[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 39 (Thursday, February 27, 2014)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 10999-11004]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-04304]


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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

10 CFR Part 431

[Docket Number EERE-2014-BT-TP-0008]
RIN 1904-AD18


Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial 
Equipment: Test Procedure for Commercial Water Heating Equipment

AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of 
Energy.

ACTION: Request for information (RFI).

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SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating a rulemaking 
and data collection process to consider amendments to the DOE test 
procedures for commercial water heaters, unfired hot water storage 
tanks, and hot water supply boilers (henceforth, ``commercial water 
heating equipment''). To inform interested parties and to facilitate 
this process, DOE has identified several issues associated with the 
current Federal test procedures on which DOE is particularly interested 
in receiving comment. In overview, the issues outlined in this document 
mainly concern updating the industry test standards that are currently 
incorporated by reference to the most recent versions, potential 
alternative methods for determining the efficiency of unfired storage 
tanks, potential changes to the method for setting the thermostat, 
potential clarifications in the thermal efficiency test method, and the 
potential inclusion of a test method for commercial heat pump water 
heaters (HPWH). DOE anticipates that these issues (as well as any 
others which are identified during the course of this rulemaking) may 
lead to proposed test procedure amendments in a subsequent notice of 
proposed rulemaking (NOPR). DOE welcomes written comments and data from 
the public on all aspects of this test procedure, including topics not 
raised in this RFI.

DATES: DOE will accept written comments, data, and information on or 
before March 31, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Interested parties are encouraged to submit comments 
electronically. However, interested persons may submit comments, 
identified by docket number EERE-2014-BT-TP-0008 and/or regulatory

[[Page 11000]]

identification number (RIN) 1904-AD18, by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov. Follow 
the instructions for submitting comments.
     Email: CommWaterHeatingEquip2014TP0008@ee.doe.gov. 
Include docket number EERE-2014-BT-TP-0008 and/or RIN 1904-AD18 in the 
subject line of the message. All comments should clearly identify the 
name, address, and, if appropriate, organization of the commenter. 
Submit electronic comments in WordPerfect, Microsoft Word, portable 
document format (PDF), or American Standard Code for Information 
Interchange (ASCII) file format, and avoid the use of special 
characters or any form of encryption.
     Postal Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of 
Energy, Building Technologies Office, Mailstop EE-5B, RFI for 
Commercial Water Heating Equipment, Docket No. EERE-2014-BT-TP-0008 
and/or RIN 1904-AD18, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 
20585-0121. If possible, please submit all items on a compact disc 
(CD), in which case it is not necessary to include printed copies.
     Hand Delivery/Courier: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department 
of Energy, Building Technologies Program, 6th Floor, 950 L'Enfant Plaza 
SW., Washington, DC 20024. Telephone: (202) 586-2945. If possible, 
please submit all items on a CD, in which case it is not necessary to 
include printed copies.
    Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name 
and docket number and/or RIN for this rulemaking. No telefacsimilies 
(faxes) will be accepted. For further information on the rulemaking 
process, see section III of this document (Public Participation).
    Docket: The docket is available for review at www.regulations.gov, 
including Federal Register notices, comments, and other supporting 
documents/materials. All documents in the docket are listed in the 
www.regulations.gov index. However, not all documents listed in the 
index may be publicly available, such as information that is exempt 
from public disclosure.
    A link to the docket Web page can be found at: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=EERE-2014-BT-TP-0008. This Web 
page contains a link to the docket for this notice on the 
www.regulations.gov Web site. The www.regulations.gov Web page contains 
simple instructions on how to access all documents, including public 
comments, in the docket.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Ashley Armstrong, U.S. Department 
of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building 
Technologies Office, EE-5B, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, 
DC 20585-0121. Telephone: (202) 586-6590. Email: 
Ashley.Armstrong@ee.doe.gov.
    Mr. Eric Stas, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of the General 
Counsel, GC-71, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585-
0121. Telephone: (202) 586-9507. Email: Eric.Stas@hq.doe.gov.
    For information on how to submit a comment, or review other public 
comments and the docket, contact Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of 
Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building 
Technologies Office, Mailstop EE-5B, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, 
Washington, DC 20585-0121. Telephone: (202) 586-2945. Email: 
Brenda.Edwards@ee.doe.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Table of Contents

