[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 93 (Wednesday, May 14, 2014)]
[Notices]
[Pages 27676-27681]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-11074]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Highway Administration


Notice of Funding Availability for the Tribal Transportation 
Program Safety Funds

AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Notice of funding availability.

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SUMMARY: This notice announces the availability of funding and requests 
grant applications for FHWA's Tribal Transportation Program Safety 
Funds (TTPSF). In addition, this notice identifies selection criteria, 
application requirements, and technical assistance during the grant 
solicitation period for the TTPSF.
    The TTPSF is authorized within the Tribal Transportation Program 
(TTP) under the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-
21). The FHWA will distribute these funds as described in this notice 
on a competitive basis in a manner consistent with the selection 
criteria.

DATES: Applications must be submitted through ttpsf@dot.gov no later 
than 5 p.m., e.t. on June 30, 2014 (the ``application deadline''). 
Applicants are encouraged to submit applications in advance of the 
application deadline; however, applications will not be evaluated, and 
awards will not be made until after the application deadline.
    The FHWA plans to conduct outreach regarding the TTPSF in the form 
of a Webinar on May 20, 2014 at 2:00 p.m., e.t. To join the Webinar, 
please click this link then enter the room as a guest: https://
connectdot.connectsolutions.com/

[[Page 27677]]

tribaltrans/. The audio portion of the Webinar can be accessed from 
this teleconference line: TOLL FREE 1-888-251-2909; ACCESS CODE 
4442306. The Webinar will be recorded and posted on FHWA's Web site at: 
http://www.flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/ttp/safety/. A TDD is available 
for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing at 202-366-3993.

ADDRESSES: Applications must be submitted electronically to 
ttpsf@dot.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information concerning 
this notice please contact Russell Garcia, TTPSF Program Manager, via 
email at russell.garcia@dot.gov; by telephone at 202-366-9815; or by 
mail at Federal Highway Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., 
Washington, DC 20590. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
e.t., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For legal 
questions, please contact Ms. Vivian Philbin, Office of the Chief 
Counsel, by telephone at (720) 963-3445; by email at 
vivian.philbin@dot.gov; or by mail at Federal Highway Administration, 
Central Federal Lands Highway Division, 12300 West Dakota Avenue, 
Lakewood, CO 80228. Office hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. m.t., 
Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 5, 2013, FHWA published the first 
notice of funding availability for the TTPSF (78 FR 47480). On November 
13, 2013, FHWA awarded 183 tribes a total of $8.6 million for 193 
projects to improve transportation safety on tribal lands. The FHWA is 
publishing this notice to announce the availability of an additional 
round of funding and request grant applications.

Table of Contents

I. Background
II. Eligibility
    A. Entities Eligible To Apply for Funding
    B. Eligible Uses of Funds
III. Selection Criteria and Policy Considerations
    A. Safety Plans and Safety Planning Activities (funding goal 40% 
of TTPSF)
    B. Engineering Improvements (Funding Goal 30% of TTPSF)
    C. Enforcement and Emergency Services Improvements (Funding Goal 
20% of TTPSF)
    D. Education Programs (Funding Goal 10% of TTPSF)
IV. Evaluation Process
V. Application Process
    A. Contents of Applications
    B. Standard Form 424, Applications for Federal Assistance
    C. Narrative (Attachment to SF-424)
    D. Contact Information
VI. Program Funding and Award
VII. Consultation

I. Background

    On July 6, 2012, President Obama signed into law MAP-21 (Pub. L. 
112-141), which authorizes TTPSF as a set aside of not more than 2 
percent of the funds made available under the TTP for each of Fiscal 
Years (FY) 2013 and 2014. Section 202(e) of title 23, United States 
Code (U.S.C.), provides that the funds are to be allocated based on an 
identification and analysis of highway safety issues and opportunities 
on tribal lands, as determined by the Secretary, on application of the 
Indian tribal governments for eligible projects described in 23 U.S.C. 
148(a)(4). Eligible projects described in section 148(a)(4) include 
strategies, activities, and projects on a public road that are 
consistent with a State strategic highway safety plan and correct or 
improve a hazardous road location or feature, or address a highway 
safety problem.
    Section 202(e) further specifies that in applying for TTPSF, an 
Indian tribal government, in cooperation with the Secretary of the 
Interior and, as appropriate, with a State, local government, or 
metropolitan planning organization, shall select projects from the 
transportation improvement program (TIP), subject to the approval of 
the Secretary of Transportation and the Secretary of the Interior.

