[Federal Register Volume 78, Number 207 (Friday, October 25, 2013)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 63823-63845]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2013-24346]



========================================================================
Rules and Regulations
                                                Federal Register
________________________________________________________________________

This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents 
having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed 
to and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations, which is published 
under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510.

The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. 
Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each 
week.

========================================================================


Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 207 / Friday, October 25, 2013 / 
Rules and Regulations

[[Page 63823]]



DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

10 CFR Parts 429 and 430

[Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-TP-0026]
RIN 1904-AC29


Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Television Sets

AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of 
Energy.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: On January 19, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 
issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) to establish a new test 
procedure for television sets (TVs). Based on comments received in 
response to the January 2012 NOPR, DOE performed additional testing and 
proposed amendments to the TV test procedure in its March 12, 2013 
supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNOPR). Following the March 
2013 SNOPR, DOE issues this final rule to establish a new test 
procedure for TVs and respond to any subsequent comments from the March 
2013 SNOPR. This rule resolves issues with the October 1979 TV test 
procedure, repealed by DOE on October 20, 2009, by allowing for 
accurate measurement of the energy consumption of modern TVs.

DATES: The effective date of this final rule is November 25, 2013.
    The incorporation by reference of certain standards in this 
rulemaking is approved by the Director of the Office of the Federal 
Register as of November 25, 2013.

ADDRESSES: The docket, which includes Federal Register notices, public 
meeting attendee lists and transcripts, comments, and other supporting 
documents/materials, is available for review at regulations.gov. All 
documents in the docket are listed in the regulations.gov index. 
However, some documents listed in the index, such as those containing 
information that is exempt from public disclosure, may not be publicly 
available.
    A link to the docket Web page can be found at: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=EERE-2010-BT-TP-0026. This Web 
page will contain a link to the docket for this notice on the 
regulations.gov site. The regulations.gov Web page will contain simple 
instructions on how to access all documents, including public comments, 
in the docket.
    For further information on how to review the docket, contact Ms. 
Brenda Edwards at (202) 586-2945 or by email: 
Brenda.Edwards@ee.doe.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Jeremy Dommu, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency 
and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, EE-2J, 1000 
Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585-0121. Telephone: (202) 
586-9870. Email: televisions@EE.Doe.Gov.
Ms. Celia Sher, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of the General 
Counsel, GC-71, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585-
0121. Telephone: (202) 287-6122. Email: Celia.Sher@hq.doe.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This final rule incorporates by reference 
into part 430 the following industry standards:
    (1) CEA-770.3-D, Consumer Electronics Association, High Definition 
TV Analog Component Video Interface, approved February 2008.
    CEA standards can be purchased from the Consumer Electronic 
Association, 1-800-699-9277, 1-734-780-8000, or http://www.techstreet.com/info/cea.tmpl.
    (2) HDMI Specification Version 1.0, High-Definition Multimedia 
Interface Licensing, LLC, High-Definition Multimedia Interface 
Specification, Informational Version 1.0, published September 4, 2003.
    HDMI standards can be purchased from HDMI Licensing, LLC, 1140 East 
Arques, Suite 100 Sunnyvale, CA 94085, or http://www.hdmi.org/contact/index.aspx.
    (3) IEC Standard 933-5:1992, International Electrotechnical 
Commission, Audio, video and audiovisual systems--Interconnections and 
matching values--Part 5: Y/C connector for video systems--Electrical 
matching values and description of the connector, First Edition 1992-
12. (Note: IEC 933-5 is also known as IEC 60933-5.)
    (4) IEC Standard 62087:2011, International Electrotechnical 
Commission, Methods of measurement of the power consumption of audio, 
video, and related equipment, Edition 3.0, 2011-04.
    IEC standards can be purchased from the International 
Electrotechnical Commission, 3 rue de Varembr[eacute], P.O. Box 131, 
CH-1211 Geneva 20-Switzerland, or http://www.iec.ch.
    (5) ITU-R BT.470-6, International Telecommunication Union, 
Conventional Television Systems, published November 1998.
    ITU standards are freely available from the International 
Telecommunication Union, http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/publications/Pages/default.aspx.
    (6) SMPTE 170M-2004, SMPTE Standard for Television--Composite 
Analog Video Signal--NTSC for Studio Applications, approved November 
20, 2004.
    SMPTE standards can be purchased from the Society of Motion Picture 
and Television Engineers, 3 Barker Ave. 5th Floor, White Plains, NY 
10601, http://www.techstreet.com/products/1228846.

Table of Contents

I. Authority and Background
    A. General
    B. Test Procedure Rulemaking Process
    C. Rulemaking Background
II. Summary of the Final Rule
III. Discussion
    A. Incorporated Industry Test Procedures
    B. Products Covered by the Proposed Test Procedure
    C. Definitions
    1. Television Sets
    2. On Mode
    3. Video Inputs
    4. Picture Setting
    5. Definitions Incorporated by IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0
    D. Measurement Equipment
    1. Power Meter Requirements
    2. Luminance Meter Requirements
    E. General Test Set-up
    1. Nominal Voltage and Frequency of the Region
    2. International Unit Harmonization
    3. Dark Room Conditions
    4. Automatic Brightness Control Sensor Configuration
    5. Network Connection
    6. Configuration of Special Functions
    7. Video Input Device Configuration

[[Page 63824]]

    8. Requirements Incorporated From IEC 62087
    F. Steady State Requirement for On Mode Power Measurements
    G. On Mode
    H. On Mode With ABC Enabled
    1. ABC Illuminance Values
    2. Test Set-Up
    3. Infrared and Ultraviolet Blocking Filter
    4. Neutral Density Filter
    5. Lamp Specification
    I. Luminance Test
    J. Standby Mode
    1. Standby-Passive Mode
    2. Standby-Active, Low Mode
    3. Standby-Active, High Mode
    K. Off Mode
    L. Sampling Plan
    M. Output Metrics
    N. Represented Power Values
    O. Annual Energy Consumption Metric
    1. On Mode
    2. Standby Mode
    3. Off Mode
IV. Procedural Issues and Regulatory Review
    A. Review Under Executive Order 12866
    B. Review Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act
    C. Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995
    D. Review Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969
    E. Review Under Executive Order 13132
    F. Review Under Executive Order 12988
    G. Review Under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995
    H. Review Under the Treasury and General Government 
Appropriations Act, 1999
    I. Review Under Executive Order 12630
    J. Review Under Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 2001
    K. Review Under Executive Order 13211
    L. Review Under Section 32 of the Federal Energy Administration 
Act of 1974
    M. Congressional Notification
V. Approval of the Office of the Secretary

I. Authority and Background

A. General

    Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (42 
U.S.C. 6291, et seq.; ``EPCA'' or, ``the Act'') sets forth a variety of 
provisions designed to improve energy efficiency. (All references to 
EPCA refer to the statute as amended through the American Energy 
Manufacturing Technical Corrections Act (AEMTCA), Public Law 112-210 
(Dec. 18, 2012)). Part B of title III, which for editorial reasons was 
redesignated as Part A upon incorporation into the U.S. Code (42 U.S.C. 
6291-6309, as codified), establishes the ``Energy Conservation Program 
for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles.'' These include 
television sets, the subject of today's final rule. (42 U.S.C. 
6292(a)(12))
    Under EPCA, the energy conservation program consists essentially of 
four parts: (1) Testing, (2) labeling, (3) Federal energy conservation 
standards, and (4) certification and enforcement procedures. The 
testing requirements consist of test procedures that manufacturers of 
covered products must use as the basis for (1) certifying to DOE that 
their products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards 
adopted under EPCA, and (2) making representations about the efficiency 
of those products. Similarly, DOE must use these test procedures to 
determine whether the products comply with any relevant standards 
promulgated under EPCA.

B. Test Procedure Rulemaking Process

    Under 42 U.S.C. 6293, EPCA sets forth the criteria and procedures 
DOE must follow when prescribing or amending test procedures for 
covered products. EPCA provides that any test procedures prescribed or 
amended under this section shall be reasonably designed to produce test 
results which measure energy efficiency, energy use or estimated annual 
operating cost of a covered product during a representative average use 
cycle or period of use and shall not be unduly burdensome to conduct. 
(42 U.S.C. 6293(b)(3))
    In addition, if DOE determines that a test procedure amendment is 
warranted, it must publish proposed test procedures and offer the 
public an opportunity to present oral and written comments on them. (42 
U.S.C. 6293(b)(2)) Finally, in any rulemaking to amend a test 
procedure, DOE must determine to what extent, if any, the proposed test 
procedure would alter the measured energy efficiency of any covered 
product as determined under the existing test procedure. (42 U.S.C. 
6293(e)(1)) If DOE determines that the amended test procedure would 
alter the measured efficiency of a covered product, DOE must amend the 
applicable energy conservation standard accordingly. (42 U.S.C. 
6293(e)(2))
    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), 
Public Law 110-140 (Dec. 19, 2007) amended EPCA to require DOE to 
implement a standby and off mode energy consumption measurement, if 
technically feasible, in test procedures where not previously present. 
Otherwise, DOE must prescribe a separate standby and off mode energy 
test procedure, if technically feasible. 42 U.S.C. 6295(gg)(2)(A). EISA 
2007 also requires any final rule to establish or revise a standard for 
a covered product, adopted after July 1, 2010, to incorporate standby 
mode and off mode energy use into a single amended or new standard, if 
feasible. 42 U.S.C. 6295(gg)(3)(A). DOE recognizes that the standby and 
off mode conditions of operation apply to TVs. In response to this 
requirement, DOE adopts provisions in the test procedures to address 
standby and off mode as discussed in sections III.J and III.K of this 
rulemaking.
    Today's rule also fulfills DOE's obligation to periodically review 
its test procedures under 42 U.S.C. 6293(b)(1)(A). DOE anticipates that 
its next evaluation of this test procedure will occur in a manner 
consistent with the timeline set out in this provision.

C. Rulemaking Background

    In May 2008, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) and the 
California Energy Commission (CEC) petitioned DOE to repeal its TV test 
procedure, promulgated on June 29, 1979, as, among other things, it was 
no longer appropriate for measuring the energy consumption of modern 
TVs.\1\ CEC cited the Digital Transition and Public Safety Act of 2005 
as a main contributor for their request to repeal the test 
procedure.\2\ The act mandated that as of June 12, 2009, all TV 
broadcasts must be transmitted digitally, transitioning from analog 
broadcasts which were formally used for all over the air TV 
broadcasts.\3\ The October 1979 test procedure relied solely on analog 
test signals for test content and was geared heavily for older screen 
technologies like cathode ray tubes (CRT) which made it increasingly 
obsolete. CEA also highlighted the work of the International 
Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) in the standard IEC 62087 Ed. 1.0 
``Methods of measurement for the power consumption of audio, video, and 
related equipment'' as a test procedure more suitable for the power 
consumption of modern TVs. 74 FR 53641.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ See Energy Conservation Program: Repeal of Test Procedures 
for Televisions. 74 FR 53640 (Oct. 20, 2009). http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/pdfs/74fr53640.pdf.
    \2\ Chamberlain, William M., ``Petition of the California Energy 
Commission to Repeal the Test Method for Television Sets in 10 
C.F.R. Part 430 Subpart B.'' May 23, 2008.  http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2008rulemaking/documents/2008-05-15_workshop/other/Petition_Of_The_CEC_To_Repeal_The_Test_Method_For_Television_Sets_In_10_CFr_Part_430_Subpart_B.pdf.
    \3\ Digital transition mandated by Public Safety Act of 2005 
http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/digitaltv.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On October 20, 2009, DOE repealed the TV test procedure and then 
began a rulemaking process designed to resolve the issues of the former 
test procedure. 74 FR 53640. As a first step in the rulemaking process, 
DOE published a request for information and request for comment 
document (RFI) on September 3, 2010. 75 FR 54048 (September 2010 RFI). 
In the September 2010 RFI, DOE

[[Page 63825]]

evaluated current industry test procedures and requested comment from 
stakeholders. Following stakeholders' initial comments, DOE published a 
NOPR which outlined the proposed television test procedure. 77 FR 2830 
(January 19, 2012) (the January 2012 NOPR). In the January 2012 NOPR, 
DOE proposed power consumption tests for on mode, standby-active, high 
mode, standby-passive mode, and off mode, as well as a luminance test 
for the home and retail picture setting. In March 2013, DOE published a 
SNOPR to amend the proposed test procedure and to clarify the intent of 
the January 2012 NOPR. 78 FR 15808 (March 12, 2013) (the March 2013 
SNOPR). The most notable amendments included: (1) The removal of the 
standby-active, high mode test, (2) the addition of the standby-active, 
low mode test, (3) the addition of specificity to the on mode test with 
automatic brightness control (ABC) enabled by default, and (4) the 
revised picture setting structure for the luminance test. DOE addresses 
all comments and clarifies the adopted test procedure in today's final 
rule.

II. Summary of the Final Rule

    Today's final rule adopts a new test procedure for TVs. This test 
procedure is designed to resolve the issues which prompted DOE to 
repeal the previous test procedure. This test procedure adopts tests 
for active (on mode), standby mode, off mode, and screen luminance 
measurements. The data obtained through this test procedure includes 
the power consumption measurements for all available modes of 
operation, power factor measurements in on mode, screen luminance 
values, and an annual energy consumption metric based on the power 
consumption of individual modes of operation. The adopted tests are 
based on stakeholder comments in response to the September 2010 RFI, 
January 2012 NOPR, and March 2013 SNOPR as well as DOE testing. 
Throughout the rulemaking process, DOE performed several rounds of 
testing to ensure the adopted tests are repeatable and reproducible.

III. Discussion

A. Incorporated Industry Test Procedures

    In preparation for the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE participated as an 
observing member of the CEA working group meetings regarding TV energy 
consumption (CEA R4 WG13) to gain a better understanding of industry's 
position on TV test procedures. DOE based many of its proposals from 
the March 2013 SNOPR on Draft version 3.5 of the CEA-2037-A standard 
(October 11, 2012), ``Determination of Television Average Power 
Consumption''. CEA, Sharp, and Panasonic commented that DOE should 
incorporate by reference the draft version 3.5 of CEA-2037-A as the DOE 
test procedure in an effort to harmonize between DOE, industry, and 
international test procedures (CEA, No. 72 at p. 2; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 
1; Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 1). However, as of today, CEA-2037-A is 
still in draft form and has not yet been finalized. DOE believes it 
would not be appropriate to reference by incorporation a test method 
that is still undergoing changes and has not been made publically 
available. Therefore, while DOE continues to base its test procedure 
requirements on draft version 3.5 of the CEA-2037-A test method into 
today's final rule, DOE is not incorporating these sections by 
reference.
    Additionally, CEA, Panasonic, and Sharp also commented that DOE 
should incorporate requirements from IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 in its test 
procedure (CEA, No. 72 at p. A-6; Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 7; Sharp, No. 
68 at p. 3). DOE agrees with these comments and incorporates many of 
today's requirements from IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0. DOE believes that these 
concepts closely align with those proposed in CEA's draft version 3.5 
of CEA-2037-A and will ensure compatibility between the DOE test 
procedure and industry standards. DOE also recognizes the importance of 
harmonizing with industry and international test procedures, and takes 
action by incorporating many industry requirements by reference in 
today's final rule. DOE is aware that industry and international test 
procedures are in development, and DOE will consider amending this test 
procedure to further harmonize with these industry test procedures once 
any ongoing efforts are finalized.

