[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 199 (Monday, October 15, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 62596-62601]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-25261]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Office of the Secretary of Transportation


Interim Guidance on State Freight Plans and State Freight 
Advisory Committees

AGENCY: Office of the Secretary of Transportation (OST), U.S. 
Department of Transportation (DOT), Federal Aviation Administration 
(FAA), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Federal Motor Carriers 
Administration (FMCSA) Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Maritime 
Administration (MARAD), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHSMA), Research and Innovative Technology 
Administration (RITA), St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation 
(SLSDC).

ACTION: Notice of Interim Guidance and Request for Comments.

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SUMMARY: On July 6, 2012, the President signed into law Public Law 112-
141, the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). 
Section 1118 of MAP-21 directs the Secretary of Transportation to 
encourage each State to develop a comprehensive State Freight Plan that 
outlines immediate and long-range plans for freight-related 
transportation investments. Section 1117 of MAP-21 directs the 
Secretary to encourage each State to establish a State Freight Advisory 
Committee. The Department of Transportation is issuing this Notice to 
provide Interim Guidance on both State Freight Plans and State Freight 
Advisory Committees. It encourages States to develop State Freight 
Plans and provides guidance to States on the required elements of a 
State Freight Plan and information on funding and on the relationship 
of State Freight Plans to other provisions of MAP-21. It encourages 
States to develop State Freight Advisory Committees as part of the 
process for developing a State Freight Plan. The Department requests 
public comments on all aspects of this Interim Guidance.

DATES: All public comments must be received by November 15, 2012.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments identified by Docket Number DOT-OST-
2012-0168 using any of the following methods:
    Government-wide rulemaking Web site: http://www.regulations.gov and 
follow the instructions for sending your comments electronically.
    Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. 
Fax 1-202-493-2251.
    Courier: commercial delivery service, such as, but not limited to 
the following--Federal Express or United Parcel Service, addressed to 
Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC between 9 
a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
    The Department will post all comments received, without change, to 
http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information. If you 
mail or hand deliver your comments and want the Department to 
acknowledge receipt of your comments, include with your comments a pre-
addressed, stamped postcard on which the docket number appears. We will 
stamp the date on the postcard and mail it to you.
    Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to 
http://www.regulations.gov or to Docket Management Facility, U.S. 
Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, 
DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, except Federal 
holidays.
    Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all 
comments

[[Page 62597]]

received in any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting 
the comment (or signing the comment if submitted on behalf of an 
association, a business, a labor union, etc.). You may review the 
Department's complete Privacy Act statement in the Federal Register 
published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78), or you may visit http://www.dot.gov/privacy.html.
    This Interim Guidance will also be posted on the Department's MAP-
21 Web site (www.dot.gov/map21).

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Jack Wells, Chief Economist, 1200 
New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590. Telephone Number (202) 
366-9224 or Email jack.wells@dot.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Table of Contents

I. Background and Program Purpose
II. Policy
III. Funding
IV. Contents of State Freight Plans
V. The State Freight Planning Process
VI. Data and Analytical Resources for State Freight Planning
VII. Request for Comments

I. Background and Program Purpose

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on the 
implementation of Section 1118 (State Freight Plans) and Section 1117 
(State Freight Advisory Committees) of the Moving Ahead for Progress in 
the 21st Century Act (MAP-21). Section 1118 directs the Secretary of 
Transportation to encourage States to develop freight plans that are 
comprehensive and that include both immediate and long-term freight 
planning activities and investments. Section 1117 directs the Secretary 
to encourage each State to establish a State Freight Advisory Committee 
consisting of a representative cross-section of public and private 
freight stakeholders. Section 1118 specifies certain minimum contents 
for State Freight Plans, and states that such a plan may be developed 
separate from or be incorporated into the statewide strategic long-
range transportation plan required by section 135 of title 23, United 
States Code.
    Section 1116 of MAP-21 (Prioritization of Projects to Improve 
Freight Movement) authorizes the Secretary to increase the Federal 
share payable for any project to 95 percent for projects on the 
Interstate System and 90 percent for any other project if the Secretary 
certifies that the project:
     Demonstrates the improvement made by the project to the 
efficient movement of freight (including making progress on freight 
performance measures established under MAP-21) and
     Is identified in a State Freight Plan developed pursuant 
to section 1118.
    The Federal Highway Administration will be issuing separate 
guidance on the implementation of Section 1116. One purpose of this 
guidance is to inform States of the freight planning process they must 
undertake to qualify for the freight prioritization provisions of 
Section 1116.

