flight Deck Procedures (Inflight)
    Subtask: Comply with sterile flight deck procedures.
(i) Task: Compliance Check (Inflight)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Provide appropriate pre-landing announcements for final 
approach.
    (2) Verify completion of all of the pre-landing activities required 
by paragraph II.A.4.(g)(2) through (18) of this attachment.
    (3) Verify that all exits are accessible.
    (4) Verify that overhead bins are closed and latched.
    (5) Verify that all video screens are retracted in accordance with 
carrier procedures.
    (6) Comply with certificate holder's charging procedures for 
photoluminescent light path.
    (7) Return to flight attendant jumpseat.
    (8) Secure barrier strap.
    (9) Don seat belt and shoulder harness.
    (10) Signal or communicate with flight crew if the cabin is not 
prepared for landing.
    (11) Perform silent review.
    (12) Assume flight attendant protective brace position.
5. Subject: Arrival
(a) Task: General (Arrival)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Perform all required arrival announcements.
    (2) Make reminder announcements to any passengers who may stand or 
place carry on bags in the aisle during taxi.
    (3) Adjust cabin lighting.
    (4) Perform only safety related duties during taxi.
(b) Task: Preparation of Exits (Arrival)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure that a normal or emergency means of egress is available 
when passengers are on board the aircraft.
    (2) Ensure crew coordination.
    (3) Ensure exits are disarmed in accordance with applicable 
regulations and aircraft specific procedures.
    (4) Verify no cabin pressure warnings or indications are present on 
the door.
    (5) Open door and operate stairs.
(c) Task: Passenger Handling (Arrival)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Monitor passenger deplaning to ensure adherence to all 
regulatory and certificate holder requirements.
    (2) Coordinate with ramp, ground, and station agents and other 
crewmembers as necessary.
    (3) Assume proper position during passenger deplaning to ensure 
even distribution of flight attendants.
    (4) Ensure that the minimum required number of flight attendants 
are onboard during entire passenger deplaning process.
(d) Task: Cabin Security (Arrival)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ensure all passengers have left the aircraft at flight 
termination by checking the aircraft, including lavatories.
    (2) Perform post-flight cabin checks.
6. Subject: During Stops
(a) Task: General (During Stops)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Follow duty assignments for flight attendants at intermediate 
stops, including passenger supervision.
    (2) Adhere to permissible reduction in the number of flight 
attendants to at least half the minimum required number (rounded down 
to the next lower number, but never fewer than one) when passengers 
remain onboard and boarding or deplaning is not occurring.
    (3) Adhere to permissible substitution for the required flight 
attendants with other persons qualified in emergency evacuation 
procedures for the airplane when passengers remain onboard and boarding 
or deplaning is not occurring, if those persons are identified to the 
passengers.
(b) Task: Aircraft Refueling (During Stops)
    Subtasks:
    (1) Review duties, regulatory requirements, and procedures 
regarding refueling with passengers onboard.
    (2) Review identification of potential hazards to occupants 
associated with aircraft refueling.
    (3) Review proper steps to be taken should problems develop during 
refueling, including evacuation.
7. Subject: Federal Aviation Regulations
(a) Task: General
    Subtasks:
    (1) Comply with certificate holder procedures for interaction with 
officers and agents of various governmental agencies, including FAA, 
TSA, FBI, CIA, and NTSB.
    (2) Comply with 14 CFR part 252: Smoking Aboard Aircraft.
(b) Task: Federal Aviation Regulations Pertinent to Flight Attendant 
Performance of Assigned Duties
    Subtasks: Understand the regulatory requirements for the following:
    (1) Flight attendant duty period limitations and rest requirements.
    (2) Crewmember protocols regarding drug and alcohol testing 
programs, including regulatory requirements and certificate holder 
policy regarding drug and alcohol testing programs.
    (3) Hazardous material recognition and prohibitions.
    (4) Admission to the flight deck.
    (5) Manipulation of controls in the flight deck.
    (6) Inoperable equipment.
    (7) Carriage of cargo in passenger compartments.
    (8) Exit seating.
    (9) Carry on baggage.
    (10) Passenger information requirements.
    (11) Passenger briefings and demonstrations.
    (12) Manual requirements.
    (13) Training program requirements.
    (14) Crewmember qualification requirements.
    (15) Aviation Safety Inspector's credentials.

[[Page 1402]]

    (16) Oxygen requirements.
    (17) Restrictions regarding service of alcoholic beverages.
    (18) Boarding restrictions regarding persons who appear to be 
intoxicated.
    (19) Retention of items of mass in passenger and crew compartments.
    (20) Stowage of passenger service equipment.
    (21) Closing and locking flight crew compartment door.
    (22) Security Requirements.
    (23) Sterile flight deck requirements.
    (24) Required number of flight attendants.
    (25) Crewmember requirements at stops where passengers remain on 
board.
    (26) Emergency equipment requirements.
    (27) Lavatory fire protection.
    (28) Communication systems.
    (29) Flotation equipment.
    (30) Flightcrew compartment access.
    (31) Taxi requirements.
    (32) Carriage and briefing of passengers requiring special 
assistance.
    (33) Fueling with passengers on board.
    (34) Portable electronic devices.
    (35) Flight attendant jumpseat requirements.
    (36) Child restraint systems.
    (37) Required placards and signs.
    (38) Compliance with seat belt and smoking regulations.
    (39) Use of medical oxygen and portable oxygen concentrators.
    (40) Any other regulations relevant to flight attendant duties and 
responsibilities.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    Discussion of the regulations should include why they are pertinent 
to flight attendants and should also include discussion regarding the 
role of other certificate holder employees and their part in ensuring 
compliance with the regulations (e.g., gate agents, flight 
crewmembers).

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

8. Subject: General Contents, Control and Maintenance of Applicable 
Portions of the Certificate Holder's Manual
(a) Task: Flight Attendant Operating Manual (FAOM)
    Subtasks: Understand the certificate holder's procedures for the 
following:
    (1) Currency requirements.
    (2) Revision process.
    (3) Bulletins or notices.
    (4) List of effective pages.
    (5) Accessibility during flight.
    (6) Procedures to ensure manual is current.
(b) Task: Scheduling and Station Operations Policies and Procedures
    Subtasks: Understand the certificate holder's procedures for the 
following:
    (1) Scheduling policies and procedures.
    (2) Station operations policies and procedures.
9. Subject: Contents of the Certificate Holder's Operations 
Specifications
(a) Task: General
    Subtask: Understand information contained in the certificate 
holder's operations specifications that is pertinent to the duties and 
responsibilities of flight attendants.
(b) Task: Exit Seat Program and Procedures
    Subtasks: Understand the certificate holder's procedures for the 
following:
    (1) Information regarding the certificate holder's exit seat 
program.
    (2) Selection criteria regarding the capabilities and conditions to 
be applied to determine the suitability of persons to occupy an exit 
seat.
    (3) Performance functions which a person seated in an exit seat 
must be willing and able to perform in the event of an emergency.
    (4) Seat selection, assessment, and verification process.
    (5) Individual exit seat briefings.
    (6) Certificate holder procedures that ensure the suitability of 
each person who occupies an exit seat.
    (7) Assessment and verification of suitability by at least one 
required crewmember prior to movement on the surface.
    (8) Re-seating procedures.
    (9) Dispute resolutions.
    (10) Required announcements.
    (11) Definition of an exit seat, including excess flight attendant 
jumpseats and the location of all exit seats on each aircraft type.
    (12) Assessment and verification of suitability prior to landing.
(c) Task: Carry-on Baggage Program and Procedures
    Subtasks: Understand the certificate holder's procedures for the 
following:
    (1) The certificate holder's carry-on baggage program as described 
in the FAOM, including carry-on baggage limitations, procedures for 
baggage scanning, and procedures for handling carry-on baggage that 
does not meet these limitations or cannot be accommodated in the 
passenger cabin.
    (2) Person(s) responsible and procedures for scanning for amount 
and size.
    (3) Weight and balance procedures and coordination with flight 
crew.
    (4) Safety implications of improperly stowed carry-on baggage.
    (5) Types of articles exempt from carry-on baggage count.
    (6) Procedures for handling and stowing carry on items exempt from 
the carry-on baggage count.
    (7) Definition of ``properly stowed,'' including that carry-on 
baggage may not hinder access to emergency equipment.
    (8) Methods of removing carry-on baggage from aircraft when 
necessary.
    (9) Procedures regarding proper stowage of carry-on baggage in the 
passenger cabin, including underseat stowage.
    (10) Procedures for handling cargo or unusual items in the cabin.
    (11) Procedures for the handling of cargo and in-seat baggage in 
the passenger compartment, including the types of cargo that may be 
carried in the passenger cabin and the location of seats in which it 
may be stowed.
    (12) Procedures to ensure crewmember verification that each piece 
of carry-on baggage is stowed properly prior to the last passenger 
entry door being closed, including specific crewmember assignments and 
responsibilities.
    (13) Certificate holder procedures regarding the handling of carry-
on baggage during an aircraft evacuation.
    (14) Importance of crew consistency in applying these regulations.
(d) Task: Minimum Equipment List (MEL)
    Subtasks: Understand the certificate holder's procedures for the 
following:
    (1) Description of the purpose and scope of the MEL as applicable 
to flight attendant duties.
    (2) Crew coordination procedures for reporting inoperative 
equipment.
    (3) Implications of MEL required procedures due to certain pieces 
of equipment being inoperative, and their effect on flight attendant 
duties.
    (4) Any other information relevant to flight attendant duties and 
responsibilities.
10. Subject: Crew Resource Management
(a) Task: Authority of the Pilot in Command
    Subtasks:
    (1) The captain's authority, including responsibility for the 
safety of flight in routine and emergency conditions.
    (2) Chain of command and importance of chain of command.

[[Page 1403]]

    (3) Chain of command as applicable to specific airplane.
(b) Task: Communication Processes and Decisions
    Subtasks:
    (1) Briefing.
    (2) Inquiry, advocacy, and assertiveness.
    (3) Self-critique.
    (4) Communication with available personnel.
    (5) Decisionmaking.
    (6) Conflict resolution.
(c) Task: Building and Maintenance of a Flight Team
    Subtasks:
    (1) Leading and following, including the importance of crewmembers 
functioning as a team.
    (2) Use of interpersonal skills and leadership styles in a way that 
fosters crew effectiveness.
    (3) Significance of cultural differences.
(d) Task: Workload Management and Situational Awareness
    Subtasks:
    (1) Preparation and planning.
    (2) Vigilance.
    (3) Workload distribution.
    (4) Distraction avoidance.
(e) Task: Communication and Coordination
    Subtasks: Flight attendant must know notification and communication 
procedures between the cabin and flight deck including:
    (1) Flight deck and cabin chimes and interphone signals for routine 
situations.
    (2) Flight attendant notification to flight crew that aircraft is 
ready for movement on the surface.
    (3) Flight crew notification to flight attendant to be seated prior 
to take-off.
    (4) Flight attendant recognition of critical phases of flight.
    (5) Crewmember coordination and notification regarding access to 
flight deck.
    (6) Notification to flight attendants of turbulent air conditions.
    (7) Notification between flight crew and flight attendants of 
emergency or unusual situations.
    (8) Notification between flight crew and flight attendants of 
inoperative equipment that is pertinent to flight attendant duties and 
responsibilities.
    (9) Normal and emergency communication procedures to be used in the 
event of inoperative communication equipment.
(f) Task: Crewmember Briefing
    Subtasks:
    (1) Crewmember responsibilities regarding briefings.
    (2) Flight crew to flight attendant(s) briefings.
    (3) Flight attendant to flight attendant(s) briefings (e.g., when 
PIC has not briefed the entire crew, or when a flight attendant joins a 
working crew).
    (4) Required information.
    (5) Security procedures.
    (6) Communication procedures.
    (7) Emergency procedures.
    (8) MELs affecting cabin safety equipment and procedures.
    (9) Flight information.
    (10) Content of crew briefing as applicable to specific aircraft.
    (11) Responsibilities of flight attendants to brief new flight 
attendant crew during a crew change regarding any unserviceability of 
equipment, special passengers, and other safety matters pertinent to 
the flight.
(g) Task: Communication and Coordination During a Passenger 
Interference Situation
    Subtasks:
    (1) Certificate holder's written program regarding the handling of 
passenger interference, including crewmember communication and 
coordination.
    (2) Importance of crewmembers and other employees working as a 
team.
    (3) Role of management and crewmember in follow-up.
(h) Task: Communication and Coordination During an Emergency Situation
    Subtasks:
    (1) Actions for each emergency situation.
    (2) Importance of notification and who must be notified.
    (3) Alternate actions if unable to notify.
    (4) Communication during preparation for a planned emergency 
evacuation: Time available, type of emergency, signal to brace, and 
special instructions.
11. Subject: Theory of Flight
(a) Task: Components of Aircraft
    Subtasks:
    (1) Wing-leading edge, trailing edge, wing tip, wing root, winglet.
    (2) Tail-fixed vertical stabilizer, rudder, elevator.
    (3) Miscellaneous-fuselage, spoilers, speed brakes, main gear, nose 
wheel.
    (4) Flight control surfaces and their functions-ailerons, flaps, 
rudder, elevator.
(b) Task: Principles of Flight
    Subtasks:
    (1) Forces acting on an aircraft-lift, weight, thrust, drag.
    (2) Three axes and movement around each-yaw, pitch and roll.
    (3) Weight and balance-weight distribution and center of gravity 
and their effect on aircraft controllability and stability.
(c) Task: Critical Surfaces and Associated Hazards
    Subtasks:
    (1) Recognition of critical surfaces.
    (2) Recognition of hazards to flight associated with contamination 
of those surfaces.
    (3) Awareness of conditions most likely to produce such 
contamination (such as snow and ice, volcanic ash and dust).
    (4) Importance of timely communication of observed hazards to 
flight deck.
    (5) Awareness of carrier procedures for decontamination of 
surfaces.
(d) Task: Aviation Terminology
    Subtasks:
    (1) Identify and define aviation terminology common to the 
certificate holder, including terms related to airports, ground 
operations and flight operations.
    (2) Identify any specific voluntary safety programs used by 
certificate holder (such as ASRS, ASAP, FOQA) as they relate to flight 
attendants.
    (3) Identify standard measurement units used in aviation (such as 
the 24 hour clock, Greenwich Mean Time, time zone changes).

B. Area of Instruction: Flight Attendant Duties and Responsibilities--
Abnormal Situations (see Sec.  121.1369)

1. Subject: Handling Passengers Whose Conduct May Jeopardize Safety
(a) Task: General
    Subtasks:
    (1) The flight attendant must know the certificate holder's 
procedures for handling passengers who could threaten the safety of the 
flight or the passengers, including how to do the following:
    (i) Identify and manage potential problem passengers who could 
threaten safety of the flight, passengers, or crew and monitor 
passenger conduct.
    (ii) Monitor and identify potential problem passengers during 
boarding.
    (iii) Identify baggage that may be considered suspect on board an 
aircraft.
    (iv) Recognize hazardous materials labels.
    (v) Report hazardous materials to the flight crew.
    (vi) Monitor lavatories periodically throughout the flight.

[[Page 1404]]

    (vii) Perform cabin checks periodically throughout the flight.
    (2) The flight attendant must know specific certificate holder 
procedures for maintaining flight deck security.
(b) Task: Passenger Interference
    Subtasks:
    (1) The flight attendant must know the following requirements, 
procedures, and all information for handling passengers who might 
interfere with crewmembers in the performance of their duties and who 
could threaten the safety of the flight or the passengers:
    (i) Title 14 CFR 121.580, Prohibition on interference with 
crewmembers.
    (ii) Title 49 U.S.C. 46318, Interference with cabin or flight crew.
    (iii) Certificate holder's program regarding the handling of 
disruptive passengers.
    (iv) Categories of disturbance and crewmember actions.
    (v) How to diffuse the situation with difficult passengers.
    (vi) Recommended crew coordination procedures.
    (2) The flight attendant must be trained to manage the following:
    (i) Address incidents of non-compliance immediately.
    (ii) Inform passenger of regulatory requirements and certificate 
holder policies.
    (iii) Manage disruptive or problem passengers by using a team 
approach or specific certificate holder techniques designed to defuse 
such situations.
    (iv) Maintain crewmember's personal security.
    (v) Communicate with flight crew immediately to report non-
compliant passengers and maintain communications throughout the event.
    (vi) Coordinate with other flight attendants regarding team concept 
problem management.
    (vii) Comply with certificate holder procedures regarding 
involvement of law enforcement officials.
    (viii) Obtain assistance from other crewmembers or passengers.
    (ix) Restrain violent passengers as indicated in certificate holder 
procedures.
    (x) Appropriate use of equipment provided by the certificate 
holder.
    (xi) Complete all required certificate holder forms.
    (xii) Be able to use techniques to recognize and diffuse passenger 
panic situations.
(c) Task: Smoking Ban Violations
    Subtasks: The flight attendant must know the following for handling 
of passengers who smoke onboard the aircraft:
    (1) Procedures for passengers who smoke while seated.
    (2) Procedures for passengers who smoke in the lavatory.
    (3) Procedures for passengers who tamper with a smoke detector.
    (4) Required crew coordination and communication.
    (5) Procedures to address a possible fire hazard from the discarded 
cigarette.
    (6) Reporting procedures.
(d) Task: Intoxication
    Subtasks:
    (1) The flight attendant must know the following for handling of 
passengers who appear to be intoxicated:
    (i) Required crew coordination, communication, and notification 
procedures.
    (ii) Prohibition against boarding passengers who appear to be 
intoxicated.
    (iii) Certificate holder procedures regarding the removal of a 
passenger who has boarded the aircraft and appears to be intoxicated.
    (iv) Prohibition against serving alcohol to passengers who appear 
to be intoxicated.
    (v) Prohibition against serving alcohol to persons who are 
escorting a prisoner or who are being escorted.
    (vi) Prohibition regarding passengers consuming alcohol not served 
by the certificate holder and associated certificate holder procedures.
    (vii) Prohibition against serving alcohol to any person carrying a 
dangerous weapon.
    (viii) Regulatory requirement to report any alcohol related 
disturbance onboard an aircraft to the FAA within 5 days.
    (ix) Reporting procedures.
    (2) The flight attendant must be trained to manage the following:
    (i) Passengers appearing to be intoxicated during boarding.
    (ii) Passengers appearing to be intoxicated during flight.
    (iii) Reseat passengers from exit seats if they appear to become 
intoxicated in flight.
    (iv) Inform passenger of regulatory requirements and certificate 
holder policies as needed.
    (v) Communicate with flight crew immediately to report non-
compliant passengers.
    (vi) Follow certificate holder procedures when serving alcohol.
(e) Task: Passenger Misconduct
    Subtasks:
    The flight attendant must know how to diffuse the situation with 
difficult passengers and recommended crew coordination procedures.
(f) Task: Security Procedures
    Subtasks:
    The certificate holder must develop a security program that meets 
the standards of the TSA's security training program for flight 
attendants. The certificate holder must document that the TSA has 
approved the security training program for flight attendants and the 
certificate holder must provide security training to each flight 
attendant in accordance with a security program approved by the TSA.
2. [Reserved]

C. Flight Attendant Duties and Responsibilities--Emergency (See Sec.  
121.1373)

1. Subject: Emergency Equipment
    The flight attendant must know the preflight (if applicable), 
location, function, operation, and limitations of the following 
equipment in Tasks (a) through (e) of this section:
(a) Task: General Emergency Equipment
    Subtasks:
    (1) Flight attendant jumpseat and restraint system.
    (2) Portable oxygen equipment.
    (3) Megaphones.
    (4) Protective breathing equipment.
    (5) Communication systems (public address system, chimes, 
interphone, visual indicators,).
    (6) Lavatory smoke detector, flapper doors, and placards.
    (7) Crash ax.
    (8) Flashlights.
    (9) Any additional portable emergency equipment or systems 
pertinent to cabin safety.
(b) Task: Equipment Used in Land and Water Evacuation
    Subtasks:
    (1) Evacuation alarms.
    (2) Emergency lighting systems.
    (3) Evacuation slides and slide rafts.
    (4) Escape ropes and escape tapes.
    (5) ELTs.
    (6) Survival kits.
    (7) Signaling equipment.
    (8) Flotation equipment.
    (9) Adult and child life preservers.
    (10) Infant flotation equipment.
    (11) Rafts.
    (12) Any specialized survival equipment specific to an aircraft 
type or operation.
(c) Task: Emergency Medical Equipment
    Subtasks:
    (1) EMKs.
    (2) First aid kits.
    (3) Portable first aid and medical oxygen and oxygen systems.
    (4) CPR equipment.
    (5) AED.
    (6) Universal precautions and associated equipment.

[[Page 1405]]

    (7) Biohazard kit contents, use, and proper disposal procedures.
    (8) Needle disposal kits.
    (9) Any additional cabin safety equipment used during inflight 
medical events.
(d) Task: Portable Fire Extinguishers
    Subtasks:
    (1) Installed fire extinguishers.
    (2) Range and duration of each extinguisher.
    (3) Classes of fires with emphasis on proper extinguisher for each 
class of fire.
(e) Task: Emergency Exit Doors, Plugs and Hatches, Including Doors, 
Window Exits, Floor Level Exits, Tailcone Exits, Ventral Stairs, Flight 
Deck Exits, and Any Other Exit Designed for Passenger or Crewmember 
Emergency Egress from the Aircraft
    Subtasks:
    (1) Each different emergency exit in the normal and emergency 
modes, including the actions and forces required in the deployment of 
the emergency slides or slide rafts.
    (2) Signal and conditions under which door can be opened or closed 
and locked or unlocked.
    (3) Procedures to verify door status (open or closed and locked or 
unlocked).
    (4) Slide pressure gauge and door pressure gauge.
    (5) Cabin pressurization indications and warnings.
    (6) Exterior and interior obstacles or hazards to persons or the 
exit during the opening or closing (e.g., jetway, stairs, mobile 
passenger lounge, barrier straps).
    (7) Signal for arming or disarming.
    (8) Procedures to properly arm and disarm the exit.
    (9) Procedures to verify girt bar placement for armed and disarmed.
    (10) Procedures to verify door is in the correct mode including 
window adjustments.
    (11) Proper procedures and use of operating mechanism to open exit 
and secure in locked position.
    (12) Proper procedures, operation, and use of stair operating 
mechanism for normal and emergency use.
    (13) Proper use of safety straps.
    (14) Proper use of barrier straps.
    (15) Proper use of locking mechanisms.
    (16) Proper use of escape ropes and escape tapes at overwing exits.
    (17) Proper use of control handles to close exits and secure in 
locked position.
    (18) Proper use of door locking override systems.
    (19) Proper use of slide override systems.
    (20) Understanding of door hazards.
    (21) Correct body position for door opening.
    (22) Protective positions during an evacuation.
    (23) Manual operations if pneumatic operations fail.
    (24) Functions of door levers, door opening devices, windows, and 
manual slide inflation systems.
    (25) Operation of exits on the flight deck.
    (26) Slide, raft, or slide raft transfer, including required steps 
for girt detachment, bustle removal, safe handling, positioning, re-
attachment of girt, and inflation of slide raft.
    (27) Use of slide, raft, or slide raft as application for other 
survival needs.
    (28) Use of following exits in normal and emergency modes:
    (i) Exits with slides or slide rafts.
    (ii) Exits without slides.
    (iii) Window exits.
    (iv) Tailcone exits.
    (v) Ventral stairs.
    (vi) Flight deck exits.
2. Subject: Emergency Situations
(a) Task: Emergency Assignments and Procedures Including Coordination 
among Crewmembers
    Subtask: The flight attendant must know emergency procedures for 
each type of emergency, including unwarranted evacuations, and planned 
and unplanned land and water evacuations.
(b) Task: Decompression and Physiological Effects of High Altitude 
(Required When Flight Operations Are Authorized Over 10,000 Feet)
    Subtasks: The flight attendant must know:
    (1) Symptoms associated with hypoxia.
    (2) Recognition of conditions in the cabin that a slow, rapid, or 
explosive decompression has occurred.
    (3) Principles of respiration and Time of Useful Consciousness and 
why it is different for cabin and flight crewmembers.
    (4) Gas expansion and gas bubble formation and how it could effect 
the crewmember during a decompression.
    (5) Incidents of decompression.
    (6) Post decompression duties.
    (7) Procedures for inter-crew communication and coordination.
    (8) Identification of information to be relayed to the flight crew 
via communication equipment.
    (9) Communication with other crewmembers.
    (10) Procedures for a slow, rapid, or explosive decompression while 
the flight attendant is in the cabin.
    (11) Procedures for a slow, rapid, or explosive decompression while 
the flight attendant is in the flight deck.
    (12) Awareness of possible flight crew response (e.g., rapid 
descent) and its effect on the cabin.
    (13) Certificate holder's procedures, including the following 
actions:
    (i) Don the nearest oxygen mask.
    (ii) Fasten seat belt or hold on to something solid.
    (iii) Await notification from the flight deck before moving around 
the cabin.
    (iv) Follow post decompression duties.
    (v) Obtain and carry portable oxygen bottle.
    (vi) Monitor condition of passengers.
    (vii) Open passenger oxygen compartments that have not deployed if 
supplemental oxygen is needed.
    (viii) Administer first aid and first aid oxygen, if necessary.
    (ix) Communicate with fellow crewmembers.
    (x) Complete required carrier forms.
(c) Task: Fire Inflight or on the Surface
    Subtasks:
    (1) Classes of fires.
    (2) Types of extinguishers appropriate to each class of fire.
    (3) Properties of halon extinguishers, including that the potential 
harmful effects on passengers and crew are negligible compared to the 
safety benefits achieved by fighting inflight fires aggressively.
    (4) Correct methods for fire fighting, including proper use of PBE.
    (5) Methods of communication while wearing PBE and using aircraft 
communication systems.
    (6) Proper techniques for PBE hood removal once away from the fire 
scene.
    (7) Need for crewmembers to take immediate and aggressive action in 
response to signs of an inflight fire.
    (8) Requirement to notify the flight deck as soon as possible and 
maintain constant communication and coordination.
    (9) Procedures to identify smoke in cabin, galleys and lower-lobe 
galleys, or lavatory.
    (10) Procedures for handling fire or smoke of undetermined origin.
    (11) Procedures for smoke removal, including crew communication and 
coordination, as well as passenger management, including any 
precautions.
    (12) Procedures for handling fire hidden behind interior panels or 
enclosed spaces, including removing or otherwise gaining access to the 
area behind interior panels (e.g., crash ax or other tools) to 
effectively apply extinguishing agents to the source of the fire.