II. Eligibility

A. Entities Eligible To Apply for Funding

    Section 202(e) specifies that TTPSF are to be made available to 
Indian tribal governments. Accordingly, consistent with other FHWA 
funding provided to tribes, any federally recognized tribe identified 
on the list of ``Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible to Receive 
Services from the Bureau of Indian Affairs'' (published at 77 FR 47868) 
is eligible to apply for TTPSF.

B. Eligible Uses of Funds

    Under section 202(e), projects for which Indian tribal governments 
may apply are highway safety improvement projects eligible under the 
Highway Safety Improvement Program as described in 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4). 
Projects eligible for funding may include strategies, activities, or 
projects on a public road that are included in a State Strategic 
Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) and correct or improve a hazardous road 
location or feature, or address a highway safety problem.\1\ This 
includes infrastructure and non-infrastructure strategies, activities 
or projects including education activities. For purposes of the TTPSF, 
for a project to be consistent with a State's SHSP, it must be data-
driven or address a priority in an applicable tribal transportation 
safety plan that considers the priorities and strategies addressed in 
the State SHSP. To be considered eligible for TTPSF, roadway or 
transportation facilities improvement projects also must be: (1) 
included in the tribe's official National Tribal Transportation 
Facility Inventory, as identified in 23 U.S.C. 202(b)(1), and (2) 
listed in the TIP.
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    \1\ Examples of eligible HSIP projects include but are not 
limited to the projects set for in 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4)(B).
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III. Selection Criteria and Policy Considerations

    The FHWA will award TTPSF funds based on the selection criteria and 
policy considerations as outlined below.
    The FHWA shall give priority consideration to eligible projects 
under 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4) that fall within one of the following four 
categories:
    (1) safety plans and safety planning activities;
    (2) engineering improvements;
    (3) enforcement and emergency services improvements; and
    (4) education programs.
    The priority categories were determined in consultation with the 
Tribal Transportation Program Coordinating Committee (TTPCC) \2\ and 
are intended to strengthen safety plans and safety planning activities 
in tribal transportation while also directing resources to needed 
safety improvements. The categories are also consistent with the FHWA 
SHSP for Indian Lands which has as its mission to, ``Implement 
effective transportation safety programs to save lives while respecting 
Native American culture and tradition by fostering communication, 
coordination, collaboration, and cooperation.'' \3\ These categories 
are also consistent with the Tribal Safety Management Implementation 
Plan (TSMIP). The TSMIP recognizes that, ``tribal safety plans are an 
essential component and an effective planning

[[Page 27678]]

tool for prioritizing and implementing safety solutions.'' \4\ The 
TSMIP also states that ``reducing highway fatalities and serious 
injuries with any sustained success requires that all four elements 
(4Es) of highway safety be addressed--engineering, enforcement, 
education, and emergency services. A Tribal Safety Program, whether 
large or small, should work to address the 4Es, and its foundation, 
data.''
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    \2\ The TTPCC is a committee established in 25 CFR Part 170 and 
is charged with providing input and recommendations to the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs (BIA) and FHWA in developing TTP policies and 
procedures. Its members are appointed by the Secretary of the 
Interior and represent all 12 BIA Regions. Tribal consultation is 
described further in Section VIII of this notice.
    \3\ The Strategic Safety Plan of Indian Lands is available at: 
http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/ttp/safety/documents/strategic-hsp.pdf.
    \4\ The SMS Implementation Plan is available at: http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/ttp/safety/documents/sms-implementation.pdf.
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    The FHWA will allocate the TTPSF among the four categories as 
follows: (1) Safety plans and safety planning activities (40 percent); 
(2) engineering improvements (30 percent); (3) enforcement and 
emergency services improvements (20 percent); and (4) education 
programs (10 percent). These funding goals were established with the 
TTPCC and will be reviewed annually and may be adjusted to reflect 
current tribal transportation safety priorities and needs. These 
proposed allocation amounts provide substantial funding for tribal 
safety plans to reflect the strong need that has been identified in 
this area and to ensure that all tribes have an opportunity to assess 
their safety needs and prioritize safety projects. The remaining 
proposed allocation amounts were established based on the significant 
need for transportation related capital improvement projects, while 
still allowing for applications that would cover all 4Es of safety.

