[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 100 (Wednesday, May 23, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 30855-30869]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-12493]



[[Page 30855]]

Vol. 77

Wednesday,

No. 100

May 23, 2012

Part V





Environmental Protection Agency





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Sixty-Ninth Report of the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee to the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency; Receipt of Report 
and Request for Comments; Notice

Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 100 / Wednesday, May 23, 2012 / 
Notices

[[Page 30856]]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

[EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020; FRL-9346-3]


Sixty-Ninth Report of the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee to 
the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency; Receipt of 
Report and Request for Comments

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Interagency Testing 
Committee (ITC) transmitted its 69th Report to the EPA Administrator on 
April 5, 2012. In the 69th ITC Report, which is included with this 
notice, the ITC is adding a category of cadmium compounds including any 
chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's structure, 6 
non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame retardants, 2 
other flame retardants, 9 chemicals to which children living near 
hazardous waste sites may be exposed, and a category of 69 
diisocyanates and related compounds (including 14 Action Plan chemicals 
and 55 related compounds) to the TSCA Priority Testing List. In 
addition, the ITC is removing 103 cadmium compounds and 14 High 
Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program orphan chemicals from the 
Priority Testing List during this reporting period (June to November 
2011). The ITC is adding the category of cadmium compounds and removing 
103 cadmium compounds to provide a more comprehensive approach to 
assessing cadmium compounds' safety.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before June 22, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Submit your comments, identified by docket identification 
(ID) number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020, by one of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the online instructions for submitting comments.
     Mail: Document Control Office (7407M), Office of Pollution 
Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 
Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001.
     Hand Delivery: OPPT Document Control Office (DCO), EPA 
East Bldg., Rm. 6428, 1201 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC. 
Attention: Docket ID Number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020. The DCO is open from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. The 
telephone number for the DCO is (202) 564-8930. Such deliveries are 
only accepted during the DCO's normal hours of operation, and special 
arrangements should be made for deliveries of boxed information.
    Instructions: Direct your comments to docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020. EPA's policy is that all comments received will be included 
in the docket without change and may be made available online at http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided, 
unless the comment includes information claimed to be Confidential 
Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is 
restricted by statute. Do not submit information that you consider to 
be CBI or otherwise protected through regulations.gov or email. The 
regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means 
EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you 
provide it in the body of your comment. If you send an email comment 
directly to EPA without going through regulations.gov, your email 
address will be automatically captured and included as part of the 
comment that is placed in the docket and made available on the 
Internet. If you submit an electronic comment, EPA recommends that you 
include your name and other contact information in the body of your 
comment and with any disk or CD-ROM you submit. If EPA cannot read your 
comment due to technical difficulties and cannot contact you for 
clarification, EPA may not be able to consider your comment. Electronic 
files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of 
encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses.
    Docket: All documents in the docket are listed in the docket index 
available at http://www.regulations.gov. Although listed in the index, 
some information is not publicly available, e.g., CBI or other 
information whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other 
material, such as copyrighted material, will be publicly available only 
in hard copy. Publicly available docket materials are available 
electronically at http://www.regulations.gov, or, if only available in 
hard copy, at the OPPT Docket. The OPPT Docket is located in the EPA 
Docket Center (EPA/DC) at Rm. 3334, EPA West Bldg., 1301 Constitution 
Ave. NW., Washington, DC. The EPA/DC Public Reading Room hours of 
operation are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding 
legal holidays. The telephone number of the EPA/DC Public Reading Room 
is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone number for the OPPT Docket is 
(202) 566-0280. Docket visitors are required to show photographic 
identification, pass through a metal detector, and sign the EPA visitor 
log. All visitor bags are processed through an X-ray machine and 
subject to search. Visitors will be provided an EPA/DC badge that must 
be visible at all times in the building and returned upon departure.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical information contact: Dr. 
John D. Walker, Interagency Testing Committee (7401M), Office of 
Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 
Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001; telephone number: 
(202) 564-7527; fax number: (202) 564-7528; email address: 
walker.johnd@epa.gov.
    For general information contact: The TSCA-Hotline, ABVI-Goodwill, 
422 South Clinton Ave., Rochester, NY 14620; telephone number: (202) 
554-1404; email address: TSCA-Hotline@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. General Information

A. Does this action apply to me?

    This notice is directed to the public in general. It may, however, 
be of particular interest to you if you manufacture (defined by statute 
to include import) and/or process TSCA-covered chemicals and you may be 
identified by the North American Industrial Classification System 
(NAICS) codes 325 and 32411. Because this notice is directed to the 
general public and other entities may also be interested, the Agency 
has not attempted to describe all the specific entities that may be 
interested in this action. If you have any questions regarding the 
applicability of this action to a particular entity, consult the 
technical person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

B. What should I consider as I prepare my comments for EPA?

    1. Submitting CBI. Do not submit this information to EPA through 
regulations.gov or email. Clearly mark the part or all of the 
information that you claim to be CBI. For CBI information in a disk or 
CD-ROM that you mail to EPA, mark the outside of the disk or CD-ROM as 
CBI and then identify electronically within the disk or CD-ROM the 
specific information that is claimed as CBI. In addition to one 
complete version of the comment that includes information claimed as 
CBI, a copy of the comment that does not contain the information 
claimed as CBI must be submitted for inclusion in the public docket. 
Information so marked will not be disclosed except in accordance with 
procedures set forth in 40 CFR part 2.

[[Page 30857]]

    2. Tips for preparing your comments. When submitting comments, 
remember to:
    i. Identify the document by docket ID number and other identifying 
information (subject heading, Federal Register date and page number).
    ii. Follow directions. The Agency may ask you to respond to 
specific questions or organize comments by referencing a Code of 
Federal Regulations (CFR) part or section number.
    iii. Explain why you agree or disagree; suggest alternatives and 
substitute language for your requested changes.
    iv. Describe any assumptions and provide any technical information 
and/or data that you used.
    v. If you estimate potential costs or burdens, explain how you 
arrived at your estimate in sufficient detail to allow for it to be 
reproduced.
    vi. Provide specific examples to illustrate your concerns and 
suggest alternatives.
    vii. Explain your views as clearly as possible, avoiding the use of 
profanity or personal threats.
    viii. Make sure to submit your comments by the comment period 
deadline identified.

II. Background

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.) 
authorizes the EPA Administrator to promulgate regulations under TSCA 
section 4(a) requiring testing of chemicals and chemical groups in 
order to develop data relevant to determining the risks that such 
chemicals and chemical groups may present to health or the environment. 
Section 4(e) of TSCA established the ITC to recommend chemicals and 
chemical groups to the EPA Administrator for priority testing 
consideration. Section 4(e) of TSCA directs the ITC to revise the TSCA 
section 4(e) Priority Testing List at least every 6 months.
    You may access additional information about the ITC at http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/itc.

A. The 69th ITC Report

    The ITC is adding a category of cadmium compounds including any 
chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's structure, 6 
non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame retardants, 2 
other flame retardants, 9 chemicals to which children living near 
hazardous waste sites may be exposed, and a category of 69 
diisocyanates and related compounds (including 14 Action Plan chemicals 
and 55 related compounds) to the TSCA section 4(e) Priority Testing 
List. In addition, the ITC is removing 103 cadmium compounds and 14 HPV 
Challenge Program orphan chemicals from the Priority Testing List 
during this reporting period (June to November 2011). The ITC is adding 
the category of cadmium compounds and removing 103 cadmium compounds to 
provide a more comprehensive approach to assessing cadmium compounds' 
safety.

B. Status of the Priority Testing List

    The Priority Testing List includes 2 alkylphenols, 16 chemicals 
with insufficient dermal absorption rate data, and 164 HPV Challenge 
Program orphan chemicals, a category of cadmium compounds including any 
chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's structure, 6 
non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame retardants, 2 
other flame retardants, 9 chemicals to which children living near 
hazardous waste sites may be exposed, and a category of 69 
diisocyanates and related compounds (including 14 Action Plan chemicals 
and 55 related compounds).

List of Subjects

    Environmental protection, Chemicals, Hazardous substances.

    Dated: May 15, 2012.
Wendy C. Hamnett,
Director, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

Sixty-Ninth Report of the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee to the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency

Table of Contents

Summary

I. Background
II. TSCA Section 8 Reporting
    A. TSCA Section 8 Reporting Rules
    B. ITC's Use of TSCA Section 8 and Other Information
    C. New Request To Add Chemicals to the TSCA Section 8(d) HaSDR 
Rule
III. ITC's Activities During This Reporting Period (June to November 
2011)
IV. Revisions to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List
    A. Chemicals Added to the Priority Testing List
    1. Cadmium Compounds
    2. Non-Phthalate Plasticizers, Phosphate Ester Flame Retardants, 
and Other Flame Retardants
    3. Chemicals to which children living near hazardous waste sites 
may be exposed
    4. Diisocyanates and Related Compounds
    B. Chemicals Removed From the Priority Testing List
    1. Cadmium Compounds
    2. HPV Challenge Program Orphan Chemicals
V. References
VI. The TSCA Interagency Testing Committee

Summary

    The ITC is adding a category of cadmium compounds including any 
chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's structure, 6 
non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame retardants, 2 
other flame retardants, 9 chemicals to which children living near 
hazardous waste sites may be exposed, and a category of 69 
diisocyanates and related compounds (including 14 Action Plan chemicals 
and 55 related compounds) to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) 
section 4(e) Priority Testing List. In addition, the ITC is also 
removing 103 cadmium compounds and 14 High Production Volume (HPV) 
Challenge Program orphan chemicals from the Priority Testing List 
during this reporting period (June to November 2011). The ITC is adding 
the category of cadmium compounds and removing 103 cadmium compounds to 
provide a more comprehensive approach to assessing cadmium compounds' 
safety.
    The TSCA section 4(e) Priority Testing List is Table 1 of this 
unit.

                                Table 1--TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List
                                                 [November 2011]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ITC Report                     Date                   Chemical name/group                 Action
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
31...............  January 1993.......................  2 Chemicals with         Designated.
                                                         insufficient dermal
                                                         absorption rate data,
                                                         methyl cyclo hexane
                                                         and cyclo pentane.
32...............  May 1993...........................  10 Chemicals with        Designated.
                                                         insufficient dermal
                                                         absorption rate data.
35...............  November 1994......................  4 Chemicals with         Designated.
                                                         insufficient dermal
                                                         absorption rate data,
                                                         cyclopentadiene,
                                                         formamide, 1,2,3-
                                                         trichloropropane and m-
                                                         nitrotoluene.
37...............  November 1995......................  Branched 4-nonylphenol   Recommended.
                                                         (mixed isomers).