[[Page 1406]]

    (13) Procedures to respond to smoke detector activation in 
lavatory.
    (14) Odor of fire (e.g., electrical fire or burning cloth).
    (15) Procedures to identify location and source of fire (e.g., in 
ovens; volatile fuel vapors; light ballast; cabin furnishings; stowage 
bins and hat racks; trash containers; clothing; APU; jetway; ramp 
fires).
    (16) Procedures to identify class of fire (if possible).
    (17) Procedures to assess the intensity of the fire (if possible).
    (18) Procedures to communicate with other crewmembers and 
passengers and respond to the fire, including:
    (i) Fight the fire and call flight crew to inform of fire.
    (ii) Obtain assistance of other flight attendants.
    (iii) Passenger handling.
    (iv) Use of interphone and other communication devices.
    (v) Use of passenger address system.
    (vi) Assign a passenger to locate and inform another flight 
attendant or flight crewmember, obtain back-up equipment and provide 
support.
    (vii) Locate and retrieve the nearest PBE.
    (viii) Remove PBE from stowage, including container or pouch.
    (ix) Don PBE and activate oxygen in proper sequence using proper 
procedures.
    (x) Locate and retrieve the nearest appropriate fire extinguisher.
    (xi) Remove extinguisher from securing device.
    (xii) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., break tamper seal, pull 
pins, release safety latches, and pressurize bottle).
    (xiii) Approach source of fire using protective techniques.
    (xiv) Maintain safe distance from fire with PBE on
    (xv) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism properly.
    (xvi) Discharge extinguisher at base of fire using proper discharge 
pattern, bottle position and flight attendant body position.
    (xvii) Use aircraft communication system with PBE on (as 
necessary).
    (xviii) Maintain and ensure ongoing communication with flight crew.
    (xix) Direct passengers to relocate away from fire location, as 
appropriate.
    (xx) Instruct passengers to breathe through clothing.
    (xxi) Distribute wet towels, if possible.
    (xxii) Relocate nearby portable oxygen bottles and canisters.
    (xxiii) Use additional fire extinguishers and other firefighting 
equipment.
    (xxiv) Coordinate ongoing fire control activity with other flight 
attendants and flight crewmembers.
    (xxv) Accept replacement by another flight attendant with PBE and 
extinguisher (as necessary) to perform continuous firefighting duties.
    (xxvi) Use follow-up procedures once fire appears extinguished.
    (xxvii) Monitor indications that PBE is reaching time limits of 
operation.
    (xxviii) Remove PBE as usefulness expires or need is eliminated.
    (xxix) Position used PBE and extinguishers according to certificate 
holder procedure.
    (xxx) Check conditions of passengers in immediate area.
    (xxxi) Report condition of fire and cabin to the flight crew.
    (xxxii) Complete required reports.
    (19) Training must also include:
    (i) Fire Prevention: Flight attendant readiness; cabin checks 
(including stowage of articles that could contribute to fire); articles 
that may block air vents in the galley; lavatory checks (including 
importance of material and condition of trash container, spring-loaded 
flapper door, smoke detection systems, and fire extinguishers); galley 
checks (including improper stowage of articles in the oven, safe oven 
operations, cooking and heating limitations, proper stowage of 
flammable materials around ovens and heating elements or lights and the 
importance of keeping areas around vents clear); enforcement of smoking 
regulations; and proper use of electrical equipment (including use of 
circuit breakers). Crewmembers must also be alert to fires that can 
occur on board the aircraft while the aircraft is on the ground (e.g., 
during boarding).
    (ii) Characteristics of an aircraft fire: Flash-over and 
criticality of time management; toxic fumes and chemical irritants; 
review of function, use, and limitations of fire fighting equipment; 
fire fighting techniques; special factors (including cabin material 
flammability and toxicity); location of highly combustible and 
flammable items and equipment; confined space; evacuation of personnel 
from lower lobe galleys and cabin ventilation.
    (iii) Electrical Equipment and Circuit Breakers: Procedures for 
circuit breaker use associated with galleys, service centers, lifts, 
lavatories, movie screens and other electrical equipment must be 
emphasized as well as location of accessible (in the passenger cabin) 
circuit breakers for each system.
    (iv) External Fires on Ground: Crew coordination; role of flight 
attendants for exterior aircraft fires; APU, jetway, ramp fires; 
notification of appropriate airport personnel if necessary.
(d) Task: Land and Water Evacuation
    Subtasks:
    (1) Recognition of the need for evacuation.
    (2) Crew communication and coordination.
    (3) Recognition of the importance of maintaining situational 
awareness and ability to anticipate and adapt as emergency progresses.
    (4) Use of evacuation signals.
    (5) Brace for impact position for self and passengers.
    (6) Importance of selection and briefing of able bodied passengers.
    (7) How to assess conditions.
    (8) Initiation of evacuation.
    (9) Decision not to evacuate.
    (10) Use of commands.
    (11) Use of protective position.
    (12) Passenger behavior (e.g., passive, aggressive, negative and 
positive panic, hysteria).
    (13) Passenger flow control management.
    (14) Evacuation of passengers or crewmembers who need the 
assistance of others.
    (15) Toxic smoke and flashover time criticality.
    (16) Care of passengers following evacuation.
    (17) Evacuation procedures for each type of evacuation, including 
passenger preparedness, cabin preparation, and crew coordination 
procedures in accordance with the certificate holder's procedures.
    (18) Crew duties and responsibilities for each crew position on 
each aircraft type on which the flight attendant will serve.
    (19) Primary and secondary exit responsibilities.
    (20) Raft responsibilities, including the importance of having an 
effective raft commander.
    (21) Launching and boarding of assigned raft.
    (22) Passenger briefings for each assigned exit and duty position.
(e) Task: Illness, Injury or Other Abnormal Situations
    Subtasks:
    (1) The flight attendant must know the following:
    (i) Procedures regarding the proper use of emergency medical 
equipment.
    (ii) Unique aircraft cabin conditions that make giving first aid 
difficult.
    (iii) Incapacitated crewmember procedures, including maintaining 
coverage of minimum crew positions and responsibilities, reseating, and 
briefing passengers who may be used for exit responsibilities.
    (2) The flight attendant must be trained to do the following:

[[Page 1407]]

    (i) Respond to request for assistance or identify ill or injured 
individual in need of first aid.
    (ii) Communicate and coordinate information with other crewmembers.
    (iii) Use interphone to communicate with flight crewmembers.
    (iv) Use interphone, public announcement system, or a passenger to 
locate and inform other flight attendants or other passengers needed to 
assist.
    (v) Request assistance from onboard medical personnel.
    (vi) Use proper techniques to move person to specified place on 
that configuration of airplane, if needed.
    (vii) Request assistance, if needed, from other flight attendants, 
passengers, or flight crew.
    (viii) Retrieve and use components of universal precaution 
equipment, as needed.
    (ix) Comply with procedures for taking universal precautions 
against blood borne pathogens.
    (x) Use gloves, mask, eye shield and other protective gear as 
needed.
    (xi) Properly dispose of biohazard.
    (xii) Report possible exposure to blood borne pathogens.
    (xiii) Retrieve and use contents of first aid kit, EMK, and other 
emergency medical equipment, according to certificate holder 
procedures.
    (xiv) Retrieve portable oxygen bottle, if needed.
    (xv) Request help from persons qualified to use EMK.
    (xvi) Request help from ground (airline contact with medical 
professionals on the ground).
    (xvii) Assess condition of person who is ill or injured, including 
conducting an interview to obtain medical history.
    (xviii) Follow certificate holder's first response medical event 
procedures.
    (xix) Use CPR equipment.
    (xx) Perform CPR.
    (xxi) Follow procedures for passenger who requires CPR during 
landing.
    (xxii) Use AED.
    (xxiii) Ensure someone is monitoring passenger who requires oxygen.
    (xxiv) Follow procedures for passenger who requires oxygen during 
landing.
    (xxv) Properly stow, reposition and report the use of portable 
oxygen bottle(s) and other emergency medical equipment.
    (xxvi) Coordinate with Emergency Medical Personnel once on the 
ground.
    (xxvii) Follow procedures to handle other passengers onboard while 
medical personnel board and care for ill or injured passenger.
    (xxviii) Inform flight crewmember of equipment used.
    (xxix) Complete required reports.
    (3) The flight attendant must be trained to recognize and treat the 
following:
    (i) Bleeding.
    (ii) Chest pain.
    (iii) Burns.
    (iv) Injuries to the extremities.
    (v) Shock.
    (vi) Unconsciousness.
    (vii) Allergic reaction.
    (viii) Hyperventilation.
    (ix) Stroke.
    (x) Seizures.
    (xi) Diabetic emergencies.
    (xii) Childbirth.
    (xiii) Abdominal distress.
    (xiv) Airsickness.
    (xv) Injuries to the skull, spine, neck and chest.
    (xvi) Eye injury.
    (xvii) Ear distress.
    (xviii) The effects of alcohol or drug abuse.
    (xix) Infectious diseases and conditions.
(f) Task: Turbulence
    Subtasks:
    (1) Awareness of turbulence hazards, aircraft behavior in 
turbulence and the need to maintain personal safety.
    (2) Predeparture briefing regarding forecast turbulence related 
weather conditions.
    (3) Announcement requirements.
    (4) Two way communication and coordination procedures between 
flight crewmembers and flight attendants during all phases of flight, 
including the use of the Fasten Seat Belt sign.
    (5) Standardized phraseology and communications regarding 
anticipated time, intensity and duration of turbulence encounters.
    (6) Procedures promoting voluntary passenger seat belt use and 
compliance with the Fasten Seat Belt sign.
    (7) Review of certificate holder history regarding turbulence 
encounters and injuries, as appropriate.
    (8) Location and use of emergency handholds available in the cabin, 
galley and lavatories (such as, handles, grab bars, or interior wall 
cutouts) by flight attendants and passengers who are not seated and 
restrained during turbulence.
    (9) Procedures regarding anticipated and unanticipated turbulence 
encounters, including:
    (i) Flight attendant notification by the flight deck.
    (ii) Assessing the severity of the turbulence and initiating 
standard operating procedures based on that assessment.
    (iii) Prioritization of flight attendant duties.
    (iv) Securing galley and passenger cabin.
    (v) Flight attendant's personal safety.
    (vi) Handling flight attendants who may become incapacitated during 
a turbulence encounter.
    (10) Handling passengers who may become injured during a turbulence 
encounter.
(g) Task: Hijacking or Other Unusual Situations
    Subtask:
    The certificate holder must develop a security program that meets 
the standards of the TSA security training program for flight 
attendants. The certificate holder must document that the TSA has 
approved the security training program for flight attendants and the 
certificate holder must provide security training to each flight 
attendant in accordance with a security program approved by the TSA.
(h) Task: Aircraft Occurrences, Accidents, and Incidents
    Subtasks:
    (1) Importance of crewmember actions.
    (2) How crewmember actions affect the outcome of accidents and 
incidents.
    (3) Review and discuss previous aircraft accidents and incidents.
(i) Task: Survival Skills
    Subtasks:
    (1) Effective survival skills to use in conditions relevant to the 
certificate holder's route structure (e.g., arctic, desert, jungle).
    (2) Specialized survival equipment on the aircraft.

III. Aircraft Specific Task Requirements (see Sec.  121.1369)

A. For Each Aircraft Type.

1. Subject: A General Description of the Aircraft
    Description, location, function, and operation of the following:
(a) Task: Aircraft Characteristics and Description
    Subtasks:
    (1) Design.
    (2) Major aircraft components and control surfaces.
    (3) Principle dimensions.
    (4) Interior configuration.
    (5) Powerplant.
    (6) Range.
    (7) Speed.
    (8) Altitude.
    (9) Passenger seating capacity.
(b) Task: Cabin Configuration
    Subtasks:
    (1) Flight attendant panels.
    (2) Flight attendant jumpseats and restraint systems.

[[Page 1408]]

    (3) Passenger seating zones.
    (4) Passenger seats.
    (5) Galley.
    (6) Lavatories.
    (7) Stowage areas.
    (8) Emergency exits.
    (9) Oxygen mask compartments.
    (10) Passenger service units.
    (11) Passenger convenience panels.
    (12) Passenger information signs.
    (13) Required placards.
    (14) Passenger-cargo configurations.
    (15) Escape path lighting.
(c) Task: Passenger Seats
    Subtasks:
    (1) Seat belts.
    (2) Shoulder harnesses.
    (3) Armrests, footrests and seat recline controls.
    (4) Tray tables.
    (5) Passenger service units.
    (6) Passenger convenience panels on armrests.
    (7) Passenger information signs.
    (8) Placards.
    (9) Passenger entertainment systems.
    (10) Passenger flotation equipment.
    (11) Any other passenger seating equipment or systems relevant to 
flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(d) Task: Air Conditioning, Ventilation, and Pressurization Systems
    Subtasks:
    (1) Cabin pressurization indicators and systems.
    (2) Aircraft environmental control systems.
    (3) Any other air conditioning and pressurization equipment or 
systems relevant to flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(e) Task: Flight Attendant Jumpseats
    Subtasks:
    (1) Preflight.
    (2) Automatic seat retraction.
    (3) Jumpseat headrest.
    (4) Restraint system integrity.
    (5) Function and operation of the restraint system.
    (6) Securing restraint system when not in use.
    (7) Flotation equipment.
    (8) Any other flight attendant station equipment or systems 
relevant to flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(f) Task: Flight Attendant Panels
    Subtasks:
    (1) Identification and function of controls, switches and 
indicators on flight attendant panels.
    (2) Preflight and use of controls and switches.
    (3) Any other flight attendant panel equipment or systems relevant 
to flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(g) Task: Carry On Baggage Stowage
    Subtasks:
    (1) Overhead compartments.
    (2) Open overhead racks.
    (3) Closets.
    (4) Stowage compartments.
    (5) Underseat stowage restraint requirements.
    (6) Weight restrictions.
    (7) Restraint or latching requirements.
    (8) Required placards.
    (9) Location requirements for oversized items in the passenger 
cabin.
    (10) Designated areas for the carriage of pet containers in the 
passenger cabin.
    (11) Designated areas for the stowage of passenger assistance aids, 
such as wheelchairs, canes and crutches.
    (12) Any other carry on baggage stowage equipment or systems 
relevant to flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(h) Task: Communication Systems
    Subtasks:
    (1) Call system, including:
    (i) Call light switches.
    (ii) Chime and light indicators when a call is initiated.
    (iii) Routine and emergency call light identification.
    (iv) Resetting procedures for call light indicators.
    (2) Interphone system, including:
    (i) Location of handset controls and indicators.
    (ii) Function and operation of routine and emergency controls and 
indicators.
    (iii) Interphone system inoperative procedures.
    (3) Passenger address system, including:
    (i) Location of handset and microphone controls and indicators.
    (ii) Passenger address system inoperative procedures.
    (iii) Any other communication equipment or systems relevant to 
flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(i) Task: Entertainment and Convenience Systems
    Subtasks:
    (1) Description of aircraft entertainment and convenience systems.
    (2) Location and operation of controls and switches including 
system indicators.
    (3) Problem identification, including probable causes and 
corrective action procedures.
    (4) Location of accessible circuit breakers for each system.
    (5) Any other entertainment and convenience equipment of systems 
relevant to flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(j) Task: Flight Deck Configuration
    Subtasks:
    (1) Flight crewmember and observer stations.
    (2) Portable emergency equipment.
    (3) Use of oxygen systems.
    (4) Use of flight deck door securing devices and locking systems.
    (5) Operation of observer's jumpseat, including function and 
operation of the restraint system.
    (6) Operation of flight deck door including emergency opening 
procedures.
    (7) Emergency exits and means of egress.
    (8) Any other flight deck equipment or systems relevant to flight 
attendant duties and responsibilities.
(k) Task: Galleys
    Subtasks:
    (1) Ovens.
    (2) Refrigeration Units.
    (3) Stowage compartments and latching devices.
    (4) Carts and braking mechanisms and restraining devices.
    (5) Electrical control panels and circuit breakers.
    (6) Water system and water shutoff valves.
    (7) Oxygen mask compartments.
    (8) Lower lobe galleys including operation of escape exits and 
lifts.
    (9) Any other galley equipment or systems relevant to flight 
attendant duties and responsibilities.
(l) Task: Lavatories
    Subtasks:
    (1) Washbasins.
    (2) Supply compartments and latching devices.
    (3) Oxygen mask compartments.
    (4) Passenger information signs.
    (5) Required placards.
    (6) Automatic fire extinguishers.
    (7) Fire detection systems.
    (8) Water shut off valves.
    (9) Water heater switches and indicators.
    (10) Interior door locking mechanism and signs.
    (11) Special lavatory components (e.g., doors that may be removed 
to facilitate access to an incapacitated passenger, lavatory walls 
which retract to allow for stretcher removal around corners and out of 
certain exits).
    (12) Any other lavatory equipment or systems relevant to flight 
attendant duties and responsibilities.
(m) Task: Required Signs and Placards
    Subtasks:
    (1) Passenger information signs, including:
    (i) No Smoking signs.
    (ii) Fasten Seat Belt signs.
    (iii) Lavatory Occupied signs.

[[Page 1409]]

    (iv) Return To Seat signs in the lavatory.
    (v) Exit signs.
    (2) Aircraft markings, including:
    (i) Interior emergency exit markings indicating location of each 
passenger emergency exit.
    (ii) Emergency exit handle markings indicating location of 
operating handle and instructions for opening exit.
    (iii) Emergency equipment markings to identify equipment location.
    (3) Aircraft placards, including:
    (i) Placards on each forward bulkhead and passenger seat stating 
Fasten Seat Belt While Seated.
    (ii) Placards in each lavatory stating Federal law provides for a 
penalty for tampering with the smoke detector installed in this 
lavatory.
(n) Task: Lighting and Electrical Systems
    Subtasks:
    (1) Interior and exterior lighting.
    (2) Cabin lighting systems, including:
    (i) Controls.
    (ii) Switches.
    (iii) Testing procedures, in accordance with certificate holder 
procedures.
    (3) Cabin circuit breakers, including:
    (i) Means of access.
    (ii) Switches.
    (iii) Indicators.
(o) Task: Oxygen Equipment and Systems
    Subtasks:
    (1) Flightcrew and observer oxygen system, including:
    (i) Location of oxygen regulators and quick-donning oxygen masks.
    (ii) Emergency operation of oxygen regulator switches and 
indicators.
    (iii) Distinction between ``on demand'' and ``under pressure'' 
oxygen flow.
    (iv) Proper use of oxygen masks.
    (2) Passenger oxygen systems, including:
    (i) Description and location of each type of oxygen mask and 
compartment.
    (ii) Location of extra masks.
    (iii) Description and location of oxygen mask compartment door 
latching indicators.
    (iv) Method to manually open each type of oxygen mask compartment.
    (v) Restrictions for repacking oxygen mask compartments.
    (vi) Automatic and manual means of system activation.
    (vii) Indicators of oxygen system activation.
    (viii) Procedure for initiating oxygen flow to the mask(s).
    (ix) Procedure for properly donning oxygen mask and testing for 
oxygen flow.
    (x) Procedure for resetting oxygen system in the event oxygen 
system is not designed to shut off automatically.
    (xi) Procedure for activating aircraft system for first aid oxygen, 
if available.
    (xii) Any other fixed oxygen equipment or systems relevant to 
flight attendant duties and responsibilities.
(p) Task: Notification of Inoperative Equipment
    Subtasks:
    (1) MEL, including specific cabin equipment and systems pertinent 
to flight attendant duties that may be inoperative, including the 
importance of requesting this information during the preflight 
briefing.
    (2) Impact of inoperative cabin equipment and systems on flight 
attendant duties and procedures.
(q) Task: Emergency Equipment Location
    Location of emergency equipment, if not included in emergency 
equipment training (see paragraph II.C.1 (a) through (d) of this 
attachment).
(r) Task: Emergency Exit Doors, Plugs and Hatches, Including Doors, 
Window Exits, Floor Level Exits, Tailcone Exits, Ventral Stairs, Flight 
Deck Exits, and Any Other Exit Designed for Passenger or Crewmember 
Egress From the Aircraft
    Subtasks:
    (1) Location and description of the normal and emergency operation 
of each emergency exit if this information is not included in Emergency 
Equipment Training (see paragraph II.C.1.(e) of this attachment).
    (2) Any other exit designed for passenger or crewmember egress from 
the aircraft.
    (i) Procedures for using each exit in the normal mode (if 
applicable).
    (ii) Procedures for using each exit in the emergency mode.
(s) Crewmember Rest Facilities
    Subtasks:
    (1) Operation of emergency systems.
    (2) Operation of escape exits.
    (3) Operation of escape lifts.
    (4) Oxygen systems.
    (5) Communication systems.
    (6) Restraint systems.
    (7) Any additional equipment or systems in the crewmember rest 
facilities on the aircraft on which the flight attendant serves.
2. [Reserved]

B. [Reserved]

IV. Emergency Training Drill Requirements (see Sec.  121.1373)

    A. Each flight attendant must operate each exit on each aircraft 
type on which the flight attendant is to serve in both the normal and 
emergency modes, including the actions and forces required in the 
deployment of emergency evacuation slides.
    B. Each flight attendant must complete the following emergency 
training drills during the specified training periods, using those 
items of installed emergency equipment for each type of aircraft 
operated by that part 119 certificate holder in which the flight 
attendant is to serve.
    C. Each piece of emergency equipment and training device must be in 
its fully secured, pinned, or bracketed position, as installed on the 
aircraft, prior to being operated by each flight attendant during each 
drill (if the flight attendant does not complete the equipment 
mountings drill for that piece of equipment) or prior to being operated 
for each flight attendant during an observation drill.
    D. Flight attendants must complete each drill according to the 
standards and situational awareness markers (CRM competencies) provided 
in each drill without manual reference or coaching.
    E. Successful individual evaluation of each flight attendant's 
performance by a person authorized to administer proficiency tests is 
required. Flight attendants who cannot demonstrate the required level 
of proficiency during testing must be retrained in accordance with the 
certificate holder's procedures prior to retesting.
    F. The operation of the equipment must be identical to that 
installed in the certificate holder's aircraft on which the flight 
attendant is to be qualified with respect to weight, dimensions, 
appearance (e.g., color, placards and markings), features, charge 
duration (if applicable), controls, types, and operation.

