[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 206 (Tuesday, October 25, 2011)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 65945-65951]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-27367]



[[Page 65945]]

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 71

Docket No. FAA-2011-0232; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWA-3
RIN 2120-AA66


Modification of Class B Airspace; Seattle, WA

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This action modifies Seattle, WA Class B airspace to ensure 
the containment of large turbine-powered aircraft operating to and from 
the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The FAA is taking this action 
to enhance safety, improve the flow of air traffic, and reduce the 
potential for midair collision in the Seattle, WA terminal area.

DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC, December 15, 2011. The Director of the 
Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference action under 
1 CFR part 51, subject to the annual revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and 
publication of conforming amendments.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul Gallant, Airspace, Regulations, 
and ATC Procedures Group, Office of Airspace Services, Federal Aviation 
Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; 
telephone: (202) 267-8783.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

History

    On June 17, 2011, the FAA published in the Federal Register a 
notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to modify the Seattle, WA Class B 
airspace area (76 FR 35363). Interested parties were invited to 
participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting written comments on 
the proposal. Fourteen written comments were received in response to 
the NPRM. One comment did not pertain to the Seattle Class B proposal, 
addressing instead a Los Angeles, CA airspace issue. The Los Angeles, 
CA airspace comment was forwarded to the appropriate office for review. 
All other comments received were considered before making a 
determination on the final rule.

Discussion of Comments

    Six commenters supported the proposed Class B airspace changes.
    One commenter wrote that the use of letters such as ``O'' and ``Q'' 
to identify sections in the Class B description could lead to confusion 
because the letters look too similar. The FAA understands the potential 
misidentification issue; however, the letters are used only for 
rulemaking purposes to identify the various subareas of the Class B 
airspace. The letters are not published on the Sectional or Terminal 
Area Chart depictions, so this should not result in pilot confusion.
    One commenter said the method of defining the lateral boundaries 
using DME from a central VOR (SEA) should be used to define the new 
Class B boundaries instead of using latitude/longitude fixes to allow 
DME-equipped aircraft to find the boundary more easily. The Class B 
description in this rule uses both methods. Initially, the FAA 
considered using radials and DME to define the airspace, but that 
method would have resulted in the designation of more Class B airspace 
than necessary to contain Seattle-Tacoma International Airport traffic. 
Therefore, the primary description method uses geographic coordinates 
(latitude and longitude). Wherever possible, however, the airspace 
corners, intersections and more central, lower altitude sections are 
described with a combination of latitude/longitude and radial/DME.
    Four commenters suggested changes to accommodate paragliding and 
hang gliding operations at Tiger Mountain. The changes included raising 
the floor of Area J from the proposed 5,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) 
to 6,000 feet MSL, revising the northeast corner of Area J to expand 
the 6,000-foot area to cover most of the flight activity, or creating a 
cutout for the paragliding and hang gliding operations. Another 
suggestion was made to incorporate a soaring cylinder with a 3-nautical 
mile (NM) radius, up to 6,000 feet MSL to accommodate current flight 
activities. The FAA considered these suggestions but chose not to adopt 
them because raising the Class B floor to 6,000 feet MSL, or creating a 
cutout or cylinder, would impact the downwind leg for arrival traffic 
into Seattle-Tacoma International Airport as well as eastbound 
departure traffic flows from Seattle. This would result in difficulty 
containing arriving and departing aircraft within Class B airspace. 
Containment of turbine-powered aircraft within Class B airspace is 
required by FAA directives and is a prime safety consideration. 
Additionally, the Tiger Mountain launch site is in close proximity to 
Area M where the Class B floor remains at 6,000 feet MSL. Paragliders 
should either be at a low level just climbing off the launch site or be 
in a descending configuration to land at the landing zone when they are 
operating in Area J.
    One commenter questioned the usefulness of the 7,000-foot Class B 
ceilings in the southwest and southeast sections compared to those in 
the northern part of the Class B airspace where pilots can transition 
the area above the Class B from multiple directions. The commenter 
further stated that there is no reason for the varied ceilings on the 
south end because these areas abut Class B areas with a 10,000-foot 
ceiling.
    Over fifty percent of the inbound IFR traffic to Seattle-Tacoma 
International Airport comes from the south. Considering the FAA 
requirement to contain turbine-powered aircraft within Class B airspace 
and due to high terrain, there was less flexibility in the airspace 
design on the south side as compared to the north side. The FAA decided 
that Class B airspace was not needed above 7,000 feet MSL in the 
southwest and southeast sections based on the arrival and departure 
profiles, hence the lower ceiling in those areas.
    Another commenter suggested that the upper limit of the Seattle 
Class B airspace be lowered from 10,000 feet MSL to 8,000 feet MSL to 
allow general aviation easier access across the airspace.
    This Class B airspace area modification was initiated to ensure the 
containment of large turbine-powered aircraft within Class B airspace. 
It was determined that an 8,000-foot ceiling would not contain those 
aircraft as required by FAA directives. This rule, however, does 
establish dual ceilings of 10,000 feet MSL and 7,000 feet MSL for 
different sections of the Seattle Class B airspace. While there are 
other Class B locations with ceilings lower than 10,000 feet MSL, each 
Class B design is individually tailored to meet local requirements 
including, but not limited to, terrain, traffic volume, IFR procedures 
serving the primary airport, existing traffic flows through the area, 
etc.
    One commenter contended that a 3,149-foot MSL obstacle, located 1.5 
NM east of the gliding area, makes the 5,000-foot MSL airspace floor 
unnecessary in that vicinity.
    The obstacle in question lies beneath Area M where the floor of 
Class B airspace is 6,000 feet MSL. Therefore, the obstacle is not a 
factor.

