[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 223 (Monday, November 19, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 69491-69496]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-28058]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Transportation Security Administration

[Docket No. DHS-2012-0068]


Privacy Act of 1974: System of Records; Secure Flight Records

AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS.

ACTION: Notice to alter an existing system of records.

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SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS), Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
is altering and republishing an existing system of records notice 
(SORN) titled Department of Homeland Security/Transportation Security 
Administration 019 (DHS/TSA-019), Secure Flight Records, for the 
passenger and non-traveler screening program known as Secure Flight. 
TSA is republishing this SORN to reflect additions to TSA's screening 
capabilities designed to better focus enhanced passenger screening 
efforts on individuals likely to pose a threat to civil aviation, and 
to facilitate the secure and efficient travel of the vast majority of 
the traveling public by distinguishing them from individuals on federal 
government watch lists. This SORN includes modifications in the 
following areas of the SORN: Categories of individuals, categories of 
records, purpose(s), routine uses, disclosure to consumer reporting 
agencies, data retention and disposal, notification procedure, records 
access procedures, and the record source categories.

DATES: Submit comments on modifications to routine use 3 on or before 
December 19, 2012. This updated system will be effective upon 
publication except that the change to routine use 3 will be effective 
30 days after date of publication in the Federal Register.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by docket number DHS-
2012-0068 by one of the following methods:
     Federal e-Rulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
     Fax: 202-343-4010.
     Mail: Jonathan R. Cantor, Acting Chief Privacy Officer, 
Privacy Office, Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528.
    Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name 
and docket number for this rulemaking. All comments received will be 
posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any 
personal information provided.
    Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or 
comments received, please visit http://www.regulations.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peter Pietra, Director, Privacy Policy 
and Compliance, TSA-36, Transportation Security Administration, 601 
South 12th Street, Arlington, VA 20598-6036; email: TSAPrivacy@dhs.gov; 
or Jonathan R. Cantor, Acting Chief Privacy Officer, Privacy Office, 
Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC 20528; email: 
privacy@dhs.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Availability of Notice

    You may obtain an electronic copy using the Internet by--
    (1) Searching the electronic Federal Docket Management System 
(FDMS) Web page at http://www.regulations.gov;
    (2) Accessing the Government Printing Office's Web page at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html; or
    (3) Visiting TSA's Security Regulations Web page at http://www.tsa.gov and accessing the link for ``Research Center'' at the top 
of the page.
    In addition, copies are available by writing or emailing the TSA 
Privacy Office in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Make 
sure to identify the docket number of this notice.

Background

    The Transportation Security Administration is responsible for 
security in all modes of transportation and performs passenger and 
baggage screening at the Nation's airports. Prior to the implementation 
of the TSA Secure Flight program, this screening was supplemented by 
aircraft operators who performed passenger watch list matching against 
the federal No Fly and Selectee Lists, as required under security 
directives issued by TSA in 2002. Aircraft operators also conducted 
this watch list matching process for certain non-traveling individuals 
\1\ authorized to enter the sterile area \2\ of an airport.
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    \1\ ``Non-traveling individual'' or ``non-traveler'' means an 
individual to whom a covered aircraft operator or covered airport 
seeks to issue an authorization to enter the sterile area of an 
airport in order to escort a minor or passenger with disabilities or 
for some other purpose permitted by TSA. The term does not include 
employees or agents of an airport or aircraft operators or other 
individuals whose access to a sterile area is governed by another 
TSA requirement. 49 CFR 1560.3.
    \2\ ``Sterile area'' means a portion of an airport defined in 
the airport security program that provides passengers access to 
boarding aircraft and to which the access generally is controlled by 
TSA, an aircraft operator, or a foreign air carrier through the 
screening of persons and property. 49 CFR 1504.5.
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    The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States 
(the 9/11 Commission) recommended that watch list matching be performed 
by TSA using the ``larger set of watch lists maintained by the Federal 
Government.'' \3\ In response, under section 4012(a)(1)-(2) of the 
Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA),\4\ 
Congress directed TSA and DHS to assume from aircraft operators the 
function of comparing airline passenger information to data in the 
Terrorist Screening Database (TSDB) maintained by the Terrorist 
Screening Center (TSC).\5\ Consistent with this statutory