V. Emergency Training Drills--General (see Sec.  121.1373)

A. Subject: Job Performance Drills

1. Task: Operation of Each Type of Installed Hand Fire Extinguisher 
(Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: The extinguisher must be charged; however, it may 
be charged with an environmentally friendly agent.
    (b) Task: This drill is not required for the type of fire 
extinguisher used in the

[[Page 1410]]

protective breathing equipment and firefighting drill (Task 8). Flight 
attendants must fight an actual or simulated fire. The flight attendant 
must complete the following during the drill, and be evaluated and 
debriefed on the proper use of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Remove fire extinguisher from the brackets (if not completed 
during the equipment mountings drill).
    (2) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., rotate handle to 
pressurize, break tamper seals, pull pin, release safety latch).
    (3) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism properly.
    (4) Aim and discharge extinguisher at the base of the fire (actual 
or simulated ``open flame'') or as close to the source as possible 
(``hidden fire'') using proper discharge pattern, bottle position and 
flight attendant body position.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) Effective training scenarios for firefighting should include 
realistic drills with emphasis on combating hidden fires. To provide 
realistic training, drills should simulate locations of hidden fires, 
such as behind sidewall panels, in overhead areas, air conditioning 
vents, or overhead panels. For example, electrical fires, lavatory 
fires or fires erupting from failures of lithium-ion batteries such as 
those used within laptop computers. The intent of the training is to 
provide crewmembers with the obstacles that would be encountered 
onboard the aircraft, but it is not intended to have each student 
remove sidewall panels. A training program should incorporate a method 
to assess the hidden fire and to combat the hidden fire such as 
locating the source of the fire, if possible, before applying an 
extinguishing agent.
    (e) Depending on the sophistication of the training device, the 
flight attendant could utilize a manual release tool that is designed 
to open the oxygen compartments to gain access to a fire that is 
suspected in that region, remove a cabin ceiling speaker cover by 
simply snapping it out of its fixture, or move carry-on baggage from an 
overhead compartment.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

2. Task: Operation of Each Type of Portable Oxygen Equipment (Job 
Performance)
    (a) Environment: The drill does not need to be repeated using each 
type of portable oxygen bottle installed in the aircraft provided the 
procedures, oxygen mask tubing, fittings, and the means to activate the 
oxygen flow are the same from one bottle to the other, regardless of 
the size of the portable oxygen bottle. Where types differ, the drills 
must be repeated with the appropriate equipment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Remove the bottle or canister from the bracket or stowage (if 
not completed during the equipment mountings drill).
    (2) Retrieve oxygen mask and hose, attach coupling to the high and 
low outlets.
    (3) Use the carrying strap.
    (4) Prepare the ``passenger'' for receiving oxygen administration 
(i.e., no smoking, possibly relocating passenger, removing petroleum 
products from passenger's face).
    (5) Activate the oxygen and test for flow, position and secure the 
mask to the passenger's face.
    (6) Secure the oxygen bottle or canister and position it to monitor 
the supply.
    (7) Demonstrate proper handling techniques if using portable solid 
state units.
    (8) Demonstrate proper placement of hot generators, as per 
certificate holder procedures, if using solid state units.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also recognize indications regarding duration of oxygen supply.
3. Task: Operation of Each Type of Fixed Oxygen System in the Cabin 
(Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: The drill does not need to be repeated using each 
type of fixed oxygen system installed in the aircraft provided the 
procedures and the means to activate the oxygen flow, and the method to 
manually open the compartment, are the same from one system to another. 
Where types differ, the drills must be repeated with the appropriate 
equipment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Each flight attendant must manually drop oxygen mask and follow 
the crewmember coordination procedures.
    (2) The flight attendant must demonstrate the ability to ``turn 
on'' the oxygen system, if necessary.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.
4. Task: Operation of Each Type of Protective Breathing Equipment (Job 
Performance)
    (a) Environment: PBE consisting of a portable oxygen bottle and 
full-face mask must be fully operational and charged. Self contained 
PBE may be substituted with a training smoke hood that is not 
operational.
    (b) Task: This drill is not required for the type of PBE used in 
the protective breathing equipment and firefighting drill (Task 8). The 
flight attendant must complete the following during the drill, and be 
evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Remove PBE from stowage including stowage container (if not 
accomplished during the equipment mountings drill) and pouch.
    (2) Don PBE and activate oxygen in proper sequence and using proper 
techniques.
    (3) Verify proper seal.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also recognize indications regarding duration of oxygen supply.
5. Task: Operation of Each Type of Installed Life Preserver and Each 
Type of Individual Flotation Means (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F of this attachment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Remove life preserver from the sealed or closed (actual or 
simulated) pouch.
    (2) Don and secure life preserver and inflate using automatic 
inflation of at least one chamber.

[[Page 1411]]

    (3) Partially inflate or simulate inflation of second chamber of 
life preserver orally.
    (4) Practice deflation technique.
    (5) Locate and review light activation.
    (6) Demonstrate the procedures to use a life preserver for a child 
(and infant, if applicable).
    (7) Demonstrate proper arm placement and use of seat cushion.
    (8) Demonstrate use of seat cushion by infant and small child.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also:
    (1) Recognize removal procedures for seat cushions, and also 
recognize any equipment or furnishings that may complement or may 
hinder the removal of the seat cushion.
    (2) Recognize the hazards that can be associated with inflating 
life preservers in the aircraft.
6. Task: Operation of Each Type of Automated External Defibrillator 
(AED) (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F of this attachment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Remove the AED from the bracket or stowage (if not completed 
during the equipment mountings drill).
    (2) Prepare the AED for use and attach leads if necessary.
    (3) Prepare the scene and ``passenger'' for use of an AED.
    (4) Follow AED prompts for proper use, including the administration 
of shocks, rescue breathing and the administration of cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR) if so prompted, to include the use of the CPR mask.
    (5) Detach leads, if required by certificate holder procedures.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also recognize the need for defibrillation.
7. Task: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)--Adult, Child, and Infant 
(Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: This drill must be performed using training 
equipment that creates an effective environment for the accomplishment 
of the performance drill.
    (b) Task: This CPR drill is not required if the flight attendant 
performs CPR during the operation of each type of installed automated 
external defibrillator. The flight attendant must complete the 
following during the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the 
proper use of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Administer CPR, to include the use of the CPR mask, for adult, 
child and infant CPR.
    (2) [Reserved].
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also recognize the need for CPR.
8. Task: Protective Breathing Equipment and Firefighting Drill (Job 
Performance)
    (a) Environment: This drill must be performed using training 
equipment that creates an effective environment for the accomplishment 
of performance drills using at least one type of hand fire extinguisher 
that replicates the features and operating mechanisms of the installed 
fire extinguishers, with the exception of the extinguishing agent, and 
is appropriate for the type of actual fire being fought while using the 
type of installed PBE required by Sec.  121.337 or an approved PBE 
simulation device. A self-contained PBE may be substituted with a 
training smoke hood which is not operational.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete at least one approved 
protective breathing equipment and firefighting drill in which the 
flight attendant combats an actual fire, during basic qualification 
training.
    (1) For recurrent training, the flight attendant must combat an 
actual or simulated fire using at least one type of installed hand fire 
extinguisher or approved training device that is appropriate for the 
type of actual fire or simulated fire to be fought while using the type 
of installed PBE required by Sec.  121.337 or an approved PBE 
simulation device.
    (2) Each 36 months, the flight attendant must combat at least one 
``hidden fire'' that is actual or simulated (e.g., behind a panel, in a 
lavatory or with an undisclosed source of origin).
    (3) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures:
    (i) Locate source of fire and smoke.
    (ii) Remove PBE from stowage container and pouch.
    (iii) Don PBE and activate oxygen in proper sequence (activation of 
oxygen may be simulated).
    (iv) Verify seal.
    (v) Demonstrate the use of aircraft communication systems (actual 
or with a training device).
    (vi) Select appropriate fire extinguisher.
    (vii) Remove the fire extinguisher from brackets/secured position 
(if not accomplished during the equipment mountings drill).
    (viii) Prepare extinguisher for use (e.g., rotate handle to 
pressurize, break tamper seals, pull pin, release safety latch).
    (ix) Approach fire or smoke.
    (x) Fight fire using proper techniques (particularly in the case of 
a ``hidden fire'').
    (xi) Operate extinguisher discharge mechanism properly.
    (xii) Demonstrate proper passenger handling/protection techniques.
    (xiii) Ensure fire is extinguished.
    (xiv) Use protective techniques to back away.
    (xv) Use proper techniques for PBE removal.
    (xvi) Properly secure equipment as per certificate holder's 
procedures.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also recognize the problem, be aware of PBE duration, and be aware of 
signals that PBE is no longer generating oxygen to wearer.
9. Task: Cabin Preparation and Evacuation Drills (Land and Water 
Evacuation) (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: This drill must be performed using training 
equipment that creates an effective environment for the completion of 
the performance drill.
    (b) Task: Each flight attendant must participate as either a flight 
attendant or a passenger in a full, complete, and uninterrupted cabin 
preparation as outlined in the ``Cabin Preparation and Evacuation for a 
Planned Land Evacuation'' drill. In addition, if the flight attendant 
is to be qualified in extended overwater operations, that flight 
attendant must participate as either a flight attendant or a passenger 
in a full, complete and uninterrupted cabin preparation as outlined in 
the ``Cabin Preparation and Evacuation for a Planned Water Landing 
(Ditching)'' drill.
    (c) For the purposes of recurrent training, flight attendants may 
complete a ``Cabin Preparation and Evacuation for

[[Page 1412]]

a Planned Land Evacuation'' drill and a ``Cabin Preparation and 
Evacuation for a Planned Water Landing (Ditching)'' drill during 
alternate recurrent training cycles. If the flight attendant has not 
participated as a flight attendant in one of the cabin preparation and 
evacuation drills, then the flight attendant must participate as a 
flight attendant in at least a portion of another evacuation drill.
    (d) The flight attendant must participate as a crewmember or a 
passenger in at least one of the following approved evacuation drills 
to include crew coordination procedures, cabin preparation and 
passenger preparation that is applicable to the certificate holder's 
operations. The flight attendant must also apply tasks and procedures 
following the prescribed sequence, as priorities allow.
    (e) During the initiation phase of the cabin preparation for the 
planned land evacuation and the planned water landing (ditching), the 
flight attendant must:
    (1) Receive notification from the flight deck, including:
    (i) Use of emergency notification signal.
    (ii) Confirmation from the flight deck that an emergency landing 
and evacuation are anticipated.
    (2) Communicate with PIC to obtain the following essential 
information:
    (i) Find out the amount of time remaining until landing.
    (ii) Find out what type of landing is anticipated (e.g., aircraft 
configuration, environmental conditions, which exits can be used).
    (iii) Establish and confirm signal to assume brace for impact 
position.
    (iv) Confirm signal to evacuate.
    (v) Coordinate with other flight attendants.
    (3) Prepare the cabin as follows:
    (i) Secure galley ensuring all galley components and supplies are 
properly restrained.
    (ii) Adjust cabin lights to full bright.
    (iii) Deliver emergency announcement or demonstration.
    (f) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drills, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures.
    (1) Conduct a Cabin Preparation and Evacuation for a Planned Land 
Evacuation.
    (i) Conduct initiation phase of the cabin preparation for the 
Planned Land Evacuation (see paragraphV.A.9.(e) of this attachment.)
    (ii) Instruct passengers to secure seatbelts low and tight and 
review how to release seat belts.
    (iii) Instruct passengers on brace for impact position(s) beginning 
with the position to be assumed by the majority of passengers.
    (iv) Conduct passenger review of passenger safety information card.
    (v) Instruct passengers on location of exits (primary and 
alternate).
    (vi) Direct passenger attention to the location of escape path 
lighting.
    (vii) Instruct passengers on how to exit down slides or out 
windows.
    (viii) Instruct passengers on use of escape ropes or escape tapes 
at overwing exits.
    (ix) Direct passengers to leave everything behind.
    (x) Direct passengers to stay low in a smoke filled cabin.
    (xi) Reseat passengers as necessary.
    (xii) Brief able bodied passengers on tasks.
    (A) Exit operation.
    (B) Signals or commands regarding starting the evacuation.
    (C) Slide operation.
    (xiii) Conduct compliance check.
    (xiv) Prepare for landing.
    (xv) Provide last minute instructions to passengers.
    (xvi) Check exits to ensure they are ready for evacuation.
    (xvii) Adjust cabin lighting to dim setting.
    (xviii) Secure barrier strap.
    (xix) Use proper techniques to fasten flight attendant restraint 
system.
    (xx) Inform PIC of cabin readiness.
    (xxi) Perform silent review.
    (xxii) Assume flight attendant protective brace position.
    (xxiii) Command passengers to assume protective brace position and 
continue brace commands until the aircraft has come to a complete stop.
    (xxiv) Perform assigned duties following emergency landing, as 
follows:
    (A) Remain seated until the aircraft comes to a complete stop.
    (B) Open seat belts.
    (C) Assess conditions.
    (D) Activate emergency lights.
    (E) Aggressively initiate evacuation procedures using communication 
protocols or manage passenger behavior if decision is made not to 
evacuate.
    (F) Activate evacuation signal.
    (G) Shout evacuation commands to passengers.
    (H) Conduct evacuation at floor level exits.
    (1) Assess conditions at exit.
    (2) Apply forces necessary to open door in emergency mode and under 
possible adverse conditions.
    (3) Take appropriate precautions for door hazard conditions.
    (4) Hold onto assist handle.
    (5) Open the exit in the armed mode.
    (6) Use manual operation if pneumatic operations fail.
    (7) Block and redirect, if necessary.
    (8) Secure the exit in the fully open position.
    (9) Hold passengers back until exit is open and ready for 
evacuation.
    (10) Pull the manual inflation handle and verify deployment, 
inflation (e.g., ramp, slide).
    (11) Ensure that stairs are positioned for evacuation.
    (12) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (13) Shout door commands to passengers.
    (14) Use passenger flow management control.
    (15) Open exits and manage flow control at more than one exit if 
procedures require responsibility for opening more than one exit.
    (16) Direct passengers to most usable doors.
    (17) Give commands to able bodied passengers.
    (I) Conduct evacuation at over wing exits.
    (1) Go to exit (if part of assigned duties).
    (2) Assess conditions at exit.
    (3) Remove hatch.
    (4) Dispose of hatch.
    (5) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (6) Give commands to passengers at over wing exit.
    (7) Control passenger flow at over wing area.
    (8) Use escape ropes or escape tapes.
    (J) Ensure evacuation of passengers needing assistance.
    (K) Evacuate crewmember through most appropriate exit, if 
crewmember is incapacitated.
    (L) Shout commands to helper passengers at the bottom of the 
slides, stairs or exit.
    (M) Remove emergency equipment.
    (N) Check flight deck.
    (2) Conduct a Cabin Preparation and Evacuation for a Planned Water 
Landing (Ditching).
    (i) Conduct initiation phase of the cabin preparation for the 
Planned Water Landing (Ditching) (see paragraph V.A.9.(e) of this 
attachment).
    (A) Direct passengers to don life vests and instruct them on use.
    (B) Don crew life vest.
    (C) Instruct passengers to secure seatbelts low and tight and 
review how to release seat belts.
    (D) Instruct passengers on brace for impact position(s) beginning 
with the position to be assumed by the majority of passengers.
    (E) Conduct passenger review of passenger safety information card.
    (F) Instruct passengers on location of exits (primary and 
alternate).

[[Page 1413]]

    (G) Direct passenger attention to the location of emergency floor 
level lighting.
    (H) Instruct passengers on how to exit down slides or out windows.
    (I) Direct passengers to leave everything behind.
    (J) Direct passengers to stay low in a smoke filled cabin.
    (K) Reseat passengers as necessary.
    (ii) Brief able bodied passengers on tasks:
    (A) Exit operation.
    (B) Signals or commands regarding starting the evacuation.
    (C) Positioning raft according to carrier procedures.
    (D) Use of slide raft as raft.
    (E) Launching raft or slide raft.
    (iii) Continue with cabin preparation:
    (A) Complete compliance check.
    (B) Prepare for landing.
    (C) Provide last minute instructions to passengers.
    (D) Check exits to ensure they are ready for evacuation.
    (E) Adjust cabin lighting to dim setting.
    (F) Secure barrier strap.
    (G) Use proper techniques to fasten flight attendant restraint 
system.
    (H) Inform PIC of cabin readiness.
    (I) Perform silent review.
    (J) Assume flight attendant protective brace position.
    (K) Command passengers to assume protective brace position and 
continue to shout brace commands until the aircraft has come to a 
complete stop.
    (iv) Perform assigned duties following impact to include the 
following:
    (A) Remain seated until the aircraft has stopped.
    (B) Open seat belts.
    (C) Assess conditions (e.g., watch for water line).
    (D) Activate emergency lights.
    (E) Aggressively initiate evacuation using communication protocols.
    (F) Activate evacuation signal.
    (G) Shout commands to passengers.
    (H) Conduct evacuation at floor level exits as follows:
    (1) Assess conditions at exit.
    (2) Apply forces necessary to open door in emergency mode and under 
possible adverse conditions.
    (3) Take appropriate precautions for door hazard conditions.
    (4) Hold onto assist handle.
    (5) Open the exit.
    (6) Use manual operation if pneumatic operations fail.
    (7) Block and redirect if necessary.
    (8) Secure the exit in the fully open position.
    (9) Hold passengers back until exit is open and ready for 
evacuation.
    (10) Pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify deployment, 
inflation.
    (11) Review deployment procedures for inflated slide and launch 
rafts if aircraft equipped with life rafts.
    (12) Simulate evacuating passengers into raft, slide raft, or 
water.
    (13) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (14) Shout door commands to passengers.
    (15) Use passenger flow management control.
    (16) Direct passengers to most useable doors.
    (17) Give commands to able bodied passengers.
    (18) Ensure evacuation of passengers needing assistance.
    (19) Inflate crew life vest.
    (I) Conduct evacuation at over wing exit.
    (1) Go to exit (if part of assigned duties).
    (2) Remove hatch.
    (3) Dispose of hatch as per certificate holder procedures.
    (4) Review raft launching procedures in overwing area.
    (5) Use escape ropes or tapes at overwing area (if applicable).
    (6) Give commands to passengers at over wing exit.
    (7) Control passenger flow at over wing area.
    (g) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or actions) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also:
    (1) Demonstrate awareness of his or her duties as a crewmember and 
duties of other crewmembers during an evacuation
    (2) Review procedures for evacuation of passengers or crewmembers 
needing assistance.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (h) To create a realistic training environment, a certificate 
holder may choose to integrate variables into the scenarios that happen 
during actual emergencies (e.g., running out of time prior to 
completing a cabin preparation, change in the type of evacuation or 
landing). For aircraft for which more than one flight attendant is 
required, drills could also be conducted in which the flight attendant 
finds himself or herself acting alone (simulating incapacitation of 
other flight attendants). The ``solo'' drill demonstrates the ability 
of the flight attendant to take command of a situation using available 
safety equipment and the capacity to respond to changing situations 
without the assistance of other crewmembers.
    (i) While adding variable to the scenarios is a good training tool, 
a scenario should not incorporate excessive variables that would 
overload a flight attendant, nor be so limited on variables that there 
is a reduced training value to the exercise.
    (j) An effective practice is to provide flight attendants a 
demonstration of ``textbook'' cabin preparation or evacuation drills 
conducted in accordance with the certificate holder's procedures. 
Certificate holders should also be aware of the desirability of flight 
crewmembers and flight attendants performing evacuation scenarios 
together. When this is not possible, certificate holders should include 
information addressing the roles of other crewmembers during emergency 
evacuation situations.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

10. Task: Evacuation Drills (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: This drill must be performed using training 
equipment that creates an effective environment for the accomplishment 
of performance drills.
    (b) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures:
    (c) During the initiation phase of the Unplanned land evacuation 
and the unplanned water evacuation drills, the flight attendant must:
    (1) Issue brace for impact commands at the first sign a problem 
exists that could lead to impact of evacuation.
    (2) Remain seated until the aircraft comes to a complete stop.
    (3) Open seat belts.
    (4) Assess conditions.
    (5) Activate emergency lights.
    (6) Aggressively initiate evacuation procedures using communication 
protocols or manage passenger behavior if decision is made not to 
evacuate.
    (7) Activate evacuation signal.
    (8) Shout evacuation commands to passengers.
    (9) Conduct evacuation at floor level exits.
    (10) Assess conditions at exit.
    (11) Apply forces necessary to open door in emergency mode and 
under possible adverse conditions.
    (12) Take appropriate precautions for door hazard conditions.
    (13) Hold onto assist handle.

[[Page 1414]]

    (14) Open the exit in the armed mode.
    (15) Use manual operation if pneumatic operations fail.
    (16) Block and redirect if necessary.
    (17) Secure the exit in the fully open position.
    (18) Hold passengers back until exit is open and ready for 
evacuation.
(d) Task: Conduct an Unplanned Land Evacuation
    (1) Conduct initiation phase of the unplanned land evacuation (See 
paragraph V.A.10(c) of this attachment.)
    (2) Pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify deployment, 
inflation (e.g., ramp, slide) (in the case of stairs, ensure they are 
positioned for evacuation).
    (3) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (4) Shout door commands (land evacuation) to passengers.
    (5) Use passenger flow management control.
    (6) Open exits and manage flow control at more than one exit if 
procedures require responsibility for opening more than one exit.
    (7) Direct passengers to most useable doors.
    (8) Give commands to able bodied passengers.
    (9) Conduct evacuation at over wing exits.
    (i) Go to exit.
    (ii) Assess conditions at exit.
    (iii) Remove hatch.
    (iv) Dispose of hatch.
    (v) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (vi) Give commands to passengers on how to egress through exit.
    (vii) Control passenger flow at over wing area.
    (viii) Use escape ropes or escape tapes.
    (10) Ensure evacuation of passengers needing assistance..
    (11) Evacuate crewmember through most appropriate exit, if 
crewmember is incapacitated.
    (12) Shout commands to helper passengers at the bottom of the 
slides, stairs or exit.
    (13) Remove emergency equipment.
    (14) Check flight deck.
    (e) Task: Conduct an Unplanned Water Evacuation.
    (1) Conduct initiation phase of the unplanned water evacuation (See 
paragraph V.A.10(c) of this attachment.).
    (2) Pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify deployment and 
inflation (if applicable).
    (3) Review procedures to inflated slide and launch rafts if 
aircraft equipped with life rafts.
    (4) Evacuate passengers into raft, slide raft, or water.
    (5) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (6) Shout door commands (water evacuation) to passengers.
    (7) Use passenger flow management control.
    (8) Direct passengers to most useable doors.
    (10) Give commands to able bodied passengers.
    (11) Ensure evacuation of passengers needing assistance.
    (12) Inflate crew life vest.
    (13) Conduct evacuation at over wing exit.
    (i) Go to exit.
    (ii) Remove hatch.
    (iii) Dispose of hatch as per certificate holder procedures.
    (iv) Review procedures to launch rafts in over wing area.
    (v) Use escape ropes or escape tapes at over wing area.
    (vi) Give commands to passengers at over wing exit.
    (vii) Control passenger flow at over wing area.
    (viii) Ensure evacuation of passengers needing assistance.
    (f) Task: Control An Unwarranted (Unneeded) Evacuation.
    The flight attendant must perform the following:
    (1) Take protective position if at door.
    (2) Coordinate with crew.
    (3) Stop evacuation; use strong commands.
    (g) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also review procedures for evacuation of passengers needing assistance.
11. Task: Equipment Mountings Drill (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: Each piece of emergency equipment or training 
device must be in the fully secured or pinned position and using the 
identical bracketing or securing system that is used on the aircraft 
prior to being operated by each flight attendant during each drill or 
prior to being operated by each flight attendant during the equipment 
mountings drill.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Completely remove each piece of portable emergency equipment 
from its bracket or securing system.
    (2) Resecure each piece of portable emergency equipment in its 
bracket or securing system or properly stow according to certificate 
holder procedures.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. The flight attendant must 
also recognize the importance of removing equipment as quickly as 
possible.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) For realistic training, it is important that the emergency 
equipment used in the drills is identical to the equipment found on the 
aircraft in relation to the bracketing or securing systems. For 
example, location of the equipment in overhead bins, emergency 
equipment stowage doghouses, and the spacing of equipment relative to 
other equipment.
    (e) The FAA recognizes that some training equipment, facilities and 
scenarios make this training requirement difficult to support. It is 
important to give certificate holders maximum flexibility to comply 
with the performance requirement that each flight attendant completely 
remove and replace each piece of portable emergency equipment from the 
bracket or securing system that is identical to those systems that a 
flight attendant would find on each aircraft on which they are 
qualified.
    (f) It is acceptable that this performance requirement be completed 
during the individual drills or the equipment mountings drill.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

12. Task: Ditching Survival Drill (Dry Training Environment) (Job 
Performance)
    (a) Environment: The certificate holder may substitute a raft, 
provided there are no substantive differences with respect to weight, 
dimensions, appearance, features, and operations and the certificate 
holder provides differences training approved by the FAA. However, when 
flight attendants are trained and qualified on multiple aircraft types 
that are extended overwater equipped, the flight attendant must 
complete ``hands on'' drill training on each different raft and slide 
raft on a training schedule acceptable to the FAA, not to exceed a 5 
year recurrent training cycle.