B. Products Covered by the Proposed Test Procedure

    Following the public meeting for the March 2013 SNOPR, California 
Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOU), CEA, Northwest Energy Efficiency 
Alliance (NEEA), Panasonic, and Sharp commented that many of the 
definitions in the proposed TV test procedure contained scoping 
criteria and requirements that are more suitable for the scope of 
coverage and product configuration sections, specifically in reference 
to the definition for television sets (CA IOU, No. 71 at p. 2; CEA, No. 
72 at p. A-4; NEEA, No. 66 at p. 2; Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 2; Sharp, 
No. 68 at p. 2). NEEA commented that while it agreed with this 
parameter, defining a TV as a product with a diagonal screen size of 
15'' or larger may have unintended future consequences (NEEA, No. 66 at 
p. 2). CEA also commented that restricting the screen size of a TV is 
not appropriate for a definition (CEA, No. 72 at p. A-4). CA IOU 
suggested that the size requirement be moved to scope of coverage 
rather than including it in the definition of a TV (CA IOU, No. 71 at 
p. 2). DOE agrees with these comments and believes that the screen size 
requirement should be moved from the definition of a television set and 
included as part of the scope of the rule, in section 1 of Appendix H 
to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. This change allows for a more 
inclusive definition of a television set, because it is no longer 
limited to having a screen size of 15 inches or greater. DOE believes 
that updating the definition allows greater flexibility for other 
regulating bodies and for future use by DOE. While the definition of a 
television set no longer contains the provision that the screen size is 
15 inches or greater, DOE updates the applicability of the test 
procedure adopted in today's final rule to only those televisions 
having a screen size of 15 inches or greater.
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE also defined a TV as a product that is 
``designed to be powered primarily by mains power . . .'' Following the 
public meeting for the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE received comment from 
Panasonic suggesting that ``primarily'' be replaced with ``solely'' to 
exclude battery powered TVs from the scope of this rulemaking 
(Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 2). Sharp commented that the terms `main 
battery' and `auxiliary battery' should be defined to help clarify the 
product coverage of this rulemaking (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 2). DOE agrees 
with these comments and has added definitions for `main battery' and 
`auxiliary battery' to section 2 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR 
part 430. A main battery is defined as a battery capable of powering 
the TV to produce dynamic video without support of mains power and an 
auxiliary battery is defined as a battery capable of powering a clock 
or retaining TV settings but incapable of powering the TV to produce 
dynamic video. DOE clarifies that the proposed definition of a 
television in the March 2013 SNOPR was designed to exclude TVs capable 
of being powered by a main battery from the rulemaking but not to 
exclude TVs with auxiliary batteries. While the definition of a 
television set no longer contains the provision that it must designed 
to be powered primarily by mains power, DOE updates the

[[Page 63826]]

applicability of the test procedure adopted in today's final rule to 
only those televisions that are powered by mains power (including TVs 
with auxiliary batteries but not TVs with main batteries).
    Sharp also suggested that TVs with non-removable main batteries 
should not be tested while TVs with removable main batteries should be 
tested (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 2). DOE believes that testing TVs that have 
main batteries may result in energy consumption values that are not 
appropriate for these products due to a different usage profile. Main 
battery-powered TVs are typically designed for portability and are not 
intended to be used for several hours a day with their batteries 
removed. Additionally, these products represent a limited cross-section 
of the TV market. DOE believes including main battery-powered devices 
would create unnecessary test burden and result in atypical energy 
consumption measurements for these products. While DOE believes these 
products still meet the definition of a TV, they follow a different 
usage profile than products that fall under the scope of this 
rulemaking.
    However, DOE believes TVs that have auxiliary batteries should be 
included within the scope of coverage of this test procedure. DOE 
believes that nearly all TVs have at least one auxiliary battery and 
this clarification does not change the scope of this rulemaking.
    In today's final rule, DOE clarifies its position for TVs powered 
by mains and batteries as part of the scope of coverage rather than the 
definition of a television set. DOE also clarifies that TVs powered by 
main batteries shall be excluded from today's rule, while TVs with 
auxiliary batteries shall be included in the scope for today's 
rulemaking, located in section 1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR 
part 430.

C. Definitions

1. Television Sets
    As discussed in section III.B of this rule, DOE has updated the 
scope of coverage to incorporate elements formerly proposed in the TV 
definition. As a result, DOE broadened the TV definition, located in 10 
CFR 430.2, to mean a product designed to produce dynamic video, 
contains an internal TV tuner encased within the product housing, and 
that is capable of receiving dynamic visual content from wired or 
wireless sources.
    The scope of coverage includes a requirement for a minimum screen 
size as well as an exclusion for TVs powered by a main battery. These 
limitations in scope are consistent with the limitations previously 
proposed in the TV definition in the March 2013 SNOPR. Moving these 
requirements to the scope of coverage allows for a broader definition 
of a TV that is consistent with industry practice while retaining the 
more narrow scope of coverage proposed under the January 2012 NOPR and 
the March 2013 SNOPR.
    DOE also notes that the internal TV tuner requirement proposed in 
the March 2013 SNOPR is still appropriate for the TV definition. 78 FR 
15811. In the All-Channel Receiver Act, the Federal Communication 
Commission (FCC) has the authority to require that all products 
marketed as a TV shall include a TV tuner within the product housing. 
47 U.S.C. 303(s). A TV tuner is a key defining characteristic between 
TVs, displays, and digital picture frames, and as discussed in the 
January 2012 NOPR, the convergence of these products makes 
distinguishing their features critical for this rulemaking. Thus, DOE 
believes that a TV tuner is necessary for the definition of a TV. NEEA 
commented that they support a TV tuner requirement for the definition 
of a TV (NEEA, No. 66 at p. 2). As part of today's final rule, DOE 
adopts the updated definition of a television set in 10 CFR 430.2 in 
response to comments from the March 2013 SNOPR.
2. On Mode
    In response to the March 2013 SNOPR, Panasonic commented that the 
definition of on mode should be updated from ``providing one or more 
principle functions'' to ``providing both picture and sound'' 
(Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 7). Although DOE agrees that this language 
would clarify the intent of a `principle function', DOE does not 
believe sound should be included as a principle function. DOE does not 
require that a TV produce sound under the scope of this rulemaking and 
believes this change may inadvertently exclude TVs that do not have 
speakers. DOE agrees with the Panasonic's intentions of clarifying the 
primary functions of a TV and therefore updates this language in the 
definition of on mode to ``producing dynamic video'' in section 2.14 of 
Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
3. Video Inputs
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed definitions for video inputs 
as a way to clearly specify the connection between the TV and the video 
input device. 78 FR 15812-15813. These definitions were based on 
industry standards and harmonized with the Set-top Box (STB) Test 
Procedure NOPR. Docket No. EERE-2-12-BT-TP-0046, 78 FR 5076. Sharp 
provided comment on the proposed video input definitions, specifically 
High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI), S-video, composite video, 
and component video. Sharp agrees with the definition for HDMI but 
recommends that the HDMI connection should be compatible with all HDMI 
versions (Sharp, No, 68 at p. 6). DOE agrees with this comment and 
clarifies the definition of HDMI in 10 CFR 430.2 by requiring that the 
video input must at least meet HDMI Version 1.0, but accepts higher 
versions as they are backwards compatible. DOE recognizes that next 
generation versions of this format will be released, but the criteria 
in version 1.0 meets the minimum requirements to measure the power 
consumption of this test procedure. Additionally, DOE does not believe 
that it is necessary to require updated HDMI versions that have been 
updated with capabilities not tested in this procedure such as 3D and 
4k resolution.
    In response to the S-video definition, Sharp commented that S-video 
should be defined according to IEC 60933-5 (Sharp, No, 68 at p. 7). IEC 
60933-5 is consistent with DOE's definition in the March 2013 SNOPR, 
and including this reference can help to clarify this video input 
connection. DOE agrees with Sharp's comment and updates the definition 
of S-video in 10 CFR 420.2 to reference IEC 60933-5.
    Sharp commented that the composite video definition should use the 
SMPTE 170 M standard for 60 Hz signals and ITU BT.470-6 standard for 50 
Hz signals (Sharp, No, 68 at p. 6). In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE 
proposed that the composite video input should use the National 
Television System Committee (NTSC) format for a 60 Hz signal. Although 
NTSC is the correct format for a 60 Hz video signal, DOE agrees that 
using the SMTPE is more appropriate because it is a standard. 
Additionally, adding a standard for a 50 Hz signal allows this test 
procedure to be used internationally. Thus, DOE clarifies the SMPTE and 
ITU standards to be used in the definition of composite video in 10 CFR 
430.2.
    Sharp commented that they support the definition for component 
video proposed in the March 2013 SNOPR, and therefore DOE retains its 
proposal and adopts this definition for component video in 10 CFR 430.2 
(Sharp, No. 68 at p. 6).
    CEA also provided comment on the video input definitions, and 
suggested, along with Sharp, that the definition for direct video 
connection should be removed because it is not used in the test 
procedure (CEA, No. 72 at p. A-5;

[[Page 63827]]

Sharp, No. 68 at p. 6). DOE originally proposed this definition to 
harmonize with the STB video input definitions proposed in the STB test 
procedure NOPR. Docket No. EERE-2-12-BT-TP-0046, 78 FR 5076. Because 
DOE did not use the term in the TV test procedure, DOE agrees with 
commenters and removes the definition for direct video connection from 
today's final rule. DOE also clarifies that symbol definitions for 
videocassette recorder (VCR), Lratio, and light measuring 
device (LMD) have been removed because these terms are no longer used 
in the test procedure.
4. Picture Setting
    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed definitions for home and 
retail picture settings to create a picture setting structure 
consistent with the ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Televisions, 
Version 4.1 (ENERGY STAR v. 4.1). 77 FR 2837. These definitions 
established a picture setting structure as depicted in Figure 1. In 
preparation of the January 2012 NOPR, DOE performed testing and 
discovered a TV that was unable to enter the retail picture setting 
after selecting the home picture setting. DOE was concerned that that 
this issue would prevent the luminance test from being performed on 
certain TVs, and therefore DOE proposed that the retail picture setting 
luminance measurement shall be performed first, followed by the home 
picture setting. Additionally, the on mode test would be performed 
after the luminance test so that the home picture setting would not 
need to be changed between tests. The proposed testing order was 
slightly different from other industry test procedures, which tested on 
mode before luminance. DOE found this difference necessary to ensure 
that all TVs were capable of entering both the home and retail picture 
settings for the luminance test.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.001

    In response to the January 2012 NOPR picture setting proposals, 
Sharp commented that the retail picture setting may not be the 
brightest picture setting as defined in the January 2012 NOPR (Sharp, 
No. 45 at p. 2). Sharp also commented that the proposed testing order 
could lead to double testing for manufacturers that test their products 
with multiple test procedures (Sharp, No. 45 at p. 3). Panasonic 
suggested that either the brightest selectable picture setting or the 
retail picture setting should be tested as the picture setting that 
measures the highest luminance in on mode (Panasonic No. 50 at p. 2). 
NEEA recommended that the retail picture setting should be defined as 
the picture setting which produces the highest attainable luminance 
from a factory defined menu option (NEEA No. 43 at p. 2). Mitsubishi 
Electric Visual Solutions America, Inc. (MEVSA) commented that `preset 
picture setting' should be defined to help clarify the retail picture 
setting definition (MEVSA, No. 44 at p. 5).
    Based on these comments, DOE proposed a definition in the March 
2013 SNOPR for the brightest selectable preset picture setting as the 
picture setting which produces the highest luminance during on mode. 78 
FR 15813-15815. The luminance of this picture setting was also measured 
instead of the retail picture setting (see Figure 2). Additionally, DOE 
clarified that the brightest selectable preset picture setting was only 
available from within the home menu. Once DOE proposed that the 
brightest selectable preset picture setting be measured within the home 
menu, `home picture setting' was no longer an appropriate term for 
measuring the default screen luminance. DOE therefore replaced the term 
`home picture setting' with the term `default picture setting' (which 
maintained the same meaning as had been previously given to `home 
picture setting') to measure the default screen luminance. DOE also 
proposed a definition for preset picture setting to help distinguish 
these picture settings within the home menu. The proposed testing 
structure no longer tested picture settings in the retail menu, and DOE 
was able to harmonize the test order with other industry procedures. 
Thus, the new testing order in the March 2013 SNOPR tested on mode in 
the default picture setting followed by the luminance test in the 
default and brightest selectable preset picture setting. NRDC and Sharp 
commented that they support the definition for brightest selectable 
preset picture setting (NRDC, No. 64 at p. 4; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 3). 
Additionally, Panasonic and Sharp commented that they support the 
definition for default picture setting (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 3; 
Sharp, No. 68 at p. 3).