[[Page 69492]]

directive, TSA promulgated the Secure Flight Final Rule \6\ for the 
purpose of enhancing the security of air travel in the United States 
and to support the federal government's counter-terrorism efforts by 
assisting in the detection of individuals on federal government watch 
lists who seek to travel by air, and to facilitate the secure travel of 
the public. By November 2010, TSA fully assumed the watch list matching 
function from aircraft operators and air carriers.
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    \3\ ``National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United 
States,'' page 393 (July 22, 2004).
    \4\ Public Law 108-458, 118 Stat. 3638 (December 17, 2004).
    \5\ The TSC was established by the Attorney General in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, the 
Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of Defense. The 
Attorney General, acting through the Director of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation (FBI), established the TSC in support of Homeland 
Security Presidential Directive 6 (HSPD-6), dated September 16, 
2003, which required the Attorney General to establish an 
organization to consolidate the Federal Government's approach to 
terrorism screening and to provide for the appropriate and lawful 
use of terrorist information in screening processes. The TSC 
maintains the Federal government's consolidated and integrated 
terrorist watch list, known as the TSDB.
    \6\ 73 FR 64018 (Oct. 28, 2008).
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    TSA established the Secure Flight system of records and published 
the SORN in the Federal Register on August 23, 2007.\7\ TSA altered and 
republished the SORN in the Federal Register on November 9, 2007.\8\ 
TSA is amending the Secure Flight SORN again to reflect additions to 
TSA's screening capabilities as discussed below.
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    \7\ 72 FR 48392.
    \8\ 72 FR 63711.
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    TSA uses Secure Flight to conduct watch list matching against the 
No Fly and Selectee List components of the TSDB. Where warranted by 
security considerations, Secure Flight also matches against the full 
TSDB and other government databases. In addition, Secure Flight matches 
against the list of individuals whom the Department of Health and Human 
Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has 
identified to DHS as persons who should not be permitted to board an 
aircraft due to public health concerns.\9\
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    \9\ To accomplish this list matching function, Secure Flight 
ingests copies of these lists of individuals identified on other 
government systems to minimize the processing time when Secure 
Flight receives passenger travel data.
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    TSA also uses Secure Flight to match air travelers and other 
individuals seeking access to airport sterile areas against a list of 
individuals who have each been assigned a unique redress number by the 
DHS Traveler Redress Inquiry Program (TRIP).\10\ TSA also may collect 
and use a passenger's ``Known Traveler Number'' if available. A Known 
Traveler Number is a unique number assigned to Known Travelers for whom 
the federal government has conducted a security threat assessment and 
determined do not pose a security threat.\11\ TSA did not use this 
capability when it initially assumed responsibility for passenger 
screening using Secure Flight. In October 2011, however, TSA announced 
the TSA Pre[check]TM pilot program.\12\ TSA initiated TSA 
Pre[check]TM as a proof of concept at four U.S. airports, 
starting with individuals enrolled within U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) Trusted Traveler programs \13\ and certain airline 
frequent flyer program members.\14\ The purpose of the proof of concept 
was to evaluate capabilities to identify air travelers who are lower 
risk and eligible for expedited security screening at the airport 
checkpoints, and to test expedited screening processes. The Known 
Travelers participating in the proof of concept volunteered information 
that permitted TSA to make risk assessments before the individual 
arrives at the airport.
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    \10\ http://www.dhs.gov/files/programs/gc_1169673653081.shtm.
    \11\ See 49 CFR 1560.3.
    \12\ See TSA Pre[check]TM Pilot Starts Today at 
Select Airports to Further Enhance Security, TSA Office of Public 
Affairs (October 4, 2011), www.tsa.gov/press/releases/2011/1004.shtm.
    \13\ CBP Trusted Traveler programs include Global Entry, SENTRI, 
and NEXUS. See www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/trusted_traveler. For 
individuals in the CBP Trusted Traveler programs, TSA receives from 
