[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 116 (Thursday, June 17, 2010)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 34322-34336]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-14495]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

7 CFR Parts 301 and 305

[Docket No. APHIS-2008-0015]
RIN 0579-AC85


Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Quarantine and 
Interstate Movement Regulations

AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA.

ACTION: Interim rule and request for comments.

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SUMMARY: We are quarantining the States of Florida and Georgia, Puerto 
Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, two parishes in Louisiana, and two 
counties in South Carolina due to the presence of citrus greening and 
quarantining Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, 
Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Texas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, three 
counties in South Carolina, portions of one county in Arizona, and all 
of three and portions of an additional three counties in California due 
to the presence of Asian citrus psyllid, a vector of the bacterial 
pathogen that causes citrus greening. This action follows the discovery 
of these pests in the respective quarantined areas. We are also 
establishing restrictions on the interstate movement of regulated 
articles from the quarantined areas. This action is necessary on an 
emergency basis in order to prevent the spread of the disease and its 
vector to noninfested areas of the United States.

DATES: This interim rule is effective June 17, 2010, except for Sec.  
301.76-4 which is effective September 15, 2010. We will consider all 
comments that we receive on or before August 16, 2010.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by either of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to (http://
www.regulations.gov/

[[Page 34323]]

fdmspublic/component/main?main=DocketDetail&d=APHIS-2008-0015) to 
submit or view comments and to view supporting and related materials 
available electronically.
     Postal Mail/Commercial Delivery: Please send one copy of 
your comment to Docket No. APHIS-2008-0015, Regulatory Analysis and 
Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8, 4700 River Road Unit 118, 
Riverdale, MD 20737-1238. Please state that your comment refers to 
Docket No. APHIS-2008-0015.
    Reading Room: You may read any comments that we receive on this 
docket in our reading room. The reading room is located in room 1141 of 
the USDA South Building, 14th Street and Independence Avenue SW., 
Washington, DC. Normal reading room hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except holidays. To be sure someone is there to 
help you, please call (202) 690-2817 before coming.
    Other Information: Additional information about APHIS and its 
programs is available on the Internet at (http://www.aphis.usda.gov).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Patrick Gomes, PPQ, APHIS, 920 
Main Campus Drive, Suite 200, Raleigh, NC 27606-5213; (919) 855-7313.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    Under section 412(a) of the Plant Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 7701 et 
seq., referred to below as the PPA), the Secretary of Agriculture may 
prohibit or restrict the movement in interstate commerce of any plant 
or plant product, if the Secretary determines that the prohibition or 
restriction is necessary to prevent the dissemination of a plant 
disease within the United States. Under the Act, the Secretary may also 
issue regulations requiring plants and plant products moved in 
interstate commerce to be subject to remedial measures determined 
necessary to prevent the spread of the disease, or requiring the 
objects to be accompanied by a permit issued by the Secretary prior to 
movement.
    In accordance with the PPA, we are amending ``Domestic Quarantine 
Notices'' at 7 CFR part 301 by adding a new subpart, ``Citrus Greening 
and Asian Citrus Psyllid'' (Sec. Sec.  301.76 through 301.76-11, 
referred to below as the regulations). The regulations quarantine the 
States of Florida and Georgia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, 
two parishes in Louisiana, and two counties in South Carolina due to 
the presence of citrus greening and quarantine Alabama, Florida, 
Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Texas, the 
U.S. Virgin Islands, three counties in South Carolina, portions of one 
county in Arizona, and all of three and portions of an additional three 
counties in California due to the presence of Asian citrus psyllid, a 
vector of the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus greening.
    Citrus greening, also known as Huanglongbing disease of citrus, is 
considered to be one of the most serious citrus diseases in the world. 
Citrus greening is a bacterial disease, caused by strains of the 
bacterial pathogen ``Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'', that attacks 
the vascular system of host plants. The pathogen is phloem-limited, 
inhabiting the food-conducting tissue of the host plant, and causes 
yellow shoots, blotchy mottling and chlorosis, reduced foliage, and tip 
dieback of citrus plants. Citrus greening greatly reduces production, 
destroys the economic value of the fruit, and can kill trees. Once 
infected, there is no cure for a tree with citrus greening disease. In 
areas of the world where the disease is endemic, citrus trees decline 
and die within a few years and may never produce usable fruit. Citrus 
greening was first detected in the United States in Miami-Dade County, 
FL, in 2005, and is only known to be present in the United States in 
the States of Florida and Georgia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin 
Islands, two parishes in Louisiana, and two counties in South Carolina.
    The bacterial pathogen causing citrus greening can be transmitted 
by grafting, and under laboratory conditions, by dodder. There also is 
some evidence, discussed later in this document, that seed transmission 
may occur. The pathogen can also be transmitted by two insect vectors 
in the family Psyllidae: Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, the Asian citrus 
psyllid (ACP), and Trioza erytreae (del Guercio), the African citrus 
psyllid. ACP can also cause economic damage to citrus in groves and 
nurseries by direct feeding. Both adults and nymphs feed on young 
foliage, depleting the sap and causing galling or curling of leaves. 
High populations feeding on a citrus shoot can kill the growing tip. 
ACP is currently present in the States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, 
Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Texas, the U.S. 
Virgin Islands, and portions of Arizona, California, and South 
Carolina. Based on regular surveys of domestic commercial citrus-
producing areas, the African citrus psyllid is not present in the 
United States.
    The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) of the 
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has undertaken measures 
to control the artificial spread of citrus greening and its vectors to 
noninfested areas of the United States since the introduction of the 
disease in 2005. On September 16, 2005, APHIS issued a Federal Order 
designating one affected county in Florida as a quarantined area, and 
imposing restrictions on the interstate movement all citrus greening 
and ACP host material from this area.\1\
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    \1\ To view the September 2005 Federal Order, or any other 
Federal Order referenced in this interim rule, go to (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/citrus_greening/regs.shtml).
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    In January 2006, we issued an environmental assessment, titled 
``Citrus Greening Control Program in Florida Nurseries'' (January 
2006).\2\ This document assessed the environmental impacts associated 
with the use of the pesticide treatments acetamiprid, chlorpyrifos, 
fenpropathrin, imidacloprid, kaolin, and a cyfluthrin/imidacloprid 
mixture as part of a disease control program for citrus greening and 
ACP.
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    \2\ To view the 2006 environmental assessment, go to (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/ea/downloads/citrusgreening1-06ea.pdf).
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    On May 3, 2006, we revised the September 2005 Federal Order to 
designate 9 additional counties in Florida as quarantined areas.
    On November 2, 2007, we issued a revised order that designated 18 
additional counties in Florida as areas quarantined for citrus greening 
and quarantined 32 counties in Texas, the entire States of Florida and 
Hawaii, the entire Territory of Guam, and the entire Commonwealth of 
Puerto Rico for ACP. This order also contained treatments that could be 
performed on ACP regulated articles to allow their movement from a 
quarantined area to areas of the United States other than commercial 
citrus-producing States. The order stated that, prior to movement, 
regulated articles (other than Bergera (=Murraya) koenigii, or 
curryleaf) had to be treated using an Environmental Protection Agency 
(EPA)-approved product labeled for use in nurseries. The articles had 
to subsequently be treated with a drench containing imidacloprid as the 
active ingredient within 30 days prior to movement and with a foliar 
spray with a product containing acetamiprid,\3\ chlorpyrifos, or 
fenpropathrin as the active ingredient within 10 days prior to 
movement.

[[Page 34324]]

Provided that it did not originate from an area quarantined for citrus 
greening, curryleaf could be moved interstate to any State following 
treatment with methyl bromide according to the APHIS-approved treatment 
schedule MB T101-n-2, found in 7 CFR part 305.
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    \3\ We have since obtained data suggesting that acetamiprid is 
not efficacious in neutralizing ACP. Accordingly, we are not 
designating it an APHIS-approved treatment within this interim rule.
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    We accompanied this revised order with a notice\4\ published on the 
same day in the Federal Register (72 FR 62204-62205, Docket No. APHIS-
2007-0135) in which we announced to the public the availability of an 
environmental assessment, titled ``Movement of Regulated Articles from 
Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid Quarantine Zones'' (October 
2007). The assessment evaluated the possible environmental impacts 
associated with implementation of the revised Federal Order and, in 
particular, the treatment schedules specified within it.
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    \4\ To view the notice or the environmental assessment, go to 
(http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/main?main=DocketDetail&d=APHIS-2007-0135).
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    The November 2007 order also provided Florida and Texas with a 
deadline of December 1, 2007, to adopt and enforce regulations 
restricting the intrastate movement of regulated articles that were 
equivalent to those imposed by the Federal Order on the interstate 
movement of regulated articles from areas within the State quarantined 
for citrus greening, in the case of Florida, and ACP, in the case of 
Texas. If such regulations were not established by December 1, 2007, we 
stated that we would designate the entire States as quarantined areas.
    Texas established such regulations prior to December 1, 2007, while 
Florida did not. Accordingly, on January 11, 2008, we amended the 
Federal Order to designate the State of Florida as an area quarantined 
for citrus greening. In that Federal Order, we also allowed for the use 
of irradiation, in addition to the option of using methyl bromide, as a 
possible treatment for curryleaf and other articles intended for 
consumption or decorative use and moved from the ACP quarantined area.
    On June 24, 2008, we amended the Federal Order to add one parish in 
Louisiana to the list of areas quarantined for citrus greening, and 
four parishes in Louisiana to the list of areas quarantined for ACP, 
following the detection of the disease and ACP within the State. On 
July 11, 2008, we amended the Federal Order to designate an additional 
parish in Louisiana as a quarantined area for ACP. On July 22, 2008, we 
amended the Federal Order to designate two additional parishes in 
Louisiana as quarantined areas for ACP. On August 5, 2008, we updated 
the order to add an additional parish in Louisiana to the list of ACP 
quarantined areas. Louisiana established equivalent intrastate 
regulations to prevent the spread of citrus greening and ACP from the 
quarantined areas.
    On September 12, 2008, we amended the Federal Order to add the 
entire State of Georgia, as well as one county in Alabama, one county 
in Mississippi, three counties in South Carolina, and three additional 
counties in Texas to the list of ACP quarantined areas. Alabama, 
Mississippi, and South Carolina established equivalent intrastate 
regulations to prevent the spread of ACP; Georgia elected to forgo 
establishment of such regulations in favor of a Statewide quarantine.
    On October 1, 2008, we updated the Federal Order to designate 
another parish in Louisiana as a quarantined area for citrus greening, 
and portions of one county in California as a quarantined area for ACP. 
Upon detection of ACP, California immediately implemented equivalent 
restrictions on intrastate movement of regulated articles. Therefore, 
only portions of one county were designated as a quarantined area.
    In January 2009, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas 
requested to have their entire States designated as quarantined areas 
for ACP. Accordingly, on January 28, 2009, we amended the Federal Order 
to designate the entire States of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and 
Texas as quarantined areas for ACP. In that Federal Order, we also 
expanded the quarantined area in California by adding portions of an 
adjacent county.
    On July 29, 2009, we updated the Federal Order to add the State of 
Georgia and two counties in South Carolina to the list of areas 
quarantined for citrus greening, and to add portions of a third county 
in California to the list of areas quarantined for ACP.
    On September 21, 2009, we updated the Order to add Los Angeles and 
Orange Counties to the area in California that is quarantined for ACP.
    On November 20, 2009, we updated the Order to designate all of 
Puerto Rico as a quarantined area for citrus greening.
    On December 15, 2009, we updated the Order to designate portions of 
one county in Arizona as a quarantined area for ACP, and to modify the 
area quarantined for ACP in California.
    This rule replaces the December 15, 2009, Federal Order. It 
codifies some of the provisions of the order, clarifies others, and 
adds provisions that we have determined since the issuance of the order 
to be necessary in order to prevent the spread of citrus greening and 
ACP to noninfested areas of the United States.