[[Page 63828]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.002

    Based on DOE's proposal in the March 2013 SNOPR, CA IOU, CEA, and 
NEEA recommended that DOE broaden its definition of preset picture 
setting to include picture settings within the retail menu (CA IOU, No. 
71 at p. 3; CEA, No. 72 at p. A-7; NEEA, No. 66 at p. 2). Broadening 
the definition for preset picture setting allows the brightest 
selectable preset picture setting to be found in either the home or 
retail menu. Panasonic, Sharp, and CEA also commented that `home mode', 
`retail mode', and `forced menu' should be defined to help clarify the 
picture setting structure (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 3; Sharp, No. 68 at 
p. 3; CEA, No. 72 at p. A-8). DOE agrees with these comments and adopts 
definitions for `home configuration', `retail configuration', and 
`forced menu' in today's final rule.
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, although DOE did not include definitions 
for `home mode' and `retail mode', these terms were discussed in the 
preamble as `home menu' and `retail menu'. DOE intentionally avoided 
using the term `mode' to prevent confusion with the modes of operation. 
Although this is still a concern, DOE believes that defining similar 
terms would be beneficial by clearly describing the picture setting 
structure. DOE therefore adopts the terms ``home configuration'', 
``retail configuration'', and ``forced menu'' in sections 2.6, 2.16, 
and 2.5 respectively of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. The 
picture setting structure adopted in today's final rule can also be 
seen in Figure 3. When developing this picture setting structure, DOE 
determined that `configuration' would be more appropriate to describe 
the function of the `home' and `retail' than the term `menu', since 
these selections do not present their own sub-menus.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.003


[[Page 63829]]


    Throughout this rulemaking, DOE has received many comments 
highlighting the difficulties of defining a single picture setting that 
exhibits the highest screen luminance value for all TVs. To mitigate 
this issue, DOE adopts a picture setting structure which defines both 
the brightest selectable preset picture setting within the home 
configuration and the default picture setting within the retail 
configuration. This structure is designed to measure the brightest 
picture setting of the TV regardless of whether it is in the home or 
retail configuration. Thus, DOE adopts the definitions for the 
brightest selectable preset picture setting and the default picture 
setting in sections 2.3 and 2.4 respectively of Appendix H to subpart B 
of 10 CFR part 430. DOE also notes that the picture setting structure 
depicted in Figure 3 only applies to TVs that have a forced menu, 
rather than all TVs. For TVs with a forced menu, the luminance test 
measures the screen luminance of three defined picture settings. For 
TVs that do not have a forced menu, the luminance test measures the 
screen luminance of two defined picture settings, as shown in Figure 4. 
The adopted luminance test can be found in section 7.4 of Appendix H to 
subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.004

5. Definitions Incorporated by IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed that the definitions and 
configuration requirements for additional and special functions be 
incorporated by reference from IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0. 78 FR 15812. 
Panasonic and Sharp agreed with these proposals, and therefore DOE 
adopts definitions for additional and special functions in sections 2.1 
and 2.17 respectively of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 
(Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 3; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 2).
    DOE clarifies that the definition of ``TV combination unit'' has 
been removed as part of today's final rule. This term was not used in 
the test procedure and is already included under the definition of 
additional functions as part of section 2.1 of Appendix H to subpart B 
of 10 CFR part 430. CEA also recommended that this definition be 
removed (CEA, No. 72 at p. A-8).

D. Measurement Equipment

1. Power Meter Requirements
    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed power meter requirements 
based on section 5.1.5 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0. 77 FR 2838. These 
requirements specify the type of meter, the measured uncertainty, and 
resolution of the measurements. DOE's proposal differed from IEC 62087 
Ed. 3.0 in that it required the sampling rate of at least 1 measurement 
per second and it required power factor to be measured simultaneous to 
real power. DOE maintained this proposal in the March 2013 SNOPR, and, 
in response, CEA commented that it agrees with these requirements (CEA, 
No. 72 at p. A-9). In today's final rule, DOE adopts these power meter 
requirements as proposed in the March 2013 SNOPR.
2. Luminance Meter Requirements
    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed requirements for luminance 
and illuminance meters under a single requirement for light measurement 
devices. 77 FR 2838-2839. These requirements included an accuracy of 
 2%  2 digits of resolution, a repeatability of 
0.4%  2 digits of resolution, and an acceptance angle of 3 
degrees or less. In response to this proposal, Sharp commented that it 
was in support of these tolerance requirements, while MEVSA and NEEA 
requested that DOE clarify these tolerance requirements (Sharp, No. 45 
at p. 3; MEVSA, No. 44 at p. 29; NEEA, No. 43 at p. 2). In the March 
2013 SNOPR, DOE included an example in the rule language to clarify the 
accuracy requirement of a light measurement device. Additionally, DOE 
reevaluated the overall tolerance requirements and determined that a 
repeatability requirement may not be appropriate for all measurement 
equipment. Thus, in the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE removed the repeatability 
requirement. DOE also determined that it could be misinterpreted in the 
proposed text that the acceptance angle requirement applied to both 
luminance and illuminance meters, which was not the intent. Thus, DOE 
clarified that the acceptance angle requirement is only applicable for 
luminance meters. 78 FR 15815-15816.
    In response to the March 2013 SNOPR, Panasonic commented they were 
in support of the accuracy requirement. (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 
3).Sharp also commented during the SNOPR public meeting that including 
both luminance and illuminance specifications together may be 
confusing, especially when attempting to make a distinction between the 
two (Sharp, No. 65 at p. 173). DOE agrees with these comments and 
separates the light measurement device specification into two 
individual requirements for luminance and illuminance meters in 
sections 3.4 and 3.5 respectively of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR 
part 430. DOE also notes that these separate requirements maintain the 
accuracy requirement proposed in the March 2013 SNOPR.
    Additionally, Sharp and CEA commented that the acceptance angle 
specification for luminance meters should only apply to non-contact 
meters (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 3; CEA, No. 72 at p. A-10). DOE agrees with 
these comments because a contact luminance meter measures screen 
luminance while making contact with the screen and eliminates any 
concern with accepting unwanted light. DOE therefore clarifies that the 
acceptance angle specification for luminance meters is only applicable

[[Page 63830]]

to non-contact luminance meters in today's final rule.

E. General Test Set-up

1. Nominal Voltage and Frequency of the Region
    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed the voltage and frequency 
requirements of 115 V  1%, 60 Hz  1%, and a 
total harmonic distortion (THD) of less than 5%. 77 FR 2838. Panasonic 
recommended that section 5.1.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 be referenced to 
include a voltage and frequency tolerance of  2% and a THD 
of less than 5% (Panasonic, No. 50 at p. 2). DOE believed that the 
tolerance levels set in the January 2012 NOPR were appropriate, but 
also agreed that incorporating a requirement from an industry test 
procedure would be beneficial. Therefore, in the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE 
proposed that the voltage and frequency specifications be incorporated 
by reference from section 4.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0. 78 FR 15815. 
Although Panasonic recommended incorporating section 5.1.1 of IEC 62087 
Ed. 3.0, DOE incorporated IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 to maintain the same 
requirements as the January 2012 NOPR. DOE also harmonized with IEC 
62301 Ed. 2.0 because it includes a table which specifies the nominal 
voltage and frequency by region to allow for international adoption. 
Additionally, DOE clarified that the THD requirement remains the same 
as the January 2012 NOPR proposal, at less than 5%.
    Based on this proposal in the March 2013 SNOPR, Sharp recommended 
that DOE use the term ``rated voltage and frequency'' rather than 
``nominal voltage and frequency'' as this was the intention of IEC in 
IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 3). DOE agrees with this 
recommendation and updates the voltage and frequency requirement to 
specify the rated values of the region and incorporates section 4.3.1 
of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 in section 3.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 
CFR part 430.
2. International Unit Harmonization
    To further harmonize with international standards, Sharp suggested 
that distance be measured in metric rather than imperial units, and 
offered a recommendation of 1.5  0.1 meters (m) for the on 
mode with ABC enabled test set-up (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 5). DOE agrees 
with Sharp's comment because using metric units will limit manufacturer 
burden when testing multiple procedures. DOE also agrees with Sharp's 
distance recommendation of 1.5 m because it is roughly 4.92 feet (ft) 
and falls within the proposed tolerance for the previous 5 ft 
requirement. DOE therefore adopts the use of metric units for all 
distance requirements in today's final rule.
3. Dark Room Conditions
    In response to the January 2012 NOPR, MEVSA recommended that DOE 
clarify dark room conditions (MEVSA, No. 44 at p. 2). Panasonic also 
noted that wall reflectivity of a room may play a role in illuminance 
measurements (Panasonic, No. 50 at p. 4). In response to these 
comments, DOE performed testing to help provide additional 
clarification. In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a definition for a 
dark room that the room illuminance shall not exceed 1.0 lux (lx) 
measured at the ABC sensor. 78 FR 15813. DOE also proposed that the ABC 
sensor shall be at least 2 ft from any wall surface.
    Based on these requirements, CEA agreed with DOE's proposal to 
measure the room illuminance at the ABC sensor (CEA, No. 72 at p. A-6). 
Sharp commented that the requirements for dark room conditions are 
embedded in the definition for a dark room (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 7). DOE 
agrees with Sharp's comment and removes the definition for dark room in 
favor of a requirement for ambient light conditions, located in section 
4.3 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. DOE clarifies that 
this change is purely stylistic and maintains a requirement of no more 
than 1.0 lx measured at the ABC sensor and that the ABC sensor shall be 
no less than 2 ft from any wall surface. DOE also clarifies that `wall 
surfaces' specified in this requirement do not include the surface on 
which the TV stand rests upon nor the rear wall which the back of the 
TV faces. Panasonic supported this proposal (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 
3). Additionally, based on comments addressed in section III.E.2, DOE 
updates the distance requirement in this section from 2 ft to 0.5 m to 
adhere with metric units.
4. Automatic Brightness Control Sensor Configuration
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a requirement to disable the 
ABC sensor for the luminance measurement. 78 FR 15832. Panasonic and 
Sharp commented that some TVs do not have the option to disable the ABC 
sensor from a settings menu, and should be disabled by directing at 
least 300 lx into the sensor (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 4; Sharp, No. 68 
at p. 3). DOE agrees with these comments and clarifies in section 
7.4.1.2 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 that if the ABC 
sensor cannot be disabled through a settings menu, at least 300 lx 
shall be directed into the ABC sensor.
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE also proposed that at least 300 lx 
shall be directed into the ABC sensor during the on mode stabilization 
test. 78 FR 15817. Unlike the luminance test, DOE believes that the ABC 
sensor should not be disabled through the TV menu because it would need 
to be re-enabled in the subsequent on mode test. Sharp commented that 
saturating the ABC sensor by directing at least 300 lx into it would 
achieve repeatable results for all TVs, regardless of whether some TVs 
have the option to disable ABC through a settings menu (Sharp, No. 68 
at p. 3). DOE agrees with Sharp's comment because it promotes a 
repeatable test set-up and avoids the potential for undesired TV menu 
selections. DOE therefore adopts an ABC configuration requirement that 
directs at least 300 lx shall of light into the ABC sensor for the on 
mode stabilization test in section 7.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 
CFR part 430.
5. Network Connection
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a network hierarchy (see 
Table 1) for the standby-active, low mode test. 78 FR 15824. In 
response to this proposal, Panasonic and Sharp commented that only Wi-
Fi and Ethernet connections are appropriate for network-enabled TVs 
(Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 6; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 7). DOE reevaluated 
these connections and determined that 75-ohm coaxial cable and RJ-11 
are commonly used for only hospitality TV networks and are not 
appropriate for network-enabled TV testing. Based on the comments by 
Panasonic and Sharp, DOE adopts a network connection hierarchy which 
includes only Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections (see Table 2) in section 
5.10.2 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.

[[Page 63831]]



         Table 1--March 2013 SNOPR Network Connection Hierarchy
------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Priority                         Connection type
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1............................  Wi-Fi (Institution of Electrical and
                                Electronics Engineers--IEEE 802.11-
                                20072).
2............................  Ethernet (IEEE 802.3). If the TV supports
                                Energy Efficient Ethernet (IEEE 802.3az-
                                20103), then it shall be connected to a
                                device that also supports IEEE 802.3az.
3............................  75-ohm Coaxial Cable.
4............................  RJ-11.
5............................  Other.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                  Table 2--Network Connection Hierarchy
------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Priority                         Connection type
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1............................  Wi-Fi (Institution of Electrical and
                                Electronics Engineers--IEEE 802.11-
                                20072)
2............................  Ethernet (IEEE 802.3). If the TV supports
                                Energy Efficient Ethernet (IEEE 802.3az-
                                20103), then it shall be connected to a
                                device that also supports IEEE 802.3az.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Additionally, DOE clarifies that this network connection hierarchy 
shall also be used for on mode connections. In the March 2013 SNOPR, 
DOE did not explicitly state that a network shall be connected during 
on mode, and therefore DOE clarifies this requirement in section 5.10.2 
of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. Network-enabled TVs 
shall be connected to a network during on mode according to the network 
hierarchy in Table 2.
6. Configuration of Special Functions
    During the public meeting for the January 2012 NOPR, the National 
Resources Defense Council (NRDC) brought to the Department's attention 
a product that consumed less than 1 W of power in standby-passive mode, 
but when a quick start function was enabled, it consumed 24 W in 
standby-passive mode (NRDC, No. 40 at p. 4). The quick start function 
is designed to significantly decrease the latency between standby mode 
and on mode by keeping the TV in a heightened power state. DOE 
responded to this comment in the March 2013 SNOPR by clarifying that 
quick start is considered to be a special function and therefore would 
be configured as such. 78 FR 15823-15824. Under the special functions 
configuration requirement, if quick start was enabled by default it 
would be tested but if it was disabled by default it would not be 
tested. In response to the March 2013 SNOPR, Panasonic commented that 
they support treating quick start as a special function (Panasonic, No. 
67 at p. 6).
    During the public meeting for the March 2013 SNOPR, NRDC clarified 
their previous comments on quick start by elaborating that a specific 
TV prompted the user to configure the quick start function from a menu, 
rather than just being embedded in a settings menu (NRDC, No. 64 at p. 
3). By requesting a user response, the quick start function is more 
likely to be enabled by the user than if the TV is shipped with this 
function disabled. NEEA, Appliance Standards Awareness Project (ASAP), 
and CA IOU also commented that the quick start function should be 
tested (NEEA, No. 66 at p. 4; ASAP, No. 69 at p. 2; CA IOU, No. 71 at 
p. 5). Sharp suggested language which would capture the power 
consumption of such functions but avoid the possibility of gaming menus 
(Sharp No. 68 at p. 5). DOE believes that the presence of the quick 
start function in a user prompt changes the way a user will treat this 
function, making it more likely that it will be enabled. This scenario 
with the quick start function prompt can be expanded to other special 
functions, such as an image processing function that increases power 
consumption during on mode. Although special function setting options 
have existed in TV menus for some time, DOE believes it is unlikely 
that a consumer will divert from the default settings unless they are 
prompted by the TV. As such, DOE agrees with stakeholder comments and 
adopts a requirement in section 5.5 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 
CFR part 430 that would configure special functions in the most power 
consumptive state when a configuration prompt is displayed.
    DOE clarifies that the selection of the home or retail 
configuration within the forced menu is not considered a special 
functions prompt and shall be configured according to the picture 
setting configuration criteria in section 5.5 of Appendix H to subpart 
B of 10 CFR part 430. Additionally, special functions that may be 
configured within a forced menu should be configured according to 
today's requirement for special functions, which specifies that the 
most power consumptive configuration be selected. In this instance, 
there is no default configuration since the user is prompted to either 
enable or disable the function from a forced menu, and therefore, 
additional guidance is required to configure quick start or other 
special functions that are selected from a forced menu. In cases where 
it is unknown which configuration uses more power, every possible 
configuration is required to be tested. For example, in Figure 5, 
testing would not be required with Eco mode both enabled and disabled 
because not enabling Eco mode is known to consume more power. 
Similarly, if it is known that enabling a special function, such as 
quick start, is more power consumptive, then that function could be 
enabled without the need to measure the power consumption in each 
possible menu configuration.

