[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 160 (Friday, August 17, 2012)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 49712-49719]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-19583]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 71

[Docket No. FAA-2011-0438; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWA-4]
RIN 2120-AA66


Amendment to Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This action modifies the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B airspace 
to contain aircraft conducting Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) instrument 
approach procedures to Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC), Salt 
Lake City, UT. The FAA is taking this action to improve the flow of air 
traffic, enhance safety, and reduce the potential for midair collision, 
while accommodating the concerns of airspace users. Further, this 
effort supports the FAA's national airspace redesign goal of optimizing 
terminal and en route airspace to reduce aircraft delays and improve 
system capacity. Minor corrections have been made to the geographic 
coordinates of the affected legal descriptions, as well as editorial 
corrections.

DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC, October 18, 2012. The Director of the 
Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference action under 
1 CFR part 51, subject to the annual revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and 
publication of conforming amendments.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace, Regulations, 
and ATC Procedures Group, Office of Airspace Services, Federal Aviation 
Administration, 800 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20591; 
telephone: (202) 267-8783.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

History

    On August 24, 2011, the FAA published in the Federal Register a 
notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to modify the Salt Lake City, UT, 
Class B airspace area (76 FR 52905). Interested parties were invited to 
participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting written comments on 
the proposal. Eight written comments were received in response to the 
NPRM. All comments received were considered before making a 
determination on the final rule.
    Class B airspace designations are published in paragraph 3000 of 
FAA Order 7400.9V, dated August 9, 2011, and effective September 15, 
2011, which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR 71.1. The Class B 
airspace designations listed in this document will be subsequently 
published in the Order.

Discussion of Comments

    Four commenters opposed the vertical extension of the Salt Lake 
City Class B airspace from 10,000 feet MSL to 12,000 feet MSL without 
mitigating impacts on VFR operations. They challenged the operational 
and safety benefit of raising the ceiling based on no actual mid-air 
collision or conflict resolution data having been provided to support 
taking this action.

[[Page 49713]]

    This Class B airspace area modification was initiated to ensure 
containment of large turbine-powered aircraft within Class B airspace. 
Raising the ceiling of the Salt Lake City Class B airspace to 12,000 
feet MSL is necessary to contain the instrument procedures and 
associated traffic patterns supporting those procedures at SLC. In 
addition to the approximately 1,000 IFR operations a day operating at 
and below 12,000 feet MSL within 30 miles of SLC, and the Ad hoc 
Committee's endorsement of the 12,000 feet MSL ceiling, the raised 
ceiling is based on operational necessity.
    Because SLC is situated in a valley with mountainous terrain to the 
east and southeast, and southwest, there is only one traffic pattern 
west of SLC, regardless of traffic flow. Departures from SLC must also 
climb in the same airspace to the west of SLC before turning on course 
to clear mountainous terrain. Departing aircraft climb to 10,000 feet 
MSL to clear the terrain surrounding SLC and remain separated from 
arrival aircraft established at or descending to the downwind traffic 
pattern altitude of 11,000 feet MSL. Every arrival into SLC must enter 
the downwind pattern west of the airport. During periods of high 
traffic volume, or when incompatible aircraft are operating, air 
traffic control must also use a 12,000-foot MSL downwind pattern 
altitude to ensure aircraft separation. Raising the ceiling of the Salt 
Lake City Class B airspace area around SLC to 12,000 feet MSL also 
ensures airspace within which all aircraft, IFR and VFR, are subject to 
the same Class B airspace operating rule; enhancing the safety benefit 
to all and further reducing the potential for mid-air collisions in the 
airspace surrounding SLC.
    To mitigate impacts on VFR aircraft operating between 10,000 feet 
and 12,000 feet MSL, the FAA has developed high altitude VFR transition 
routes, with associated frequencies, altitudes, and route depictions, 
for inclusion on the Salt Lake City Terminal Area Chart, as discussed 
further below. This charting was accomplished on April 5, 2012.
    One commenter argued against raising the Salt Lake City Class B 
airspace area ceiling to 12,000 feet MSL, claiming it will have an 
adverse impact on all general aviation operations in that airspace. The 
commenter stated (1) the FAA was imposing a non-regulatory 14 CFR part 
91.211, Supplemental oxygen, requirement on general aviation aircraft 
to install supplemental oxygen systems to fly over the Class B 
airspace; (2) air traffic controller approval/denial authority for VFR 
clearances through Class B airspace creates an operational barrier to 
VFR operations where none existed before; and (3) the FAA's only intent 
is to provide increased operational and safety benefits to one segment 
of air traffic--Part 121 operators.
    The FAA does not agree. First, the 14 CFR 91.211 regulation 
referenced establishes the requirement for the minimum flight crew of 
civil aircraft operating at cabin pressure altitudes above 12,500 feet 
MSL up to and including 14,000 feet MSL to use supplemental oxygen for 
that part of the flight at those altitudes that exceed thirty minutes. 
Raising the Salt Lake City Class B airspace area ceiling to 12,000 feet 
MSL still allows VFR aircraft to pass over the Class B airspace area at 
12,500 feet MSL without requiring a supplemental oxygen system. 
Aircraft with flight durations of thirty minutes or less flying over 
the Salt Lake City Class B airspace area above 12,500 feet MSL up to 
and including 14,000 feet MSL may also operate without a supplemental 
oxygen system. For aircraft without supplemental oxygen systems that 
are unable to fly over the Salt Lake City Class B airspace ceiling as 
noted above, there are alternatives to installing a supplemental oxygen 
system available for transiting the SLC area. Those alternatives 
include obtaining a Class B clearance, flying established VFR 
transition routes, and circumnavigating the Salt Lake City Class B 
airspace area laterally or under the floor of the sub-areas.
    Second, the FAA acknowledges that Class B clearances will be 
required for VFR aircraft that opt to continue flying VFR over SLC 
between 10,000 feet and 12,000 feet MSL, and that Class B airspace 
clearance requests from VFR aircraft are based on workload, operational 
limitations, and traffic conditions. Using radar, the Salt Lake City 
Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) air traffic controllers have 
visibility of all aircraft, IFR and VFR, operating in the vicinity of 
SLC. Knowing the IFR traffic flows and the altitudes and intentions of 
IFR and VFR aircraft operating in the vicinity of SLC, the TRACON 
controllers are able to determine if clearance requests to enter or 
transit the Class B airspace can be safely approved. For Class B 
airspace clearance requests that can be approved, the TRACON 
controllers will continue to issue clearances with altitude and routing 
instructions to provide positive separation from all other aircraft, 
IFR and VFR, operating within the Class B airspace.
    Lastly, this Class B airspace modification provides operational and 
safety benefits to all airspace users operating in the vicinity of SLC. 
The modified Class B airspace areas were designed to ensure all 
instrument procedures and associated traffic patterns for those 
procedures are contained within Class B airspace. However, a number of 
adjustments to the Salt Lake City Class B airspace area were made 
during the proposal process to ensure the airspace modification 
supported all interested airspace users. Revising the surface area 
boundary, amending floor altitudes of various sub-areas, charting high 
altitude VFR transition routes, and modifying VFR flyways, as 
suggested, are all examples of the efforts taken to ensure the final 
Salt Lake City Class B airspace design provides operational and safety 
benefits to all airspace users in the vicinity of SLC.
    Four commenters were concerned that raising the Salt Lake City 
Class B airspace ceiling would result in a reduction of general 
aviation aircraft that are able to transition above the Class B 
airspace area and would force many general aviation pilots to fly at 
lower altitudes under the Class B airspace shelves, resulting in 
increased congestion in mountainous terrain, or circumnavigate the 
Class B airspace area altogether, using less efficient routing at more 
expense.
    The FAA understands the need for safe routes for VFR aircraft to 
transition through, around, and under the Class B airspace. For VFR 
aircraft that are unable to overfly the modified Class B airspace 
ceiling (12,000 feet MSL), and decide not to contact Salt Lake City 
TRACON to receive Class B services, there are a number of airspace 
modifications made to the Class B airspace area to minimize impacts to 
VFR pilots flying under the Class B airspace shelves or opting to 
circumnavigate the Class B airspace altogether. The floor of Class B 
airspace south of Point of the Mountain was raised from 9,000 feet MSL 
to 10,000 feet MSL and the airspace west/northwest of the Point of the 
Mountain was raised from 7,000 feet MSL to 8,000 feet MSL to allow 
north- and south-bound VFR aircraft flying along I-15 and Point of the 
Mountain to remain 1,000 feet higher, at all times, than the previous 
Class B airspace allowed. The modified Salt Lake City Class B airspace 
design also incorporated reductions to the northern and southern 
boundaries of the Class B surface area to provide additional airspace 
for east- and west-bound VFR aircraft to fly under the Class B airspace 
area; thus reducing the