CBP a list of eligible travelers that is ingested into Secure Flight 
to minimize the processing time when Secure Flight receives 
passenger travel data. Eligible members of these programs provide 
their Known Traveler number to aircraft operators for transmittal to 
Secure Flight.
    \14\ For airline frequent flyers, TSA has developed eligibility 
criteria and partnered with aircraft operators that identify 
frequent flyers who meet those criteria. Those frequent flyers are 
given the opportunity to opt into the TSA Pre[check]TM 
program. When those passengers' travel data are submitted by the 
aircraft operators to Secure Flight, the aircraft operator also 
includes a designator code that identifies the passenger as eligible 
for expedited screening. See www.tsa.gov/what_we_do/escreening.shtm.
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    Earlier this year, TSA began the transition of the TSA 
Pre[check]TM program--including individuals in CBP Trusted 
Traveler programs and certain airline frequent flyer program members--
from proof of concept to an operational status.\15\ TSA is expanding 
the availability of TSA Pre[check]TM to additional U.S. 
airports and populations, such as eligible members of the U.S. Armed 
Forces and certain active security clearance holders.\16\ By 
identifying passengers who are low risk and providing them expedited 
screening, TSA Pre[check]TM enables the agency to better 
focus its screening efforts on individuals who are more likely to pose 
a threat to civil aviation.
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    \15\ See TSA Pre[check]TM Screening Benefits 
Expanding to Additional Airports, TSA Office of Public Affairs 
(March 30, 2012), www.tsa.gov/press/releases/2012/0330.shtm; DHS/
TSA/PIA-018(e)--Secure Flight Program Update, www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/privacy/privacy_pia_tsa_secureflight_update018 update018(e).pdf.
    \16\ As additional populations are added to the TSA 
Pre[check]TM program, additional lists of eligible 
individuals will be ingested by Secure Flight. The Secure Flight 
Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) will be updated to reflect that 
information. See www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/privacy/privacy_pia_tsa_secureflight_update018(e).pdf.
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    As part of the effort to identify individuals that are low risk, 
TSA also is creating and maintaining a watch list of individuals who 
are disqualified from eligibility from TSA Pre[check]TM, for 
some period of time or permanently, because they have been involved in 
violations of security regulations of sufficient severity or frequency. 
Disqualifying violations of aviation security regulations may involve 
violations at the airport or on board aircraft, such as a loaded 
firearm that is discovered in carry-on baggage at the checkpoint, or a 
threat to use a destructive device against a transportation conveyance, 
facilities, or personnel. The TSA Pre[check]TM 
Disqualification List will be generated by TSA's Performance and 
Results Information System (PARIS).\17\
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    \17\ PARIS is an enforcement and inspections system for all 
modes of transportation for which TSA has security related duties, 
and maintains records related to the investigation or prosecution of 
violations or potential violations of Federal, State, local, or 
international criminal law. For additional information, see DHS/TSA-
001 Transportation Security Administration Transportation Security 
Enforcement Record System (TSERS), 75 FR 28042 (May 19, 2010).
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    Consistent with its ongoing efforts to focus on passengers who are 
more likely to pose a threat to civil aviation, and following the 
failed terrorist attack on an international flight bound for Detroit on 
December 25, 2009, the Secure Flight program began matching passengers 
on international flights bound for the United States against a list of 
individuals requiring enhanced screening that is generated through 
CBP's Automated Targeting System (ATS).\18\ ATS uses threat-based 
intelligence scenarios designed to identify international travelers who 
are more likely to pose a threat and for whom enhanced screening is 
appropriate. TSA receives from CBP a continuously updated list of 
individuals identified through these scenario rules for use in Secure 
Flight passenger screening. Oversight is exercised by the DHS Offices 
of Privacy, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and General Counsel to 
ensure that the threat-based intelligence is appropriately applied. 
After they arrive in the United States, some of these international 
travelers also may receive enhanced screening prior to