Differences From the NPRM

    Editorial corrections have been made to the wording of the Seattle 
Class B airspace description for standardization. These corrections 
include adding ``lat.'' and ``long.'' before all geographic

[[Page 65946]]

coordinates, adding the words ``bounded by a line beginning at * * *'' 
where appropriate, and replacing the word ``clockwise'' with a 
direction (such as, ``thence east to * * *'') where an arc is not 
referenced. These corrections are to standardize the format only. Also, 
in the NPRM description of Area E, a typographical error that listed 
the ``40-mile'' arc of the SEA VORTAC is corrected to read the ``4-
mile'' arc. Radials listed in this rule are stated in degrees relative 
to True North. With the exception of the above noted changes and minor 
editorial corrections, this rule is the same as that published in the 
NPRM.

The Rule

    The FAA is amending 14 CFR part 71 to modify the Seattle, WA, Class 
B airspace area. This action (depicted on the attached chart) reduces 
the overall size of the Seattle Class B airspace by approximately 194 
square miles and incorporates two different ceiling altitudes. The rule 
expands the eastern Class B boundary to ensure containment of turbojet 
aircraft, but eliminates unnecessary outer (arrival route) wings that 
currently extend to 30 NM. Where possible, certain Class B boundaries 
are aligned with existing VORTAC and geographical features resulting in 
improved boundary definition. The following are the revisions for 
section of the Seattle Class B airspace area:
    Area A. 2 NM arc northeast of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport 
is straightened and realigned with the border of the Renton Class D 
airspace area. The area just south of SEA VORTAC is moved slightly to 
the west to better contain arrivals to Seattle-Tacoma International 
Airport runway 34L and departures from runway 16R.
    Area B. No change.
    Area C. Southeast corner is moved to the west, and floor of 
airspace is raised from 1,600 feet to 1,800 feet.
    Area D. No change.
    Area E. Southeast border of airspace is moved slightly to the west.
    Area F. No change.
    Area G. 2 NM arc northeast of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport 
is straightened and realigned with the border of the Renton Class D 
airspace area.
    Area H. Entire airspace is moved east slightly. Northern and 
southern boundaries are depicted as angles instead of curves.
    Area I. Floor is lowered to 4,000 feet and the area is narrowed and 
described with straight lines instead of curved lines.
    Area J. New area joins existing areas that have floors of 5,000 
feet.
    Area K. New area with a floor of 5,000 feet.
    Area L. Area narrowed and described with straight lines instead of 
curved lines.
    Area M. Area expanded slightly on the northeast and southeast 
corners and described with straight lines instead of curved lines.
    Area N. New area floor is raised from 3,000 feet to 4,000 feet in 
part of area, and lowered from 5,000 feet to 4,000 feet in part of 
area. Boundary described by straight lines.
    Area O. Area is considerably smaller. Floor is lowered from 6,000 
feet to 5,000 feet in part of area, and raised from 3,000 feet to 5,000 
feet in part of area. Ceiling is lowered from 10,000 feet to 7,000 
feet.
    Area P. Area is considerably smaller. Floor is lowered from 6,000 
feet to 5,000 feet in part of area and raised from 3,000 feet to 5,000 
feet in part of area. Ceiling is lowered from 10,000 feet to 7,000 
feet.
    Area Q. Area is reshaped with straight lines instead of curved 
lines. Floor is lowered from 6,000 feet and 8,000 feet to 5,000 feet. 
Ceiling is lowered from 10,000 feet to 7,000 feet.
    Area R. Size of area is significantly reduced and described by 
straight lines instead of curved lines.
    Area S. Area is reshaped with straight lines instead of curved 
lines.
    Area T. Area is reshaped with straight lines instead of curved 
lines and the ceiling is lowered from 10,000 feet to 7,000 feet.
    The above changes ensure the containment of large turbine-powerd 
aircraft within Class B airspace as required by FAA directives.