[[Page 49714]]

flying miles to be flown when compared to the previous Class B surface 
area. The Class B airspace along the ridgeline of the Wasatch Mountains 
was raised from the 9,000 feet MSL to 10,500 feet MSL to accommodate 
glider operations and VFR aircraft crossing the ridgeline.
    Four commenters were concerned that general aviation pilots would 
not have as many alternatives as possible to transit through, over, and 
near the Salt Lake City Class B airspace. They requested the FAA 
consider all available means of accommodating general aviation to 
include an East-West VFR transit corridor, T-routes, VFR transitions, 
and VFR flyways.
    Salt Lake City's traffic flows and pattern altitudes make 
establishing a VFR corridor impractical. Salt Lake City has only one 
downwind leg that passes west of the airport, and approximately 50 
percent of Salt Lake City's departure traffic departs to the west/
northwest, climbing to 10,000 feet MSL to clear terrain. The only way 
to allow a VFR aircraft to transit Salt Lake City Class B airspace at 
or below 10,000 feet MSL would be to stop the departures. These 
departures would conflict with any VFR corridor design that passed over 
the airport.
    However, as recommended by the commenters and the Ad hoc Committee, 
the FAA has published frequencies, altitudes, and VFR transition and 
flyway routes on the Salt Lake City Terminal Area Chart to minimize the 
Class B airspace modification impact to VFR aircraft. The published VFR 
transition routes are established at 10,500 feet MSL for westbound 
traffic and at 11,500 feet MSL for eastbound traffic. Additionally, the 
VFR flyway amendment recommendations the FAA received have been 
incorporated on the VFR Flyway Planning Chart, as provided and 
addressed in the NPRM.
    One commenter expressed concern that VFR aircraft flying near and 
above 12,000 feet MSL over Park City, UT, would conflict with IFR 
aircraft from SLC as a result of the Salt Lake City Class B airspace 
modification.
    The FAA notes that Park City, UT, is located approximately 22 miles 
east southeast of SLC and approximately 19 miles east of the nearest 
boundary of the Salt Lake City Class B airspace. An analysis of SLC 
departure traffic indicates that aircraft departing for locations to 
the east are above 12,000 feet MSL approximately 16 miles west 
northwest of Park City and are not a factor for VFR aircraft over Park 
City, at and above 12,000 feet MSL. The modification of the Salt Lake 
City Class B airspace area was designed to contain existing instrument 
procedures and large turbo-powered aircraft arriving/departing SLC. The 
existing departure procedures, altitudes, and flight tracks for the 
same fleet mix are unchanged by this Class B airspace modification. 
Since the Salt Lake City TRACON will continue using the same departure 
procedures, altitudes, and flight tracks in use today, no IFR-VFR 
aircraft traffic issues over Park City, UT, are expected.
    One commenter stated it is virtually impossible to depart South 
Valley Regional Airport (U42) in Instrument Meteorological Conditions 
(IMC), or even marginal VFR conditions, on an IFR clearance due to 
conflicts with the IFR traffic flow into and out of SLC. The commenter 
requested the FAA address the issue by developing a viable IFR 
departure procedure for U42 so that any minor modifications to the Salt 
Lake City Class B modification could be incorporated into this 
regulatory action.
    The delays associated with IFR operations at U42 are related to 
terrain, the close proximity of SLC, and non-radar separation 
requirements. The FAA's Flight Procedures Development Team was asked to 
review the issue identified above and recommend any alternatives or 
solutions that could be considered. Unfortunately, they could offer no 
solution due to U42's geographic proximity to SLC with its associated 
high density air traffic operations. Salt Lake City TRACON personnel 
met with the U42 Fixed Base Operator (FBO) owner to discuss the U42 
operation, ensure understanding of the limitations by all parties, and 
reinforce the importance of coordinating IFR operations ahead of time 
as the best way to address departure delays at U42.