[[Page 69493]]

subsequent domestic and international outbound flights for a period of 
time, again based on threat-based, intelligence-driven scenario rules.
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    \18\ See Secretary Napolitano Announces New Measures to 
Strengthen Aviation Security, DHS Office of the Press Secretary 
(April 2, 2010).
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    TSA receives from CBP an Electronic System for Travel Authorization 
(ESTA) status code for international travelers. ESTA is an automated 
system used by CBP to determine the eligibility of visitors to travel 
to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program and whether the 
traveler poses any law enforcement or security risk. In order to 
eliminate multiple messages to the airlines from CBP and TSA on a 
single passenger, Secure Flight transmits the ESTA status code for 
international travelers to the aircraft operator as part of the 
boarding pass printing result.
    Finally, TSA is adding a clause to subsection (a) of the Category 
of Individuals to ensure that, when requested by a U.S. government 
agency or institution, TSA may use Secure Flight to vet passengers on 
U.S. government operated, chartered, or leased flights. A corresponding 
change to routine use (3) is being made to permit disclosure of 
information to the U.S. government agency for screening status or 
operational response.
    In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a, DHS/TSA 
is altering and republishing DHS/TSA SORN DHS/TSA-019, titled Secure 
Flight Records (72 FR 63711, November 9, 2007). Consistent with the 
discussion above, the following modifications are being made to the 
DHS/TSA-019 Secure Flight Records system of records:
     The Categories of Individuals section is updated as 
follows:
     [cir] We have added a category of individuals to subsection (a) to 
ensure that U.S. government operated flights are covered, including 
flights leased or chartered by the U.S. government.
     [cir] We have rewritten subsection (c) to clarify that it 
addresses individuals involved with chartered or leased aircraft ``with 
a maximum take-off weight'' over 12,500 pounds; and
     [cir] We have added a new subsection (f) to expressly include 
individuals who are identified as Known Travelers.
     The Categories of Records section is updated as follows:
     [cir] We have amended subsection (a) to note that TSA receives 
from aircraft operators the designator code used to verify certain 
travelers' frequent flyer status.
     [cir] Subsection (a) also was amended to clarify that Secure 
Flight may receive Secure Flight Passenger Data (SFPD) \19\ for 
individuals who seek to charter, lease, operate, or be transported on 
aircraft ``with a maximum take-off weight'' over 12,500 pounds, and 
owners and/or operators of such aircraft,
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    \19\ SFPD is the following information regarding a passenger or 
non-traveling individual: Full name, date of birth, gender, redress 
number or Known Traveler Number, passport information, reservation 
control number, record sequence number, record type, passenger 
update indicator, traveler reference number, and itinerary 
information. 49 CFR 1560.3.
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     [cir] We have revised subsection (d) to reflect that matching 
analyses and results may include lists generated by other classified 
and unclassified government watchlists. As discussed above such lists 
include CBP ATS, the TSA Pre[check]TM Disqualification list, 
and the CDC Do Not Board list.
     [cir] We have inserted a new subsection (h) to expressly include 
the Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) status code for 
international travelers as a category of records,
     [cir] We have inserted a new subsection (i) to expressly include 
records about Known Travelers.
     The Purpose(s) section is updated to reflect that, in 
addition to assisting in the detection of individuals identified on 
federal government watch lists who seek to travel by air, Secure Flight 
also is used to identify air travelers who are lower risk and eligible 
for expedited security screening at the airport checkpoints.
     The Routine Uses section is updated as follows:
     [cir] We have rewritten routine use (2) to conform to a standard 
DHS routine use pertaining to the sharing of information with 
contractors when necessary.
     [cir] We have amended routine use (3) to more accurately reflect 
that TSA discloses the passenger screening status, not the watch list 
matching status, to airlines, airports, and the Department of 
Transportation, and to reflect that passenger screening information may 
be disclosed to U.S. government agencies that operate, charter, or 
lease aircraft. This would permit, for example, the Department of 
Defense (DoD) to request that passengers on a DoD operated or chartered 
flight be vetted through Secure Flight.
     [cir] We have amended routine use (4) to make it consistent with 
routine use (3) providing for disclosure regarding individuals who pose 
or are suspected of posing a risk to transportation or national 
security.
     [cir] We have deleted from routine use (9) the reference to the 
DHS Office of Inspector General since such disclosures would be 
accomplished pursuant to the Privacy Act under 5 U.S.C. 552a(b)(1) 
rather than pursuant to a routine use.
     The Disclosure to Consumer Reporting Agencies section is 
being changed to reflect that disclosures in connection with the Debt 
Collection Act of 1982 (Pub. L. 97-365) are not part of this system of 
records. Routine use 12 remains in place to permit disclosures in the 
event of a data breach.
     The Retention and Disposal section is amended to reflect 
that the retention schedule was approved by NARA. This section also was 
amended to reflect that lists of individuals in Secure Flight, such as 
Known Traveler lists and the TSA Pre[check]TM 
Disqualification list, will be deleted or destroyed when superseded.
     The System Manager and Notification Procedure section has 
been updated to reflect updated contact information.
     The Records Access Procedures section has been updated to 
reflect the correct zip code for the TSA Freedom of Information Act 
Office.
     The Records Access Procedures section also was revised to 
clarify that individuals who believe they have been improperly denied 
entry by CBP may submit a redress request through DHS TRIP.
     The Record Source Categories section is updated to clarify 
that Secure Flight may receive information from all three branches of 
the Federal government, as well as from private entities (e.g., 
airlines) that participate in the Known Traveler program.
     The Exemptions Claimed for the System category is updated 
to include non-travelers to whom a covered aircraft operator or covered 
airport seeks to issue an authorization to enter the sterile area of an 
airport.