[[Page 63832]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.005

7. Video Input Device Configuration
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed that the TV shall be tested 
with a video input device of a different manufacturer to avoid device 
communication that can alter the power consumption of the TV. 78 FR 
15816-15817. This requirement was based off the discovery that certain 
TV and Blu-ray disc players of the same manufacturer have the ability 
to communicate with one another. Communication between devices changed 
menu settings and resulted in power variations which increased the 
potential for unrepeatable results. In response to this proposal, CEA 
and Panasonic commented that they are in support of this requirement 
(CEA, No. 72 at p. A-10; Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 4). DOE believes that 
requiring different manufacturers for the TV and the video input device 
will promote a repeatable test procedure, and therefore DOE adopts the 
March 2013 SNOPR proposal for video input devices in section 3.6 of 
Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
8. Requirements Incorporated From IEC 62087
    In response to the January 2012 NOPR, DOE received comment from 
Sharp recommending that DOE include requirements for additional and 
special functions (Sharp, No. 45 at p. 2). Similarly, DOE received 
comment from Panasonic and Sharp that the stabilization requirement 
from section 11.4.2 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 should be used to ensure that 
the TV reaches a steady power state for the on mode test (Panasonic No. 
50 at p. 2; Sharp No. 45 at p. 3). In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE 
proposed general requirements for on mode testing by incorporating 
section 11.4 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0. 78 FR 15832. Although this 
requirement included specifications for stabilization, additional 
functions, and special functions, DOE subsequently included individual 
references for sections 11.4.2 (stabilization), 11.4.5 (additional 
functions), and 11.4.6 (special functions) in the March 2013 SNOPR to 
help clarify its position. In response to the March 2013 SNOPR 
proposals, Sharp commented that a frame rate requirement should be 
included that is compatible with the region (Sharp No. 68 at p. 6). 
While reevaluating the on mode requirements, DOE noted that section 
11.4 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 also included a requirement for frame rate 
that aligned with Sharp's recommendation. Based on comments from the 
January 2012 NOPR and the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE concluded that the 
general on mode requirements incorporated from section 11.4 of section 
62087 Ed. 3.0 may have confused stakeholders and should be clarified in 
today's final rule.
    DOE clarifies these requirements by removing the general reference 
to section 11.4 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 and only referencing individual 
subsections. Based on comments received from the January NOPR and March 
2013 SNOPR, DOE will continue to reference sections 11.4.2 
(stabilization), 11.4.5 (additional functions), and 11.4.6 (special 
functions) in sections 5.1, 5.4, and 7.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 
10 CFR part 430. Additionally, DOE agrees with Sharp's comment on video 
frame rate and incorporates section 11.4.10 (frame rate) by reference 
in section 5.8 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. DOE did 
not receive comment on the remaining subsections of section 11.4 of IEC 
62087 Ed. 3.0 and therefore discusses the impact of these subsections 
on today's final rule.
    Section 11.4.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 specifies ambient temperature 
for on mode testing. In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed these same 
requirements to align with industry accepted testing conditions. 77 FR 
2839. DOE wishes to continue harmonizing with IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 and 
therefore adopts section 11.4.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 in section 4.1 of 
Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. DOE clarifies that this 
reference maintains the same ambient temperature conditions proposed in 
the January 2012 NOPR and March 2013 SNOPR.
    Sections 11.4.3 and 11.4.4 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 specify 
configuration requirements for low noise block power supplies and 
conditional access modules. These functions are not covered as part of 
this rulemaking and therefore do not need to be configured. DOE 
therefore does not incorporate by reference these sections as part of 
today's final rule.
    Sections 11.4.7 and 11.4.8 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 specify 
configuration requirements for the ABC sensor and picture setting 
requirements. DOE has worked with stakeholders to fine tune its 
requirements for the ABC sensor and picture setting structure and 
believes that the adopted requirements ensure repeatable measurements. 
DOE therefore does not incorporate by reference sections 11.4.7 and 
11.4.8 from today's final rule.
    Sections 11.4.9 and 11.4.11 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 specify aspect 
ratio and sound level requirements for on mode testing. DOE agrees that 
these requirements contribute to a repeatable configuration for video 
and sound and therefore incorporates these requirements by reference 
sections 5.7 and 5.9 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
    Finally, section 11.4.12 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 specifies the 
accuracy of input signal levels. This requirement is not appropriate 
for today's test procedure because only video input devices such as 
Blu-ray discTM and DVD players are used to provide the input 
video signal. This requirement is therefore not incorporated by 
reference in today's final rule.
    DOE reiterates that section 11.4 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 was 
originally incorporated by reference in the March 2013 SNOPR for 
general on mode requirements. To clarify this requirement, DOE removes 
the general reference and instead incorporates the following individual 
subsections from 11.4: 11.4.1 (environmental conditions),

[[Page 63833]]

11.4.2 (stabilization), 11.4.5 (additional functions), 11.4.6 (special 
functions), 11.4.9 (aspect ratio), 11.4.10 (frame rate), and section 
11.4.11 (sound level).

F. Steady State Requirement for On Mode Power Measurements

    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed a stabilization test to 
ensure that the TV has reached a steady state in order to produce a 
consistent and repeatable on mode power consumption measurement. This 
test required that all TVs display the IEC dynamic broadcast-content 
video signal for a period of 1 hour and compare each consecutive 10-
minute segment. The TV must meet the stabilization criteria, 
incorporated from section 11.4.2 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0, that the final 
two consecutive 10-minute segments have a percent difference of less 
than 2%. 77 FR 2843. In response to this proposal, Panasonic suggested 
that the stabilization time may be reduced if the TV can be shown to 
stabilize in less than an hour as this is included in the IEC 
stabilization guidelines (Panasonic, No. 50 at p. 2). This would 
potentially reduce the stabilization time by up to 40 minutes, 
requiring that at least two 10-minute segments be compared to ensure a 
stable power measurement. DOE agreed with this comment, and in the 
March 2013 SNOPR proposed that the stabilization time could be reduced 
to only the time required to meet the stabilization criteria. 78 FR 
15817. In response to the March 2013 SNOPR proposal, Panasonic and 
Sharp expressed their support for this update (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 
4; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 3). In section 7.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 
10 CFR part 430, DOE adopts its proposal from the March 2013 SNOPR that 
the stabilization period can be ended once the TV has met the 
stabilization criteria.

G. On Mode

    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed that on mode be tested with 
the Blu-ray disc version of the IEC dynamic broadcast-content video 
signal for a duration of 10 minutes. 77 FR 2839-2840. DOE also 
specified a video input connection hierarchy which tested HDMI/digital 
visual interface (DVI), video graphics array (VGA), component video, S-
video, and composite video in this order of priority. 77 FR 2838-2839. 
Panasonic, Sharp, and MEVSA commented that DVI and VGA are computer 
inputs and inappropriate for testing televisions (Panasonic, No. 50 at 
p. 2; Sharp, No. 45 at p. 6; MEVSA, No. 44 at p. 3). DOE agreed with 
these comments and removed DVI and VGA from the connection hierarchy in 
the March 2013 SNOPR. 78 FR 15816. In response to this proposal, 
Panasonic and Sharp commented that they are in support of this 
hierarchy (Panasonic, No. 68 at p. 3; Sharp, No. 67 at p. 4). DOE 
adopts the proposed video input connection hierarchy of HDMI, component 
video, S-Video, and composite video in section 5.2 of Appendix H to 
subpart B of 10 CFR part 430. Additionally, DOE adopts the use of the 
Blu-ray disc version of the IEC dynamic broadcast-content video signal 
for the test content in today's final rule.
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE also proposed that the TV be tested 
using the primary video input terminals as opposed to input terminals 
with an alternate designation such as ``game'' or ``DVI''. 78 FR 15816. 
Panasonic and Sharp commented that they are in support of this 
requirement (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 4; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 3). DOE 
therefore adopts this requirement for video input terminals in section 
5.3 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE required that power factor shall be 
measured and recorded for all on mode power measurements. 78 FR 15825. 
Panasonic recommended that the power factor measurement be based on a 
single measurement during the luminance test (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 
7). DOE believes that a single measurement during the luminance test 
may result in increased test burden and unrepeatable measurements as 
the luminance test displays the IEC three vertical bar signal for only 
a brief period of time and does not require the use of power 
measurement equipment. Measuring the power factor during on mode 
results in no additional test time and allows for multiple measurements 
over the 10 minute test duration to increase accuracy. CA IOU supported 
the measurement of power factor and recommended that the CEC procedure 
be used or a method which produces an accurate measurement that is not 
unduly burdensome (CA IOU, No. 71 at p. 6). The CEC test method 
specifies that the reported value shall be the average value of 
measurements taken at an interval once per minute simultaneous to the 
on mode power measurement. DOE agrees with this method but believes 
that the sampling rate should be once per second to be consistent with 
the on mode power measurement. DOE therefore adopts a power factor 
measurement taken once per second, simultaneous to the on mode power 
consumption measurement in section 3.3.2 of Appendix H to subpart B of 
10 CFR part 430.

H. On Mode With ABC Enabled

1. ABC Illuminance Values
    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed measuring the on mode power 
consumption with ABC enabled at 10, 50, 100 and 300 lx. 77 FR 2850-
2853. CEA, MEVSA, Panasonic, and Sharp all agreed with testing at four 
illuminance values but had slightly differing opinions on which values 
should be measured (CEA, No. 47 at p. 5; MEVSA, No. 44 at p. 7; 
Panasonic, No. 50 at p. 5; Sharp, No. 45 at p. 4). DOE also evaluated 
research performed by the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance 
Standards Program (CLASP) in ``Further Analysis of Background Lighting 
Levels during Television Viewing''.\4\ Based on stakeholder comments 
and research performed by CLASP, DOE proposed values of 100, 35, 12, 
and 3 lx in the March 2013 SNOPR. 78 FR 15822-15823. Panasonic, Sharp, 
NRDC, NEEA, ASAP, and CA IOU all agreed with this proposal as they 
believe they are representative of actual TV viewing (Panasonic, No. 67 
at p. 5; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 5; NRDC, No. 64 at p. 1; NEEA, No. 66 at 
p. 3; ASAP, No. 69 at p. 1; CA IOU, No. 71 at p. 3). ams AG proposed 
four different illuminance values at 5, 15, 45, and 100 lx, however DOE 
considers this proposal to be sufficiently close to the illuminance 
values proposed in the March 2013 SNOPR (ams AG, No. 70 at p. 3). In 
section 7.3.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR 430, DOE adopts the 
March 2013 SNOPR proposal of measuring on mode when ABC is enabled at 
100, 35, 12, and 3 lx.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ Jones, Keith. Further Analysis of Background Lighting Levels 
during Television Viewing. CLASP. March 29, 2012. http://
www.clasponline.org/en/Resources/Resources/
StandardsLabelingResourceLibrary/2012/~/media/Files/SLDocuments/
2012/2012-3--
FurtherAnalysisOfBackgroundLightingLevelsDuringTelevisionViewing.pdf.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

2. Test Set-up
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a test set-up which required 
the lamp be positioned 5 ft from the ABC sensor at a perpendicular 
angle and the TV be positioned no more than 2 ft from any room surface 
with all 4 corners of the TV equidistant from a vertical reference 
plan. 78 FR 15822. DOE also required that the illuminance values be 
obtained by varying the input voltage to the lamp. 78 FR 15821-15822. 
Panasonic commented that they agree with DOE's proposal that the TV 
shall be aligned equidistant from a vertical reference plane 
(Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 5). DOE adopts these test set-up requirements 
in sections 4.5, 7.3.1, and 7.3.4 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10

[[Page 63834]]

CFR part 430. Additionally, as discussed in section III.E.2, DOE has 
updated these distance requirements to harmonize with international 
units.
3. Infrared and Ultraviolet Blocking Filter
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed that the ABC test set-up use 
an infrared and ultraviolet (IR/UV) blocking filter to ensure that only 
the visible light spectrum enter the ABC sensor. 78 FR 15822. DOE 
proposed this requirement after evaluating the light spectrum produced 
by the ABC test set-up. DOE found that dimming the lamp increases the 
amount of IR light produced even though illuminance is only determined 
by the amount of visible light received by the illuminance meter. As a 
result, a TV that is sensitive to IR light may exhibit increased power 
consumption because it senses both the visible and IR portions of the 
light. Alternately, TVs which use ABC sensors that interpret light 
based on the visible human response are not affected by the increased 
levels of IR light at low illuminance values.
    Based on these findings, DOE proposed in the March 2013 SNOPR that 
an IR/UV blocking filter be used to eliminate these portions of the 
light so the ABC sensor only receives light in the visible spectrum. In 
response to the March 2013 SNOPR, Sharp commented that an IR/UV 
blocking filter would not produce conditions typical of a real world 
scenario and that dimmed residential light has components of IR as well 
(Sharp, No. 68 at p. 4). NEEA commented that sunlight includes 
components of the UV spectrum and further justification would be needed 
to filter out this light (NEEA, No. 66 at p. 3). DOE agrees that it is 
impossible to determine the typical light spectrum that consumers use 
to watch TV. Since DOE did not perform extensive testing using IR/UV 
filters, ASAP, Panasonic, NRDC, and CA IOU recommended that further 
testing be conducted to evaluate the repeatability of such filters 
(ASAP, No. 69 at p. 1; Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 5; NRDC No. 64 at p. 1; 
CA IOU, No. 71 at p. 4). DOE believes that an IR/UV blocking filter has 
the potential to make the test procedure more repeatable because small 
variations in light would have less of an impact on TV power 
consumption. However, some IR/UV blocking filters may block different 
wavelengths than others, resulting in more variation. DOE did not 
perform additional testing to determine the repeatability of various 
IR/UV blocking filters, because even if testing did produce repeatable 
results, it would be impossible to determine if the test wavelengths 
correspond to typical viewing conditions.
    Additionally, ams AG commented that while a gradual backlighting 
response to ambient light is optimal for a TV viewing at various room 
illuminance levels, some ABC sensors use a crude implementation which 
results in a poor picture quality (ams AG, No. 70 at p. 5). ams AG 
commented that the ABC sensor should be accurate at low illuminance 
levels by rejecting IR and UV light and providing a photometric 
response near to the eye (ams AG, No. 70 at p. 5). Ultimately, ams AG 
discouraged the use of IR/UV blocking filters for ABC testing (ams AG, 
No. 70 at p. 5). DOE agrees with ams AG's comment and believes that 
removing the IR/UV filter requirement would provide manufacturers the 
incentive to update their ABC sensor technology. Based on these 
comments, DOE no longer believes that an IR/UV blocking filter would be 
appropriate and excludes this requirement in today's final rule.
4. Neutral Density Filter
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed two methods for simulating a 
3 lx illuminance value at the ABC sensor. The first method varied the 
light source until 3 lx was measured at the ABC sensor. However, the 
second method used a neutral density (ND) filter to uniformly block 
light received by the ABC sensor, resulting in a 3 lx measurement. 78 
FR 15823. In the IR and ND filter supporting document,\5\ DOE testing 
showed that both methods resulted in the same power consumption values 
when used in conjunction with an IR/UV blocking filter. Alternatively, 
when an ND filter was tested without an IR/UV blocking filter, the TV 
power consumption varied. Now that DOE is no longer using the IR/UV 
blocking filter as part of the ABC test set-up, allowing two methods to 
simulate the 3 lx illuminance value is no longer appropriate as it 
would result in repeatability issues.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ IR and ND Supporting Document. This material is available in 
Docket EERE-2010-BT-TP-0026 at www.regulations.gov.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In response to the March 2013 SNOPR, Panasonic and Sharp expressed 
support for using the ND filter (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 6; Sharp, No. 
68 at p. 5). To ensure a repeatable 3 lx power consumption measurement, 
DOE adopts the ND filter as the only method acceptable for simulating 
the 3 lx illuminance value. DOE believes this method is more repeatable 
because it ensures greater accuracy at low illuminance levels. 
Panasonic also commented that the ND filter should include further 
specification to increase test repeatability (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 
6). DOE agrees with Panasonic's comment and clarifies in section 7.3.1 
of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 that the ND filter must 
be a 2 F-stop filter which uniformly filters 75% of the light.
5. Lamp Specification
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed that the lamp be a 1000-lumen 
standard spectrum halogen incandescent parabolic aluminized reflector 
(PAR) 30S. DOE also noted in the March 2013 SNOPR that standard 
spectrum is any incandescent reflector lamp that does not meet the 
definition of modified spectrum as defined in 10 CFR 430.2 78 FR 15821-
5822. DOE believes that requiring a standard spectrum lamp is necessary 
to avoid lamps that contain spectrum modifying qualities such as an IR 
coating.
    Although stakeholders agreed that these lamp requirements were 
helpful to create a repeatable test set-up, Sharp and Panasonic 
expressed concerns about the international availability of PAR 30Slamp 
(Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 5; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 4). DOE evaluated the 
lamp market and reached a similar conclusion that the specified lamp 
can be difficult to find internationally. In order to maintain a 
repeatable lamp requirement, DOE updates this specification by using 
more general language to avoid international naming differences. DOE 
adopts a standard spectrum halogen incandescent aluminized reflector 
with a beam angle of 30  10 degrees, a lamp diameter of 95 
 10 mm, and a center beam candle power (CBCP) of 1500 
 500 candelas (cd). For additional clarity, DOE adds a note 
to the lamp requirements that lamps that contain spectrum modifying 
qualities, such as an IR coating, are not consider to meet a standard 
spectrum. DOE shifts away from a lumen-based requirement because the 
CBCP is a better approximation of the light that the ABC sensor 
receives during illuminance testing. The ABC sensor primarily receives 
light from the center beam of the lamp to determine illuminance values 
and therefore this rating is more representative of the lamp's output 
under these circumstances. The new CBCP requirement corresponds to a 
slightly lower lumen range, but spot testing indicates that lamps 
within this range continue to meet the illuminance values needed for 
ABC testing. DOE therefore adopts these lamp requirements in section 
7.3.3 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.