Environmental Review

    The FAA has determined that this action qualifies for categorical 
exclusion under the National Environmental Policy Act in accordance 
with FAA Order 1050.1E, ``Environmental Impacts: Policies and 
Procedures,'' paragraph 311a. This airspace action is not expected to 
cause any potentially significant environmental impacts, and no 
extraordinary circumstances exist that warrant preparation of an 
environmental assessment.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507(d)) requires 
that the FAA consider the impact of paperwork and other information 
collection burdens imposed on the public. We have determined that there 
is no new information collection requirement associated with this final 
rule.

Regulatory Evaluation Summary

    Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic 
analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 and Executive Order 13563 
directs that each Federal agency shall propose or adopt a regulation 
only upon a reasoned determination that the benefits of the intended 
regulation justify its costs. Second, the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 
1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) requires agencies to analyze the economic impact 
of regulatory changes on small entities. Third, the Trade Agreements 
Act (Pub. L. 96-39) prohibits agencies from setting standards that 
create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United 
States. In developing U.S. standards, the Trade Act requires agencies 
to consider international standards and, where appropriate, that they 
be the basis of U.S. standards. Fourth, the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-4) requires agencies to prepare a written 
assessment of the costs, benefits, and other effects of proposed or 
final rules that include a Federal mandate likely to result in the 
expenditure by State, local, or tribal governments, in the aggregate, 
or by the private sector, of $100 million or more annually (adjusted 
for inflation with base year of 1995). This portion of the preamble 
summarizes the FAA's analysis of the economic impacts of this rule.
    Department of Transportation Order DOT 2100.5 prescribes policies 
and procedures for simplification, analysis, and review of regulations. 
If the expected cost impact is so minimal that a proposed or final rule 
does not warrant a full evaluation, this order permits that a statement 
to that effect and the basis for it be included in the preamble if a 
full regulatory evaluation of the cost and benefits is not prepared. 
Such a determination has been made for this rule. The reasoning for 
this determination follows.
    After consultation with a diverse cross-section of stakeholders 
that participated in the Ad Hoc Committee to develop the 
recommendations contained in the proposed rule, and a review of the 
recommendations and comments, the FAA expects that this rule will 
result in minimal cost. This rule will enhance safety by containing all 
instrument approach procedures, and associated traffic patterns, within 
the confines of Class B airspace and better segregate IFR aircraft 
arriving/departing Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and VFR 
aircraft operating in the vicinity of the Seattle Class B airspace.

[[Page 65947]]

    This rule will enhance safety, reduce the potential for a midair 
collision in the Seattle area and would improve the flow of air 
traffic. As such, we estimate a minimal impact with substantial 
positive net benefits. The FAA has, therefore, determined that this 
rule is not a ``significant regulatory action'' as defined in section 
3(f) of Executive Order 12866, and is not ``significant'' as defined in 
DOT's Regulatory Policies and Procedures.