A. Safety Plans and Safety Planning Activities (Funding Goal 40 Percent 
of TTPSF)

    The development of a tribal safety plan that is data driven, 
identifies transportation safety issues, prioritizes activities, is 
coordinated with the State SHSP and promotes a comprehensive approach 
to addressing safety needs by including all 4Es is a critical step in 
improving highway safety. Additional information on developing a tribal 
safety plan can be found at: http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/ttp/safety/.
    Accordingly, FHWA will award TTPSF for developing and updating 
tribal safety plans, and other safety planning activities. Eligible 
uses of funds are described in Section II of this notice and example 
projects are listed in 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4), which can be found at:  
http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/docs/title23usc.pdf.
    The FHWA will use the following criteria in the evaluation of TTPSF 
funding requests for tribal safety plans: (1) development of a tribal 
safety plan where none currently exists; and (2) age or status of an 
existing tribal safety plan.
    The FHWA will use the following criteria in the evaluation of TTPSF 
funding requests for safety planning activities: (1) Inclusion of the 
activity in a completed State SHSP or tribal transportation safety plan 
that is no more than 5 years old; (2) submission of supporting data 
that demonstrates the need for the activity; (3) leveraging of private 
or other public funding; (4) or the project is part of a comprehensive 
approach to safety which includes other safety efforts.
    Examples of eligible safety planning activities include, but are 
not limited to:
     Collection, analysis, and improvement of safety data; and
     Road safety assessments.

B. Engineering Improvements (Funding Goal 30 Percent of TTPSF)

    Eligible uses of funds are described in Section II of this notice 
and example projects are listed in 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4), which can be 
found at: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/docs/title23usc.pdf.
    The FHWA will use the following criteria in the evaluation of 
funding requests for engineering improvements: (1) Inclusion of the 
activity in a completed State SHSP or tribal transportation safety plan 
that is no more than 5 years old; (2) inclusion of the activity in a 
completed road safety audit, engineering study, impact assessment or 
other engineering document; (3) submission of supporting data that 
demonstrates the need for the project; (4) ownership of the facility; 
(5) leveraging of private or other public funding; (6) years since the 
tribe has last received funding for an TTPSF engineering improvement 
project; (7) or the project is part of a comprehensive approach to 
safety which includes other safety efforts.
    Examples of eligible engineering improvement projects include, but 
are not limited to:
     Intersection safety improvements;
     Pavement and shoulder widening (including addition of a 
passing lane to remedy an unsafe condition);
     Installation of rumble strips or another warning device, 
if the rumble strips or other warning devices do not adversely affect 
the safety or mobility of bicyclists and pedestrians, including persons 
with disabilities;
     Installation of a skid-resistant surface at an 
intersection or other location with a high frequency of crashes;
     Improvements for pedestrian or bicyclist safety or safety 
of persons with disabilities;
     Construction and improvement of railway-highway grade 
crossing safety feature;
     Installation of protective devices;
     Construction of a traffic calming feature;
     Elimination of a roadside hazard;
     Installation, replacement, and other improvement of 
highway signage and pavement markings, or a project to maintain minimum 
levels of retro reflectivity that addresses a highway safety;
     Installation of a traffic control or other warning device 
at a location with high crash potential;
     Installation of guardrails, barriers (including barriers 
between construction work zones and traffic lanes for the safety of 
road users and workers), and crash attenuators;
     The addition or retrofitting of structures or other 
measures to eliminate or reduce crashes involving vehicles and 
wildlife;
     Installation of yellow-green signs and signals at 
pedestrian and bicycle crossings and in school zones;
     Construction and operational improvements on high risk 
rural roads;
     Geometric improvements to a road for safety purposes that 
improve safety;
     Roadway safety infrastructure improvements consistent with 
the recommendations included in the publication of the FHWA entitled 
``Highway Design Handbook for Older Drivers and Pedestrians'';
     Truck parking facilities eligible for funding under 
section 1401 of the MAP-21;
     Systemic safety improvements; and
     Transportation-related safety projects for modes such as 
trails, docks, boardwalks, ice roads, and others that are eligible for 
TTP funds.