[[Page 1415]]

    (b) Task: The flight attendant must participate in the following 
approved dry ditching drill as applicable to the certificate holder's 
procedures and approved extended overwater operations. The flight 
attendant may complete this drill in conjunction with the one time wet 
ditching drill to initially qualify to serve on an aircraft that is 
used for extended overwater operations. In addition, the flight 
attendant must perform this drill during recurrent or requalification 
training, as applicable.
    (c) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures:
    (1) Identify boarding station and board raft.
    (2) Review the need to crawl and stay low.
    (3) Discuss the importance of distributing the load.
    (4) Review the need to stay attached to the aircraft as long as 
possible, and operation of the quick disconnect.
    (5) Review the need to get clear of fuel-covered water and debris.
    (6) Locate and deploy the sea anchor.
    (7) Discuss the importance of upwind and downwind.
    (8) Retrieve the survival kit and review contents.
    (9) Identify inflation valve and review operation of inflation pump 
and raft repair kit.
    (10) Identify items such as bailing bucket and sponge for bailing 
raft dry.
    (11) Erect the canopy and discuss methods for collecting rain water 
and water purification techniques.
    (12) Demonstrate how canopy can be used in both hot and cold 
climates.
    (13) Review signaling devices located in survival kits or brought 
to the raft.
    (14) Discuss the cautions associated with flares and sea dye marker 
and proper use.
    (15) Point out raft lights.
    (16) Review alternate signaling devices (e.g., mirrors).
    (17) Locate and demonstrate use of heaving line. Review techniques 
to retrieve survivors.
    (18) Discuss raft management including distribution of duties to 
passengers and ongoing physiological effects of the situation.
    (19) Discuss long term water survival techniques or strategies.
    (20) Discuss static line breaking strain.
    (21) Discuss transporting incapacitated persons from the aircraft 
into the rafts.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.
13. Jumpseat Drill (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: Each flight attendant must complete a flight 
attendant jumpseat drill by using at least one type of installed flight 
attendant jumpseat from an aircraft on which the flight attendant will 
be qualified to serve.
    (b) Task: This is an emergency drill requirement that the flight 
attendant must complete for the certificate holder for which the flight 
attendant is employed. This drill is not required if the flight 
attendant has completed any drill using at least one type of installed 
flight attendant jumpseat from an aircraft on which the flight 
attendant will be qualified to serve during an exit device operation 
drill or evacuation drill. During the completion of proficiency drills, 
the flight attendant must operate at least one exit starting from a 
seated position on at least one type of installed flight attendant 
jumpseat from an aircraft on which the flight attendant will be 
qualified to serve during an exit device operation drill, evacuation 
drill or flight attendant jumpseat drill.
    (c) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures:
    (1) Preflight check of the flight attendant jumpseat.
    (2) Properly secure restraint system.
    (3) Demonstrate brace position appropriate for flight attendant 
jumpseat location on aircraft, as per certificate holder procedures.
    (4) Proper methods of releasing restraint device, in accordance 
with per certificate holder procedures.
    (5) Proper method of stowing flight attendant jumpseat and 
restraint system, in accordance with certificate holder procedures.
    (d) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate..

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (e) Proper use of the flight attendant jumpseat and restraint 
system is integral to a flight attendant being able to initiate an 
effective aircraft evacuation. The rule has a requirement for flight 
attendants who receive initial or transition training on any aircraft 
type to receive academic training on the use the flight attendant 
jumpseat for that aircraft type. In addition, the rule requires job 
performance training in each flight attendant jumpseat by aircraft type 
during basic qualification training or Aircraft Operating Experience 
(AOE).
    (f) Flight attendants will not always be seated in their jumpseats 
when they initiate the commands and actions to open an exit in the 
emergency mode during an evacuation. For example, a flight attendant 
could be in the cabin performing safety related duties during aircraft 
taxi, or in the cabin of an aircraft that is parked at the gate during 
boarding when an evacuation may need to be initiated. The drill allows 
the certificate holder to give flight attendants the opportunity to 
reinforce effective jumpseat techniques during exit operation, but 
allows certificate holders the flexibility to incorporate other 
``starting points'' into exit device operation scenarios.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

B. Subject: One Time Job Performance Drills

1. Ditching Survival Drill (Wet Training Environment) (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: The certificate holder may substitute a raft, 
provided there are no substantive differences with respect to weight, 
dimension, appearance, features, and operations, and the certificate 
holder provides differences training approved by the Administrator.
    (b) Task: This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the 
flight attendant must accomplish for the certificate holder for which 
the flight attendant is employed. This one time drill must be given in 
basic qualification or transition training, whichever training 
initially qualifies the flight attendant to serve on an airplane that 
is used for extended overwater operations.
    (c) Activities prior to raft boarding may be done in classroom, 
airplane, or airplane mockup. Raft boarding and subsequent activities 
must be done in water.
    (d) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Don and use life vest as a means of flotation.
    (2) Use flotation seat cushion for adult and child or infant.
    (3) Board the raft.

[[Page 1416]]

    (4) Demonstrate effective raft management (e.g., distribute 
passengers and deploy sea anchor).
    (5) Use heaving lines and life lines.
    (6) Erect the raft canopy.
    (7) Manage passengers, including distribution of duties to 
passengers.
    (e) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.
2. Emergency Evacuation Egress Slide Drill (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: Each flight attendant must complete an emergency 
evacuation slide drill by egressing the aircraft or approved training 
device using at least one type of installed emergency evacuation slide 
from an aircraft on which the flight attendant will be qualified to 
serve.
    (b) Task: This drill is required when the flight attendant is 
qualifying on an aircraft that is equipped with emergency evacuation 
slides. This drill is not required if the flight attendant egresses the 
aircraft or approved training device using at least one type of 
installed emergency evacuation slide from an aircraft on which the 
flight attendant will be qualified to serve during the evacuation 
drill. (See paragraph V.A.10 of this attachment.)
    (c) This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the flight 
attendant must complete for the certificate holder for which the flight 
attendant is employed. This one time drill must be given in basic 
qualification, transition training, or recurrent training, whichever 
training initially qualifies the flight attendant to serve on an 
aircraft with evacuation slides.
    (d) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures:
    (1) Observe the airplane exits being opened in the emergency mode 
and the associated exit slide or slide raft pack being deployed and 
inflated or perform the tasks resulting in the completion of these 
actions (if not completed during the emergency evacuation including the 
use of a slide observation drill).
    (2) Use the correct method to egress the aircraft and descend the 
slide.
    (e) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.
3. Emergency Evacuation Egress Drill (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: Each flight attendant must complete an emergency 
evacuation drill by egressing the aircraft or approved training device 
using at least one type of installed emergency exit, from an aircraft 
on which the flight attendant will be qualified to serve.
    (b) Task: This is a one-time emergency drill requirement that the 
flight attendant must complete for the certificate holder for which the 
flight attendant is employed. This one time drill must be given in 
basic qualification or transition, whichever training initially 
qualifies the flight attendant to serve on an aircraft that is not 
equipped with evacuation slides. An emergency exit that has stairs may 
not be used.
    (c) The flight attendant must complete the following during the 
drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment 
and procedures:
    (1) Observe the aircraft exits being opened in the emergency mode 
or perform the tasks resulting in the completion of these actions
    (2) Use the correct method to egress the aircraft, or training 
device that is representative of the aircraft in relation to sill 
height from the ground or window exit to the wing.
    (d) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (e) If the flight attendant will be qualified to serve on an 
aircraft with emergency evacuation slides (e.g., B-737), as well as an 
aircraft that does not have emergency evacuation slides (e.g., CRJ), 
then the flight attendant must complete both the emergency evacuation 
egress slide drill and the emergency evacuation egress drill. To 
achieve a realistic training environment, certificate holders are 
encouraged to integrate these drills into other required performance 
drill scenarios.
    Examples:
    (1) If a flight attendant qualifies on a B-737 and a CRJ in basic 
qualification training, then the flight attendant must complete an 
emergency evacuation egress slide drill and an emergency evacuation 
egress drill.
    (2) If a flight attendant qualifies on CRJ in basic qualification 
training, then the flight attendant must complete an emergency 
evacuation egress drill.
    (3) If a flight attendant qualifies on B-737 in basic qualification 
training and the certificate holder acquires a CRJ 2 years later and 
the flight attendant has transition training on the CRJ, then the 
flight attendant must complete and emergency evacuation egress slide 
drill during basic qualification training and an emergency evacuation 
egress drill during transition training on the CRJ.
    (4) If a flight attendant qualifies on a CRJ in basic qualification 
training, the certificate holder acquires B-737s 2 years later, and the 
flight attendant has transition training on the B-737, then the flight 
attendant must complete an emergency evacuation egress drill during 
basic qualification training and an emergency evacuation egress slide 
drill during transition training on the B-737.

END INFORMATION

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

C. Subject: Observation Drills

1. Task: Removal From the Aircraft or Training Device and Inflation of 
Each Type of Installed Life Raft (Observation Drill)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the observation drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use 
of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Specific attachment points in the aircraft.
    (2) How and where to attach life raft to aircraft.
    (3) Safe inflation techniques.
    (4) Launching points.
    (5) Righting overturned rafts, if applicable.
2. Task: Deployment, Inflation and Detachment From the Aircraft of Each 
Type of Installed Slide or Slide Raft Pack (Observation Drill)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the observation drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use 
of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Proper use of the exit operating handle.
    (2) Location and color of the inflation handle.
    (3) Demonstration of forces and actions required to inflate slide 
or slide raft.
    (4) Sound of inflating slide or slide raft.
    (5) Proper inflation and position of the slide or slide raft.

[[Page 1417]]

    (6) Location of the ditching handle or laces.
    (7) Demonstration of the forces and actions required to use the 
ditching handle including secondary actions.
    (8) Lanyard and the removal or cutting of lanyard using the 
certificate holder's procedures.
    (9) Righting overturned rafts, if applicable.
3. Task: Emergency Evacuation Including the Use of a Slide (Observation 
Drill)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the observation drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use 
of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Correct methods of evacuation.
    (2) Correct methods of entering the slide.
    (3) Necessity for helpers at the bottom of slide.
4. Task: Non-Floor Level Exits in the Flight Deck Through Which a 
Crewmember May Egress the Aircraft (Observation Drill)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment.
    (b) Task: Each flight attendant must observe the operation of any 
additional exits in the flight deck that crewmembers may use to egress 
the aircraft type for which the flight attendant is qualifying. The 
flight attendant may receive AOE credit for observing the exit 
operation on the aircraft or in an approved training device. The flight 
attendant must complete the following during the observation drill, and 
be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of equipment and 
procedures:
    (1) Assesses conditions outside the exit to determine exit 
usability.
    (2) Correct use of the exit operating mechanism including hand and 
body position.
    (3) Use of proper terms and procedures.
    (4) Correct positioning of the escape device.
    (5) Method to secure exit in fully opened position or ensuring 
correct stowage position.
    (6) Knows appropriate protective hand and body positions.
    (7) Access to escape tapes, escape ropes or inertial reels.
5. Task: Flight Deck Fixed Oxygen System (Observation Drill)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the observation drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use 
of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Access oxygen mask and remove from stowage.
    (2) Use of proper procedures to don oxygen mask and activate oxygen 
in proper sequence for an emergency.
    (3) Re-securing of equipment.
    (4) Observe the locations of the flight deck fixed oxygen system 
during AOE flight.

VI. Emergency Training Drills--Aircraft Specific (see Sec.  121.1373)

A. Subject: Exit Device Operation

1. Task: Floor Level Door Exit Device Operation (Normal Mode) (Job 
Performance)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment. Equipment 
may be substituted provided there is no substantive difference with 
respect to weight, dimensions and appearance and the flight attendant 
has been provided with training on differences between training 
equipment and the actual aircraft exit. Equipment may not be 
substituted if the forces and actions necessary to operate the 
equipment are different or if the operating mechanism is different.
    (b) Task: The flight attendant must complete the following during 
the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Identify signal and conditions under which each door can be 
opened and closed.
    (2) Assess the exterior and interior conditions for obstacles or 
hazards to persons or the exit during the opening and closing (e.g., 
jetway, stairs, barrier straps).
    (3) Follow procedure to ensure flight attendant awareness at armed 
boarding door prior to aircraft pushback.
    (4) Identify signal for arming and disarming.
    (5) Coordinate and communicate.
    (6) Properly arm and disarm the exit.
    (7) Verify girt bar placement for armed and disarmed.
    (8) Verify door is in the correct mode.
    (9) Use proper techniques for the operating mechanism (such as door 
handles to open exit and secure in locked position).
    (10) Secure safety strap then unsecure safety strap; release 
locking mechanism.
    (11) Properly use control handles to close exit and secure in 
locked position.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate.
2. Task: Floor Level Door Exit Device Operation (Emergency Mode) (Job 
Performance)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment. Equipment 
may be substituted provided there is no substantive difference with 
respect to weight, dimensions and appearance and the flight attendant 
has been provided with training on differences between training 
equipment and the actual aircraft exit. Equipment may not be 
substituted if the forces and actions necessary to operate the 
equipment are different or if the operating mechanism is different.
    (b) Task: The drill and door operations must be performed in a 
manner that resembles an actual evacuation. The flight attendant's 
voice commands and actions during the drill must be aggressive and 
easily understood. The flight attendant must complete the following 
during the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Position escape device.
    (2) Verify the exit is in the correct mode.
    (3) Recognize the signal for or the conditions under which the exit 
is to be opened in the emergency mode.
    (4) Use proper voice commands to passengers.
    (5) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine the exit 
usability (e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (6) Open the exit in the armed mode and secure the exit in the 
fully open position.
    (7) Hold onto assist handle.
    (8) Pull the manual inflation handle(s) and verify deployment, 
inflation (e.g., ramp, slide).
    (9) Maintain appropriate protective body and hand positions.
    (10) Follow crew coordination procedures.
    (11) Access release handle(s) (e.g., Slide disconnect, jettison 
tailcone, ventral stairs).
    (12) Recognition of when it is appropriate to exit the aircraft.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. In addition, the flight 
attendant must:
    (1) Be aware of passenger flow and traffic to all exits during the 
evacuation.
    (2) Be aware of additional exit responsibilities.

[[Page 1418]]

3. Task: Cabin Window Exit Device and Plug or Hatch Exit Device 
Operation (Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment. Equipment 
may be substituted provided there is no substantive difference with 
respect to weight, dimensions and appearance and the flight attendant 
has been provided with training on differences between training 
equipment and the actual aircraft exit. Equipment may not be 
substituted if the forces and actions necessary to operate the 
equipment are different or if the operating mechanism is different.
    (b) Task: The drill and door operations must be performed in a 
manner that resembles an actual evacuation. Commands must be aggressive 
and easily understood. Each flight attendant must operate each cabin 
window exit device and plug or hatch exit device, which has a different 
operating mechanism. The flight attendant must complete the following 
during the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed on the proper use of 
equipment and procedures:
    (1) Recognize the signal for or the conditions under which the exit 
is to be opened.
    (2) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine exit usability 
(e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (3) Open and correctly stow the exit (if applicable).
    (4) Give commands to passengers for exiting exit.
    (5) Verbally describe correct exit placement following removal (if 
applicable) if the training procedures differ from the operational 
procedures.
    (6) Pull the manual inflation handle (if applicable) and verify 
deployment (e.g., slide ramp), if applicable.
    (7) Assume and maintain appropriate protective body and hand 
positions.
    (8) Access escape tapes or escape ropes.
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. In addition, the flight 
attendant must:
    (1) Be aware of passenger flow and traffic to all exits during the 
evacuation.
    (2) Be aware of additional exit responsibilities.
4. Task: Any Additional Emergency Exits Required for Type Certification 
(Job Performance)
    (a) Environment: See paragraph IV.F. of this attachment. Equipment 
may be substituted provided there is no substantive difference with 
respect to weight, dimensions and appearance and the flight attendant 
has been provided with training on differences between training 
equipment and the actual aircraft exit. Equipment may not be 
substituted if the forces and actions necessary to operate the 
equipment are different or if the operating mechanism is different.
    (b) Task: The drill and door operations must be performed in a 
manner that resembles an actual evacuation. Commands must be aggressive 
and easily understood. Each flight attendant must operate any 
additional emergency exit devices required for type certification 
through which crewmembers or passengers may egress the aircraft. In the 
case of some aircraft, an exit required for type certification may be 
located on the flight deck. In this case, the flight attendant must 
complete performance drills on that exit. The flight attendant must 
complete the following during the drill, and be evaluated and debriefed 
on the proper use of equipment and procedures:
    (1) Recognize the signal for or the conditions under which the exit 
is to be opened.
    (2) Assess conditions outside the exit to determine exit usability 
(e.g., clear of obstruction, fire, aircraft attitude).
    (3) Open and correctly stow the exit (if applicable).
    (4) Give commands to passengers for exiting exit.
    (5) Verbally describe correct exit placement following removal (if 
applicable) if the training procedures differ from the operational 
procedures.
    (6) Pull the manual inflation handle (if applicable) and verify 
deployment (e.g., slide ramp), if applicable.
    (7) Assume and maintain appropriate protective body and hand 
positions.
    (8) Access escape tapes or escape ropes and access release 
handle(s) (e.g., slide disconnect).
    (c) Situational Awareness (CRM Markers): The flight attendant must 
communicate and coordinate (through discussion or action) with other 
crewmembers during the drill, as appropriate. In addition, the flight 
attendant must:
    (1) Be aware of passenger flow and traffic to all exits during the 
evacuation.
    (2) Be aware of additional exit responsibilities.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

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BEGIN INFORMATION

    (d) The Type Certification Data Sheets for all aircraft are 
available online at: http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_
Guidance_Library/rgMakeModel.nsf/MainFrame?OpenFrameSet.

B. [Reserved]

Attachment 3 of Appendix S to Part 121

Training and Evaluation Requirements for Flight Attendant Training 
Curricula (Basic Qualification), Categories (New Hire, Initial, 
Transition, Emergency, Recurrent, and Requalification), and Aircraft 
Operating Experience

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BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

A. Training and Evaluation Requirements (see Sec. Sec.  121.1301, 
121.1331, 121.1341, 121.1343, 121.1361)

1. How must the task requirements required for instruction and 
evaluation in each curriculum be determined?
    (a) To determine the tasks in which each flight attendant must be 
trained and evaluated, the certificate holder must use the task 
listings provided in the following table. The tasks must be specific to 
the aircraft types (as appropriate), and must be adjusted for and kept 
current with the certificate holder's operation as reflected in the FAA 
approved operations specifications and FAOM, as amended.
    (b) If the certificate holder adds tasks or environments to those 
listed in Table 2A, it must further develop the tasks or environments 
to include the requirement and frequency for training and evaluation in 
each specific category of training listed in the table. These changes 
must be submitted to the POI for approval.
    (c) The recurrent curriculum requirements in the following table 
also include the frequency during which each flight attendant must be 
trained and evaluated in each task. The table indicates which tasks 
must be completed by each flight attendant every 12 months. The table 
also indicates which tasks must be completed by each flight attendant 
once every 36 months.
2. Individuals authorized to administer flight attendant training, 
evaluation, and aircraft operating experience

[[Page 1419]]



  Table 3A--Persons Authorized To Administer Flight Attendant Training, Evaluation, and Observation Activities Under Subpart BB--SEE Sec.   121.1323 of
                                        This Part for Special Limited Authorizations for Initial Cadre Personnel
                                                [See Sec.  Sec.   121.1291,121.1321, 121.1323, 121.1387]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              Employer and position
                                                       -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Other contractor       Part 142 or other part 119   The part 119 certificate        FAA
                                                       ----------------------------     certificate holder                holder           -------------
Flight attendant training, evaluation, and observation                             --------------------------------------------------------   Aviation
    activities under subpart BB (by aircraft type)         Flight        Subject       Flight                      Flight                      safety
                                                          attendant      matter       attendant   Check flight    attendant   Check flight    inspector
                                                         instructor    expert \3\    instructor     attendant    instructor     attendant      (cabin
                                                             \4\                         \4\           \1\           \4\           \1\         safety)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic Training
    (New Hire, Initial, Emergency, Differences,                   X             X             X             X             X             X
     Recurrent, and Requalification)..................
Proficiency Test \2\
    (Emergency, Recurrent, Requalification)...........  ............  ............  ............  ............            X             X             X
Supervision of Operating Experience...................  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X   ............
Proficiency Check
    (Aircraft Operating Experience)...................  ............  ............  ............  ............  ............            X             X
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Requires authorization by the Administrator for specific duties to be performed.
\2\ Persons qualified to administer proficiency tests, with the exception of FAA Aviation Safety Inspectors (Cabin Safety), must meet the requirements
  of Sec.   121.1387 of this part.
\3\ Subject Matter Experts, who meet the requirements of Sec.   121.1291 of this part and this QPS, may conduct specific flight attendant training.
\4\ Persons qualified to administer flight attendant training must meet the requirements of Sec.   121.1291 of this part.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (a) A flight attendant instructor may not be physically able to 
perform certain performance drills due to injury, pregnancy, or 
disability. Therefore, the FAA allows those individuals to complete the 
required training to qualify as a flight attendant instructor, with the 
exception of those performance drills the person can not physically 
perform. However, the FAA only allows flight attendant instructors to 
instruct in performance drills that they were able to physically 
perform within the past 12 months as part of basic qualification or 
recurrent flight attendant training.
    (b) [Reserved]

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

3. The use of Subject Matter Experts
    (a) Under Sec.  121.1291, a subject matter expert, with specific 
technical knowledge on a subject, may be used to conduct training on 
specific tasks, in accordance with the following:
    (1) Except as provided in paragraph A.3.(a)(2) of this attachment, 
when flight attendant training is provided by a subject matter expert, 
a qualified flight attendant instructor must be present.
    (2) Subject matter experts in certain subject areas may provide 
flight attendant training on the following specific tasks without a 
qualified flight attendant instructor present:
    (i) Firefighting and firefighting equipment.
    (ii) Emergency medical events and emergency medical equipment.
    (iii) Hazardous materials recognition.
    (b) [Reserved]

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

4. How to determine flight attendant eligibility for Requalification 
Training

               Table 3B--Flight Attendant: Requalification
                            [Sec.   121.1309]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
    No person may serve as a flight attendant if that person becomes
     unqualified by failing to meet Recurrent training requirements
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
To be requalified the flight attendant must complete Sec.   121.1301, as
   applicable, or comply with the appropriate phase of Requalification
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If the flight attendant has been      Then the flight attendant may
            unqualified for:                 requalify by completing:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Less than 12 months:
A flight attendant who misses Recurrent  Phase I Requalification (Sec.
 training but does not miss a complete    121.1309(a)(1)):
 Recurrent Flight Attendant Training      Current Recurrent
 Cycle.                                   Flight Attendant Training
                                          Cycle.
                                          Base month not
                                          changed.
A flight attendant that misses an        Phase I Requalification (Sec.
 entire Recurrent Flight Attendant        121.1309(a)(2)):
 Training Cycle.                          Current Recurrent
                                          Flight Attendant Training
                                          Cycle.
                                          Complete all study
                                          materials and evaluations from
                                          the previous Recurrent Flight
                                          Attendant Training Cycle.