II. Policy

    The U.S. Department of Transportation strongly encourages all 
States to develop State Freight Plans. The Department believes that 
freight transportation, because its effects are often regional or 
national in scope, and includes freight providers that own and operate 
private infrastructure, has often been more difficult for States to 
incorporate into their planning process than has passenger 
transportation, and that accordingly infrastructure investments and 
other State policy initiatives related to freight transportation have 
often received less funding and attention than passenger-related 
initiatives. Because freight transportation is critical to the economic 
vitality of the United States, renewed attention to safe and efficient 
freight transportation can have a positive effect on the economic 
growth of the United States.
    State Freight Plans can identify freight transportation facilities 
that are critical to each State's economic growth and give appropriate 
priority to investments in such facilities. In doing so, such Plans can 
enhance economic growth at both the State and National level, thus 
enhancing the Nation's economic competitiveness. State Freight Plans 
can also help to guide investments and other policies that will help to 
achieve the Department's other strategic goals, including safety, state 
of good repair, livability, and environmental sustainability. State 
Freight Plans can also identify freight transportation facilities that 
are critical to export movements and, by directing resources toward 
improving those facilities, assist the United States in meeting the 
goals of the President's National Export Initiative.
    The State Freight Plan may be developed separate from or 
incorporated into the statewide strategic long-range transportation 
plan required by section 135 of title 23, United States Code. If the 
State Freight Plan is separate from the statewide strategic long-range 
transportation plan, each plan should show how the findings of the 
State Freight Plan are incorporated into the statewide strategic long-
range transportation plan. If the two plans are combined, the statewide 
strategic long-range transportation plan should include a separate 
section focused on freight transportation, and must include the 
elements specified in section 1118. Other State transportation plans, 
such as State Rail Plans, are required by statute to be coordinated 
with section 135 of title 23, and as a consequence the freight 
component of those plans should be incorporated into the State Freight 
Plan to ensure a comprehensive and system-wide planning approach.
    The Department also strongly encourages all States to establish 
State Freight Advisory Committees. Such Advisory Committees are an 
important part of the process needed to develop a thorough State 
Freight Plan. Bringing together the perspectives and knowledge of 
public and private partners, including shippers, carriers, and 
infrastructure owners and operators, is important to developing a 
quality State Freight Plan.
    The Department will be developing a multimodal National Freight 
Strategic Plan in accordance with the requirements of Section 1115 of 
MAP-21, and intends to rely significantly on the freight plans prepared 
by the States.

III. Funding

    Authorization level under MAP-21: There is no formula or 
discretionary funding specifically associated with State Freight Plans 
or State Freight Advisory Committees.
    States may use funding allocated under the Surface Transportation 
Program (23 U.S.C. 133) for developing State Freight Plans, as well as 
funding under the State Planning and Research Program (23 U.S.C. 505). 
They may also use carryover balances from National Highway System funds 
authorized under SAFETEA-LU (23 U.S.C. 103(b)(6)(E) as in effect on the 
day before enactment of MAP-21) that can be used for transportation 
planning in accordance with 23 U.S.C. 134 and 135 (23 U.S.C. 103 was 
amended by MAP-21 section 1104, which eliminated the National Highway 
System Program under section 103, and hence eliminated the funding for 
planning under section 103 as amended).

IV. Contents of State Freight Plans

    Section 1118 of MAP-21 requires that a State Freight Plan developed 
pursuant to Section 1118 include, at a minimum, the following elements:
     An identification of significant freight system trends, 
needs, and issues with respect to the State;

[[Page 62598]]

     A description of the freight policies, strategies, and 
performance measures that will guide the freight-related transportation 
investment decisions of the State;
     A description of how the plan will improve the ability of 
the State to meet the national freight goals established under section 
167 of title 23, United States Code;
     Evidence of consideration of innovative technologies and 
operational strategies, including intelligent transportation systems, 
that improve the safety and efficiency of freight movement;
     In the case of routes on which travel by heavy vehicles 
(including mining, agricultural, energy cargo or equipment, and timber 
vehicles) is projected to substantially deteriorate the condition of 
roadways, a description of improvements that may be required to reduce 
or impede the deterioration; and
     An inventory of facilities with freight mobility issues, 
such as truck bottlenecks, within the State, and a description of the 
strategies the State is employing to address those freight mobility 
issues.