[[Page 30858]]

 
41...............  November 1997......................  Phenol, 4-(1,1,3,3-      Recommended.
                                                         tetramethylbutyl)-.
55...............  December 2004......................  161 High Production      Recommended.
                                                         Volume (HPV) Challenge
                                                         Program orphan
                                                         chemicals.
56...............  August 2005........................  3 HPV Challenge Program  Recommended.
                                                         orphan chemicals.
68...............  May 2011...........................  Cadmium................  Recommended.
69...............  November 2011......................  Cadmium compounds......  Recommended.
69...............  November 2011......................  6 Non-phthalate          Recommended.
                                                         plasticizers.
69...............  November 2011......................  25 Phosphate ester       Recommended.
                                                         flame retardants.
69...............  November 2011......................  2 Other flame            Recommended.
                                                         retardants.
69...............  November 2011......................  9 Chemicals to which     Recommended.
                                                         children living near
                                                         hazardous waste sites
                                                         may be exposed.
69...............  November 2011......................  69 Diisocyanates and     Recommended.
                                                         related compounds.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I. Background

    The ITC was established by TSCA section 4(e) ``to make 
recommendations to the Administrator respecting the chemical substances 
and mixtures to which the Administrator should give priority 
consideration for the promulgation of rules for testing under section 
4(a). * * * At least every six months * * *, the Committee shall make 
such revisions to the Priority Testing List as it determines to be 
necessary and transmit them to the Administrator together with the 
Committee's reasons for the revisions'' (Public Law 94-469, 90 Stat. 
2003 et seq., 15 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.). ITC reports are available from 
regulations.gov (http://www.regulations.gov) after publication in the 
Federal Register. The ITC produces its revisions to the Priority 
Testing List with administrative and technical support from the ITC 
staff, ITC members, and their U.S. Government organizations, and 
contract support provided by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 
ITC members and staff are listed at the end of this report.

II. TSCA Section 8 Reporting

A. TSCA Section 8 Reporting Rules

    Following receipt of the ITC's report (and the revised Priority 
Testing List) by the EPA Administrator, EPA's Office of Pollution 
Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) may add the chemicals from the revised 
Priority Testing List to the TSCA section 8(a) Preliminary Assessment 
Information Reporting (PAIR) rule (40 CFR part 712) and/or the TSCA 
section 8(d) Health and Safety Data Reporting (HaSDR) rule (40 CFR part 
716). The PAIR rule requires manufacturers (including importers) of 
chemicals added to the Priority Testing List to submit to EPA certain 
production and exposure information (http://www.epa.gov/oppt/chemtest/pubs/pairform.pdf). As provided for in the PAIR rule, whenever EPA 
announces the receipt of an ITC report, EPA amends, unless otherwise 
instructed by the ITC, the PAIR rule by adding the recommended (or 
designated) chemicals that have been added to the Priority Testing List 
by the ITC.
    The HaSDR rule requires certain past, current, and proposed 
manufacturers, importers, and (if specified by EPA) processors of 
listed chemicals to submit to EPA copies and lists of unpublished 
health and safety studies on the listed chemicals that they 
manufacture, import, or (if specified by EPA) process. As provided for 
in the HaSDR rule, whenever EPA announces the receipt of an ITC report, 
EPA amends, unless otherwise instructed by the ITC, the HaSDR rule by 
adding the recommended (or designated) chemicals that have been added 
to the Priority Testing List by the ITC.

B. ITC's Use of TSCA Section 8 and Other Information

    The ITC's use of TSCA section 8 and other information is described 
in the 52nd ITC Report (Ref. 1).

C. New Request To Add Chemicals to the TSCA Section 8(d) HaSDR Rule

    The ITC is requesting that EPA add a category of cadmium compounds 
including any chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's 
structure, 6 non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame 
retardants, 2 other flame retardants, 9 chemicals to which children 
living near hazardous waste sites may be exposed, and a category of 69 
diisocyanates and related compounds to the TSCA section 8(d) HaSDR 
rule. The category of cadmium compounds, 6 non-phthalate plasticizers, 
25 phosphate ester flame retardants, 2 other flame retardants, 9 
chemicals to which children living near hazardous waste sites may be 
exposed, and a category of 69 diisocyanates and related compounds are 
discussed in section IV of this report.

III. ITC's Activities During This Reporting Period (June to November 
2011)

    During this reporting period, the ITC discussed the need to expand 
the definition of the cadmium compounds beyond the 103 cadmium 
compounds recommended in the 68th ITC Report (Ref. 2). As a result the 
ITC is recommending a category of cadmium compounds including any 
chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's structure and 
removing the 103 cadmium compounds from the Priority Testing List. The 
ITC is adding the category of cadmium compounds and removing 103 
cadmium compounds to provide a more comprehensive approach to assessing 
cadmium compounds' safety.
    In addition, the ITC discussed the use of TSCA section 8(d) to 
obtain biomonitoring data. As a result of these discussions, the ITC is 
adding 6 non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame 
retardants, 2 other flame retardants, and 9 chemicals to which children 
living near hazardous waste sites may be exposed to the Priority 
Testing List and asking EPA to add these chemicals to the TSCA section 
8(d) HaSDR rule to obtain biomonitoring data. The ITC also discussed 
adding a category of 69 diisocyanates and related compounds to the 
Priority Testing List and to the TSCA section 8(d) HaSDR rule to 
facilitate EPA's ability to obtain existing studies. Finally, the ITC 
discussed EPA's Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for HPV Challenge 
Program chemicals (Ref. 3). As a result of these discussions the ITC is 
removing 14 HPV Challenge Program orphan chemicals from the Priority 
Testing List.

IV. Revisions to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List

A. Chemicals Added to the Priority Testing List

    1. Cadmium compounds--i. Recommendation. The EPA and the

[[Page 30859]]

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) request that the ITC add the 
category cadmium compounds to the Priority Testing List to obtain 
health and safety studies on cadmium compounds that are present in any 
consumer product. The cadmium compounds category includes any chemical 
that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's structure.
    ii. Rationale for recommendation. The EPA and the CPSC are 
concerned with the content of cadmium and cadmium compounds in certain 
children's toys, jewelry, and other consumer products due to known 
toxicity and health concerns from exposure to cadmium and cadmium 
compounds. The EPA has expanded the cadmium compounds category to 
include any chemical that contains cadmium as part of that chemical's 
structure to capture information on more than the 103 cadmium compounds 
listed in the 68th ITC Report (Ref. 2). Cadmium remains on the Priority 
Testing List as recommended in the 68th ITC Report.
    iii. Supporting information. The supporting information for cadmium 
and cadmium compounds is described in the 68th ITC Report. However, the 
supporting information for this report is for cadmium and cadmium 
compounds, not cadmium or cadmium compounds.
    iv. Information needs. EPA and CPSC need health and safety studies 
for assessing the extent and degree of exposure and potential hazard 
associated with cadmium and cadmium compounds including: 
Epidemiological or clinical studies; occupational exposure, health 
effects, and ecological effects studies; and environmental fate studies 
(including relevant physical chemical properties).
    For example, EPA and CPSC need studies about the total amount of 
cadmium and cadmium compounds contained in a product, the solubility, 
and bioavailability of cadmium and cadmium compounds (including 
accessibility of cadmium and cadmium compounds to children and studies 
of the age and foreseeable behavior of children exposed to a product 
for children and/or children's toys), the foreseeable duration and 
route of potential cadmium and cadmium compounds exposure through 
contact with products, and studies on the marketing, patterns of use, 
and lifecycle of cadmium-containing products.
    2. Non-phthalate plasticizers, phosphate ester flame retardants, 
and other flame retardants--i. Recommendation. The CPSC requests that 
the ITC add 6 non-phthalate plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame 
retardants, and 2 other flame retardants to the Priority Testing List 
to obtain biomonitoring studies on the identity and quantity of urinary 
metabolites. This recommendation is coordinated with the Agency for 
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
    ii. Rationale for recommendation. The CPSC is requesting that 6 
non-phthalate plasticizers be added to the Priority Testing List 
because they need biomonitoring data on urinary metabolites. Phthalate 
plasticizers are being replaced with non-phthalate plasticizers, such 
as acetyl tri-n-butyl citrate (Chemical Abstract Service Registry 
Number (CAS No.) 77-90-7); di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (CAS No. 103-23-1); 
di(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (CAS No. 6422-86-2); 2,2,4-trimethyl-
1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (CAS No. 6846-50-0); 1,2-
cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1,2-diisononyl ester (CAS No. 16612-78-
8); and 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1,2-dinonyl ester, branched 
and linear ester (CAS No. 474919-59-0) (Table 2 of this unit). The 6 
non-phthalate plasticizers identified in Table 2 of this unit are known 
to be used in children's products, including teething rings and soft 
plastic toys and have the potential to migrate from these products into 
human saliva.
    In addition, the CPSC is requesting that 25 phosphate ester flame 
retardants and 2 other flame retardants be added to the Priority 
Testing List because they need biomonitoring data on urinary 
metabolites. The flame retardants identified in Tables 3A, 3B, and 4 of 
this unit are known to be used in upholstered furniture, automobile 
upholstery, and children's products such as car seats, play pens, and 
toys. These flame retardants are substitutes for pentabromodiphenyl 
ether, which was withdrawn from the market due to environmental and 
health concerns.
    iii. Supporting information--a. Non-phthalate plasticizers. The 
non-phthalate plasticizer, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (CAS No. 103-23-1) 
was added to the Priority Testing List in the 28th ITC Report (Ref. 4). 
Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was recommended for chemical fate, ecological 
effects, and health effects testing because of extensive human and 
environmental exposures. Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate was removed from the 
Priority Testing List in the 32nd ITC Report because manufacturers 
committed to develop dossiers and necessary test data under the 
Screening Information Data Set (SIDS) program of the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (Ref. 5). Di(2-ethylhexyl) 
terephthalate (CAS No. 6422-86-2) was added to the Priority Testing 
List in the 11th ITC Report as bis(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (Ref. 
6). Di(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate was recommended for chemical fate, 
ecological effects, and health effects testing because of extensive 
human and environmental exposures. Di(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate was 
removed from the Priority Testing List in the 13th ITC Report (Ref. 7). 
Di(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate was removed because EPA developed a 
Negotiated Testing Agreement with the chemical's manufacturers to 
conduct the testing (Ref. 8). 2,2,4-Trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol 
diisobutyrate (CAS No. 6846-50-0) has been reviewed by OECD and a SIDS 
dossier has been developed (http://www.inchem.org/documents/sids/sids/6846500.pdf). 1,2-Cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1,2-diisononyl ester 
(CAS No. 166412-78-8) is a plasticizer for ``PVC and other polar 
polymers and can be used in applications that are particularly 
sensitive from a toxicological point of view'' (http://www2.basf.us/plasticizers/pdfs/Hex_DINCH_e_08_04.pdf). 1,2- 
Cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, 1,2-dinonyl ester, branched and linear 
(CAS No. 474919-59-0) is a plasticizer that is ``recommended for 
medical products, toys and food packaging applications.'' Dreyfus and 
Babich have demonstrated that all six of these non-phthalate 
plasticizers migrate into simulated saliva (Ref. 9).
    b. Phosphate ester flame retardants. Tributyl phosphate (CAS No. 
126-73-8) was recommended with intent to designate in the 18th ITC 
Report (Ref. 10). Tributyl phosphate was recommended for chemical fate, 
ecological effects, and health effects testing because of extensive 
human and environmental exposures. Tributyl phosphate was also added to 
the May 19, 1986 PAIR and HaSDR rules (Ref. 11). After reviewing 
extensive voluntary data submissions from manufacturers and reports 
submitted in response to the May 19, 1986 PAIR and HaSDR rules, the ITC 
designated tributyl phosphate for chemical fate, ecological effects, 
and health effects testing in the 19th ITC Report (Ref. 12). Tributyl 
phosphate was removed from the Priority Testing List in the 22nd ITC 
Report (Ref. 13). Tributyl phosphate was removed from the Priority 
Testing List because EPA proposed the testing designated by the ITC in 
a NPRM that was published on November 12, 1987 (Ref. 14). EPA required 
the testing designated by the ITC in a final rule published on August 
14, 1989 (Ref. 15).
    Tributyl phosphate (CAS No. 126-73-8), triisobutyl phosphate (CAS 
No. 126-