[[Page 63835]]

I. Luminance Test

    In the NOPR, DOE evaluated many different test patterns for the 
luminance test but ultimately proposed the IEC three vertical bar 
signal. 77 FR 2841-2842. NEEA, PG&E, Panasonic, and Sharp all supported 
the use of this test pattern and DOE therefore adopts the IEC three 
vertical bar signal in today's final rule (NEEA, No. 43 at p. 3; PG&E, 
No. 46 at p. 3; Panasonic, No. 50 at p. 3; Sharp, No. 45 at p. 4).
    In today's final rule DOE adopts a new picture setting structure 
that measures the luminance of up to three picture settings. As 
discussed in section III.C.4, DOE received comments on both the January 
2012 NOPR and the March 2013 SNOPR that when only one high-luminance 
picture setting is measured between the retail configuration and home 
configuration, there is a possibility that the picture setting in the 
alternate configuration is brighter. To resolve this issue, DOE 
clarifies that luminance shall be measured in the brightest selectable 
preset picture setting in the home configuration as well as the default 
picture setting within the retail configuration.
    DOE clarifies that certain cases may make measuring all three 
picture settings impossible, such as when a TV does not have a forced 
menu prompting the selection of either home configuration or retail 
configuration. Figure 4 in section III.C.4 indicates that only the 
brightest selectable preset picture setting and the default picture 
setting shall be measured in this case. DOE also identifies similar 
cases, such as when the retail configuration is no longer available 
after entering the home configuration or when it displays tickers or 
demos that are incapable of being disabled. Under these circumstances, 
only the default and brightest selectable preset picture settings would 
be measured within the home mode.
    With this picture setting structure, DOE no longer believes that a 
luminance ratio should be the output metric but rather that all 
measured luminance values should be recorded. This aligns with comments 
provided by NEEA, NRDC, and PG&E in response to the January 2012 NOPR, 
suggesting that DOE output the absolute luminance values rather than a 
ratio (NEEA, No. 43 at p. 3; NRDC, No. 40 at p. 6; PG&E, No. 46 at p. 
2).
    DOE also notes that in the March 2013 SNOPR, the brightest 
selectable preset picture setting was measured prior to the default 
picture setting, even though the testing order was updated so that on 
mode was tested before the luminance test. 78 FR 15817-15818. Because 
the on mode test is performed in the default picture setting, measuring 
the luminance in the default picture setting first would minimize 
unnecessary picture setting changes. Therefore, DOE clarifies, in 
section 7.4.1.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430, that the 
screen luminance is measured in the default picture setting prior to 
measuring the screen luminance in the brightest selectable preset 
picture setting in order to decrease test burden and increase 
repeatability.
    Additionally, measuring screen luminance after on mode on TVs with 
ABC enabled may lead to stabilization issues. These TVs are tested in 
on mode at 3 lx immediately prior to the luminance test, at which point 
the ABC function is disabled. This transition is likely to cause a 
significant increase in screen luminance. Sharp and Panasonic commented 
that the TV should undergo a stabilization period following the on mode 
test to ensure consistent luminance measurements (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 
4; Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 4). DOE agrees with this comment and adopts 
a 10-minute re-stabilization period using the IEC dynamic broadcast-
content video signal in section 7.4.1.3 of Appendix H to subpart B of 
10 CFR part 430.
    Following the re-stabilization, the IEC three vertical bar signal 
shall be selected and displayed. Immediately after the signal is 
displayed on the screen, the luminance shall be measured to avoid the 
activation of anti-image retention functions. MEVSA commented on this 
language in the January 2012 NOPR and suggested the DOE should clarify 
what is meant by ``immediately'' (MEVSA, No. 44 at p. 6). Sharp also 
commented that the luminance measurement should be made within 30 
seconds of being displayed (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 4). DOE recognizes that 
this measurement period is slightly vague and clarifies in section 
7.4.1 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 that the 
measurement shall be made within 5 seconds of the IEC three vertical 
bar signal being displayed. Although Sharp suggests that the image can 
be displayed for up to 30 seconds, DOE believes waiting such a long 
time may result in some TVs activating anti-image retention functions 
which affect the brightness levels, departing from the original intent 
of measuring the screen brightness during on mode. Measuring the screen 
luminance with a static image is currently the only way to measure 
brightness during on mode, and therefore should be measured as soon as 
possible to avoid the initiation of anti-image retention functions. DOE 
believes 5 seconds is a reasonable amount of time to make a measurement 
and avoids the activation of anti-image retention functions. DOE also 
believes that this timeframe will allow for repeatable measurements 
without burden to manufacturers and test labs.

J. Standby Mode

    In accordance with section 310 of the Energy Independence and 
Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), today's final rule is required to 
incorporate a test for standby mode if it is technically feasible. In 
the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed definitions for standby-active, 
high, standby-active, low, and standby-passive mode based on Table 1 of 
IEC 62087 3.0 and adopts these definitions in today's final rule. 77 FR 
2836-2837.
    At the public meeting for the March 2013 SNOPR, it was brought to 
the Department's attention that discrete modes of operation may be 
interpreted differently and therefore DOE clarifies the modes of 
operation for standby mode.
1. Standby-Passive Mode
    The standby-passive mode test is designed to measure the power 
consumption of the TV when it is connected to mains power and can only 
be switched into a different mode of operation by an internal signal or 
a remote control unit. In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed that 
standby-passive mode be measured using section 5.3.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 
2.0. 77 FR 2857. This requirement is adopted as part of today's final 
rule in section 7.5.2 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
    DOE clarifies that the standby-passive mode test shall be conducted 
with the TV disconnected from any external sources, as they may be 
capable of providing an external signal capable of switching the TV 
into a different mode of operation. Additionally, this test can be 
conducted on all TVs regardless of the TV's features and capabilities. 
As part of today's final rule, DOE adopts this test to measure the 
power consumption of the TV in standby-passive mode.
2. Standby-Active, Low Mode
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a test to measure the power 
consumption of network-enabled TVs in standby-active, low mode. 78 FR 
15824. Sharp commented that this test does not necessarily test 
standby-active, low mode because the TV must be able to switch to a 
different mode of operation through an external signal (Sharp, No. 68 
at p. 5). Sharp's main concern was that a TV would only meet this

[[Page 63836]]

definition if it could switch from standby-active, low mode to on mode 
by an external signal. DOE clarifies that standby-active, high mode is 
considered another mode of operation in comparison to standby-active, 
low mode. Thus, if an external signal can prompt a television to begin 
exchanging/receiving data with/from an external source (standby-active, 
high mode), then the TV is considered to be capable of switching into 
another mode of operation by an external signal. This TV would 
therefore meet the definition for standby-active, low mode. DOE 
believes that nearly all network-enabled televisions would be capable 
of entering standby-active, low mode, based on this definition. Figure 
6 outlines a method for determining the test capabilities of a TV in 
standby mode.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.006

    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a test for standby-active, 
low mode based on section 8.6.5.8 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0, which measures 
the power consumption of STBs in standby-active, low mode, and is 
adapted for TVs. 78 FR 15824. This procedure uses a 30-minute 
stabilization period followed by a 10-minute power measurement. 
Panasonic and Sharp commented that the specified stabilization period 
of 30 minutes is unnecessary and suggested that it be reduced to 10 
minutes (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 6; Sharp, No. 68 at p. 5). Panasonic 
also commented that the same standby mode test should be used for 
standby-active, low and standby-passive mode (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 
6). DOE agrees that a stabilization time of 30 minutes is unnecessary 
for this testing and adopts the same measurement procedure as standby-
passive and off mode in section 7.5.3 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 
CFR part 430, which is incorporated by reference from section 5.3.1 of 
IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0. DOE clarifies that this test requires a minimum of 5 
minutes to stabilize the TV but this period may be extended for 
products that require additional time.
3. Standby-Active, High Mode
    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed testing standby-active high 
mode by incorporating the CEA Test Procedure for Download Acquisition 
Mode (DAM) Testing from the Version 4.1 ENERGY STAR Test Procedure for 
Televisions. 77 FR 2858. After further evaluation, DOE determined that 
the DAM test procedure does not accurately assess the power consumption 
of network-enabled TVs because this procedure was designed for 
hospitality TVs. DOE is not aware of any workloads used to simulate 
network traffic for network-enabled TVs, let alone one that would be 
comparable across all manufacturer platforms. Therefore, in the March 
2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed to remove the test for standby-active, high 
mode altogether. Panasonic and Sharp supported the removal of the DAM 
test for standby-active high mode (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 6; Sharp, 
No. 68 at p. 5). In today's final rule, DOE continues to exclude a test 
for standby-active, high mode but retains the definition from IEC 62087 
Ed. 3.0 to be consistent with industry procedures.

[[Page 63837]]

K. Off Mode

    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed a definition for off mode 
based on Table 1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0. 77 FR 2836.
    During the rulemaking process, DOE has observed TVs that have a 
manual off switch which, by definition, places the TV in off mode. A 
test for off mode is technically feasible and therefore must be 
included in accordance with the requirements of EISA 2007. DOE adopts 
the definition for off mode in section 2.13 and the test for off mode 
in section 7.6 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 using the 
definition and measurement procedure from IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 that were 
originally proposed in the January 2012 NOPR.

L. Sampling Plan

    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a sampling plan to ensure 
consistent and repeatable results for all output metrics. 78 FR 15811-
15812. The sampling plan requires that at least two products of a basic 
model be tested to develop a representative rating, which is consistent 
with other consumer products regulated under EPCA. Sharp recommended 
that instead of determining the confidence interval of two or more 
units, one unit should be randomly selected and tested (Sharp, No. 68 
at p. 2) Sharp also expressed concern that using divisors of 1.05 and 
1.10 could result in conservative energy ratings by manufactures 
(Sharp, No. 68 at p. 2). Panasonic commented that energy 
representations shall be performed using only one product (Panasonic 
No. 67 at. p. 2). DOE believes that using one product to determine an 
output metric may lead to unrepresentative output values. Variation 
among units within a basic model along with test variation is taken 
into consideration by the sampling plan, and is the reason that two or 
more products are used for any represented value. A minimum of two 
units are needed to establish a confidence level, which increases the 
accuracy of the represented value. Additionally, the use of 1.05 and 
1.10 divisors allows for variation among units and allows manufacturers 
to accurately represent the efficiency of each basic model without the 
need for conservative representation values. DOE believes that the 
proposed sampling plan ensures an accurate and representative value and 
therefore DOE adopts this sampling plan in 10 CFR 429.25.

M. Output Metrics

    In the January 2012 NOPR, DOE proposed a multiple metric output but 
also considered an annual energy consumption (AEC) metric. The proposed 
metrics included on mode, standby-active, high mode, standby-passive 
mode, and off mode. 77 FR 2859. In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE updated 
these outputs to correspond to test changes resulting from the new 
proposals. The proposed multiple metrics in the March 2013 SNOPR 
included on mode, standby-active, low mode, standby-passive mode, off 
mode, and AEC. 78 FR 15825-15826. One of the main differences between 
the January 2012 NOPR and March 2013 SNOPR proposal was the inclusion 
of the AEC metric. In response to the AEC as proposed in the March 2013 
SNOPR, CA IOU, CEA, NEEA, and NRDC expressed concern that the weighted 
values for the modes of operation may shift and no longer be 
representative (CA IOU, No. 71 at p. 6; CEA, No. 72 at p. 7; NEEA, No. 
66 at p. 5; NRDC, No. 64 at p. 5). However, Panasonic supported the 
proposed output metrics (Panasonic, No. 67 at p. 6). DOE believes that 
TV viewing habits have not significantly changed but will closely 
monitor these trends to ensure a representative value for the AEC. 
While it is possible for the duty cycle to change, the proposed 
weighting will provide a representative AEC for consumers, and a 
consistently weighted metric over time allows for energy consumption 
comparisons between past and future TV models. DOE therefore adopts an 
AEC metric in section 8 of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
    DOE believes that output values for on mode, standby mode, off 
mode, and AEC provide a sufficient representation of the TV's power and 
energy usage and therefore adopts these metrics in today's final rule.