In addition to these minimum elements required by section 1118, the 
Department has provided additional recommended elements based on what 
States have found useful to include in freight plans that have already 
been prepared, as well as on consistency with the requirements for the 
National Freight Strategic Plan, found in 23 U.S.C 167(f).
    State Freight Plans may be organized in any structure that works 
best for individual States, as long as they cover the required 
elements; however, in order to aid States in addressing the required 
criteria, and to facilitate the incorporation of analysis from the 
State Freight Plans into the National Freight Strategic Plan, as well 
as to aid in conceptualizing the detailed issues surrounding robust 
freight planning, DOT is suggesting the following structure as a 
recommended model for states to follow.

1. Strategic Goals

    As specified in section 1118, a State Freight Plan must include a 
description of how the plan will improve the ability of the State to 
meet the national freight goals established under 23 U.S.C. 167. The 
following is a summary of the goals of the National Freight Policy 
established in 23 U.S.C. 167:
     Improving the contribution of the freight transportation 
system to economic efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness;
     Reducing congestion on the freight transportation system;
     Improving the safety, security, and resilience of the 
freight transportation system;
     Improving the state of good repair of the freight 
transportation system;
     Using advanced technology, performance management, 
innovation, competition, and accountability in operating and 
maintaining the freight transportation system;
     Reducing adverse environmental and community impacts of 
the freight transportation system.

The Department recommends that each State Freight Plan also include a 
discussion of the State's strategic goals for freight transportation. 
These goals would include the goals of the National Freight Policy 
summarized above, but States may also add other strategic goals. The 
Department recommends that State Freight Plans indicate which goals are 
most important to the State.

2. The Economic Context of Freight Transportation Planning

    The Department recommends that each State Freight Plan include a 
discussion of the role that freight transportation plays in the State's 
overall economy. This section would identify what industries are most 
important to the State, and what supply chains (including the 
transportation modes that support them) are critical to the State's 
industries. In particular, it would indicate what supply chains 
involving the State are important to exports, whether the exports of 
that State or of other States.

3. Freight Policies, Strategies, and Institutions

    As specified in section 1118, a State Freight Plan must include a 
discussion of the State's freight policies and strategies that will 
guide the freight-related transportation investment decisions of the 
State. The Department recommends that this section also discuss how 
these freight policies and strategies will guide not just freight-
related transportation investment decisions of the State, but also the 
broader freight improvement strategy of the State, including 
operational strategies and policy changes. The Department recommends 
that this discussion also:
     Include the State's grant and loan programs that are 
available to pay for freight-related transportation infrastructure;
     Identify the State's freight-related institutions, 
including transportation-related infrastructure owners and regulatory 
authorities, such as the State DOT, port authorities, toll roads, and 
bridge and tunnel authorities;
     Explain the governance structures and funding mechanisms 
for such authorities (e.g., whether the authorities are controlled by 
the governor or are independent, and whether the authority has a 
dedicated source of revenue);
     Identify private transportation infrastructure owners, 
such as railroads, terminals, pipelines, and freight transfer 
facilities;
     Identify statutory and constitutional constraints on 
freight-related investments and policies, such as prohibitions on 
spending State funds for certain kinds of freight infrastructure;
     Discuss regional freight planning activities in which the 
State participates, such as planning for key multi-state freight 
corridors, multi-state metropolitan areas, or for other regional groups 
of States; and
     Set out the State's priorities in freight transportation 
infrastructure development.