Restrictions on the interstate movement of regulated articles (Sec.  
301.76)

    Section 301.76 prohibits the interstate movement of articles 
regulated for citrus greening and ACP from an area quarantined for 
citrus greening or ACP, except in accordance with the regulations.

Definitions (Sec.  301.76-1)

    Section 301.76-1 contains definitions of the following terms: 
Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), 
Asian citrus psyllid, certificate, citrus greening, commercial citrus 
grove, compliance agreement, EPA, established population, inspector, 
interstate, limited permit, moved (move, movement), nursery, nursery 
stock, person, port, quarantined area, regulated article, and State.
    We recognize that the definitions of two of these terms differ from 
existing definitions in our domestic quarantine regulations for citrus 
canker, another disease of citrus plants (see 7 CFR 301.75-1). First, 
in the citrus canker regulations, we define a commercial citrus grove 
as ``an establishment maintained for the primary purpose of producing 
citrus fruit for commercial sale.'' We are defining this term in this 
rule as ``a solid-set planting of trees maintained for the primary 
purpose of producing citrus fruit for commercial sale.'' This new 
definition clarifies that groves differ from other establishments that 
produce citrus fruit for commercial sale, such as nurseries and 
packinghouses. Such a clarification is necessary because movement of 
regulated nursery stock to a commercial citrus grove, in certain 
instances, exempts the articles from having to be labeled in accordance 
with Sec.  301.76-4(a). We discuss this labeling requirement in greater 
depth later in this document.
    Second, in the citrus canker regulations, we define a nursery as 
``any premises, including greenhouses but excluding groves, at which 
nursery stock is grown or maintained.'' Here, we are defining a nursery 
as ``any commercial location where nursery stock is grown, propagated, 
stored, maintained, or sold, or any location from which nursery stock 
is distributed.'' This definition clarifies that any establishment that 
contains nursery stock, including retailers and distributors, must 
comply with the relevant regulations established by this interim rule.

[[Page 34325]]

    We intend to amend these two definitions in the citrus canker 
regulations in a forthcoming rulemaking to make them identical to the 
definitions in the citrus greening regulations.

Regulated articles for ACP and citrus greening (Sec.  301.76-2)

    Articles of several species of plants are host material for ACP, 
and thus present a risk of spreading ACP if they are moved from 
quarantined areas without restrictions. Most, although not all, of 
these species are also already confirmed to be hosts of ``Candidatus 
Liberibacter asiaticus'', the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus 
greening. That said, both ACP and citrus greening are known to attack 
hosts within the plant family Rutaceae. Moreover, scientists have not 
yet discovered any members of the Rutaceae family that are resistant or 
immune to citrus greening. Indeed, studies to date suggest that 
grafting plant parts infected with citrus greening, as well as probing 
and feeding by ACP carrying the citrus greening pathogen, can transmit 
citrus greening to ACP host articles previously considered immune to 
the disease.\5\ Finally, there is emerging evidence that plant species 
that are only known to be hosts of ACP may also be infected by citrus 
greening without showing symptoms of the disease.\6\ Based on the 
apparent lack of immunity to citrus greening among the Rutaceae family, 
the possibility that ACP hosts may be infected but asymptomatic hosts 
for citrus greening, and the severity of citrus greening, we have 
determined it necessary to consider all ACP host species to be 
potential host species of citrus greening.
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    \5\ See, e.g., Hung, T.H. M. L. Wu, H. J. Su. Identification of 
Alternative Hosts of the Fastidious Bacterium Causing Citrus 
Greening Disease. Journal of Phytopathology (June 2000), 321-326.
    \6\ Source: Dr. Andrew Beattie, University of West Sydney. 
Correspondence with APHIS, March 2008.
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    Therefore, paragraph (a) of Sec.  301.76-2 states that all plants 
and plant parts (including leaves), except fruit, of the following 
species are regulated articles for ACP and citrus greening: Aegle 
marmelos, Aeglopsis chevalieri, Afraegle gabonensis, A. paniculata, 
Amyris madrensis, Atalantia spp. (including Atalantia monophylla), 
Balsamocitrus dawei, Bergera (=Murraya) koenigii, Calodendrum capense, 
Choisya ternate, C. arizonica, X Citroncirus webberi, Citropsis 
articulata, Citropsis gilletiana, Citrus madurensis (= X 
Citrofortunella microcarpa), Citrus spp., Clausena anisum-olens, C. 
excavata, C. indica, C. lansium, Eremocitrus glauca, Eremocitrus 
hybrid, Esenbeckia berlandieri, Fortunella spp., Limonia acidissima, 
Merrillia caloxylon, Microcitrus australasica, M. australis, M. 
papuana, XMicrocitronella spp., Murraya spp., Naringi crenulata, 
Pamburus missionis, Poncirus trifoliata, Severinia buxifolia, Swinglea 
glutinosa, Tetradium ruticarpum, Toddalia asiatica, Triphasia trifolia, 
Vepris (=Toddalia) lanceolata, and Zanthoxylum fagara.
    In a November 19, 2007, final rule (72 FR 65172-65204, Docket No. 
APHIS-2007-0022) governing the interstate movement of citrus fruit from 
an area quarantined for citrus canker, we stated that we were 
evaluating whether seed contained in fruit serves as a pathway for the 
transmission of citrus greening.\7\ Our evaluation determined that it 
does not. Moreover, fruit is not known to be a host article of ACP. 
Accordingly, we are not designating fruit as a regulated article for 
either citrus greening or ACP.
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    \7\ To view the November 2007 final rule, go to (http://www.regulations.gov/fdmspublic/component/main?main=DocketDetail&d=APHIS-2007-0022).
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    That said, while propagative seed (i.e., seed not contained in 
fruit and intended for planting) is not a host of ACP, we do consider 
it a potential host of citrus greening. This determination is based on 
emerging scientific evidence, from studies conducted by USDA's 
Agricultural Research Service and the Center for Plant Health Science 
and Technology (CPHST) of APHIS' Plant Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) 
program, that a small percentage of seedlings generated from seed taken 
from plants infected with citrus greening have tested positive for the 
disease. While evidence is not yet conclusive regarding the ability of 
propagative seed to transmit the disease, the severity of citrus 
greening has led us to determine that, in the absence of scientific 
evidence demonstrating that propagative seed is not a host of citrus 
greening, it should be considered a host.
    Therefore, paragraph (b) of Sec.  301.76-2 states that propagative 
seed of the species listed in Sec.  301.76-2(a) is considered a host of 
citrus greening but not a host of ACP. Accordingly, notwithstanding the 
other provisions of this rule, the movement of propagative seed of 
these species from an area quarantined for citrus greening is 
prohibited, while the movement of such seed from an area quarantined 
only for ACP, but not for citrus greening, is allowed without 
restriction.
    Paragraph (c) states that any other product, article, or means of 
conveyance may be designated as a regulated article for ACP or citrus 
greening, if an inspector determines that it presents a risk of 
spreading these pests, and after the inspector provides written 
notification to the person in possession of the product, article, or 
means of conveyance that it is subject to the restrictions of the 
regulations. This is intended to address, for example, a truck carrying 
refuse from a quarantined area, if an inspector considers it reasonable 
to believe that this refuse may contain leaves, branches, or other 
plant parts of regulated articles.
    Finally, as we discuss in greater detail later in this document, 
certain plant parts of species that are hosts of citrus greening and 
ACP are used for consumption, as apparel or as a similar personal 
accessory, or for other decorative use. In order to render these parts 
suitable for their intended use, as a standard industry practice, the 
parts often are subject to extensive processing. For example, Bergera 
(=Murraya) koenigii (curryleaf) leaves that are intended for culinary 
use are usually both dried and shredded prior to shipment.
    After reviewing these industry practices, APHIS has determined 
that, if they are uniformly applied, they often make the plant parts 
incapable of hosting live ACP or disseminating viable or potentially 
viable ``Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus''. Accordingly, paragraph 
(d) of Sec.  301.76-2 states that plant parts of the species listed in 
paragraph (a) of the section may be exempted from the regulations in 
the subpart, provided that the parts have been processed such that an 
inspector determines they no longer present a risk of spreading ACP or 
citrus greening. Examples of such processing include, but are not 
limited to, heating, freezing, drying, pickling, and shredding.
    (Please note that the final determination regarding whether to 
exempt such parts lies with the inspector. If an inspector has reason 
to believe that the articles may still host viable ACP or citrus 
greening, he or she may require that a certificate or limited permit be 
issued before the parts may be moved in interstate commerce or subject 
the articles to remedial measures pursuant to APHIS' authority under 
the PPA.)