N. Represented Power Values

    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed that the rated power 
consumption in on, standby, and off modes that are output from Appendix 
H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 shall be determined by first applying 
the sampling plan and statistical requirements proposed for 10 CFR 
429.25. The AEC metric would then be calculated using these rated power 
consumption values. 78 FR 15811-15812. Because this proposal required 
the sampling plan to be performed before calculating the rated power 
consumption values, multiple units would need to be tested to calculate 
and output the rated power consumption or AEC in Appendix H to subpart 
B of 10 CFR part 430. In order to ensure that this appendix provides a 
methodology for testing and calculating the power consumptions and AEC 
of a single unit and that 10 CFR 429.25 provides a methodology for 
determining the represented rating of multiple tested units, DOE is 
altering both the sampling plan in 10 CFR 429.25 and outputs of 
Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 as part of today's final 
rule. Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430 will output the power 
consumption for each mode of operation and the AEC for a single tested 
unit. 10 CFR 429.25 would then calculate the represented power values 
by applying the sampling plan and statistical requirements for multiple 
tested units. The represented power values would then be used to 
calculate a represented AEC. DOE is also adopting rounding requirements 
for all four representated values in part 429. DOE believes that this 
approach will provide a clearer methodology for testing a single unit 
and calculating the represented power values and represented AEC of 
multiple units. Therefore, DOE is adopting these requirements as part 
of today's final rule.

O. Annual Energy Consumption Metric

1. On Mode
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed an on mode weighting of 5 
hours based on DOE's analysis of Neilson data. 78 FR 15825-15826. Sharp 
expressed support for a 5 hour weighting in on mode (Sharp No. 68 at p. 
6). DOE believes that 5 hours is a representative weighting for typical 
on mode usage and therefore adopts this AEC weighting in section 8.3 of 
Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
2. Standby Mode
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a weighting structure for 
standby mode that is dependent on whether the TV is network-enabled. 78 
FR 15825-15826. DOE clarifies that although most network-enabled TVs 
would meet the definition of standby-active, low mode, having a network 
connection is not necessarily the only condition for this requirement. 
DOE believes that the definition for standby-active, low mode should be 
used as the criterion to determine how the TV receives a standby mode 
weighting. If the TV is capable of entering standby-active, low mode, 
this test is performed and the TV receives a 19 hour weighting for 
standby-active, low mode. Sharp commented that it supports a 19 hour 
weighting for standby mode (Sharp, No. 68 at p. 6).

[[Page 63838]]

    NRDC expressed concern that a 19 hour standby-active, low mode and 
0 hour standby-passive mode would result in unmeasured power for the 
quick start function (NRDC, No. 64 at p. 4). NRDC also commented that 
the quick start function is independent of a network connection (NRDC, 
No. 64 at p. 4). DOE clarifies that the power consumption associated 
with the quick start function will be included in both the standby-
passive and standby-active, low mode metrics when available. As 
discussed in section III.E.5, this function will be enabled when it is 
made available through a display prompt regardless of the TV's network 
connection capabilities. DOE believes that the adopted implementation 
of quick start will alleviate NRDC's concerns for the standby mode 
weighting and, based on stakeholder support, DOE adopts a 19 hour 
standby mode weighting for the AEC in section 8.3 of Appendix H to 
subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.
3. Off Mode
    In the March 2013 SNOPR, DOE proposed a test for off mode and a 0 
hour weighting for the AEC. 78 FR 15825-15826. Sharp commented that 
this test should be removed because only a few TVs are equipped with 
this feature (Sharp, No. 45 at p. 7). To comply with the requirements 
of EISA 2007, however, DOE is required to include an off mode test when 
it is technically feasible and so includes this test in today's final 
rule. Although some TVs may be equipped with a manual off switch which 
is necessary for off mode, this feature is increasingly less prevalent 
on new TVs and when it is present on TVs, it is virtually never used. 
Therefore, DOE adopts a weighting of 0 hours in off mode in section 8.3 
of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR part 430.

IV. Procedural Issues and Regulatory Review

A. Review Under Executive Order 12866

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has determined that test 
procedure rulemakings do not constitute ``significant regulatory 
actions'' under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, Regulatory 
Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735 (Oct. 4, 1993). Accordingly, this 
action was not subject to review under the Executive Order by the 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in OMB.

B. Review Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) requires 
preparation of a regulatory flexibility analysis (RFA) for any rule 
that by law must be proposed for public comment, unless the agency 
certifies that the rule, if promulgated, will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. As required 
by Executive Order 13272, ``Proper Consideration of Small Entities in 
Agency Rulemaking,'' 67 FR 53461 (August 16, 2002), DOE published 
procedures and policies on February 19, 2003, to ensure that the 
potential impacts of its rules on small entities are properly 
considered during the DOE rulemaking process. 68 FR 7990. DOE has made 
its procedures and policies available on the Office of the General 
Counsel's Web site: http://energy.gov/gc/office-general-counsel.
    DOE reviewed today's final rule under the provisions of the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act and the policies and procedures published on 
February 19, 2003. This rule prescribes a test procedure to be used to 
develop and implement future energy conservation standards for TVs. DOE 
certifies that this rule will not have a significant impact on a 
substantial number of small entities. The factual basis for this 
certification is as follows.
    The Small Business Administration (SBA) considers an entity to be a 
small business, if, together with its affiliates, it employs less than 
a threshold number of workers specified in 13 CFR Part 121. The 
thresholds set forth in these regulations are based on size standards 
and codes established by the North American Industry Classification 
System (NAICS).\6\ TV manufacturers are classified under NAICS code 
334220, ``Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications 
Equipment Manufacturing,'' and are considered small entities if they 
employ 750 employees or less.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \6\ For more information visit: http://www.sba.gov. The size 
standards are available at http://www.sba.gov/content/small-business-size-standards.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DOE determined that most manufacturers of TVs are large 
multinational corporations. To develop a list of domestic 
manufacturers, DOE reviewed the Hoover database \7\ and other publicly 
available data, including the Energy Star qualified TVs database. As a 
result of its review, DOE determined that there were no TV 
manufacturers who would qualify as small entities. DOE also notes that 
manufacturers are already required to use a test procedure similar to 
DOE's adopted test procedure to make energy representations under the 
Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) EnergyGuide labeling program. 76 FR 
1038. DOE's adopted test procedure can be conducted concurrently with 
FTC testing without significant additional burden.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ Hoovers. Web 12 Dec 2011. http://www.hoovers.com.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Based on the above, DOE certifies that today's rule would not have 
a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities 
and has not prepared an RFA for this rulemaking. DOE transmitted the 
certification and supporting statement of factual basis to the Chief 
Counsel for Advocacy of the SBA for review under 5 U.S.C. 605(b).

C. Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995

    There is currently no information collection requirement related to 
the test procedure for TVs. In the event that DOE proposes an energy 
conservation standard with which manufacturers must demonstrate 
compliance, DOE will seek OMB approval of such information collection 
requirement.
    DOE has established regulations for the certification and 
recordkeeping requirements for certain covered consumer products and 
commercial equipment. 76 FR 12422 (March 7, 2011). The collection-of-
information requirement for the certification and recordkeeping is 
subject to review and approval by OMB under the Paperwork Reduction Act 
(PRA). This requirement has been approved by OMB under OMB control 
number 1910-1400. Public reporting burden for the certification is 
estimated to average 20 hours per response, including the time for 
reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and 
maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the 
collection of information.
    As stated above, in the event DOE proposes an energy conservation 
standard for TVs with which manufacturers must demonstrate compliance, 
DOE will seek OMB approval of the associated information collection 
requirement. DOE will seek approval either through a proposed amendment 
to the information collection requirement approved under OMB control 
number 1910-1400 or as a separate proposed information collection 
requirement.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of the law, no person is 
required to respond to, nor shall any person be subject to a penalty 
for failure to comply

[[Page 63839]]

with, a collection of information subject to the requirements of the 
PRA, unless that collection of information displays a currently valid 
OMB Control Number.

D. Review Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969

    In this final rule, DOE adopts a new test procedure for TVs. DOE 
has determined that this rule falls into a class of actions that are 
categorically excluded from review under the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and DOE's implementing 
regulations at 10 CFR Part 1021. Specifically, this rule establishes a 
new test procedure without affecting the amount, quality or 
distribution of energy usage, and, therefore, will not result in any 
environmental impacts. Thus, this rulemaking is covered by Categorical 
Exclusion A5 under 10 CFR Part 1021, subpart D, which applies to any 
rulemaking that does not result in any environmental impacts. 
Accordingly, neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental 
impact statement is required.

E. Review Under Executive Order 13132

    Executive Order 13132, ``Federalism,'' 64 FR 43255 (August 4, 1999) 
imposes certain requirements on agencies formulating and implementing 
policies or regulations that preempt State law or that have Federalism 
implications. The Executive Order requires agencies to examine the 
constitutional and statutory authority supporting any action that would 
limit the policymaking discretion of the States and to carefully assess 
the necessity for such actions. The Executive Order also requires 
agencies to have an accountable process to ensure meaningful and timely 
input by State and local officials in the development of regulatory 
policies that have Federalism implications. On March 14, 2000, DOE 
published a statement of policy describing the intergovernmental 
consultation process it will follow in the development of such 
regulations. 65 FR 13735. DOE examined this final rule and determined 
that it will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the 
relationship between the national government and the States, or on the 
distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of 
government. EPCA governs and prescribes Federal preemption of State 
regulations as to energy conservation for the products that are the 
subject of today's final rule. States can petition DOE for exemption 
from such preemption to the extent, and based on criteria, set forth in 
EPCA. (42 U.S.C. 6297(d)) No further action is required by Executive 
Order 13132.

F. Review Under Executive Order 12988

    Regarding the review of existing regulations and the promulgation 
of new regulations, section 3(a) of Executive Order 12988, ``Civil 
Justice Reform,'' 61 FR 4729 (Feb. 7, 1996), imposes on Federal 
agencies the general duty to adhere to the following requirements: (1) 
Eliminate drafting errors and ambiguity; (2) write regulations to 
minimize litigation; (3) provide a clear legal standard for affected 
conduct rather than a general standard; and (4) promote simplification 
and burden reduction. Section 3(b) of Executive Order 12988 
specifically requires that Executive agencies make every reasonable 
effort to ensure that the regulation: (1) Clearly specifies the 
preemptive effect, if any; (2) clearly specifies any effect on existing 
Federal law or regulation; (3) provides a clear legal standard for 
affected conduct while promoting simplification and burden reduction; 
(4) specifies the retroactive effect, if any; (5) adequately defines 
key terms; and (6) addresses other important issues affecting clarity 
and general draftsmanship under any guidelines issued by the Attorney 
General. Section 3(c) of Executive Order 12988 requires Executive 
agencies to review regulations in light of applicable standards in 
sections 3(a) and 3(b) to determine whether they are met or it is 
unreasonable to meet one or more of them. DOE has completed the 
required review and determined that, to the extent permitted by law, 
this final rule meets the relevant standards of Executive Order 12988.

G. Review Under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) 
requires each Federal agency to assess the effects of Federal 
regulatory actions on State, local, and Tribal governments and the 
private sector. Public Law 104-4, sec. 201 (codified at 2 U.S.C. 1531). 
For a regulatory action resulting in a rule that may cause the 
expenditure by State, local, and Tribal governments, in the aggregate, 
or by the private sector of $100 million or more in any one year 
(adjusted annually for inflation), section 202 of UMRA requires a 
Federal agency to publish a written statement that estimates the 
resulting costs, benefits, and other effects on the national economy. 
(2 U.S.C. 1532(a), (b)) The UMRA also requires a Federal agency to 
develop an effective process to permit timely input by elected officers 
of State, local, and Tribal governments on a proposed ``significant 
intergovernmental mandate,'' and requires an agency plan for giving 
notice and opportunity for timely input to potentially affected small 
governments before establishing any requirements that might 
significantly or uniquely affect small governments. On March 18, 1997, 
DOE published a statement of policy on its process for 
intergovernmental consultation under UMRA. 62 FR 12820; also available 
at http://energy.gov/gc/office-general-counsel. DOE examined today's 
final rule according to UMRA and its statement of policy and determined 
that the rule contains neither an intergovernmental mandate, nor a 
mandate that may result in the expenditure of $100 million or more in 
any year, so these requirements do not apply.

H. Review Under the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 
1999

    Section 654 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 1999 (Pub. L. 105-277) requires Federal agencies to issue a Family 
Policymaking Assessment for any rule that may affect family well-being. 
Today's final rule will not have any impact on the autonomy or 
integrity of the family as an institution. Accordingly, DOE has 
concluded that it is not necessary to prepare a Family Policymaking 
Assessment.

I. Review Under Executive Order 12630

    DOE has determined, under Executive Order 12630, ``Governmental 
Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property 
Rights'' 53 FR 8859 (March 18, 1988) that this regulation will not 
result in any takings that might require compensation under the Fifth 
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

J. Review Under Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 
2001

    Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 2001 (44 U.S.C. 3516 note) provides for agencies to review most 
disseminations of information to the public under guidelines 
established by each agency pursuant to general guidelines issued by 
OMB. OMB's guidelines were published at 67 FR 8452 (Feb. 22, 2002), and 
DOE's guidelines were published at 67 FR 62446 (Oct. 7, 2002). DOE has 
reviewed today's final rule under the OMB and DOE guidelines and has 
concluded that it is consistent with applicable policies in those 
guidelines.

K. Review Under Executive Order 13211

    Executive Order 13211, ``Actions Concerning Regulations That 
Significantly Affect Energy Supply,

[[Page 63840]]

Distribution, or Use,'' 66 FR 28355 (May 22, 2001), requires Federal 
agencies to prepare and submit to OMB, a Statement of Energy Effects 
for any significant energy action. A ``significant energy action'' is 
defined as any action by an agency that promulgated or is expected to 
lead to promulgation of a final rule, and that: (1) Is a significant 
regulatory action under Executive Order 12866, or any successor order; 
and (2) is likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, 
distribution, or use of energy; or (3) is designated by the 
Administrator of OIRA as a significant energy action. For any 
significant energy action, the agency must give a detailed statement of 
any adverse effects on energy supply, distribution, or use if the 
regulation is implemented, and of reasonable alternatives to the action 
and their expected benefits on energy supply, distribution, and use.
    Today's regulatory action to establish a test procedure for 
measuring the power consumption of TVs is not a significant regulatory 
action under Executive Order 12866. Moreover, it would not have a 
significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of 
energy, nor has it been designated as a significant energy action by 
the Administrator of OIRA. Therefore, it is not a significant energy 
action, and, accordingly, DOE has not prepared a Statement of Energy 
Effects.