Differences From the NPRM

    Editorial corrections have been made to the wording of the Salt 
Lake City Class B airspace legal description to remove duplicative 
information and excessive verbiage, simplify sub-area descriptions, and 
improve clarity. These corrections standardize the format only and do 
not affect the areas described.
    In the Salt Lake City Class B airspace legal description header, 
the VORTAC listed as the ``Salt Lake City VORTAC (TCH)'' is corrected 
to read the ``Wasatch VORTAC (TCH)''. The geographic coordinates 
defining the VORTAC location were correct as published and remain 
unchanged.
    Two typographical errors were also noted in the NPRM that affect 
the descriptions of Areas F, G, and H. The first typographical error 
listed the geographic coordinates for the southwest corner of Area F 
and northwest corner of Area G as ``lat. 40[deg]30'55'' N., long. 
112[deg]07'00'' W.'', and is corrected to read ``lat. 40[deg]30'33'' 
N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.'' in both area descriptions. The second 
typographical error listed the geographic coordinates for the northwest 
corner of Area H as ``lat. 40[deg]27'07'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' 
W.'', and is corrected to read ``lat. 40[deg]24'07'' N., long. 
112[deg]07'00'' W.'' to match the geographic coordinate information for 
the same point described in Area G.
    Additionally, this action makes a minor correction to the western 
boundary of Area I to ensure a 0.5 NM buffer east of the extended RNAV 
35 final approach. The Wasatch VORTAC (TCH) DME and geographic position 
coordinates listed as ``24.1-mile DME'' and ``lat. 40[deg]27'05'' N., 
long. 111[deg]54'51'' W.'' that were used to define the northern point 
of that boundary are corrected to read ``24.4-mile DME'' and ``lat. 
40[deg]26'51'' N., long. 111[deg]54'42'' W.'' The corresponding 
information for that point contained in Area G is also corrected. The 
geographic position coordinates listed as ``lat. 40[deg]18'14'' N., 
long. 111[deg]53'40'' W.'' used to define the southern point of that 
boundary are corrected to read ``lat. 40[deg]18'14'' N., long. 
111[deg]53'42'' W.'' The corresponding information for that point 
contained in Area H is also corrected. Lastly, the geographic position 
coordinates listed as ``lat. 40[deg]24'12'' N., long. 111[deg]54'36'' 
W.'' used to define the southeast corner of Area G and northeast corner 
of Area H, along the corrected western boundary of Area I, are 
corrected to read ``lat. 40[deg]24'19'' N., long. 111[deg]54'23'' W.''
    Finally, this action makes a number of corrections to the 
``seconds'' component of the lat./long. geographic coordinates to 
better match this information with the corresponding visual landmark or 
fix/radial/distance information for the associated point. These minor 
editorial corrections do not change the affected areas.
    Radials listed in this rule are stated in degrees relative to True 
North.

The Rule

    The FAA is amending Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 
CFR) part 71 to modify the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B airspace area. 
This action (depicted on the attached chart) raises the existing 
ceiling from 10,000 feet MSL to 12,000 feet MSL, and makes various 
boundary modifications in order to provide the additional airspace that 
is necessary to contain all instrument procedures at SLC and the large 
turbo-powered aircraft flying those instrument procedures within the 
confines of Class B airspace. The modifications better segregate IFR 
aircraft arriving/departing SLC and VFR aircraft operating in the 
vicinity of the Salt Lake Class B airspace