Quarantined areas; citrus greening and ACP (Sec.  301.76-3)

    Paragraph (a) of Sec.  301.76-3 describes the process by which a 
quarantined area for citrus greening or ACP is designated. Under this 
process, the Administrator will designate an area as a quarantined area 
for citrus greening or as a quarantined area for ACP in accordance

[[Page 34326]]

with the criteria listed in paragraph (c) of Sec.  301.76-3.
    We will publish the description of all areas quarantined for citrus 
greening or ACP on the PPQ Web site at (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/citrus_greening/index.shtml). The 
description of each quarantined area will include the date the 
description was last updated and a description of the changes that have 
been made to the quarantined area. Lists of all quarantined areas may 
also be obtained by request from any local office of PPQ; local offices 
are listed in telephone directories and on the Internet at (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/services/report_pest_disease/report_pest_disease.shtml). After a change is made to the list of quarantined 
areas, we will publish a notice in the Federal Register informing the 
public that the change has occurred and describing the change to the 
quarantined area.
    Paragraph (b) describes the conditions for the designation of less 
than an entire State as a quarantined area. Less than an entire State 
will be designated as a quarantined area for citrus greening or ACP 
only if the Administrator determines that:
     The State has adopted and is enforcing restrictions on the 
intrastate movement of regulated articles that are equivalent to those 
imposed by the regulations on the interstate movement of regulated 
articles; and
     The designation of less than the entire State as a 
quarantined area will prevent the interstate spread of citrus greening 
or ACP.
    Based upon the criteria of this paragraph, we are quarantining the 
entire States of Florida and Georgia, as well as Puerto Rico and the 
U.S. Virgin Islands for citrus greening, and Alabama, Florida, Georgia, 
Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, Texas, and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands for ACP. We do not, however, consider it necessary to 
quarantine the entire State of Louisiana or South Carolina for citrus 
greening or to quarantine the entire States of Arizona, South Carolina, 
or California for ACP. This is because these States have adopted and 
are enforcing equivalent restrictions on the intrastate movement of 
regulated articles from all areas within the State that are quarantined 
for citrus greening or ACP, and because citrus greening or ACP have not 
been found in any areas within those States other than the following 
parishes and counties, or portions thereof:
     In Arizona, portions of Yuma County, as follows, which are 
quarantined for ACP: Sections 19, and 28 through 35 of Township 5 South 
and Range 20 West; Sections 15 through 36 of Township 5 South and Range 
21 West; Sections 13 and 85 of Township 5 South and Range 22 West; 
Sections 7, 17 through 21, and Sections 27 through 34 of Township 6 
South and Range 19 West; all Sections of Township 6 South and Range 20 
West through 22 West; Section 31 of Township 7 South and Range 18 West; 
All Sections of Township 7 South and Range 19 West through 22 West; 
Sections 6, 7, 18, 19, 30, and 31 of Township 8 South Range 18 West; 
All Sections of Township 8 South and Range 19 West through 24 West; 
Sections 6, 7, 18 and 19 of Township 9 South and Range 18 West; All 
Sections of Townships 9 South and Range 19 West through 25 West; 
Sections 1 through 23, 27 through 33 of Township 10 South and Range 19 
West; All Sections of Townships 10 South and Range 20 West through 25 
West; Sections 5, 6, and 7 of Township 11 South and Range 19 West; All 
Sections of Townships 11 South and Range 20 West through 25 West; All 
Sections of Townships 12 South and Range 21 West through 23 West; All 
Sections of Townships 16 South and Range 21 East and 22 East;
     In Louisiana, Orleans and Washington Parishes, which are 
quarantined for citrus greening;
     In South Carolina, Beaufort and Charleston Counties, which 
are quarantined for both ACP and citrus greening, and Colleton County, 
which is quarantined for ACP; and
     In California, Imperial, Los Angeles, and Orange Counties, 
in their entirety; an area consisting of portions of Riverside and San 
Diego Counties; an area consisting of portions of Riverside County and 
San Diego County; and an area consisting of other portions of Riverside 
County and San Bernadino County, which are quarantined for ACP.
    As we mentioned earlier in this document, paragraph (c) of Sec.  
301.76-3 sets forth the criteria for designating a State or a portion 
of a State as a quarantined area for citrus greening or ACP. Under the 
provisions of this paragraph, we will designate a State or portion of a 
State as a quarantined area for citrus greening when the presence of 
citrus greening is confirmed within the area by an APHIS-administered 
test, and we will designate a State or portion of a State as a 
quarantined area for ACP in which an established population of ACPs has 
been detected. ``Established population'' is defined in Sec.  301.76-1 
as the presence of ACP within an area that the Administrator determines 
is likely to persist for the foreseeable future.
    A State, or portion of a State, will also be designated as a 
quarantined area for either citrus greening or ACP if the Administrator 
considers it necessary to quarantine the area because of its 
inseparability for quarantine enforcement purposes from localities in 
which citrus greening or an established population of ACP has been 
found.
    In other regulations governing plant pests, we tend to designate an 
area as a quarantined area if the pest is determined to be present in 
the area. We have not used this criterion for designating an area as 
quarantined for ACP because certain ACP hosts that are intended for 
consumption, as apparel or as a similar personal accessory, or for 
other decorative use may be treated with irradiation at a dosage that 
neutralizes ACP, but does not kill it. Therefore, sterile ACP could be 
present on an article that will be shipped to retailers well outside of 
the natural range of ACP, e.g., on curryleaf shipped to a State in the 
Northeast corridor. We believe that, by qualifying that an established 
population of ACP must be detected within the area, we will have 
sufficient latitude to deal with any such incidents on a case-by-case 
basis, without necessarily imposing restrictions on the interstate 
movement of regulated articles from a State in which ACP is detected on 
such an article. In short, there are occasions when live ACP may be 
detected in an area and we will not quarantine the area for ACP.
    If we detect an established population of ACP within an area, we 
will, on every occasion, quarantine that area for ACP. This is because 
ACP is the primary vector for citrus greening within the United States. 
Its presence in an area facilitates the introduction and spread of 
citrus greening.

Labeling requirements for regulated nursery stock produced within an 
area quarantined for citrus greening (Sec.  301.76-4)

    We have determined that the inadvertent but illicit interstate 
movement of regulated nursery stock from an area quarantined for citrus 
greening is a high-risk pathway for the spread of the disease. For 
example, a tourist visiting a quarantined area could purchase 
ornamental nursery stock at a retail store, roadside stand, or airport 
kiosk, be unaware of the restrictions regarding its interstate 
movement, and transport the article to another State via luggage or 
some other means of conveyance. We are aware of at least 11 instances 
in FY 2008 when hosts of citrus greening were intercepted in passenger 
luggage in transit from Florida to another commercial citrus-

[[Page 34327]]

producing State. We are also aware of instances when producers have 
attempted to sell regulated nursery stock propagated in an area 
quarantined for citrus greening illicitly through Internet commerce. 
Because citrus greening is a high-risk disease, and because the 
introduction of citrus greening into a previously unaffected commercial 
citrus-producing area within the United States could result in 
substantial economic losses within that area, it is vitally important 
to establish a mechanism to alert the general public to these movement 
restrictions with the goal of preventing inadvertent movement.
    Therefore, paragraph (a) of Sec.  301.76-4 states that, effective 
September 15, 2010, except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of 
Sec.  301.76-4, all regulated nursery stock offered for commercial sale 
within an area quarantined for citrus greening must have an APHIS-
approved plastic or metal tag on which a statement alerting consumers 
to Federal prohibitions regarding the interstate movement of the 
article is prominently and legibly displayed. Alternatively, if the 
article is destined for commercial sale in a box or container, the 
statement may be printed on the box or container, or printed on a label 
permanently affixed to the box or container, provided that, in either 
case, the statement is prominently and legibly displayed.
    The operator of the site of propagation of the nursery stock and 
the person offering the plants for commercial sale are jointly 
responsible for all such labeling. Either party may actually do the 
labeling, as long as the plant is labeled in accordance with this 
section by the time it is offered for commercial sale. In accordance 
with our authority under the PPA, APHIS inspectors may take remedial 
measures to prevent the commercial sale of any products that lack such 
labeling; this may include confiscation or destruction of unlabeled 
articles.
    We recognize that some regulated nursery stock produced within a 
quarantined area is destined for planting in a commercial citrus grove 
within that same area and moved directly to that grove, without 
movement outside of the quarantined area. This nursery stock, often 
known as ``source stock,'' is used by the grove in order to ensure that 
there are enough fruit-bearing plants on site for the grove to be 
economically viable. Accordingly, this stock is not moved from the 
grove or commercially distributed. Since this nursery stock is not sold 
to the general public, and is moved solely within an area that is 
already affected with citrus greening, paragraph (b) of Sec.  301.76-4 
states that such nursery stock may be moved without being labeled in 
accordance with paragraph (a).
    Similarly, paragraph (c) states that nursery stock that will be 
moved interstate for immediate export under a limited permit in 
accordance with Sec.  301.76-7(c) may be moved without being labeled in 
such a manner. Such nursery stock is not sold to the general public 
within the United States, and is moved interstate in a sealed container 
that must remain sealed as long as the articles are within the United 
States.
    Finally, we are making this section effective on September 15, 
2010, rather than upon publication of this rule in the Federal 
Register, in order to provide APHIS with sufficient time to engage in 
discussions with Federal and State plant health personnel, as well as 
regulated parties, regarding what statements and design should be 
approved for such labels. APHIS will provide producers and commercial 
retailers with a list of approved statements and tags as expeditiously 
as possible in order to provide these regulated parties with sufficient 
time to produce or purchase and affix labels in order to comply with 
this section.

General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited 
permit; provisions for cancellation of a certificate or limited permit 
(Sec.  301.76-5)

    Under Federal domestic plant quarantine programs, there is a 
difference between the use of certificates and limited permits. 
Certificates are issued when an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement finds that, because of certain conditions, a 
regulated article can be moved safely from a quarantined area without 
spreading the disease or pest. For example, the article may have been 
grown under certain conditions that prohibit the introduction of the 
disease or pest, or may have been subject to remedial measures that 
eradicate the disease or destroy all life stages of the pest. Regulated 
articles accompanied by a certificate may be moved interstate without 
further movement restrictions. Limited permits are issued for regulated 
articles when an inspector finds that, because of a possible pest risk, 
the articles may safely be moved interstate only subject to further 
restrictions, such as prohibitions on movement to certain locations or 
movement for limited purposes. This interim rule establishes conditions 
for the issuance both of certificates and of limited permits. Section 
301.76-5 contains the general conditions for issuing a certificate or 
limited permit.
    Paragraphs (a)(1) and (a)(2) of Sec.  301.76-5 set out the general 
conditions under which an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement will issue a certificate for the interstate 
movement of a regulated article. In addition to all other relevant 
conditions within the regulations, a certificate may only be issued if 
a regulated article:
     Will be moved in compliance with any additional emergency 
conditions that the Administrator may impose under section 414 of the 
Plant Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) to prevent the spread of ACP; and
     Is eligible for unrestricted movement under all other 
Federal domestic plant quarantines and regulations applicable to the 
article.
    In paragraph (a)(1), we have included a footnote (number 2) to 
explain that, in accordance with sections 414, 421, and 423 of the PPA 
(7 U.S.C. 7714, 7731, and 7754), an inspector may hold, seize, 
quarantine, treat, apply other remedial measures to, destroy, or 
otherwise dispose of plants, plant pests, or other articles.
    Paragraph (b) of Sec.  301.76-5 sets out general conditions for the 
issuance of a limited permit. In addition to all other relevant 
conditions of the regulations, an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement may issue a limited permit for the interstate 
movement of a regulated article only if he or she determines that the 
regulated article is to be moved interstate to a specified destination 
for specified handling, processing, or utilization (the destination and 
other conditions to be listed in the limited permit) and that this 
movement of the regulated article will not result in the spread of 
citrus greening or ACP. Furthermore, a limited permit will only be 
issued if the regulated article is to be moved in compliance with any 
additional emergency conditions the Administrator may impose under 
section 414 of the PPA to prevent the spread of citrus greening and 
ACP, and if the regulated article is eligible for interstate movement 
under all other Federal domestic plant quarantines and regulations 
applicable to the article.
    Paragraph (c) allows any person who has entered into and is 
operating under a compliance agreement to issue a certificate or 
limited permit for the interstate movement of a regulated article after 
he or she has determined that the article is eligible for a certificate 
or limited permit under the regulations.
    Paragraph (d) contains provisions for the withdrawal of a 
certificate or limited