L. Review Under Section 32 of the Federal Energy Administration Act of 
1974

    Under section 301 of the Department of Energy Organization Act 
(Pub. L. 95-91; 42 U.S.C. 7101), DOE must comply with section 32 of the 
Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974, as amended by the Federal 
Energy Administration Authorization Act of 1977. (15 U.S.C. 788; FEAA) 
Section 32 essentially provides in relevant part that, where a rule 
authorizes or requires use of commercial standards, the rulemaking must 
inform the public of the use and background of such standards. In 
addition, section 32(c) requires DOE to consult with the Attorney 
General and the Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) 
concerning the impact of the commercial or industry standards on 
competition.
    The final rule incorporates testing methods contained in certain 
sections of the IEC standards 60933-5 Ed. 1.0, 62087 Ed. 3.0, and 62301 
Ed. 2.0 as well as CEA 770.3-D, SMPTE 170M, ITU BT.470-6, and HDMI 
Version 1.0. DOE has evaluated these standards and is unable to 
conclude whether they fully comply with the requirements of section 
32(b) of the FEAA (i.e. whether it was developed in a manner that fully 
provides for public participation, comment, and review.) DOE has 
consulted with both the Attorney General and the Chairman of the FTC 
about the impact on competition of using the methods contained in these 
standards and has received no comments objecting to their use.

M. Congressional Notification

    As required by 5 U.S.C. 801, DOE will report to Congress on the 
promulgation of today's rule before its effective date. The report will 
state that it has been determined that the rule is not a ``major rule'' 
as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

V. Approval of the Office of the Secretary

    The Secretary of Energy has approved publication of this final 
rule.

List of Subjects

10 CFR Part 429

    Confidential business information, Energy conservation, Household 
appliances, Imports, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

10 CFR Part 430

    Administrative practice and procedure, Confidential business 
information, Energy conservation, Household appliances, Imports, 
Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Small 
businesses.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on September 30, 2013.
Kathleen B. Hogan,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency and 
Renewable Energy.

    For the reasons stated in the preamble, DOE amends part 429 and 430 
of Chapter II of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations as set forth 
below:

PART 429--CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER 
PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT

0
1. The authority citation for part 429 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 6291-6317.


0
2. Section 429.25 is added to read as follows:


Sec.  429.25  Television sets.

    (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The 
requirements of Sec.  429.11 are applicable to televisions; and
    (2) For each basic model of television, samples shall be randomly 
selected and tested to ensure that--
    (i) Any represented value of power consumption of a basic model for 
which consumers would favor lower values shall be greater than or equal 
to the higher of:
    (A) The mean of the sample, where:
    [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.007
    
and x is the sample mean; n is the number of samples; and xi 
is the i\th\ sample;

Or,

    (B) For on mode power consumption, the upper 95 percent confidence 
limit (UCL) of the true mean divided by 1.05, where:
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.008

and x is the sample mean; s is the sample standard deviation; n is the 
number of samples; and t0.95 is the t-statistic for a 95% 
one-tailed confidence interval with n-1 degrees of freedom (from 
Appendix A of this subpart).

And

    (C) For standby mode power consumption and power consumption 
measurements in modes other than on mode, the upper 90 percent 
confidence limit (UCL) of the true mean divided by 1.10, where:
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.009

and x is the sample mean; s is the sample standard deviation; n is the 
number of samples; and t0.90 is the t-statistic for a 90% 
one-tailed confidence interval with n-1 degrees of freedom (from 
Appendix A of this subpart).

    (ii) Any represented annual energy consumption of a basic model 
shall be determined by applying the AEC calculation in section 8.2 of 
Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR Part 430 to the represented values of 
power consumption as calculated pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this 
section.
    (iii) Rounding requirements. The represented value of power 
consumption and the represented annual energy consumption shall be 
rounded as follows:
    (A) For power consumption in the on, standby, and off modes, the 
represented value shall be rounded according to the accuracy 
requirements specified in section 3.3.3 of Appendix H to subpart B of 
10 CFR Part 430.

[[Page 63841]]

    (B) For annual energy consumption, the represented value shall be 
rounded according to the rounding requirements specified in section 8.3 
of Appendix H to subpart B of 10 CFR Part 430.
    (b) [Reserved]

PART 430--ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS

0
3. The authority citation for part 430 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 6291-6309; 28 U.S.C. 2461 note.


0
4. Section 430.2 is amended by:
0
a. Removing the definitions ``Color television set'' and ``Monochrome 
television set'';
0
b. Adding, in alphabetical order, the definitions ``Component video'', 
``Composite video'', ``High-definition multimedia interface or 
HDMI[supreg]'', and ``S-video''; and
0
c. Revising the definition for ``Television set''.
    The additions and revisions read as follows:


Sec.  430.2  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Component video means a video display interface as defined in the 
Consumer Electronics Association's (CEA) standard, CEA-770.3-D 
(incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
    Composite video means a video display interface that uses Radio 
Corporation of America (RCA) connections carrying a signal defined by 
the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers' (SMPTE) 
standard, SMPTE 170M-2004 (incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3) 
for regions that support a power frequency of 59.94 Hz or International 
Telecommunication Union's (ITU) standard, ITU-R BT 470-6 (incorporated 
by reference; see Sec.  430.3) for regions that support a power 
frequency of 50 Hz.
* * * * *
    High-definition multimedia interface or HDMI[supreg] means an audio 
and video interface as defined by HDMI[supreg] Specification 
Informational Version 1.0 or greater (incorporated by reference; see 
Sec.  430.3).
* * * * *
    S-video means a video display interface that transmits analog video 
over two channels: luma and chroma as defined by IEC 60933-5 Ed. 1.0 
(incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
* * * * *
    Television set or TV means a product designed to produce dynamic 
video, contains an internal TV tuner encased within the product 
housing, and that is capable of receiving dynamic visual content from 
wired or wireless sources including but not limited to:
    (1) Broadcast and similar services for terrestrial, cable, 
satellite, and/or broadband transmission of analog and/or digital 
signals; and/or
    (2) Display-specific data connections, such as HDMI, Component 
video, S-video, Composite video; and/or
    (3) Media storage devices such as a USB flash drive, memory card, 
or a DVD; and/or
    (4) Network connections, usually using Internet Protocol, typically 
carried over Ethernet or Wi-Fi.
* * * * *


0
5. Section 430.3 is amended by:
0
a. Redesignating paragraph (p) as (t);
0
b. Redesignating paragraphs (n) through (o) as (q) through (r);
0
c. Redesignating paragraphs (l) through (m) as (n) through (o);
0
d. Redesignating paragraphs (i) through (k) as (j) through (l);
0
e. Further redesignating newly designated paragraphs (o)(1) and (2) as 
(o)(3) and (4), respectively;
0
f. Adding new paragraphs (i), (m), (o)(1), (o)(2), (p), and (s);
0
g. Amending newly designated paragraph (o)(4) by adding ``H,'' after 
``G,''.
    The additions read as follows:


Sec.  430.3  Materials incorporated by reference.

* * * * *
    (i) CEA. Consumer Electronics Association, Technology & Standards 
Department, 1919 S. Eads Street, Arlington, VA 22202, 703-907-7600, or 
go to www.CE.org.
    (1) CEA Standard, CEA-770.3-D, High Definition TV Analog Component 
Video Interface, published February 2008; IBR approved for Sec.  430.2.
    (2) [Reserved]
* * * * *
    (m) HDMI[supreg]. High-Definition Multimedia Interface Licensing, 
LLC, 1140 East Arques Avenue, Suite 100, Sunnyvale, CA 94085, 408-616-
1542, or go to www.hdmi.org.
    (1) HDMI Specification Informational Version 1.0, High-Definition 
Multimedia Interface Specification, published September 4, 2003; IBR 
approved for Sec.  430.2.
    (2) [Reserved]
* * * * *
    (o) IEC. * * *
    (1) IEC Standard 933-5:1992, (``IEC 60933-5 Ed. 1.0''), Audio, 
video and audiovisual systems--Interconnections and matching values--
Part 5: Y/C connector for video systems--Electrical matching values and 
description of the connector, First Edition, 1992-12; IBR approved for 
Sec.  430.2. (Note: IEC 933-5 is also known as IEC 60933-5.)
    (2) IEC Standard 62087:2011, (``IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0''), Methods of 
measurement for the power consumption of audio, video, and related 
equipment, Edition 3.0, 2011-04, Sections 3.1.1, 3.1.18, 11.4.1, 
11.4.2, 11.4.5, 11.4.6, 11.4.8, 11.4.9, 11.4.10, 11.4.11, 11.5.5, and 
annexc.3; IBR approved for Appendix H to subpart B of this part.
* * * * *
    (p) ITU. International Telecommunication Union, Place des Nations, 
1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland, +41-22-730-5111, or go to http://www.itu.int/en.
    (1) ITU-R BT.470-6, Conventional Television Systems, published 
November 1998; IBR approved for Sec.  430.2.
    (2) [Reserved]
* * * * *
    (s) SMPTE. Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers, 3 
Barker Ave., 5th Floor, White Plains, NY 10601, 914-761-1100, or go to 
http://standards.smpte.org.
    (1) SMPTE 170M-2004, (``SMPTE 170M-2004''), SMPTE Standard for 
Television--Composite Analog Video Signal--NTSC for Studio 
Applications, approved November 30, 2004; IBR approved for Sec.  430.2.
    (2) [Reserved]
* * * * *


0
6. Section 430.23 is amended by adding paragraph (h) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  430.23  Test procedures for the measurement of energy and water 
consumption.

* * * * *
    (h) Television sets. The power consumption of a television set, 
expressed in watts, including on mode, standby mode, and off mode power 
consumption values, shall be measured in accordance with sections 7.1, 
7.3, and 7.4 of appendix H of this subpart respectively. The annual 
energy consumption, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, shall be 
measured in accordance with section 8 of appendix H of this subpart.
* * * * *


0
7. Appendix H to subpart B of part 430 is added to read as follows:

Appendix H to Subpart B of Part 430--Uniform Test Method for Measuring 
the Power Consumption of Television Sets

    Note: After April 23, 2014, any representations made with 
respect to the

[[Page 63842]]

energy use or efficiency of televisions must be made in accordance 
with the results of testing pursuant to this appendix. Given that 
after April 23, 2014 representations with respect to the energy use 
or efficiency of televisions must be made in accordance with tests 
conducted pursuant to this appendix, manufacturers may wish to begin 
using this test procedure as soon as possible.

1. Scope

    This appendix covers the test requirements used to measure the 
energy and power consumption of television sets that:
    (i) Have a diagonal screen size of at least fifteen inches; and
    (ii) Are powered by mains power (including TVs with auxiliary 
batteries but not TVs with main batteries).

2. Definitions and Symbols

    2.1. Additional functions shall be defined using the additional 
functions definition in section 3.1.1 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    2.2. Auxiliary Battery means a battery capable of powering a 
clock or retaining TV settings but is incapable of powering the TV 
to produce dynamic video.
    2.3. Brightest selectable preset picture setting means the 
preset picture setting in which the television produces the highest 
screen luminance within either the home or retail configuration.
    2.4. Default picture setting means the preset picture setting 
that the TV enters into immediately after making a selection from 
the forced menu. If the TV does not have a forced menu, this is the 
as-shipped preset picture setting.
    2.5. Forced menu means a series of menus which require the 
selection of initial settings before allowing the user to utilize 
primary functions. Within these menus contains an option to choose 
the viewing environment between retail and home configurations.
    2.6. Home configuration means the TV configuration selected from 
the forced menu which is designed for typical consumer viewing and 
is recommended by the manufacturer for home environments.
    2.7. IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 means the test standard published by the 
International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled ``Methods of 
measurement of the power consumption of audio, video, and related 
equipment,'' IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  
430.3).
    2.8. IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray Disc\TM\ Dynamic Broadcast-
Content Video Signal means the test video content published by the 
International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled ``IEC 62087 Ed. 
3.0, video content--BD, video content for IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 on Blu-
rayTM Disc,'' IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    2.9. IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 means the test standard published by the 
International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled ``Household 
electrical appliances--Measurement of standby power,'' IEC 62301 Ed. 
2.0 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    2.10. Illuminance means the luminous flux per unit area of light 
illuminating a given surface, expressed in units of lux (lx).
    2.11. Luminance means the photometric measure of the luminous 
intensity per unit area of light traveling in a given direction, 
expressed in units of candelas per square meter (cd/m\2\).
    2.12. Main battery means a battery capable of powering the TV to 
produce dynamic video without the support of mains power.
    2.13. Off mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is 
connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor picture, and 
cannot be switched into any other mode of operation with the remote 
control unit, an internal signal, or external signal.
    2.14. On mode means the mode of operation in which the TV is 
connected to mains power, and is capable of producing dynamic video.
    2.15. Preset picture setting means a preprogrammed factory 
setting obtained from the TV menu with pre-determined picture 
parameters such as brightness, contrast, color, sharpness, etc. 
Preset picture settings can be selected within the home or retail 
mode.
    2.16. Retail configuration means the TV configuration selected 
from the forced menu which is designed to highlight the TV's 
features in a retail environment. This configuration may display 
demos, disable configurable settings, or increase screen brightness 
in a manner which is not desirable for typical consumer viewing.
    2.17. Special functions shall be defined using the definition in 
section 3.1.18 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see 
Sec.  430.3).
    2.18. Standby-passive mode means the mode of operation in which 
the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor 
picture, and can be switched into another mode with only the remote 
control unit or an internal signal.
    2.19. Standby-active, high mode means the mode of operation in 
which the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor 
picture, is exchanging/receiving data with/from an external source, 
and can be switched into another mode of operation with the remote 
control unit, an internal signal, or an external signal.
    2.20. Standby-active, low mode means the mode of operation in 
which the TV is connected to mains power, produces neither sound nor 
picture, can be switched into another mode with the remote control 
unit or an internal signal, and can additionally be switched into 
another mode with an external signal.
    2.21. Symbol usage. The following identity relationships are 
provided to help clarify the symbols used throughout this test 
procedure.
ABC--Automatic Brightness Control
AEC--Annual Energy Consumption
BD--Blu-ray Disc\TM\
DVD--Digital Versatile Disc\TM\
DVI--Digital Visual Interface
HDMI[supreg]--High Definition Multimedia Interface
Lbrightest--Screen luminance in brightest selectable 
preset picture setting within the home configuration
Ldefault--Screen luminance in default picture setting 
within the home configuration
Ldefault--retail--Screen luminance in default picture 
setting within the retail configuration
LAN--Local Area Network
Pon--Power consumed in on mode
P3--Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 3 lx
P12--Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 12 
lx
P35--Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 35 
lx
P100--Average power consumed in on mode, ABC enabled, 100 
lx
Pstandby-passive--Power consumption in standby-passive 
mode
Pstandby-active, low--Power consumption in standby-
active, low mode
Poff--Power consumption in off mode
STB--Set-top Box
THD--Total Harmonic Distortion
TV--Television Set
USB--Universal Serial Bus
W3--Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 3 lx
W12--Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 12 lx
W35--Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 35 lx
W100--Percent weighting for on mode, ABC enabled, 100 lx
WAN--Wide Area Network