Privacy Act

    The Privacy Act embodies fair information practice principles in a 
statutory framework governing the means by which the federal government 
agencies collect, maintain, use, and disseminate individuals' records. 
The Privacy Act applies to information that is maintained in a ``system 
of records.'' A ``system of records'' is a group of any records under 
the control of an agency for which information is retrieved by the name 
of an individual or by some identifying number, symbol, or other 
identifying particular assigned to the individual. In the Privacy Act, 
an individual is defined to encompass U.S. citizens and lawful 
permanent residents. As a matter of policy, DHS extends administrative 
Privacy Act protections to all individuals when systems of records 
maintain information on U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents, and 
visitors. Individuals may

[[Page 69494]]

request access to their own records that are maintained in a system of 
records in the possession or under the control of DHS by complying with 
DHS Privacy Act regulations, 6 CFR Part 5.
    The Privacy Act requires each agency to publish in the Federal 
Register a description denoting the type and character of each system 
of records that the agency maintains, and the routine uses that are 
contained in each system in order to make agency recordkeeping 
practices transparent, to notify individuals regarding the uses to 
their records are put, and to assist individuals to more easily find 
such files within the agency. Below is the description of the DHS/TSA-
019 Secure Flight Records system of records.
    In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552a(r), DHS has provided a report of 
this system of records to the Office of Management and Budget and to 
Congress.
SYSTEM OF RECORDS

DHS/TSA-019

SYSTEM NAME:
    Secure Flight Records.

SECURITY CLASSIFICATION:
    Unclassified; Sensitive Security Information.

SYSTEM LOCATION:
    Records are maintained at the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA), 601 South 12th Street, Arlington, VA, and at 
other secure TSA facilities in Annapolis Junction, Maryland and 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. Records also may be maintained at the 
secured facilities of contractors or other parties that perform 
functions under the Secure Flight program.

CATEGORIES OF INDIVIDUALS COVERED BY THE SYSTEM:
    (a) Individuals who attempt to make reservations for travel on, 
have traveled on, or have reservations to travel on a flight operated 
by a U.S. aircraft operator, or a flight into, out of, or overflying 
the United States that is operated by a foreign air carrier, or flights 
operated by the U.S. government, including flights chartered or leased 
by the U.S. government;
    (b) Non-traveling individuals who seek to obtain authorization from 
an aircraft or airport operator to enter the sterile area of an 
airport;
    (c) For flights that TSA grants a request by the operators of 
leased or charter aircraft with a maximum take-off weight over 12,500 
pounds to screen the individuals using Secure Flight, the following 
individuals: (1) Individuals who seek to charter or lease an aircraft 
with a maximum take-off weight over 12,500 pounds or who are proposed 
to be transported on or operate such charter aircraft; and (2) owners 
and/or operators of such chartered or leased aircraft;
    (d)(1) Known or suspected terrorists identified in the Terrorist 
Screening Database (TSDB) maintained by the Terrorist Screening Center 
(TSC); and (2) individuals identified on classified and unclassified 
governmental databases such as law enforcement, immigration, or 
intelligence databases;
    (e) Individuals who have been distinguished from individuals on a 
watch list through a redress process, or other means; and
    (f) Individuals who are identified as Known Travelers for whom the 
federal government has conducted a security threat assessment and 
determined do not pose a security threat.