[[Page 34328]]

permit if the inspector determines that the holder of the certificate 
or limited permit has not complied with all of the provisions for the 
use of the document or with all of the conditions contained in the 
document. This paragraph also contains provisions for notifying the 
holder of the reasons for the withdrawal and for holding a hearing if 
there is any conflict concerning any material fact in the event that 
the person wishes to appeal the cancellation.
    Finally, paragraph (e) states that, unless specific provisions 
exist in Sec.  301.76-6 or Sec.  301.76-7 of this subpart to allow the 
interstate movement of a certain regulated article, the interstate 
movement of that article is prohibited. This paragraph is necessary to 
clarify that the general provisions Sec.  301.76-5 do not, in 
themselves, provide sufficient conditions for the movement of regulated 
articles, but serve, instead, as indispensable preconditions for the 
movement of regulated articles.

Additional conditions for the issuance of certificates and limited 
permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined 
only for ACP, but not for citrus greening (Sec.  301.76-6)

    Section 301.76-6 establishes additional conditions for the issuance 
of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles moved 
interstate from an area that is quarantined only for ACP, and not 
quarantined for citrus greening. Paragraph (a) establishes additional 
conditions under which an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement may issue a certificate for the interstate 
movement of any regulated article to any State. In addition to the 
general conditions for issuance of a certificate contained in Sec.  
301.76-5(a), a certificate may be issued if:
     The article is treated with methyl bromide in accordance 
with 7 CFR part 305.
     The article is shipped in a container that has been sealed 
with an agricultural seal placed by an inspector.
     The container that will be moved interstate is clearly 
labeled with the certificate.
     A copy of the certificate will be attached to the 
consignee's copy of the accompanying waybill.
    Methyl bromide treatment in accordance with treatment schedule MB 
T101-n-2 has been demonstrated to kill all life stages of ACP. 
Moreover, by requiring that such articles must be sealed with an 
agricultural seal placed by an inspector after treatment, we are 
mitigating the risk that the articles will become reinfested with ACP 
during movement. Accordingly, these conditions collectively are 
sufficient for the issuance of a certificate.
    However, it should be noted that methyl bromide can be phytotoxic, 
that is, damaging or lethal to living plant tissue. Accordingly, we 
recommend that persons contemplating whether to apply methyl bromide to 
regulated nursery stock take this potential phytotoxicity into 
consideration prior to application of the treatment.
    Moreover, it should also be noted that EPA or State or local 
environmental authorities may not authorize the use of methyl bromide 
on certain regulated articles.
    Paragraph (b) establishes additional conditions for the issuance of 
a limited permit for the interstate movement of regulated nursery stock 
from an area quarantined only for ACP, but not for citrus greening. 
Specifically, in addition to the general conditions for issuance of a 
limited permit in Sec.  301.76-5(b), an inspector or person operating 
under a compliance agreement may issue a limited permit for the 
interstate movement of regulated nursery stock if:
     The nursery stock is treated for ACP with an APHIS-
approved soil drench or in-ground granular application no more than 30 
days and no fewer than 20 days before shipment, followed by an APHIS-
approved foliar spray no more than 10 days before shipment. All 
treatments must be applied according to their EPA label, including 
directions on application, restrictions on place of application and 
other restrictions, and precautions, and including statements 
pertaining to Worker Protection Standards.
     The nursery stock is inspected by an inspector in 
accordance with Sec.  301.76-9 and found free of ACP.
     The nursery stock is affixed prior to movement with a 
plastic or metal tag on which the statement ``Limited permit: USDA-
APHIS-PPQ. Not for distribution in American Samoa, Northern Mariana 
Islands, or those portions of AZ, CA, and SC not quarantined due to the 
presence of Asian citrus psyllid or citrus greening'' is prominently 
and legibly displayed. If the nursery stock is destined for movement or 
sale in boxes or containers, the statement may be printed on the box or 
container, or printed on a label permanently affixed to the box or 
container, provided that, in either case, the statement is prominently 
and legibly displayed.
     The nursery stock is moved in a container sealed with an 
agricultural seal placed by an inspector.
     This container also prominently and legibly displays the 
statement of the limited permit.
     A copy of the limited permit is attached to the 
consignee's copy of the accompanying waybill.
     The nursery stock is moved in accordance with the 
conditions specified on the limited permit to the location specified on 
the permit.
    We have previously evaluated both the efficacy of and potential 
environmental impacts associated with the use of several pesticide 
treatments as part of a control program for ACP. Based on efficacy 
studies reviewed by CPHST and the evaluations documented in our 2006 
and 2007 environmental assessments, we have determined that soil 
drenches containing imidacloprid and foliar sprays containing 
chlorpyrifos or fenpropathrin are effective and environmentally sound 
means of controlling ACP for all regulated nursery stock.
    At the request of the citrus industry and State plant health 
officials in several States with commercial citrus production, CPHST 
recently examined the efficacy of in-ground granular applications 
containing dinotefuran and foliar sprays containing bifenthrin, 
deltamethrin, or a mixture of imidacloprid and cyfluthrin as pesticide 
treatments for ACP, and found them to be effective in treating 
regulated nursery stock for ACP. Moreover, the EA that accompanies this 
rule documents that the use of bifenthrin, deltamethrin, dinotefuran, 
or a mixture of imidacloprid and cyfluthrin as a treatment for ACP is 
not likely to have a significant impact on the human environment. 
Accordingly, APHIS is approving the use of each of these pesticides as 
treatments for ACP.
    Additionally, we are currently evaluating the efficacy of several 
other pesticides as treatments for ACP, and we welcome public comment 
regarding the efficacy of any pesticides not currently approved by 
APHIS as treatments for ACP. If, after publication of this rule, we 
determine that a pesticide is efficacious, we will evaluate its impact 
on the human environment. As necessary, we will prepare an 
environmental assessment documenting this evaluation, and will publish 
a notice in the Federal Register to inform the public of the 
availability of this assessment. If an environmental assessment is not 
necessary, or if an assessment and notice of availability are necessary 
but we receive no comments on our notice suggesting that the pesticide 
has a significant impact on the human environment, we will consider 
treatments containing the pesticide to be APHIS-approved treatments for 
ACP. We will maintain a continually updated list of all approved 
pesticides on the

[[Page 34329]]

PPQ Web site (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/citrus_greening/index.shtml).
    While these soil drenches, granular applications, and foliar sprays 
have been proven to be efficacious in neutralizing ACP, because we are 
not establishing regulations governing the locations in which such 
treatments may be applied, it is possible, although unlikely, that the 
nursery stock could be reinfested with ACP before it is sealed in a 
container.
    Because of this risk, we are prohibiting the movement of nursery 
stock treated in such a manner to American Samoa, the Northern Mariana 
Islands, and those portions of Arizona and California that are not 
quarantined due to the presence of ACP because those areas contain 
commercial citrus production and an established population of ACP has 
not yet been detected in the areas. The introduction of ACP to these 
areas, and the possible subsequent introduction of citrus greening, 
could result in substantive economic losses for the areas.
    Although it is not listed as a commercial citrus-producing State, 
we are also prohibiting the movement of nursery stock treated in such a 
manner to the areas in South Carolina that are not quarantined for ACP 
or citrus greening because both ACP and citrus greening exist in South 
Carolina, because surveys have determined that host articles exist both 
in residential areas and in the wild in portions of the State that are 
currently not under quarantine for ACP or citrus greening, and because 
the further dissemination of ACP or citrus greening throughout the 
State could serve as a pathway for the natural or artificial spread of 
ACP and citrus greening throughout the South or to other uninfested 
areas of the United States.
    Soil drenches and in-ground granular applications must be applied 
no fewer than 20 days before shipment because we have determined that 
application of a soil drench fewer than 20 days before shipment often 
results in suboptimal absorption of the drench and, in certain 
instances, may impede the treatment from being effective in 
neutralizing ACP. Conversely, if a foliar spray is applied more than 10 
days before shipment, this increases the possibility of reintroduction 
of the psyllid prior to shipment.
    Regarding the approved soil drenches and granular applications, we 
note that dinotefuran is currently not approved by EPA for use on 
fruit-bearing nursery stock. Similarly, we note that Worker Protection 
Standards, which are statements on the label of certain pesticides 
regarding the prerequisites that an individual must fulfill in order to 
be qualified to apply those pesticides, may also restrict a producer's 
ability to apply certain of these treatments. Finally, we encourage all 
persons who intend to apply soil drenches, granular applications, and 
foliar sprays in accordance with the provisions of this section to 
consult with the environmental authorities in their State, since State 
regulations may restrict the sale or use of certain Federally approved 
treatments.
    Shortly before issuance of our January 11, 2008, Federal Order, we 
received a request from parties who desired to move regulated articles 
intended for consumption (e.g., Bergera (=Murraya) koenigii, or 
curryleaf), as apparel or as a similar personal accessory, or for other 
decorative use (e.g., Murraya paniculata, or mock orange flowers or 
foliage, which are often incorporated into leis and into interior 
floral arrangements) from an area quarantined only for ACP, but not for 
citrus greening, following irradiation treatment.
    Based on our evaluation of the risk associated with such movement, 
we established conditions to allow such movement in that Federal Order.
    In paragraph (c) of Sec.  301.76-6, we codify the movement 
conditions of the January 2008 Federal Order. The paragraph states 
that, in addition to the general conditions for issuance of a limited 
permit within the regulations, an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement may issue a limited permit for the interstate 
movement of regulated articles intended for consumption, as apparel or 
as a similar personal accessory, or for other decorative use if:
     The articles are treated with irradiation in accordance 
with 7 CFR part 305 at an irradiation facility that is not located in 
an area quarantined for citrus greening.
     The container that will be used to move the articles 
interstate is clearly labeled with the limited permit, which contains 
the name of the State or portion of a State where the regulated article 
was produced and a statement that the article was treated in accordance 
with 7 CFR part 305.
     A copy of the limited permit is attached to the 
consignee's copy of the accompanying waybill.
    Irradiation treatment at a dose of at least 400 gray has been 
demonstrated to neutralize, that is, to kill or render sterile, all 
plant pests that are members of the class Insecta, and do not belong to 
the order Lepidoptera; this includes ACP. This treatment schedule, 
along with all other authorized treatment schedules, is found in the 
PPQ Treatment Manual, found on the Internet at (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/plants/manuals/ports/treatment.shtml).
    The phytosanitary treatment regulations contained in 7 CFR part 305 
set out standards for treatments required in 7 CFR parts 301, 318 and 
319. Section 305.9 of those regulations contains general requirements 
for irradiation treatment and includes several specific provisions that 
pertain to the irradiation treatment of certain articles that are 
regulated as hosts of fruit flies and that are moved interstate from an 
area quarantined for fruit flies. After reviewing these provisions, we 
have determined that, with several non-substantive changes, they can 
also be applied to the irradiation treatment of articles that are 
regulated as hosts of ACP and that are moved interstate from an area 
quarantined for ACP. We are amending Sec.  305.9 accordingly.
    By amending Sec.  305.9, we are not only providing for irradiation 
treatment at a dose of at least 400 gray as an approved treatment for 
host articles of ACP, but also providing that certain risk mitigation 
measures within that section be applied to regulated articles to 
preclude the introduction of ACP to the articles. First, Sec.  305.9 
requires inspectors to be present at the facility and monitor 
treatments and authorizes these individuals to conduct unannounced 
inspections of the facility. Second, the section requires that all 
regulated articles be packed in insect-proof cartons prior to 
irradiation, and that safeguarding be applied to all pallets on which 
the articles are transported. These measures collectively obviate the 
need for requiring that irradiated articles be moved interstate in a 
container sealed with an agricultural seal.
    Irradiation at the generic dose of 400 gray may not necessarily 
kill ACP; however, as noted above, it does neutralize it, that is, 
render it sterile. Some ACP may therefore survive treatment at the 
facility and interstate movement from the facility to the location 
provided on the limited permit. This is our rationale for requiring 
that the facility not be located in an area quarantined for citrus 
greening. Moreover, we are requiring that limited permits issued in 
accordance with paragraph (c) of Sec.  301.76-6 contain the State or 
portion of a State where the regulated article was produced, in order 
to alleviate concerns that the consignee listed on the limited permit 
may have that such an article, if found to be

