[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 98 (Wednesday, May 21, 2014)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 29271-29306]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-10686]



[[Page 29271]]

Vol. 79

Wednesday,

No. 98

May 21, 2014

Part II





 Department of Energy





-----------------------------------------------------------------------





10 CFR Parts 429 and 430





 Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Dehumidifiers; 
Proposed Rule

Federal Register / Vol. 79 , No. 98 / Wednesday, May 21, 2014 / 
Proposed Rules

[[Page 29272]]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

10 CFR Parts 429 and 430

[Docket No. EERE-2014-BT-TP-0010]
RIN 1904-AC80


Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Dehumidifiers

AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of 
Energy.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to revise its 
test procedures for dehumidifiers, by adding clarifications for 
equipment setup during testing and correcting the calculations of 
active mode energy use and an efficiency metric, integrated energy 
factor (IEF). The proposed amendments would also create a new appendix 
which would require certain active mode testing at a lower ambient 
temperature, add a measure of fan-only mode energy consumption in the 
IEF metric, and include testing methodology and measures of performance 
for whole-home dehumidifiers. Finally, DOE proposes to add clarifying 
definitions of covered products, amend the certification requirements, 
add verification instructions for the capacity measurement, and make 
certain editorial corrections.

DATES: DOE will hold a public meeting on Friday, June 13, 2014 from 9 
a.m. to 12 p.m., in Washington, DC. The meeting will also be broadcast 
as a webinar. See section V, ``Public Participation,'' for webinar 
registration information, participant instructions, and information 
about the capabilities available to webinar participants.
    DOE will accept comments, data, and information regarding this 
notice of proposed rulemaking (NOPR) before and after the public 
meeting, but no later than August 4, 2014. See section V, ``Public 
Participation,'' for details.

ADDRESSES: The public meeting will be held at the U.S. Department of 
Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 8E-089, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., 
Washington, DC 20585. To attend, please notify Ms. Brenda Edwards at 
(202) 586-2945. Please note that foreign nationals visiting DOE 
Headquarters are subject to advance security screening procedures. Any 
foreign national wishing to participate in the meeting should advise 
DOE as soon as possible by contacting Ms. Edwards to initiate the 
necessary procedures. Please also note that those wishing to bring 
laptops into the Forrestal Building will be required to obtain a 
property pass. Visitors should avoid bringing laptops, or allow an 
extra 45 minutes. Persons can attend the public meeting via webinar. 
For more information, refer to the Public Participation section near 
the end of this document.
    Any comments submitted must identify the NOPR for Test Procedures 
for Dehumidifiers, and provide docket number EE-2014-BT-TP-0010 and/or 
regulatory information number (RIN) number 1904-AC80. Comments may be 
submitted using any of the following methods:
    1. Federal eRulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov. Follow the 
instructions for submitting comments.
    2. Email: Dehumidifier2014TP0010@ee.doe.gov. Include the docket 
number and/or RIN in the subject line of the message.
    3. Mail: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of Energy, Building 
Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., 
Washington, DC 20585-0121. If possible, please submit all items on a 
CD. It is not necessary to include printed copies.
    4. Hand Delivery/Courier: Ms. Brenda Edwards, U.S. Department of 
Energy, Building Technologies Program, 950 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Suite 
600, Washington, DC 20024. Telephone: (202) 586-2945. If possible, 
please submit all items on a CD. It is not necessary to include printed 
copies.
    For detailed instructions on submitting comments and additional 
information on the rulemaking process, see section V of this document 
(Public Participation).
    Docket: The docket, which includes Federal Register notices, public 
meeting attendee lists and transcripts, comments, and other supporting 
documents/materials, is available for review at regulations.gov. All 
documents in the docket are listed in the regulations.gov index. 
However, some documents listed in the index, such as those containing 
information that is exempt from public disclosure, may not be publicly 
available.
    A link to the docket Web page can be found at: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=EERE-2014-BT-TP-0010. This Web 
page contains a link to the docket for this document on the 
regulations.gov site. The regulations.gov Web page contains 
instructions on how to access all documents, including public comments, 
in the docket. See section V for information on how to submit comments 
through regulations.gov.
    For further information on how to submit a comment, review other 
public comments and the docket, or participate in the public meeting, 
contact Ms. Brenda Edwards at (202) 586-2945 or by email: 
Brenda.Edwards@ee.doe.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 
Mr. Bryan Berringer, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy 
Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, EE-5B, 1000 
Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585-0121. Telephone: (202) 
586-0371. Email: bryan.berringer@ee.doe.gov.
Ms. Elizabeth Kohl, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of the General 
Counsel, GC-71, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585-
0121. Telephone: (202) 586-7796. Email: elizabeth.kohl@hq.doe.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Table of Contents

I. Authority and Background
    A. General Test Procedure Rulemaking Process
    B. Test Procedure for Dehumidifiers
II. Summary of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking
III. Discussion
    A. Products Covered by This Test Procedure Rulemaking
    B. Determination, Classification, and Testing Provisions for 
Dehumidifier Active Modes
    1. Dehumidification Mode
    a. Ambient Temperature
    b. Relative Humidity
    c. Ducted Test Installation for Whole-Home Dehumidifiers
    d. Psychrometer Requirements
    e. Condensate Collection
     f. Control Settings
    2. Fan-Only Mode
    C. Additional Technical and Editorial Corrections
    1. Definition of ``Dehumidifier''
    2. Referenced Section in Test Procedures at 10 CFR 430.23
    3. Integrated Energy Factor Calculation
    4. Number of Annual Inactive Mode and Off Mode Hours
     D. Materials Incorporated by Reference
     E. Certification and Verification
    F. Compliance Dates of Amended Test Procedures
 IV. Procedural Issues and Regulatory Review
    A. Review Under Executive Order 12866
    B. Review Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act
    C. Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995
    D. Review Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969
    E. Review Under Executive Order 13132
    F. Review Under Executive Order 12988
    G. Review Under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995
    H. Review Under the Treasury and General Government 
Appropriations Act, 1999
    I. Review Under Executive Order 12630
    J. Review Under Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 2001
    K. Review Under Executive Order 13211
    L. Review Under Section 32 of the Federal Energy Administration 
Act of 1974

[[Page 29273]]

V. Public Participation
    A. Attendance at Public Meeting
    B. Procedure for Submitting Prepared General Statements for 
Distribution
    C. Conduct of Public Meeting
    D. Submission of Comments
    E. Issues on Which DOE Seeks Comment
VI. Approval of the Office of the Secretary

I. Authority and Background

    Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (42 
U.S.C. 6291, et seq.; ``EPCA'' or, ``the Act'') sets forth a variety of 
provisions designed to improve energy efficiency. (All references to 
EPCA refer to the statute as amended through the American Energy 
Manufacturing Technical Corrections Act (AEMTCA), Public Law 112-210 
(Dec. 18, 2012).) Part B of title III, which for editorial reasons was 
redesignated as Part A upon incorporation into the U.S. Code (42 U.S.C. 
6291-6309, as codified), establishes the ``Energy Conservation Program 
for Consumer Products Other Than Automobiles.'' These include 
dehumidifiers, the subject of this proposed rule. (42 U.S.C. 
6292(a)(11))
    Under EPCA, the energy conservation program consists essentially of 
four parts: (1) Testing, (2) labeling, (3) Federal energy conservation 
standards, and (4) certification and enforcement procedures. The 
testing requirements consist of test procedures that manufacturers of 
covered products must use as the basis for (1) certifying to DOE that 
their products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards 
adopted under EPCA, and (2) making representations about the efficiency 
of those products. Similarly, DOE must use these test procedures to 
determine whether the products comply with any relevant standards 
promulgated under EPCA.

A. General Test Procedure Rulemaking Process

    Under 42 U.S.C. 6293, EPCA sets forth the criteria and procedures 
DOE must follow when prescribing or amending test procedures for 
covered products. EPCA provides in relevant part that any test 
procedures prescribed or amended under this section shall be reasonably 
designed to produce test results that measure energy efficiency, energy 
use or estimated annual operating cost of a covered product during a 
representative average use cycle or period of use and shall not be 
unduly burdensome to conduct. (42 U.S.C. 6293(b)(3))
    In addition, if DOE determines that a test procedure amendment is 
warranted, it must publish proposed test procedures and offer the 
public an opportunity to present oral and written comments on them. (42 
U.S.C. 6293(b)(2)) Finally, in any rulemaking to amend a test 
procedure, DOE must determine to what extent, if any, the proposed test 
procedure would alter the measured energy efficiency of any covered 
product as determined under the existing test procedure. (42 U.S.C. 
6293(e))

B. Test Procedure for Dehumidifiers

    EPCA specifies that the dehumidifier test criteria used under the 
ENERGY STAR \1\ program in effect as of January 1, 2001,\2\ must serve 
as the basis for the DOE test procedure for dehumidifiers, unless 
revised by DOE. (42 U.S.C. 6293(b)(13)) The ENERGY STAR test criteria 
required that American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Association 
of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) Standard DH-1, 
``Dehumidifiers,'' be used to measure capacity while the Canadian 
Standards Association (CAN/CSA) standard CAN/CSA-C749-1994 (R2005), 
``Performance of Dehumidifiers,'' be used to calculate the energy 
factor (EF). The version of AHAM Standard DH-1 in use at the time the 
ENERGY STAR test criteria were adopted was AHAM Standard DH-1-1992. DOE 
adopted these test criteria, along with related definitions and 
tolerances, as its test procedure for dehumidifiers at 10 CFR part 430, 
subpart B, appendix X in 2006. 71 FR 71340, 71347, 71366, 713667-68 
(Dec. 8, 2006).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ For more information on the ENERGY STAR program, please 
visit www.energystar.gov.
    \2\ ``Energy Star Program Requirements for Dehumidifiers'', 
Version 1.0, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, available online 
at: www.energystar.gov/products/specs/system/files/DehumProgReqV1.0.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On October 31, 2012, DOE published a final rule to establish a new 
test procedure for dehumidifiers that references ANSI/AHAM Standard DH-
1-2008, ``Dehumidifiers,'' (ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008) for both energy use 
and capacity measurements. 77 FR 65995 (Oct. 31, 2012). The final rule 
also adopted standby and off mode provisions that satisfy the 
requirement in EPCA for DOE to include measures of standby mode and off 
mode energy consumption in its test procedures for residential 
products, if technically feasible. (42 U.S.C. 6295(gg)(2)(A)) This new 
DOE test procedure, codified at that time at 10 CFR part 430, subpart 
B, appendix X1 (appendix X1), established a new metric, integrated 
energy factor (IEF), which incorporates measures of active, standby, 
and off mode energy use.
    DOE subsequently removed the existing test procedures at appendix X 
and redesignated the test procedures at appendix X1 as appendix X. 79 
FR 7366, Feb. 7, 2014. After August 6, 2014, any representations of 
energy use, including standby mode or off mode energy consumption, or 
efficiency of portable dehumidifiers must be made in accordance with 
the results of testing pursuant to the redesignated appendix X. In this 
NOPR, DOE proposes further amendments to the redesignated appendix X.
    DOE also initiated a rulemaking to consider amending the energy 
conservation standards for dehumidifiers. As part of this rulemaking, 
DOE is considering standards for whole-home, including refrigerant-
desiccant, dehumidifiers. Any amended standards for both portable and 
whole-home dehumidifiers would be based on the efficiency metrics as 
determined from a new DOE test procedure at appendix X1 that DOE is 
proposing to establish in this document. DOE published a document 
announcing the availability of the Energy Conservation Standards 
Rulemaking Framework Document for Dehumidifiers on August 17, 2012 (the 
``August 2012 Framework Document'') 77 FR 49739 (Aug. 17, 2012). The 
August 2012 Framework Document, also published on the DOE Web site, 
discusses the analyses DOE intends to conduct throughout the standards 
rulemaking. In response to the August 2012 Framework Document and at 
the public meeting held on September 24, 2012, DOE received a number of 
comments related to the dehumidifier test procedure. DOE considered 
these comments in its analysis for this NOPR, and provides responses in 
this document.