C. Enforcement and Emergency Services Improvements (Funding Goal 20 
Percent of TTPSF)

    Eligible uses of funds are described in Section II of this notice 
and example projects are listed in 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4), which can be 
found at: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/docs/title23usc.pdf.
    The FHWA will use the following criteria in the evaluation of 
funding requests for enforcement and emergency services improvements: 
(1) Inclusion of the activity in a completed State SHSP or tribal 
transportation safety plan that is no more than 5 years old; (2) 
submission of supporting data that demonstrates the need for the 
project; (3) leveraging of private or other public funding; (4) or the 
project is part of a comprehensive approach to safety which includes 
other safety efforts.

[[Page 27679]]

    Examples of eligible enforcement and emergency services improvement 
activities include, but are not limited to:
     The conduct of a model traffic enforcement activity at a 
railway-highway crossing;
     Installation of a priority control system for emergency 
vehicles at signalized intersections; and
     Planning integrated interoperable emergency communications 
equipment, operational activities, or traffic enforcement activities 
(including police assistance) relating to work zone safety.

D. Education Programs (Funding Goal 10 Percent of TTPSF)

    Eligible uses of funds are described in Section II of this notice 
and example projects are listed in 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4), which can be 
found at: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21/docs/title23usc.pdf.
    The FHWA will use the following criteria in the evaluation of 
funding requests for education projects: (1) Inclusion of the activity 
in a completed State SHSP or tribal transportation safety plan that is 
no more than 5 years old; (2) submission of supporting data that 
demonstrates the need for the project; (3) leveraging of private or 
other public funding; (4) or the project is part of a comprehensive 
approach to safety which includes other safety efforts.
    Examples of eligible education activities include, but are not 
limited to:
     Safety Management System Implementation Plan activities;
     Public service announcements; and
     Programs implemented to inform the public or address 
behaviors that affect transportation safety.

IV. Evaluation Process

    The TTPSF grant applications will be evaluated in accordance with 
the below discussed evaluation process. The FHWA will establish an 
evaluation team to review each application received by FHWA prior to 
the application deadline. The evaluation team will be led by FHWA and 
will include members from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The team 
will include technical and professional staff with relevant experience 
and expertise. The evaluation teams will be responsible for evaluating 
and rating all of the projects.
    All applications will be evaluated and assigned a rating of 
``Highly Qualified,'' ``Qualified,'' or ``Not Qualified.'' The ratings, 
as defined below, are proposed within each priority funding category as 
follows:

1. Safety Plans and Safety Planning Activities

A. Development of Tribal Safety Plans
    a. Highly Qualified: requests (up to a maximum of $12,500) for 
development of new tribal safety plans or to update incomplete tribal 
safety plans; and requests (up to a maximum of $7,500.00) to update 
existing tribal safety plans that are more than 3 years old.
    b. Not Qualified: projects that do not meet the eligibility 
requirements; any request to update an existing tribal safety plan that 
is less than 3 years old.
B. Other Safety Planning Activities
    a. Highly Qualified: requests for other safety planning activities 
that are in a current State SHSP or tribal safety plan that is not more 
than 5 years old; submission of data that demonstrates the need for the 
activities; significant leveraging of private or public funding; and 
are part of a comprehensive approach to safety which includes other 
safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``highly qualified'' exceeds 
the amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given the level of the commitment of other 
funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and where the 
applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement the 
proposed project in a timely manner.
    b. Qualified: requests for other safety planning activities that 
are in a current State SHSP or tribal safety plan that is more than 5 
years old; submission of some data that demonstrates the need for the 
activity; some leveraging of private or public funding; and are part of 
a comprehensive approach to safety which includes other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``qualified'' exceeds the 
amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given the level of the commitment of other 
funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and where the 
applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement the 
proposed project in a timely manner.
    c. Not Qualified: projects that do not meet the eligibility 
requirements; projects that are not included in a State SHSP or tribal 
safety plan.