[[Page 1420]]

 
                                          Flight attendants
                                          qualified in extended
                                          overwater operations must
                                          participate in a cabin
                                          preparation and evacuation
                                          drill (water) if the drill is
                                          not part of the current
                                          Recurrent Flight Attendant
                                          Training Cycle.
                                          Base month may change.
12 months or more, but less than 24      Phase II Requalification:
 months:
                                          Current Recurrent
                                          Flight Attendant Training
                                          Cycle.
                                          Complete all study
                                          materials and evaluations from
                                          the previous Recurrent Flight
                                          Attendant Training Cycle.
                                          Flight attendants
                                          qualified in extended
                                          overwater operations must
                                          participate in a cabin
                                          preparation and evacuation
                                          drill (water) if the drill is
                                          not part of the current
                                          Recurrent Flight Attendant
                                          Training Cycle.
                                          Base month may change.
                                          Ground based briefing
                                          with a representative from the
                                          certificate holder. The
                                          purpose of this briefing is to
                                          cover all new policies
                                          procedures or security
                                          requirements applicable to
                                          flight attendant duties that
                                          have been updated, modified or
                                          implemented since the person
                                          last served as a flight
                                          attendant for that certificate
                                          holder.
24 months or more:                       Phase III Requalification
                                          Basic Qualification
                                          Training.
                                          Base month may change.
                                          5 hours of aircraft
                                          operating experience and two
                                          operating cycles on at least
                                          one aircraft type.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (a) When a flight attendant does not complete recurrent training 
during the eligibility period, the flight attendant is unqualified on 
the first day of the month following the grace month. For example, if a 
flight attendant's base month is February, the flight attendant has 
until March 31st to complete recurrent training. If the flight 
attendant does not complete recurrent training by March 31st, the 
flight attendant becomes unqualified and unable to serve on April 1st. 
For purposes of determining the applicable phase of requalification, 
the flight attendant's base month must be used without considering the 
grace month. Therefore, in the example above, the base month (February) 
instead of the grace month (March) would be used to determine the 
applicable phase of requalification.
    (b) [Reserved]
5. How to determine the requirements for Aircraft Operating Experience
    The following chart illustrates the proposed requirements.

              Table 3C--Aircraft Operating Experience (AOE)
                            (Sec.   121.1305)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
On whose airplanes?..................  For the certificate holder for
                                        which the flight attendant will
                                        serve.
What kind of flight?.................  Passenger carrying revenue flight
                                        or in proving flights.
When must it be completed?...........  AOE must be completed within 90
                                        days of completing Initial
                                        training.
Who supervises it?...................  A check flight attendant.
How many people can one check flight   Not more than four.
 attendant supervise on one flight?.
How many check flight attendants can   Not more than two.
 supervise people on each flight?.
Are there any other limits on the      The number of persons receiving
 number of people accomplishing this    aircraft operating experience on
 on each flight?.                       an aircraft may not exceed twice
                                        the number of flight attendants
                                        required by Sec.   121.391 for
                                        that aircraft.
What duties must people receiving AOE  The assigned duties of a flight
 perform?.                              attendant.
Can the person be a required flight    No.
 attendant?.
What is the requirement for            At least 5 hours total combined
 completing AOE?.                       AOE with at least two operating
                                        cycles on each aircraft type. If
                                        the flight attendant is
                                        qualifying on one aircraft type,
                                        the flight attendant must have
                                        at least 5 hours of AOE on that
                                        aircraft type and complete two
                                        operating cycles on that
                                        aircraft type. If the flight
                                        attendant is qualifying on three
                                        aircraft types, the flight
                                        attendant must have at least 5
                                        hours of AOE total and complete
                                        six operating cycles, two on
                                        each aircraft type.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

6. How to Determine the Requirements for Recency
    The following chart illustrates the proposed requirements.

[[Page 1421]]



              Table 3D--Flight Attendant: Recent Experience
                            (Sec.   121.1307)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
To reestablish recent experience the person must do the following:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
If the person has not served as a      Participate in a ground based
 flight attendant for the certificate   briefing with a person employed
 holder for more than 6 months, but     by the certificate holder. The
 less than 36 months the person must.   purpose of this briefing is to
 (Sec.   121.1307(b)(2)).............   cover any new policies,
                                        procedures, and security
                                        requirements pertinent to flight
                                        attendant duties that have been
                                        updated, modified or implemented
                                        since the last time the person
                                        served as a flight attendant for
                                        that certificate holder.
If the person has not served as a      (a) Participate in a ground based
 flight attendant for the certificate   briefing with a person employed
 holder for 36 months or more the       by the certificate holder. The
 person must.                           purpose of this briefing is to
 (Sec.   121.1307(b)(3)).............   cover any new policies,
                                        procedures, and security
                                        requirements pertinent to flight
                                        attendant duties that have been
                                        updated, modified or implemented
                                        since the last time the person
                                        served as a flight attendant for
                                        that certificate holder.
                                       (b) Serve as a flight attendant
                                        for one operating cycle on any
                                        aircraft type for that
                                        certificate holder, but not as a
                                        required crewmember.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

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[[Page 1435]]

    34. Add appendix T to part 121 to read as follows:

Appendix T--Aircraft Dispatcher Qualification Performance Standards

Table of Contents

Introduction

A. What are Qualification Performance Standards (QPS)?
B. What types of materials are contained within this document?
C. Can the reader rely solely on this document for aircraft 
dispatcher qualification and related training requirements?
D. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?
E. Why do we need a QPS for aircraft dispatchers?
F. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?
G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?
H. What references are recommended?
I. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it 
incorporated in this QPS?
J. How is Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) training incorporated 
in this QPS?
K. Tables and Flowchart
Table 1, Baseline Programmed Hours for Aircraft Dispatchers: 
Training Program and Qualification Requirements
Table 2, Minimum Programmed Hours for Aircraft Dispatchers: Training 
Program and Qualification Requirements
Table 3, Requalification For Aircraft Dispatchers: Training Program 
and Qualification Requirements
Table 4, Training Category Evaluation Requirements for Aircraft 
Dispatchers
Table 5, Personnel Authorized To Administer Aircraft Dispatcher 
Training and Evaluation, and To Conduct Observation Activities Under 
Subpart CC
Flowchart 1, Flowchart for Initial and Combined Certification and 
Initial Training Curriculum
Attachment 1. General Knowledge and Skills Requirements--Subjects 
and Tests--For Initial, Combined Certification and Initial, 
Recurrent, and Requalification Training Categories (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1419; 121.1431; 
121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 
121.1453; 121.1455; and 121.1471)
Attachment 2. Basic Aircraft and Specific Aircraft Type Training 
Requirements --Subjects and Tests--For Initial, Combined 
Certification and Initial, Transition, Recurrent, Requalification, 
Differences, and Special Training Categories (see Sec. Sec.  
121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1431; 121.1433; 
121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; 
121.1455, and 121.1471)
Attachment 3. Generic Training Requirements--Subjects and Tests--For 
Certification (see Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 
121.1417; 121.1419; 121.1421; 121.1423; 121.1425; 121.1431; 
121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 
121.1453; and 121.1471)
ttachment 4. Evaluation Requirements and Performance Standards For 
Initial, Combined Certification and Initial, Transition, Recurrent, 
Requalification, Differences, and Special Training Categories (see 
Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1419; 
121.1421; 121.1423; 121.1425; 121.1431; 121.1433; 121.1435; 
121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; and 121.1471)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

Introduction

A. What are Qualification Performance Standards (QPS)?

    The QPS defines the FAA standards by providing all of the tasks, 
areas of training and evaluation, including activities, procedures, and 
knowledge needed to qualify and certificate aircraft dispatchers for 
performing in operations under this part. The QPS document for 
dispatchers is part 121 appendix T: Aircraft Dispatcher Qualification 
Performance Standards. This QPS will be used by certificate holders 
operating under part 121, by training center certificate holders when 
supporting certificate holders and other commercial operators that 
operate under part 121 and by Flight Standards personnel during 
approval, evaluation and surveillance of aircraft dispatcher training 
programs. The QPS incorporates a continuous analysis process which 
enables the certificate holder to maintain and refine the training 
process by continually monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of 
the training program.

B. What types of materials are contained within this document?

    This QPS contains Information and QPS Requirements.
    1. Information: Explanations or suggestions, which clarify or 
support regulatory requirements, found in the Code of Federal 
Regulations or in this QPS document. Explanations or suggestions are 
provided as guidance and are not regulatory (not mandatory). This 
guidance appears under the heading ``BEGIN INFORMATION'' and uses the 
terms ``should'' or ``may'' to indicate that it is not mandatory.
    2. QPS Requirements: Aircraft Dispatcher QPS requirements are 
regulatory and mandatory. These requirements appear under the heading 
``BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENTS'' and use the terms ``must'' and ``may not.''

C. Can the reader rely solely on this document for aircraft dispatcher 
qualification and related training requirements?

    No, do not rely solely on this document for regulatory requirements 
in these areas. The reader must also use 14 CFR part 121, subpart CC.

D. How can I get answers to questions about the contents of this 
appendix?

    1. You may contact: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal 
Aviation Administration Flight Standards Service, Air Transportation 
Division, AFS-210, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, 
Telephone: (202) 267-8166, Fax: (202) 267-5229.
    2. You may find answers to questions on the Flight Standards 
Internet Web Site at: ``http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/
headquarters_offices/avs/offices/afs/.'' On this Web Site you will 
find Flight Standards Programs, Aviation Safety Inspector Handbooks and 
Documents, the current Aviation Regulations (14 CFR), Advisory 
Circulars, and other items of interest. Also linked from this site are 
additional information sources and other FAA links.

E. Why do we need a QPS for aircraft dispatchers?

    1. To provide the certificate holder with a minimum set of 
standards for developing the following:
    (a) Training and certification programs,
    (b) Performance standards, and
    (c) Evaluation criteria as they relate to the aircraft dispatcher 
job function.
    2. To provide the certificate holder with the requirements for a 
continuous analysis process.
    3. To provide routine and periodic update capability. This 
capability is needed to respond to accidents, incidents, or rapidly 
occurring changes to equipment and operations. All changes made to this 
appendix will be subject to public notice and comment, unless good 
cause exists to support a finding that notice and comment would be 
impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.

F. Where can each type of standard be found in the QPS?

    1. Attachment 1 has the general knowledge and skills requirements.
    2. Attachment 2 has the basic aircraft and specific aircraft type 
training requirements.
    3. Attachment 3 contains generic training requirements for 
certification. With this attachment, certificate holders would have the 
option to provide additional training subjects, which

[[Page 1436]]

when combined with Attachments 1 and 2, would lead to the issuance of 
an aircraft dispatcher certificate.
    4. Attachment 4 has the required evaluation requirements and 
performance standards for each task and knowledge area.

G. Where can definitions and acronyms be found?

    The definitions relevant to this QPS appear in Sec.  121.1405. 
Acronyms are as follows:

ACARS Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System
ADPM Aircraft Dispatcher Procedures Manual
AFD Airport Facility Directory
AFM Airplane Flight Manual
AIM Aeronautical Information Manual
AIRMET Airman Meteorological Report
ARTCC Air Route Traffic Control Center
ASD Aircraft Situation Display
ATC Air Traffic Control
ATIS Automated Terminal Information System
CEP Central East Pacific
CRM Crew Resource Management
DPD Dispatch Program Designee
DRM Dispatch Resource Management
EFIS Electronic Flight Indicating Systems
EGPWS Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System
ETOPS Extended Operations
ETP Equal Time Point
EWINS Enhanced Weather Information System
FCOM Flight Crew Operating Manual
FDC Flight Data Center
FMS Flight Management System
FSS Flight Service Station
GOM General Operating Manual
GPS Global Positioning System
GPWS Ground Proximity Warning System
HF High Frequency
IAP Initial Approach Point
ICAO International Civil Aviation Organization
INS Inertial Navigation System
IOS Instructor's Operating Station
LOFT Line Oriented Flight Training
LORAN Long Range Navigation
MEL Minimum Equipment List
METAR Meteorological Aviation Routine Weather Report
MNPS Minimum Navigation Performance Specification
NATS North Atlantic Track System
NDB Non-directional Radio Beacon
NOPAC North Pacific
PACOTS Pacific Organized Track System
PIC Pilot in Command
PRM Precision Radar Monitor
QPS Qualification Performance Standards
RNAV Area Navigation
RNP Required Navigation Performance
RVR Runway Visual Range
RVSM Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum
SID Standard Instrument Departure
SIGMET Significant Meteorological Report
SFAR Supplemental Federal Aviation Regulation
STAR Standard Terminal Arrival Route
TAF Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

H. What references are recommended?

    The following references (as amended) were used to prepare detailed 
knowledge and skill standards for tasks. They are strongly recommended 
for providing further details for lesson development.
    1. 14 CFR part 1, Definitions and Abbreviations.
    2. 14 CFR part 65, Certification: Airmen Other than Flight 
Crewmembers.
    3. 14 CFR part 91, General Operating and Flight Rules.
    4. 14 CFR part 119, Certification: Air Carriers and Commercial 
Operators.
    5. 14 CFR part 121, Operating Requirements: Domestic, Flag, and 
Supplemental Operations.
    6. 14 CFR part 139, Certification of Airports.
    7. AC 00-6, Aviation Weather.
    8. AC 00-45E, Aviation Weather Services.
    9. AC 25.1581-1, Airplane Flight Manual.
    10. AC 60-22, Aeronautical Decision Making.
    11. AC 60-28, English Language Skill Standards.
    12. AC 61-27, Instrument Flying Handbook.
    13. AC 61-84, Role of Preflight Preparation.
    14. AC 120-28, Criteria for Approval of Category III Landing 
Weather Minima.
    15. AC 120-29, Criteria for Approving Category I and Category II 
Landing Minima for Approach.
    16. AC 120-42a, Extended Range Operations (ETOPS).
    17. AC 120-55, TCAS II Operational Approval for Air Carriers.
    18. AC 120-59, Air Carrier Internal Evaluation Programs.
    19. AC 120-71, Standard Operating Procedures for Flight Deck 
Crewmembers.
    20. AC 120-88, Preventing Injuries Caused by Turbulence.
    21. AC 121-32, Dispatch Resource Management Training.
    22. NTSB 830, Notification and Reporting of Aircraft Accidents or 
Incidents and Overdue Aircraft, and Preservation of Aircraft Wreckage, 
Mail, Cargo, and Records.
    23. Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM).
    24. International Flight Information Manual (IFIM).
    25. En route Low and High Altitude Charts.
    26. Profile Descent Charts.
    27. Standard Instrument Departure (SID).
    28. Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STAR).
    29. Airport Facility Directory (AFD) and Instrument Approach 
Procedure Charts (IAP).
    30. National Flight Data Center Notices to Airmen (FDC NOTAM).
    31. Integrated Measurement of Crew Resource Management and 
Technical Flying Skills, DOT/FAA/RD-93/26.
    32. Transportation Security Regulations (TSRs).
    33. HMR 175, Hazardous Materials Regulations, Carriage by Aircraft.
    34. FAA Order 8040.4, Safety Risk Management.
    35. Air Transportation Operations Inspector's Handbook, 8400.10.

I. What is the continuous analysis process and how is it incorporated 
in this QPS? (see Sec. Sec.  121.1437(a)(10) and 121.1441)

    1. The continuous analysis process is a certificate holder internal 
evaluation and improvement process. The continuous analysis process 
will enable the certificate holder to maintain and refine the training 
process by continually monitoring the effectiveness and efficiency of 
the process. Various assessment tools (testing, checking, inspection, 
documenting, evaluation, and analysis) will be used to validate the 
effectiveness of a training program or the need to change a training 
program.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    2. A continuous analysis process is incorporated in this QPS 
through integration with the qualification and training program. The 
certificate holder is responsible for designating responsibility for 
the process. The certificate holder must ensure appropriate and 
adequate assessment tools (testing, checking, critique, inspection, 
observation, documenting, evaluation, and analysis) are utilized to 
enable the certificate holder to validate the effectiveness of the 
qualification and training program, or the need to change that program. 
The certificate holder must describe the attributes of the continuous 
analysis process in the certificate holder's FAA approved training 
program.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    3. Components of a Continuous Analysis Process
    (a) Qualification and training program as approved by the 
Administrator.
    (b) Attributes of the continuous analysis process.

[[Page 1437]]

    (1) Who is responsible?
    (2) Who has authority to change the process?
    (3) Description of the process.
    (4) Controls. Policy, procedure, training, evaluation.
    (5) Documenting and measurement.
    (6) Interfaces between Departments. Consistency (policy, 
procedures, manuals).
    (i) Across Departments.
    (ii) Across Divisions.
    (c) Assessment tools (adequate and appropriate).
    (1) Testing.
    (2) Checking.
    (3) Critique.
    (4) Inspection and observation.
    (5) Documenting.
    (6) Evaluation and analysis.
    (d) Modification and adjustment of the qualification and training 
program.
    (e) Approval for modification and adjustment.

J. How is Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) training incorporated in 
this QPS? (see Sec.  121.1433(b)(7))

    1. DRM training is incorporated through the certificate holder's 
aircraft dispatcher qualification and training program and the daily 
application of on the job skills.
    2. DRM Training and Evaluation requirements for initial, combined 
certification and initial, recurrent, and requalification training 
categories are contained in attachments 1, 3, and 4.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    3. DRM Training and Evaluation.
    (a) Training. DRM training is a component of the initial, combined 
certification and initial, recurrent, and requalification training 
categories. drm training must consist of the requirements listed in 
Attachment 4.
    (b) Evaluation. Evaluation of an aircraft dispatcher's practical 
application of DRM skills must occur as follows:
    (1) During the proficiency test (for initial or combined 
certification and initial training) and during the proficiency check 
(for recurrent or requalification training).
    (2) During the supervised operating experience delivered after 
initial, combined certification and initial, or requalification 
training.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    4. Daily Application of DRM for Job Skills.
    (a) The following are examples of how the daily application of DRM 
will assist in developing DRM skills:
    (1) Briefing during the changeover period between an aircraft 
dispatcher coming on duty, and the aircraft dispatcher going off duty.
    (2) Briefing of the flight crews.
    (3) The aircraft dispatcher's ability to manage risk and mitigate 
potential problems.
    (4) Obtaining required operational information.
    (5) Performance feedback from operational control personnel on the 
aircraft dispatcher's decision making process.
    (6) The aircraft dispatcher's ability to handle abnormal situations 
and emergencies.
    (7) Interaction with fellow aircraft dispatchers.
    (8) Interaction with various departments within the airline.
    (b) Joint DRM Training:
    (1) Certificate holders are discovering the value of revising DRM 
training to reach varied employee groups and to combine those groups 
during training. The objective is to improve the effectiveness and 
safety of the entire operations team.
    (2) Aircraft dispatchers are required to observe flightdeck 
operations as part of initial, combined certification and initial, 
recurrent, and requalification training. Some certificate holders 
include familiarization visits to the aircraft dispatchers' operational 
control center to provide the flight crewmembers insight into the joint 
responsibility of the pilot in command and the aircraft dispatcher. 
These familiarization visits have commonly been part of the special 
training offered to the first time captains. The FAA encourages the use 
of aircraft dispatchers in Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT).
    (3) The certificate holder should provide realistic training 
scenarios for aircraft dispatchers to improve their daily decision 
making process.
    (4) DRM refers to the effective use of all available resources 
including, human resources, hardware, and information. Human resources 
include all other groups routinely working with the airline operational 
control center (or pilot in command) who are involved in decisions that 
are required to operate a flight safely. DRM is not a single task. DRM 
is a set of competencies that must be evident in all tasks in this QPS.
    (5) DRM training is subject to the continuous analysis process 
required by Sec.  121.1441 of this part.
    (6) The DRM Advisory Circular (AC 121-32 as amended) discusses in 
greater detail how to integrate DRM into operational control and 
numerous departments within the certificate holder.

K. Tables and Flowchart

    1. The following tables summarize aircraft dispatcher training 
requirements for certificate holders.
    2. Table 1 shows the baseline programmed hours for aircraft 
dispatcher training programs. The Administrator considers the 
certificate holder's training program, level of operational complexity, 
and aircraft dispatcher responsibilities when determining whether to 
increase the number of baseline programmed hours.
    3. Table 2 shows the minimum progammed hours a certificate holder 
may submit to the administrator for a training program with reduced 
hours. The Administrator considers the certificate holder's training 
program, level of operational complexity, and aircraft dispatcher 
responsibilities when determining whether to approve a reduction in 
programmed hours.
    4. Table 3 shows the requalification training program and 
qualification requirements. The table shows five phases based on the 
number of months of lapsed currency. The certificate holder may 
requalify a previously qualified dispatcher for up to 36 months. In 
accordance with Sec.  121.1419, the training and evaluation must be 
initiated and successfully completed prior to the end of the specific 
lapsed period. Initial training is required when an aircraft dispatcher 
has been out of currency for 36 months or more.
    5. Table 4 shows the tasks in which each aircraft dispatcher must 
be trained and evaluated. In Table 4 an ``X'' means that the aircraft 
dispatcher must complete the task satisfactorily. An ``N/A'' means that 
the task is not applicable.
    6. Table 5 shows the ``Personnel Authorized To Administer Aircraft 
Dispatcher Training and Evaluation and To Conduct Observation 
Activities Under Subpart CC.''
    7. Flowchart 1 is included to illustrate the curriculum path, 
evaluations, and timeline for initial and combined certification and 
initial training programs.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

[[Page 1438]]



  Table 1--Baseline Programmed Hours for Aircraft Dispatchers: Training Program and Qualification Requirements
                                              [See Sec.   121.1435]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                Training categories
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Activity                  Initial for                                                  Combined
                                     certificated          Recurrent          Transition       certification and
                                      dispatchers                                                   initial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Generic Training (see attachment  N/A...............  N/A...............  N/A...............  136.
 3).
General Knowledge and Skills      48................  16................  N/A...............  32.
 Segment (see attachment 1).
Basic Aircraft (see attachment    32................  N/A...............  N/A...............  32.
 2).
Practical Test..................  N/A...............  N/A...............  N/A...............  Required.
Specific Training per Aircraft    8.................  4.................  8.................  8.
 Type (see attachment 2).
General Knowledge for Flag        8*................  N/A...............  N/A...............  8*.
 Operations (see attachment 1).
General Knowledge per Flag Area   2*................  2*................  N/A...............  2*.
 of Operation (see attachment 1).
Supervised Operating Experience,  8.................  N/A...............  N/A...............  8.
 Domestic.
Supervised Operating Experience,  8*................  N/A...............  N/A...............  8*.
 per Flag Area of Operation.
Operating Familiarization.......  Required..........  Required..........  N/A...............  Required.
Proficiency Test................  Required..........  N/A...............  Required..........  Required.
Proficiency Check...............  N/A...............  Required..........  N/A...............  N/A.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* The Administrator may require additional programmed hours contingent on the level of the training program,
  operational complexity, and responsibilities of the dispatcher.