II. Summary of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    In this NOPR, DOE proposes to establish in 10 CFR 430.2 definitions 
for different categories of residential dehumidifiers: Portable 
dehumidifiers and whole-home dehumidifiers. The proposal includes a 
definition for whole-home dehumidifiers that incorporate moisture 
removal by means of either a refrigeration system and a desiccant, 
which require specific testing methodology. The provisions in appendix 
X1 proposed in this NOPR would include test equipment and methodology 
for measuring the capacity and IEF of whole-home dehumidifiers under 
conditions representative of typical ducted installations.
    DOE also proposes amending the dehumidifier test procedure to 
provide a more accurate representation of active mode performance in 
new appendix X1. The active mode provisions currently in

[[Page 29274]]

appendix X require testing under ambient conditions consisting of a 
dry-bulb temperature of 80 degrees Fahrenheit ([deg]F) and a wet-bulb 
ambient temperature of 69.6 [deg]F; however, DOE's recent analysis and 
information from interested parties suggest that this set of test 
conditions may not be representative of residential installation 
locations, and that dehumidifier performance varies according to the 
ambient temperature and humidity. Therefore, DOE is proposing 
amendments to be incorporated in the new appendix X1 that would reduce 
the required ambient dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures during the test 
to better reflect the energy use and capacity of dehumidifiers in real-
world conditions.
    DOE further proposes to incorporate into appendix X1 measures of 
energy use in fan-only mode for dehumidifiers that operate the fan 
either continuously or cyclically without activating the refrigeration 
system when the ambient relative humidity is lower than the setpoint, 
rather than entering off-cycle mode.
    Because appendix X does not provide instructions regarding the 
proper control settings, including the fan speed to be used for testing 
dehumidifiers with multiple fan-speed options and the relative humidity 
control setting, DOE is proposing to conduct active mode testing in 
appendix X and appendix X1 using the setting for continuous operation 
for dehumidifiers equipped with such an option. For dehumidifiers 
without a setting for continuous operation, DOE proposes to require 
testing at the highest possible fan speed and lowest relative humidity 
setting to achieve the maximum possible moisture removal rate, which is 
the primary function of the product. DOE also proposes in appendix X 
and appendix X1 to define this primary operating mode as 
``dehumidification mode'' to distinguish it from fan-only mode, which 
is also an active mode, and to clarify that the definition of ``product 
capacity'' is a measure of the moisture removed under the specified 
ambient conditions.
    Finally, DOE also is proposing in this document to: (1) Add 
specifications in appendix X and appendix X1 for psychrometer setup for 
multiple air intakes, which would require the use of a separate 
sampling tree for each intake grille, and require that when testing 
multiple portable dehumidifiers at the same time, each dehumidifier be 
provided with a separate psychrometer centered in front of each of its 
air intake grille(s); (2) specify in appendix X and appendix X1 that 
the condensate must be collected in a substantially closed vessel 
placed on the weight-measuring instrument if means are provided on the 
dehumidifier for draining condensate away from the cabinet; if not, any 
condensate in excess of the amount that the internal collection bucket 
can hold should be collected in an overflow pan for the condensate 
weight measurement without the use of any internal pump (unless the use 
of such a pump is provided by the manufacturer by default during 
dehumidification mode); (3) correct the definition of ``dehumidifier'' 
in 10 CFR 430.2 and clarify that it does not cover portable air 
conditioners or room air conditioners; (4) provide a technical 
correction and clarifications within the IEF equation in appendix X and 
appendix X1; (5) correct typographical errors in the number of annual 
hours for inactive mode and off mode in appendix X and appendix X1; (6) 
provide instructions for the dates of use of appendix X and appendix 
X1; and (7) add capacity to the sampling requirements used for 
dehumidifier certification, along with clarification in 10 CFR 
430.23(z) regarding how capacity is measured.

III. Discussion

A. Products Covered by This Test Procedure Rulemaking

    EPCA defines a dehumidifier as a self-contained, electrically 
operated, and mechanically encased assembly consisting of--
     A refrigerated surface (evaporator) that condenses 
moisture from the atmosphere;
     A refrigerating system, including an electric motor;
     An air-circulating fan; and
     Means for collecting or disposing of the condensate.

42 U.S.C. 6291(34); 10 CFR 430.2.

    DOE is aware of two general categories of residential 
dehumidifiers, classified according to the primary installation 
configuration: Portable dehumidifiers and whole-home dehumidifiers. 
Portable dehumidifiers are the most common category of dehumidifier 
sold in the United States, representing more than 95 percent of 
residential dehumidifier shipments. Consumers typically purchase 
portable dehumidifiers to reduce the relative humidity in one room or 
area of a living space less than 2,500 square feet, and may move these 
units from room to room to selectively reduce humidity where necessary. 
These units may also be located in an unconditioned space where 
moisture control is desired. Portable units currently on the market 
have rated capacities ranging from 22 pints of moisture removed per day 
(pints/day) to more than 120 pints/day. Portable units are standalone 
appliances designed to operate independent of any other air treatment 
devices, and do not require attachment to ducting, although certain 
models may have optional components to do so (i.e., ``convertible 
portable'' units).
    Whole-home dehumidifiers are designed to be attached to ducting 
that supplies dehumidified air to multiple or large living spaces in a 
residence and that returns humid air from the same spaces to the 
dehumidifier inlet. Whole-home dehumidifiers are often installed in 
conjunction with an existing heating, ventilation, or central air-
conditioning (HVAC) system, and may utilize certain components of the 
HVAC equipment such as the air-handling blower, but can operate 
independently as well. Whole-home dehumidifiers typically use the same 
dehumidification system as portable units; however, to effectively 
dehumidify a large area, these units are manufactured with larger 
components than portable dehumidifiers, and may include additional 
features, such as pre-coolers or desiccant wheels, which may be 
difficult to incorporate into portable units due to volume and weight 
constraints. Whole-home product capacities range from approximately 65 
pints/day to more than 200 pints/day when tested without ducting. The 
lack of ducting, however, allows higher airflow through the 
dehumidifier than would be experienced in real-world installations, 
which in turn results in higher measured values for capacity and IEF.
    In the August 2012 Framework Document, DOE considered whether 
whole-home dehumidifiers as well as portable dehumidifiers should be 
considered covered products for the purposes of energy conservation 
standards. In response, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), San 
Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison 
(SCE), (hereafter the ``California Investor-Owned Utilities (IOUs)'') 
expressed support for DOE's proposal to cover whole-home dehumidifiers 
and recommended that DOE acquire additional data on both the 
performance and market saturation of these units. (California IOUs, No. 
11 at p. 4) \3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ A notation in the form ``California IOUs, No. 11 at p. 4'' 
identifies a written comment: (1) Made by Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company, San Diego Gas and Electric Company, and Southern California 
Edison (``the California IOUs''); (2) recorded in document number 11 
that is filed in the docket of the residential dehumidifier energy 
conservation standards rulemaking (Docket No. EERE-2012-BT-STD-0027) 
and available for review at www.regulations.gov; and (3) which 
appears on page 4 of document number 11.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 29275]]

    AHAM requested clarification regarding coverage and requirements 
for testing with ducted installation, particularly with portable 
products that can be optionally ducted as compared to dehumidifiers 
with manufacturer instructions that specify ducting. (AHAM, Public 
Meeting Transcript, No. 10 at p. 28) \4\ DOE research of the 
residential dehumidifier market revealed models that can be used as 
either a portable dehumidifier or as a ducted (i.e., whole-home) 
dehumidifier. Several manufacturers refer to these products as 
``convertible'' dehumidifiers. These convertible products have optional 
ducting kits that can either be installed or removed to accommodate 
free standing portable operation or ducted installations. Therefore, 
these products would meet the proposed definitions of both portable and 
whole-home dehumidifiers. Accordingly, DOE proposes in this document 
that if a given model meets both the proposed definition of a portable 
dehumidifier and a whole-home dehumidifier, with conversion achieved by 
means of optional ducting ducting kits, the product must be tested as 
both product categories, must meet both applicable standards, and must 
be certified as meeting both standards, if DOE ultimately establishes 
standards for whole home units.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ A notation in the form ``AHAM, Public Meeting Transcript, 
No. 10 at p. 28'' identifies an oral comment that DOE received 
during the September 24, 2012, residential dehumidifier energy 
conservation standards framework public meeting, was recorded in the 
public meeting transcript in the docket for the residential 
dehumidifier energy conservation standards rulemaking (Docket No. 
EERE-2012-BT-STD-0027), and is maintained in the Resource Room of 
the Building Technologies Program. This particular notation refers 
to a comment (1) made by AHAM during the public meeting; (2) 
recorded in document number 10, which is the public meeting 
transcript that is filed in the docket of this energy conservation 
standards rulemaking; and (3) which appears on page 28 of document 
number 10.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Southern Company noted that dehumidification technologies other 
than those based on refrigeration systems, such as desiccant 
dehumidifiers, are available on the market, and questioned whether 
products that do not use a refrigeration system and do not collect a 
liquid condensate would be covered. (Southern Company, Public Meeting 
Transcript, No. 10 at p. 45) Dehumidifiers that remove moisture using a 
desiccant but with no refrigeration system would not meet the statutory 
definition set forth by EPCA, and thus would not be covered products. 
(42 U.S.C. 6291(34)) However, certain whole-home dehumidifiers 
incorporate desiccant technology along with refrigeration systems, 
hereafter referred to as refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. Some of 
the moisture in the ``process'' air (i.e., the air that is supplied 
from and returned to the dehumidified space) is condensed on the 
evaporator as with typical dehumidifiers, while additional moisture is 
removed via a porous desiccant material that adsorbs moisture when damp 
air passes through or over it. The desiccant material is typically 
configured in a circular or wheel structure. A portion of the wheel 
adsorbs moisture from the process air entering the unit, which is then 
delivered to the dehumidified space. As the wheel rotates, the moisture 
in that segment is released into a separate heated reactivation air 
stream and exhausted out of the home. In addition to removing some 
moisture from the process air directly, the refrigeration system boosts 
the temperature of the reactivation air to more effectively remove 
moisture from the desiccant wheel, and cools the incoming air to 
improve the adsorptivity of the desiccant material. Because 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers have separate process and 
reactivation air streams and associated ducting, DOE proposes 
provisions in appendix X1 to test such whole-home units.
    In this NOPR, to clarify which provisions in the dehumidifier test 
procedure apply to the different categories of dehumidifiers, DOE is 
proposing to amend 10 CFR 430.2 to include definitions of portable, 
whole-home, and refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers as follows:
    Portable dehumidifier: A dehumidifier designed to operate within 
the dehumidified space without the attachment of additional ducting, 
although means may be provided for optional duct attachment.
    Whole-home dehumidifier: A dehumidifier designed to be installed 
with ducting to deliver return process air to its inlet and to supply 
dehumidified process air from its outlet to one or more locations in 
the dehumidified space.
    Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifier: A whole-home dehumidifier that 
removes moisture from the process air by means of a desiccant material 
in addition to a refrigeration system.
    DOE also proposes in this NOPR to adopt the following definition 
for ``process air'' in appendix X1:
    Process air: The air supplied to the dehumidifier from the 
dehumidified space and discharged to the dehumidified space after 
moisture has been removed by means of the refrigeration system.
    DOE requests comment on the proposed definitions for portable, 
whole-home, and refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, and whether there 
are additional dehumidifier product categories that should be 
considered as covered products, consistent with the statutory 
definition of dehumidifier.