 2. Engineering Improvements

    a. Highly Qualified: efforts that are in a current State SHSP or 
tribal safety plan that is less than 5 years old; data included in the 
application that directly supports the project; project is in a current 
road safety audit, impact assessment, or other safety engineering 
study; projects located on a BIA or tribal facility; significant 
leverage with other funding; the tribe has not received funding for a 
TTPSF transportation safety construction project in more than 10 years 
or the project is part of a comprehensive approach to safety which 
includes three or more other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``highly qualified'' exceeds 
the amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given to the level of the commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and 
where the applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement 
the proposed project in a timely manner.
    b. Qualified: efforts that are in a current State SHSP or tribal 
safety plan, but the plan is more than 5 years old; some data included 
in the application that supports the project; project is in a road 
safety audit, impact assessment, or other safety engineering study that 
is more than 5 years old; project is located on a transportation 
facility not owned by a tribe or BIA; some leveraging with other 
funding; the tribe has not received funding for a TTPSF transportation 
safety construction project in the last 2 to 10 years or the projects 
is part of a coordinated approach with one to two other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``qualified'' exceeds the 
amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given to the level of the commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and 
where the applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement 
the proposed project in a timely manner.
    c. Not Qualified: projects that do not meet the eligibility 
requirements; are not included in a State SHSP or tribal safety plan; 
no data provided in the application to support the request; are not 
included in a road safety audit, impact assessment, or other safety

[[Page 27680]]

engineering study; have received funding for a TTPSF transportation 
safety construction project within the last 2 years or do not have a 
comprehensive approach to safety with other partners.

3. Enforcement and Emergency Services

    a. Highly Qualified: efforts that are in a current State SHSP or 
tribal safety plan that is less than 5 years old; data included in the 
application that directly supports the requested project, significant 
leverage with other funding or are part of a comprehensive approach to 
safety, including three or more other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``highly qualified'' exceeds 
the amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given to the level of the commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and 
where the applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement 
the proposed project in a timely manner.
    a. Qualified: efforts that are in a current State SHSP or tribal 
safety plan but the plan is more than 5 years old; some data included 
in the application that supports the project; some leveraging with 
other funding or are coordinated with one to two other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``qualified'' exceeds the 
amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given to the level of the commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and 
where the applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement 
the proposed project in a timely manner.
    c. Not Qualified: projects that do not meet the eligibility 
requirements; are not included in a State SHSP or tribal safety plan; 
no data provided in the application that supports the project does not 
have a comprehensive approach to safety with other partners.

4. Education Programs

    a. Highly Qualified: efforts that are in a current State SHSP or 
tribal safety plan that is less than 5 years old; data included in the 
application that directly supports the requested project; significant 
leverage with other funding or are part of a comprehensive approach to 
safety including three or more other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``highly qualified'' exceeds 
the amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given to the level of the commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and 
where the applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement 
the proposed project in a timely manner.
    b. Qualified: efforts that are in a current State SHSP or tribal 
safety plan but the plan is more than 5 years old; some data included 
in the application that supports the project; some leveraging with 
other funding or are coordinated with one to two other safety efforts.
    If the number of applications rated as ``qualified'' exceeds the 
amount of available funding, FHWA will give priority funding 
consideration to selecting one or more components of a project but only 
to the extent that the components have independent utility. Priority 
consideration will also be given to the level of the commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request, and 
where the applicants demonstrate the capacity to successfully implement 
the proposed project in a timely manner.
    c. Not Qualified: projects that do not meet the eligibility 
requirements; are not included in a State SHSP or tribal safety plan; 
no data provided in the application that supports the project does not 
have a comprehensive approach to safety with other partners.

V. Application Process

A. Contents of Applications

    The applicants must include all of the information requested below 
in their applications. The FHWA may request any applicant to supplement 
the data in its application, but encourages applicants to submit the 
most relevant and complete information the applicant could provide. The 
FHWA also encourages applicants, to the extent practicable, to provide 
data and evidence of project merits in a form that is publicly 
available or verifiable.

B. Standard Form 424, Applications for Federal Assistance

    A complete application must consist of: (1) The Standard Form 424 
(SF 424) available at http://flh.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/ttp/safety.