I. Authority and Background
II. Discussion
    A. Updated Industry Test Method
    B. Unfired Hot Water Storage Tanks
    C. Setting the Thermostat for Commercial Water Heater Testing
    D. Clarification of the Thermal Efficiency Test Procedure
    E. Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters
    F. Other Issues
III. Public Participation
    A. Submission of Comments
    B. Issues on Which DOE Seeks Comment

I. Authority and Background

    Title III, Part C \1\ of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 
1975 (EPCA or the Act), Public Law 94-163 (42 U.S.C. 6311-6317, as 
codified), added by Public Law 95-619, Title IV, Sec.  441(a), 
established the Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial 
Equipment, which includes provisions covering the types of commercial 
water heating equipment that are the subject of this notice.\2\ In 
general, this program is intended to improve the energy efficiency of 
certain types of commercial and industrial equipment. Relevant 
provisions of the Act include definitions (42 U.S.C. 6311), energy 
conservation standards (42 U.S.C. 6313), test procedures (42 U.S.C. 
6314), labeling provisions (42 U.S.C. 6315), and the authority to 
require information and reports from manufacturers (42 U.S.C. 6316). 
The testing requirements consist of test procedures that manufacturers 
of covered equipment must use as both the basis for certifying to DOE 
that their equipment complies with the applicable energy conservation 
standards adopted pursuant to EPCA, and for making representations 
about the efficiency of that equipment. (42 U.S.C. 6314; 42 U.S.C. 
6316)
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    \1\ For editorial reasons, upon codification in the U.S. Code, 
Part C was redesignated Part A-1.
    \2\ All references to EPCA in this document refer to the statute 
as amended through the American Energy Manufacturing Technical 
Corrections Act (AEMTCA), Public Law 112-210 (Dec. 18, 2012).
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    The initial test procedures for commercial water heating equipment 
corresponded to those referenced in the American Society of Heating, 
Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and Illuminating 
Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1 (i.e., 
ASHRAE Standard 90.1) which went into effect on October 24, 1992. EPCA 
requires that if an industry test procedure that is referenced in 
ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is amended, DOE must establish an amended test 
procedure to be consistent with the amended industry test procedure, 
unless DOE determines that the amended test procedure is not reasonably 
designed to produce test results which reflect the energy efficiency, 
energy use, or estimated operating costs of the equipment during a 
representative average use cycle; in addition, DOE must determine that 
the amended test procedure is not unduly burdensome to conduct. (42 
U.S.C. 6314(a)(2) and (4))
    If DOE determines that a test procedure amendment is warranted, it 
must publish a proposed test procedure and offer the public an 
opportunity to present oral and written comments. (42 U.S.C. 
6314(b)(1)-(2)) To amend a test procedure, DOE must determine the 
extent to which the proposed test procedure would alter the equipment's 
measured energy efficiency. If DOE determines that the amended test 
procedure would alter the measured efficiency of the covered equipment, 
DOE must amend the applicable energy conservation standard accordingly. 
(42 U.S.C. 6314(a)(4)(C); 42 U.S.C. 6293(e))
    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), 
Public Law 110-140, amended EPCA to require that at least once every 7 
years, DOE must review test procedures for all covered equipment and 
either: (1) Amend the test procedures if the Secretary determines that 
the amended test procedures would more accurately or fully comply with 
the requirements of 42 U.S.C. 6314(a)(2)-(3),\3\ or (2)