B. Determination, Classification, and Testing Provisions for 
Dehumidifier Active Modes

    Appendix X defines ``active mode'' as a mode in which a 
dehumidifier is performing the main functions of removing moisture from 
ambient air by drawing moist air over a refrigerated coil using a fan, 
circulating air through activation of the fan without activation of the 
refrigeration system, or defrosting the refrigerant coil. In the course 
of testing conducted for this proposal, DOE observed that dehumidifiers 
may operate in different modes that would be classified as part of 
active mode, depending on whether the humidity setpoint has been 
reached.
    When the dehumidifier is operating in active mode and the ambient 
relative humidity is higher than the humidity setpoint, the unit may 
perform any of the main functions listed under the active mode 
definition. Further, DOE observed during its tests that a dehumidifier 
may alternate among these main functions, with the unit activating a 
particular main function for a period of minutes or hours before 
switching to a different main function. The pattern of activation of 
these functions may vary, depending on the programming of the 
particular model and the ambient conditions. DOE notes that none of the 
17 portable and 8 whole-home dehumidifiers in its test sample exhibited 
such variable behavior under the ambient conditions currently specified 
in appendix X, nominally 80 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 69.6 [deg]F 
wet-bulb temperature, and instead continuously removed moisture from 
the ambient air. However, when the ambient temperature was lower than 
80[emsp14][deg]F and the relative ambient humidity was higher than the 
setpoint, certain units in the test sample periodically operated the 
fan without activating the refrigeration system. This action may have 
been taken to prevent the formation of frost or to remove any ice 
build-up from the evaporator to continue the main function of moisture 
removal. Therefore, DOE proposes to add the following definition of 
``dehumidification mode'' to appendix X and appendix X1 to describe all 
dehumidifier operations during the

[[Page 29276]]

period when the humidity setpoint is lower than the ambient relative 
humidity and the dehumidifier is engaged in the main function of 
moisture removal:
    Dehumidification mode: An active mode in which a dehumidifier (1) 
has activated the main moisture removal function according to the 
humidistat or humidity sensor signal and (2) has either activated the 
refrigeration system or activated the fan or blower without activation 
of the refrigeration system.
    The energy use for all main functions, including periods of fan 
operation with and without activation of the refrigeration system that 
may occur when the ambient relative humidity is above the setpoint, 
would be measured according to the proposed provisions for 
dehumidification mode testing in appendix X1, as discussed in section 
III.B.1 of this document, and for active mode testing in appendix X.
    A dehumidifier fan may also operate without activation of the 
refrigeration system after the humidity setpoint has been reached or 
when selected by the consumer. Under these conditions, the fan may be 
operated to ensure that air is drawn over the humidistat to monitor 
ambient conditions, or for air circulation in the dehumidified space. 
It is also possible that immediately following a period of 
dehumidification mode, this fan operation may be initiated to remove 
any remaining frost from the evaporator. Such functions would classify 
this ``fan-only mode'' as an active mode, and it is distinct from any 
periods of fan-only operation in dehumidification mode because the 
setpoint has been reached or the product is not being used for the main 
purpose of moisture removal. For this reason, DOE proposes to include 
the following definition of ``fan-only mode'' in appendix X1:
    Fan-only mode: An active mode in which the dehumidifier (1) has 
cycled off its main moisture removal function by humidistat or humidity 
sensor, (2) has activated its fan or blower to operate either 
cyclically or continuously, and (3) may reactivate the main moisture 
removal function according to the humidistat or humidity sensor signal.
    In this document, DOE also proposes in appendix X1 to measure the 
energy consumption during fan-only mode according to methodology 
discussed in section III.B.2 of this document.
1. Dehumidification Mode
    In appendix X, DOE adopted the ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 test procedure 
to determine dehumidifier active mode performance while performing its 
main function of removing moisture from ambient air. According to this 
methodology, the dehumidifier is operated continuously in a test room 
with nominal ambient temperature and humidity conditions of 80  2.0 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 69.6  1.0 [deg]F 
wet-bulb temperature. Following a stabilization period during which 
three consecutive measurements at 10-minute intervals of dry-bulb 
temperature, wet-bulb temperature, and applied voltage must remain 
within allowable tolerances, the dehumidifier is operated continuously 
for 6 hours while collecting the condensate and recording the energy 
consumption. At the end of the test, the condensate is weighed and this 
value is used to calculate the unit's capacity, in pints per day. The 
calculation incorporates equations to normalize the results to nominal 
ambient conditions, accounting for variability in ambient conditions 
from test to test. The ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 test procedure includes a 
calculation for EF, expressed in liters per kilowatt hour (L/kWh), with 
corrections to normalize the data to nominal ambient conditions. 
Appendix X additionally includes the calculation of IEF, also expressed 
in L/kWh, which combines active mode energy consumption with the 
combined low-power mode energy consumption based on annual usage 
estimates for each mode.
a. Ambient Temperature
    As noted previously, the active mode provisions in appendix X that 
measure the moisture removal rate and energy consumption during 
dehumidification mode specify ambient conditions at a nominal 80 [deg]F 
dry-bulb temperature and 69.6 [deg]F wet-bulb temperature, which 
correspond to 60-percent relative humidity, for the duration of the 6-
hour test. This section discusses proposed ambient temperature options 
for both portable and whole home dehumidifiers. The proposals in this 
section are based on ambient and ground temperature for specific 
geographical locations that represent the majority of national 
dehumidifier use, and testing of a market representative sample of 
dehumidifiers. DOE tested 13 portable and 14 whole-home dehumidifiers 
according to ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 at varying temperatures.
    In response to the August 2012 Framework Document, AHAM commented 
that, although representative values for dehumidifier ambient 
conditions are difficult to specify due to variability in factors such 
as geographical locations and locations within the living space, the 
existing ambient conditions in the test procedure adequately address 
these differences and should not be amended. However, AHAM requested 
that if DOE does consider amending the test conditions, it should 
conduct studies on average geographical locations and average living 
space locations in which dehumidifiers are used and the ambient 
conditions in those spaces. Furthermore, AHAM commented that DOE would 
need to consider the effect of amended ambient conditions on measured 
energy use and on repeatability and reproducibility of the test 
procedure. (AHAM, No. 8 at pp. 4-5)
    Appliance Standards Awareness Project (ASAP), American Council for 
an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), Consumers Union (CU), Natural 
Resources Defense Council (NRDC), and Northwest Energy Efficiency 
Alliance (NEEA), (hereafter the ``Joint Commenters'') and the 
California IOUs commented that the current single rating condition 
specified in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 is not representative of field 
conditions where dehumidifiers are used, and that testing at 80 [deg]F 
and 60-percent relative humidity may overstate EF compared to operation 
in the field over a range of ambient conditions. ASAP and the Joint 
Commenters referenced a study conducted by the Cadmus Group (hereafter 
referred to as the Cadmus Group Study) \5\ that found the measured EFs 
of units in the field to be significantly lower than rated, and that 
attributed the difference, in part, to the ambient conditions 
(temperature and relative humidity) in the field being significantly 
lower than the current test conditions. ASAP and the Joint Commenters 
also referenced a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) study \6\ 
that summarized testing on six dehumidifiers and showed significant 
decreases in EF as either ambient temperature or relative humidity 
decreased. (ASAP, Public Meeting Transcript, No. 10 at pp. 19-21; Joint 
Commenters, No. 9 at pp. 1-5; California IOUs, No. 11 at pp. 1-3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ L. Mattison and D. Korn, ``Dehumidifiers: A Major Consumer 
of Residential Electricity,'' The Cadmus Group, Inc., 2012 ACEEE 
Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 2012, Pacific 
Grove, CA. Available online at: www.aceee.org/files/proceedings/2012/data/papers/0193-000291.pdf.
    \6\ J. Winkler, D. Christensen, and J. Tomerlin, ``Laboratory 
Test Report for Six ENERGY STAR[supreg] Dehumidifiers,'' National 
Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL/TP-5500-52791, December 2011. 
Available online at: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy12osti/52791.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Joint Commenters and ASAP further stated that the test 
procedure

[[Page 29277]]

does not capture dehumidifier performance under frost conditions (i.e., 
when ice accumulates on the evaporator as the dry-bulb temperature 
drops below 65 [deg]F, for most units), which a dehumidifier operating 
in a basement is likely to experience. ASAP commented that data from 
the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) \7\ indicate that 75 
percent of homes with dehumidifiers have basements, where temperatures 
are lower than 80 [deg]F. The Joint Commenters referenced the 
``Building Foundations Design Handbook'' to suggest that the typical 
temperatures of unconditioned basements range between 55 [deg]F and 70 
[deg]F.\8\ The Joint Commenters also stated that both ANSI/AHAM DH-1-
2008 and Consumer Reports \9\ testing of dehumidifiers reflect the 
importance of adequate operation under frost conditions. The Joint 
Commenters noted that the ``low temperature test'' in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-
2008, which includes recommended levels of performance related to unit 
operation and frost accumulation, is conducted at 65 [deg]F, and that 
Consumer Reports ratings of dehumidifiers include ``cool room 
performance,'' which is conducted at 50 [deg]F. The Joint Commenters 
urged DOE to amend the test procedures to more accurately reflect field 
conditions and performance by including at least one low-temperature 
rating point (e.g., 60 [deg]F), which is likely to occur in basements 
and at which frost accumulation can affect operation. (ASAP, Public 
Meeting Transcript, No. 10 at pp. 20-22; Joint Commenters, No. 9 at pp. 
2-5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ RECS data are available online at: www.eia.gov/consumption/residential/data/2009/.
    \8\ ``Builder's Foundation Handbook,'' Oak Ridge National 
Laboratory. May 1998, page 11. Available online at: www.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/foundation/ORNL_CON-295.pdf.
    \9\ www.consumerreports.org/cro/best-dehumidifiers.htm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In response to these comments and as described in the following 
paragraphs, DOE conducted additional research regarding the typical 
ambient conditions under which residential portable and whole-home 
dehumidifiers operate. In its analysis, DOE investigated regional and 
time-of-year usage patterns as well as likely installation locations 
within the home.
Ambient Operating Conditions
    The ``Builder's Foundation Handbook,'' published in 1998 by Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory as an update to its 1988 ``Building 
Foundation Design Handbook,'' states that ambient temperatures in 
unconditioned basements in most climates in the United States typically 
range between 55 [deg]F and 70 [deg]F. A field study by the Energy 
Center of Wisconsin (hereafter referred to as the Wisconsin Study),\10\ 
conducted in various homes across Wisconsin in 2010, assessed the net 
electricity savings from sub-slab ventilation systems installed in 
ENERGY STAR Homes \11\ that use basement dehumidifiers. Appendix B of 
this field study presents the basement temperature in 49 homes between 
June and November. Based on these data, the typical basement 
temperatures in Wisconsin, which is part of the region that represents 
the largest dehumidifier market, are between 60 [deg]F and 75 [deg]F 
for these months.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \10\ ``Dehumidification and Subslab Ventilation in Wisconsin 
Homes,'' Energy Center of Wisconsin. ECW Report Number 258-1, June 
2010. Appendix B, pp. 29-42. Available online at: www.ecw.org/ecwresults/258-1.pdf.
    \11\ Wisconsin ENERGY STAR Homes Program is a voluntary program 
promoting building practices that address combustion safety, 
building durability, occupant comfort, indoor air quality, and 
energy efficiency. According to the ENERGY STAR Web site, over 
15,000 homes are certified to the program to date. Additional 
information is available online at: www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=new_homes_partners.showStateResults&s_code=WI.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition to considering the findings in these studies, DOE 
conducted further analysis based on consumer and climate data to 
determine the most representative dehumidifier test conditions. DOE 
reviewed the 2009 RECS database to identify the geographic regions that 
account for the majority of dehumidifier usage. DOE found that of the 
15 million homes that reported using dehumidifiers, 5.1 million were 
located in the Northeast region and 6.5 million were in the Midwest 
region. RECS includes additional dehumidifier usage data for two sub-
regions within each of these regions, but does not disaggregate the 
data by state within the sub-regions.
    DOE noted that, in response to a March 27, 2006 framework document 
(71 FR 15059), AHAM submitted estimated dehumidifier monthly usage 
data.\12\ AHAM's medium estimate indicated 1,095 annual active mode 
operating hours from April to October. The majority of dehumidifier 
annual operation, 73.5 percent, occurs in the summer months between 
June and August, while the other 26.5 percent occurs in April, May, 
September, and October. Table III.1 lists the AHAM-estimated active 
mode operation hours per month.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \12\ ``AHAM Data on Dehumidifiers for Efficiency Standards 
Rulemaking,'' Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, August 
23, 2006. Docket No. EE-2006-STD-0127, Comment Number 17.

