[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 221 (Thursday, November 15, 2012)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 68069-68070]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-27842]


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POSTAL SERVICE

39 CFR Part 20


Outbound International Mailings of Lithium Batteries

AGENCY: Postal ServiceTM.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: The Postal Service is revising the Mailing Standards of the 
United States Postal Service, International Mail Manual (IMM[supreg]) 
to new standards when mailing primary and secondary lithium cells or 
lithium batteries internationally, or to and from an APO, FPO, or DPO 
destinations.

DATES: Effective date: November 15, 2012.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rick Klutts at 813-877-0372.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the final rule published on May 14, 2012, 
(77 FR 28259-28261), the Postal Service implemented new international 
standards effective May 16, 2012, that prohibited the mailing of 
lithium batteries and cells internationally and when sent to and from 
any Army Post OfficeTM (APO), Fleet Post Office (FPO), or 
Diplomatic Post Office (DPO) location. The Postal Service took this 
action to bring its international mailing standards into compliance 
with international standards for the acceptance of dangerous goods in 
international mail. We also stated in that notice that we anticipated 
on January 1, 2013, customers would be able to mail specific quantities 
of lithium batteries internationally (including to and from an APO, 
FPO, or DPO location) when the batteries are properly installed in the 
personal electronic devices they are intended to operate. Through 
recent discussions with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the 
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the Universal 
Postal Union (UPU), we are pleased to announce that we will be able to 
implement the following changes effective November 15, 2012. In 
addition, we will also make parallel changes to other USPS publications 
that make reference to the international mailing of lithium batteries 
such as Mailing Standards of the United States Postal Service, Domestic 
Mail Manual (DMM) and Publication 52, Hazardous, Restricted, and 
Perishable Mail.
    The Postal Service hereby adopts the following changes to Mailing 
Standards of the United States Postal Service, International Mail 
Manual (IMM), which is incorporated by reference in the Code of Federal 
Regulations. See 39 CFR 20.1.

List of Subjects in 39 CFR Part 20

    Foreign relations, International postal services.

    Accordingly, 39 CFR part 20 is revised to read as follows:

PART 20--[AMENDED]

0
1. The authority citation for 39 CFR part 20 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 5 U.S.C. 552(a); 13 U.S.C. 301-307; 18 U.S.C. 1692-
1737; 39 U.S.C. 101, 401, 403, 404, 407, 414, 416, 3001-3011, 3201-
3219, 3403-3406, 3621, 3622, 3626, 3632, 3633, and 5001.


0
2. Revise the following sections of Mailing Standards of the United 
States Postal Service, International Mail Manual (IMM), as follows:

Mailing Standards of the United States Postal Service, International 
Mail Manual (IMM)

1 International Mail Services

* * * * *

130 Mailability

* * * * *

135 Mailable Dangerous Goods

* * * * *
    [Insert new 135.6 to read as follows:]

135.6 Batteries

135.61 General

    Only lithium cells and batteries under 135.62 and 135.63 that are 
properly installed in the equipment they are intended to operate may be 
sent internationally or to APO, FPO, or DPO locations when not 
restricted or prohibited by the destination country or APO, FPO, or DPO 
location. For specific country restrictions, see the applicable 
Individual Country Listing. For specific APO, FPO, or DPO restrictions, 
see the information for the destination ZIP Code in the article titled 
``Overseas Military/Diplomatic Mail'' published in each issue of the 
Postal Bulletin.
    Lithium batteries packed with equipment and lithium batteries sent 
separate from equipment are prohibited. Damaged or recalled batteries 
are prohibited and may not be mailed internationally under any 
circumstances.

135.62 Primary Lithium (Non-Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries

    Small consumer-type primary lithium cells and batteries (lithium 
metal or lithium alloy) like those used to power cameras and 
flashlights are mailable in a single shipment with the following 
restrictions:
    a. The batteries must be installed in the equipment being shipped.
    b. Each shipment may contain a maximum of only four lithium cells 
or two lithium batteries.
    c. The lithium content must not exceed 1 gram (g) per cell.
    d. The total aggregate lithium content must not exceed 2 g per 
battery.
    e. The batteries installed in the equipment must be protected from 
damage and short circuit.

[[Page 68070]]

    f. The equipment must be equipped with an effective means of 
preventing it from being turned on or activated.
    g. The equipment must be contained in a strong sealed package and 
cushioned to prevent movement or damage.

135.63 Secondary Lithium-ion (Rechargeable) Cells and Batteries

    Small consumer-type lithium-ion cells and batteries like those used 
to power cell phones and laptop computers are mailable in a single 
shipment with the following restrictions:
    a. The batteries must be installed in the equipment being shipped.
    b. Each shipment may contain a maximum of only four lithium-ion 
cells or two lithium-ion batteries.
    c. The lithium content must not exceed 20 Watt-hour rating (Wh) per 
cell.
    d. The total aggregate lithium content must not exceed 100 Wh per 
battery.
    e. Each battery must bear the Wh marking on the battery to 
determine if it is within the limits defined in 123.63c and 123.63d.
    f. The batteries installed in the equipment must be protected from 
damage and short circuit.
    g. The equipment must be equipped with an effective means of 
preventing it from being turned on or activated.
    h. The equipment must be contained in a strong sealed package and 
cushioned to prevent movement or damage.

136 Nonmailable Goods

136.1 Dangerous Goods

    * * * Some examples of dangerous goods include the following:
* * * * *
    [Delete item ``i'' in its entirety.]
* * * * *
    We will publish an amendment to 39 CFR part 20 to reflect these 
changes.

Stanley F. Mires,
Attorney, Legal Policy & Legislative Advice.
[FR Doc. 2012-27842 Filed 11-13-12; 11:15 am]
BILLING CODE 7710-12-P