[[Page 49715]]

area. The following are the revisions to the Salt Lake City Class B 
airspace area:
    Area A. Redefined from the surface to 12,000 feet MSL. The northern 
boundary is moved south an average of 2 miles to allow VFR aircraft to 
transition westbound sooner and relieve congestion between the Hill Air 
Force Base (AFB) Class D airspace and Salt Lake City Class B surface 
area airspace. The boundary north of the Skypark Airport (BTF) is moved 
slightly to the west to relieve congestion between the Class B surface 
area airspace and the Wasatch Mountains. The southern boundary surface 
area airspace East of U42 is combined with the new Area D as noted 
below.
    Area B. Incorporates portions of existing Areas B and J, and 
establishes a floor at 7,800 feet MSL and ceiling at 12,000 feet MSL. 
The western boundary changes from the SLC Runway 17 ILS/DME antenna (I-
BNT) 25-mile DME arc to the TCH 20-mile DME arc. Raising the floor 
matches the existing Class B airspace area over Hill AFB and allows VFR 
aircraft operating in the area to climb sooner.
    Area C. New area established by incorporating a portion of existing 
Area A, raising the floor from the surface to 6,000 feet MSL and the 
ceiling to 12,000 feet MSL, to reduce congestion between the Hill AFB 
Class D airspace and the Salt Lake City Class B surface area airspace 
to allow VFR aircraft easier access to transit north of SLC below the 
Class B airspace area.
    Area D. Expands laterally into existing Class B airspace with the 
ceiling raised to 12,000 feet MSL. Incorporates a portion of the 
existing Area A located East of U42, raising the floor from the surface 
to 6,000 feet MSL, to allow VFR aircraft easier access to and from U42.
    Area E. Combines existing Areas C and K with the floor established 
at 6,500 feet MSL and the ceiling raised to 12,000 feet MSL. The 
southern boundary is extended south slightly using the TCH 16-mile DME 
arc. The southwest portion of the boundary is relocated east slightly 
using the TCH 12-mile DME arc to eliminate terrain penetrations of 
Class B airspace. The western boundary is defined by the TCH 13.5-mile 
DME arc instead of the I-BNT 13-mile DME arc.
    Area F. New area established in existing Area E with the ceiling 
raised to 12,000 feet MSL and the northern boundary defined by the TCH 
16-mile DME arc instead of the I-BNT 11 DME arc. The southern boundary 
is moved south slightly to contain runway 34L and 34R ILS approaches.
    Area G. Combines existing Areas F and G with the floor established 
at 8,000 feet MSL and ceiling raised to 12,000 feet MSL. The southern 
boundary is established approximately four miles south of the existing 
Areas F and G southern boundary to allow IFR traffic during 
simultaneous independent ILS approaches to join final closer to SLC.
    Area H. Similar to existing Area H, with the floor established at 
9,000 feet MSL and ceiling raised to 12,000 feet MSL. Expanded slightly 
to the west to use the same longitude for its boundary as the new Area 
G and redefines the southern boundary further north by using the TCH 
33-mile DME arc.
    Area I. New area established east of area H with the floor 
established at 10,000 feet MSL and ceiling at 12,000 feet MSL. Designed 
to capture arrival traffic from the southeast.
    Area J. New area established over the north end of the Oquirrh 
Mountains with the floor established at 11,000 feet MSL and ceiling at 
12,000 feet MSL. This area contains IFR departure traffic climbing 
southbound, as well as arrival traffic being vectored to the downwind.
    Area K. New area established redefining a portion of existing Area 
B with the floor raised to 8,600 feet MSL and ceiling to 12,000 feet 
MSL. Provides additional airspace for VFR aircraft.
    Area L. Redefines a portion of existing Area I (northern section) 
with the floor raised to 10,500 feet MSL and ceiling to 12,000 feet 
MSL. Allows north-flow departures from SLC to climb and turn eastbound 
on course. The eastern boundary of this new area is moved to the west 
along the Wasatch Mountains ridgeline. The southern section of existing 
Area I is deleted.
    Area M. Similar to existing Area M with the floor at 9,000 feet MSL 
and ceiling raised to 12,000 feet MSL. The lateral boundaries extend 
slightly with the northern boundary extended north to the TCH 26-mile 
DME arc and the western boundary extended west approximately one mile.
    Area N. New area established north of the existing Salt Lake City 
Class B airspace area with the floor at 10,000 feet MSL and ceiling at 
12,000 feet MSL. Contains aircraft flying instrument approaches to SLC 
runway 17.
    Area O. New area established in existing Class B airspace north and 
east of SLC with the floor at 7,500 feet MSL and ceiling raised to 
12,000 feet MSL. Provides containment of aircraft flying instrument 
approaches to SLC runway 16R and 16L.

Environmental Review

    The FAA has determined that this action qualifies for categorical 
exclusion under the National Environmental Policy Act in accordance 
with FAA Order 1050.1E, ``Environmental Impacts: Policies and 
Procedures,'' paragraph 311a. This airspace action is not expected to 
cause any potentially significant environmental impacts, and no 
extraordinary circumstances exist that warrant preparation of an 
environmental assessment.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3507(d)) requires 
that the FAA consider the impact of paperwork and other information 
collection burdens imposed on the public. We have determined that there 
is no new information collection requirement associated with this final 
rule.