      Table III.1--AHAM Medium Estimate of Monthly Operating Hours
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Operating
                           Month                                hours
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jan........................................................            0
Feb........................................................            0
Mar........................................................            0
Apr........................................................           14
May........................................................           86
Jun........................................................          231
Jul........................................................          288
Aug........................................................          288
Sep........................................................          130
Oct........................................................           58
Nov........................................................            0
Dec........................................................            0
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................        1,095
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The AHAM usage estimates vary as a function of the month. DOE 
therefore analyzed available temperature data on a monthly basis, and 
then calculated a weighted average based on the monthly usage 
estimates. DOE analyzed 2012 hourly temperature and relative humidity 
data from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), collected at weather 
stations in each of the states in the two regions with significant 
dehumidifier ownership, as identified by RECS.
    For the reasons discussed in section III.B.1.b of this document, 
DOE estimated that consumers are likely to operate dehumidifiers when 
the ambient relative humidity is at or above 60 percent. From the NCDC 
data, DOE calculated the average ambient temperature for each state 
within the regions with significant dehumidifier ownership for the 
hours with at least 60-percent relative humidity during the months of 
dehumidifier usage. DOE then averaged the individual states' ambient 
temperatures to determine a representation of the average monthly 
ambient temperatures with at least 60-percent relative humidity for 
each sub-region represented by the RECS data. Using the RECS 
dehumidifier ownership data for each sub-region, DOE used a weighted 
average to determine the representative average monthly ambient 
temperature for each of the regions (i.e., Northeast and Midwest) that 
represent significant dehumidifier use. DOE then combined the regional 
data, using a similar weighted-average approach with the RECS 
dehumidifier ownership data, into overall monthly average ambient 
temperatures with at least 60-percent relative humidity. DOE then 
combined these average monthly temperatures into a single weighted-
average annual

[[Page 29278]]

temperature using the AHAM-estimated monthly hours of operation. From 
this analysis, DOE determined that the average annual ambient 
temperature, in regions where the majority of dehumidifiers are used 
during the months of dehumidifier usage and when the relative humidity 
is at least 60 percent, is 64.1[emsp14][deg]F. DOE notes that this 
temperature is close to the dry-bulb temperature specified in the low-
temperature test in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 (65[emsp14][deg]F). ANSI/AHAM 
DH-1-2008 also states that this ambient condition was selected based on 
manufacturer surveys that have shown that for areas typically 
dehumidified (i.e., basements or other sub-ground level areas), a 
significant portion of users want to operate their dehumidifier at 
temperatures as low as 65[emsp14][deg]F. Due to the similarity between 
this temperature and the average annual ambient temperature determined 
from DOE's analysis (64.1[emsp14][deg]F), DOE tentatively concludes 
that 65[emsp14][deg]F is a representative dry-bulb temperature at which 
to conduct dehumidification mode testing.
    DOE further investigated whether the 65[emsp14][deg]F ambient 
temperature is more representative of actual conditions than 
80[emsp14][deg]F by comparing the number of annual hours within the 
regions with significant dehumidifier use that experienced at least 60-
percent relative humidity within the test tolerance of 80[emsp14][deg]F 
 2[emsp14][deg]F (78-82[emsp14][deg]F) with the number of 
hours within 65[emsp14][deg]F  2[emsp14][deg]F (63-
67[emsp14][deg]F). Using the same region-based weighted-average 
approach described above but only for the hours within the temperatures 
of interest at which the relative humidity is at least 60 percent, DOE 
determined that a total of 112 hours annually, on average, are at the 
nominal 80[emsp14][deg]F conditions, while 433 hours annually, on 
average, are spent at the nominal 65[emsp14][deg]F conditions. Figure 
III.1 presents the entire distribution of weighted-average annual hours 
as a function of ambient temperature, and shows that the number of 
annual hours when the relative humidity is above the 60-percent 
threshold decreases significantly at 70[emsp14][deg]F and higher. In 
addition, the annual hours decrease at ambient temperatures below 
60[emsp14][deg]F.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.000

    This analysis suggests that dehumidifier operation occurs most 
frequently when the ambient temperature is in the range of 60-
70[emsp14][deg]F, and that dehumidifiers likely operate nearly four 
times more frequently at a 65[emsp14][deg]F ambient temperature than at 
80[emsp14][deg]F, which further indicates that testing in 
dehumidification mode at 65[emsp14][deg]F dry-bulb temperature is more 
representative of typical dehumidifier use than testing at 
80[emsp14][deg]F.
    As ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 noted, areas that are typically dehumidified 
include basements and other sub-ground level locations. Because the 
ambient conditions in some of these locations may be more dependent on 
the ground temperature than the outside air temperature, DOE conducted 
further investigation of the representative ambient temperature for 
these cases. As a proxy for the typical basement temperature, DOE 
considered the NCDC data for the hourly soil temperature, measured at a 
depth of 40 inches (about 1 meter). DOE conducted an analysis similar 
to the analysis conducted for the average outside air temperature, 
calculating the sub-region, region, and overall weighted-average 
monthly soil temperatures based on the RECS usage data. DOE then 
calculated the weighted-average annual soil temperature based on the 
AHAM estimated monthly usage patterns. This analysis resulted in a 
weighted-average annual soil temperature of 65.2[emsp14][deg]F for 
regions with significant dehumidifier use during the months in which 
dehumidifiers are operated. This temperature, which may be 
representative of basement and crawl-space ambient conditions, closely 
matches the weighted-average annual outside air temperature.

[[Page 29279]]

    Based on this analysis and comments from interested parties, DOE 
determined that the most appropriate and representative 
dehumidification mode testing conditions is likely 65[emsp14][deg]F 
dry-bulb temperature and 60-percent relative humidity. As discussed 
previously, these conditions are identical to those specified in the 
``Low Temperature Test'' in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008, which manufacturers 
may already be conducting, thereby reducing testing burden because 
manufacturers will not need to conduct tests at a temperature other 
than that specified in the industry-accepted low temperature test. 
Accordingly, DOE is proposing to require dehumidification mode testing 
in appendix X1 at nominal ambient conditions of 65[emsp14][deg]F dry-
bulb temperature and 56.6[emsp14][deg]F wet-bulb temperature, which 
corresponds to 60-percent relative humidity, for both portable and 
whole-home dehumidifiers.
    Although the analysis above identifies 65[emsp14][deg]F as the most 
representative dry-bulb temperature during testing, DOE acknowledges 
that a portion of annual dehumidifier operation likely occurs at a 
higher ambient temperature. As an alternate approach to the proposal 
for testing at 65[emsp14][deg]F in appendix X1, testing at both 
65[emsp14][deg]F and 80[emsp14][deg]F, with 60-percent relative 
humidity for each, may be appropriate. The IEF and capacity results 
from the two test conditions would be combined to form single values of 
IEF and capacity by, for example, calculating a weighted average based 
on the number of annual hours associated with each test condition as 
described above. In this example, the weighting factors would be 79 
percent for the 65[emsp14][deg]F test conditions (433 annual hours at 
65[emsp14][deg]F  2[emsp14][deg]F divided by 545 total 
annual hours at nominal both conditions) and 21 percent for the 
80[emsp14][deg]F conditions (112 annual hours at 80[emsp14][deg]F 
 2[emsp14][deg]F divided by 545 total annual hours at both 
conditions). Other weighting factors could be considered as well. DOE 
notes there would be additional burden associated with this alternate 
approach of testing at two different conditions and then combining 
results into one metric because two stabilization periods and two 6-
hour test periods would be required for each dehumidification mode 
test.
Whole-Home Dehumidifiers
    The Joint Commenters suggested that typical operating conditions 
for whole-home dehumidifiers are different than those for portable 
units. They stated that for whole-home units, the dry-bulb temperature 
of the entering air will be close to the thermostat setting in the 
home. (Joint Commenters, No. 9 at p. 5)
    RECS contains information on average indoor temperature for three 
different times of the day: (1) during the day when the residence is 
occupied, (2) during the day when the residence is unoccupied, and (3) 
during the night. Table III.2 below contains the results of DOE's 
investigation of summer average indoor temperatures for 1,735 homes in 
the Northeast and Midwest regions, considered by RECS to be the regions 
with the heaviest use of dehumidification.

                                      Table III.2--RECS Indoor Temperature
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Temperature (
               Time of day                         Occupied                     Season                [deg]F)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Day.....................................  Yes.......................  Summer....................            72.3
Day.....................................  No........................  Summer....................            73.7
Night...................................  Yes.......................  Summer....................            72.2
    Average.............................  ..........................  ..........................            72.7
Number of Homes.........................  ..........................  ..........................           1,735
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As an alternative to the 65 [deg]F inlet condition and the weighted 
combination of the 65 [deg]F and 80 [deg]F inlet conditions discussed 
above for portable dehumidifiers, DOE may consider requiring in 
appendix X1 ducted testing for whole-home dehumidifiers with the inlet 
air temperature equal to the average indoor temperature in the regions 
requiring the most dehumidification. To date, the data available to DOE 
suggest that this alternative inlet temperature would be 73 [deg]F. DOE 
requests any additional information on typical indoor temperatures and 
comment on this proposed approach.
Performance Impacts at Reduced Temperature
    Similar to other refrigeration-based systems, when a dehumidifier 
operates at lower ambient temperatures, the air flowing over the 
evaporator (i.e., intake air) does not provide as much heat transfer to 
the refrigerant to evaporate it, thereby reducing the compressor power 
and overall dehumidifier capacity. In addition, at ambient temperatures 
of 65 [deg]F or below, the water condensing on the evaporator may 
freeze, limiting air flow and further reducing efficiency and capacity. 
Dehumidifiers often incorporate a thermocouple attached to the 
refrigerant tubing in the evaporator to determine if icing has 
occurred. The dehumidifier then either shuts down all active mode 
operation to allow the ice to passively melt, or ceases compressor 
operation and operates the fan to pass ambient air over the evaporator 
to melt the ice. This fan operation is more energy consumptive than a 
passive defrost approach, but is more effective at removing ice, 
allowing the compressor to be reactivated more quickly. DOE considers 
such fan operation to be part of dehumidification mode, distinct from 
fan-only mode operation wherein the humidity setpoint has been reached.
    To investigate the performance and efficiency impacts of varying 
ambient temperature conditions, DOE selected a test sample of 13 
portable dehumidifiers spanning a range of manufacturers, capacities, 
and efficiencies. In addition, DOE selected one representative whole-
home unit for which to assess initial impacts of varying temperature. 
These units are listed in Table III.3. DOE performed dehumidification 
mode testing on these 14 dehumidifiers at three dry-bulb temperatures: 
(1) 80 [deg]F, the temperature currently specified for active mode 
testing according to appendix X; (2) 65 [deg]F, the temperature 
required for the low temperature test in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008; and (3) 
55 [deg]F, the lowest operating setpoint which could be met for all 
test units per manufacturer documentation. The relative humidity was 
set at 60 percent for all tests. Because these tests focused on 
determining the effect of reduced ambient temperature on active mode 
energy use independent of standby power considerations, DOE measured EF 
rather than IEF for this test series.
    After testing this range of temperatures on the sample of 14 
dehumidifiers and conducting analysis which suggests that 65 [deg]F is 
a representative ambient temperature for

[[Page 29280]]

dehumidifiers generally, DOE conducted additional whole-home 
dehumidifier testing to investigate the impact of reducing the test 
temperature from 80 [deg]F to 65 [deg]F. DOE selected 13 more whole-
home models for ambient temperature and ducted installation testing 
(discussed in section III.B.1.c of this document), of which nine units 
were chosen for unducted testing at both 80 [deg]F and 65 [deg]F 
ambient conditions to further understand the effects of ambient 
temperature. For the purposes of this testing, DOE included in the 
whole-home test sample those units that could be optionally ducted or 
unducted. Table III.3 lists the additional whole-home units tested.

                               Table III.3--Dehumidifier Investigative Test Sample
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Initial ambient temperature test sample              Additional whole-home dehumidifier test sample
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Reported                                          Reported
                  Test unit                    capacity (pints/             Test unit                capacity
                                                     day)                                           (pints/day)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
P1...........................................              30   W1..............................              70
P2...........................................              40   W2..............................              70
P3...........................................              40   W3 \a\..........................              90
P4...........................................              45   W4 \a\..........................              90
P5...........................................              50   W5 \a\..........................             100
P6...........................................              50   W6..............................             105
P7...........................................              50   W7 \a\..........................             120
P8...........................................              50   W8 \a\..........................             120
P9...........................................              60   W9 \a\..........................             135
P10..........................................              65   W10 \a\.........................             155
P11..........................................              70   W11.............................             155
P12..........................................              70   W12 \a\.........................             200
P13..........................................             110   W13 \a\.........................             205
W14 \b\......................................             105
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\a\ Tested for ambient temperature investigation as well as ducting configuration.
\b\ Tested only for ambient temperature investigation.