CATEGORIES OF RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM:
    (a) Records containing passenger and flight information (e.g., full 
name, date of birth, gender, redress number, Known Traveler Number, 
passport information, frequent flyer designator code or other identity 
authentication/verification code obtained from aircraft operators, and 
itinerary); records containing information about non-traveling 
individuals seeking access to an airport sterile area for a purpose 
approved by TSA; and records containing information about individuals 
who seek to charter, lease, operate or be transported on aircraft with 
a maximum take-off weight over 12,500 pounds if TSA grants the request 
of an aircraft owner or operator to use Secure Flight;
    (b) Records containing information from an individual's form of 
identification or a physical description of the individual;
    (c) Records obtained from the TSC of known or suspected terrorists 
in the TSDB; and records regarding individuals identified on classified 
and unclassified governmental watch lists;
    (d) Records containing the matching analyses and results of 
comparisons of individuals to the TSDB and other classified and 
unclassified governmental watch lists;
    (e) Records related to communications between or among TSA and 
aircraft operators, airport operators, owners and/or operators of 
leased or charter aircraft with a maximum take-off weight over 12,500 
pounds, TSC, law enforcement agencies, intelligence agencies, and 
agencies responsible for airspace safety or security, regarding the 
screening status of passengers or non-traveling individuals and any 
operational responses to individuals identified in the TSDB;
    (f) Records of the redress process that include information on 
known misidentified persons, including any Redress Number assigned to 
those individuals;
    (g) Records that track the receipt, use, access, or transmission of 
information as part of the Secure Flight program;
    (h) Electronic System for Travel Authorization status code 
generated by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for international 
travelers; and
    (i) Records containing information about individuals who are 
identified as Known Travelers.

AUTHORITY FOR MAINTENANCE OF THE SYSTEM:
    49 U.S.C. 114, 40113, 44901, 44903, and 44909.

PURPOSE(S):
    The Secure Flight Records system will be used to identify and 
protect against potential and actual threats to transportation security 
and support the federal government's counterterrorism efforts by 
assisting in the identification of individuals who warrant further 
scrutiny prior to boarding an aircraft or seek to enter a sterile area 
or who warrant denial of boarding or denial of entry to a sterile area 
on security grounds. It also will be used to identify individuals who 
are lower risk and therefore may be eligible for expedited security 
screening at the airport checkpoints. Both of these functions are 
designed to facilitate the secure travel of the public.

ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES 
OF USERS AND PURPOSES OF SUCH USES:
    (1) To the TSC in order to: (a) Determine whether an individual is 
a positive identity match to an individual identified as a known or 
suspected terrorist in the watch list; (b) allow redress of passenger 
complaints; (c) facilitate an operational response, if one is deemed 
appropriate, for individuals who are a positive identity match to an 
individual identified as a known or suspected terrorist in the watch 
list; (d) provide information and analysis about terrorist encounters 
and known or suspected terrorist associates to appropriate domestic and 
foreign government agencies and officials for counterterrorism 
purposes; and (e) perform technical implementation functions necessary 
for the Secure Flight program.
    (2) To contractors and their agents, grantees, experts, 
consultants, and others performing or working on a contract, service, 
grant, cooperative

[[Page 69495]]