[[Page 11001]]

publish a notice of determination not to amend a test procedure. (42 
U.S.C. 6314(a)(1)(A)) Under this requirement, DOE must review the test 
procedures for commercial water heating equipment no later than May 16, 
2019, which is 7 years after the most recent final rule amending the 
Federal test method for commercial water heating equipment.\4\ The 
final rule resulting from this rulemaking will satisfy the requirement 
to review the test procedure for commercial water heating equipment 
within 7 years.
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    \3\ 42 U.S.C. 6314(a)(2) requires that test procedures be 
reasonably designed to produce test results which reflect energy 
efficiency, energy use, and estimated operating costs of a type of 
industrial equipment (or class thereof) during a representative 
average use cycle (as determined by the Secretary), and not be 
unduly burdensome to conduct.
     42 U.S.C. 6314(a)(3) requires that if the test procedure is a 
procedure for determining estimated annual operating costs, such 
procedure must provide that such costs are calculated from 
measurements of energy use in a representative average-use cycle (as 
determined by the Secretary), and from representative average unit 
costs of the energy needed to operate such equipment during such 
cycle. The Secretary must provide information to manufacturers of 
covered equipment regarding representative average unit costs of 
energy.
    \4\ DOE published a final rule in the Federal Register on May 
16, 2012, that, in relevant part, amended its test procedure for 
commercial water-heating equipment. 77 FR 28928.
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    DOE's commercial water heating equipment test procedure is found in 
the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 10 CFR 431.106, Uniform test 
method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial water 
heaters and hot water supply boilers (other than commercial heat pump 
water heaters.\5\ DOE's test procedure for commercial water heating 
equipment provides a method for determining the thermal efficiency and 
standby loss of commercial water heating equipment. DOE initially 
incorporated by reference certain sections of the American National 
Standards Institute Standard (ANSI) Z21.10.3-1998 (ANSI Z21.10.3-1998), 
Gas Water Heaters, Volume III, Storage Water Heaters, With Input 
Ratings Above 75,000 Btu Per Hour, Circulating and Instantaneous. 69 FR 
61974, 61984 (Oct. 21, 2004). On May 16, 2012, DOE published a final 
rule in the Federal Register to update the test procedures to 
incorporate by reference the most recent version of the relevant 
industry test procedure at the time of publication, ANSI Z21.10.3-2011 
(same title). 77 FR 28928. The most recent updates did not materially 
alter the procedure.
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    \5\ DOE has reserved a place in its regulations for commercial 
heat pump water heaters at 10 CFR 431.107, Uniform test method for 
the measurement of energy efficiency for commercial heat pump water 
heaters.
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    The American Energy Manufacturing Technical Corrections Act 
(AEMTCA), Public Law 112-210, was signed into law on December 18, 2012 
and amended EPCA to require that DOE publish a final rule establishing 
a uniform efficiency descriptor and accompanying test methods for 
residential water heaters and certain commercial water heating 
equipment. (42 U.S.C. 6295(e)(5)) AEMTCA required DOE to replace the 
current efficiency metric for residential water heaters (Energy 
Factor), and the current efficiency metrics for commercial water 
heaters (thermal efficiency and standby loss), with a uniform 
efficiency descriptor. (42 U.S.C. 6295(e)(5)(C)) Further, AEMTCA 
required that the uniform efficiency descriptor and accompanying test 
method apply, to the maximum extent possible, to all water heating 
technologies currently in use and to future water heating technologies. 
(42 U.S.C. 6295(e)(5)(H)) However, AEMTCA allowed DOE to exclude from 
the uniform efficiency descriptor specific categories of covered water 
heaters that do not have residential uses, that can be clearly 
described, and that are effectively rated using the current thermal 
efficiency and standby loss descriptors. (42 U.S.C. 6295(e)(5)(F))
    DOE published an RFI on January 11, 2013 that requested feedback on 
several topics mainly associated with: (1) Currently available 
efficiency metrics and test procedures for rating the efficiency of 
residential and certain commercial water heaters; (2) the requirements 
for a uniform metric set forth in the AEMTCA; and (3) available options 
for DOE to address those statutory requirements. 78 FR 2340. After 
considering comments on the RFI, DOE published a NOPR in the Federal 
Register on November 4, 2013 (henceforth the ``November 2013 NOPR'') 
that proposed to update the test procedures for residential and certain 
commercial water heaters. 78 FR 66202.
    The November 2013 NOPR proposed to modify the current residential 
water heater metric (Energy Factor) to be used as the uniform 
descriptor for all residential and certain commercial water heating 
equipment that have residential uses (i.e., ``light commercial water 
heaters''). DOE also proposed to exclude certain water heaters from 
coverage under the uniform descriptor that have no residential use, can 
be clearly identified and described, and that are effectively rated 
using the current thermal efficiency and standby loss efficiency 
descriptors. 78 FR 66202, 66206 (Nov. 4, 2013).
    In this rulemaking for the test procedures for commercial water 
heating equipment, DOE is only considering the commercial water heating 
equipment that was not covered by the test method developed for the 
November 2013 NOPR. DOE will update the scope of this rulemaking as 
necessary based on changes, if any, to the scope of the final rule 
establishing the uniform efficiency descriptor.
    In support of its test procedure rulemaking, DOE conducts in-depth 
technical analyses of publicly-available test standards and other 
relevant information. DOE continually seeks data and public input to 
improve its testing methodologies to more accurately reflect customer 
use and to produce repeatable results. In general, DOE is requesting 
comment and supporting data regarding representative and repeatable 
methods for measuring the energy use of commercial water heating 
equipment. In particular, DOE seeks comment and information on the 
specific topics discussed below.