[[Page 30860]]

71-6) and tri(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (CAS No. 78-51-3) were 
recommended for chemical fate testing and added to the Priority Testing 
List in the 26th ITC Report (Ref. 16). Tributyl phosphate was also 
recommended for ecological effects testing (plant toxicity testing) in 
the 26th ITC Report. Tributyl phosphate, triisobutyl phosphate, and 
tri(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate were added to the September 28, 1990 PAIR 
and HaSDR rules (Ref. 17). After reviewing reports and studies 
submitted in response to the September 28, 1990 PAIR and HaSDR rules, 
tributyl phosphate, triisobutyl phosphate and tri(2-butoxyethyl) 
phosphate were removed from the Priority Testing List in the 33rd ITC 
Report (Ref. 18). Tributyl phosphate was removed from the Priority 
Testing List because testing was being conducted in response to the 
August 14, 1989 final rule. Triisobutyl phosphate was removed from the 
Priority Testing List because it was not known to be domestically 
produced or imported in substantial quantities. Tri (2-butoxyethyl) 
phosphate was removed from the Priority Testing List because it was not 
a high priority for testing at that time.
    Triphenyl phosphate (CAS No. 115-86-6) was added to the Priority 
Testing List in the 2nd ITC Report as one of the chemicals in the aryl 
phosphates category (Ref. 19). The testing recommendations for the aryl 
phosphates category included carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, 
teratogenicity, other chronic effects, environmental effects, and 
epidemiology. Triphenyl phosphate was added to the June 22, 1982 PAIR 
rule (Ref. 20) and the September 2, 1982 HaSDR rule (Ref. 21). 
Triphenyl phosphate was removed from the Priority Testing List in the 
14th ITC Report (Ref. 22). Triphenyl phosphate was removed from the 
Priority Testing List because the aryl phosphates category was included 
in a December 29, 1983 Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) 
(Ref. 23). Triphenyl phosphate was also included in a January 17, 1992 
NPRM (Ref. 24).
    Tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (CAS No. 115-96-8) was added to the 
Priority Testing List in the 23rd ITC Report (Ref. 25). Tris(2-
chloroethyl) phosphate was recommended for chemical fate and ecological 
effects testing. Tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate was added to the 
November 16, 1988 PAIR and HaSDR rules (Ref. 26). After reviewing 
reports and studies submitted in response to the November 16, 1988 PAIR 
and HaSDR rules, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate was removed from the 
Priority Testing List in the 36th ITC Report (Ref. 27). Tris(2-
chloroethyl) phosphate was removed from the Priority Testing List 
because the data or structure activity relationships considered by the 
ITC did not indicate a need for further testing at that time.
    Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (CAS No. 13674-87-8), tris(2-
chloro-1-propyl) phosphate (CAS No. 6145-73-9), and tris(1-chloro-2-
propyl)phosphate (CAS No. 13674-84-5) were added to the Priority 
Testing List in the 23rd ITC Report (Ref. 25). The 3 phosphate ester 
flame retardants were recommended for chemical fate, ecological 
effects, and health effects testing because of extensive human and 
environmental exposures. The three phosphate ester flame retardants 
were included in the November 16, 1988 PAIR and HaSDR rules (Ref. 26). 
Several chemical fate, ecological effects and health effects studies 
were submitted to EPA under the HaSDR rule. The sunset date for 
submitting studies under the HaSDR rule was December 16, 1998. The 
three phosphate ester flame retardants were removed from the Priority 
Testing List in the 36th ITC Report because the data or structure 
activity relationships considered by the ITC did not indicate a need to 
designate the chemicals for further testing at that time (Ref. 27). 
Tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate has been identified as a probable 
human carcinogen, and tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (mixture of 
isomers), see Table 3B, an analog to tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) 
phosphate, is being tested by the National Toxicology Program (NTP). 
The phosphate ester flame retardant bis(2-chloropropyl) (l-chloro-2-
isopropyl) phosphate (CAS No. 76649-15-5) was added to the Priority 
Testing List in the 30th ITC Report (Ref. 28). Bis(2-chloropropyl) (l-
chloro-2-isopropyl) phosphate is a component of tris(chloropropyl) 
phosphate (mixture of isomers). Bis(2-chloropropyl) (l-chloro-2-
isopropyl) phosphate was recommended for chemical fate, ecological 
effects and health effects testing because of potential human and 
environmental exposures and included in the May 14, 1993 PAIR and HaSDR 
rules (Ref. 29). A few studies were submitted to EPA under the HaSDR 
rule. Bis(2-chloropropyl) (l-chloro-2-isopropyl) phosphate was removed 
from the Priority Testing List in the 36th ITC Report because the data 
or structure activity relationships considered by the ITC did not 
indicate a need to designate the chemical for further testing at that 
time (Ref. 27).
    c. Other flame retardants. The Brominated Phthalates Panel of the 
American Chemistry Council submitted its test plan for bis(2-ethyl-1-
hexyl) tetrabromophthalate (CAS No. 26040-51-7]) to the EPA's HPV 
Challenge Program on July 23, 2004 (http://www.epa.gov/hpv/pubs/summaries/phthacid/c15484.pdf). Partially as a result of this 
submission, there are numerous data available for bis(2-ethyl-1-hexyl) 
tetrabromophthalate (http://iaspub.epa.gov/oppthpv/quicksearch.display?pChem=102247). Toxicological data on 2-ethylhexyl-
2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (CAS No.183658-27-7) could not be located by 
California's Office of Health Hazard Assessment (http://oehha.ca.gov/multimedia/biomon/pdf/120408flamedoc.pdf). Bis(2-ethly-1-hexyl) 
tetrabromophthalate and 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate are 
components of Firemaster[supreg]550, a flame-retardant substitute for 
pentabromodiphenyl ether.
    iv. Information needs. The CPSC needs biomonitoring data on the 
identity and quantity of urinary metabolites for the 6 non-phthalate 
plasticizers, 25 phosphate ester flame retardants and 2 other flame 
retardants listed in Tables 2, 3A, 3B, and 4 of this unit. 
Specifically, CPSC is seeking information that would help to estimate 
human exposure to these compounds. First, CPSC needs studies on the 
metabolism of these compounds in animals or humans, including the 
identification of metabolites present in human urine, blood or other 
fluids. For the citrates and phosphates, urinary metabolites may 
include diesters; for adipate the metabolites may include the 
monoester. Second, CPSC needs studies that measure the amount of 
metabolite present in human urine or other media. Third, CPSC needs 
quantitative studies of metabolism in animals or humans that would 
allow one to estimate total exposure from metabolite levels.

 Table 2--Non-Phthalate Plasticizers Being Added to the Priority Testing
                                  List
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                CAS No.                            Plasticizer
------------------------------------------------------------------------
77-90-7................................  1,2,3-Propanetricarboxylic
                                          acid, 2-(acetyloxy)-, tributyl
                                          ester; Acetyl tri-n-butyl
                                          citrate.

[[Page 30861]]

 
103-23-1...............................  Hexanedioic acid, 1,6-bis(2-
                                          ethylhexyl) ester; Di(2-
                                          ethylhexyl) adipate.
6422-86-2..............................  1,4-Benzenedicarboxylic acid,
                                          1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester;
                                          Di(2-ethylhexyl)
                                          terephthalate.
6846-50-0..............................  Propanoic acid, 2-methyl-, 1,1'-
                                          [2,2-dimethyl-1-(1-
                                          methylethyl)-1,3- propanediyl]
                                          ester; 2,2,4-Trimethyl-1,3-
                                          pentanediol diisobutyrate.
166412-78-8............................  1,2-Cyclohexanedicarboxylic
                                          acid, 1,2-diisononyl ester.
474919-59-0............................  1,2-Cyclohexanedicarboxylic
                                          acid, 1,2-dinonyl ester,
                                          branched and linear.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