    During ambient temperature testing, DOE observed that for all test 
units at 80 [deg]F, the compressor and fan operated continuously for 
the entire test period. At the lower temperatures, certain 
dehumidifiers in the test sample had cyclic or intermittent periods of 
fan-only operation for defrosting or frost prevention, with the 
duration and frequency of such periods increasing at the lowest 
temperature (55 [deg]F).
    All dehumidifiers in DOE's investigative test sample performed at 
lower EFs and capacities during low-temperature investigative tests 
conducted at the 65 [deg]F and 55 [deg]F dry-bulb temperatures than at 
the 80 [deg]F condition specified in appendix X. Because, as discussed 
above, the 65 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature condition appears to more 
accurately reflect actual installations than the current test procedure 
ambient temperature requirement, the EF and capacity measured at this 
temperature, while lower than the values that would be measured under 
the current appendix X, should more accurately represent dehumidifier 
performance in the field.
    Table III.4 shows the impacts on capacity and EF that were measured 
by reducing the ambient test temperature from 80 [deg]F to 65 [deg]F 
and 55 [deg]F.

       Table III.4--Per-Unit and Product Class Average Performance Impacts at Reduced Ambient Temperatures
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                    Percent change  in capacity    Percent change  in EF from 80
                                                        from 80 [deg]F  (%)                 [deg]F  (%)
  Product class  (pints/day)        Test unit    ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     65 [deg]F       55 [deg]F       65 [deg]F       55 [deg]F
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<35.00........................  P1..............             -35             -74             -26             -57
                                Class Average...             -35             -74             -26             -57
35.01-45.00...................  P2..............             -77             -91             -61             -79
                                P3..............             -48             -73             -32             -53
                                P4..............             -33             -69             -15             -46
                                Class Average...             -53             -78             -36             -59
45.01-54.00...................  P5..............             -39             -91             -25             -81
                                P6..............             -33             -78             -21             -62
                                P7..............             -36             -76             -21             -59
                                Class Average...             -36             -82             -22             -67
54.01-75.00...................  P8..............             -61             -78             -39             -67
                                P9..............             -39             -86             -32             -63
                                P10.............             -65             -83             -36             -60
                                P11.............             -59             -83             -35             -64
                                P12.............             -36             -81             -14             -64
                                Class Average...             -52             -82             -31             -63
>75.00........................  P13.............             -27             -96             -15             -90
                                W3..............             -35  ..............             -21  ..............
                                W4..............             -42  ..............             -29  ..............
                                W5..............             -49  ..............             -26  ..............
                                W7..............             -27  ..............             -15  ..............

[[Page 29281]]

 
                                W8..............             -24  ..............               5  ..............
                                W9..............             -49  ..............             -33  ..............
                                W10.............             -20  ..............              -4  ..............
                                W12.............             -42  ..............             -35  ..............
                                W13.............             -45  ..............             -35  ..............
                                W14.............             -39             -94             -25             -80
                                Class Average...             -36             -95             -21             -85
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As shown in Table III.4, DOE testing demonstrates a significant 
percentage reduction in both capacity and EF at temperatures lower than 
80 [deg]F. At 65 [deg]F, capacity drops per product class average by as 
much as 53 percent and EF by up to 36 percent. DOE notes that at 55 
[deg]F, the units in the test sample show an even greater reduction in 
capacity and EF as the units approach their lowest operating 
temperature and perform frequent defrost functions.
    Under DOE's alternate approach, which would combine results from 
testing at 80 [deg]F and 65 [deg]F using a weighted average, there 
would still be a significant reduction in capacity and EF, as well as 
IEF when used, because the results of the 65 [deg]F test would receive 
a 79-percent weighting in the combined calculation. Therefore, a 
modification in the test procedure conditions for appendix X1 would 
likely result in significant reductions in measured capacity, EF, and 
IEF under either the proposed approach or alternate combined 
calculation. DOE would consider the effects of any reduction to 
capacity and active mode energy use resulting from the proposed test 
procedure amendments when determining appropriate energy conservation 
standards for dehumidifiers.
    DOE also numerically estimated whole-home dehumidifier performance 
under the alternative proposal for testing these units at 73 [deg]F 
using data measured for whole-home units at 80 [deg]F, 65 [deg]F, and 
55 [deg]F ambient temperatures. DOE first developed generalized curves 
relating dehumidifier normalized capacity and EF (i.e., capacity at the 
test ambient temperature divided by capacity measured at 80 [deg]F, and 
EF at the test ambient temperature divided by EF measured at 80 [deg]F) 
to ambient temperature, which will define these relationships 
independent of rated capacity. DOE determined that the best curve fit 
for both capacity and EF as a function of temperature and relative 
humidity is a biquadratic equation, which is typically used for HVAC 
equipment. However, since relative humidity was held constant at 60 
percent, the biquadratic equations reduce to quadratic equations with 
terms that scale with temperature and the square of the temperature, in 
the form of f (temperature) = [Ax(temperature\2\) + Bx(temperature) 
+C]. Using data for capacity and EF measured at the three ambient 
temperatures, DOE calculated the coefficients for the normalized 
capacity versus temperature function and the normalized EF versus 
temperature function. From these coefficients, DOE estimated capacity 
and EF at the proposed alternative ambient temperature of 73 [deg]F, as 
shown in Table III.5.

       Table III.5--Estimated Whole-Home Dehumidifier Performance Impact at 73 [deg]F Ambient Temperature
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Capacity
                Test unit                       Dehumidification technology         change (%)     EF Change (%)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W3......................................  Refrigerant...........................             -15              -6
W4......................................  Refrigerant...........................             -18              -9
W5......................................  Refrigerant...........................             -21              -8
W7......................................  Refrigerant-Desiccant.................             -12              -5
W8......................................  Refrigerant...........................             -10               2
W9......................................  Refrigerant...........................             -21             -10
W10.....................................  Refrigerant...........................              -9              -1
W12.....................................  Refrigerant-Desiccant.................             -18             -11
W13.....................................  Refrigerant...........................             -19             -11
Average.................................  ......................................             -16              -7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Due to the expected effects on capacity at the proposed reduced 
ambient temperature in appendix X1, DOE also proposes to amend the 
definition of ``product capacity'' in appendix X1 to clarify that it is 
a measure of the amount of moisture removed per 24-hour period under 
the specified ambient conditions. For consistency and clarity, DOE also 
proposes to similarly amend the definition of product capacity in 
appendix X.
Summary and Request for Comments
    DOE requests comment on its analysis of representative ambient 
conditions and the proposal to require dehumidification mode testing in 
appendix X1 at 65 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 56.6 [deg]F wet-bulb 
temperature (i.e., 60-percent relative humidity). DOE welcomes input on 
the reductions to active mode energy use and capacity that would occur 
as a result of the proposed modifications to the test procedure ambient 
dry-bulb

[[Page 29282]]

conditions. DOE also welcomes comment on the alternate approach of 
conducting dehumidification mode testing at both 65[emsp14][deg]F and 
80[emsp14][deg]F ambient temperatures, with IEF and capacity calculated 
from the combined results of the two tests. For such a combined 
approach, DOE invites input on appropriate weighting factors. DOE 
additionally seeks comment on the alternate approach for whole-home 
dehumidifiers, in which dehumidification mode testing would be 
conducted at 73[emsp14][deg]F ambient temperature to be representative 
of average residential thermostat settings. DOE also seeks comment on 
the testing burden associated with the proposal for testing at 
65[emsp14][deg]F and the alternate approaches.
b. Relative Humidity
    In response to the August 2012 Framework Document, DOE received 
comments regarding the applicability and appropriateness of the 
relative humidity conditions specified in the dehumidifier test 
procedure. The Joint Commenters and California IOUs expressed concerns 
regarding the current test procedure relative humidity conditions, 
citing several studies and other sources of information. These 
interested parties claimed that:
    (1) Adverse health effects, such as respiratory infections and 
allergies, are minimized by maintaining ambient relative humidity 
between 40 percent and 60 percent. (Joint Commenters, No. 9 at p. 3)
    (2) While people generally cannot sense fluctuations in relative 
humidity levels between 25 percent and 60 percent, most people can 
sense when the relative humidity rises above 60 percent. (Id.)
    (3) Units in the Cadmus Group study were being operated at a 50-
percent relative humidity setpoint, lower than the 60-percent relative 
humidity ambient condition required in the test procedure. (California 
IOUs, No. 11 at p. 2; Joint Commenters, No. 9 at p. 3)
    (4) According to the Wisconsin Study, nearly half of the basements 
monitored maintained an average relative humidity of less than 50 
percent during the summer months, and only five dehumidifiers were 
being operated in relative humidity levels of at least 60 percent. 
(Id.)
    The Joint Commenters, ASAP, and California IOUs believe that the 
current rating condition of 60-percent relative humidity represents the 
upper bound of both recommended levels and levels that consumers are 
likely to select, and that a lower relative humidity level for the test 
procedure would likely encourage good performance in the field where 
units have to work harder to remove moisture at lower relative humidity 
levels. Therefore, these commenters urged DOE to change the relative 
humidity level for the portable dehumidifier test from 60 percent to a 
lower value. The Joint Commenters also recommended that whole-home 
dehumidifier testing be conducted at a lower relative humidity level 
than 60 percent. (ASAP, Public Meeting Transcript, No. 10 at p. 20; 
California IOUs, No. 11 at pp. 1-3; Joint Commenters, No. 9 at pp. 1-5) 
The California IOUs also stated that ENERGY STAR suggests that the 
optimum relative humidity level for a building is between 30 percent 
and 50 percent, which, according to the California IOUs, would suggest 
that dehumidifiers are likely to be less efficient in real-world 
operation than in their test results. (California IOUs, No. 11 at p. 2)
    DOE reviewed the studies cited in the above comments, and conducted 
additional research on the appropriate level of relative humidity for 
the dehumidification mode testing. Regarding potential health impacts 
outside a certain range of relative humidity, DOE notes that ANSI/
American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning 
Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 55-2013, ``Thermal Environmental Conditions 
for Human Occupancy'' (ASHRAE 55), states that that there is an 
acceptable range of indoor relative humidity for thermal comfort, with 
an upper limit of 0.012 humidity ratio (pounds of water divided by 
pounds of dry air) at standard pressure, which corresponds to a 
relative humidity of approximately 55 percent at a dry-bulb temperature 
of 80[emsp14][deg]F. At lower dry-bulb temperatures, 60-percent 
relative humidity would correspond to a humidity ratio below the upper 
comfort limit.\13\ DOE further notes that the Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration (OSHA) Technical Manual recommends that employers 
control humidity and maintain a range of 20 to 60 percent.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \13\ Further information on thermal comfort may be found in 
Appendix F of ASHRAE Standard 55-2013. Available for purchase online 
at www.ashrae.org.
    \14\ ``OSHA Technical Manual,'' U.S. Department of Labor, 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, TED 01-00-015, 
Section III, Chapter 2, January 20, 1999. Available online at: 
www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_iii/otm_iii_2.html#5.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This information, in aggregate, indicates that 60-percent relative 
humidity is a representative upper bound for an ambient humidity 
condition that consumers would find acceptable. In addition, among the 
21 sampled homes metered in the Cadmus Group study, DOE observes that 
the average consumer-selected setpoint was for 50-percent relative 
humidity, with values ranging from 35 percent to 65 percent. However, 
the average dehumidifier setpoint is not representative of the average 
ambient relative humidity during dehumidification mode, because 
dehumidifiers operate only when the ambient air relative humidity is 
higher than the setpoint and shut off dehumidification when the 
controls detect that the target relative humidity level has been 
reached. DOE gathered information on the actual ambient relative 
humidity during dehumidification mode from a metering study conducted 
in 20 homes in Houston, Texas, over approximately a year for various 
categories of dehumidifiers, both portable and whole-home.\15\ During 
this study, the homeowners were not required to set a specific relative 
humidity setpoint; it was recommended to them, however, to maintain a 
relative humidity of around 55 percent. The subsequent metering found 
that, in homes with dehumidification separate from cooling, on average 
5 percent of metered hours were spent at relative humidity levels 
greater than 60 percent, although three out of the 10 units exceeded 
60-percent relative humidity 15 to 25 percent of the time. The Cadmus 
Group study, referenced by ASAP, the California IOUs, and the Joint 
Commenters, also observed varying accuracy of humidity controls in 
maintaining the relative humidity at the setpoint. In the Wisconsin 
Study of basement relative humidity levels, 11 out of 40 participating 
sites had daily averages that exceeded 60-percent humidity for at least 
25 percent of the summer season, while 16 sites experienced daily 
averages ranging from 50 to 60 percent for at least 25 percent of the 
summer season.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \15\ A.F. Rudd, J.W. Lstiburek, P. Eng, and K. Ueno. 
``Residential Dehumidification Systems Research for Hot-Humid 
Climates,'' Conducted by Building Science Corporation for the U.S. 
Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, NREL/SR-550-
36643, February 2005.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DOE additionally examined manufacturer literature for portable 
dehumidifiers to ascertain what default relative humidity settings are 
provided by manufacturers. DOE observed that, among manufacturers and 
brands that specified to the consumer what the initial default relative 
humidity level is, the most common setting was 60 percent. However, the 
majority of