[[Page 34330]]

infested with irradiated ACP, originates from an area quarantined for 
both ACP and citrus greening, and thus is potentially infested with ACP 
carrying the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus greening. In a 
similar manner, we are requiring that the limited permit contain a 
statement that the article was treated in accordance with 7 CFR part 
305, in order to provide assurances to the consignee that any ACP found 
on the article have been neutralized with irradiation. In the absence 
of such a statement, we consider it reasonable for the consignee to 
assume either that the article has not been treated for ACP, or that 
ACP have been introduced to the article during transit.
    Finally, we note that we have, to date, only received requests to 
allow the interstate movement of articles intended for consumption, as 
apparel or as a similar personal accessory, or for other decorative use 
following irradiation treatment for ACP. However, we will entertain any 
requests that we receive requesting that we authorize the use of such 
treatment for other regulated articles.

Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits 
for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for 
citrus greening (Sec.  301.76-7)

    The interstate movement of regulated nursery stock from an area 
quarantined for citrus greening presents a substantial risk of 
introducing citrus greening to a currently unaffected area of the 
United States. Accordingly, we are only authorizing the issuance of 
limited permits for nursery stock that is grown, produced, or 
maintained at a nursery or other facility located in an area 
quarantined for citrus greening if the nursery stock is moved 
interstate for immediate export under a protocol designed to ensure 
that it does not present a pathway for the artificial spread of citrus 
greening or ACP to these unaffected areas. Paragraph (a) of Sec.  
301.76-7 provides the conditions of the protocol.
    Under the protocol, in addition to all other general conditions for 
issuance of a limited permit, the nursery stock must be treated for ACP 
with an APHIS-approved soil drench or in-ground granular application, 
followed by an APHIS-approved foliar spray, in accordance with Sec.  
301.76-6(b)(1), or with methyl bromide or irradiation, in accordance 
with 7 CFR part 305; must be inspected by an inspector prior to 
movement in accordance with Sec.  301.76-9 and found free of ACP, if 
treated in accordance with Sec.  301.76-6(b)(1); and must be affixed 
prior to movement with a plastic or metal tag on which the statement 
``Limited permit: USDA-APHIS-PPQ. For immediate export only'' is 
prominently and legibly displayed. If the nursery stock is destined for 
movement or sale in a box or container, the statement may be printed on 
the box or container, or printed on a label permanently affixed to the 
box or container, provided that, in either case, the statement is 
prominently and legibly displayed. The nursery stock must be 
accompanied by a copy of this limited permit attached to the 
consignee's copy of the waybill, and must be moved in accordance with 
the conditions of the limited permit directly to the port of export, in 
a container sealed with an agricultural seal placed by an inspector. A 
copy of the limited permit must also be attached to or legibly printed 
on this sealed container. The nursery stock must remain in this 
container, and the container must remain sealed, as long as the plants 
are within the United States.
    Apart from treatment and inspection for ACP, the provisions of this 
protocol constitute the safeguards necessary to mitigate the risk 
associated with the interstate movement of potential host material for 
citrus greening. Treatment and inspection for ACP are necessary 
because, as we mentioned earlier in this document, ACP is the primary 
vector of citrus greening in the United States, and ACP in a citrus 
greening quarantined area must be presumed to be a carrier of the 
disease. We can foresee no instances when an area would be quarantined 
for citrus greening without also being quarantined for ACP either prior 
to or after the detection of citrus greening.
    Paragraph (b) states that, except for nursery stock for which a 
limited permit has been issued in accordance with the conditions of 
paragraph (a) of this section, no other regulated article may be moved 
interstate from an area quarantined for citrus greening. This paragraph 
is necessary to clarify that the provisions of paragraph (a) are 
currently the only conditions under which we will allow the interstate 
movement of regulated articles from such an area.
    That said, while there are presently no other conditions under 
which we will allow the interstate movement of nursery stock or any 
other regulated article from an area quarantined for citrus greening, 
we are evaluating the risk associated with the interstate movement of 
nursery stock produced from propagative material that is free of ACP 
and citrus greening and grown, packed, and moved under pest-
exclusionary conditions. If we determine that there are conditions that 
are sufficient to allow nursery stock to move safely from such a 
quarantined area, we will initiate rulemaking to add provisions to 
Sec.  301.76-6 to provide for the movement of such nursery stock.

Compliance agreements and cancellation (Sec.  301.76-8)

    Section 301.76-8 provides for the use of and cancellation of 
compliance agreements. Compliance agreements are provided for the 
convenience of persons who are involved in the growing, maintaining, 
processing, handling, packing, treating, or moving of regulated 
articles from quarantined areas. A person may enter into a compliance 
agreement when an inspector has determined that the person requesting 
the compliance agreement has been made aware of the requirements of the 
regulations and the person has agreed to comply with the requirements 
of the regulations and all the provisions of the compliance agreement. 
The person must also agree to maintain and offer for inspection such 
records as are necessary to demonstrate continual adherence to the 
requirements of the regulations and the provisions of the compliance 
agreement. This section contains a footnote (number 4) that explains 
where compliance agreement forms may be obtained.
    Section 301.76-8 also provides that an inspector may cancel the 
compliance agreement upon finding that a person who has entered into 
the agreement has failed to comply with any of the provisions of the 
regulations or the agreement. The inspector will notify the holder of 
the compliance agreement of the reasons for the cancellation and offer 
an opportunity for a hearing to resolve any conflicts of material fact 
in the event that the person wishes to appeal the cancellation.

Inspection of regulated nursery stock (Sec.  301.76-9)

    As we mentioned in our discussion of Sec.  301.76-7, all regulated 
nursery stock treated with soil drenches or in-ground granular 
applications and foliar sprays prior to interstate movement from an 
area quarantined only for ACP but not for citrus greening, as well as 
all nursery stock intended for interstate movement for immediate export 
from an area quarantined for citrus greening, must be inspected by an 
inspector. Section 301.76-9 contains the requirements for such an 
inspection. The inspection must occur no more than 72 hours prior to 
movement. The person who desires to move the articles interstate must 
notify the inspector as far in advance of the desired interstate 
movement as possible. The articles must be inspected at the place and 
in the manner the inspector

[[Page 34331]]

designates as necessary to comply with this rule. If the inspector has 
reason to believe that the interstate movement of the articles may lead 
to the artificial spread of citrus greening or ACP, he or she may deny 
issuance of a limited permit for interstate movement of the article or 
take other remedial measures to prohibit such spread.
    We are including a footnote (number 5) in this section to provide 
further information regarding how to contact an inspector. The footnote 
states that inspectors are assigned to local offices of APHIS, which 
are listed in local telephone directories. It further states that 
information concerning local offices may also be obtained from the 
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and 
Quarantine, Domestic and Emergency Operations, 4700 River Road Unit 
134, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236.

Attachment and disposition of certificates and limited permits (Sec.  
301.76-10)

    Section 301.76-10 requires the certificate or limited permit, or a 
copy thereof, to be attached to or legibly printed on the outside of 
the container containing the regulated article or the regulated article 
itself, if the article is not packed in a container, to be attached to 
or legibly printed on the sealed container in which the article is 
shipped and to be attached to the consignee's copy of the accompanying 
waybill. Further, the section requires that the carrier or the 
carrier's representative must furnish the certificate or limited permit 
to the consignee listed on the certificate or limited permit upon 
arrival at the location provided on the certificate or limited permit.

Costs and charges (Sec.  301.76-11)

    Section 301.76-11 explains the APHIS policy that the services of an 
inspector that are needed to comply with the regulations are provided 
between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays, 
to persons requiring those services. No services are provided outside 
of these hours, and all services provided are without cost. Finally, 
APHIS will not be responsible for any costs or charges incident to 
inspections or compliance with the provisions of the quarantine and 
regulations in this subpart, other than the services of the inspector.