 Table 3A--Phosphate Ester Flame Retardants Being Added to the Priority
                              Testing List
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                CAS No.                          Flame retardant
------------------------------------------------------------------------
78-40-0................................  Phosphoric acid, triethyl
                                          ester; Triethyl phosphate.
78-51-3................................  Ethanol, (2-butoxy-), 1,1',1''-
                                          phosphate; Tri(2-butoxyethyl)
                                          phosphate.
115-86-6...............................  Phosphoric acid, triphenyl
                                          ester; Triphenyl phosphate.
115-96-8...............................  Ethanol, 2-chloro-, phosphate
                                          (3:1); Tris-(2-chloroethyl)
                                          phosphate.
126-71-6...............................  Phosphoric acid, tris(2-
                                          methylpropyl) ester;
                                          Triisobutyl phosphate.
126-73-8...............................  Phosphoric acid tributyl ester;
                                          Tributyl phosphate.
1241-94-7..............................  Phosphoric acid, 2-ethylhexyl
                                          diphenyl ester; 2-Ethylhexyl
                                          diphenyl phosphate.
1330-78-5..............................  Phosphoric acid,
                                          tris(methylphenyl) ester;
                                          Tricresyl phosphate, mixed
                                          isomers.
5945-33-5..............................  Phosphoric acid, P,P'-[(1-
                                          methylethylidene)di-4, 1-
                                          phenylene] P,P,P 'P '-
                                          tetraphenyl ester; Tetraphenyl
                                          Bisphenol A diphosphate.
6145-73-9..............................  1-Propanol, 2-chloro-, 1,1',1''-
                                          phosphate; Tris(2-chloro-1-
                                          propyl)phosphate.
13674-84-5.............................  2-Propanol, 1-chloro-, 2,2'2''-
                                          phosphate; Tris(1-chloro-2-
                                          propyl) phosphate.
13674-87-8.............................  2-Propanol, 1,3-dichloro-,
                                          phosphate (3:1); Tris(1,3-
                                          dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate.
25155-23-1.............................  Phenol, dimethyl-, 1,1',1``-
                                          phosphate; Trixylyl phosphate.
26444-49-5.............................  Phosphoric acid, methylphenyl
                                          diphenyl ester; Cresyl
                                          diphenyl phosphate.
29761-21-5.............................  Phosphoric acid, isodecyl
                                          diphenyl ester; Isodecyl
                                          diphenyl phosphate.
38051-10-4.............................  Phosphoric acid, P,P'-[2,2-
                                          bis(chloromethyl)-1,3-
                                          propanediyl] P,P,P 'P '-
                                          tetrakis(2-chloroethyl) ester;
                                          2,2-Bis(chloromethyl)-1,3-
                                          propanediyl tetrakis(2-
                                          chloroethyl) phosphate.
56803-37-3.............................  Phosphoric acid, (1,1-
                                          dimethylethyl)phenyl diphenyl
                                          ester; tert-Butylphenyl
                                          diphenyl phosphate.
65652-41-7.............................  Phosphoric acid, bis[(1,1-
                                          dimethylethyl)phenyl] phenyl
                                          ester; Bis (tert-butylphenyl)
                                          phenyl phosphate.
68937-41-7.............................  Phenol, isopropylated,
                                          phosphate (3:1); Isopropylated
                                          triphenyl phosphate.
68937-40-6.............................  Phenol, isobutylenated,
                                          phosphate (3:1); Isobutylated
                                          phenol phosphate.
76025-08-6.............................  Phosphoric acid, bis(2-chloro-1-
                                          methylethyl) 2-chloropropyl
                                          ester; Bis(1-chloro-2-
                                          isopropyl) (2-chloropropyl)
                                          phosphate.
76649-15-5.............................  Phosphoric acid, 2-chloro-1-
                                          methylethyl bis(2-
                                          chloropropyl) ester; Bis(2-
                                          chloropropyl) (l-chloro-2-
                                          isopropyl) phosphate.
181028-79-5............................  Phosphoric trichloride,
                                          reaction products with
                                          bisphenol A and phenol;
                                          Bisphenol A diphosphate.
220352-35-2............................  Phenol, tert-Bu derivs.,
                                          phosphates (3:1); Butylated
                                          triphenyl phosphate.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Table 3B--The Phosphate Ester Flame Retardant, Tris(chloropropyl)
Phosphate (Mixture of Isomers), Being Added to the Priority Testing List
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           Tris(Chloropropyl) phosphate
                CAS No.                              isomers
------------------------------------------------------------------------
6145-73-9..............................  1-Propanol, 2-chloro-, 1,1',1''-
                                          phosphate.
13674-84-5.............................  2-Propanol, 1-chloro-, 2,2',2''-
                                          phosphate.
76025-08-6.............................  Phosphoric acid, bis(2-chloro-1-
                                          methylethyl) 2-chloropropyl
                                          ester.
76649-15-5.............................  Phosphoric acid, 2-chloro-1-
                                          methylethyl bis(2-
                                          chloropropyl) ester.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Table 4--Other Flame Retardants Being Added to the Priority Testing List
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                CAS No.                          Flame retardant
------------------------------------------------------------------------
26040-51-7.............................  1,2-Benzenedicarboxylic acid,
                                          3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-, 1,2-bis(2-
                                          ethylhexyl) ester; Bis(2-ethly-
                                          1-hexyl) tetrabromophthalate.
183658-27-7............................  Benzoic acid, 2,3,4,5-
                                          tetrabromo-, 2-ethylhexyl
                                          ester; 2-Ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-
                                          tetrabromobenzoate.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 30862]]

    3. Chemicals to which children living near hazardous waste sites 
may be exposed--i. Recommendation. ATSDR requests that the ITC add nine 
chemicals to which children living near hazardous waste sites may be 
exposed to the Priority Testing List to obtain biomonitoring studies on 
these chemicals.
    ii. Rationale for recommendation. ATSDR is requesting nine 
chemicals to which children living near hazardous waste sites may be 
exposed be added to the Priority Testing List because children 
constitute a particularly vulnerable population of individuals, who, 
based upon their increased time outdoors and playtime behaviors, have a 
potentially higher than normal exposure to these chemicals around 
hazardous waste sites. For the chemicals in Table 5 of this unit, there 
is insufficient information available concerning both background levels 
and possible elevated exposure levels for children.
    iii. Supporting information. ATSDR works closely with the Center 
for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Environmental 
Health (NCEH), (http://www.cdc.gov/nceh), in their biomonitoring 
program known as the National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental 
Chemicals (NHANES), (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm/). At least 
three of the chemicals in Table 5 of this unit have been included in 
past NHANES: 1,1-dichloroethane (CAS No. 75-34-3); 1,1,2,2-
tetrachloroethane (CAS No. 79-34-5); and 1,2-dichloroethane (CAS No. 
107-06-2). In the NHANES 2003-2004 subsample: 1,1-dichloroethane (CAS 
No.75-34-3); 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (CAS No. 79-34-3); and 1,2-
dichloroethane (CAS No. 107-06-2) were detectable in less than a few 
percent of the participants. In a non-representative sample of adults 
in NHANES III (1988-1994), blood levels were also non-detectable or 
detected in <10% of samples. ATSDR needs to know if children living 
near hazardous waste sites have elevated blood levels of the chemicals 
in Table 5 of this unit.
    1,1-Dichloroethane was added to the Priority Testing List in the 
32nd ITC Report because it was recommended for dermal absorption rate 
testing (Ref. 5). 1,1-Dichloroethane was also added to the Priority 
Testing List in the 55th ITC Report because it was a HPV chemical that 
was not sponsored for testing (Ref. 30). 1,1-Dichloroethane was removed 
from the Priority Testing List in the 56th ITC Report because it was no 
longer a HPV chemical (Ref. 31). 1,1-Dichloroethane's toxicity includes 
effects on the heart, such as irregular heartbeats, which prompted 
discontinuing its use as a surgical anesthetic. It is also known to 
cause kidney disease after long-term high exposure and has delayed 
growth in offspring of experimental animals exposed to high 
concentrations during pregnancy.
    1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane has been observed to cause liver damage 
in experimental animals exposed to lower doses for long periods.
    Benzidine (CAS No. 92-87-5), determined by the Department of Health 
and Human Services (HHS), World Health Organization (WHO) and EPA to be 
a carcinogen, can increase the risk of urinary bladder cancer in long 
term occupational exposures.
    1,2-Dibromomethane (CAS No. 106-93-4) has been found to cause 
reproductive effects in some male workers including sperm damage. 
Experimental animal studies found birth defects in the young of animals 
exposed while in utero.
    Acrolein (CAS No. 107-02-8) was added to the Priority Testing List 
in the 27th ITC Report as 1 of 89 aldehydes (Ref. 32). Acrolein was 
recommended for ecological effects testing because there were 
insufficient data to reasonably determine or predict the ecological 
effects of aldehydes that were submitted to the EPA as new chemicals. 
Acrolein was removed from the Priority Testing List in the 45th ITC 
Report (Ref. 33). Acrolein was removed because it was added to the OECD 
HPV Chemical Program (http://webnet.oecd.org/Hpv/UI/SIDS_Details.aspx?id=6E4A94A8-0068-4088-8CF7-C193F61012D0). Acrolein is a 
component of tobacco smoke and animal studies have found that inhaling 
it causes irritation to the nasal cavity and damage to the lining of 
lungs. Oral exposure through drinking water can cause stomach 
irritations, ulcers, and bleeding.
    1,2-Dichloroethane (a.k.a. ethylene dichloride) was added to the 
Priority Testing List in the 35th ITC Report because it was recommended 
for dermal absorption rate testing (Ref. 34). 1,2-Dichloroethane was 
removed from the Priority Testing List in the 45th ITC Report (Ref. 
33). 1,2-Dichloroethane was removed from the Priority Testing List 
because EPA published a June 9, 1999 NPRM for dermal absorption rate 
testing (Ref. 35). 1,2-Dichloroethane has been found to cause nervous 
system disorders, liver, and kidney disease and lung effects in humans 
ingesting or inhaling large amounts. It has also been found to cause 
kidney disease in experimental animals that ingested low doses.
    Phenol (CAS No. 108-95-2) was added to the Priority Testing List in 
the 27th ITC Report because of its very high production volume, 
potential for release, and presence in commercial and consumer products 
(Ref. 32). Phenol was removed from the Priority Testing List because 
EPA proposed the testing designated by the ITC in a test rule that was 
published on November 22, 1993 (Ref. 36). Phenol, which is used as an 
antiseptic at low doses, can cause lung irritation, headaches and 
burnings eyes if inhaled at high doses. Repeated exposures can induce 
muscle tremors and loss of coordination, and high exposures in air for 
several weeks can cause paralysis, severe injury to the heart, liver, 
kidneys, and lungs.
    Cresols (CAS No. 1319-77-3) were added to the Priority Testing List 
in the 1st ITC Report because their wide use as industrial solvents 
caused concerns for substantial occupational exposures (Ref. 37). 
Cresols were removed from the Priority Testing List in the 13th ITC 
Report (Ref. 7). Cresols were removed from the Priority Testing List 
because EPA proposed the testing designated by the ITC in a test rule 
that was published on July 11, 1983 (Ref. 38). Cresols were again added 
to the Priority Testing List in the 61st ITC Report to obtain dermal 
sensitization data (Ref. 39). Cresols were removed from the Priority 
Testing List in the 62nd ITC Report because the Cresols Panel of the 
American Chemistry Council submitted studies that met the ITC's data 
needs (Ref. 40). Cresols at high levels for even short exposures can 
cause irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. Skin contact with high 
levels can burn the skin and can damage the kidneys, liver, blood, 
lungs, and brain. Experimental animal studies found lesions in the nose 
and thyroid gland via food exposure.
    Exposure to large amounts of aluminum (CAS No. 7429-90-5) dust can 
cause lung problems and decreased performance in some tests that 
measure functions of the nervous system. Also, some people with kidney 
disease can store a lot of aluminum in their bodies and sometimes 
develop bone or brain diseases which may be caused by the excess 
aluminum.
    iv. Information needs. For the chemicals listed in Table 5 of this 
unit, ATSDR needs blood levels in children not living near hazardous 
waste sites and in children living near hazardous waste sites. ATSDR 
needs these data to determine if the children living near hazardous 
waste sites have elevated levels of these chemicals and may be more 
susceptible to their toxic effects.