   Table 2--Minimum Programmed Hours for Aircraft Dispatchers: Training Program and Qualification Requirements
                                              [See Sec.   121.1435]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                Training categories
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Activity                  Initial for                                                  Combined
                                     certificated          Recurrent          Transition       certification and
                                      dispatchers                                                   initial
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Generic Training (see attachment  N/A...............  N/A...............  N/A...............  136.
 3).
General Knowledge and Skills      48................  8.................  N/A...............  32.
 Segment (see attachment 1).
Basic Aircraft (see attachment    24................  N/A...............  N/A...............  32.
 2).
Practical Test..................  N/A...............  N/A...............  N/A...............  Required.
Specific Training per Aircraft    4.................  2.................  4.................  4.
 Type (see attachment 2).
General Knowledge for Flag        8.................  N/A...............  N/A...............  8.
 Operations (see attachment 1).
General Knowledge per Flag Area   2.................  2.................  N/A...............  2.
 of Operation (see attachment 1).
Supervised Operating Experience,  8.................  N/A...............  N/A...............  8.
 Domestic.
Supervised Operating Experience,  8.................  N/A...............  N/A...............  8.
 per Flag Area of Operation.
Operating Familiarization.......  Required..........  Required..........  N/A...............  Required.
Proficiency Test................  Required..........  N/A...............  Required..........  Required.
Proficiency Check...............  N/A...............  Required..........  N/A...............  N/A.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                   Table 3--Requalification Programmed Hours for Aircraft Dispatchers: Training Program and Qualification Requirements
                                                                  [See Sec.   121.1419]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Months lapse in currency
                                    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Activity                                         Phase II at least 6   Phase III at least 12   Phase IV at least 24
                                       Phase I less than 6    months, but less than  months, but less than  months, but less than   Phase V 36 months or
                                             months                 12 months              24 months              36 months                 more
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Missed Recurrent Modules (see        Required..............  Required..............  Required.............  Required.............  N/A.
 attachments 1 and 2).

[[Page 1439]]

 
General Knowledge and Skills         0.....................  2.....................  4....................  8....................  Initial.
 Segment (see attachment 1).
Specific Training per Aircraft Type  0.....................  1.....................  2....................  2....................  Initial.
 (see attachment 2).
General Knowledge per Flag Area of   0.....................  2.....................  2....................  2....................  Initial.
 Operation (see attachment 1).
Supervised Operating Experience,     0.....................  4.....................  8....................  8....................  Initial.
 Domestic.
Supervised Operating Experience,     0.....................  2.....................  2....................  2....................  Initial.
 per Flag Area of Operation.
Operating Familiarization..........  Required if not         Required if not         Required.............  Required.............  Required.
                                      completed in previous   completed in previous
                                      12 months.              12 months.
Proficiency Tests or Checks (see     Proficiency Check       Proficiency Check       Proficiency Check      Proficiency Check      Proficiency Test
 Table 4 and attachment 4).           Required if not         Required if not         Required.              Required.              Required.
                                      completed in previous   completed in previous
                                      12 months.              12 months.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                   Table 4--Training Category Evaluation Requirements for Aircraft Dispatchers
                                               [See Attachment 4]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Proficiency test                    Proficiency
                                             ---------------------------------------------------      check
          Area of evaluation  tasks                                                 Combined    ----------------
                                                  Initial         Transition     certification    Recurrent and
                                                                                  and initial*     requalified
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I. Area of Evaluation: General
    A. Equipment Knowledge..................               X                X                X                X
    B. Aircraft Performance and Limitations                X                X                X                X
     Knowledge..............................
    C. Operating Requirements...............               X              N/A                X                X
    D. National Weather System..............               X              N/A                X                X
    E. National NOTAM System................               X              N/A                X                X
II. Area of Evaluation: Duty Period
 Orientation
    A. Operations Orientation...............               X              N/A                X                X
    B. Dispatcher Shift Turnover............               X              N/A                X                X
    C. Shift Self Briefing..................               X              N/A                X                X
    D. Certificate Holder Manuals,                         X                X                X                X
     Procedures, and Operating Information..
III. Area of Evaluation: Planning and
 Executing a Dispatch Release
    A. Obtain Required Information..........               X              N/A                X                X
    B. Flight Planning......................               X                X                X                X
    C. Create and Issue Dispatch Release....               X              N/A                X                X
    D. Briefing Flight Crews................               X              N/A                X                X
IV. Area of Evaluation: Flight Monitoring
    A. Updating and Gathering Information...               X              N/A                X                X
    B. Operational Control Decision-Making..               X              N/A                X                X
    C. Amend Dispatch Release...............               X              N/A                X                X
V. Area of Evaluation: Situation Management
    A. Dispatch and Aircraft Abnormality or                X                X                X                X
     Emergency..............................
    B. Collection and Dissemination of                     X              N/A                X                X
     Information on Overdue or Missing
     Aircraft...............................
VI. Area of Evaluation: Dispatch Resource
 Management
    A. Demonstrate and apply DRM concepts...               X              N/A                X                X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*In addition to the Proficiency Test, a Practical Test is required as prescribed in Attachment 3.


[[Page 1440]]


                         Table 5--Personnel Authorized To Administer Aircraft Dispatcher Training and Evaluation, and To Conduct Observation Activities Under Subpart CC
                                                                            [See Sec.  Sec.   121.1421 and 121.1439]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                   Employer and position
                                                         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Other than employees of the part                            The part 119 certificate holder                                  FAA
                                                               119 certificate holder      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Aircraft dispatcher training, evaluation, and      ----------------------------------
         observation activities under subpart CC                                 Non-         Certificated         Non-                                             Dispatch     Aviation safety
                                                            Certificated     certificated      dispatcher      certificated     Certificated        Check           program         inspector
                                                             dispatcher       dispatcher       instructor       dispatcher       dispatcher       dispatcher        designee        operations
                                                             instructor       instructor                        instructor
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Training And Evaluation
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Generic Training, General Knowledge and Skills, and                \a\ X            \a\ X                X            \a\ X   ...............               X                X   ...............
 Basic Aircraft.........................................
DRM, Certificate Holder Computer Systems, Computer        ...............  ...............               X   ...............  ...............               X                X   ...............
 Flight Planning, Contingency Operations, Practical
 Dispatch Applications..................................
Specific Aircraft Type..................................           \a\ X            \a\ X                X            \a\ X   ...............               X                X   ...............
Flag and Flag Area of Operations........................           \a\ X   ...............               X   ...............  ...............               X                X   ...............
Supervised Operating Experience.........................  ...............  ...............           \b\ X   ...............           \b\ X                X                X   ...............
Proficiency Test (Initial, Transition)..................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............               X                X                X
Proficiency Check (Recurrent, Requalification)..........  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............               X                X                X
Practical Test for Certificate..........................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............               X                X
Proficiency Test (Combined Certification and Initial)...  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............               X                X
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Observation Activities
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Observation of Dispatch Program Designee (DPD)..........  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............               X
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\a\ Must be acceptable to the Administrator.
\b\ May be conducted by a check dispatcher or a person who meets the experience requirements of Sec.   121.1417.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

BILLING CODE 4910-13-P

[[Page 1441]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP12JA09.037

BILLING CODE 4910-13-C
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

END INFORMATION

Attachment 1 of Appendix T to Part 121

General Knowledge and Skills Requirements--Subjects and Tests--for 
Initial, Combined Certification and Initial, Recurrent, and 
Requalification Training Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

A. General Knowledge and Skills Segment for Initial, Combined 
Certification and Initial, Recurrent, and Requalification. (See 
Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1431; 121.1433; 
121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; 121.1455; 
and 121.1471)

    1. The general knowledge and skills segment introduces the student 
to the certificate holder, its policies, and operations. The general 
knowledge and skills segment also includes other pertinent information 
that prepares the student for specific ground and skills training, 
including how to use the certificate holder's operating manuals for 
exercising operational control.
    2. The general knowledge and skills segment includes required 
subjects. In addition, some of the subjects have examples. These 
examples are for clarification only and are not all inclusive.
    3. For recurrent and requalification see the discussion under 
general knowledge and skills segment for recurrent and requalification 
in paragraph B of this attachment.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    4. The FAA Aircraft Dispatcher Knowledge Test is a requirement for 
certification and the practical test. The certificate holder's testing 
under this attachment is not a substitute for the FAA Aircraft 
Dispatcher Knowledge Test.
    5. Training is required for all subjects listed in each area of 
instruction that pertain to the certificate holder's operations 
specifications for persons in initial, combined certification and 
initial, recurrent, and requalification training. Training is also 
required for subjects not listed in each area of instruction, but that 
pertain to a certificate holder's operation. The aircraft dispatcher 
must understand the subjects required for the areas of instruction 
listed in Attachment 1 of this appendix.
    6. The certificate holder must administer a knowledge test for the 
subjects in each area of instruction. The knowledge test must be 
written or computer based. The FAA must approve the form and content in 
each area of instruction. An individual must satisfactorily complete 
the knowledge test. To satisfactorily complete a knowledge test, a 
score of 80% or better in each area of instruction is required and a 
qualified person must correct the test to 100%. Correction of missed 
questions must include a discussion of which answer is correct, and why 
the answer selected is incorrect. Retraining is required in each area 
of instruction when a score of 80% or better is not achieved. 
Retraining is followed by reevaluation of the student in each retrained 
area of instruction. The form and content of the reevaluation must also 
be approved by the FAA. The knowledge tests for each training category 
must meet the following requirements:
    (a) For initial and combined certification and initial, a knowledge 
test must be comprised of the minimum number of questions required for 
the subjects within each area of instruction.
    (b) For recurrent training, a knowledge test must be comprised of 
at least 20 questions selected from the applicable areas of 
instruction.
    (c) For requalification training that requires missed recurrent 
training modules, each recurrent knowledge test must be comprised of at 
least 20

[[Page 1442]]

questions per missed recurrent training module, selected from the 
applicable areas of instruction. For each activity not completed as 
part of recurrent training (as required by Table 3 of this appendix), a 
test comprised of subjects selected from the applicable areas of 
instruction must have at least 5 questions per required activity.
    7. The FAA may allow distance learning for subjects in each area of 
instruction unless otherwise indicated. However, the FAA will not 
approve cumulative distance learning hours that equal more than 50% of 
the total required programmed hours as listed in Tables 1, 2 or 3 of 
this appendix.
    8. General Knowledge required--Areas of Instruction--With Subjects:
    (a) Area of Instruction: Introduction and Orientation. (5 questions 
required)
    Subjects:
    (1) Course contents, schedules, and materials.
    (2) Key personnel.
    (3) Record keeping requirements.
    (4) Drug testing and alcohol testing.
    (5) Identification badges.
    (6) Certificate holder publications.
    (7) Schedule.
    (8) Dispatcher's duties and responsibilities.
    (9) Joint dispatcher and pilot in command responsibilities.
    (b) Area of Instruction: Applicable Federal Regulations. (10 
questions required)
    Subjects:
    (1) 14 CFR part 1.
    (2) 14 CFR part 91.
    (3) 14 CFR part 119.
    (4) 14 CFR part 121.
    (5) 14 CFR part 139.
    (6) 49 CFR part 175 (HMR).
    (7) 49 CFR part 830 (NTSB).
    (8) Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs).
    (9) 49 CFR Chapter 12 (TSR).
    (c) Area of Instruction: Manual overview. (10 questions required) 
Subjects:
    (1) The certificate holder's operations specifications.
    (2) Manuals containing the following:
    (i) Procedures established by FAA authorized exemptions to certain 
Federal Aviation Regulations (if applicable).
    (ii) Procedures established by FAA authorized deviations to certain 
Federal Aviation Regulations (if applicable).
    (iii) Minimum Equipment List (MEL).
    (iv) Configuration Deviation List (CDL).
    (v) Dispatch Deviation Guide (DDG) procedures.
    (vi) Maintenance flight logs procedures.
    (vii) Procedures for maintenance, test, training, and ferry 
flights.
    (viii) Deicing and anti-icing procedures.
    (ix) The process for gathering safety related information such as 
NOTAMs and weather.
    (x) The certificate holder's approved training program.
    (xi) Certificate holder security procedures and directives.
    (xii) Certificate holder communications and procedures.
    (xiii) Emergency procedures.
    (xiv) Procedures for determining whether hazardous materials are on 
board an aircraft and notification procedures in an emergency.
    (xv) Dispatch procedures.
    (xvi) Weight and balance procedures.
    (xvii) Contents of the Airplane Flight Manual.
    (xviii) Certificate holder operations (e.g., GOM, FOM).
    (xix) Station operations procedures.
    (xx) Crew operating procedures.
    (d) Area of Instruction: Meteorology. (15 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Upper air meteorology.
    (2) METAR.
    (3) TAF.
    (4) SIGMET-AIRMET.
    (5) Area forecast.
    (6) Winds aloft (high and low altitude).
    (7) Surface meteorology.
    (8) Thunderstorms.
    (9) Tornadoes.
    (10) Tropical weather (if applicable).
    (i) Typhoons.
    (ii) Tropical storms.
    (iii) Hurricanes.
    (11) Atmospheric hazards to aviation:
    (i) Low level windshear.
    (ii) Microburst.
    (iii) Mountain waves (if applicable).
    (iv) Turbulence (all types).
    (v) Icing.
    (vi) Reduced visibility (e.g., fog, ice fog, smog).
    (vii) Volcanic ash.
    (12) FAA approved weather service providers and approved sources.
    (13) Interpretation and use of weather charts.
    (14) Enhanced Weather Information System (EWINS), (if applicable).
    (e) Area of Instruction: Approach plates and charts. (5 questions 
required).
    Subjects:
    (1) SIDS and DP.
    (2) STARS.
    (f) Area of Instruction: Navigation Aids and Publications. (10 
questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) ILS/Localizer.
    (2) ILS PRM (if applicable).
    (3) VOR and VOR/DME.
    (4) VOR Classification.
    (5) NDB.
    (6) RNAV (e.g., GPS, Inertial).
    (7) Class I, Class II, or Performance Based Navigation (as 
applicable).
    (8) Terminal and en route charts and publications.
    (9) Inoperative navigation aids.
    (10) RADAR.
    (g) Area of Instruction: Airport characteristics. (5 questions 
required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Airports (emphasizing special or unique characteristics).
    (2) Runway configurations (e.g., parallel runways, orientation).
    (3) Runway surfaces (e.g., grooved, porous friction, runway weight 
bearing capacity).
    (4) Obstacles.
    (5) Slope.
    (6) Elevation.
    (7) Terrain features.
    (8) Methods of receiving information about airport operations and 
conditions.
    (9) Airport lighting and marking.
    (h) Area of Instruction: Air Traffic Control. (15 questions 
required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Air Traffic Control communication and coordination.
    (2) Instrument approach procedures.
    (3) Terminal departure procedures.
    (4) Terminal arrival procedures.
    (5) En route procedures (e.g., strategic and tactical planning 
tools such as Coded Departure Routes (CDR), National Route Program 
(NRP), Severe Weather Avoidance Procedures (SWAP)).
    (6) Flow Control, ARTCC, approach, departure, tower, ground, FSS.
    (7) National Airspace System.
    (8) High Altitude Redesign (HAR).
    (9) Airspace (Class A-G).
    (10) Controlled and uncontrolled airspace and airports.
    (11) Approved instrument approach procedures (operations 
specifications).
    (12) Information required on ATC Flight Plans (e.g., RNP, RVSM).
    (13) Collaborative Decision Making (CDM) (as applicable).
    (14) Certificate holder policy on reroutes and deviations and 
impact on operational control.
    (i) Area of Instruction: NOTAMS (as applicable) (10 questions 
required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Local (L).
    (2) Distant (D).
    (3) FDC.
    (4) Chart NOTAMs.
    (5) Chart supplements.
    (6) FIR boundary NOTAMs.
    (7) Oceanic NOTAMs.
    (8) ATC NOTAMs.
    (9) Military NOTAMs.
    (10) TFRs and prohibited airspace.
    (11) Airport Facility Directory (AFD).
    (12) Certificate holder.

[[Page 1443]]

    (13) Field conditions.
    (14) SFARs.
    (15) Method for gathering and disseminating NOTAMs.
    (16) Other NOTAM sources.
    (j) Area of Instruction: Crewmember requirement, if applicable per 
certificate holder procedures. (5 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Duty time requirements.
    (2) Qualification.
    (i) Aircraft.
    (ii) Airports.
    (iii) Areas.
    (iv) Takeoff and landing minimums.
    (k) Area of Instruction: Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) 
Training.
    Distance learning not allowed. (5 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Briefings.
    (2) Assertiveness.
    (3) Inquiry.
    (4) Conflict resolution.
    (5) Interdepartmental coordination process.
    (6) Interpersonal relationships.
    (7) Situational awareness.
    (8) Preparation, planning, and vigilance.
    (9) Time management (prioritizing).
    (10) Tactical and strategic use of resources.
    (11) Stress management.
    (12) Decisionmaking process.
    (13) Multi-tasking.
    (14) Risk management.
    (15) Leadership.
    (16) Communication.
    (l) Area of Instruction: Ground de-ice and anti-ice program (5 
questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Types, purpose, characteristics, and effectiveness of de-ice 
and anti-ice fluids.
    (2) De-ice and anti-ice handling and performance implications.
    (3) Aircraft surface contamination and critical area 
identification.
    (4) Use of holdover times.
    (5) Aircraft de-ice and anti-ice procedures and checks to detect 
contaminated surfaces.
    (m) Area of Instruction: Computer System, as applicable. Distance 
learning not allowed. (10 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Weather.
    (2) Flight planning.
    (3) Dispatch release.
    (4) Irregular operations.
    (5) Takeoff, en route, and landing gross weight calculations.
    (6) Weight and balance.
    (7) Flight monitoring, times, and schedule.
    (8) Airborne and ground based aircraft situation displays (e.g., 
ASD).
    (9) NOTAMs.
    (10) Computer applications and technology required to perform 
aircraft dispatcher duties.
    (n) Area of Instruction: Contingency operations for maintaining 
operational control in the event of single or multiple system failures 
(e.g., power, communication). Distance learning not allowed. (5 
questions required).
    (o) Area of Instruction: Other required training. The hours for 
other required training are in addition to approved programmed hours of 
instruction stated in Table 1 of this appendix.
    Subjects:
    (1) Awareness training for hazardous materials (part 121, subpart 
Z).
    (2) Drug testing program and alcohol misuse prevention program 
(part 121 appendices I and J).
    (3) Security training (49 CFR part 1544).
    9. Training for a specific type of operation, Domestic or Flag.
    (a) Area of Instruction: Domestic operations: (15 questions 
required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Definition of a domestic operation and what constitutes a 
domestic operation.
    (2) The certificate holder's approved operations specifications 
related to Domestic operations. Examples:
    (i) Special use airspace (e.g., Domestic RVSM).
    (ii) Fuel reserves for domestic operations.
    (iii) Operations specification A 12 (Operations to certain foreign 
airports).
    (iv) Exemptions or deviations (if applicable).
    (v) Operations specification C 70 (Authorized airports).
    (3) En route operations over routes and diversions, if applicable, 
that may expose passengers and crew to extreme environmental 
conditions. Examples:
    (i) Western U.S. terrain clearance and driftdown.
    (ii) Ozone and hazardous weather.
    (4) Unique domestic instrument approach and departure procedures. 
Examples:
    (i) Missed approach procedures.
    (ii) Unique local procedures.
    (iii) Special instrument approach and departure procedures.
    (iv) Specific SFAR requirements (if applicable).
    (v) Engine out departure procedures.
    (5) Required Navigation Performance (RNP) or Performance Based 
Navigation.
    (6) Domestic communications system; air to ground, radio relay.
    (7) Procedures for determining alternate airport requirements. 
Examples:
    (i) Alternate airport selection.
    (ii) Changes to alternates.
    (8) Crewmember requirement, if applicable per certificate holder 
procedures.
    (i) Duty time requirement.
    (ii) Qualification.
    (A) Aircraft.
    (B) Airports.
    (C) Areas.
    (D) Takeoff and landing minimums.
    (9) Dispatch release and its validity time for an intermediate 
airport.
    (10) Other issues surrounding operational control of domestic 
operations. Examples:
    (i) Holding fuel requirements.
    (ii) Dispatching into congested airspace.
    (iii) Reanalysis of airborne flights.
    (iv) Uncontrolled airspace authorizations, en route and terminal.
    (b) Area of Instruction: General knowledge for Flag Operations: (10 
questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Definition of a flag operation and what constitutes a flag 
operation.
    (2) Flag regulations.
    (3) Class II navigation (e.g., Inertial, GPS).
    (4) Equal Time Point (ETP), if applicable.
    (5) Extended overwater.
    (6) Fuel requirements.
    (7) The practical application of the term ``Re-dispatch'' and 
information required to be exchanged between the aircraft dispatcher 
and the Pilot in Command, if applicable.
    (8) International weather. Accessing international weather 
information (unique problems associated with obtaining international 
weather information).
    (9) ICAO NOTAMS, as applicable.
    (i) Chart NOTAMS.
    (ii) Chart supplements.
    (iii) The certificate holder's procedures for obtaining NOTAM 
information.
    (iv) Track messages.
    (v) International ATC environments. Examples:
    (A) Uncontrolled airspace.
    (B) Airspace restrictions and procedures.
    (C) Language barriers.
    (vi) Operations over high terrain. Example: Driftdown 
considerations (terrain clearance, oxygen, and alternate requirements).
    (vii) Procedures for determining alternate airport requirements. 
Examples:
    (A) Alternate airport selection.
    (B) Changes to alternates.
    (viii) Crewmember requirement, if applicable per certificate holder 
procedures.

[[Page 1444]]

    (A) Duty time requirements.
    (B) Qualification.
    (1) Aircraft.
    (2) Airports.
    (3) Areas.
    (4) Takeoff and landing minimums.
    (ix) Compliance with foreign regulations and requirements that may 
be more restrictive than U.S. regulations and requirements.
    (x) Dispatch release and its validity time for an intermediate 
airport.
    (c) Area of Instruction: General Knowledge per Flag Area of 
Operation. The following subjects must be used to build the training 
for each flag area of operation. For training programs that include 
multiple flag areas of operation, duplicate subjects (e.g., ETOPS, Flag 
Regulations) need only be trained once. (10 questions required).

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

    (1) Rules, regulations, operations specifications, procedures, 
environmental issues, cultural issues, and other factors influence the 
certificate holder's operations in different parts of the world. Flag 
Area of Operation means a specific geographical area that may require 
compliance with unique policies, procedures, regulations, and 
requirements. Because of these varying operational complexities, the 
required training is divided into 12 Flag Areas of Operation.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    (2) Each Flag Area of Operation must contain the minimum number of 
programmed hours as outlined in Tables 1, 2, or 3, as applicable.
    (3) Flag Areas of Operation:
    (i) Africa. Includes: Continental Africa, Cape Verde, Madagascar, 
Mauritius, Reunion, Seychelles.
    (ii) Asia-Eastern. Includes: Mainland China, Mongolia, Siberia.
    (iii) Commonwealth of Independent States. Includes: Armenia, 
Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russian 
Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan.
    (iv) Europe-Central. Includes: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, 
Faroe Islands, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Ireland, 
Italy, Latvia, Luxembourg, Madeira Islands, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, 
Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom.
    (v) Europe-Eastern. Includes: Albania, Boznia-Herzegovinia, 
Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, 
Slovakia, Slovenia, Yugoslavia.
    (vi) Latin America. Includes: Mexico, Central America, Caribbean 
Islands and Cuba.
    (vii) Middle East-South Asia. Includes: Afghanistan, Bahrain, 
Bangladesh, Bhutan, Chagos Archipelago, Cyprus, India, Iran, Iraq, 
Israel, Jordan, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi 
Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, Indian Ocean.
    (viii) North America. Includes: Alaska, Bermuda, Canada, Contiguous 
United States.
    (ix) Atlantic Basin. Includes: Special Contingency Routes, MNPS, 
Greenland, Iceland, South Atlantic Ocean.
    (x) Pacific Basin. Includes: Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, 
Aleutian Islands, Hawaiian Islands, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia, 
Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Pacific Islands.
    (xi) Polar Routes, Area of Magnetic Unreliability, and any 
applicable alternates.
    (xii) South America. Includes: All Continental Countries.
    (4) The certificate holder's approved operations specifications 
related to flag operations.
    (5) Long range navigation and associated special requirements. 
Examples:
    (i) Number of Long Range Navigation Systems (LRNS) required for a 
specific airspace.
    (ii) Contingency procedures.
    (6) Long range communication and associated special requirements. 
Examples:
    (i) Number of Long Range Communication Systems (LRCS) required for 
a specific airspace.
    (ii) Types required for specific airspace (e.g., VHF, HF, 
Satellite, data link).
    (iii) Contingency procedures.
    (7) Extended Operations (ETOPS), as applicable. Examples of 
variables that must be considered:
    (i) Fuel.
    (ii) Weather.
    (iii) Alternate airport requirements.
    (iv) Adequate or suitable airports.
    (v) Required equipment.
    (vi) Maintenance status.
    (vii) Entry and exit points.
    (8) En route operations over routes and diversions, as applicable 
that may expose passengers and crew to extreme environmental 
conditions. Examples:
    (i) Greenland.
    (ii) Himalayas.
    (iii) Polar.
    (iv) Russian airspace.
    (9) Special use airspace (e.g., Reduced Vertical Separation 
Minimums (RVSM)).
    (10) Required Navigation Performance (RNP) or Performance Based 
Navigation.
    (11) Unique international instrument approach and departure 
procedures. Examples:
    (i) Limited navigational aids.
    (ii) Limited ATC facilities.
    (iii) Missed approach procedures.
    (iv) Unique local procedures.
    (v) Special instrument approach procedures.
    (vi) Specific SFAR requirements, as applicable.
    (vii) Engine out departure procedures.
    (12) Approved airports and landing rights.
    (13) Over-fly permission.
    (14) Unique characteristics and special conditions in international 
airspace and at international airports. Examples:
    (i) Performance limitations.
    (ii) Mountainous terrain.
    (iii) Navigation aids.
    (15) Issues unique to flag area of operations into which the 
certificate holder operates. Examples:
    (i) Air traffic control.
    (ii) Organized tracks.
    (iii) Polar operations.
    (iv) Uncontrolled airspace.