Regulatory Flexibility Determination

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) (RFA) 
establishes ``as a principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall 
endeavor, consistent with the objectives of the rule and of applicable 
statutes, to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale 
of the businesses, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions 
subject to regulation. To achieve this principle, agencies are required 
to solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain 
the rationale for their actions to assure that such proposals are given 
serious consideration.'' The RFA covers a wide-range of small entities, 
including small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and small 
governmental jurisdictions.
    Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a rule will 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. If the agency determines that it will, the agency must 
prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in the RFA.
    However, if an agency determines that a rule is not expected to 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities, section 605(b) of the RFA provides that the head of the 
agency may so certify and a regulatory flexibility analysis is not 
required. The certification must include a statement providing the 
factual basis for this determination, and the reasoning should be 
clear.
    The FAA believes the rule will not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities as the economic impact 
is expected to be minimal. The FAA received comments indicating the 
rule could have a significant impact on a substantial number of small 
entities but the FAA believes the rule will accommodate these operators 
and not impose costs. The areas of interest for paragliding/hang 
gliding are the landing zone which is \3/4\ of a mile inside area J and 
the launch site which is 2 miles inside area M. The new rule would 
allow general aviation pilots to miss the paragliders launch site 
(inside area M) and their landing zone (inside area J) and go east 
where they can climb and maneuver outside of the Class B airspace. Area 
J's new floor would be reduced from 6,000 feet to 5,000 feet. By 
reducing the floor to 5,000 feet, the FAA can safely contain aircraft 
in Class B airspace. A currently active pilot outreach program will be 
used to educate pilots on the types of operations that may be 
encountered in Areas in J and M.
    Therefore, the FAA Administrator certifies that this final rule 
will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of 
small entities.

International Trade Impact Assessment

    The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (Pub. L. 96-39), as amended by the 
Uruguay Round Agreements Act (Pub. L. 103-465), prohibits Federal 
agencies from establishing standards or engaging in related activities 
that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United 
States. Pursuant to these Acts, the establishment of standards is not 
considered an unnecessary obstacle to the foreign commerce of the 
United States, so long as the standard has a legitimate domestic 
objective, such as the protection of safety, and does not operate in a 
manner that excludes imports that meet this objective. The statute also 
requires consideration of international standards and, where 
appropriate, that they be the basis for U.S. standards. The FAA has 
assessed the effect of this final rule and determined that it will 
enhance safety and is not considered an unnecessary obstacle to trade.

Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-
4) requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement 
assessing the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final 
agency rule that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more 
(in 1995 dollars) in any one year by State, local, and tribal 
governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector; such a mandate 
is deemed to be a ``significant regulatory action.'' The FAA currently 
uses an inflation-adjusted value of $143.1 million in lieu of $100 
million. This final rule does not contain such a mandate; therefore, 
the requirements of Title II of the Act do not apply.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71

    Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air).

The Amendment

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration amends 14 CFR part 71 as follows:

PART 71--DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR 
TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS

0
1. The authority citation for part 71 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 
FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p.389.


Sec.  71.1  [Amended]

0
2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of the Federal 
Aviation Administration Order 7400.9V, Airspace Designations and 
Reporting Points, dated August 9, 2011, and effective September 15, 
2011, is amended as follows:

Paragraph 3000 Subpart B--class B airspace.

* * * * *

ANM WA B Seattle, WA [Revised]

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (Primary Airport)
    (Lat. 47[deg]27'00'' N., Long. 122[deg]18'42'' W.)
Seattle VORTAC (SEA)
    (Lat. 47[deg]26'07'' N., Long. 122[deg]18'35'' W.)

Boundaries

    Area A. That airspace extending upward from the surface to and 
including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line beginning 
at the SEA 007[deg] radial at 3.6 DME, thence to the SEA 007[deg] 
radial at 4 DME, thence counterclockwise along the 4-mile arc of the 
SEA VORTAC to the intersection of the SEA 326[deg] radial at the 
Puget Sound shoreline, thence south along the Puget Sound shoreline 
to the 2-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence counterclockwise along 
the 2-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 202[deg] radial, thence 
south to the SEA 197[deg] radial at 4 DME, thence south to the SEA 
192[deg] radial at 6 DME, thence counterclockwise along the 6-mile 
arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 163[deg] radial, thence north to 
the SEA 159[deg] radial at 4 DME, thence north to the SEA 146[deg] 
radial at 2 DME, thence counterclockwise along the 2-mile arc of SEA 
VORTAC to the SEA 069[deg] radial to the point of beginning.
    Area B. That airspace extending upward from 1,100 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the SEA 007[deg] radial at 4 DME, thence north along 
the SEA 007[deg] radial to the 6-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence 
counterclockwise along the 6-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 
342[deg] radial, thence south along the SEA 342[deg] radial to the 
4-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence clockwise along the 4-mile arc 
of the SEA VORTAC to the point of beginning.
    Area C. That airspace extending upward from 1,800 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line