[[Page 29283]]

portable dehumidifiers are equipped with electronic controls and an 
automatic restart feature, in which the previous settings are retained 
when the unit is powered off or disconnected from the supply power. If 
portable dehumidifiers operate in dehumidification mode largely at a 
consumer-selected relative humidity setting, that setting, as seen in 
the Cadmus Group study, would be on average approximately 50 percent.
    These data characterize the relative humidity levels and 
dehumidifier settings experienced in real-world dehumidifier 
installations. While dehumidifiers may operate under a range of ambient 
relative humidity levels, the average setpoint observed in the Cadmus 
Group study and the recommended relative humidity level from ASHRAE 55 
suggest that consumers use dehumidifiers to achieve relative humidity 
levels from 50 to 55 percent. For a unit to operate in dehumidification 
mode, the ambient relative humidity must be higher than the setpoint. 
Therefore, DOE proposes that the ambient relative humidity level 
maintained throughout dehumidification mode testing remain at 60 
percent, as specified in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008.
    DOE also notes that each of the three different ambient temperature 
tests in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008, including the test at the 65 [deg]F dry-
bulb temperature that DOE is proposing for appendix X1, is conducted at 
60-percent relative humidity. Maintaining this 60-percent relative 
humidity test condition would minimize manufacturer testing burden, as 
manufacturers may already be conducting the low-temperature test in 
ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008. For the above reasons, DOE is not proposing to 
amend the ambient relative humidity in appendix X1. To achieve 60-
percent relative humidity at the proposed 65 [deg]F dry-bulb 
temperature, the wet-bulb temperature would be specified as 56.6 
[deg]F. DOE requests comment on this proposed determination to maintain 
the 60-percent ambient relative humidity requirement.
c. Ducted Test Installation for Whole-Home Dehumidifiers
    This section discusses proposed modifications to the dehumidifier 
test setup and additional required instrumentation for whole-home 
dehumidifiers. DOE based its proposals on research of current industry 
practices for testing ducted air treatment devices and investigative 
testing of 13 whole-home dehumidifiers under various testing 
configurations.
    As discussed in section III.A of this document, whole-home 
dehumidifiers are intended to be installed and operated as part of a 
ducted air-delivery system. These units are designed with standard-size 
collars to interface with the home's HVAC ducting, and typically 
require two ducts for the process air stream: a supply air intake for 
return air from the dehumidified space and an air outlet for delivery 
of the dehumidified air to the same space. Certain whole-home 
dehumidifiers also provide an option to connect an additional fresh air 
duct to the inlet to dilute indoor pollutants and maintain high oxygen 
content in the air. The amount of fresh air ventilation can be 
regulated by a variety of dampers and controls. In addition, some 
whole-home dehumidifiers are designed to operate attached to multiple 
outlet ducts to allow for the distribution of dry air to multiple rooms 
or multiple sections in a home's air delivery system.
    The California IOUs expressed concern that the existing test 
procedure is not appropriate for measuring the efficiency of whole-home 
units and requested that DOE consider a modified test procedure for 
these units. (California IOUs, No. 11 at p. 4)
    The test setup currently provided in appendix X for 
dehumidification mode testing does not specify the attachment of 
ducting to the inlet or outlet of the unit. The ducting in a typical 
installation imposes an external static pressure (ESP) which reduces 
airflow and affects the capacity and efficiency. To evaluate these 
impacts as a function of ducting configurations, DOE conducted 
investigative dehumidification mode testing on a sample of 13 whole-
home dehumidifiers, including the two refrigerant-desiccant units. 
Table III.6 provides characteristics of the units selected for 
investigative testing. All units were first tested according to 
appendix X to establish baseline unducted performance. DOE subsequently 
conducted additional investigative testing to determine the potential 
impacts of modifying the appendix X conditions to measure whole-home 
dehumidifier performance in a ducted installation.

                       Table III.6--DOE Whole-Home Dehumidifier Investigative Test Sample
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Duct collar            Dehumidifier      Rated capacity   Rated EF (L/
            Sample No.                  configuration            technology         (pint/day)         kWh)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W1................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........              70            2.37
W2................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........              70            2.37
W3................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........              90            2.50
W4................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........              90            2.53
W5................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........             100            2.60
W6................................  Dual Outlet..........  Refrigerant..........             105            4.20
W7................................  Dual Airstreams......  Refrigerant-Desiccant             120            3.30
W8................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........             120            2.70
W9................................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........             135            1.80
W10...............................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........             155            3.50
W11...............................  Dual Outlet..........  Refrigerant..........             155            3.50
W12...............................  Dual Airstreams......  Refrigerant-Desiccant             200            2.47
W13...............................  Single Outlet........  Refrigerant..........             205            2.70
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ratings are based on testing according to appendix X.

    Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers also incorporate the supply air 
intake and dehumidified air outlet for the process air stream, but have 
additional intake and outlet ducts for the reactivation air. The 
reactivation air is drawn from and discharged to a location outside of 
the dehumidified space, typically outdoors.
    For clarity, DOE proposes in this NOPR to adopt the following 
definitions for ``reactivation air'' in appendix X1:
    Reactivation air: The air drawn from unconditioned space to remove 
moisture from the desiccant wheel of a refrigerant-desiccant 
dehumidifier and discharged to unconditioned space.

[[Page 29284]]

Capacity Measurement for Refrigerant-Desiccant Dehumidifiers
    Product capacity represents the amount of moisture a dehumidifier 
would remove in a 24-hour period of operation at the specified ambient 
conditions. Appendix X's current capacity measurement methodology 
involves weighing the amount of water collected during the 6-hour 
dehumidification mode test and adjusting the recorded weight to account 
for slight variations from nominal ambient temperature, relative 
humidity, and barometric pressure. This value is then multiplied by 24 
and divided by the test duration in hours to determine the pints of 
moisture that would be removed per day.
    The majority of whole-home dehumidifiers rely solely on a 
refrigeration system to remove moisture, for which capacity can be 
accurately measured by the current appendix X methodology, and thus DOE 
proposes to retain this methodology for whole-home dehumidifiers other 
than refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. Refrigerant-desiccant 
dehumidifiers, however, use both a refrigeration system to remove some 
moisture from the process air (in liquid form) and a desiccant wheel to 
remove additional moisture from the process air by transferring it (in 
vapor form) to the reactivation airstream.
    To address refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, DOE developed a 
capacity calculation that determines the mass of moisture removed from 
the process airstream using the difference in psychrometric properties 
between the inlet and outlet air streams. Specifically, the measured 
dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity are used to determine the 
absolute humidity at both locations in pounds of water per cubic foot 
of dry air. The absolute humidity is then multiplied by the volumetric 
flow rate, measured in cubic feet per minute, to determine the process 
air inlet and outlet moisture flow rates, measured in pounds of water 
per minute. The difference between the inlet and outlet moisture flow 
rates determines the amount of moisture the unit under test removes 
from the process air. Unlike the current condensate collection capacity 
method, DOE believes that the proposed vapor capacity calculation 
method would accurately account for the total moisture that 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers remove from the process airstream.
    DOE applied the vapor capacity calculation method to the whole-home 
dehumidifiers in its investigative sample to compare it to the method 
of determining capacity from condensate collection, as well as to 
understand the relative contributions of condensation and desiccant 
moisture removal for refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. Nine whole-
home units, including two refrigerant-desiccant units, were tested in 
this investigation at 65 [deg]F dry-bulb ambient temperature, 60-
percent relative humidity, and 0.5 inches of water column (in. w.c.) 
ESP. Six of the seven refrigeration-based samples in Table III.7 
demonstrate close correlation between the vapor and condensate methods, 
validating the vapor capacity calculation method.

                                 Table III.7--Comparison of Condensate Collection and Vapor Calculation Capacity Methods
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Capacity (pints/day)                  Energy factor (L/kWh)
                          Dehumidification                                 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Test unit               technology             Compressor operation     Condensate     Vapor      Difference   Condensate     Vapor      Difference
                                                                              capacity     capacity       (%)        capacity     capacity       (%)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W3.................  Refrigerant...............  Continuous...............           53           52           -2         1.59         1.57           -1
W4.................  Refrigerant...............  Continuous...............           53           51           -4         1.43         1.38           -4
W5.................  Refrigerant...............  Cycling..................           49           68           39         1.89         2.66           40
W7.................  Refrigerant-Desiccant.....  Continuous...............           42           84          100         1.08         2.18          101
W8.................  Refrigerant...............  Continuous...............           58           55           -4         1.44         1.37           -4
W9.................  Refrigerant...............  Continuous...............           71           71           -1         1.10         1.09           -1
W10................  Refrigerant...............  Continuous...............          109          113            3         2.82         2.85            1
W12................  Refrigerant-Desiccant.....  Continuous...............           70           99           41         0.75         1.11           48
W13................  Refrigerant...............  Continuous...............          108          104           -4         1.68         1.63           -3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    One refrigerant-based unit, W5, demonstrates poor correlation 
between capacity calculation methods, but this unit was the only whole-
home dehumidifier in DOE's sample that cycled the compressor during 
testing under these conditions. This may indicate accumulation of ice 
on the evaporator over the duration of the test, a condition for which 
the condensate collection method does not account. The two refrigerant-
desiccant dehumidifiers have capacities measured by the vapor method 
that exceed the capacities determined from the condensate collection 
method by 41 percent and 100 percent, suggesting that these 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers remove approximately one-third or 
more of the total moisture removed by means of the desiccant. 
Therefore, DOE proposes that appendix X1 require that refrigerant-
desiccant dehumidifiers use the vapor calculation to determine tested 
capacity to most accurately measure the total amount of moisture 
removed from the process air.
Duct Configuration
    DOE reviewed research conducted for whole-home dehumidifiers to 
gain insight on possible ducting configurations, and noted that NREL's 
research on ENERGY STAR dehumidifiers \16\ included testing of ducted 
whole-home dehumidifiers under inlet air conditions ranging from 60 
[deg]F to 98 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 25-percent to 90-percent 
relative humidity. In its testing, NREL attached inlet and outlet ducts 
to the supply and return ducts of its laboratory air-handling system. 
The ducts incorporated laminar flow elements to measure volumetric flow 
rates, chilled mirror hygrometers to measure dew point temperatures, 
and thermocouple arrays to measure dry bulb temperatures.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \16\ ``Laboratory Test Report for Six ENERGY STAR 
Dehumidifiers.'' National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NREL/TP-5500-
52791, December 2011. Available online at www.nrel.gov/docs/fy12osti/52791.pdf
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To aid in developing detailed specifications for instrumented 
ducts, DOE reviewed the test procedure issued by the Air Movement and 
Control Association International, Inc. (AMCA), in association with 
ANSI and ASHRAE--ANSI/ASHRAE 51-2007/ANSI/AMCA 210-07, ``Laboratory 
Methods of Testing Fans for Certified

[[Page 29285]]

Aerodynamic Performance Rating'' (ANSI/AMCA 210). The duct requirements 
specified in ANSI/AMCA 210 would allow for the accurate measurement of 
psychrometric and volumetric flow properties of the air entering and 
exiting a whole-home dehumidifier under test.
    DOE proposes in this document to adopt in appendix X1 certain 
provisions regarding fresh air inlets, process air inlet and outlet 
ducts, test duct specifications, transition sections, and flow 
straighteners specified in ANSI/AMCA 210 for testing whole-home 
dehumidifiers.
1. Fresh Air Inlets
    As discussed previously, fresh air from the exterior of a home may 
be directed to a second inlet on some whole-home dehumidifiers to 
improve the quality of the dehumidified air. However, DOE is not aware 
of information on the percentage of whole-home dehumidifiers equipped 
with this fresh air ducting option. DOE tentatively concludes that the 
added test burden of accounting for a second inlet duct with air flow 
that may be at a different temperature and humidity than the process 
air inlet temperature would be significant. Therefore, DOE proposes to 
require in appendix X1 that any fresh air collars be capped closed and 
sealed with tape during testing.
    To investigate performance impacts of sealing the fresh air inlet 
and supplying all inlet air through the process air inlet duct, DOE 
tested five whole-home units with and without the fresh air inlet 
capped at 65 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature, 60-percent relative humidity, 
and an ESP of 0.5 inches of water column (which, as discussed later in 
this section, was determined to be the most representative of whole-
home dehumidifier installations). Table III.8 below contains the 
results of this series of testing.