Treatments in 7 CFR part 305 and the PPQ Treatment Manual

    As we mentioned earlier in this document, the phytosanitary 
treatments regulations contained in 7 CFR part 305 set out standards 
and schedules for treatments required in 7 CFR parts 301, 318, and 319.
    Within part 305, Sec.  305.2 states that approved treatment 
schedules are set out in the PPQ Treatment Manual, and Sec.  305.3 
contains our processes for adding, revising, or removing treatment 
schedules. Paragraph (b)(1)(iii) of Sec.  305.3 states that new 
treatment schedules may immediately be added to the manual, if PPQ has 
determined that the schedules are effective, based on efficacy data, 
and that ongoing trade in an article may be adversely impacted unless 
the new treatment schedules are approved for use.
    Prior to this rule, methyl bromide was not listed in the manual as 
an approved treatment for ACP. However, as we mentioned above, we have 
determined, based on multiple efficacy studies, that the methyl bromide 
treatment schedule MB T101-n-2 will kill ACP in all life stages of the 
pest, and therefore can be used to treat all articles regulated for 
ACP. Moreover, we have determined that failing to add this treatment 
schedule to the manual could adversely impact interstate commerce in 
regulated articles from an area quarantined for ACP by removing a 
treatment option that was available to producers under our Federal 
Orders. Therefore, in accordance with Sec. Sec.  305.2 and 305.3, we 
are immediately amending the treatment manual to list MB T101-n-2 as an 
approved treatment schedule for such articles.

Emergency Action

    This rulemaking is necessary on an emergency basis to prevent the 
artificial spread of citrus greening and ACP, a vector of citrus 
greening. Under these circumstances, the Administrator has determined 
that prior notice and opportunity for public comment are contrary to 
the public interest and that there is good cause under 5 U.S.C. 553 for 
making this rule effective less than 30 days after publication in the 
Federal Register.
    We will consider comments we receive during the comment period for 
this interim rule (see DATES above). After the comment period closes, 
we will publish another document in the Federal Register. The document 
will include a discussion of any comments we receive and any amendments 
we are making to the rule.

Executive Order 12866 and the Regulatory Flexibility Act

    This interim rule has been determined to be significant for the 
purposes of Executive Order 12866 and, therefore has been reviewed by 
the Office of Management and Budget.
    We are quarantining the States of Florida and Georgia, Puerto Rico, 
the U.S. Virgin Islands, two parishes in Louisiana, and two counties in 
South Carolina due to the presence of citrus greening and quarantining 
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Puerto 
Rico, Texas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, three counties in South Carolina, 
portions of one county in Arizona, and all of three and portions of an 
additional three counties in California due to the presence of Asian 
citrus psyllid, a vector of the bacterial pathogen that causes citrus 
greening. This action follows the discovery of these pests in the 
respective quarantined areas. We are also establishing restrictions on 
the interstate movement of regulated articles from the quarantined 
areas.
    We have prepared an economic analysis for this interim rule. The 
analysis, which includes a cost-benefit analysis, identifies nursery 
operations and other production sites in Alabama, Arizona, California, 
Florida, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Puerto Rico, 
South Carolina, Texas, and the U.S. Virgin Islands that produce citrus 
trees, orange jasmine, curryleaf, and other articles regulated by the 
interim rule as the entities that are likely to be affected by this 
action and examines the potential economic effects on those entities. 
The economic analysis may be viewed on the Regulations.gov Web site 
(see ADDRESSES above for instructions for accessing Regulations.gov). 
Copies of the economic analysis are also available from the person 
listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

Executive Order 12372

    This program/activity is listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance under No. 10.025 and is subject to Executive Order 12372, 
which requires intergovernmental consultation with State and local 
officials. (See 7 CFR part 3015, subpart V.)

Executive Order 12988

    This rule has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil 
Justice Reform. This rule: (1) Preempts all State and local laws and 
regulations that are inconsistent with this rule; (2) has no 
retroactive effect; and (3) does not require administrative proceedings 
before parties may file suit in court challenging this rule.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    In accordance with section 3507(j) of the Paperwork Reduction Act 
of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), the information collection and 
recordkeeping

[[Page 34332]]

requirements included in this interim rule have been submitted for 
emergency approval to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). OMB 
has assigned control number 0579-0363 to the information collection and 
recordkeeping requirements.
    We plan to request continuation of that approval for 3 years. 
Please send written comments on the 3-year approval request to the 
following addresses: (1) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, 
OMB, Attention: Desk Officer for APHIS, Washington, DC 20503; and (2) 
Docket No. APHIS-2008-0015, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, 
APHIS, Station 3A-03.8, 4700 River Road Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737-
1238. Please state that your comments refer to Docket No. APHIS-2008-
0015 and send your comments within 60 days of publication of this rule.
    This interim rule will require persons to complete various forms 
and documents. These include: Compliance agreements, certificates, 
limited permits, and labels.
    We are soliciting comments from the public (as well as affected 
agencies) concerning our information collection and recordkeeping 
requirements. These comments will help us:
    (1) Evaluate whether the information collection is necessary for 
the proper performance of our agency's functions, including whether the 
information will have practical utility;
    (2) Evaluate the accuracy of our estimate of the burden of the 
information collection, including the validity of the methodology and 
assumptions used;
    (3) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to 
be collected; and
    (4) Minimize the burden of the information collection on those who 
are to respond (such as through the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology; e.g., permitting electronic 
submission of responses).
    Estimate of burden: Public reporting burden for this collection of 
information is estimated to average 0.0002644 hours per response.
    Respondents: Nurseries, commercial retailers.
    Estimated annual number of respondents: 116.
    Estimated annual number of responses per respondent: 16,399.62.
    Estimated annual number of responses: 1,902,356.
    Estimated total annual burden on respondents: 503 hours. (Due to 
averaging, the total annual burden hours may not equal the product of 
the annual number of responses multiplied by the reporting burden per 
response.)
    Copies of this information collection can be obtained from Mrs. 
Celeste Sickles, APHIS' Information Collection Coordinator, at (301) 
851-2908.

E-Government Act Compliance

    The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is committed to 
compliance with the E-Government Act to promote the use of the Internet 
and other information technologies, to provide increased opportunities 
for citizen access to Government information and services, and for 
other purposes. For information pertinent to E-Government Act 
compliance related to this interim rule, please contact Mrs. Celeste 
Sickles, APHIS' Information Collection Coordinator, at (301) 851-2908.

List of Subjects

7 CFR Part 301

    Agricultural commodities, Plant diseases and pests, Quarantine, 
Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Transportation.

7 CFR Part 305

    Irradiation, Phytosanitary treatment, Plant diseases and pests, 
Quarantine, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

0
Accordingly, we are amending 7 CFR parts 301 and 305 as follows:

PART 301--DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES

0
1. The authority citation for part 301 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 7 U.S.C. 7701-7772 and 7781-7786; 7 CFR 2.22, 2.80, 
and 371.3.

    Section 301.75-15 issued under Sec. 204, Title II, Public Law 
106-113, 113 Stat. 1501A-293; sections 301.75-15 and 301.75-16 
issued under Sec. 203, Title II, Public Law 106-224, 114 Stat. 400 
(7 U.S.C. 1421 note).


0
2. Part 301 is amended by adding a new ``Subpart--Citrus Greening and 
Asian Citrus Psyllid,'' Sec. Sec.  301.76 through 301.76-11, to read as 
follows:
Subpart--Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid
Sec.
301.76 Restrictions on the interstate movement of regulated 
articles.
301.76-1 Definitions.
301.76-2 Regulated articles for Asian citrus psyllid and citrus 
greening.
301.76-3 Quarantined areas; citrus greening and Asian citrus 
psyllid.
301.76-4 Labeling requirements for regulated nursery stock produced 
within an area quarantined for citrus greening.
301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any 
certificate or limited permit; provisions for cancellation of a 
certificate or limited permit.
301.76-6 Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and 
limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas 
quarantined only for Asian citrus psyllid, but not for citrus 
greening.
301.76-7 Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and 
limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas 
quarantined for citrus greening.
301.76-8 Compliance agreements and cancellation.
301.76-9 Inspection of regulated nursery stock.
301.76-10 Attachment and disposition of certificates and limited 
permits.
301.76-11 Costs and charges.

Subpart--Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid


Sec.  301.76  Restrictions on the interstate movement of regulated 
articles.

    No person may move interstate from any quarantined area any 
articles regulated for citrus greening and Asian citrus psyllid, except 
in accordance with this subpart.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ In order to enforce this section, any properly identified 
inspector is authorized to stop and inspect persons and means of 
conveyance and to seize, quarantine, treat, apply other remedial 
measures to, destroy, or otherwise dispose of host articles as 
provided in sections 414, 421, and 434 of the Plant Protection Act 
(7 U.S.C. 7714, 7731, and 7754).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


Sec.  301.76-1  Definitions.

    Administrator. The Administrator of the Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service or any individual authorized to act for the 
Administrator.
    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The Animal and 
Plant Health Inspection Service of the United States Department of 
Agriculture.
    Asian citrus psyllid. The insect known as Asian citrus psyllid 
(Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) in any stage of development.
    Certificate. A document, stamp, or other means of identification 
approved by APHIS and issued by an inspector or person operating under 
a compliance agreement when he or she finds that, because of certain 
conditions, a regulated article can be moved safely from an area 
quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid and/or citrus greening without 
spreading the psyllid or the disease.
    Citrus greening. A plant disease caused by several strains of the 
uncultured, phloem-limited bacterial pathogen ``Candidatus Liberibacter 
asiaticus''.
    Commercial citrus grove. A solid-set planting of trees maintained 
for the

[[Page 34333]]

primary purpose of producing citrus fruit for commercial sale.
    Compliance agreement. A written agreement between APHIS and a 
person engaged in the business of growing, maintaining, processing, 
handling, packing, or moving regulated articles for interstate 
movement, in which the person agrees to comply with this subpart. For 
the purposes of this subpart, a memorandum of understanding is 
considered a compliance agreement.
    EPA. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Established population. Presence of Asian citrus psyllid within an 
area that the Administrator determines is likely to persist for the 
foreseeable future.
    Inspector. An individual authorized by the Administrator to perform 
the duties required under this subpart.
    Interstate. From any State into or through any other State.
    Limited permit. A document issued by an inspector or person 
operating under a compliance agreement to allow the interstate movement 
of regulated articles to a specified destination, for specified 
handling, processing, or utilization.
    Moved (move, movement). Shipped, offered for shipment, received for 
transportation, transported, carried (whether on one's person or by any 
other means of conveyance), or allowed to be moved, shipped, 
transported, or carried. For the purposes of this subpart, movements 
include any type of shipment, including mail and Internet commerce.
    Nursery. Any commercial location where nursery stock is grown, 
propagated, stored, maintained, or sold, or any location from which 
nursery stock is distributed.
    Nursery stock. Any plants or plant parts, excluding fruit, intended 
to be planted, to remain planted, or to be replanted. Nursery stock 
includes, but is not limited to, trees, shrubs, cuttings, grafts, 
scions, and buds.
    Person. Any association, company, corporation, firm, individual, 
joint stock company, partnership, society, or other entity.
    Port. Any place designated by the President, Secretary of the 
Treasury, or Congress at which a Customs officer is assigned with 
authority to accept entries of merchandise, to collect duties, and to 
enforce the various provisions of the Customs and Navigation laws in 
force at that place.
    Quarantined area. Any State or portion of a State designated as a 
quarantined area for Asian citrus psyllid or citrus greening in 
accordance with Sec.  301.76-3.
    Regulated article. Any article listed in Sec.  301.76-2 or 
otherwise designated as a regulated article in accordance with Sec.  
301.76-2(c).
    State. The District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana 
Islands, or any State, territory, or possession of the United States.