4. State Freight Transportation Assets

    As specified in section 1118, a State Freight Plan must include an 
inventory of facilities with freight mobility issues. The Department 
recommends that this inventory also include a complete inventory of the 
State's freight transportation assets. This would include a description 
of the State's transportation infrastructure in all freight-carrying 
modes, the warehousing and intermodal facilities located in the State, 
and the freight gateways and corridors that are located in or that pass 
through the State. MAP-21 places particular emphasis on transportation 
infrastructure that is used to serve areas of the State that are 
significant for energy development, mining, agriculture, and timber 
production, and the Department recommends that the State Freight Plan 
inventory note particularly routes that are used to move equipment for 
these productive activities into those areas and for moving the output 
of those productive activities out of those areas.

5. The Conditions and Performance of the State's Freight Transportation 
System

    As specified in section 1118, a State Freight Plan must include the 
performance measures that will guide the freight-related transportation 
investment decisions of the State. The Department recommends that this 
discussion also include an analysis of the conditions and performance 
of the State's freight transportation system. This analysis would 
include the identification of bottlenecks in the

[[Page 62599]]

freight transportation system that cause delays and unreliability in 
freight movements, as well as other specific locations that are in a 
poor state of good repair, create safety hazards, or create other 
performance problems. The National Freight Strategic Plan also is 
required to include an analysis of the conditions and performance of 
the national freight system, and when those measures of freight 
conditions and performance are established, the Department recommends 
that State Freight Plans include those measures. Until those measures 
are established, however, the Department recommends that States use the 
measures of condition and performance that they consider to be most 
reasonable and appropriate. In general, the Department recommends that 
measures of conditions and performance reflect the State's freight 
transportation goals--for each goal, there would be at least one 
measure of condition or performance that indicates how well the freight 
transportation system is doing in achieving that goal.
    The Department recommends that States use measures of conditions of 
transportation infrastructure that reflect the quality of service that 
this infrastructure provides to users of that infrastructure and to the 
general public. Similarly, measures of the performance of the freight 
transportation system would reflect the quality of freight service 
provided to freight shippers and the impact of the freight 
transportation system on the general public. Measures of conditions and 
performance would reflect outcomes that are directly important to the 
system's users and to the general public (for example, reductions in 
crashes, fatalities, and injuries; reduced delay and congestion; and 
reduced vehicle operating costs); The Department recommends that States 
try to avoid using measures that are not of direct importance to users 
and the general public (for example, miles of track or number of 
bridges inspected each year).

6. Freight Forecast

    Consistent with one of the required elements of the National 
Freight Strategic Plan, which must be developed in consultation with 
the States, the Department recommends that State Freight Plans include 
a 20-year forecast of freight transportation demands, broken down by 
mode of transportation and commodity classification, and showing 
demands for transportation of freight coming into the State, outbound 
from the State, passing through the State between outside origin and 
destination points, and moving intrastate between origin and 
destination points within the State. The freight forecast could draw 
upon the forecast prepared by the Federal Highway Administration's 
(FHWA) Office of Freight Management and Operations and on the Federal 
Aviation Administration's national and airport-level forecasts of air 
cargo. The FHWA forecast includes projected tonnage for each mode--
truck, rail, air (air and truck), water, and pipeline.

7. Overview of Trends, Needs, and Issues

    As specified in section 1118, a State Freight Plan must identify 
significant freight system trends, needs, and issues with respect to 
the State. The Department recommends that this discussion also include 
how emerging trends make those needs and issues of greater 
significance, or how these trends affect how those needs and issues can 
be addressed.

8. Strengths and Problems of the State's Freight Transportation System

    The Department recommends that a State Freight Plan include an 
analysis of the strengths of the State's freight system that it wishes 
to preserve and the problems that it wishes to solve. This analysis 
would show what the strengths of the State's freight system are that 
the State wishes to build upon; it would also show in what respects the 
State's freight system does not meet the State's goals, and indicate 
which problems are most important for the State to address. Some of 
these might include problems that the State expects to develop in the 
future as a result of increasing demand for freight transportation or 
other trends that the State is anticipating.