agreement, or other assignment for DHS, when necessary to accomplish an 
agency function related to this system of records. Individuals provided 
information under this routine use are subject to the same Privacy Act 
requirements and limitations on disclosure as are applicable to DHS 
officers and employees.
    (3) To aircraft operators, foreign air carriers, airport operators, 
the Department of Transportation, and the Department of Defense or 
other U.S. government agencies or institutions, to communicate 
individual screening status and facilitate an operational response, 
where appropriate, to individuals who pose or are suspected of posing a 
risk to transportation or national security.
    (4) To owners or operators of leased or charter aircraft to 
communicate individual screening status and facilitate an operational 
response, when appropriate, to individuals who pose or are suspected of 
posing a risk to transportation or national security.
    (5) To the appropriate federal, state, local, tribal, territorial, 
foreign, or international agency regarding or to identify individuals 
who pose, or are under reasonable suspicion of posing, a risk to 
transportation or national security.
    (6) To the Department of Justice (DOJ) or other Federal agency for 
purposes of conducting litigation or administrative proceedings, when: 
(a) The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), or (b) any employee or 
former employee of DHS in his/her official capacity, or (c) any 
employee or former employee of DHS in his/her individual capacity where 
the DOJ or DHS has agreed to represent the employee, or (d) the United 
States or any agency thereof, is a party to the litigation or 
proceeding or has an interest in such litigation or proceeding.
    (7) To the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) or 
other Federal agencies pursuant to records management inspections being 
conducted under the authority of 44 U.S.C. 2904 and 2906.
    (8) To a congressional office in response to an inquiry from that 
congressional office made at the request of the individual.
    (9) To the Government Accountability Office or other agency, 
organization, or individual for the purposes of performing authorized 
audit or oversight operations, but only such information as is 
necessary and relevant to such audit and oversight functions.
    (10) To the appropriate federal, state, local, tribal, territorial, 
foreign, or international agency responsible for investigating, 
prosecuting, enforcing, or implementing a statute, rule, regulation, or 
order regarding a violation or potential violation of civil or criminal 
law, regulation, or order when such disclosure is proper and consistent 
with the performance of the official duties of the person making the 
disclosure.
    (11) To international and foreign governmental authorities in 
accordance with law and formal or informal international agreements 
when such disclosure is proper and consistent with the performance of 
the official duties of the person making the disclosure.
    (12) To appropriate agencies, entities, and persons when (a) TSA 
suspects or has confirmed that the security or confidentiality of 
information in the system of records has been compromised; (b) TSA has 
determined that as a result of the suspected or confirmed compromise 
there is a risk of harm to economic or property interests, identity 
theft or fraud, or harm to the security or integrity of this system or 
other systems or programs (whether maintained by TSA or another agency 
or entity) that rely upon the compromised information; and (c) the 
disclosure made to such agencies, entities, and persons is reasonably 
necessary to assist in connection with TSA's efforts to respond to the 
suspected or confirmed compromise and prevent, minimize, or remedy such 
harm.
    (13) To appropriate federal, state, local, tribal, or foreign 
governmental agencies or multilateral governmental organizations, 
including the World Health Organization, for purposes of assisting such 
agencies or organizations in preventing exposure to or transmission of 
communicable or quarantinable disease or for combating other 
significant public health threats; appropriate notice will be provided 
of any identified health threat or risk.

DISCLOSURE TO CONSUMER REPORTING AGENCIES:
    None.

POLICIES AND PRACTICES FOR STORING, RETRIEVING, ACCESSING, RETAINING 
AND DISPOSING OF RECORDS IN THE SYSTEM:
STORAGE:
    Records are maintained at the Transportation Security 
Administration, 601 South 12th Street, Arlington, VA, and at other 
secure TSA facilities in Annapolis Junction, Maryland and Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. Records also may be maintained at the secured 
facilities of contractors or other parties that perform functions under 
the Secure Flight program. The records are stored on magnetic disc, 
tape, digital media, and CD-ROM, and may also be retained in hard copy 
format in secure file folders or safes.

RETRIEVABILITY:
    Data are retrievable by the individual's name or other identifier, 
as well as non-identifying information such as itinerary.

SAFEGUARDS:
    All records are protected from unauthorized access through 
appropriate administrative, physical, and technical safeguards. The 
system is also protected through a multi-layer security approach. The 
protective strategies are physical, technical, administrative, and 
environmental in nature. The system has role-based access control to 
sensitive data, physical access control to DHS facilities, auditing 
software, and confidentiality of communications, including encryption, 
authentication of sending parties, compartmentalizing databases. 
Personnel is conducted screening to ensure that all personnel with 
access to data are screened through background investigations 
commensurate with the level of access required to perform their duties.
    Information in this system is safeguarded in accordance with 
applicable rules and policies, including any applicable TSA and DHS 
automated systems security and access policies. The system will be in 
compliance with Office of Management and Budget and National Institute 
of Standards and Technology guidance. Access to the computer system 
containing the records in this system of records is limited to those 
individuals who require it to perform their official duties. The 
computer system also maintains a real-time audit of individuals who 
access the system.