[[Page 30863]]



              Table 5--Chemicals to Which Children Living Near Hazardous Waste Sites May Be Exposed
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             CAS No.                                                  Chemical
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
75-34-3..........................  Ethane, 1,1-dichloro-; 1,1-Dichloroethane.
79-34-5..........................  Ethane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-; 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane.
92-87-5..........................  [1,1'-Biphenyl]-4,4'diamine; Benzidine.
106-93-4.........................  Ethane, 1,2-dibromo-; 1,2-Dibromoethane.
107-02-8.........................  2-Propenal; Acrolein.
107-06-2.........................  Ethane, 1,2-dichloro-; 1,2-Dichloroethane.
108-95-2.........................  Phenol.
1319-77-3........................  Phenol, methyl-; Cresol.
7429-90-5........................  Aluminum.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    4. Diisocyanates and related compounds--i. Recommendation. The EPA 
requests that the ITC add the category of 69 diisocyanates and related 
compounds to the Priority Testing List to obtain use, fate, and 
exposure studies on uncured (unreacted) diisocyanates and their related 
compounds that are used in the manufacture of, and present in, 
products.
    ii. Rationale for recommendation. EPA is concerned about 
diisocyanates and related compounds in the manufacture and use of 
products that may result in exposures to consumers, children, and the 
general population. Diisocyanates are well known dermal and inhalation 
sensitizers in the workplace and have been documented to cause asthma, 
lung damage, and in severe cases, fatal reactions. EPA is especially 
concerned about the potential health effects that may result from 
exposures to the consumer or self-employed worker while using products 
containing uncured diisocyanates (e.g., spray applied foam insulation 
(rigid foam), sealants, adhesives, paints, floor finishes, and 
coatings) and incidental exposures to the children and the general 
population while such products are used in or around buildings 
including homes or schools (for example on floors and athletic tracks) 
before the product has fully reacted and cured.
    In April 2011, EPA published Action Plans for toluene diisocyanate 
(TDI) and 5 related compounds (http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/pubs/actionplans/tdi.pdf) and methylene diphenyl 
diisocyanate (MDI) and 7 related compounds (http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/pubs/actionplans/mdi.pdf). These Action Plans outline 
EPA's screening-level review of available hazard and exposure 
information on uncured (unreacted) MDI, TDI, and 12 additional related 
compounds. However, after further review, EPA recognizes that aspects 
of an exposure scenario to consumers are generally applicable to many 
diisocyanate compounds. Therefore, in addition to the 14 diisocyanates 
and related compounds listed in the Action Plans, EPA identified 29 
aromatic and 26 aliphatic diisocyanate compounds, such as hexamethylene 
diisocyanate (HDI). These 29 aromatic and 26 aliphatic diisocyanate 
compounds are used in sealants, coatings, spray foams, elastomers or 
adhesives and may be substituted in such products for the 14 
diisocyanates and related compounds listed in the Action Plans. The ITC 
is adding the 14 diisocyanates and related compounds listed in the 
Action Plans and the 29 aromatic and 26 aliphatic diisocyanate 
compounds to the Priority Testing List to provide a more comprehensive 
approach to assessing hazard and exposure information for diisocyanates 
and related compounds. The 14 diisocyanates and related compounds 
listed in the Action Plans and the 29 aromatic and 26 aliphatic 
diisocyanate compounds are identified in Table 6 of this unit.
    ITC is recommending that the 69 diisocyanates and related compounds 
be added to the TSCA section 8(d) HaSDR rule to facilitate EPA's 
ability to obtain existing studies. Studies obtained on these chemicals 
may provide updated information from prior requests and assist EPA in 
taking appropriate action(s) to protect consumers, commercial workers, 
and other affected citizens from exposure to uncured diisocyanate-
containing products during their use. In addition, any updated 
information may assist EPA in taking appropriate action(s) to protect 
bystanders and building occupants, including children from inadvertent 
exposure to diisocyanates and related compounds that might be released 
during and after application of diisocyanate-containing products.
    The ITC recommended priority consideration of isocyanates as part 
of the 26th ITC Report (Ref. 16). EPA subsequently issued a TSCA 
section 8(d) HaSDR rule for these chemicals on September 28, 1990 (Ref. 
17). Given the time elapsed since that reporting rule was issued, the 
changes in the industry, and the increased use of diisocyanate-
containing products, EPA believes issuing another rule that would 
require reporting of unpublished health and safety studies that were 
not previously submitted is appropriate.
    iii. Supporting information--a. Health. Most of the data on human 
health hazards resulting from diisocyanate exposures are based on 
occupational populations. These data indicate that exposure to 
diisocyanates can cause contact dermatitis, skin and respiratory tract 
irritation, immune sensitization, and asthma (Ref. 41). It is well 
documented that isocyanate exposure is an attributable cause of work-
related asthma, and prevalence in the exposed workforce is estimated at 
1-20% (Refs. 42 and 43).
    Occupational skin exposures in workers exposed to MDI are of 
concern because isocyanate sensitization and/or asthma has occurred in 
cases where the potential for skin exposure is substantial, but 
measured airborne MDI monomer levels are below occupational exposure 
levels (OELs) or below the limits of detection with the methods used, 
or where similar MDI levels would be expected but MDI air monitoring 
data are not available (Refs. 44-48).
    The minimum exposure to isocyanates that can elicit sensitization 
responses or asthma is not known. In addition, immune response and 
subsequent disease in humans can be quite variable (Ref. 49). 
Fatalities linked to occupational diisocyanate exposures in sensitized 
persons have been reported (Refs. 50 and 51).
    Cross-sensitization has been observed between MDI, TDI, HDI, and 
dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (HMDI) in mice, and between MDI, TDI, 
and HDI in humans (Ref. 52).
    Animal data indicate that MDI may be carcinogenic; however, a 
consistent association has not been reported in epidemiologic studies 
(Refs. 53 and 54). Animal data indicate that TDI may be carcinogenic 
(Ref. 55). HDI was negative

[[Page 30864]]

for carcinogenicity in a 2-year bioassay in rats (Ref. 56).
    b. Exposure. In contrast to the large amount of exposure data 
available for professional workers who work with diisocyanates, EPA is 
hoping to obtain additional exposure data characterizing the use and 
exposure scenarios of consumer and commercial products containing 
uncured diisocyanates. In addition, comparing concentrations to which 
the consumer and general population is or can be exposed with existing 
workplace exposure limits to determine overexposure is not appropriate 
because the OSHA permissible exposure limits (PELs) are not intended to 
protect consumers and the general population (Ref. 49).
    Until polyurethane products fully cure, there may be the potential 
for inhalation and dermal exposure. These exposures may result from 
direct use of products or from bystander exposure. The use of spray 
polyurethane foam insulation (rigid foam) products has resulted in 
personal and area air samples of MDI above the OSHA PEL (Refs. 57-60). 
Potential bystander exposures to TDI products have been found in the 
literature, including emissions of TDI from concrete patio sealants 
(Refs. 61 and 62). Levels of moisture curing polyurethanes, including 
TDI were found in air hallway samples of an apartment building when the 
moisture curing polyurethanes were being used (Ref. 63). There were 
emissions during emergency response of an overturned truck carrying TDI 
(Ref. 64), and para-occupational exposure for secretaries and janitors 
who worked in the vicinity of but not directly with TDI (Ref. 65).
    Unbound aliphatic isocyanates used in coatings may remain on the 
surface of curing coating products, like paint, for up to several weeks 
(Ref. 47). In addition, there is potential for significant exposures to 
aliphatic isocyanates for direct users and bystanders in the auto 
refinishing and auto repair industry (Ref. 66).
    Children exposed to the same airborne concentrations of MDI as 
adults may receive a larger dose because children take more breaths per 
minute and have a higher relative tidal volume. An accidental acute 
exposure of children to high levels of MDI in a polyurethane sealant 
used on a school athletic track was associated with asthma-like 
symptoms, including among children with no prior history of respiratory 
dysfunction (Ref. 67). Children with asthma are an especially 
vulnerable population for exposure; they are more susceptible to 
inflammatory narrowing of the airways, which results in a 
proportionally greater obstruction of their smaller respiratory system 
(Refs. 68 and 69).
    Additional data characterizing the concentration of diisocyanates 
and related compounds in the air during and after use of products that 
may result in dermal, eye, or inhalation exposures to uncured 
diisocyanates will be helpful to the Agency. It would be helpful to 
receive additional information on the extent factors such as 
application techniques, product composition, ambient conditions, and 
method of measurement that influence the availability of uncured 
diisocyanates. EPA is also aware that there is uncertainty about the 
curing time of various products under different situations and that 
additional data could help address certain concerns, such as re-entry 
time, which are important for improving communication to prevent 
exposure.
    c. Ecotoxicity. Although there is a moderate acute ecotoxicity 
profile for MDI and TDI, the hazards associated with exposures to these 
chemicals have centered on human health effects not ecological effects. 
Experimental ecotoxicological data for MDI and TDI and their 
degradation products indicate moderate to low toxicity to aquatic 
organisms (Refs. 57 and 70-73). Other toxicity data suggest low 
likelihood of effects to terrestrial biota such as plants and 
earthworms (Refs. 74 and 75).
    iv. Information needs. Information is needed on diisocyanates and 
related compounds used to formulate a broad class of polyurethane 
products (e.g., sealants, adhesives, etc.) that are intended to further 
react upon end-use. Information is also needed on the percent of 
diisocyanates remaining, if any, in the final products, and/or studies 
that assess exposure to uncured (unreacted) diisocyanates. Studies are 
needed that provide information on the inhalation, dermal, and eye 
exposure potential and/or exposure levels for various populations; 
e.g., workers, consumers, bystanders, and building occupants, including 
children (through characterizing concentrations of diisocyanates in 
indoor air, outdoor air, blood, or urine) during and after use of 
products containing uncured diisocyanates. Studies are also needed on 
induction of sensitization, asthma development, other lung or health 
effects (irritation to the mucous membranes of the eyes and 
gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, chest tightness, cough, nasal 
congestion, death), biomarkers of recent and long-term exposure to 
diisocyanates, and the contributory nature of skin exposure to the 
development of diisocyanate asthma.
    Also needed are dermal exposure assessments in terms of dermal 
exposure potential and extent of exposure to diisocyanates during 
diisocyanate-containing product use in occupational as well as non-
occupational (e.g., consumer use) settings. Although some techniques 
and methods have been developed to measure human skin exposure to 
diisocyanates, these techniques and methods have several limitations. 
Consequently studies that provide improved qualitative and quantitative 
methods for detecting and quantifying skin exposures to diisocyanates 
and any associated data on measured exposures are required. Studies 
investigating associations between dermal exposure to diisocyanates and 
individual differences in metabolism with biomarkers of exposure would 
also provide useful information for exposure assessment. Additionally, 
studies are needed that characterize uncured diisocyanate levels within 
products over time. Background conditions and information on frequency 
and duration (use patterns) to diisocyanates are also needed.
    EPA is also interested in obtaining studies that contain 
information on sampling and analytical methods under development for 
dermal exposures; methods for assessing exposure to total reactive 
diisocyanates; methods and techniques to determine potential dermal 
exposure and uptake of diisocyanates through the skin; biological 
monitoring methods for estimating exposure to diisocyanates through all 
routes of exposure; and efficacy of currently used personal protective 
equipment in protecting workers and other populations during product 
use.
    Specifically, EPA is interested in health and safety studies 
evaluating professional-, commercial-, and consumer-use products 
containing uncured diisocyanates with special emphasis on the following 
types of studies:
    a. Inhalation monitoring studies characterizing potential worker 
and consumer exposures including associated airborne levels of total 
reactive diisocyanates and other chemicals.
    b. Inhalation monitoring studies characterizing incidental 
exposures of bystanders and building occupants including associated 
airborne levels of total reactive diisocyanates and other chemicals.
    c. Industrial hygiene or epidemiological assessments of dermal