3. Accuracy and Precision of Measurement Equipment

    3.1. Voltage and Frequency. Set the test voltage and frequency 
to the rated electrical supply values of the region in accordance 
with Table 1 in section 4.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0
    3.2. Power Supply Requirements. The TV power use shall be 
measured using a power supply that meets the specifications found in 
section 4.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see 
Sec.  430.3). The THD of the supply voltage shall not exceed 5%, 
inclusive to the 13th order harmonic, when the unit is under test.
    3.3. Power Meter Requirements. The power measurement shall be 
carried out directly by means of a wattmeter, a wattmeter with 
averaging function, or a watt-hour meter by dividing the reading by 
the measuring time. For TVs where the input video signal varies over 
time, use a wattmeter with an averaging function to carry out the 
measurement.
    3.3.1. The sampling rate of the watt-hour meter or wattmeter 
with averaging function shall be one measurement per second or more 
frequent.
    3.3.2. The power measurement instrument shall measure and record 
the power factor and the real power consumed during all on mode 
tests at the same sampling rate.
    3.3.3. Power measurements of 0.5 W or greater shall be made with 
an uncertainty of less than or equal to 2 percent (at the 95 percent 
confidence level). Measurements of power of less than 0.5 W shall be 
made with an uncertainty of less than or equal to 0.01 W (at the 95 
percent confidence level). The power measurement instrument shall 
have a resolution of:
    0.01 W or better for power measurements of 10 W or less;
    0.1 W or better for power measurements of greater than 10 W up 
to 100 W;

[[Page 63843]]

    1 W or better for power measurements of greater than 100 W.
    3.4. Luminance Meter Requirements. Contact or non-contact 
luminance meters shall have an accuracy of  2 percent 
 2 digits of the digitally displayed value. Non-contact 
meters are also required to have an acceptance angle of 3 degrees or 
less.
    3.5. Illuminance Meter Requirements. All illuminance meters 
shall have an accuracy of  2 percent  2 
digits of the digitally displayed value.
    3.6. Video Input Device. The video input device (i.e. BD player) 
shall be capable of decoding a BD signal. The video input device 
manufacturer shall be different from the manufacturer of the TV 
under test to prevent device interaction.

4. Test Room Set-Up

    4.1. Ambient Temperature Conditions. For all testing, maintain 
ambient temperature conditions in accordance with in section 11.4.1 
of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    4.2. Ambient Relative Humidity Conditions. For all testing, 
maintain the ambient relative humidity between 10 and 80 percent.
    4.3. Room Illuminance Level. All luminance testing (with a non-
contact meter) and on mode testing (with ABC enabled by default) 
shall be performed in a room which measures less than or equal to 
1.0 lx measured at the ABC sensor while the TV is in off or a 
standby mode. If the TV does not have an ABC sensor, measure at the 
bottom center of the TV bezel.
    4.4. Installation. Install the TV in accordance with 
manufacturer's instructions.
    4.5. TV Placement. TVs which have an ABC sensor enabled by 
default shall be placed at least 0.5 meters away from any wall 
surface (i.e. wall, ceiling, and floor). This does not include the 
furnishings which the TV may be placed on or the wall which the back 
of the TV faces. All four corners of the face of the TV shall be 
placed equidistant from a vertical reference plane (e.g. wall).

5. TV and Video Signal Configuration

    5.1. Additional Functions. The TV shall be set up according to 
the requirements in section 11.4.5 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    5.2. Video Connection Priority. The TV and the video input 
device shall be connected using an HDMI input cable. If the TV does 
not have an HDMI input terminal, the specified input terminals shall 
be used in the following order: Component video, S-video, and 
Composite video.
    5.3. Input Terminal. If the TV has multiple input terminals of 
the same type (i.e. HDMI 1, HDMI 2), testing shall only be performed 
using any input terminal designed for viewing live TV or dynamic 
content from a BD player or STB, not from an input designed for an 
alternative purpose. Examples 1 and 2 provide visual explanations of 
this requirement.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TR25OC13.010

    5.4. Special Functions. The TV shall be set up according to the 
requirements in section 11.4.6 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    5.5. Special Function Configuration. If at any time during on 
mode operation a message prompt is displayed requesting the 
configuration of special functions, the most power consumptive 
configuration shall be selected. If it is unknown which 
configuration yields the most power consumptive state, verify the 
selection by measuring the power consumption of each possible 
configuration.

    Note: The selection of the home or retail configuration within 
the forced menu is not considered the configuration of a special 
function, and is therefore exempt from this requirement.

    5.6. On Mode Picture Setting. Ensure that the TV is in the 
default picture setting within the home configuration for all on 
mode tests. This picture setting shall only be changed as instructed 
by the luminance test.
    5.7. Video Aspect Ratio. The input video signal shall be 
configured in accordance with section 11.4.9 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 
(incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3)
    5.8. Frame Rate. The video frame rate shall be selected in 
accordance with section 11.4.10 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated 
by reference; see Sec.  430.3)
    5.9. Sound level. The TV sound level shall be configured in 
accordance with section 11.4.11 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated 
by reference; see Sec.  430.3)
    5.10. Network Connection Configuration.
    5.10.1. Network Connections and Capabilities. Network 
connections should be listed in the user manual. If no connections 
are specified in the user manual, verify that the TV does not have 
network capabilities by checking for the absence of physical

[[Page 63844]]

connections and the absence of network settings in the menu. If the 
TV has the capability to be connected to a network but was not 
shipped with a required piece of hardware (e.g. wireless adapter), 
that connection type shall not be tested.
    5.10.2. Network Configuration. If the TV is network enabled, 
connect it to a LAN in on mode and prior to being placed into 
standby mode. The LAN shall allow devices to ping other devices on 
the network but will not allow access to a WAN. If the TV has 
multiple network connections (e.g., Wi-Fi and Ethernet), the TV 
shall be configured and connected to a single network source in 
accordance with the hierarchy of connections listed in Table 1 of 
this section.

                  Table 1--Network Connection Hierarchy
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Priority                      Network connection type
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.........................................  Wi-Fi (Institution of
                                             Electrical and Electronics
                                             Engineers--IEEE 802.11-
                                             20072)
2.........................................  Ethernet (IEEE 802.3). If
                                             the TV supports Energy
                                             Efficient Ethernet (IEEE
                                             802.3az-20103), then it
                                             shall be connected to a
                                             device that also supports
                                             IEEE 802.3az.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

6. Calculation of Average Power Consumption

    6.1. Average Power Calculation. For all tests in the on, 
standby-active, low, and standby-passive modes, the average power 
shall be calculated using one of the following two methods:
    6.1.1. Record the accumulated energy (Ei) in kilo-
watt hours (kWh) consumed over the time period specified for each 
test (Ti). The average power consumption is calculated as 
Pi = Ei/Ti.
    6.1.2. Record the average power consumption (Pi) by 
sampling the power at a rate of at least 1 sample per second and 
computing the arithmetic mean of all samples over the time period 
specified for each test (Ti).
    The resulting average power consumption value for each mode of 
operation shall be rounded according to the accurary requirements 
specified in section 3.3.3 of this section.
    7. Test Measurements.
    7.1. On Mode Test.
    7.1.1. On Mode Stabilization. If the TV has an ABC sensor 
enabled by default, direct at least 300 lx into the ABC sensor. The 
TV shall be stabilized prior to testing on mode using the IEC 62087 
Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray Disc\TM\ dynamic broadcast-content video signal in 
accordance with section 11.4.2 of IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    7.1.2. On Mode Test for TVs without ABC Enabled by Default. The 
following test shall be performed if the TV is shipped with ABC 
disabled by default or the ABC function is unavailable. Display the 
IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray Disc\TM\ dynamic broadcast-content video 
signal for one 10-minute period (incorporated by reference, see 
Sec.  430.3). Measure and record the average power consumption value 
over the test duration as Pon.
    7.1.3. On Mode Test for TVs with ABC Enabled by Default. The 
following test shall be performed if the TV is shipped with ABC 
enabled by default:
    7.1.3.1. Illuminance Values. Display the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-
ray Disc\TM\ dynamic broadcast-content video signal for one 10-
minute period (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3) with 100 
lx ( 5 lx) entering the ABC sensor. Measure and record 
the average power consumption value over the test duration as 
P100. Repeat the measurements with 35 lx ( 2 
lx), 12 lx ( 1 lx), and 3 lux ( 1 lx) 
entering the ABC sensor and record the values as P35, 
P12, and P3 respectively. Testing shall be 
performed from the brightest to dimmest illuminance value and the 
values shall be changed by varying the input voltage to the light 
source.

    Note: The 3 lx illuminance value shall be simulated using a 67 
mm 2 F-stop neutral density filter. 12 lx is measured at the ABC 
sensor prior to the application of the neutral density filter.

    7.1.3.2. On Mode Power Calculation. All illuminance values shall 
be weighted equally when calculating the on mode power for a TV with 
ABC enabled by default and shall be determined by the following 
equation:

Pon = P100 * W100 + P35 
* W35 + P12 * W12 + P3 * 
W3
Where:
    W100 = W35 = W12 = 
W3 = 0.25

    7.1.3.3. Lamp Requirements. A standard spectrum, halogen 
incandescent aluminized reflector lamp with a lamp diameter of 95 mm 
(10 mm), a beam angle of 30 degrees ( 10 
degrees), and a center beam candlepower of 1500 cd ( 500 
cd) shall be positioned in front of the ABC sensor so that the light 
is directed into the sensor. Note: Lamps with spectrum modifying 
qualities, such as an IR coating, are not considered to meet a 
standard spectrum.
    7.1.3.4. Light Source Set-up. The center of the lamp shall 
measure 1.5 m (0.1 m) from the center of the ABC sensor. 
The light source shall be aligned ensuring that the center focal 
point of the lamp is perpendicular to the center of the ABC sensor.
    7.1.3.5. Illuminance Measurement. The room illuminance shall be 
measured at the sensor in the direction of the light source while 
the TV is on and displaying the first menu from the IEC 62087 Ed. 
3.0 Blu-ray Disc\TM\ dynamic broadcast-content video signal.
    7.2. Luminance Test.
    7.2.1. Luminance Test Set-up.
    7.2.1.1. Picture Setting Set-up. When transitioning from the on 
mode power consumption test to the luminance test, the TV shall 
remain in the default picture setting within the home configuration 
for the first luminance measurement.
    7.2.1.2. ABC Configuration. The ABC sensor shall be disabled at 
all times during the luminance test. If the ABC sensor is incapable 
of being disabled through the TV settings menu, direct at least 300 
lx of light into the ABC sensor.
    7.2.1.3. Stabilization. Prior to the first luminance 
measurement, the TV must undergo a 10-minute re-stabilization period 
using the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 Blu-ray DiscTM dynamic 
broadcast-content video signal.
    7.2.2. Luminance Meter Set-up. Align the luminance meter 
perpendicular to the center of the TV screen. If a non-contact 
luminance meter is used to measure the screen luminance, the 
luminance measurement shall be taken at a distance capable of 
meeting the meter specifications outlined in section 3.1.3, and in 
accordance with the meter's user manual.
    7.2.3. Three Vertical Bar Signal Measurement. The IEC 62087 Ed. 
3.0 three vertical bar signal found in section 11.5.5 of IEC 62087 
Ed. 3.0 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3) shall be 
displayed for no more than 5 seconds when each luminance measurement 
is taken. The luminance measurement taken in the default picture 
setting within the home configuration shall be recorded as 
LDefault--Home.
    7.2.4. Luminance in the Brightest Selectable Preset Picture 
Setting. Using the IEC 62087 Ed. 3.0 three vertical bar signal, 
determine the brightest selectable preset picture setting within the 
home configuration. Measure and record the screen luminance in the 
brightest selectable preset picture setting as 
LBrightest--Home.
    7.2.5. Retail Configuration Luminance Measurement. If the TV has 
a retail configuration and the retail configuration is acceptable 
for making a luminance measurement, measure and record the screen 
luminance in the default picture setting within the retail 
configuration as LDefault--Retail. A retail configuration 
is considered acceptable for a luminance measurement if the TV does 
not display a demo or ticker which alters the screen content, or if 
such features are present, they must be capable of being disabled 
for the entire re-stabilization period and measurement.
    7.3. Standby Mode Test.
    7.3.1. Video Input Device. The video input device shall be 
disconnected from the TV for all testing in standby mode.
    7.3.2. Standby-Passive Mode. The standby-passive mode test shall 
be performed according to section 5.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3). Measure and record the 
average power consumption value over the test duration as 
Pstandby-passive.
    7.3.3. Standby-Active, Low Mode. The standby-active, low mode 
shall only be tested if the TV is capable of connecting to a network 
and is capable of entering this mode of operation. The standby-
active, low mode test shall be performed according to section 5.3.1 
of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3). 
Measure and record the average power consumption value over the test 
duration as Pstandby-active,low.
    7.4. Off Mode Test.
    7.4.1. The off mode test shall be performed according to section 
5.3.1 of IEC 62301 Ed. 2.0 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  
430.3). Measure and record the average power consumption value over 
the test duration as Poff.

[[Page 63845]]

8. Annual Energy Consumption

    8.1. Input Value. The annual energy consumption (AEC) of the TV 
shall be calculated using on mode, standby mode, and off mode power 
consumption values as measured pursuant to section 7.1, 7.3, and 7.4 
respectively.
    8.2. Rounding. Calculate the AEC of the TV using the equation 
below. The calculated AEC value shall be rounded as follows:
    If the calculated AEC value is 100 kWh or less, the rated value 
shall be rounded to the nearest tenth of a kWh;
    If the calculated AEC value is greater than 100 kWh, the rated 
value shall be rounded to the nearest kWh.
    8.3. Calculations. Express the AEC in kWh per year, according to 
the following:
AEC = 365 * (Pon * Hon + 
Pstandby-active, low * Hstandby-active, low + 
Pstandby-passive * Hstandby-passive + 
Poff * Hoff)/1000
Where:
    Pm = power measured in a given mode m (in Watts)
    Hm = hours per day spent in mode m
    365 = conversion factor from daily to yearly
    1000 = conversion factor from watts to kilowatts

    Values for Hm (in hours/day) are specified in Table 2 
of this section:

                                           Table 2--Hourly Weightings
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     Hstandby-       Hstandby-
            Standby-active, low mode                    Hon         active, low       passive          Hoff
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yes.............................................               5              19               0               0
No..............................................               5               0              19               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


[FR Doc. 2013-24346 Filed 10-24-13; 8:45 a.m.]
BILLING CODE 6450-01-P