END QPS REQUIREMENTS

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

B. General Knowledge and Skills Segment for Recurrent and 
Requalification. (See Sec. Sec.  121.1419; 121.1431; 121.1433; 
121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1455; and 121.1471).

    The general knowledge and skills segment is designed to maintain 
the currency of each aircraft dispatcher. It ensures the necessary 
operational and procedural knowledge required for the dispatcher to 
effectively exercise operational control.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    1. Training is required for dispatchers in recurrent or 
requalification training programs for a certificate holder. Training 
must address operational and procedural review of topics deemed 
necessary by the certificate holder and approved by the Administrator. 
Curricula must contain (but are not limited to) selected portions of 
the following areas of instruction. The test that is required for 
recurrent training must contain 20 questions. For requalification 
training, the number of

[[Page 1445]]

questions required for testing is based on the number of missed 
training modules. See paragraph A.6.(c) of this attachment for specific 
requirements for requalification training.
    2. General Knowledge required.
    Areas of Instruction:
    Subjects:
    (a) Operations Specifications.
    (b) General Operating Manual.
    (c) Air Traffic Control and Instrument Approach Procedures.
    (d) Reduced Vertical Separation Minimum (RVSM).
    (e) Certificate holder communications systems and procedures.
    (f) Meteorology.
    (g) NOTAMS.
    (h) Maintenance procedures.
    (i) Emergency procedures.
    (j) Joint dispatcher and pilot in command responsibilities.
    (k) Characteristics of appropriate airports.
    (l) Prevailing weather phenomena.
    (m) Approach plates and charts.
    (n) Navigational aids and publications.
    (o) Certificate holder computer systems (distance learning not 
allowed).
    (p) Computer flight planning (distance learning not allowed).
    (q) Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) (distance learning not 
allowed).
    (r) Ground de-ice and anti-ice procedures and policies (must be 
covered each year).
    (s) Flag Areas of Operation--Selected subjects from paragraphs 
A.9.(b) and (c) of this attachment.
    3. Area of Instruction: Other required training.
    The hours for other required training are in addition to approved 
programmed hours of instruction stated in Table 1 of this appendix.
    Subjects:
    (a) Awareness training for hazardous materials (part 121, subpart 
Z).
    (b) Drug testing program and alcohol misuse prevention program 
(part 121 appendices I and J).
    (c) Security training (49 CFR part 1544).

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 2 of Appendix T to Part 121

Basic Aircraft and Specific Aircraft Type Training Requirements--
Subjects and Tests--for Initial, Combined Certification and Initial, 
Transition, Recurrent, Requalification, Differences, and Special 
Training Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

A. General. (See Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 
121.1431; 121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 
121.1453; 121.1455, and 121.1471)

    1. The basic aircraft segment introduces the student to the base 
aircraft of the operator including aircraft systems and performance. 
The specific aircraft segment is an overview of aircraft systems and 
performance that prepares the student for specific application and 
skills training to include how to use the certificate holder's aircraft 
manual or manuals for conducting operational control of the airline.
    2. The basic aircraft and specific aircraft segment includes 
required subjects. In addition, some of the required subjects have 
examples. These examples are for clarification only and are not all 
inclusive.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

    3. The FAA Aircraft Dispatcher Knowledge Test is a requirement for 
certification and the practical test. The certificate holder's testing 
under this attachment is not a substitute for the FAA Aircraft 
Dispatcher Knowledge Test.
    4. Training is required for all subjects listed in each area of 
instruction that pertain to the certificate holder's operations 
specifications for persons in initial, combined certification and 
initial, transition, recurrent, requalification, difference, and 
special training. Training is also required for subjects not listed in 
each area of instruction, but that pertain to a certificate holder's 
operation. The aircraft dispatcher must understand the subjects 
required for the areas of instruction listed in Attachment 2.
    5. The certificate holder must administer a knowledge test for the 
subjects in each area of instruction. The knowledge test must be 
written or computer based. The FAA must approve the form and content in 
each area of instruction. An individual must satisfactorily complete 
the knowledge test. To satisfactorily complete a knowledge test, a 
score of 80% or better in each area of instruction is required and a 
qualified person must correct the test to 100%. Correction of missed 
questions must include a discussion of which answer is correct, and why 
the answer selected is incorrect. Retraining is required in each area 
of instruction when a score of 80% or better is not achieved. 
Retraining is followed by reevaluation of the student in each retrained 
area of instruction. The form and content of the reevaluation must also 
be approved by the FAA. The knowledge tests for each training category 
must be as follows:
    (a) For initial and combined certification and initial, a knowledge 
test comprised of the minimum number of questions required for the 
subjects within each area of instruction.
    (b) For recurrent training, a knowledge test comprised of at least 
20 questions selected from the applicable areas of instruction. For 
certificate holders with more than one aircraft type, aircraft systems 
for each specific aircraft type may be covered over a 3 year cycle as 
approved by the Administrator.
    (c) For requalification training that requires missed recurrent 
training modules, each recurrent knowledge test must be comprised of at 
least 20 questions per missed recurrent training module, selected from 
the applicable areas of instruction. For each activity required by 
Table 3 of this appendix, a test comprised of subjects selected from 
the applicable areas of instruction must have at least 5 questions per 
required activity.
    (d) For differences training at least 5 questions. Training and 
evaluation is required in specific subject areas specified when 
differences are required.
    6. The FAA may allow distance learning for subjects in each area of 
instruction unless otherwise indicated. However, the FAA will not 
approve cumulative distance learning hours that equal more than 50% of 
the total required programmed hours as listed in Tables 1, 2 or 3 of 
this appendix.

B. Basic Aircraft Training Requirements for Initial or Combined 
Certification and Initial. (See Sec. Sec.  121.1431; 121.1433; 
121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; 121.1455, 
and 121.1471)

    Areas of Instruction--With Subjects:
    1. Area of Instruction: Basic Aircraft Systems Theory and 
Performance. (10 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (a) Air conditioning.
    (b) Pressurization.
    (c) Auto flight.
    (d) Communications.
    (e) Electrical.
    (f) Equipment and furnishings.
    (g) Fire protection.
    (h) Flight controls.
    (i) Fuel.
    (j) Hydraulics.
    (k) Ice and rain protection.
    (l) Instrumentation.

[[Page 1446]]

    (m) Landing gear.
    (n) Lights.
    (o) Oxygen.
    (p) Water and waste.
    (q) Auxiliary power.
    (r) Doors.
    (s) Propellers.
    (t) Engines.
    (u) Weight and balance theory.
    (v) Flight planning overview.
    (w) Aircraft performance.
    2. Area of Instruction: A general description of the aircraft 
performance characteristics emphasizing the following as applicable: (5 
questions required).
    Subjects:
    (a) Aircraft limitations that may affect the aircraft performance.
    (b) Navigation equipment and required navigation performance.
    (c) Communication equipment and required communication performance.
    (d) Other factors affecting operating and performance 
characteristics.
    3. Area of Instruction: MEL and CDL specific applications and 
appropriate operating manual procedures applicable to dispatch for: (10 
questions required).
    Subjects:
    (a) Air conditioning.
    (b) Pressurization.
    (c) Auto flight.
    (d) Communications.
    (e) Electrical.
    (f) Equipment and furnishings.
    (g) Fire protection.
    (h) Flight controls.
    (i) Fuel.
    (j) Hydraulics.
    (k) Ice and rain protection.
    (l) Instrumentation.
    (m) Landing gear.
    (n) Lights.
    (o) Oxygen.
    (p) Water and waste.
    (q) Auxiliary power.
    (r) Doors.
    (s) Propellers.
    (t) Engines.
    4 Area of Instruction: Additional training in the following 
subjects must be included (as applicable): (10 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (a) Instrument approach and communication equipment.
    (b) Aircraft specific deicing procedures.
    (c) Special considerations and authorizations for international 
operations.
    (d) Reduced separation standards.
    (e) Special maintenance procedures.
    (f) Flight manual specific emergency procedures and equipment.
    (g) Weight and balance considerations.
    (h) Basic aircraft performance dispatch requirements and 
procedures.
    (i) Flight planning including route, track and altitude selection, 
en route performance, flight time analysis, weather considerations, and 
fuel analysis.
    (j) Aircraft specific emergency procedures.
    (k) Mission capable considerations (e.g., over-water equipped).

C. Aircraft Type Specific Training Requirements for Initial, Combined 
Certification and Initial, Transition, Recurrent, and Requalification. 
(See Sec. Sec.  121.1431; 121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 
121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; 121.1455, and 121.1471)

    1. Aircraft Type Specific Training Requirements--Areas of 
Instruction--With
    Subjects:
    (a) Area of Instruction: Systems Overview: (15 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Air conditioning.
    (2) Pressurization.
    (3) Auto flight.
    (4) Communications.
    (5) Electrical.
    (6) Equipment and furnishings.
    (7) Fire protection.
    (8) Flight controls.
    (9) Fuel.
    (10) Hydraulics.
    (11) Ice and rain protection.
    (12) Instrumentation.
    (13) Landing gear.
    (14) Lights.
    (15) Oxygen.
    (16) Water and waste.
    (17) Auxiliary power.
    (18) Doors.
    (19) Propellers.
    (20) Engines.
    (b) Area of Instruction: Performance. (5 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Take-off performance.
    (2) En route performance.
    (3) Landing performance.
    (c) Area of Instruction: Other. (10 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (1) Aircraft manuals.
    (2) Aircraft limitations.
    (3) Weight and balance.
    (4) Emergency and abnormal procedures.
    2. Differences training. (5 questions required)
    Each training program must provide differences training if the 
Administrator finds that, due to differences between aircraft of the 
same type operated by the certificate holder, additional training is 
necessary to ensure that each dispatcher is adequately trained to 
perform the assigned duties. The programmed hours established for 
differences training are in addition to the previously approved 
programmed hours for the approved training program. For differences 
training (Sec.  121.1471), the hours remain in the differences training 
category. There are no programmed hours in Tables 1 and 2 of this 
appendix for differences training.
    3. Special training.
    The programmed hours established for special training are in 
addition to the previously approved programmed hours for the approved 
training program. For special training (Sec.  121.1437(c)), the 
certificate holder integrates the training into the existing categories 
in Tables 1 and 2 of this appendix. There are no programmed hours in 
Tables 1 and 2 for special training.

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 3 of Appendix T to Part 121

Generic Training Requirements--Subjects and Tests--for Certification

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

A. The Generic Training

    This attachment lists those subject areas required to train and 
evaluate persons who are not certificated dispatchers. In addition, 
some of the required subjects have examples. These examples are for 
clarification only and are not all inclusive. The areas of instruction 
in this attachment will help prepare persons to take the aircraft 
dispatcher practical test.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

B. General (See Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 
121.1419; 121.1421; 121.1423; 121.1425; 121.1431; 121.1433; 121.1435; 
121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; and 121.1471)

    1. The FAA Aircraft Dispatcher Knowledge Test is a requirement for 
certification and the practical test. The certificate holder's testing 
under this attachment is not a substitute for the FAA Aircraft 
Dispatcher Knowledge Test.
    2. Instruction and evaluation is required in all area subjects for 
combined certification and initial training.
    3. The certificate holder must administer a knowledge test for the 
subjects in each area of instruction. The knowledge test must be 
written or computer based. The FAA must approve the form and content in 
each area of instruction. An individual must

[[Page 1447]]

satisfactorily complete the knowledge test. To satisfactorily complete 
a knowledge test, a score of 80% or better in each area of instruction 
is required and a qualified person must correct the test to 100%. 
Correction of missed questions must include a discussion of which 
answer is correct, and why the answer selected is incorrect. Retraining 
is required in each area of instruction when a score of 80% or better 
is not achieved. Retraining is followed by reevaluation of the student 
in each retrained area of instruction. The form and content of the 
reevaluation must also be approved by the FAA.
    4. The FAA may allow distance learning for subjects in each area of 
instruction unless otherwise indicated. However, the FAA will not 
approve cumulative distance learning hours that equal more than 50% of 
the total required programmed hours as listed in Tables 1 and 2 of this 
appendix.

C. General Training Requirements Areas of Instruction--With Subjects: 
(See Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1419; 
121.1421; 121.1423; 121.1425; 121.1431; 121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 
121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; and 121.1471)

    1. Area of Instruction: Regulations (10 questions required)
    Subjects:
    (a) 14 CFR part 65, subparts A and C.
    (b) 14 CFR parts 1, 25, 61, 71, 91, 121, 139, and 175.
    (c) 49 CFR part 830 (NTSB).
    (d) General Operating Manual (GOM).
    2. Area of Instruction: Meteorology (15 questions required).
    Subjects:
    (a) Basic Weather Studies.
    (1) The earth's motion and its effects on weather.
    (2) Analysis of the following regional weather types, 
characteristics, and structures, or combinations thereof:
    (i) Maritime.
    (ii) Continental.
    (iii) Polar.
    (iv) Tropical.
    (3) Analysis of the following local weather types, characteristics, 
and structures or combinations thereof:
    (i) Coastal.
    (ii) Mountainous.
    (iii) Island.
    (iv) Plains.
    (4) The following characteristics of the atmosphere:
    (i) Layers.
    (ii) Composition.
    (iii) Global wind patterns.
    (iv) Ozone.
    (v) Tropopause.
    (5) Pressure:
    (i) Units of measure.
    (ii) Weather systems characteristics.
    (iii) Temperature effects on pressure.
    (iv) Altimeters.
    (v) Pressure gradient force.
    (vi) Pressure pattern flying weather.
    (6) Wind:
    (i) Major wind systems and coriolis force.
    (ii) Jetstreams and their characteristics.
    (iii) Local wind and related terms.
    (7) States of matter:
    (i) Solids, liquid, and gases.
    (ii) Causes of change of state.
    (8) Clouds:
    (i) Composition, formation, and dissipation.
    (ii) Types and associated precipitation.
    (iii) Use of cloud knowledge in forecasting.
    (9) Fog:
    (i) Causes, formation, and dissipation.
    (ii) Types.
    (10) Ice:
    (i) Causes, formation, and dissipation.
    (ii) Types.
    (11) Stability and instability:
    (i) Temperature lapse rate, convection.
    (ii) Adiabatic processes.
    (iii) Lifting processes.
    (iv) Divergence.
    (v) Convergence.
    (12) Turbulence:
    (i) Jetstream associated.
    (ii) Pressure pattern recognition.
    (iii) Low level windshear.
    (iv) Mountain waves.
    (v) Thunderstorms.
    (vi) Clear air turbulence.
    (13) Airmasses:
    (i) Classification and characteristics.
    (ii) Source regions.
    (iii) Use of airmass knowledge in forecasting.
    (14) Fronts:
    (i) Structure and characteristics, both vertical and horizontal.
    (ii) Frontal types.
    (iii) Frontal weather flying.
    (15) Theory of storm systems:
    (i) Thunderstorms.
    (ii) Tornadoes.
    (iii) Hurricanes and typhoons.
    (iv) Microbursts.
    (v) Causes, formation, and dissipation.
    (b) Weather, analysis, and forecasts.
    (1) Observations:
    (i) Surface observations.
    (A) Observations made by certified weather observer.
    (B) Automated weather observations.
    (ii) Terminal forecasts.
    (iii) Significant en route reports and forecasts.
    (A) Pilot reports.
    (B) Area forecasts.
    (C) Sigmets, airmets.
    (D) Center weather advisories.
    (iv) Weather imagery.
    (A) Surface analysis.
    (B) Weather depiction.
    (C) Significant weather prognosis.
    (D) Winds and temperature aloft.
    (E) Composite moisture stability chart.
    (F) Surface weather prognostic chart.
    (G) Radar meteorology.
    (H) Satellite meteorology.
    (I) Other charts as applicable.
    (v) Meteorological information data collection systems.
    (2) Data collection, analysis, and forecast facilities.
    (3) Service outlets providing aviation weather products.
    (c) Weather Related Aircraft Hazards.
    (1) Crosswinds and gusts.
    (2) Contaminated runways.
    (3) Restrictions to surface visibility.
    (4) Turbulence and windshear.
    (5) Icing.
    (6) Thunderstorms and microburst.
    (7) Volcanic ash.
    3. Area of Instruction: Navigation (10 questions required)
    Subjects:
    (a) Study of the Earth.
    (1) Time reference and location (0 Longitude, UTC).
    (2) Definitions.
    (3) Projections.
    (4) Charts.
    (b) Chart Reading, Application, and Use.
    (c) National Airspace Plan.
    (d) Navigation Systems.
    (e) Airborne Navigation Instruments.
    (f) Instrument Approach Procedures.
    (1) Transition procedures.
    (2) Precision approach procedures.
    (3) Non-precision approach procedures.
    (4) Minimums and the relationship to weather.
    (g) Special Navigation and Operations.
    (1) North Atlantic.
    (2) Pacific.
    (3) Global differences.
    4. Area of Instruction: Communications (5 questions required)
    Subjects:
    (a) Regulatory requirements.
    (b) Communication Protocol.
    (c) Voice and Data Communications.
    (d) Notice to Airmen (NOTAMS).
    (e) Aeronautical Publications.
    (f) Abnormal Procedures.
    5. Area of Instruction: Air Traffic Control (10 questions required)
    Subjects:
    (a) Responsibilities.
    (b) Facilities and Equipment.
    (c) Airspace classification and route structure.
    (d) Flight Plans.
    (1) Domestic.

[[Page 1448]]

    (2) International.
    (e) Separation Minimums.
    (f) Priority Handling.
    (g) Holding Procedures.
    (h) Traffic Management.
    6. Area of Instruction: Emergency and Abnormal Procedures. (5 
questions required)
    Subjects:
    (a) Security measures on the ground.
    (b) Security measures in the air.
    (c) FAA responsibility and services.
    (d) Collection and dissemination of information on overdue or 
missing aircraft.
    (e) Means of declaring an emergency.
    (f) Responsibility for declaring an emergency.
    7. Area of Instruction: Practical dispatch applications. (distance 
learning not allowed)
    Subjects:
    (a) Human Factors.
    (1) Decision-making:
    (i) Situation assessment.
    (ii) Generation and evaluation of alternatives.
    (A) Tradeoffs and prioritization.
    (B) Contingency planning.
    (iii) Support tools and technologies.
    (2) Human error:
    (i) Causes.
    (A) Individual and organizational factors.
    (B) Technology-induced error.
    (ii) Prevention.
    (iii) Detection and recovery.
    (3) Teamwork:
    (i) Communication and information exchange.
    (ii) Cooperative and distributed problem-solving.
    (iii) Resource management.
    (A) Air Traffic Control (ATC) activities and workload.
    (B) Flight crew activities and workload.
    (C) Maintenance activities and workload.
    (D) Operations control staff activities and workload.
    (b) Applied Dispatching.
    (1) Briefing techniques, Dispatcher, Pilot.
    (2) Preflight:
    (i) Safety.
    (ii) Weather analysis.
    (A) Satellite imagery.
    (B) Upper and lower altitude charts.
    (C) Significant en route reports and forecasts.
    (D) Surface charts.
    (E) Surface observations.
    (iii) NOTAMS and airport conditions.
    (iv) Crew.
    (A) Qualifications.
    (B) Limitations.
    (v) Flight planning.
    (A) Route of flight.
    (1) Standard Instrument Departures and Standard Terminal Arrival 
Routes.
    (2) En route charts.
    (3) Operational altitude.
    (4) Departure and arrival charts.
    (B) Minimum departure fuel.
    (1) Climb.
    (2) Cruise.
    (3) Descent.
    (vi) Decision to operate the flight.
    (vii) ATC flight plan filing.
    (viii) Flight documentation.
    (A) Flight plan.
    (B) [Reserved]
    (3) Authorize flight departure with concurrence of pilot in 
command.
    (4) In-flight operational control:
    (i) Situational awareness.
    (ii) Information exchange.
    (iii) Amend original dispatch release as required.
    (5) Post-flight:
    (i) Arrival verification.
    (ii) Weather debrief.
    (iii) Flight irregularity reports as required.
    8. Area of Instruction: Weight and balance subject: (5 questions 
required)
    Subject:
    (a) Theory and application weight and balance.
    (b) [Reserved]
    9. Area of Instruction: Performance for the type of aircraft. (5 
questions required)

END QPS REQUIREMENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment 4 of Appendix T to Part 121

Evaluation Requirements and Performance Standards for Initial, Combined 
Certification and Initial, Transition, Recurrent, Requalification, 
Differences, and Special Training Categories

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN INFORMATION

A. General

    The following list provides a set of tasks and situations by area 
of evaluation for the aircraft dispatcher. These are the areas and 
tasks found in the introduction to the QPS in Table 4, Training 
Category Evaluation Requirements for Aircraft Dispatchers, which 
establishes the evaluation by task.