[[Page 30865]]

exposure to uncured diisocyanate-containing products in occupational 
settings as well as for consumers, including impact of curing time on 
such exposures.
    d. Studies focusing on the contributory nature of skin exposure to 
the development of diisocyanate asthma in workers, consumers, and the 
general population, including modification of skin uptake of 
polyisocyanates by co-exposure to solvents and other agents or by skin 
cuts/abrasions.
    e. Epidemiological studies that address induction of sensitization 
and asthma development and other observed health effects in exposed 
populations including exposure-response relationships. Also of interest 
is a discussion of factors that impact these processes, physiological 
or otherwise.
    f. Studies on advances in biomonitoring for sensitive biological 
markers of recent and long-term exposure to diisocyanates including 
studies that associate dermal exposure and individual differences in 
metabolism with biomarkers.
    g. Studies on recent developments and refinements in specific 
qualitative and quantitative techniques and methods for dermal exposure 
assessment including and beyond those currently available (e.g., pads, 
wipes, and tape stripping methods).
    h. Studies that have used emission testing protocols (environmental 
chambers) for sample testing that provide levels of uncured 
diisocyanates over time and associated curing rates in accordance with 
specific humidity and temperature levels and ventilation rates and/or 
building re-occupancy guidance after installation or use of products.
    i. Studies that provide information on new or under development 
sampling and analytical methods for total reactive diisocyanates in 
diverse media (vapor, aerosol, dust, hard surfaces) including studies 
that provide details of industry methods.
    j. Studies with information on testing protocols currently in use 
or in development for air monitoring, products testing, biomonitoring, 
or dermal exposure.
    k. Field studies that report on ventilation rates in existing and 
new buildings and their relationship to detected airborne levels of 
chemicals.
    l. Efficacy assessments of engineering control strategies such as 
dilution ventilation, local exhaust ventilation, and containment in 
reducing worker exposure as well as bystander/occupant exposure.
    m. Efficacy assessments of personal protective equipment (PPE) used 
for exposure reduction, e.g., respirators, chemical protective suits, 
gloves, aprons, overalls used by workers, and for specific types of PPE 
that could be used by consumers or bystanders.
    EPA needs the information described in Unit IV.A.4. iv.a. through 
m. on the diisocyanates and related compounds, which are listed in 
Table 6 of this unit.

              Table 6--Diisocyanates and Related Compounds
------------------------------------------------------------------------
          CAS No.                Chemical name             Action
------------------------------------------------------------------------
91-08-7....................  Benzene, 1,3-          A, B
                              diisocyanato-2-
                              methyl-.
91-97-4....................  1,1'-Biphenyl, 4,4'-   A, C
                              diisocyanato-3,3'-
                              dimethyl-.
101-68-8...................  Benzene, 1,1'-         A, D
                              methylenebis[4-
                              isocyanato-.
104-49-4...................  Benzene, 1,4-          A, C
                              diisocyanato-.
123-61-5...................  Benzene, 1,3-          A, C
                              diisocyanato-.
139-25-3...................  Benzene, 1,1'-         C
                              methylenebis[4-
                              isocyanato-3-methyl-.
584-84-9...................  Benzene, 2,4-          A, B
                              diisocyanato-1-
                              methyl-.
822-06-0...................  Hexane, 1,6-           A, E
                              diisocyanato-.
2422-91-5..................  Benzene, 1,1',1''-     A, C
                              methylidynetris[4-
                              isocyanato-.
2536-05-2..................  Benzene, 1,1'-         D
                              methylenebis[2-
                              isocyanato-.
2778-42-9..................  Benzene, 1,3-bis(1-    C
                              isocyanato-1-
                              methylethyl)-.
3173-72-6..................  Naphthalene, 1,5-      C
                              diisocyanato-.
3634-83-1..................  Benzene, 1,3-          C
                              bis(isocyanatomethyl
                              )-.
3779-63-3..................  1,3,5-Triazine-        E
                              2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-
                              trione, 1,3,5-tris(6-
                              isocyanatohexyl)-.
4035-89-6..................  Imidodicarbonic        A, E
                              diamide, N,N',2-
                              tris(6-
                              isocyanatohexyl)-.
4098-71-9..................  Cyclohexane, 5-        A, E
                              isocyanato-1-
                              (isocyanatomethyl)-
                              1,3,3-trimethyl-.
4128-73-8..................  Benzene, 1,1'-         C
                              oxybis[4-isocyanato-.
5124-30-1..................  Cyclohexane, 1,1'-     A, E
                              methylenebis[4-
                              isocyanato-.
5873-54-1..................  Benzene, 1-isocyanato- A, D
                              2-[(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)met
                              hyl]-.
7517-76-2..................  Cyclohexane, 1,4-      E
                              diisocyanato-, trans-
                              .
9016-87-9..................  Isocyanic acid,        D
                              polymethylenepolyphe
                              nylene ester.
9017-01-0..................  Benzene, 1,3-          B
                              diisocyanatomethyl-,
                              homopolymer; TDI
                              homopolymer.
9019-85-6..................  Benzene, 1,3-          C
                              diisocyanatomethyl-,
                              trimer.
10347-54-3.................  Cyclohexane, 1,4-      E
                              bis(isocyanatomethyl
                              )-.
13622-90-7.................  Cyclohexane, 1,1'-     E
                              methylenebis[4-
                              isocyanato-,
                              (trans,trans)-.
15646-96-5.................  Hexane, 1,6-           A, E
                              diisocyanato-2,4,4-
                              trimethyl-.
16325-38-5.................  Benzene, 1,2,4,5-      C
                              tetrachloro-3,6-
                              bis(isocyanatomethyl
                              )-.
16938-22-0.................  Hexane, 1,6-           A, E
                              diisocyanato-2,2,4-
                              trimethyl-.
17589-24-1.................  1,3-Diazetidine-2,4-   D
                              dione, 1,3-bis[4-[(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)met
                              hyl]phenyl]-.
23370-68-5.................  1,3-Diazetidine-2,4-   E
                              dione, 1,3-bis[(5-
                              isocyanato-1,3,3-
                              trimethylcyclohexyl)
                              methyl]-.
25686-28-6.................  Benzene, 1,1'-         D
                              methylenebis[4-
                              isocyanato-,
                              homopolymer; MDI
                              homopolymer.
25854-16-4.................  Benzene,               A, C
                              bis(isocyanatomethyl
                              )-.
26447-40-5.................  Benzene, 1,1'-         A, D
                              methylenebis[isocyan
                              ato-.
26471-62-5.................  Benzene, 1,3-          A, B
                              diisocyanatomethyl-.
26603-40-7.................  1,3,5-Triazine-        A, B
                              2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-
                              trione, 1,3,5-tris(3-
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-.
26747-90-0.................  1,3-Diazetidine-2,4-   A, B
                              dione, 1,3-bis(3-
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-.
28182-81-2.................  Hexane, 1,6-           E
                              diisocyanato-,
                              homopolymer;
                              hexamethylene
                              diisocyanate (HDI)
                              homopolymer.
31107-36-5.................  1,3-Diazetidin-2-one,  D
                              1,3-bis[4-[(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)met
                              hyl]phenyl]-4-[[4-
                              [(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)
                              methyl]phenyl]imino]-
                              .
38661-72-2.................  Cyclohexane, 1,3-      E
                              bis(isocyanatomethyl
                              )-.
42170-25-2.................  Cyclohexane,           E
                              bis(isocyanatomethyl
                              )-.
50639-37-7.................  2H-1,3,5-Oxadiazine-   E
                              2,4,6(3H,5H)-trione,
                              3,5-bis(6-
                              isocyanatohexyl)-.

[[Page 30866]]

 
50830-59-6.................  1,3,4-Thiadiazole, 2-  C
                              isocyanato-5-
                              (trifluoromethyl)-,
                              dimer.
51508-06-6.................  1,3,4-Thiadiazole, 2-  C
                              (1,1-dimethylethyl)-
                              5-isocyanato-, dimer.
53880-05-0.................  Cyclohexane, 5-        E
                              isocyanato-1-
                              (isocyanatomethyl)-
                              1,3,3-trimethyl-,
                              homopolymer;
                              Isophorone
                              diisocyanate
                              homopolymer.
55525-54-7.................  Urea, N,N'-bis[(5-     E
                              isocyanato-1,3,3-
                              trimethylcyclohexyl)
                              methyl]-.
60732-52-7.................  Carbamic acid, N,N '-  C
                              (3-
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-, C,C'-(oxydi-
                              2,1-ethanediyl)
                              ester.
65087-21-0.................  Carbamic acid, N-[4-   E
                              [(4-
                              isocyanatocyclohexyl
                              )methyl]cyclohexyl]-
                              , C,C'-(oxydi-2,1-
                              ethanediyl) ester.
65104-99-6.................  Imidodicarbonic        C
                              diamide, 2,2'-
                              [methylenebis(2-
                              chloro-4,1-
                              phenylene)]bis[N,N '-
                              bis(3-isocyanato-
                              methylphenyl)-.
65105-00-2.................  Carbamic acid, N-(3-   C
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-, C,C'-(1-methyl-
                              1,3-propanediyl)
                              ester.
65105-02-4.................  Carbamic acid, N-(3-   C
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-, C,C'-(1,4-
                              butanediyl) ester.
67873-91-0.................  1,3,5-Triazine-        E
                              2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-
                              trione, 1,3,5-
                              tris[(5-isocyanato-
                              1,3,3-
                              trimethylcyclohexyl)
                              methyl]-.
68083-39-6.................  Benzenamine, N,N'-     C
                              methanetetraylbis[3-
                              isocyanato-2,4,6-
                              tris(1-methylethyl)-.
68092-73-9.................  Carbamic acid, N-(3-   C
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-, C,C'-(1,2-
                              ethanediyl) ester.
68092-74-0.................  Carbamic acid, N-(3-   C
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-, C,C'-[oxybis(1-
                              methyl-2,1-
                              ethanediyl)] ester.
68133-14-2.................  Carbamic acid, N-(3-   C
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-, C,C'-
                              [[[(diethoxyphosphin
                              yl) methyl]imino]di-
                              2,1-ethanediyl]
                              ester.
68239-06-5.................  Cyclohexane, 2-heptyl- A, E
                              3,4-bis(9-
                              isocyanatononyl)-1-
                              pentyl-.
68310-46-3.................  Hexanoic acid, [[2-    E
                              ethyl-2-[[[[[5-
                              isocyanato-1(or 5)-
                              (methoxycarbonyl)pen
                              tyl]
                              amino]carbonyl]oxy]
                              methyl]-1,3-
                              propanediyl]bis(oxyc
                              arbonylimino)]bis[is
                              ocyanato-, 1,1'-
                              dimethyl ester.
68366-14-3.................  Carbamic acid, N-[5-   C
                              isocyanato-2(or 4)-
                              methylphenyl]-, C,C'-
                              (1-methyl-1,3-
                              propanediyl) ester.
68555-56-6.................  1,3-Diazetidine-2,4-   C
                              dione, 1,3-bis(4-
                              isocyanato-3-
                              methylphenyl)-.
68975-84-8.................  Carbamic acid, N-[(5-  E
                              isocyanato-1,3,3-
                              trimethylcyclohexyl)
                              methyl]-, C,C'-
                              (oxydi-2,1-
                              ethanediyl) ester.
69878-18-8.................  Hexanoic acid, 2,6-    E
                              diisocyanato-, 2-
                              isocyanatoethyl
                              ester.
70024-76-9.................  Hexatriacontane,       E
                              diisocyanato-,
                              branched.
70198-24-2.................  Undecane, 1,6,11-      E
                              triisocyanato-.
71130-76-2.................  Urea, N-(3-            C
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)-N'-[[[4-[[[(3-
                              isocyanatomethylphen
                              yl)
                              amino]carbonyl]amino
                              ]
                              phenyl]methyl]phenyl
                              ]-.
71832-70-7.................  Carbamic acid, N-[4-   C
                              [(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)met
                              hyl]phenyl]-, C,C'-
                              (oxydi-2,1-
                              ethanediyl) ester.
75790-84-0.................  Benzene, 2-isocyanato- C
                              4-[(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)met
                              hyl]-1-methyl-.
75790-87-3.................  Benzene, 1-isocyanato- C
                              2-[(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)thi
                              o]-.
85702-90-5.................  2,9,11,13-             E
                              Tetraazanonadecaneth
                              ioic acid, 19-
                              isocyanato-11-(6-
                              isocyanatohexyl)-
                              10,12-dioxo-, S-[3-
                              (trimethoxysilyl)pro
                              pyl] ester.
106790-31-2................  Benzenamine, 4-        C
                              isocyanato-N,N-bis(4-
                              isocyanatophenyl)-
                              2,5-dimethoxy-.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes: A--Previously added to the ITC's Priority Testing List in the
  26th ITC Report (Ref. 16).
B--In the Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI) Action Plan (http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/pubs/actionplans/tdi.pdf).
C--One of the 29 aromatic diisocyanate compounds.
D--In the Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) Action Plan (http://www.epa.gov/oppt/existingchemicals/pubs/actionplans/mdi.pdf).
E--One of the 26 aliphatic diisocyanate compounds.