II. Discussion

A. Updated Industry Test Method

    Beginning on May 13, 2013, the industry test method for measuring 
energy efficiency for commercial water heaters and hot water supply 
boilers referenced by the DOE test procedure is ANSI Z21.10.3-2011. 10 
CFR 431.106. The DOE test procedure references Exhibit G1 and Exhibit 
G2 of ANSI Z21.10.3-2011 for measuring thermal efficiency and standby 
loss, respectively. The most recent edition of the industry test 
method, ANSI Z21.10.3-2013/Canadian Standards Association (CSA) 4.3-
2013, Gas-fired Water Heaters, Volume III, Storage Water Heaters with 
Input Ratings above 75,000 Btu per Hour, Circulating and Instantaneous, 
was released in 2013. The only substantive difference between the 2011 
and 2013 version, as it pertains to the sections referenced by DOE, 
were changes in the numbering and order of sections.
    DOE plans to consider updating the DOE test procedure to reference 
the updated industry test method for measuring thermal efficiency and 
standby loss to ANSI Z21.10.3-2013/CSA 4.3 -2013 Annex E.1 and Annex 
E.2, respectively. These references shall replace previous references 
to Exhibits G1 and G2 in the 2011 industry test method.
    Issue 1: DOE requests feedback on the appropriateness of using the 
ANSI Z21.10.3-2013/CSA 4.3-2013 industry test method to replace the 
current reference to ANSI Z21.10.3-2011. DOE is also interested in 
information and data pertaining to the repeatability of thermal 
efficiency and standby loss tests included in the ANSI Z21.10.3-2011

[[Page 11002]]

test method and the ANSI Z21.10.3-2013 test method.

B. Unfired Hot Water Storage Tanks

    DOE defines an ``unfired hot water storage tank'' as ``a tank used 
to store water that is heated externally, and that is industrial 
equipment.'' 10 CFR 431.102. As explained in the November 2013 NOPR, 
DOE has proposed to exclude unfired hot water storage tanks from the 
uniform efficiency descriptor required by AEMTCA. 78 FR 66202, 66207 
(Nov. 4, 2013). Therefore, DOE plans to address the test procedure for 
this equipment in this rulemaking.
    The Federal standard for unfired hot water storage tanks requires a 
minimum level of tank insulation, which is an R-value of 12.5. 10 CFR 
431.110. DOE's test procedure for commercial water heating equipment at 
10 CFR 431.106 does not currently include a method of testing energy 
efficiency of unfired hot water storage tanks. Although DOE does not 
specify a test method for unfired storage tanks in 10 CFR 431.106, DOE 
defines ``R-value'' as follows:

    R-value means the thermal resistance of insulating material as 
determined based on ASTM Standard Test Method C177-97 or C518-91 and 
expressed in ([deg]F[middot]ft\2\[middot]h/Btu).