         Table III.8--Impact of Fresh Air Connection on Whole-Home Dehumidifier Performance at 65 [deg]F
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        Capacity (pints/day)                      Energy Factor (L/kWh)
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Sample number           No fresh    With fresh    Performance     No fresh    With fresh    Performance
                                  air          air        impact (%)        air          air        impact (%)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3...........................           53           54               2         1.59         1.63               3
5...........................           49           49               1         1.89         1.98               5
8...........................           58           60               4         1.44         1.50               5
10..........................          109          114               4         2.82         2.91               3
13..........................          108          113               5         1.68         1.75               4
Average.....................  ...........  ...........               3  ...........  ...........               4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Based on these data, DOE tentatively determined that using the 
fresh air inlet at the ambient conditions proposed by this document has 
a slight positive impact on measured capacity and EF, less than or 
equal to 5 percent for all five test units. However, given the lack of 
information regarding consumer use of the fresh air ducting, DOE 
tentatively concludes that the impact is not significant enough to 
warrant the added test burden of providing separate fresh air inlet 
flow; therefore, DOE maintains its proposal that any fresh air inlet on 
a whole-home dehumidifier be capped and sealed during testing. DOE 
welcomes comment on this proposal, in particular on the burden 
associated with testing whole-home dehumidifiers with separate fresh 
air inlet flow, the representative ambient conditions for such fresh 
air supply, and the percentage of units in the field that incorporate 
the fresh air supply.
2. Process Air Inlet and Outlet Ducts
    As a further means of reducing testing burden, DOE investigated the 
effects of dehumidification mode testing for refrigeration-based whole-
home units using ducting only on the process air outlet, rather than 
both the inlet and outlet of the process airstream. The appropriate ESP 
would be achieved through flow restriction in the outlet test duct 
while inlet psychrometric conditions would be maintained by controlling 
the test chamber. DOE assessed this option by comparing data for a 
representative 70 pints/day unit with both inlet and outlet ducts 
attached and with only the outlet duct in place. Table III.9 contains 
the results of these tests, along with a numerical extrapolation to 
approximate the capacity and EF impacts at the proposed ESP of 0.5 in. 
w.c.

                                     Table III.9--Impact of Whole-Home Dehumidifier Testing With Only an Outlet Duct
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Capacity (pints/day)                            Energy Factor (L/kWh)
                                                         -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    ESP ** (in. w.c.)                        Inlet and      Outlet duct   Percent impact     Inlet and      Outlet duct   Percent impact
                                                           outlet ducts        only             (%)        outlet ducts        only             (%)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0.01....................................................              75              77             2.7            2.39            2.40             0.3
0.11....................................................              73              74             1.2            2.25            2.31             2.4
0.19....................................................              71              73             4.1            2.15            2.26             5.0
0.50 *..................................................              63              66             6.0            1.73            2.01            16.0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* Results at this ESP are a numerical extrapolation.
** These tests were conducted at ESPs of up to 0.19 in. w.c. at 80 [deg]F and at 60-percent relative humidity.

    While the data suggest that a performance improvement may be 
achieved by removing the inlet test duct at an ESP of 0.5 in. w.c. and 
an ambient temperature of 80 [deg]F, DOE notes that these data are 
limited and that there is uncertainty associated with these 
extrapolated results. DOE also notes that requiring both inlet and 
outlet test ducts would represent a significant burden to manufacturers 
and test laboratories that may not have testing facilities large

[[Page 29286]]

enough to accommodate the total length of ducting. Therefore, DOE 
proposes in this document that whole-home dehumidifiers, other than 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, would be tested under appendix X1 
with only outlet ducting in place. Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers 
would require an inlet and outlet duct for the process airstream, but 
may use only an inlet duct for the reactivation airstream. The inlet 
and outlet ducts attached to the process airstream would contain the 
instrumentation necessary for the proposed capacity calculation for 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers discussed previously. The inlet 
duct attached to the reactivation airstream would provide consistent 
means for measuring the inlet psychrometric conditions of both 
airstreams. DOE seeks comment and information on these proposed ducting 
requirements and may accordingly consider requiring both inlet and 
outlet ducts for all whole-home dehumidifiers.
3. Test Duct Specifications
    ANSI/AMCA 210 includes various configurations of ducting that may 
be attached to equipment under test for measuring air flow 
characteristics. Upon review of these configurations, DOE determined 
that Figures 7A and 16 of ANSI/AMCA 210 would be the simplest and most 
relevant to whole-home dehumidifier testing. Other duct configurations 
specified in ANSI/AMCA 210 require chambers or nozzles to simulate the 
conditions a unit may experience during operation. However, DOE 
tentatively concluded that the equipment specified in Figures 7A and 16 
of ANSI/AMCA 210 provide conditions representative of normal operation 
while requiring the fewest components. Therefore, DOE proposes to 
determine the lengths of the inlet and outlet ducts used for whole-
house dehumidifier testing according to the dimensions provided in 
these figures, which specify duct lengths as a function of duct 
diameter. Because DOE's review of current products indicates that the 
majority of whole-home dehumidifiers connect to ducting via circular 
collars with a diameter of 10 inches, DOE proposes to require in 
appendix X1 that 10-inch diameter inlet and outlet ducts be used, with 
duct lengths and instrumentation spacing specified based on 
calculations using this diameter.
    The material used for ducting can impact the transfer of heat and 
moisture through duct walls, and may include galvanized mild steel, 
polyurethane panels, fiberglass duct board, flexible plastics, and 
fabric ducting. Because galvanized mild steel ducts are commonly used 
in HVAC applications and are not affected by moisture, DOE proposes to 
require this material for the ducting specified in appendix X1. DOE 
further proposes to limit heat transfer by requiring that the ducts be 
insulated using insulation with a minimum R value of 6, with all seams 
and edges sealed with tape.
4. Transition Sections
    DOE is aware of whole-home dehumidifiers equipped with circular 
collars with diameters other than 10 inches, such as 8 or 12 inches. 
DOE's research also determined that at least one refrigerant-desiccant 
dehumidifier has rectangular collars. To accommodate such designs, DOE 
proposes to require that transition pieces be used to connect these 
collars to the test ducts. To minimize turbulence caused by transition 
pieces, DOE proposes to require that the pieces have a maximum 
divergent angle of 3.5 degrees and a maximum convergent angle of 7.5 
degrees, in accordance with the requirements in section 5.2.1.3, 
Transition Pieces, of ANSI/AMCA 210.
5. Flow Straighteners
    To provide consistent and repeatable results, the air flow must be 
laminar upstream of sensors and inlets. DOE first examined the length 
of 10-inch diameter ducting that would be required to achieve laminar, 
fully-developed flow, based on the Reynolds number (Re) of the duct:
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.001

    Where:

    D is the diameter of the duct;
    v is the mean velocity of the fluid;
    [rho] is the density of the fluid; and
    [mu] is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid.

    For the units within its test sample, DOE used the range of 
volumetric flow rates (approximately 200 to 400 cubic feet per minute) 
in the above equation to determine the range of Re. For Re greater than 
4000, as calculated for units within the test sample, the calculation 
for the effective duct length required for fully developed flow is:

Effective Length = 4.4Re1/6

    From this equation, DOE determined that a minimum duct length of 20 
feet would be required to ensure fully developed laminar flow, a length 
that DOE concludes is burdensome based on associated test chamber size 
requirements. Instead, DOE proposes to require in appendix X1 the use 
of cell-type air flow straighteners in test ducts. The flow 
straightener dimensions would be specified according to section 
5.2.1.6, Airflow Straightener, of ANSI/AMCA 210. DOE also proposes that 
flow straighteners be located as specified by Figures 7A and 16 of 
ANSI/AMCA 210. Specifically, the downstream face of an inlet duct flow 
straightener would be located a distance upstream of the test unit's 
inlet collar or any transition section equal to 6.5 times the diameter 
of the duct and the downstream face of an outlet duct flow straightener 
would be located a distance downstream of the unit's outlet collar or 
any transition section equal to 3.5 times the diameter of the duct.
Instrumentation
    The following sections discuss the proposed instrumentation for the 
ducts that would be attached to whole-home dehumidifiers during 
testing.
1. Instrumentation for Measuring Dry-Bulb Temperature
    Appendix X currently requires measurement of the dry-bulb and wet-
bulb temperatures to ensure that the appropriate ambient relative 
humidity is maintained in the test chamber near the inlet of the 
dehumidifier under test. These provisions do not allow for measuring 
psychrometric conditions within the ducting attached to whole-home 
dehumidifiers. Therefore, DOE considered instrumentation specifications 
and installation requirements for whole-home dehumidifier testing.
    For whole-home dehumidifiers other than refrigerant-desiccant 
units, no inlet duct would be attached according to this proposal, and 
therefore DOE proposes for these dehumidifiers to require the same 
instrumentation and equipment setup for measuring ambient conditions 
near the process air inlet as for portable dehumidifiers.
    For dry-bulb temperature sensing within the process air inlet and 
outlet ducts and the reactivation air inlet duct for refrigerant-
desiccant dehumidifiers, DOE proposes in appendix X1 to reference 
section 5.3.5, Centers of Segments--Grids, of ASHRAE Standard 41.1-
2013, ``Standard Method for Temperature Measurement,'' which DOE 
considers to be an industry-accepted approach for temperature 
measurements in ducted air flow. These provisions would require that 
temperature measurements be made using an array of temperature sensors 
at different locations on the same cross-sectional plane. The locations 
of the individual sensors at that plane would be determined by dividing 
the plane into at least four segments of equal area.