END INFORMATION

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

BEGIN QPS REQUIREMENT

B. Evaluation Requirements. (See Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 121.1413; 
121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1419; 121.1421; 121.1423; 121.1425; 121.1431; 
121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 121.1453; 
and 121.1471)

    1. Evaluation is required for all tasks and situations listed in 
each duty area that pertain to the certificate holder's operations 
specifications for persons in initial, combined certification and 
initial, transition, recurrent, requalification, difference, and 
special training. Evaluation is also required for tasks and situations 
that are not listed, but that pertain to a certificate holder's 
operation. The aircraft dispatcher must understand, and where 
applicable, satisfactorily complete the tasks required for the areas of 
evaluation listed in Table 4 of this appendix.
    2. The certificate holder must use Table 4 to determine the tasks 
and situations on which each aircraft dispatcher must be trained and 
evaluated for each training category. If the certificate holder adds 
tasks or situations to those listed in Table 4, it must further develop 
the tasks or situations to include the requirement and frequency for 
training and evaluation in each specific category of training listed in 
the table. These changes must be approved by the POI.
    3. Evaluation Requirements for Initial, Combined Certification and 
Initial, and Transition Training Categories.
    (a) The proficiency test for initial and combined certification and 
initial is a combination of knowledge evaluation and skills evaluation 
during which additional training or practice is not allowed.
    (b) The proficiency test for transition may be a knowledge 
evaluation, a skills evaluation, or a combination of knowledge 
evaluation and skills evaluation, during which additional training or 
practice is not allowed.
    (c) The knowledge evaluation portion of the proficiency test must 
cover the subjects in each area of evaluation in Table 4 of this 
appendix. The knowledge evaluation for initial and combined 
certification and initial must be in the form of written or computer 
based questions. The knowledge evaluation for transition must be in the 
form of oral, written, or computer based questions. The knowledge 
evaluation must contain the minimum number of questions addressing each 
area of evaluation outlined in this attachment. The FAA must approve 
the form and content in each area of evaluation. An individual must 
satisfactorily complete the knowledge evaluation. To

[[Page 1449]]

satisfactorily complete a knowledge evaluation, a score of 80% or 
better in each area of evaluation is required and a qualified person 
must correct the test to 100%. Correction of missed questions must 
include a discussion of which answer is correct, and why the answer 
selected is incorrect. Retraining is required in each area of 
evaluation when a score of 80% or better is not achieved. Retraining is 
followed by reevaluation of the student in each retrained area of 
evaluation. The form and content of the reevaluation must also be 
approved by the FAA.
    (d) The skills evaluation portion of the proficiency test must be 
administered in either an actual or simulated dispatch work environment 
and must cover the subjects in each area of instruction as depicted in 
Table 4. Each area of evaluation must be satisfactorily demonstrated to 
the Check Dispatcher, Dispatch Program Designee, or FAA Operations 
Inspector, as applicable. Retraining is required for each task in each 
area of evaluation that is not satisfactorily completed. Retraining is 
followed by reevaluation of the student in each retrained area of 
instruction. The FAA must also approve the form and content of the 
reevaluation.
    4. Evaluation Requirements for Recurrent and Requalification 
Training Categories.
    (a) For recurrent training and requalification training, the 
proficiency check is a combination of knowledge evaluation and skills 
evaluation of tasks listed in Table 4 and described in this attachment 
during which additional training or practice is allowed. A portion of 
the proficiency check must be administered in either an actual or 
simulated dispatch work environment.
    (b) The minimum number of questions addressing each task is listed 
in each area of evaluation. These questions are only required for 
knowledge evaluation portion of the proficiency check. The knowledge 
evaluation portion of the proficiency check must be administered in the 
form of oral, written, or computer based questions. To satisfactorily 
complete a proficiency check, a score of 80% in each task area of 
evaluation is required and a qualified person must correct the test to 
100%. Correction of missed questions must include a discussion of which 
answer is correct, and why the answer selected is incorrect. Retraining 
is required in each area of evaluation when a score of 80% or better is 
not achieved. Retraining is followed by reevaluation of the student in 
each retrained area of evaluation. The form and content of the 
reevaluation must also be approved by the FAA. The skills evaluation 
portion of the proficiency check must be satisfactorily demonstrated to 
the Check Dispatcher, Dispatch Program Designee, or FAA Operations 
Inspector, as applicable.
    5. Dispatch Resource Management (DRM) indicators must be evaluated 
throughout the entire proficiency test or check.
    6. The certificate holder must tailor the procedures in this 
attachment for each aircraft type and approved operation. The 
certificate holder must include these procedures in the manual(s) 
provided to the aircraft dispatcher.

C. Tasks and Situations by Area of Evaluation (See Sec. Sec.  121.1411; 
121.1413; 121.1415; 121.1417; 121.1419; 121.1421; 121.1423; 121.1425; 
121.1431; 121.1433; 121.1435; 121.1437; 121.1439; 121.1441; 121.1451; 
121.1453; and 121.1471)

1. Area of Evaluation: General
    (a) Task: Equipment Knowledge. (10 questions required).
    The dispatcher must have an understanding and a basic knowledge 
about the following subjects (systems and components) (as applicable):
    (1) Landing gear, including: Extension and retraction systems, 
brakes, anti-skid, tires, nose-wheel steering, and shock absorbers.
    (2) Engine(s), including: Controls and indications, induction 
system, carburetor and fuel injection, turbo-charging, cooling, fire 
detection and protection, mounting points, turbine wheels, compressors, 
de-icing, anti-icing, and other related components.
    (3) Propellers, including: Type, controls, feathering and 
unfeathering, auto feather, negative torque sensing, synchronizing, and 
synchro-phasing.
    (4) Fuel system, including: Capacity, controls; indicators; cross-
feeding; transferring; jettison; fuel grade, color and additives; 
fueling and de-fueling procedures; and allowable fuel substitutions, if 
applicable.
    (5) Oil system, including: Grade and indicators.
    (6) Hydraulic system, including: Capacity pumps, pressure, 
reservoirs, grade, and regulators.
    (7) Electrical system, including: Alternators, generators, battery, 
circuit breakers and protection devices, controls, indicators, and 
external and auxiliary power sources and ratings.
    (8) Environmental systems, including: Heating, cooling, 
ventilation, oxygen and pressurization, controls, indicators, and 
regulating devices.
    (9) Avionics and communications, including: Autopilot, flight 
director, and Electronic Flight Indicating Systems (EFIS); Flight 
Management System(s) (FMS); Long Range Navigation systems; Doppler 
Radar; Inertial Navigation Systems (INS); Global Positioning System 
(GPS, DGPS, WGPS); VOR, NDB, ILS, MLS, and RNAV systems and components; 
indicating devices; transponder; and emergency locator transmitter.
    (10) Ice protection (anti-ice and de-ice), including: Pitot-static 
system, propeller (if appropriate), windshield, wing and tail surfaces.
    (11) Flight controls, including: Ailerons, elevator(s), rudder(s), 
control tabs, balance tabs, stabilizer, flaps, spoilers, leading edge 
flaps and slats, and trim systems.
    (b) Task: Aircraft Performance and Limitations Knowledge. (10 
questions required)
    (1) The dispatcher must understand and be proficient in the use of 
(as appropriate to the aircraft) performance charts, tables, graphs, or 
other data relating to the certificate holder's approved system for the 
following:
    (i) Accelerate--stop distance.
    (ii) Accelerate--go distance.
    (iii) Balanced field.
    (iv) Takeoff performance, all engines and with engine(s) 
inoperative, as appropriate.
    (v) Climb performance including segmented climb performance; with 
all engines operating; with one or more engine(s) inoperative, and with 
other engine malfunctions as may be appropriate.
    (vi) Service ceiling, all engines, with engines(s) inoperative, 
including Drift Down and Terrain Clearance, if appropriate.
    (vii) Cruise performance.
    (viii) Fuel consumption, range, and endurance.
    (ix) Descent performance.
    (xi) Go-around from rejected landings.
    (xii) The effects of meteorological conditions upon performance 
characteristics with correct application of these factors to a specific 
chart, table, graph or other performance data.
    (xiii) How to determine longitudinal and lateral center-of-gravity 
location for a specific load condition including how to add, remove, or 
shift weight to meet longitudinal (forward and aft), and lateral 
balance limits for takeoff, cruise, and landing.
    (2) The aircraft dispatcher must know all of the limitations 
appropriate to each aircraft type and the kind of operation the 
dispatcher dispatches with respect to:
    (i) Systems and components.
    (ii) Performance.

[[Page 1450]]

    (iii) MEL issues and how they may be different for a flag operation 
or a domestic operation.
    (c) Task: Operating Requirements (10 questions required).
    The aircraft dispatcher must understand the certificate holder's 
operating requirements as provided in:
    (1) Operations Specifications.
    (2) General Operating Manual.
    (3) 14 CFR part 1.
    (4) 14 CFR part 91.
    (5) 14 CFR part 119.
    (6) 14 CFR part 121.
    (7) 14 CFR part 139.
    (8) 49 CFR part 175 (HMR).
    (9) 49 CFR part 830 (NTSB).
    (10) Special Federal Aviation Regulations (SFARs).
    (11) 49 CFR Chapter 12 (TSR).
    (12) ATC System.
    (13) Airport Facility Directory.
    (d) Task: National Weather System. (5 questions required).
    The aircraft dispatcher must know the National weather system 
(international weather systems, if applicable) and be able to use the 
system to assess weather conditions at departure, intermediate, en 
route, destination, and alternate airports.
    (e) Task: National NOTAM System. (5 questions required).
    The aircraft dispatcher must know the National NOTAM system 
(international NOTAM systems, if applicable) and be able to determine 
the impact of these NOTAMs on en route flight planning and at 
departure, intermediate, en route, destination, and alternate airports.
2. Area of Evaluation: Duty Period Orientation
    (a) Task: Operations Orientation. (5 questions required).
    The dispatcher must know how to use available information to create 
an operations orientation that covers, as applicable:
    (1) The location of all flights for which the dispatcher is 
responsible.
    (2) Planned flights and any special flights for the duty period.
    (3) Knowledge of issues, such as anticipated ATC problems and 
delays.
    (4) NOTAMS, weather, and field conditions for regular and alternate 
airports.
    (5) Navigation facilities and any irregularities that may affect 
the safety of flight.
    (b) Task: Dispatcher Shift Turnover. (5 questions required).
    The dispatcher must:
    (1) Determine that his or her duty schedule complies with part 121 
dispatcher duty regulations and certificate holder operating 
procedures.
    (2) Become thoroughly briefed at the beginning of duty period by 
the dispatcher who is turning over operational control.
    (3) Develop situational awareness and prioritize his or her 
workload.
    (4) Provide thorough briefing at the end of the duty period to the 
relieving dispatcher.
    (c) Task: Shift Self Briefing. (5 questions required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must use available information to 
anticipate and respond to events that may occur during the duty period, 
including:
    (1) The general weather patterns.
    (2) Weather information system status.
    (3) EWINS status (if applicable).
    (4) Radar imagery.
    (5) Fuel status of current and planned flights.
    (6) MEL status of current and planned flights.
    (7) General airport conditions.
    (d) Task: Certificate Holder Manuals, Procedures, and Operating 
Information. (10 questions required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must understand and verify the currency of 
the operational procedures contained in the following:
    (1) Certificate holder manual containing Flight Crew Operating 
Manual (FCOM) information.
    (2) Airplane Flight Manual (AFM).
    (3) Manual containing certificate holder operations procedures.
    (4) Manual containing the Aircraft Dispatcher Procedures Manual 
(ADPM).
    (5) Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM).
    (6) Certificate holder's operations specifications.
    (7) Maintenance restrictions such as airworthiness directives.
    (8) MEL.
    (9) CDL.
3. Area of Evaluation: Planning and Executing a Dispatch Release
    (a) Task: Obtain, Evaluate, and Disseminate Required Information. 
(10 questions required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must do the following, as applicable:
    (1) Obtain, evaluate, and disseminate to the flight crew all 
pertinent weather information in the aircraft dispatcher's area of 
responsibility as follows:
    (i) Weather reports and forecasts.
    (ii) Pilot and radar reports.
    (iii) Surface analysis reports.
    (iv) Radar summary charts.
    (v) Significant weather prognostics.
    (vi) Winds and temperature aloft.
    (vii) Freezing level charts.
    (viii) Turbulence reports and forecasts.
    (ix) Icing reports and forecasts.
    (x) Stability charts.
    (xi) Severe weather outlook charts.
    (xii) Constant pressure charts.
    (xiii) Constant pressure prognostics.
    (xiv) Tables and conversion graphs.
    (xv) SIGMETS, convective SIGMETS, convective outlooks, weather 
warnings, and AIRMETS.
    (xvi) ATIS report.
    (xvii) Satellite imagery.
    (xviii) NOTAMs.
    (xix) Field condition reports.
    (2) Obtain, evaluate, and disseminate to the flight crew other 
information in the aircraft dispatcher's area of responsibility, such 
as the following:
    (i) Aircraft status.
    (A) Maintenance and MEL.
    (B) Loading and fuel.
    (C) Performance data.
    (ii) ATC problems such as departure or arrival delays, flow control 
and en route or altitude problems.
    (iii) ATC tower closures, curfews, or other information, such as 
noise abatement requirements at or near the arrival period.
    (iv) Fuel and ground handling issues.
    (v) Highlight restrictive MEL and CDL items.
    (vi) Irregular operations plan of action (e.g., diversion).
    (3) Obtain, review, and disseminate to the flight crew the 
following:
    (i) The suitability of runways, including whether closed runways or 
runways with displaced thresholds are accounted for in the performance 
computations.
    (ii) All NOTAMs.
    (iii) Information about field conditions (contact the station if 
the information is not readily available) at airports to determine the 
validity of the information and the impact on operations.
    (iv) The fueling restrictions and any station equipment problems 
(contact the station if the information is not readily available) for 
the airports to determine the impact on planned operations.
    (4) Review the aircraft dispatcher ``read file'' for updated 
operational information.
    (5) Review AIM.
    (i) Navaids.
    (ii) Airports and air navigation and lighting.
    (iii) Airspace.
    (iv) Air traffic control procedures including clearances.
    (v) Airport operations.
    (vi) Departure, en route, and arrival procedures.
    (6) Review the Flight Crew Qualification for route to be flown
    (i) Special airports.
    (ii) Special use airspace.
    (iii) High minimum captains and flight crew minimums.

[[Page 1451]]

    (7) Review the aircraft status.
    (i) Maintenance and MEL.
    (ii) Loading and fuel.
    (iii) Performance data.
    (iv) Special areas of operation requirements.
    (b) Task: Flight Planning. (15 questions required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must do the following, as applicable:
    (1) Select an alternate airport.
    (i) Use a flight movement forecast (FMF) under an approved EWINS 
program.
    (ii) Determine whether an alternate airport is required for the 
destination airport in accordance with 14 CFR part 121, any existing 
exemptions, deviations, operations specification requirements, and 
procedures, for the certificate holder.
    (iii) If weather conditions at the departure airport are below 
landing minimums in the certificate holder's operation specifications 
for that airport, specify a departure alternate in accordance with 14 
CFR part 121, and the approved certificate holder procedures.
    (iv) Ensure that each alternate airport selected (whether for 
departure or destination airports) meets the requirements of 14 CFR 
part 121, and the approved certificate holder procedures.
    (v) Consider and plan for an unscheduled stop.
    (vi) Determine the operational suitability of the planned alternate 
by determining the following:
    (A) Field conditions (e.g., wet runways, runway friction reports, 
braking action reports).
    (B) The MEL and CDL status of the aircraft and any potential 
weather related condition or restriction.
    (C) Crosswind and tailwind components.
    (D) Weather reporting service is available.
    (E) Approach chart does not prohibit its use as an alternate.
    (F) The appropriate navigational facilities are monitored and 
operational.
    (G) The airport has an instrument approach procedure authorized for 
use by the certificate holder.
    (H) Tower closures and alternative procedures.
    (2) Determine whether holding is anticipated at both the 
destination and the appropriate alternate(s) by considering the 
following:
    (i) En route conditions.
    (ii) ATC constraints.
    (iii) Possible re-routes.
    (iv) Marginal weather conditions at the arrival airports.
    (v) MEL and CDL considerations.
    (3) Determine the MEL and CDL status of the aircraft and its impact 
on the flight plan.
    (4) Plan the flight considering the following:
    (i) The ATC preferred routing (e.g., High Altitude Redesign, RVSM, 
RNP).
    (ii) The performance requirements of part 121, subpart I.
    (iii) The MEL or CDL status of the aircraft and any potential 
weather related considerations of resultant restrictions.
    (iv) The en route navigational facilities are monitored and 
operational.
    (v) Maintenance, test, training, and ferry flights (as applicable).
    (5) Determine the fuel load requirements.
    (i) Ensure that the flight is released with sufficient fuel on 
board to comply with the requirements of 14 CFR and the certificate 
holder's requirements for computing minimum fuel supply.
    (ii) Consider the impact of underfueling or overfueling on the 
dispatch release.
    (iii) Comply with the requirements of any deviations or exemptions 
used.
    (6) Determine aircraft performance requirements. Ensure that the 
flight is released at a weight and configuration that complies with the 
requirements of 14 CFR part 121, subpart I and any additional 
certificate holder requirements.
    (c) Task: Create and Issue Dispatch Release. (5 questions required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must do the following, as applicable:
    (1) Create and issue a dispatch release using the certificate 
holder's approved system for issuing dispatch releases.
    (2) Create and issue a dispatch release using the certificate 
holder's approved back-up system for issuing dispatch releases.
    (3) Ensure that the dispatch release meets the regulatory 
requirements and contains or has attached to it the available weather 
reports, weather forecasts (or a combination of these) for the 
destination airport, any intermediate stops, and any alternate 
airports.
    (4) Ensure the dispatch release meets the approved certificate 
holder requirements.
    (d) Task: Briefing Flight Crews. (5 questions required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must demonstrate the ability to brief the 
flight crew on the topics listed in paragraph C.3. of this attachment.
4. Area of Evaluation: Flight Monitoring
    (a) Task: Updating and Gathering Information. (5 questions 
required)
    During the en route portion of the flight, the dispatcher must:
    (1) Track changing weather and operating conditions.
    (2) Determine the actual time the aircraft departed, progress of 
flight, and its estimated time of arrival.
    (3) Provide the PIC with necessary information for the safe conduct 
of the flight, such as changing meteorological conditions or 
irregularities of facilities and services. Provide this information 
using the certificate holder's approved communication system(s).
    (4) Advise the PIC of any changes in the operations environment as 
follows:
    (i) ATC constraints.
    (ii) Updated NOTAMs that may affect the flight.
    (iii) Change in operations and an alternate plan.
    (iv) Field conditions and runway availability.
    (b) Task: Operational Control Decisionmaking. (5 questions 
required)
    The aircraft dispatcher must do the following, as applicable:
    (1) Understand the operational function of and interaction with 
other departments, such as the following:
    (i) Maintenance.
    (ii) Crew scheduling.
    (iii) Training.
    (iv) Customer service.
    (v) Airport and station.
    (2) Process the operational function of and interaction with these 
departments into an operational control decision in accordance with 
approved certificate holder procedures.
    (c) Task: Amend Dispatch Release. (5 questions required).
    The aircraft dispatcher must demonstrate the following:
    (1) Determine when an amendment to a dispatch release is required 
(e.g., mechanical problem, alternate or destination changes).
    (2) Amend the dispatch release in accordance with approved 
certificate holder procedures.
    (3) Record that amendment in accordance with approved certificate 
holder procedures.
5. Area of Evaluation: Situation Management
    (a) Task: Dispatch and Aircraft Abnormality or Emergency. (10 
questions required).
    The dispatcher must demonstrate the ability to do the following:
    (1) Manage the following abnormal and emergency situations 
generated from a source other that the flight crew:
    (i) A bomb threat is received.
    (ii) Inflight medical emergency.
    (iii) Engine failure in flight.
    (iv) Inflight fire.
    (v) Overweight landings.
    (vi) Low fuel emergencies.

[[Page 1452]]

    (vii) Aircraft diversions.
    (viii) Hijacking.
    (ix) Sabotage threats.
    (x) An aircraft has been involved in a major accident.
    (xi) An aircraft is overdue or missing.
    (xii) Actions or alerts issued by military or other security 
agencies.
    (xiii) Any other operational situation that affects the safety of 
flight.
    (2) Establish communication with the Aircraft through the normal 
certificate holder air to ground communication system.
    (3) Immediately notify the PIC of an emergency situation that 
arises during flight that requires an immediate decision and action by 
an aircraft dispatcher and record that decision.
    (4) Determine whether the PIC has declared an emergency.
    (5) Declare an emergency (if appropriate) in accordance with 14 CFR 
in the event the aircraft dispatcher cannot communicate with the PIC.
    (6) Maintain operational control of the flight experiencing the 
abnormal or emergency situation.
    (7) Notify certificate holder management of the abnormal or 
emergency situation.
    (8) Maintain operational control of all flights in the dispatcher's 
control.
    (9) Contact maintenance for mechanical situations.
    (10) Determine the extent of the situation and attempt to classify 
the type of situation in order to report it properly to the 
authorities.
    (11) Use of the appropriate certificate holder manuals (e.g., QRH, 
emergency procedures manual).
    (b) Task: Collection and dissemination of information on overdue or 
missing aircraft. (5 questions required).
    The aircraft dispatcher must:
    (1) Know how to send a written report of any deviation (within 10 
days of the emergency) through the certificate holder's operations 
manager to the POI at the certificate holding district office in 
accordance with 14 CFR.
    (2) Know how to notify the nearest National Transportation Safety 
Board (NTSB) office when an accident or any of the following occur:
    (i) Flight control system malfunction or failure.
    (ii) Inability of any required flight crewmember to perform normal 
flight duties as a result of injury or illness.
    (iii) Failure of structural components of a turbine engine 
excluding compressor and turbine blades and vanes.
    (iv) In-flight fire.
    (v) Aircraft collide in flight.
    (vi) Damage to property, other than the aircraft, estimated to 
exceed $25,000 for repair (including materials and labor) or fair 
market value in the event of total loss, whichever is less.
    (vii) For large multiengine aircraft (more than 12,500 pounds 
maximum certificated takeoff weight):
    (A) In-flight failure of electrical systems which requires the 
sustained use of an emergency bus powered by a back-up source such as a 
battery, auxiliary power unit, or air-driven generator to retain flight 
control or essential instruments;
    (B) In-flight failure of hydraulic systems that results in 
sustained reliance on the sole remaining hydraulic or mechanical system 
for movement of flight control surfaces;
    (C) Sustained loss of the power or thrust produced by two or more 
engines; and
    (D) An evacuation of an aircraft in which an emergency egress 
system is utilized.
    (viii) An aircraft is overdue and is believed to have been involved 
in an accident.
6. Area of Evaluation: Dispatch Resource Management
    (a) Evaluation. Evaluation of an aircraft dispatcher's practical 
application of DRM skills must occur as follows:
    (1) After the aircraft dispatcher has completed initial, combined 
certification and initial, recurrent, and requalification training. 
This evaluation must be completed during the proficiency test (for 
initial and combined certification and initial training) and during the 
proficiency check (for recurrent or requalification training).
    (2) During the supervised operating experience delivered after 
initial, combined certification and initial, and requalification 
training.
    (b) Task: Demonstrate and apply DRM concepts. (Evaluation must be 
in the form of demonstration)
    The aircraft dispatcher must know and be able to apply the 
following DRM competencies:
    (1) Briefings.
    (2) Assertiveness.
    (3) Inquiry.
    (4) Conflict resolution.
    (5) Interdepartmental coordination process.
    (6) Interpersonal relationships.
    (7) Situational awareness.
    (8) Preparation, planning, and vigilance.
    (9) Time management (prioritizing).
    (10) Tactical and strategic use of resources.
    (11) Stress management.
    (12) Decisionmaking process.
    (13) Multi-tasking.
    (14) Risk management.
    (15) Leadership.
    (16) Communication.

PART 135--OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON-DEMAND OPERATIONS

    35. The authority citation for part 135 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 44113, 44701-44702, 44705, 44709, 
44711-44713, 44715-44717, 44722.

    36. Revise Sec.  135.1(a)(4) to read as follows:


Sec.  135.1  Applicability.

    (a) * * *
    (4) Each person who applies for initial or provisional approval of 
an Advanced Qualification Program curriculum, curriculum segment, or 
portion of a curriculum segment under subpart Y of part 121 of this 
chapter and each person employed or used by a certificate holder to 
perform training, qualification, or evaluation functions under an 
Advanced Qualification Program under subpart Y of part 121 of this 
chapter.
* * * * *
    37. Revise Sec.  135.3(b) and (c) and add paragraph (d) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  135.3  Rules applicable to operations under this part.

* * * * *
    (b) Each certificate holder that conducts commuter operations under 
this part with airplanes in which two pilots are required by the type 
certification rules of this chapter must comply with subpart BB of part 
121 of this chapter instead of the requirements of subparts E, G, and H 
of this part.
    (c) The rules in subpart BB of part 121 of this chapter are 
considered a subpart of part 135 of this chapter for certificate 
holders identified in paragraph (b) of this section.
    (d) If authorized by the Administrator upon application, each 
certificate holder that conducts operations under this part to which 
paragraph (b) of this section does not apply, may comply with the 
applicable sections of subpart BB of part 121 of this chapter instead 
of the requirements of subparts E, G, and H of this part, except that 
those authorized certificate holders may choose to comply with the 
operating experience requirements of Sec.  135.244, instead of the 
requirements of Sec.  121.1225 of this chapter.

PART 142--TRAINING CENTERS

    38. The authority citation for part 142 continues to read as 
follows:


[[Page 1453]]


    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 40119, 44101, 44701-44703, 
44705, 44707, 44709-44711, 45102-45103, 45301-45302.


Sec.  142.1  [Amended]

    39. Remove and reserve Sec.  142.1(b)(2).
    40. Revise Sec.  142.63(b) to read as follows:


Sec.  142.63  Privileges.

* * * * *
    (b) Approved under subpart Y, Advanced Qualification Program, of 
part 121 of this chapter, for meeting recency of experience 
requirements.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on December 4, 2008.
 John M. Allen,
Acting Director, Flight Standards Service.
[FR Doc. E8-29584 Filed 1-9-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P