[[Page 65948]]

beginning at the SEA 192[deg] radial at 6 DME, thence south along 
the SEA 192[deg] radial to the 12-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence 
counterclockwise along the 12-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 
166[deg] radial, thence north to the SEA 163[deg] radial at 8 DME, 
thence north to the SEA 163[deg] radial at 6 DME, thence clockwise 
along the 6-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the point of beginning.
    Area D. That airspace extending upward from 1,800 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the SEA 007[deg] radial at 6 DME, thence 
counterclockwise along the 6-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 
342[deg] radial, thence northwest along the SEA 342[deg] radial to 
the 12-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence clockwise along the 12-
mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 007[deg] radial, thence south 
along the SEA 007[deg] radial to the point of beginning.
    Area E. That airspace extending upward from 2,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the SEA 197[deg] radial at 4DME, thence clockwise along 
the 4-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 326[deg] radial, thence 
south along the Puget Sound shoreline to the 2-mile arc of the SEA 
VORTAC, thence counterclockwise along the 2-mile arc of the SEA 
VORTAC to the SEA 202[deg] radial to the point of beginning.
    Area F. That airspace extending upward from 2,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the SEA 342[deg] radial at 4 DME, thence north along 
the SEA 342[deg] radial to the Puget Sound shoreline, thence south 
along the Puget Sound shoreline to the SEA 326[deg] radial at 4 DME, 
thence clockwise along the 4-mile arc of SEA VORTAC to the point of 
beginning.
    Area G. That airspace extending upward from 2,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the SEA 007[deg] radial at 3.6 DME, thence north along 
the SEA 007[deg] radial to the 12-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence 
clockwise along the 12-mile arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 
022[deg] radial, thence south along the 022[deg] radial to the 4-
mile arc of the SEA VORTAC, thence clockwise along the 4-mile arc of 
the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 159[deg] radial, thence north to the SEA 
146[deg] radial at 2 DME, thence counterclockwise along the 2-mile 
arc of the SEA VORTAC to the SEA 069[deg] radial to the point of 
beginning.
    Area H. That airspace extending upward from 3,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the SEA 338[deg] radial at 20 DME, thence east to the 
SEA 023[deg] radial at 20 DME, thence southeast to the SEA 033[deg] 
radial at 16 DME, thence south to the SEA 135[deg] radial at 12 DME, 
thence southwest to the SEA 157[deg] radial at 18.3 DME, thence west 
to the SEA 200[deg] radial at 18 DME, thence northwest to the SEA 
212[deg] radial at 15 DME, thence north to the SEA 335[deg] radial 
at 18 DME to the point of beginning, excluding that airspace in the 
areas A through G.
    Area I. That airspace extending upward from 4,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]48'13'' N., long. 122[deg] 27'59'' W., (SEA 
344[deg] radial at 23NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]47'59'' N., 
long. 122[deg]08'02'' W. (SEA 018[deg] radial at 23NM), thence south 
to lat. 47[deg]44'31'' N., long. 122[deg]07'00'' W., (SEA 023[deg] 
radial at 20NM), thence west to lat. 47[deg]44'39'' N., long. 
122[deg]29'41'' W. (SEA 338[deg] radial at 20NM) to the point of 
beginning.
    Area J. That airspace extending upward from 5,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]39'31'' N., long. 122[deg]05'41'' W., (SEA 
033[deg] radial at 16NM), thence southeast to lat. 47[deg]37'49'' 
N., long. 121[deg]59'59'' W., (SEA 047[deg] radial at 17.2NM), 
thence south to lat. 47[deg]17'36'' N., long. 122[deg]00'04'' W., 
(SEA 124[deg] radial at 15.2NM), thence west to lat. 47[deg]17'38'' 
N., long. 122[deg]06'07'' W., (SEA 135[deg] radial at 12NM) to the 
point of beginning.
    Area K. That airspace extending upward from 5,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]38'53'' N., long. 122[deg]36'14'' W., (SEA 
317[deg] radial at 17.5NM), thence northeast to lat. 47[deg]42'25'' 
N., long. 122[deg]29'50'' W. (SEA 335[deg] radial at 18NM), thence 
south to lat 47[deg]13'24'' N., long. 122[deg]30'14'' W. (SEA 
212[deg] radial at 15NM), thence north to lat. 47[deg]16'09'' N., 
long. 122[deg]36'01'' W. (SEA 230[deg] radial at 15.5NM) to the 
point of beginning.
    Area L. That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]39'00'' N., long. 122[deg]43'03'' W. (SEA 
308[deg] radial at 21NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]38'53'' N., 
long. 122[deg]36'14'' W. (SEA 317[deg] radial at 17.5NM), thence 
south to lat. 47[deg]16'09'' N., long. 122[deg]36'01'' W. (SEA 
230[deg] radial at 15.5NM), thence northwest to lat. 47[deg]18'46'' 