Sec.  301.76-2  Regulated articles for Asian citrus psyllid and citrus 
greening.

    The following are regulated articles for Asian citrus psyllid and 
citrus greening:
    (a) All plants and plant parts (including leaves), except fruit, 
of: Aegle marmelos, Aeglopsis chevalieri, Afraegle gabonensis, A. 
paniculata, Amyris madrensis, Atalantia spp. (including Atalantia 
monophylla), Balsamocitrus dawei, Bergera (=Murraya) koenigii, 
Calodendrum capense, Choisya ternate, C. arizonica, X Citroncirus 
webberi, Citropsis articulata, Citropsis gilletiana, Citrus madurensis 
(= X Citrofortunella microcarpa), Citrus spp., Clausena anisum-olens, 
C. excavata, C. indica, C. lansium, Eremocitrus glauca, Eremocitrus 
hybrid, Esenbeckia berlandieri, Fortunella spp., Limonia acidissima, 
Merrillia caloxylon, Microcitrus australasica, M. australis, M. 
papuana, X Microcitronella spp., Murraya spp., Naringi crenulata, 
Pamburus missionis, Poncirus trifoliata, Severinia buxifolia, Swinglea 
glutinosa, Tetradium ruticarpum, Toddalia asiatica, Triphasia trifolia, 
Vepris (=Toddalia) lanceolata, and Zanthoxylum fagara.
    (b) Propagative seed of the species listed in paragraph (a) of this 
section is considered a host of citrus greening but not a host of Asian 
citrus psyllid. Therefore, notwithstanding the other provisions of this 
subpart, the movement of propagative seed of these species from an area 
quarantined for citrus greening is prohibited, while the movement of 
such seed from an area quarantined only for Asian citrus psyllid, but 
not for citrus greening, is allowed without restriction.
    (c) Any other product, article, or means of conveyance may be 
designated a regulated article for Asian citrus psyllid or citrus 
greening, if an inspector determines that it presents a risk of 
spreading these pests, and after the inspector provides written 
notification to the person in possession of the product, article, or 
means of conveyance that it is subject to the restrictions of this 
subpart.
    (d) Plant parts of the species listed in paragraph (a) of this 
section may be exempted from the regulations in this subpart, provided 
that the parts have been processed such that an inspector determines 
they no longer present a risk of spreading Asian citrus psyllid or 
citrus greening.


Sec.  301.76-3  Quarantined areas; citrus greening and Asian citrus 
psyllid.

    (a) The Administrator will designate an area as a quarantined area 
for citrus greening or as a quarantined area for Asian citrus psyllid 
in accordance with the criteria listed in paragraph (c) of this 
section. The Administrator will publish a description of all areas 
quarantined for citrus greening or Asian citrus psyllid on the Plant 
Protection and Quarantine (PPQ) Web site: (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/citrus_greening/index.shtml). The 
description of each quarantined area will include the date the 
description was last updated and a description of any changes that have 
been made to the quarantined area. Lists of all quarantined areas may 
also be obtained by request from any local office of PPQ; local offices 
are listed in telephone directories and on the Internet at (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/services/report_pest_disease/report_pest_disease.shtml). After a change is made to the description of 
quarantined areas, we will publish a notice in the Federal Register 
informing the public that the change has occurred and describing the 
change to the quarantined areas.
    (b) Designation of an area less than an entire State as a 
quarantined area. Less than an entire State will be designated as a 
quarantined area for citrus greening or the Asian citrus psyllid only 
if the Administrator determines that:
    (1) The State has adopted and is enforcing restrictions on the 
intrastate movement of regulated articles that are equivalent to those 
imposed by this subpart on the interstate movement of regulated 
articles; and
    (2) The designation of less than the entire State as a quarantined 
area will prevent the interstate spread of citrus greening or Asian 
citrus psyllid.
    (c) Criteria for designation of a State, or a portion of a State, 
as a quarantined area for citrus greening or Asian citrus psyllid.
    (1) A State, or portion of a State, will be designated as a 
quarantined area for citrus greening when the presence of citrus 
greening is confirmed within the area by an APHIS-administered test.
    (2) A State, or portion of a State, will be designated as a 
quarantined area for Asian citrus psyllid in which an established 
population of Asian citrus psyllids has been detected.
    (3) A State, or portion of a State, will be designated as a 
quarantined area for

[[Page 34334]]

either citrus greening or Asian citrus psyllid if the Administrator 
considers it necessary to quarantine the area because of its 
inseparability for quarantine enforcement purposes from localities in 
which citrus greening or an established population of Asian citrus 
psyllids has been found.


Sec.  301.76-4  Labeling requirements for regulated nursery stock 
produced within an area quarantined for citrus greening.

    (a) Effective September 15, 2010, except as provided in paragraphs 
(b) and (c) of this section, all regulated nursery stock offered for 
commercial sale within an area quarantined for citrus greening must 
have an APHIS-approved plastic or metal tag on which a statement 
alerting consumers to Federal prohibitions regarding the interstate 
movement of the article is prominently and legibly displayed. 
Alternatively, if the article is destined for commercial sale in a box 
or container, the statement may be printed on the box or container, or 
printed on a label permanently affixed to the box or container, 
provided that, in either case, the statement is prominently and legibly 
displayed. The operator of the site of propagation of the nursery stock 
and the person offering the plants for commercial sale are jointly 
responsible for all such labeling.
    (b) Nursery stock produced within a quarantined area for planting 
in a commercial citrus grove within that same area and moved directly 
to that grove, without movement outside of the quarantined area, may be 
moved without being labeled in accordance with paragraph (a) of this 
section.
    (c) Nursery stock that will be moved interstate for immediate 
export under a limited permit in accordance with Sec.  301.76-7(c) may 
be moved without being labeled in accordance with paragraph (a) of this 
section.
    (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control 
number 0579-0363)


Sec.  301.76-5  General conditions governing the issuance of any 
certificate or limited permit; provisions for cancellation of a 
certificate or limited permit.

    (a) Certificates. In addition to all other relevant conditions 
within this subpart, an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement will issue a certificate only if a regulated 
article:
    (1) Will be moved in compliance with any additional emergency 
conditions that the Administrator may impose under section 414 of the 
Plant Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) \2\ to prevent the spread of Asian 
citrus psyllid; and
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ An inspector may hold seize, quarantine, treat, apply other 
remedial measures to, destroy, or otherwise dispose of plants, plant 
pests, or other articles in accordance with sections 414, 421, and 
423 of the Plant Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 7714, 7731, and 7754).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (2) Is eligible for unrestricted movement under all other Federal 
domestic plant quarantines and regulations applicable to the article.
    (b) Limited permits. In addition to all other relevant conditions 
within this subpart, an inspector or person operating under a 
compliance agreement may issue a limited permit for the interstate 
movement of a regulated article only if the regulated article:
    (1) Is to be moved interstate to a specified destination for 
specified handling, processing, or utilization (the destination and 
other conditions to be listed in the limited permit) and this movement 
of the regulated article will not result in the spread of citrus 
greening or the Asian citrus psyllid;
    (2) Is to be moved in compliance with any additional emergency 
conditions the Administrator may impose under section 414 of the Plant 
Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) to prevent the spread of citrus greening 
and the Asian citrus psyllid; and
    (3) Is eligible for interstate movement under all other Federal 
domestic plant quarantines and regulations applicable to the article.
    (c) Certificates and limited permits for the interstate movement of 
a regulated article may be issued by an inspector or person operating 
under a compliance agreement. A person operating under a compliance 
agreement may issue a certificate for the interstate movement of a 
regulated article after he or she has determined that the article is 
eligible for a certificate in accordance with paragraph (a) of this 
section and all other relevant conditions of this subpart. A person 
operating under a compliance agreement may issue a limited permit for 
interstate movement of a regulated article after he or she has 
determined that the article is eligible for a limited permit in 
accordance with paragraph (b) of this section and all other relevant 
conditions of this subpart.
    (d) Any certificate or limited permit that has been issued may be 
withdrawn, either orally or in writing, by an inspector if he or she 
determines that the holder of the certificate or limited permit has not 
complied with all of the provisions in this subpart or has not complied 
with all the conditions contained in the certificate or limited permit. 
If the withdrawal is oral, the withdrawal and the reasons for the 
withdrawal will be confirmed in writing as soon as circumstances allow. 
Any person whose certificate or limited permit has been withdrawn may 
appeal the decision in writing to the Administrator within 10 days 
after receiving the written notification of the withdrawal. The appeal 
must state all of the facts and reasons upon which the person relies to 
show that the certificate or limited permit was wrongfully withdrawn. 
As promptly as circumstances allow, the Administrator will grant or 
deny the appeal, in writing, stating the reasons for the decision. A 
hearing will be held to resolve any conflict as to any material fact. 
Rules of practice concerning a hearing will be adopted by the 
Administrator.
    (e) Unless specific provisions exist in Sec.  301.76-6 or Sec.  
301.76-7 of this subpart to allow the interstate movement of a certain 
regulated article, the interstate movement of that article is 
prohibited.
    (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control 
number 0579-0363)


Sec.  301.76-6  Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and 
limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas 
quarantined only for Asian citrus psyllid, but not for citrus greening.