RETENTION AND DISPOSAL:
    Records relating to an individual determined by the automated 
matching process to be neither a match nor or potential match to a 
watchlist will be destroyed within seven days after completion of the 
last leg of the individual's directional travel itinerary. Records 
relating to an individual determined by the automated matching process 
to be a potential watch list match will be retained for seven years 
after the completion of the individual's directional travel itinerary. 
Records relating to an individual determined to be a confirmed 
watchlist match will be retained for 99 years after the date of match 
confirmation.
    Lists of individuals stored in Secure Flight, such as individuals 
identified as Known Travelers and individuals who

[[Page 69496]]

have been disqualified from eligibility to receive expedited screening 
as a result of their involvement in certain security incidents, will be 
deleted or destroyed when superseded by an updated list.

SYSTEM MANAGER(S) AND ADDRESS:
    Secure Flight Mission Support Branch Manager, Transportation 
Security Administration, TSA-19, 601 South 12th Street, Arlington, VA 
20598-6019.

NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE:
    To determine whether this system contains records relating to you, 
write to the Freedom of Information Act Office, Transportation Security 
Administration, TSA-20, 601 South 12th Street, Arlington, VA 20598-
6020.

RECORDS ACCESS PROCEDURES:
    Requests for records access must be in writing and should be 
addressed to the Freedom of Information Act Office, Transportation 
Security Administration, TSA-20, 601 South 12th Street, Arlington, VA 
20598-6020. Requests should conform to the requirements of 6 CFR Part 
5, Subpart B, which provides the rules for requesting access to Privacy 
Act records maintained by DHS. The envelope and letter should be 
clearly marked ``Privacy Act Access Request.'' The request should 
include a general description of the records sought and must include 
the requester's full name, current address, and date and place of 
birth. The request must be signed and either notarized or submitted 
under penalty of perjury. Some information may be exempt from access 
provisions. An individual who is the subject of a record in this system 
may access those records that are not exempt from disclosure. A 
determination whether a record may be accessed will be made at the time 
a request is received.
    Individuals who believe they have been improperly denied entry by 
CBP, refused boarding for transportation, or identified for additional 
screening may submit a redress request through the DHS Traveler Redress 
Program (``TRIP'') (see 72 FR 2294, January 18, 2007). TRIP is a single 
point of contact for individuals who have inquiries or seek resolution 
regarding difficulties they experienced during their travel screening 
at transportation hubs--like airports and train stations or crossing 
U.S. borders. Through TRIP, a traveler can correct erroneous data 
stored in Secure Flight and other data stored in other DHS databases 
through one application. Additionally, for further information on the 
Secure Flight program and the redress options please see the 
accompanying Privacy Impact Assessment for Secure Flight published on 
the DHS Web site at www.dhs.gov/privacy. Redress requests should be 
sent to: DHS Traveler Redress Inquiry Program (TRIP), TSA-901, 601 
South 12th Street, Arlington, VA 20598-6036 or online at http://www.dhs.gov/trip.

CONTESTING RECORDS PROCEDURES:
    Same as ``Notification Procedure'' and ``Record Access Procedure'' 
above.

RECORD SOURCE CATEGORIES:
    Information contained in the system is obtained from U.S. aircraft 
operators, foreign air carriers, the owners and operators of leased or 
charter aircraft with a maximum take-off weight over 12,500 pounds who 
request TSA screening, the TSC, TSA employees, airport operators, 
Federal executive branch agencies, Federal judicial and legislative 
branch entities, State, local, international, and other governmental 
agencies, private entities for Known Traveler program participants, and 
the individuals to whom the records in the system pertain.

EXEMPTIONS CLAIMED FOR THE SYSTEM:
    No exemption will be asserted with respect to identifying 
information, or flight information, obtained from passengers, non-
travelers, and aircraft owners or operators.
    This system, however, may contain records or information recompiled 
from or created from information contained in other systems of records 
that are exempt from certain provisions of the Privacy Act. For these 
records or information only, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2) and 
(k)(2), TSA claims the following exemptions for these records or 
information from subsections (c)(3) and (4); (d)(1), (2), (3), and (4); 
(e)(1), (2), (3), (4)(G) through (I), (5), and (8); (f); and (g) of the 
Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, as necessary and appropriate to 
protect such information. Certain portions or all of these records may 
be exempt from disclosure pursuant to these exemptions.

    Dated: November 6, 2012.
Jonathan R. Cantor,
Chief Privacy Officer, Acting, Department of Homeland Security.
[FR Doc. 2012-28058 Filed 11-16-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 9110-05-P