Regulatory Evaluation Summary

    Changes to Federal regulations must undergo several economic 
analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 and Executive Order 13563 direct 
that each Federal agency shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon 
a reasoned determination that the benefits of the intended regulation 
justify its costs. Second, the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. 
L. 96-354) requires agencies to analyze the economic impact of 
regulatory changes on small entities. Third, the Trade Agreements Act 
(Pub. L. 96-39) prohibits agencies from setting standards that create 
unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United States. In 
developing U.S. standards, the Trade Act requires agencies to consider 
international standards and, where appropriate, that they be the basis 
of U.S. standards. Fourth, the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 
(Pub. L. 104-4) requires agencies to prepare a written assessment of 
the costs, benefits, and other effects of proposed or final rules that 
include a Federal mandate likely to result in the expenditure by State, 
local, or tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private 
sector, of $100 million or more annually (adjusted for inflation with 
base year of 1995). This portion of the preamble summarizes the FAA's 
analysis of the economic impacts of this final rule.
    Department of Transportation Order DOT 2100.5 prescribes policies 
and procedures for simplification, analysis, and review of regulations. 
If the expected cost impact is so minimal that a proposed or final rule 
does not warrant a full evaluation, this order permits that a statement 
to that effect and the basis for it to be included in the preamble if a 
full regulatory evaluation of the cost and benefits is not prepared. 
Such a determination has been made for

[[Page 49716]]

this final rule. The reasoning for this determination follows:
    After consultation with a diverse cross-section of stakeholders 
that participated in the Ad hoc Committee to develop the 
recommendations contained in this rule, and a review of the 
recommendations and comments, the FAA expects that this final rule 
would result in minimal cost. The FAA is taking this action to improve 
the flow of air traffic, enhance safety, and reduce the potential for 
midair collision in the Salt Lake City Class B airspace.
    The FAA received comments to the NPRM that indicated concern with 
the rule from an economic standpoint. Commenters such as the Aircraft 
Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) expressed the concern that an 
increase to the ceiling height of Salt Lake City Class B airspace will 
result in general aviation pilots taking less efficient routing to 
circumnavigate the Class B airspace. The Experimental Aircraft 
Association (EAA) fears that general aviation operators who are unable 
to comply with the supplemental oxygen requirement or unable to obtain 
air traffic control clearance to fly visual flight rules (VFR) into the 
Class B will be forced to fly thousands of miles around the Salt Lake 
City Class B airspace in mountainous terrain. The result would be to 
cost general aviation aircraft operators thousands of dollars in 
unanticipated aircraft operating expenses and place the aircraft and 
passengers over hostile, mountainous terrain for extended periods of 
time.
    The FAA has restructured the airspace to allow sufficient 
alternatives to circumnavigation for VFR traffic. The restructuring and 
other FAA actions include the following:
     Raising Class B airspace floors south of and west/
northwest of the Point of the Mountain 1,000 feet to allow north- and 
south-bound VFR aircraft flying along I-15 more airspace to fly under 
the SLC Class B airspace area;
     Reducing Class B surface area northern and southern 
boundaries to provide more airspace for east- and west-bound VFR 
aircraft to fly under the Class B airspace area;
     Raising Class B airspace floor along the Wasatch Mountains 
ridgeline 1,500 feet to provide more airspace for VFR aircraft crossing 
the ridgeline;
     Establishing and charting high altitude VFR transition 
routes at 10,500 feet MSL for westbound traffic and at 11,500 feet MSL 
for eastbound traffic, with associated frequencies, on the Salt Lake 
City Terminal Area Charts; and
     Adopting VFR flyway amendment recommendations received 
from the Ad hoc Committee and NPRM commenters.

The FAA provided numerous alternatives for GA traffic to fly in the 
Salt Lake City airspace. As such, we estimate a minimal impact.
    FAA has, therefore, determined that this final rule is not a 
``significant regulatory action'' as defined in section 3(f) of 
Executive Order 12866, and is not ``significant'' as defined in DOT's 
Regulatory Policies and Procedures.

Regulatory Flexibility Determination

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-354) (RFA) 
establishes ``as a principle of regulatory issuance that agencies shall 
endeavor, consistent with the objectives of the rule and of applicable 
statutes, to fit regulatory and informational requirements to the scale 
of the businesses, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions 
subject to regulation.'' To achieve this principle, agencies are 
required to solicit and consider flexible regulatory proposals and to 
explain the rationale for their actions to assure that such proposals 
are given serious consideration.'' The RFA covers a wide-range of small 
entities, including small businesses, not-for-profit organizations, and 
small governmental jurisdictions.
    Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a rule will 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. If the agency determines that it will, the agency must 
prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis as described in the RFA. 
However, if an agency determines that a rule is not expected to have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities, 
section 605(b) of the RFA provides that the head of the agency may so 
certify and a regulatory flexibility analysis is not required. The 
certification must include a statement providing the factual basis for 
this determination, and the reasoning should be clear.
    The FAA believes the rule would not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities as the economic impact 
is expected to be minimal.
    Therefore, the FAA Administrator certifies that this final rule 
will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of 
small entities.

International Trade Impact Assessment

    The Trade Agreements Act of 1979 (Pub. L. 96-39), as amended by the 
Uruguay Round Agreements Act (Pub. L. 103-465), prohibits Federal 
agencies from establishing standards or engaging in related activities 
that create unnecessary obstacles to the foreign commerce of the United 
States. Pursuant to these Acts, the establishment of standards is not 
considered an unnecessary obstacle to the foreign commerce of the 
United States, so long as the standard has a legitimate domestic 
objective, such as the protection of safety, and does not operate in a 
manner that excludes imports that meet this objective. The statute also 
requires consideration of international standards and, where 
appropriate, that they be the basis for U.S. standards. The FAA has 
assessed the potential effect of this final rule and determined that it 
will enhance safety and is not considered an unnecessary obstacle to 
trade.

Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (Pub. L. 104-
4) requires each Federal agency to prepare a written statement 
assessing the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final 
agency rule that may result in an expenditure of $100 million or more 
(in 1995 dollars) in any one year by State, local, and tribal 
governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector; such a mandate 
is deemed to be a ``significant regulatory action.'' The FAA currently 
uses an inflation-adjusted value of $143.1 million in lieu of $100 
million. This final rule does not contain such a mandate; therefore, 
the requirements of Title II of the Act do not apply.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71

    Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air).