B. Chemicals Removed From the Priority Testing List

    1. Cadmium compounds. As a result of EPA's expanding the cadmium 
compounds category to include any chemical that contains cadmium as 
part of that chemical's structure, the ITC is removing 103 cadmium 
compounds, but not cadmium from the Priority Testing List. The 103 
cadmium compounds were listed in the 68th ITC Report (Ref. 2).
    2. HPV Challenge Program orphan chemicals. Two hundred seventy HPV 
Challenge Program orphan chemicals were added to the Priority Testing 
List in the 55th ITC Report (Ref. 30) and 5 were added to the Priority 
Testing List in the 56th ITC Report (Ref. 31).
    Thirty HPV Challenge Program orphan chemicals were removed from the 
Priority Testing List in the 56th ITC Report (Ref. 31). Eight HPV 
Challenge Program orphan chemicals were removed from the Priority 
Testing List in the 58th ITC Report (Ref. 76). Thirty-five HPV 
Challenge Program orphan chemicals were removed from the Priority 
Testing List in the 61st ITC Report (Ref. 39). One HPV Challenge 
Program orphan chemical was removed from the Priority Testing List in 
the 63rd ITC Report (Ref. 77). Twenty-nine HPV Challenge Program orphan 
chemicals were removed from the Priority Testing List in the 68th ITC 
Report (Ref. 2).
    Fourteen HPV Challenge Program orphan chemicals are being removed 
from the Priority Testing List because they were included in the EPA's 
October 21, 2011 TSCA section 4 proposed test rule (Ref. 3). These 14 
HPV Challenge Program orphan chemicals are listed in Table 7 of this 
unit.

                          Table 7--Fourteen HPV Challenge Program Orphan Chemicals Being Removed From the Priority Testing List
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
           CAS No.                                                                   Chemical name
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
98-16-8......................  Benzenamine, 3-(trifluoromethyl)-.
124-63-0.....................  Methanesulfonyl chloride.
460-00-4.....................  Benzene, 1-bromo-4-fluoro-.
542-92-7.....................  1,3-Cyclopentadiene.
928-72-3.....................  Glycine, N-(carboxymethyl)-, disodium salt.
28106-30-1...................  Benzene, ethenylethyl-.
35203-06-6...................  Benzenamine, 2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-methylene-.

[[Page 30867]]

 
35203-08-8...................  Benzenamine, 2,6-diethyl-N-methylene-.
37734-45-5...................  Carbonochloridothioic acid, S-(phenylmethyl) ester.
37764-25-3...................  Acetamide, 2,2-dichloro-N,N-di-2-propenyl-.
65996-91-0...................  Distillates (coal tar), upper.
68153-60-6...................  Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with diethylenetriamine, acetates.
68442-77-3...................  2-Butenediamide, (2E)-, N1,N4-bis[2-(4,5-dihydro-2-nortall-oil alkyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl] derivs.
68909-77-3...................  Ethanol, 2,2'-oxybis-, reaction products with ammonia, morpholine derivs. Residues.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

V. References

1. ITC. Fifty-Second Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (68 
FR 43608, July 23, 2003) (FRL-7314-4). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
2. ITC. Sixty-Eighth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (76 
FR 46174, August 1, 2011) (FRL-8879-3). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
3. EPA. Certain High Production Volume Chemicals; Test Rule and 
Significant New Use Rule; Fourth Group of Chemicals; Proposed rule. 
Federal Register (76 FR 65580, October 21, 2011) (FRL-8876-6). 
Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
4. ITC. Twenty-Eighth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(56 FR 41212, August 19, 1991) (FRL-3937-4). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
5. ITC. Thirty-Second Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(58 FR 38490, July 16, 1993) (FRL-4630-2). (Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
6. ITC. Eleventh Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (47 FR 
54626, December 3, 1982) (FRL-2254-7). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
7. ITC. Thirteenth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (48 
FR 55674, December 14, 1983) (FRL-2484-7). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
8. EPA. Bis(2-Ethylhexyl)Terephthalate; Response to the Interagency 
Testing Committee; Notice. Federal Register (48 FR 51845, November 
14, 1983) (FRL-2450-3). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
9. Dreyfus, M. A. and Babich, M. A. Plasticizer migration from toys 
and child care articles. The Toxicologist, Vol. 20, abstract 1243, 
p. 266. Society of Toxicology. Reston, VA. 2011. Available online 
at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-
1020.
10. ITC. Eighteenth Report of the ITC; Notice Federal Register (51 
FR 18368, May 19, 1986) (FRL-3017-2). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
11. EPA. Addition of Chemicals to Information-Gathering Rules; Final 
rule. Federal Register (51 FR 18323, May 19, 1986) (FRL-3017-3). 
Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
12. ITC. Nineteenth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (51 
FR 41417, November 14, 1986) (FRL-3109-7). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
13. ITC. Twenty-second Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(53 FR 18196, May 20, 1988) (FRL-3381-7). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
14. EPA. Tributyl Phosphate; Proposed Test Rule. Federal Register 
(52 FR 43346, November 12, 1987) (FRL-3289-6). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
15. EPA. Tributyl Phosphate; Final Test Rule. Federal Register (54 
FR 33400, August 14, 1989) (FRL-3627-4). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
16. ITC. Twenty-Sixth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(55 FR 23050, June 5, 1990) (FRL-3765-4). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
17. EPA. Preliminary Assessment Information and Health and Safety 
Data Reporting; Addition of Chemicals; Final rule. Federal Register 
(55 FR 39780, September 28, 1990) (FRL-3773-3). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
18. ITC. Thirty-Third Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(59 FR 3764, January 26, 1994) (FRL-4750-9). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
19. ITC. Second Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (43 FR 
16684, April 19, 1978) (FRL-884-7). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
20. EPA. Chemical Information Rules; Manufacturers Reporting; 
Preliminary Assessment Information; Final rule. Federal Register (47 
FR 26992, June 22, 1982) (FRL-2039-7). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
21. EPA. Health and Safety Data Reporting; Submission of Lists and 
Copies of Health and Safety Studies; Final rule. Federal Register 
(47 FR 38780, September 2, 1982) (FRL-2112-2). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
22. ITC. Fourteenth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (49 
FR 22389, May 29, 1984) (FRL-2594-4). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
23. EPA. Aryl Phosphates; Response to the Interagency Testing 
Committee; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. Federal Register 
(48 FR 57452, December 29, 1983) (FRL-2458-1). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
24. EPA. Aryl Phosphate Base Stocks; Proposed Test Rule Including 
Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements. Federal Register (57 FR 
2138, January 17, 1992) (FRL-3883-4). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
25. ITC. Twenty-Third Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(53 FR 46262, November 16, 1988) (FRL-3476-6). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
26. EPA. Preliminary Assessment Information and Health and Safety 
Data Reporting; Addition of Chemicals; Final rule. Federal Register 
(53 FR 46279, November 16, 1988) (FRL-3476-3). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
27. ITC. Thirty-Sixth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(60 FR 42982, August 17, 1995) (FRL-4965-6). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
28. ITC. Thirtieth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (57 
FR 30608, July 9, 1992) (FRL-4071-4). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
29. EPA. Preliminary Assessment Information and Health and Safety 
Data Reporting; Addition of Chemicals; Final rule. Federal Register 
(58 FR 28511, May

[[Page 30868]]