    (a) Additional conditions for issuance of a certificate; any 
regulated article. In addition to the general conditions for issuance 
of a certificate contained in Sec.  301.76-5(a), an inspector or person 
operating under a compliance agreement may issue a certificate for the 
interstate movement of any regulated article to any State if:
    (1) The article is treated with methyl bromide in accordance with 7 
CFR part 305 of this chapter.
    (2) The article is shipped in a container that has been sealed with 
an agricultural seal placed by an inspector.
    (3) The container that will be moved interstate is clearly labeled 
with the certificate.
    (4) A copy of the certificate will be attached to the consignee's 
copy of the accompanying waybill.
    (b) Additional conditions for issuance of a limited permit; 
regulated nursery stock. In addition to the general conditions for 
issuance of a limited permit contained in Sec.  301.76-5(b), an 
inspector or person operating under a compliance agreement may issue a 
limited permit for the interstate movement of regulated nursery stock 
to areas of the United States other than American Samoa, Northern 
Mariana Islands, and those portions of Arizona, California, and South 
Carolina not quarantined due to the presence of

[[Page 34335]]

Asian citrus psyllid or citrus greening, if:
    (1) The nursery stock is treated for ACP with an APHIS-approved 
soil drench or in-ground granular application no more than 30 days and 
no fewer than 20 days before shipment, followed by an APHIS-approved 
foliar spray no more 10 days before shipment. All treatments must be 
applied according to their EPA label, including directions on 
application, restrictions on place of application and other 
restrictions, and precautions, and including statements pertaining to 
Worker Protection Standards.
    (2) The nursery stock is inspected by an inspector in accordance 
with Sec.  301.76-9 and found free of Asian citrus psyllid.
    (3) The nursery stock is affixed prior to movement with a plastic 
or metal tag on which the statement ``Limited permit: USDA-APHIS-PPQ. 
Not for distribution in American Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, or 
those portions of AZ, CA and SC not quarantined due to the presence of 
Asian citrus psyllid or citrus greening'' is prominently and legibly 
displayed. If the nursery stock is destined for movement or sale in 
boxes or containers, the statement may be printed on the box or 
container, or printed on a label permanently affixed to the box or 
container, provided that, in either case, the statement is prominently 
and legibly displayed.
    (4) The nursery stock is moved in a container sealed with an 
agricultural seal placed by an inspector.
    (5) This container prominently and legibly displays the statement 
of paragraph (b)(3) of this section.
    (6) A copy of the limited permit is attached to the consignee's 
copy of the accompanying waybill.
    (7) The nursery stock is moved in accordance with the conditions 
specified on the limited permit to the location specified on the 
permit.
    (c) Additional conditions for issuance of a limited permit; 
regulated articles intended for consumption, as apparel or as a similar 
personal accessory, or for other decorative use.\3\ In addition to the 
general conditions for issuance of a limited permit contained in Sec.  
301.76-5(b), an inspector or person operating under a compliance 
agreement may issue a limited permit for the interstate movement of 
regulated articles intended for consumption, as apparel or as a similar 
personal accessory, or for other decorative use if:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ Examples of such articles include Bergera (=Murraya) 
koenigii leaves, as well as Murraya paniculata flowers or foliage.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (1) The articles are treated with irradiation in accordance with 7 
CFR part 305 of this chapter at an irradiation facility that is not 
located in an area quarantined for citrus greening.
    (2) The container that will be used to move the articles interstate 
is clearly labeled with the limited permit, which must contain the name 
of the State or portion of a State where the articles were produced and 
a statement that the articles were treated in accordance with 7 CFR 
part 305 of this chapter.
    (3) A copy of the limited permit is attached to the consignee's 
copy of the accompanying waybill.


Sec.  301.76-7  Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and 
limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas 
quarantined for citrus greening.

    (a) Additional conditions for issuance of a limited permit; 
regulated nursery stock grown, produced, or maintained at a nursery or 
other facility located in the quarantined area. In addition to the 
general conditions for issuance of a limited permit contained in Sec.  
301.76-5(b), an inspector or person operating under a compliance 
agreement may issue a limited permit for the interstate movement for 
immediate export of regulated nursery stock grown, produced, or 
maintained at a nursery or other facility located in the quarantined 
area if:
    (1) The nursery stock is treated for Asian citrus psyllid with an 
APHIS-approved soil drench or in-ground granular application, followed 
by an APHIS-approved foliar spray, in accordance with Sec.  301.76-
6(b)(1), or with methyl bromide or irradiation, in accordance with 7 
CFR part 305 of this chapter.
    (2) The nursery stock is inspected by an inspector in accordance 
with Sec.  301.76-9 and found free of Asian citrus psyllid, if treated 
in accordance with Sec.  301.76-6(b)(1).
    (3) The nursery stock is affixed prior to movement with a plastic 
or metal tag on which the statement ``Limited permit: USDA-APHIS-PPQ. 
For immediate export only'' is prominently and legibly displayed. If 
the nursery stock is destined for movement or sale in a box or 
container, the statement may be printed on the box or container, or 
printed on a label permanently affixed to the box or container, 
provided that, in either case, the statement is prominently and legibly 
displayed.
    (4) The nursery stock is accompanied by a copy of this limited 
permit attached to the consignee's copy of the waybill.
    (5) The nursery stock is moved in accordance with the conditions 
specified on the limited permit directly to the port of export 
specified on the limit permit, in a container sealed with an 
agricultural seal placed by an inspector.
    (6) A copy of the limited permit is attached to or legibly printed 
on this container.
    (7) The nursery stock remains in this container, and the container 
remains sealed, as long as the plants are within the United States.
    (b) Except for nursery stock for which a limited permit has been 
issued in accordance with the conditions of paragraph (a) of this 
section, no other regulated article may be moved interstate from an 
area quarantined for citrus greening.


Sec.  301.76-8  Compliance agreements and cancellation.

    (a) Any person involved in the growing, maintaining, processing, 
handling, packing, treating, or moving of regulating articles from 
areas quarantined for citrus greening or Asian citrus psyllid may enter 
into a compliance agreement when an inspector determines that the 
person understands this subpart, agrees to comply with its provisions, 
and agrees to comply with all the provisions contained in the 
compliance agreement. The person must also agree to maintain and offer 
for inspection such records as are necessary to demonstrate continual 
adherence to the requirements of the regulations and the provisions of 
the compliance agreement.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ Compliance agreement forms are available without charge from 
the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and 
Quarantine, Domestic and Emergency Operations, 4700 River Road Unit 
134, Riverdale, MD 20737-1236, and from local offices of the Plant 
Protection and Quarantine offices, which are listed in telephone 
directories.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    (b) Any compliance agreement may be canceled, either orally or in 
writing, by an inspector whenever the inspector finds that the person 
who has entered into the compliance agreement has failed to comply with 
this subpart. If the cancellation is oral, the cancellation and the 
reasons for the cancellation will be confirmed in writing as promptly 
as circumstances allow. Any person whose compliance agreement has been 
canceled may appeal the decision, in writing, within 10 days after 
receiving written notification of the cancellation. The appeal must 
state all of the facts and reasons upon which the person relies to show 
that the compliance agreement was wrongly canceled. As promptly as 
circumstances allow, the Administrator will grant or deny the appeal, 
in writing, stating the reasons for the decision. A hearing will be 
held to resolve any conflict as to any material fact. Rules of practice 
concerning a

[[Page 34336]]

hearing will be adopted by the Administrator.
    (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control 
number 0579-0363)


Sec.  301.76-9  Inspection of regulated nursery stock.

    All regulated nursery stock treated with soil drenches or in-ground 
granular applications and foliar sprays prior to interstate movement 
from an area quarantined only for Asian citrus psyllid, but not for 
citrus greening, as well as all nursery stock intended for interstate 
movement for immediate export from an area quarantined for citrus 
greening, must be inspected by an inspector\5\ no more than 72 hours 
prior to movement. The person who desires to move the articles 
interstate must notify the inspector as far in advance of the desired 
interstate movement as possible. The articles must be inspected at the 
place and in the manner the inspector designates as necessary to comply 
with this subpart. If the inspector has reason to believe that the 
interstate movement of the articles may lead to the artificial spread 
of citrus greening or Asian citrus psyllid, he or she may deny issuance 
of a limited permit for interstate movement of the article or take 
other remedial measures to prohibit such spread.
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    \5\ Inspectors are assigned to local offices of APHIS, which are 
listed in local telephone directories. Information concerning local 
offices may also be obtained from the Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine, Domestic and 
Emergency Operations, 4700 River Road Unit 134, Riverdale, MD 20737-
1236.
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    (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control 
number 0579-0363)


Sec.  301.76-10  Attachment and disposition of certificates and limited 
permits.

    (a) A certificate or limited permit required for the interstate 
movement of a regulated article, or a copy thereof, must, at all times 
during the interstate movement, be:
    (1) Attached to or legibly printed on the outside of the container 
containing the regulated article or attached to the regulated article 
itself, if the article is not packed in a container; and
    (2) Attached to or legibly printed on the sealed container in which 
the article is shipped; and
    (3) Attached to the consignee's copy of the accompanying waybill. 
The host article must be sufficiently described on the certificate or 
limited permit and on the waybill to identify the article.
    (b) The certificate or limited permit for the interstate movement 
of a host article must be furnished by the carrier or the carrier's 
representative to the consignee listed on the certificate or limited 
permit upon arrival at the location provided on the certificate or 
limited permit.


Sec.  301.76-11  Costs and charges.

    The services of the inspector during normal business hours (8 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays) will be furnished 
without cost. APHIS will not be responsible for any costs or charges 
incident to inspections or compliance with the provisions of the 
quarantine and regulations in this subpart, other than for the services 
of the inspector.

PART 305--PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS

0
3. The authority citation for part 305 continues to read as follows:
    7 U.S.C. 7701-7772 and 7781-7786; 21 U.S.C. 136 and 136a; 7 CFR 
2.22, 2.80, and 371.3
0
4. Section 305.9 is amended as follows:
0
a. By revising the introductory text of the section and adding new 
paragraphs (a)(3) and (c)(4) to read as set forth below.
0
b. In paragraph (f)(2) introductory text, by adding the words ``or 
Asian citrus psyllid'' after the words ``fruit flies''.
0
c. In paragraph (f)(3), by adding the words ``or Asian citrus psyllid'' 
after the words ``fruit flies''.


Sec.  305.9  Irradiation treatment requirements.

    Irradiation, carried out in accordance with the provisions of this 
section, is approved as a treatment for any imported regulated article 
(i.e., fruits, vegetables, cut flowers, and foliage); for any regulated 
article moved interstate from Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin 
Islands, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands 
(referred to collectively, in this section, as Hawaii and U.S. 
territories); for any berry, fruit, nut, or vegetable listed as a 
regulated article in Sec.  301.32-2(a) of this chapter; and for any 
regulated article listed in 301.76-2 of this chapter and intended for 
consumption, as apparel or as a similar personal accessory, or for 
decorative use.
    (a) * * *
    (3) For articles that are moved interstate from areas quarantined 
only for Asian citrus psyllid, and not for citrus greening, irradiation 
facilities must be located within an area that is not quarantined for 
citrus greening.
* * * * *
    (c) * * *
    (4) Irradiation facilities treating articles moved interstate from 
areas quarantined only for Asian citrus psyllid, and not for citrus 
greening, must complete a compliance agreement with APHIS as provided 
in Sec.  301.76-8 of this chapter.
* * * * *
    Done in Washington, DC, this 8\th\ day of June 2010.

Ann Wright,
Acting Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs.
[FR Doc. 2010-14495 Filed 6-16-10: 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-34-S