Adoption of the Amendment

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration amends 14 CFR part 71 as follows:

PART 71--DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR 
TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS

0
1. The authority citation for part 71 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 
FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389.


Sec.  71.1  [Amended]

0
2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of the Federal 
Aviation Administration Order 7400.9V, Airspace Designations and 
Reporting Points, dated August 9, 2011, and effective September 15, 
2011, is amended as follows:

[[Page 49717]]

Paragraph 3000 Subpart B--Class B Airspace.

* * * * *

ANM UT B Salt Lake City, UT [Modified]

Salt Lake City International Airport (Primary Airport)
    (Lat. 40[deg]47'18'' N., long. 111[deg]58'40'' W.)
Wasatch VORTAC (TCH)
    (Lat. 40[deg]51'01'' N., long. 111[deg]58'55'' W.)
Hill AFB (HIF)
    (Lat. 41[deg]07'26'' N., long. 111[deg]58'23'' W.)

Boundaries

    Area A. That area extending upward from the surface to and 
including 12,000 MSL, within an area bounded by a line beginning at 
the TCH 20[deg] radial 6.6-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]57'13'' N., long. 
111[deg]55'56'' W.; thence south to the intersection of Redwood Rd. 
and W. 500 South St. at the TCH 049[deg] radial 3.1-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]53'02'' N., long. 111[deg]55'48'' W.; thence south to Center 
St. at the TCH 102[deg] radial 2.3-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]50'32'' 
N., long. 111[deg]55'57'' W.; thence east along Center St. to 
Interstate 15 (I-15) at the 4.3-mile DME radius of the Salt Lake 
City International Airport at the TCH 099[deg] radial 3-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]50'32'' N., long. 111[deg]54'56'' W.; thence clockwise 
along the 4.3-mile DME radius of the Salt Lake City International 
Airport to I-15 at the TCH 151[deg] radial 7.3-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]44'37'' N., long. 111[deg]54'15'' W.; thence south along I-15 
to W. 5300 South St. at the TCH 163[deg] radial 12.3-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]39'17'' N., long. 111[deg]54'06'' W.; thence west to the 
Usana Amphitheatre at the TCH 192[deg] radial 11.8-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]39'28'' N., long. 112[deg]02'08'' W.; thence northwest to the 
intersection of State Route 201 (SR-201) and S. 8000 West St. at the 
TCH 210[deg] radial 9.1-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]43'06'' N., long. 
112[deg]04'56'' W.; thence northwest to Interstate 80 (I-80) at the 
TCH 239[deg] radial 9-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]46'22'' N., long. 
112[deg]09'04'' W.; thence north to a point southeast of Seagull 
Point on Antelope Island at the TCH 304[deg] radial 9.3-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]56'13'' N., long. 112[deg]09'05'' W.; thence east to the 
point of beginning.
    Area B. That airspace extending upward from 7,800 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the TCH 265[deg] radial 12-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]49'57'' N., long 112[deg]14'40'' W.; thence west along the 
TCH 265[deg] radial to the 20-mile DME arc at lat. 40[deg]49'13'' 
N., long. 112[deg]25'09'' W.; thence clockwise along the TCH 20-mile 
DME arc to the 4.3-mile DME radius of Hill AFB at the TCH 009[deg] 
radial at lat. 41[deg]10'47'' N., long. 111[deg]54'48'' W.; thence 
clockwise along the 4.3-mile DME radius of Hill AFB to W. 1700 South 
St. at the TCH 347[deg] radial 14.7-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]05'20'' 
N., long. 112[deg]03'21'' W.; thence west along W. 1700 South St. to 
the TCH 329[deg] radial 16.8-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]05'22'' N., 
long. 112[deg]10'20'' W.; thence south to the TCH 316[deg] radial 
11.6-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]59'21'' N., long. 112[deg]09'33'' W.; 
thence south to a point southeast of Seagull Point on Antelope 
Island at the TCH 304[deg] radial 9.3-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]56'13'' N., long. 112[deg]09'05'' W.; thence southwest to the 
point of beginning.
    Area C. That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the TCH 316[deg] radial 11.6-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]59'21'' N., long. 112[deg]09'33'' W.; thence east to I-15 at 
the TCH 013[deg] radial 9.8-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]00'34'' N., 
long. 111[deg]56'00'' W.; thence south to the TCH 020[deg] radial 
6.6-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]57'13'' N., long. 111[deg]55'56'' W.; 
thence west to a point southeast of Seagull Point on Antelope Island 
at the TCH 304[deg] radial 9.3-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]56'13'' N., 
long. 112[deg]09'05'' W.; thence north to the point of beginning.
    Area D. That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the Usana Amphitheatre at the TCH 192[deg] radial 11.8-
mile DME at lat. 40[deg]39'28'' N., long. 112[deg]02'08'' W.; thence 
east to the intersection of I-15 and W. 5300 South St. at the TCH 
163[deg] radial 12.3-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]39'17'' N., long. 
111[deg]54'06'' W.; thence south along I-15 to the TCH 169[deg] 
radial 20.7-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]30'43'' N., long. 
111[deg]53'31'' W.; thence west to the TCH 184[deg] radial 20.4-mile 
DME at lat. 40[deg]30'38'' N., long. 112[deg]00'33'' W.; thence 
north to the TCH 184[deg] radial 16-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]35'03'' 
N., long. 112[deg]00'23'' W.; thence clockwise along the TCH 16-mile 
DME arc to State Route 48 (SR-48) at the TCH 189[deg] radial at lat. 
40[deg]35'13'' N., long. 112[deg]02'18'' W.; thence north to the 
point of beginning.