14, 1993) (FRL-4182-1). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
30. ITC. Fifty-Fifth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (70 
FR 7364, February 11, 2005) (FRL-7692-1). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
31. ITC. Fifty-Sixth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (70 
FR 61520, October 24, 2005) (FRL-7739-9). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
32. ITC. Twenty-Seventh Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(56 FR 9534, March 6, 1991) (FRL-3845-3). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
33. ITC. Forty-Fifth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (65 
FR 75544, December 1, 2000) (FRL-6399-5). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
34. ITC. Thirty-Fifth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(59 FR 67596, December 29, 1994) (FRL-4923-2). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
35. EPA. Proposed Test Rule for In Vitro Dermal Absorption Rate 
Testing of Certain Chemicals of Interest to Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration. Federal Register (64 FR 31074, June 9, 1999) 
(FRL-5760-3). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
36. EPA. Acetophenone, Phenol, N,N-Dimethylaniline, Ethyl Acetate 
and 2,6-Dimethylphenol; Proposed Test Rule, Notice of Opportunity to 
Initiate Negotiations for TSCA Section 4 Testing Consent Agreements. 
Federal Register (58 FR 61654, November 22, 1993) (FRL-4010-2). 
Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
37. ITC. First Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (42 FR 
55026, October 12, 1977). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
38. EPA. Cresols; Proposed Test Rule. Federal Register (48 FR 31812, 
July 11, 1983) (FRL-2341-2). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
39. ITC. Sixty-First Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (73 
FR 5080, January 28, 2008) (FRL-8347-1). Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
40. ITC. Sixty-Second Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(73 FR 27450, May 12, 2008) (FRL-8363-2). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
41. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 
Preventing Asthma and Death from MDI Exposure during Spray-on Truck 
Bed Liner and Related Applications: NIOSH Alert. DHHS (NIOSH) 
Publication Number 2006-149. September 2006. Available online at: 
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2006-149.
42. Ott, M. G., Diller, W. F., and Jolly, A.T. 2003. Respiratory 
Effects of Toluene Diisocyanate in the Workplace: A Discussion of 
Exposure-Response Relationships. Critical Reviews in Toxicology. 33: 
1-59. Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID 
number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
43. Bello, D., Woskie, S. R., Streicher, R. P., Liu, Y., Stowe, M. 
H., Eisen, E. A., Ellenbecker, M. J., Sparer, J., Youngs, F., 
Cullen, M. R., and Redlich, C. A. 2004. Polyisocyanates in 
Occupational Environments: A Critical Review of Exposure Limits and 
Metrics. American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 46: 480-491. 
Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
44. Bernstein, D. I., Korbee, L., Stauder, T., Bernstein, J. A., 
Scinto, J., Herd, Z. L., and Bernstein, I. L. 1993. The low 
prevalence of occupational asthma and antibody-dependent 
sensitization to diphenylmethane diisocyanate in a plant engineered 
for minimal exposure to diisocyanates. Journal of Allergy and 
Clinical Immunology. 92: 387-396. Available on online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
45. Ulvestad, B., Melbostad, E., and Fuglerud, P. 1999. Asthma in 
tunnel workers exposed to synthetic resins. Scandinavian Journal of 
Work, Environment & Health. 25(4): 335-341. Available online at: 
http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020.
46. Petsonk, E., Wang, M., Lewis, D., Siegel, P., and Husberg, B. 
2000. Asthma-Like Symptoms in Wood Product Plant Workers Exposed to 
Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyante. Chest. 118: 1183-1193. Available 
online at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
47. Sommer, B. G., Sherson, D. L., Kjoller, H., Hansen, I., Clausen, 
G., and Jepsen, J. R., 2000. Asthma caused by methylene-diphenyl-
diisocyanate cast in a nurse. Ugeskr Lateger 162(4): 505-506 as 
cited in Bello, D., Herrick, C. A., Smith, T. J., Woskie, S. R., 
Streicher, R. P., Cullen, M.R., Liu, Y., and Redlich, C.A. 2007. 
Skin Exposure to Isocyanates: Reasons for Concern. Environmental 
Health Perspectives. 115: 328-335. Available on line at: 
http:[sol][sol]ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/
fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info%3Adoi%2F10.1289%2Fehp.9557.
48. Donnelly, R., Buick, J. B., and Macmahon, J. 2003. Occupational 
asthma after exposure to plaster casts containing methylene diphenyl 
diisocyanate. Occupational Medicine. 53: 432-434. Available online 
at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-
OPPT-2011-1020.
49. Redlich, C. A., Bello, D., and Wisnewski, A. 2006. Isocyanate 
Exposures and Health Effects. Environmental and Occupational 
Medicine (W. Rom and S. Markowitz, Eds.), pp. 502-516. Lippincott 
Williams & Wilkins. Philadelphia, PA. Available online at: 
http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020.
50. NIOSH. Preventing Asthma and Death from Diisocyanate Exposure: 
NIOSH Alert. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 96-111. 1996. Available 
online at: http:[sol][sol]www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/96-111.
51. American Chemistry Council (ACC). TSCA 8(e) Notice of 
Substantial Risk 8EHQ-0905-16225 Fatalities linked to diisocyanates. 
EPA. September 2005. Available online at: 
http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID Number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020.
52. O'Brien, I. M., Harries, M. G., Burge, P. S., and Pepys, J. 
1979. Toluene di-isocyanate-induced asthma I. Reactions to TDI, MDI, 
HDI and histamine. Clinical & Experimental Allergy. 9: 1-6. 
Available online at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID 
number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
53. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). 1987. 4,4'-
Methylenediphenyl Diisocyanate and Polymeric 4,4'-Methylenediphenyl 
Diisocyanate. Vol. 71, Monographs 71-47, pp. 1049-1058. Available 
online at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
54. European Chemicals Bureau (ECB). 2005. European Union Risk 
Assessment Report methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI). Available 
online at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
55. Collins, M. A. 2002. Toxicology of Toluene Diisocyanate. Applied 
Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. 17: 846-855. Available 
online at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
56. OECD. Screening Information Data Set (SIDS) Initial Assessment 
Report for 12th SIAM: Hexamethylene Diisocyanate CAS No: 822-06-0 
(HDI). June 2001. pp. 1-73. United National Environment Programme 
(UNEP). Paris, France. Available online at: 
http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020.
57. Bayer Material Science. 2009. FYI 1209-01618. Available online 
at: http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-
OPPT-2011-1020.
58. Crespo, J. and Galan, J. 1999. Exposure to MDI During the 
process of insulating buildings with sprayed polyurethane foam. 
Annals of Occupational Hygiene. 43: 415-419. Available online at: 
http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020.
59. Occupational Health and Safety Research Institute. 2009. 4,4'-
Diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) safety practices and 
concentration during polyurethane foam spraying. R-629, pp. 1-66. 
Available

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online at: http:[sol][sol]www.irsst.qc.ca/files/documents/PubIRSST/
R-629.pdf.
60. Lesage, J., Stanley, J., Karoly, W. J., and Lichtenberg, F. W. 
2007. Airborne Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) Concentrations 
Associated with the Application of Polyurethane Spray Foam in 
Residential Construction. Journal of Occupational and Environmental 
Hygiene. 4: 145-155. Available online at: 
http:[sol][sol]www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-
2011-1020.
61. Kelly, T. J., Myers, J. D., and Holdren, M. W. 1999. Testing of 
Household Products and Materials for Emission of Toluene 
Diisocyanate. Indoor Air. 9: 117-124. Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID Number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
62. Jarand, C. W., Akapo, S. O., Swenson, L. J., and Kelman, B. J. 
2002. Diisocyanate Emission from a Paint Product: A Preliminary 
Analysis. Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. 17: 491-
494. Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID 
number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
63. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC-
DOHMH). Environmental Investigation of Chemical Ingredients of 
Moisture Cure Urethanes Used as Wood Floor Coatings. May 20, 2003. 
Available online at:http://home2.nyc.gov/html/doh/downloads/pdf/epi/epi-mcu-report.pdf.
64. Luo, J., Nelsen K., and Fischbein, A. 1990. Persistent reactive 
airway dysfunction syndrome after exposure to toluene diisocyanate. 
British Journal of Industrial Medicine. 47: 239-241. Available 
online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-
OPPT-2011-1020-0064.
65. Zotti, R., Muran, A., and Zambon, F., 2000. Two cases of 
paraoccupational asthma due to toluene diisocyanate (TDI). 
Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 57: 837-839. Available 
online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-
OPPT-2011-1020.
66. Woskie, S., Sparer, J., Gore, R., Stowe, M., Bello, D., Liu, Y., 
Youngs, F., Redlich, C., Eisen, E., and Cullen M. 2004. Determinants 
of Isocyanate Exposures in Auto Body Repair and Refinishing Shops. 
Annals of Occupational Hygiene. Vol. 48, No. 5, 393-403. Available 
online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-
OPPT-2011-1020.
67. Jan, R. L., Chen, S. H., Chang, H. Y., Yeh, H. J., Shieh, C. C., 
and Wang, J. Y. 2008. Asthma-like syndrome in school children after 
accidental exposure to xylene and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate. 
Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection. 41: 337-341. 
Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: 
EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
68. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Asthma in Children. Medline 
Plus. October 13, 2011. Available online at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/asthmainchildren.html.
69. Trasande, L. and Thurston, G. 2005. The role of air pollution in 
asthma and other pediatric morbidities. Journal of Allergy and 
Clinical Immunology. 115: 689-699. Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
70. Bayer, A.G. 1992. Determination on the ecological behavior of 
Desmodur W. Unpublished Report 218 A/90 1992-05-29. As cited in SIDS 
Initial Assessment Report For SIAM 20, Paris, France. April 19-22, 
2005. Available online at: http://www.alipa.org/uploads/Modules/Publications/OECD_DraftSIDS_5124301.pdf.
71. Bayer, A.G. 2000b. Fish test. Unpublished Report 858 A/99 F, 
2000-01-07. As cited in SIDS Initial Assessment Report For SIAM 20, 
Paris, France. April 19-22, 2005. Available online at: http://www.alipa.org/uploads/Modules/Publications/OECD_DraftSIDS_5124301.pdf.
72. Bayer, A.G. 2000c. Daphnia test. Unpublished Report 858 A/99 D, 
2000-01-06. As cited in SIDS Initial Assessment Report For SIAM 20, 
Paris, France. April 19-22, 2005. Available online at: http://www.alipa.org/uploads/Modules/Publications/OECD_DraftSIDS_5124301.pdf.
73. Bayer, A.G. 2000d. Algal test. Unpublished Report 858 A/99 Al, 
2000-01-06. As cited in SIDS Initial Assessment Report For SIAM 20, 
Paris, France. April 19-22, 2005. Available online at: http://www.alipa.org/uploads/Modules/Publications/OECD_DraftSIDS_5124301.pdf.
74. Van der Hoeven, N., Roza, P., and Henzen, L. 1992a. 
Determination of the effect of TDI, TDA, MDI, and MIDA on the 
emergence and growth of the plant species Avena sativa and Lactuca 
sativa according to OECD Guideline No. 208. TNO. 111 Report No. 
11024. Available from: British Library Document Supply Centre, 
Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire. As cited in Allport, D., 
Gilbert, D., and Outterside, S. 2003. MDI and TDI: Safety, Health 
and the Environment. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. West Sussex, England, 
264. Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID 
number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
75. Van der Hoeven, N., Roza, P., and Henzen, L., 1992b. 
Determination of the LC50 (14 days) of TDI, TDA, MDI, and MDA to the 
earthworm Eisenia fetida according to OECD guideline No. 207. TNO. 
111 Report No. 11025. Available from: British Library Document 
Supply Centre, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire. As cited in 
Allport, D., Gilbert, D., and Outterside, S. 2003. MDI and TDI: 
Safety, Health and the Environment. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. West 
Sussex, England, 265. Available online at: http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
76. ITC. Fifty-Eighth Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register 
(71 FR 39188, July 11, 2006) (FRL-8073-7). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.
77. ITC. Sixty-Third Report of the ITC; Notice. Federal Register (73 
FR 65486, November 3, 2008) (FRL-8387-6). Available online at: 
http://www.regulations.gov. Docket ID number: EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-1020.

VI. The TSCA Interagency Testing Committee

 Statutory Organizations With Representatives

Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Dianne L. Poster, Alternate.

Environmental Protection Agency

Robert W. Jones, Member.
John E. Schaeffer, Alternate.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Nigel Walker, Member.
Scott Masten, Alternate.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Gayle DeBord, Member.
Dennis W. Lynch, Alternate.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Thomas Nerad, Member.
Janet Carter, Alternate.

 Liaison Organizations With Representatives

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Glenn D. Todd, Member.

Consumer Product Safety Commission

Dominique Johnson, Member.

Department of Agriculture

Clifford P. Rice, Member.

Department of Defense

Laurie E. Roszell, Member.

Department of the Interior

Barnett A. Rattner, Member.

Food and Drug Administration

Kirk Arvidson, Member.
Ronald F. Chanderbhan, Alternate.

ITC Staff

John D. Walker, Director.
Carol Savage, Administrative Assistant (NOWCC Employee).

    TSCA Interagency Testing Committee (7401M), Office of Pollution 
Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 
Pennsylvania Ave. NW., Washington, DC 20460-0001; email address: 
savage.carol@epa.gov; url: http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/itc.

[FR Doc. 2012-12493 Filed 5-22-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-P