C. Narrative (Attachment to SF 424)

    Applicants must attach a supplemental narrative to their submission 
through ttpsf@dot.gov to successfully complete the application process. 
The applicant must include the supplemental narrative in the 
attachments section of the SF 424 mandatory form.
    The applicant must identify in the project narrative the 
eligibility category under which the project identified in the 
application fits. The applicant also should respond to the application 
requirements below. The FHWA recommends that the application be 
prepared with standard formatting preferences (e.g. a single-spaced 
document, using a standard 12-point font, such as Times New Roman, with 
1-inch margins).
    An application must include any information needed to verify that 
the project meets the statutory eligibility criteria as well as other 
information required for FHWA to assess each of the criteria specified 
in Section III (Selection Criteria). Applicants are required to 
demonstrate the responsiveness of their proposal to any pertinent 
selection criteria with the most relevant information that applicants 
can provide, regardless of whether such information is specifically 
requested, or identified, in the final notice. Applicants should 
provide evidence of project milestones, financial capacity, and 
commitment in order to support project readiness.
    Consistent with the requirements for an eligible highway safety 
improvement project under 23 U.S.C. 148(a)(4), applicants must describe 
clearly how the project would correct or improve a hazardous road 
location or feature, or would address a highway safety problem. The 
application must include supporting data.
    For ease of review, FHWA recommends that the project narrative 
generally adhere to the following basic outline, and include a table of 
contents, project abstract, maps, and graphics:
    1. Project Abstract: Describe project work that would be completed 
under the project, the hazardous road location or feature or the 
highway safety problem that the project would address, and whether the 
project is a complete project or part of a larger project with prior 
investment (maximum five sentences). The project abstract must 
succinctly describe how this specific request for TTPSF would be used 
to complete the project.
    2. Project Description: (including information on the expected 
users of the project, a description of the hazardous

[[Page 27681]]

road location or feature or the highway safety problem that the project 
would address, and how the project would address these challenges);
    3. Applicant information and coordination with other entities 
(identification of the Indian tribal government applying for TTPSF, 
description of cooperation with other entities in selecting projects 
from the TIP as required under 23 U.S.C. 202(e)(2), information 
regarding any other entities involved in the project);
    4. Grant Funds and Sources/Uses of Project Funds (information about 
the amount of grant funding requested for the project, availability/
commitment of funds sources and uses of all project funds, total 
project costs, percentage of project costs that would be paid for with 
the TTPSF, and the identity and percentage shares of all parties 
providing funds for the project (including Federal funds provided under 
other programs);
    5. A description of how the proposal meets the Selection Criteria 
identified in Section III (Selection Criteria and Policy 
Considerations) and the statutory eligibility criteria as described in 
Section II (Eligibility).

D. Contact Information

    The applicant must include contact information requested as part of 
the SF-424. The FHWA will use this information if additional 
application information is needed or to inform parties of FHWA's 
decision regarding selection of projects. Contact information should be 
provided for a direct employee of the lead applicant. Contact 
information for a contractor, agent, or consultant of the lead 
applicant is insufficient for FHWA's purposes.

VI. Program Funding and Award

    Section 1101 of MAP-21 authorized $450,000,000 for the TTP for each 
of FY 2013 and 2014. Section 1119 of MAP-21 amends 23 U.S.C. 202(e) to 
provide that not more than 2 percent of such funds made available for 
the TTP may be allocated for TTPSF. Accordingly, FHWA expects that a 
maximum of $9,000,000 could be made available in 2014 for TTPSF. The 
FHWA anticipates high demand for this limited amount of funding and 
encourages applications with scalable requests that allow more tribes 
to receive funding; and for requests that identify a commitment of 
other funding sources to complement the TTPSF funding request. 
Applicants should show the capacity to successfully implement the 
proposed request in a timely manner, and ensure that cost estimates and 
timelines to complete deliverables are included in their application to 
be given full consideration.

VII. Consultation Process

    The DOT issued Order 5301.1, ``Department of Transportation 
Programs, Policies, and Procedures Affecting American Indians, Alaska 
Natives, and Tribes'' on November 16, 1999. This Order affirmed the 
DOT's and its Modal Administrations' unique legal relationship with 
Indian tribes, established DOT's consultation and coordination process 
with Indian tribes for any action that may significantly or uniquely 
affect them, and listed goals for Modal Administrations to meet when 
carrying out policies, programs, and activities affecting American 
Indians, Alaska Natives, and tribes. The Department affirms its 
commitment to these principles, and those set forth in Executive Order 
13175 and the President's November 5, 2009, memorandum in establishing 
the DOT Consultation Plan dated March 4, 2010, and found at: http://www.dot.gov/sites/dot.dev/files/docs/Tribal%20Consultation%20Plan.pdf.

    Authority: Section 1119 of Pub. L. 112-141; 23 U.S.C. 202(e).

    Dated: May 7, 2014.
Gregory Nadeau,
Deputy Administrator.
[FR Doc. 2014-11074 Filed 5-13-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-22-P