    Area E. That airspace extending upward from 6,500 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning on SR-48 at the TCH 189[deg] radial 16-mile DME arc at 
lat. 40[deg]35'13'' N., long. 112[deg]02'18'' W.; thence clockwise 
along the TCH 16-mile DME arc to the TCH 203[deg] radial at lat. 
40[deg]36'14'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence north along 
long. 112[deg]07'00'' W. to the TCH 211[deg] radial 12-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]40'42'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence clockwise 
along the TCH 12-mile DME arc to the railroad tracks at the TCH 
233[deg] radial at lat. 40[deg]43'43'' N., long. 112[deg]11'27'' W.; 
thence west along the railroad tracks to the TCH 236[deg] radial 
13.5-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]43'27'' N., long. 112[deg]13'38'' W.; 
thence clockwise along the TCH 13.5-mile DME arc to the TCH 265[deg] 
radial at lat. 40[deg]49'49'' N., long. 112[deg]16'38'' W.; thence 
east along the TCH 265[deg] radial to the TCH 12-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]49'57'' N., long. 112[deg]14'40'' W.; thence northeast to a 
point southeast of Seagull Point on Antelope Island at the TCH 
304[deg] radial 9.3-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]56'13'' N., long. 
112[deg]09'05'' W.; thence south to I-80 at the TCH 239[deg] radial 
9-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]46'22'' N., long. 112[deg]09'04'' W.; 
thence southeast to the intersection of SR-201 and S. 8000 West St. 
at the TCH 210[deg] radial 9.1-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]43'06'' N., 
long. 112[deg]04'56'' W.; thence southeast to the Usana Amphitheatre 
at the TCH 192[deg] radial 11.8-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]39'28'' N., 
long. 112[deg]02'08'' W.; thence south to the point of beginning.
    Area F. That airspace extending upward from 7,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the TCH 184[deg] radial 16-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]35'03'' N., long. 112[deg]00'23'' W.; thence clockwise along 
the TCH 16-mile DME arc to the TCH 203[deg] radial at lat. 
40[deg]36'14'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence south along 
long. 112[deg]07'00'' W. to the TCH 197[deg] radial 21.4-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]30'33'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence east to the 
TCH 184[deg] radial 20.4-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]30'38'' N., long. 
112[deg]00'33'' W.; thence north to the point of beginning.
    Area G. That airspace extending upward from 8,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning on I-15 at the TCH 169[deg] radial 20.7-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]30'43'' N., long. 111[deg]53'31'' W.; thence south along I-15 
to the TCH 172[deg] radial 24.4-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]26'51'' N., 
long. 111[deg]54'42'' W.; thence south along the TCH 173[deg] radial 
to the TCH 26.9-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]24'19'' N., long. 
111[deg]54'23'' W.; thence west to the TCH 193[deg] radial 27.6-mile 
DME at lat. 40[deg]24'07'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence 
north along long. 112[deg]07'00'' W. to the TCH 197[deg] radial 
21.4-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]30'33'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; 
thence east to the point of beginning. Excluding R-6412, when 
active.
    Area H. That airspace extending upward from 9,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the TCH 193[deg] radial 27.6-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]24'07'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence south along 
long. 112[deg]07'00'' W. to the TCH 191[deg] radial 33-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]18'34'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence counter 
clockwise along the TCH 33-mile DME arc to the TCH 173[deg] radial 
at lat. 40[deg]18'14'' N., long. 111[deg]53'42'' W.; thence north 
along the TCH 173[deg] radial to the TCH 26.9-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]24'19'' N., long. 111[deg]54'23'' W.; thence west to the 
point of beginning. Excluding R-6412, when active.
    Area I. That airspace extending upward from 10,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning on I-15 at the TCH 172[deg] radial 24.4-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]26'51'' N., long. 111[deg]54'42'' W.; thence south along I-15 
to intercept the TCH 160[deg] radial 33-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]19'54'' N., long. 111[deg]44'26'' W.; thence clockwise along 
the TCH 33-mile DME arc to the TCH 173[deg] radial at lat. 
40[deg]18'14'' N., long. 111[deg]53'42'' W.; thence north along the 
TCH 173[deg] radial to the point of beginning.
    Area J. That airspace extending upward from 11,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning on the railroad tracks at the TCH 238[deg] radial 20-mile 
DME at lat. 40[deg]40'22'' N., long. 112[deg]21'12'' W.; thence east 
along the railroad tracks to the TCH 233[deg] radial 12-mile DME at 
lat. 40[deg]43'43'' N., long. 112[deg]11'27'' W.; thence counter 
clockwise along the TCH 12-mile DME arc to the TCH 211[deg] radial 
at lat. 40[deg]40'42'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence south 
along long. 112[deg]07'00'' W. to the TCH 198[deg] radial 20-mile 
DME at lat. 40[deg]31'58'' N., long. 112[deg]07'00'' W.; thence 
clockwise along the TCH 20-mile DME arc to the point of beginning.
    Area K. That airspace extending upward from 8,600 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the TCH 265[deg] radial 13.5-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]49'49'' N., long. 112[deg]16'38'' W.; thence west along the 
TCH 265[deg] radial to intercept the TCH 20-mile DME arc at lat. 
40[deg]49'13'' N., long. 112[deg]25'09'' W.; thence counter 
clockwise along the TCH 20-mile DME arc to the railroad tracks at 
the TCH