9. The State's Decision-Making Process

    The Department recommends that a State Freight Plan include a 
discussion of the State's decision-making process on freight 
transportation improvements, including how the State conducted outreach 
to stakeholders and the public and how the State prioritized the 
various strategies, projects, and policy changes it considered. This 
discussion would show how the State coordinated improvements to 
different modes of transportation in order to achieve its goals in the 
most cost-effective way. It would also discuss ways in which the State 
coordinated with other States in regional freight planning efforts, and 
with metropolitan areas within the State that have done freight 
planning.
    The Department encourages States to conduct economic analysis as 
part of the State Freight Plan, including analyses of benefits and 
costs of various improvements that they are considering. If economic 
analysis has been conducted, the results of that analysis should be 
reported in this portion of the State Freight Plan. The discussion 
would show how the State compared alternative approaches to achieving 
the same goal. As specified in section 1118, the discussion must also 
show evidence of consideration of operational strategies (such as 
congestion pricing) or innovative technologies (such as use of 
intelligent transportation systems (ITS)) that improve the safety and 
efficiency of freight movement. If an economic analysis is provided, it 
would be particularly useful to estimate benefits and costs of each 
alternative considered.

10. The State's Freight Improvement Strategy

    As specified in section 1118, a State Freight Plan must include a 
description of the strategies the State is employing to address freight 
mobility issues. The Department recommends that this description also 
include a presentation of the State's complete freight improvement 
strategy, with different improvements ranked in order of priority (or 
grouped into higher and lower priority groups). This presentation of 
the State's freight improvement strategy would include an analysis of 
how each improvement will advance the State's strategic goals, relating 
to:
     Capital investments;
     Operational improvements, such as congestion pricing and 
travel demand management;
     Policy changes, including performance management, 
competition, and accountability initiatives; and
     Expanded use of ITS and other innovative technologies.

The strategy would also include:

     An analysis of how proposed improvements will affect 
specific supply chains and industries that have been identified as 
important to the State in Section 2;
     Because MAP-21 places particular emphasis on 
infrastructure that is used for transporting mining, agricultural, 
energy, and timber equipment and products, a discussion of how those 
freight transportation routes would be affected (and in particular how 
the strategy would impede the deterioration in the condition of 
infrastructure on those routes);
     An analysis of the improvements in outcomes that are 
expected to result from the proposed freight improvements;
     A discussion of how the freight plan relates to other 
transportation

[[Page 62600]]

plans, such as a state rail plan, a long-range statewide transportation 
plan, or a metropolitan area freight plan; and

A discussion of how the State's Freight Improvement Strategy 
coordinates with plans of other adjacent States, including groups of 
States that work together to plan for freight transportation along key 
multi-state freight corridors, in multi-state metropolitan areas, or 
through other regional groupings.

11. Implementation Plan

    Finally, the Department recommends that a State Freight Plan 
include a comprehensive implementation plan, showing both short-term 
and long-term strategies, and including an approximate time schedule 
for each proposed freight improvement. This implementation plan would 
include an analysis of which capital improvements have the potential to 
generate a revenue stream, and hence which projects have the potential 
to be funded with loans (repaid from the revenue stream) rather than 
solely through grants or general funds. The Plan would include a 
funding plan, showing how each project will be funded, including those 
funded by grants, loans, and public-private partnerships. The Plan 
would discuss the State's proposed partnerships with private 
infrastructure owners, such as railroads, terminal operators, and 
pipeline companies. Finally, the Plan would discuss how the State 
proposes to work with adjacent States on projects that cross State 
lines, or on freight corridors that cross State lines (even if the 
project itself is all in one State).

V. The State Freight Planning Process

    The Department recommends that States use a collaborative process 
for freight planning that involves all of the relevant stakeholders 
affected by the freight transportation system. These stakeholders would 
include owners of freight transportation infrastructure (both public 
and private); carriers operating on publicly-owned freight 
infrastructure; shippers and freight forwarders; representatives of 
employees of these stakeholders; State, local, and tribal governments; 
and the general public. Stakeholders might be domiciled both inside the 
State and outside of the State.
    States are strongly encouraged to establish State Freight Advisory 
Committees to facilitate this collaborative process. As specified in 
section 1117 of MAP-21, State Freight Advisory Committees should 
include representatives of a cross-section of public and private sector 
experts and stakeholders. These might include representatives of:
     The transportation department of the State;
     Metropolitan planning organizations, councils of 
government, regional councils, and other regional and planning 
organizations;
     Local and tribal governments;
     Independent transportation authorities, such as seaport 
and airport authorities, toll highway authorities, and bridge and 
tunnel authorities;
     Private infrastructure owners, such as railroads and 
pipelines;
     Carriers, including carriers operating on their own 
infrastructure and carriers operating on publicly-owned infrastructure;
     Shippers and freight forwarders;
     Freight-related associations;
     Organizations representing the freight industry workforce;
     Environmental, safety, and community organizations; and
     Independent transportation experts, including academic 
specialists and consultants.
    State Freight Advisory Committees should be charged with
     Advising the State on freight-related priorities, issues, 
projects, and funding needs;
     Serving as a forum for discussion of State decisions 
affecting freight transportation;
     Communicating and coordinating regional priorities with 
other organizations;
     Promoting the sharing of information between the private 
and public sectors on freight issues; and
     Participating in the development of the State's Freight 
Plan.