N., long./122[deg]42'45'' W. (SEA 246[deg] radial at 18NM) to the 
point of beginning.
    Area M. That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]37'49'' N., long. 121[deg]59'59'' W. (SEA 
047[deg] radial at 17.2NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]36'45'' N., 
long. 121[deg]56'03'' W. (SEA 055[deg] radial at 18.6NM), thence 
east to lat. 47[deg]35'39'' N., long. 121[deg]51'58'' W. (SEA 
062[deg] radial at 20.4NM), thence south to lat. 47[deg]18'18'' N., 
long. 121[deg]51'40'' W. (SEA 113[deg] radial at 19.9NM), thence 
southwest to lat. 47[deg]17'28'' N., long. 121[deg]55'42'' W. (SEA 
119[deg] radial at 17.8NM), thence west to lat. 47[deg]17'36'' N., 
long. 122[deg]00'04'' W. (SEA 124[deg] radial at 15.2NM) to the 
point of beginning.
    Area N. That airspace extending upward from 4,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]09'13'' N., long. 122[deg]27'36'' W. (SEA 
200[deg] radial at 18NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]09'17'' N., 
long. 122[deg]08'06'' W. (SEA 157[deg] radial at 18.3NM), thence 
south to lat. 47'06'' 16'N., long. 122[deg]08'34'' W. (SEA 161[deg] 
radial at 21NM), thence west to lat. 47[deg]06'20'' N., long. 
122[deg]26'21'' W. (SEA 195[deg] radial at 20.5NM) to the point of 
beginning.
    Area O. That airspace extending upward from 5,000 feet MSL to 
and including 7,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]18'46'' N., long. 122[deg]42'45'' W. (SEA 
246[deg] radial at 18NM), thence southeast to lat. 47[deg]16'09'' 
N., long. 122[deg]36'01'' W. (SEA 230[deg] radial at 15.5NM), thence 
southeast to lat. 47[deg]13'24'' N., long. 122[deg]30'14'' W. (SEA 
212[deg] radial at 15NM), thence south to lat. 47[deg]09'13'' N., 
long. 122[deg]27'36'' W. (SEA 200[deg] radial at 18NM), thence south 
to lat. 47[deg]06'20'' N., long. 122[deg]26'21'' W. (SEA 195[deg] 
radial at 20.5NM), thence southwest to lat. 47[deg]02'35'' N., long. 
122[deg]30'26'' W. (SEA 199[deg] radial at 24.9NM), thence northwest 
to lat. 47[deg]10'55'' N., long. 122[deg]40'04'' W. (SEA 224[deg] 
radial at 21.1NM) to the point of beginning.
    Area P. That airspace extending upward from 5,000 feet MSL to 
and including 7,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]17'38'' N., long. 122[deg]06'07'' W. (SEA 
135[deg] radial at 12NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]17'36'' N., 
long. 122[deg]00'04'' W. (SEA 124[deg] radial at 15.2NM), thence 
east to lat. 47[deg]17'28'' N., long. 121[deg]55'42'' W. (SEA 
119[deg] radial at 17.8NM), thence southwest to lat. 47[deg]14'03'' 
N., long. 121[deg]58'57'' W. (SEA 132[deg]degree radial at 18NM), 
thence south to lat. 47[deg]11'46'' N., long. 121[deg]58'59'' W. 
(SEA 137[deg] radial at 19.6NM), thence southwest to lat. 
47[deg]02'38'' N., long. 122[deg]06'04'' W. (SEA 160[deg] radial at 
25NM), thence northwest to lat. 47[deg]06'16'' N., long. 
122[deg]08'34'' W. (SEA 161[deg] radial at 21NM), thence north to 
lat. 47[deg]09'17'' N., long. 122[deg]08'06'' W. (SEA 157[deg] 
degree radial at 18.3NM) to the point to beginning.
    Area Q. That airspace extending upward from 5,000 feet MSL to 
and including 7,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]51'15'' N., long. 122[deg]30'00'' W. (SEA 
343[deg] radial at 26.3NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]51'09'' N., 
long. 122[deg]05'46'' W. (SEA 019[deg] radial at 26.5NM), thence 
southeast to lat. 47[deg]41'54'' N., long. 121[deg]55'57'' W. (SEA 
044[deg] radial at 22NM), thence south to lat. 47[deg]36'45'' N., 
long 121[deg]56'03'' W. (SEA 055[deg] radial at 18.6NM), thence 
northwest to lat. 47[deg]37'49'' N., long. 121[deg]59'59'' W. (SEA 
047[deg] radial at 17.2NM), thence northwest to lat. 47[deg]39'31'' 
N., long. 122[deg]05'41'' W. (SEA 033[deg] radial at 16NM), thence 
north to lat. 47[deg]44'31'' N., long. 122[deg]07'00'' W. (SEA 
023[deg] radial at 20NM), thence north to lat. 47[deg]47'59'' N., 
long. 122[deg]08'02'' W. (SEA 018[deg] radial at 23NM) thence west 
to lat. 47[deg]48'13'' N., long. 122[deg]27'59'' W. (SEA 344[deg] 
radial at 23NM), thence south to lat. 47[deg]44'39'' N., long. 
122[deg]29'41'' W. (SEA 338[deg] radial at 20NM), thence south to 
lat. 47[deg]42'25'' N., long. 122[deg]29'50'' W. (SEA 335[deg] 
radial at 18NM), thence southwest to lat. 47[deg]38'53'' N., long. 
122[deg]36'14'' W. (SEA 317[deg] radial at 17.5NM), thence west to 
lat. 47[deg]39'00'' N., long. 122[deg]43'03'' W. (SEA 308[deg] 
radial at 21NM) to the point of beginning.
    Area R. That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 7,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]55'27'' N., long. 122[deg]27'04'' W., (SEA 
349[deg] radial 29.9NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]55'31'' N., 
long. 122[deg]08'29'' W., (SEA 013[deg] radial at 30.2NM), thence 
southeast to lat. 47[deg]51'09'' N., long. 122[deg]05'46'' W., (SEA 
019[deg] radial at 26.5NM), thence west to lat. 47[deg]51'15'' N., 
long. 122[deg]30'00'' W., (SEA 343[deg] radial at 26.3NM) to the 
point of beginning.