10 CFR 431.102.

    Thus, to determine the R-value of the insulation, one of two 
industry standards must be used: (1) American Society for Testing and 
Materials (ASTM) C177-97, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat 
Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the 
Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus; or (2) ASTM C518-10, Standard Test Method 
for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat 
Flow Meter Apparatus. DOE's definition of ``R-value'' inherently 
includes the industry test methods that should be used for determining 
the R-value of the storage tank insulation. However, the ASTM test 
methods C518 and C177 are not necessarily designed for measuring the R-
value of test specimens, in this case unfired storage tanks.
    While the two test methods both measure thermal transmission 
properties, they vary in complexity and apparent difficulty. The two 
test methods differ in complexity in terms of the measuring equipment 
required. For instance, ASTM C518 requires the use of a heat flux 
transducer to directly measure the heat flux through a specimen, while 
ASTM C177 only requires temperature sensors (e.g., thermocouples, 
thermistors). However, both test methods have very similar test 
procedures, with the main similarity being the requirement of the 
establishment of thermal equilibrium within the apparatus.
    There are also minor sampling differences between the two methods: 
ASTM C177 requires three sampling runs of at least thirty minutes, 
while ASTM C518 requires five samplings in intervals of at least ten 
minutes. However, ASTM C518 notes that the time between sample readings 
may need to be increased to thirty minutes or longer for high-
resistance or high-density specimens. Another major difference between 
the two methods is that the ASTM C518 method requires the constant 
calculation of the specimen's thermal conductivity during a test run, 
while ASTM C177 only stipulates acquisition of temperature and power 
data (and calculates the thermal conductivity after the test is 
completed based on the data).
    The two referenced ASTM test methods also share many similarities: 
Specifying the appropriate orientations of apparatus components, 
providing instructions for calibrating the test measurement system, and 
including procedures for specimen conditioning and stabilization. In 
addition, both test methods require flat specimens.
    DOE is considering several options to improve the test method for 
commercial unfired hot water storage tanks. First, DOE is considering 
establishing a test method in 10 CFR 431.106 to clarify the applicable 
test procedure for unfired storage tanks. DOE is considering the 
potential for a single method of determining R-value to ensure that all 
R-values are determined on a consistent and equitable basis. However, 
DOE notes that unfired hot water storage tank manufacturers may not 
test the insulation of their tanks, but rather rely on the R-value 
information provided by the insulation manufacturer. Furthermore, DOE 
is considering whether having a test procedure that determines R-value 
for unfired storage tanks may be inappropriate, given that the methods 
for determining R-value are intended for determining the R-value of a 
flat sample, rather than an entire storage tank. In addition, DOE notes 
that determining the R-value of a single sample does not allow for the 
assessment of whether this value is applicable to the entire surface of 
the tank, including bottom, top, and fitting areas. DOE examined the 
product literature for the commercially-available unfired hot water 
storage tanks that DOE identified on the market and found that 
approximately 55 percent of the available models were shipped without 
any insulation, but rather were insulated in the field. Thus, DOE is 
considering alternative metrics, such as a standby loss test for 
unfired hot water storage tanks.
    Since unfired hot water storage tanks do not consume gas or 
electricity, any test procedure to measure standby loss would not 
include a measurement of energy consumption. Rather, the test could 
entail running pre-heated water at a specified temperature through the 
vessel until a specified mean internal tank temperature is achieved, 
and measuring the thermal energy loss of the water over a given period 
of time. In addition, a method to measure storage volume of the tank 
would need to be developed, which could entail measuring the weight of 
the tank before and after filling it with water and calculating the 
storage volume based on the change in weight and density of water. DOE 
requests comment on several aspects of a potential standby loss test 
procedure for commercial unfired storage tanks including: (1) Target 
mean tank temperature; (2) ambient air temperature; (3) time duration 
of the test; (4) location of temperature sensors; and (5) whether to 
keep the tank connected or disconnected to inlet and outlet piping 
during the test.
    Issue 2: DOE requests comment on whether updates to DOE's 
incorporated test methods for unfired hot water storage tanks are 
needed. In particular, DOE requests comment on whether a single test 
method for R-value should be used (and if so, which industry method is 
most appropriate), or whether replacing R-value with standby loss or 
some other metric as the energy efficiency descriptor for unfired hot 
water storage tanks would be preferable. If a new metric such as 
standby loss is more appropriate than R-value, DOE requests feedback on 
the best way to establish a standby loss test and the parameters of 
such a test method.