VI. Data and Analytical Resources for State Freight Planning

    The modal administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation 
and other departments in the U.S. Government can provide a wide range 
of data and analysis to assist States in the freight planning process. 
The following is a series of links to internet Web sites that provide 
useful data and analysis resources:

General Data and Analysis Sources on Freight

Commodity Flow Survey: http://www.bts.gov/publications/commodity_flow_survey/
Data Sources Related to Freight Transportation: http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/freight_analysis/data_sources/index.htm
Freight Analysis Framework: http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/freight_analysis/faf/index.htm
Freight Performance Measures: http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/freight_analysis/travel_time.htm
Quick Response Freight Manual: http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/publications/qrfm2/index.htm

Maritime Statistics

USA Trade Online (The Official Source for U.S. Merchandise Trade 
Data), U.S. Census Bureau: https://www.usatradeonline.gov/
Navigation Data Center, Waterborne Commerce Statistics Center, U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers: http://www.ndc.iwr.usace.army.mil/wcsc/wcsc.htm
Navigation Data Center, Vessel Entrances and Clearances, U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers: http://www.ndc.iwr.usace.army.mil/data/dataclen.htm
Maritime Statistics, U.S. Maritime Administration: http://www.marad.dot.gov/library_landing_page/data_and_statistics/Data_and_Statistics.htm
Marview Statistics, U.S. Maritime Administration: www.marview.gov/

Rail Freight Resources and Statistics

The Preliminary National Rail Plan: http://www.fra.dot.gov/Downloads/RailPlanPrelim10-15.pdf
The National Rail Plan Progress Report: http://www.fra.dot.gov/downloads/NRP_Sept2010_WEB.pdf
The Proposed State Rail Plan Guidance: http://www.fra.dot.gov/rpd/passenger/fp_Proposed_State_Rail_Plan_Guidance.shtml
Comparative Evaluation of Rail and Truck Fuel Efficiency on 
Competitive Corridors: http://www.fra.dot.gov/Downloads/Comparative_Evaluation_Rail_Truck_Fuel_Efficiency.pdf
Discussion of the confidential Carload Waybill Sample and State 
access: http://www.stb.dot.gov/stb/industry/econ_waybill.html
National Transportation Atlas Database includes FRA rail network: 
http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_atlas_database/
Online highway rail grade crossing investment analysis tool: http://gradedec.fra.dot.gov/
Interactive mapping application that allows users to view aspects of 
railroad infrastructure: http://fragis.frasafety.net/GISFRASafety/default.aspx

Air Freight Statistics

FAA Air Cargo forecasts: http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/apl/aviation_forecasts/aerospace_forecasts/2012-2032/

    Click on ``Forecast Tables, US Commercial and Foreign Flag 
Carriers, Tables 5-23.'' Cargo forecasts are Tables 19 and 20.

VII. Request for Comments

    DOT invites interested parties to submit comments on any aspect of 
the Department's implementation of MAP-21 requirements for State 
Freight Plans or State Freight Advisory Committees. The Department will 
consider these comments as it continues to implement the freight 
provisions of the law. The instructions for submitting comments can be 
found in the Addresses section above. Late-filed comments will be 
considered to the extent practicable.


[[Page 62601]]


    Issued in Washington, DC, on October 5, 2012.
Ray LaHood,
Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2012-25261 Filed 10-12-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P