[[Page 65949]]

    Area S. That airspace extending upward from 5,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]06'20'' N., long. 122[deg]26'21'' W., (SEA 
195[deg] radial at 20.5NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]06'16'' N., 
long. 122[deg]08'34'' W., (SEA 161[deg] radial at 21NM), thence 
southeast to lat. 47[deg]02'38'' N., long. 122[deg]06'04'' W., (SEA 
160[deg] radial at 25NM), thence west to lat. 47[deg]02'35'' N., 
long. 122[deg]30'26'' W. (SEA 199[deg] radial at 24.9NM) to the 
point of beginning.
    Area T. That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 7,000 feet MSL within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at lat. 47[deg]02'35'' N., long. 122[deg]30'26'' W. (SEA 
199[deg] radial at 24.9NM), thence east to lat. 47[deg]02'38'' N., 
long. 122[deg]06'04'' W., (SEA 160[deg] radial at 25NM), thence 
southwest to lat. 46[deg]57'13'' N., long. 122[deg]08'03'' W., (SEA 
166[deg] radial at 29.8NM), thence west to lat. 46[deg]57'05'' N., 
long. 122[deg]27'35'' W. (SEA 192[deg] radial at 29.7NM), to the 
point of beginning.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on October 17, 2011.
Gary A. Norek,
Acting Manager, Airspace, Regulations and ATC Procedures Group.
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P

[[Page 65950]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC11.003


[[Page 65951]]


[FR Doc. 2011-27367 Filed 10-24-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-C