C. Setting the Thermostat for Commercial Water Heater Testing

    DOE's test method for measuring energy efficiency of commercial 
water heating equipment currently requires specific conditions be met 
for inlet water temperature and the mean tank temperature before the 
test begins. In particular, ANSI Z21.10.3-2011, Exhibit G, section 1.g 
(which is incorporated by reference into the DOE test procedure) 
requires that before starting testing, the thermostat shall be set by 
starting with the water in the system at 70[deg]  2 [deg]F 
(21[deg]  1 [deg]C) and the maximum mean temperature of the 
water after the thermostat reduces the gas supply to a minimum, shall 
be 140[deg]  5 [deg]F (60[deg] 3 [deg]C).

[[Page 11003]]

    DOE understands that some units may experience issues pertaining to 
the above set point conditions. Specifically, for certain commercial 
water heaters, the mean tank temperature may not reach the required 
140[deg]  5 [deg]F (60[deg]  3 [deg]C) after 
the first cut-out, even when the thermostat is set to the maximum 
setting. In such cases, the outlet temperature of the hot water may be 
at, or even well above 140[deg]  5 [deg]F (60[deg]  3 [deg]C); however, due to stratification in the tank, the mean 
tank temperature may not reach 140[deg]  5 [deg]F (60[deg] 
 3 [deg]C). The Department requests comment on potential 
test procedure changes to address this issue, including either a lower 
mean tank temperature requirement (if feasible) or a measurement of 
outlet water temperature rather than mean tank temperature.
    Issue 3: DOE requests comment on potential test procedure changes 
to address issues with setting the tank thermostat, including (but not 
limited to) either a lower mean tank temperature requirement or a 
measurement of outlet water temperature rather than mean tank 
temperature.

D. Clarification of the Thermal Efficiency Test Procedure

    DOE's test method for measuring the thermal efficiency of 
commercial water heaters incorporates by reference ANSI Z21.10.3-2011, 
Exhibit G, section 1. In particular, section 1.j describes the 
procedure used to conduct the 30-minute test and the technique to 
calculate the thermal efficiency. DOE notes that the formula used to 
compute the thermal efficiency does not account for any changes in heat 
content stored inside the water heater during the test. This change in 
stored energy could change the computation of thermal efficiency since 
some of the energy input to the water heater does not appear as heat 
delivered by the water heater. DOE requests comment on whether such a 
term is needed or whether provisions should be added to the test 
procedure to ensure that the temperature of the water in the tank does 
not change from the start of the 30-minute test to the end. 
Furthermore, DOE notes that the only specification on the rate of flow 
is that the outlet temperature is constant for 3 minutes. This 
specification makes no mention of the temperature within the water 
heater, the status of the burners or heating elements before and during 
the test, appropriate levels of flow rates, or the fuel consumption 
rate for water heaters with variable firing rates. DOE requests comment 
on whether a clarification is required to ensure that the flow rate 
implemented during this test is expected to require continuous burner 
operation or whether the water heater is allowed to cycle its burner to 
meet the demand imposed by the water draw.
    Issue 4: DOE requests comment on whether clarifications are needed 
to the test procedure for determining thermal efficiency of commercial 
water heaters to indicate required flow rates and to account for 
potential changes in stored heat within the water heater from the start 
of the 30-minute test to the end.

E. Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters

    Currently, DOE does not have a test procedure for commercial heat 
pump water heaters (although a place is reserved at 10 CFR 431.107). 
However, DOE will consider whether to adopt test procedures for such 
equipment in this rulemaking. DOE is aware of two industry test methods 
that could potentially be adopted by DOE as the test method for 
commercial heat pump water heaters. In particular, DOE is aware of 
ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 118.1-2012, Method of Testing for Rating 
Commercial Gas, Electric, and Oil Service Water-Heating Equipment, and 
the Air-conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) 
Standard 1300, 2013 Standard for Performance Rating of Commercial Heat 
Pump Water Heaters. ASHRAE 118.1-2012 includes test methods for 
determining coefficient of performance (COP) and standby loss for 
commercial heat pump water heaters, and AHRI 1300 references the ASHRAE 
118.1-2012 test method and also specifies various rating conditions 
(e.g., evaporator entering air temperatures (for air-source heat pump 
water heaters), evaporator entering water temperatures (for water-
source heat pump water heaters), and condenser entering water 
temperatures). DOE may consider adopting these industry test methods or 
other methods as part of this rulemaking and seeks comment regarding 
the appropriate test method for commercial heat pump water heaters.
    Issue 5: DOE seeks comment on appropriate test procedures for 
commercial heat pump water heaters. In particular, DOE is interested in 
receiving comments and information relating to the industry test 
methods that are available (i.e., ASHRAE 118.1-2012 and AHRI 1300) and 
whether any modifications to those standards would be needed for 
adoption as the Federal test method.