[[Page 49718]]

238[deg] radial at lat. 40[deg]40'22'' N., long. 112[deg]21'12'' W.; 
thence east along the railroad tracks to the TCH 236[deg] radial 
13.5-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]43'27'' N., long. 112[deg]13'38'' W.; 
thence clockwise along the TCH 13.5-mile DME arc to the point of 
beginning.
    Area L. That airspace extending upward from 10,500 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the intersection of the Wasatch Mountains ridge line 
and Interstate 84 (I-84) at the TCH 016[deg] radial 18-mile DME at 
lat. 41[deg]08'17'' N., long. 111[deg]52'18'' W.; thence west along 
I-84 to the 4.3-mile radius of Hill AFB at the TCH 015[deg] radial 
17.9-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]08'16'' N., long. 111[deg]52'48'' W.; 
thence clockwise along the 4.3-mile radius of Hill AFB to U.S. 
Highway 89 at the TCH 014[deg] radial 13.6-mile DME at lat. 
41[deg]04'11'' N., long. 111[deg]54'39'' W.; thence south along U.S. 
Highway 89 to I-15 at the TCH 024[deg] radial 9-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]59'14'' N., long. 111[deg]54'05'' W.; thence south along I-15 
to the TCH 072[deg] radial 4-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]52'16'' N., 
long. 111[deg]53'50'' W.; thence east along lat. 40[deg]52'16'' N. 
to the TCH 081[deg] radial 8-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]52'16'' N., 
long. 111[deg]48'30'' W.; thence north along long. 111[deg]48'30'' 
W. to the Wasatch Mountains ridge line at the TCH 059[deg] radial 
9.2-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]55'45'' N., long. 111[deg]48'30'' W.; 
thence north along the Wasatch Mountains ridge line to the point of 
beginning.
    Area M. That airspace extending upward from 9,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning on I-15 at the TCH 356[deg] radial 26-mile DME at lat. 
41[deg]16'57'' N., long. 112[deg]01'33'' W.; thence counter 
clockwise along the TCH 26-mile DME arc to the TCH 338[deg] radial 
at lat. 41[deg]15'07'' N., long. 112[deg]11'50'' W.; thence south to 
the TCH 333[deg] radial 20-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]08'50'' N., long. 
112[deg]10'56'' W.; thence clockwise along the TCH 20-mile DME arc 
to I-15 at the TCH 356[deg] radial at lat. 41[deg]10'58'' N., long. 
112[deg]00'49'' W.; thence north along I-15 to the point of 
beginning.
    Area N. That airspace extending upward from 10,000 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning on I-15 at the TCH 356[deg] radial 26-mile DME at lat. 
41[deg]16'57'' N., long. 112[deg]01'33'' W.; thence clockwise along 
the TCH 26-mile DME arc to North Mountain Rd. at the TCH 003[deg] 
radial at lat. 41[deg]16'59'' N., long. 111[deg]56'57'' W.; thence 
south on North Mountain Rd., which turns into Harrison Blvd., to the 
TCH 004[deg] radial 20-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]10'58'' N., long. 
111[deg]56'56'' W.; thence counter clockwise along the TCH 20-mile 
DME arc to I-15 at the TCH 356[deg] radial at lat. 41[deg]10'58'' 
N., long. 112[deg]00'49'' W.; thence north along I-15 to the point 
of beginning.
    Area O. That airspace extending upward from 7,500 feet MSL to 
and including 12,000 feet MSL, within an area bounded by a line 
beginning at the intersection of U.S. Highway 89 and a 4.3-mile 
radius from Hill AFB at the TCH 014[deg] radial 13.6-mile DME at 
lat. 41[deg]04'11'' N., long. 111[deg]54'39'' W.; thence clockwise 
along the 4.3-mile radius from Hill AFB to 1700 South St. at the TCH 
347[deg] radial 14.7-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]05'20'' N., long. 
112[deg]03'21'' W.; thence west along W. 1700 South St. to the TCH 
329[deg] radial 16.8-mile DME at lat. 41[deg]05'22'' N., long. 
112[deg]10'20'' W.; thence south to the TCH 316[deg] radial 11.6-
mile DME at lat. 40[deg]59'21'' N., long. 112[deg]09'33'' W.; thence 
east to I-15 at the TCH 013[deg] radial 9.8-mile DME at lat. 
41[deg]00'34'' N., long. 111[deg]56'00'' W.; thence south to the TCH 
020[deg] radial 6.6-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]57'13'' N., long. 
111[deg]55'56'' W.; thence south to the intersection of Redwood Rd. 
and W. 500 South St. at the TCH 049[deg] radial 3.1-mile DME at lat. 
40[deg]53'02'' N., long. 111[deg]55'48'' W.; thence south to Center 
St. at the TCH 102[deg] radial 2.3-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]50'32'' 
N., long. 111[deg]55'57'' W.; thence east along Center St. to I-15 
at the TCH 099[deg] radial 3-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]50'32'' N., 
long. 111[deg]54'56'' W.; thence north along I-15 to U.S. Highway 89 
at the TCH 024[deg] radial 9-mile DME at lat. 40[deg]59'14'' N., 
long. 111[deg]54'05'' W.; thence north along U.S. Highway 89 to the 
point of beginning.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on August 2, 2012.
Gary A. Norek,
Manager, Airspace Policy and ATC Procedures Group.
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P

[[Page 49719]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR17AU12.002

[FR Doc. 2012-19583 Filed 8-16-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-C