F. Other Issues

    DOE also seeks comments on other relevant issues that would affect 
the test procedures for commercial water heating equipment. Although 
DOE has attempted to identify those portions of the test procedure 
where it believes amendments may be warranted, interested parties are 
welcome to provide comments on any aspect of the test procedure, 
including updates of referenced standards, as part of this 
comprehensive 7-year-review rulemaking.

III. Public Participation

A. Submission of Comments

    DOE will accept comments, data, and information regarding this RFI 
no later than the date provided in the DATES section at the beginning 
of this RFI. Interested parties may submit comments using any of the 
methods described in the ADDRESSES section at the beginning of this 
RFI. After the close of the comment period, DOE will begin collecting 
data, conducting the analyses, and reviewing the public comments. These 
actions will be taken to aid in the development of a test procedure 
NOPR for commercial water heating equipment.
    DOE considers public participation to be a very important part of 
the process for developing test procedures. DOE actively encourages the 
participation and interaction of the public during the comment period 
in each stage of the rulemaking process. Interactions with and between 
members of the public provide a balanced discussion of the issues and 
assist DOE in the rulemaking process. Anyone who wishes to be added to 
the DOE mailing list to receive future notices and information about 
this rulemaking should contact Ms. Brenda Edwards at (202) 586-2945, or 
via email at Brenda.Edwards@ee.doe.gov.

B. Issues on Which DOE Seeks Comment

    Although DOE welcomes comments on any aspect of this RFI and its 
test procedure for commercial water heating equipment, DOE is 
particularly interested in receiving comments and views of interested 
parties concerning the following issues:
    1. DOE requests feedback on the appropriateness of using the ANSI 
Z21.10.3-2013/CSA 4.3-2013 industry test method to replace the 
reference to ANSI Z21.10.3-2011. DOE is also interested in information 
and data pertaining to the repeatability of thermal efficiency and 
standby loss tests included in the ANSI Z21.10.3-2011

[[Page 11004]]

test method and the ANSI Z21.10.3-2013 test method.
    2. DOE requests comment on whether updates to DOE's incorporated 
test methods for unfired hot water storage tanks are needed. In 
particular, DOE requests comment on whether a single test method for R-
value should be used (and if so, which industry method is most 
appropriate), or whether replacing R-value with standby loss as the 
energy efficiency descriptor for unfired hot water storage tanks would 
be preferable. If a new metric such as standby loss is more appropriate 
than R-value, DOE requests feedback on the best way to establish a 
standby loss test and the parameters of such a test method.
    3. DOE requests comment on potential test procedure changes to 
address issues with setting the tank thermostat, including (but not 
limited to) either a lower mean tank temperature requirement or a 
measurement of outlet water temperature rather than mean tank 
temperature.
    4. DOE requests comment on whether clarifications are needed to the 
test procedure for thermal efficiency of commercial water heaters to 
indicate required flow rates and to account for potential changes in 
thermal energy within the water heater from the start of the 30-minute 
test to the end.
    5. DOE seeks comment on appropriate test procedures for commercial 
heat pump water heaters. In particular, DOE is interested in receiving 
comments and information relating to the industry test methods that are 
available (i.e., ASHRAE 118.1-2012 and AHRI 1300) and whether any 
modifications to those standards would be needed for adoption as the 
Federal test method.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on February 21, 2014.
Kathleen B. Hogan,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency and 
Renewable Energy.
[FR Doc. 2014-04304 Filed 2-26-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6450-01-P