[[Page 29287]]

A sensor would then be placed at the center of each of these segments.
    ANSI/AMCA 210 specifies that temperature be measured at positions 
that are a distance upstream of the test unit's inlet collar and any 
transition section equal to half the diameter of the duct and a 
distance downstream of the unit's outlet collar and any transition 
section equal to 9.5 times the diameter of the duct. Temperature 
measurements at these locations within the ducting would provide 
accurate measurement of dry-bulb temperatures. Based on DOE's proposed 
specification of 10-inch diameter ducting, DOE proposes in this 
document to require temperature measuring instruments to be located 5 
inches upstream of the inlet collar, where such ducting is used, and 95 
inches downstream of the outlet collar.
2. Instrumentation for Measuring Relative Humidity
    As noted previously, testing of whole-home dehumidifiers other than 
refrigerant-desiccant units would specify the same provisions for 
measuring ambient conditions near the process air inlet as for portable 
dehumidifiers. For refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, however, the 
vapor calculation method for capacity measurement would require 
measurement of the relative humidity in the process air inlet and 
outlet ducts. In addition, relative humidity would be measured in the 
reactivation air inlet duct for these units.
    For calculating relative humidity, DOE considered: (1) A cooled 
surface condensation hygrometer that measures dew-point temperature, 
which can be used in conjunction with dry-bulb temperature to determine 
relative humidity; and (2) an aspirating psychrometer that measures 
wet-bulb temperature. Chilled mirror hygrometers incorporate a cooled 
surface \17\ that allows moisture to condense on the surface. The 
condensate surface is maintained electronically in vapor pressure 
equilibrium with the surrounding gas, while surface condensation is 
detected optoelectronically. The measured surface temperature is the 
dew-point temperature. Typical industrial versions of the instrument 
may be as accurate as 0.2 [deg]C (0.36 [deg]F), 
corresponding to 2-percent relative humidity at 65 [deg]F 
dry-bulb temperature and nominal 60-percent relative humidity. However, 
these instruments are costly and require a skilled operator, frequent 
cleaning, and regular calibration.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \17\ The cooled surface within chilled mirror hygrometers may be 
achieved thermoelectrically, mechanically, or chemically.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    An aspirating psychrometer consists of two electrical or mechanical 
temperature sensors, one of which is dry to measure dry-bulb 
temperature and the other of which is wetted via a sock or wick to 
measure wet-bulb temperature. Evaporation of the water cools the wet-
bulb sensor, with the evaporation rate dependent on the relative 
humidity of the air. A suction fan operating at a low flow rate 
provides ventilation of the sensors. An aspirating psychrometer is 
already required in the appendix X test procedure for unducted testing. 
Therefore, the dehumidifier industry is already familiar with this type 
of sensor. In addition, their simplicity and relatively low cost make 
aspirating psychrometers a favorable option for testing. Typical 
aspirating psychrometers have an accuracy of 2 percent 
relative humidity, but higher accuracy versions are capable of 
achieving 1 percent relative humidity. DOE concludes that 
this higher-accuracy aspirating psychrometer would provide a means for 
measuring relative humidity at a lower testing burden than a chilled 
mirror hygrometer, and therefore proposes to specify in appendix X1 
that relative humidity be measured in the ducting used for whole-home 
dehumidifier testing using an aspirating psychrometer with an accuracy 
of at least 1 percent relative humidity. Such psychrometers 
are likely being used already by testing laboratories for dehumidifier 
testing under appendix X, because the temperature accuracy requirements 
in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 correspond to approximately 1 
percent relative humidity accuracy at the nominal ambient dry-bulb and 
wet-bulb temperatures. Therefore, DOE concludes that testing 
laboratories currently conducting dehumidifier testing already have the 
aspirating psychrometers proposed to be used for whole-home 
dehumidifier testing in a ducted configuration. DOE acknowledges that 
alternating this sensor between the test configuration of portable and 
whole-home dehumidifiers would require additional sensor calibration. 
Manufacturers and testing facilities may elect to purchase additional 
aspirating psychrometers to eliminate the need to recalibrate between 
switching test configurations. DOE proposes to require in appendix X1 
that the relative humidity within test ducts be measured using an 
aspirating psychrometer with an accuracy within 1 percent 
relative humidity. DOE also proposes that the aspirating psychrometer 
be placed at the duct's geometric centerline within 1 inch of the dry-
bulb temperature measurement plane.
3. Instrumentation for Measuring External Static Pressure (ESP)
    Frictional forces and head losses due to the air flowing in the 
ducting lead to an ESP that is imposed on the whole-home dehumidifier. 
As duct length and the number of elbows and other flow restrictions 
increases, the ESP increases as well. In a recent supplemental notice 
of proposed rulemaking for test procedures for residential furnace 
fans, DOE has proposed to define ESP as the difference in static 
pressure measured in the outlet and return air duct during testing. 78 
FR 19606, 19618 (Apr. 2, 2013). For consistency with these testing 
procedures, DOE proposes to establish the following analogous 
definition for ESP for whole-home dehumidifier testing in appendix X1:
    External static pressure (ESP): The process air outlet static 
pressure minus the process air inlet static pressure, measured in 
inches of water column (in. w.c.).
    As discussed previously, ESP would be calculated by subtracting 
pressures losses between the dehumidifier and both static pressure tap 
locations from the measured static pressure differential. The blower 
within a whole-home dehumidifier must overcome this ESP to move air 
throughout a home's air delivery system. As ESP increases, the flow 
rate a blower can achieve at a particular rotational speed decreases, 
which also decreases moisture removal capacity. Therefore, DOE proposes 
that ducted dehumidifier testing in appendix X1 be conducted at an ESP 
representative of typical residential installations. DOE reviewed 
several sources of information to determine the appropriate ESP.
    DOE's review of whole-home dehumidifier product literature revealed 
that rated volumetric air flow rate in cubic feet per minute (CFM) is 
typically provided at ESP values ranging from 0.4 to 0.8 in. w.c., as 
well as at zero ESP. Manufacturers likely provide the former range of 
values to characterize performance under conditions representative of 
actual installations. In addition, the Center for Energy and 
Environment (CEE) researched the feasibility of a residential furnace 
fan retrofit program, monitoring 81 Minnesota home air delivery systems 
during the heating season.\18\ This study

[[Page 29288]]

found that the average ESP of these duct systems was 0.55 in. w.c. In 
addition, the median ESP fell between 0.45 and 0.55 in. w.c. For 
furnace fans designed to be installed in systems with an internal 
evaporator coil, DOE's analysis for the furnace fan test procedure 
indicated that a representative weighted-average ESP would be 0.50 in. 
w.c. 78 FR 19606, 19608 (Apr. 2, 2013).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \18\ Center for Energy and Environment Comment on Energy 
Conservation Standards for Residential Furnace Fans, July 27, 2010. 
Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0011, Comment Number 22.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Based on this information, DOE tentatively concluded that an ESP of 
0.5 in. w.c. would, on average, represent the static pressure 
conditions found in a ducted whole-home dehumidifier installed in a 
typical home. DOE also notes that a test condition tolerance of 0.02 
in. w.c. on ESP is established in appendix M to 10 CFR Part 430 subpart 
B for testing the energy consumption of central air conditioners and 
heat pumps. DOE proposes to adopt this same tolerance for average ESP 
throughout whole-home dehumidifier testing to maintain consistency with 
other covered products installed in similar ducting and with accepted 
industry requirements. Therefore, DOE proposes to require in appendix 
X1 that an ESP of 0.5  0.02 in. w.c. be maintained during 
the dehumidification mode testing of whole-home dehumidifiers. To 
obtain the proposed nominal ESP of 0.5 in. w.c., DOE also proposes in 
this document to require that outlet test ducts contain mechanical 
throttling devices to adjust the ESP.
    For nine whole-home units in its sample, DOE quantified the impacts 
of variations in ESP on capacity and EF at a process air inlet 
temperature of 65 [deg]F, as shown in Table III.10.

                                 Table III.10--Impact of Varying ESP on Whole-Home Dehumidifier Performance at 65 [deg]F
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            Capacity (pints/day)                        Energy Factor (L/kWh)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           Test unit                                       0.25              0.75                       0.25              0.75
                                                                 0 in.     in.    0.5 in.    in.     1 in.    0 in.     in.    0.5 in.    in.     1 in.
                                                                  w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.     w.c.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W3............................................................       63  .......       53  .......  .......     1.91  .......     1.59  .......  .......
W4............................................................       56       54       53       49       23     1.5      1.48     1.43     1.31     0.43
W5............................................................       66  .......       49  .......  .......     2.31  .......     1.89  .......  .......
W8............................................................       82       73       58        0        0     2.42     2.02     1.44  .......  .......
W9............................................................       77       75       71       68       68     1.18     1.13     1.1      1.05     1
W7............................................................      107       98       84  .......  .......     2.76     2.55     2.18  .......  .......
W10...........................................................      120  .......      109  .......  .......     3.16  .......     2.82  .......  .......
W12...........................................................      112      105       99  .......  .......     1.28     1.18     1.11  .......  .......
W13...........................................................      125  .......      108  .......  .......     1.94  .......     1.68  .......  .......
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Compared to an ESP of 0 in. w.c., DOE's proposed test condition of 
0.5 in. w.c. decreased the capacity of the models in DOE's sample by an 
average of 17 percent and decreased the EF by an average of 18 percent 
at 65 [deg]F ambient temperature. Impacts for individual units ranged 
from 2 to 33 percent for capacity and 2 to 42 percent for EF.
    DOE proposes to measure ESP as the difference between the inlet and 
outlet static pressures. If either inlet or outlet ducting is not 
required by the test procedure, the ambient static pressure of 0 in. 
w.c. shall be used to determine ESP. When ducting is required, the duct 
locations would be consistent with those specified in Figure 7A and 
Figure 15 of ANSI/AMCA 210, corrected to account for pressure losses 
between the measurement locations and the dehumidifier. Specifically, 
the static pressure differential would be measured between a location 
at a distance upstream of the test unit's process air inlet port or any 
transition section equal to 1.5 times the diameter of the duct and a 
location at a distance downstream of the unit's process air outlet port 
or any transition section equal to 8.5 times the diameter of the duct. 
DOE also proposes to reference in appendix X1 the provisions in section 
7.5.2, Pressure Losses, of ANSI/AMCA 210 that specify how duct pressure 
losses between the unit under test and the plane of each static 
pressure measurement would be calculated. These duct pressure losses 
would be subtracted from the measured static pressure differential at 
the inlet and outlet measurement locations.
    ANSI/AMCA 210 also provides an option for measuring static pressure 
in a duct using traverses of pitot-static tubes. Accordingly, DOE 
proposes to specify in appendix X1 the pitot-static tube construction 
in accordance with section 4.2.2, Pitot-Static Tube, of ANSI/AMCA 210, 
and the arrangement of pitot-static tubes in each traverse across the 
plane of the duct according to section 4.3.1, Pitot Traverse, of ANSI/
AMCA 210. DOE further proposes that the static pressure at each point 
in a traverse would be measured at the static tap of the corresponding 
pitot-static tube, and these measurements would be averaged to 
calculate the static pressure at that location in the duct.
    DOE considered the appropriate accuracy for the pressure sensing 
instruments used to measure ESP. Section 4.2.1, Manometers and Other 
Pressure Indicating Instruments, of ANSI/AMCA 210 specifies a pressure 
measurement instrument with a maximum allowable uncertainty of 1 
percent of the maximum observed reading during the test or 0.005 in. 
w.c., whichever is larger. At the nominal test condition of 0.5 in. 
w.c. ESP, the maximum allowable uncertainty would be 0.005 in. w.c. DOE 
also observes that section 5.3.2 of the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 37-2009, 
``Methods of Testing for Rating Electrically Driven Unitary Air-
Conditioning and Heat Pump Equipment'' (ANSI/ASHRAE 37), specifies that 
duct static pressures be measured with instruments that have an 
accuracy of 0.01 in. w.c. This accuracy is identical to the 
differential pressure instrument accuracy requirements for testing 
central air conditioners and heat pumps according to section 2.5.3, 
Indoor Coil Static Pressure Difference Measurement, of DOE's test 
procedure for these products (appendix M to subpart B). Section 2.5.3 
of appendix M also specifies that the differential pressure instrument 
shall have a resolution of no more than 0.01 in. w.c. DOE tentatively 
concludes that, for the ESP proposed for whole-home dehumidifier 
testing in this document, the pressure measurement specifications from 
ANSI/AMCA 210 could present a burden for those manufacturers that 
currently test central air conditioners in their testing facilities, 
and that the accuracy and resolution specified in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 
37 would both be feasible for test facilities and produce repeatable 
and reproducible results. Therefore, DOE proposes in appendix X1 that 
the pressure instrument used to measure the ESP shall have an accuracy 
within 0.01 in. w.c. and a resolution of no more than 0.01 
in. w.c. DOE welcomes comment and information on

[[Page 29289]]

the appropriate pressure measuring instrument specifications.
4. Instrumentation for Measuring Volumetric Air Flow Rate
    DOE proposes in appendix X1 that the volumetric air flow rate in 
ducts attached to the inlet and outlet of the process air of a 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifier would be calculated using duct 
diameter, dry-bulb temperature, and velocity pressure \19\ 
measurements, using the methods for measuring air flow rates at test 
conditions specified in section 7.3.1, Velocity Traverse, of ANSI/AMCA 
210. Average velocity pressures would be determined using the same 
traverses of pitot-static tubes in the process air inlet and outlet 
ducts as discussed above for measuring ESP. In addition, for 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, average velocity pressure for the 
reactivation air stream would also be measured using a traverse in the 
reactivation air inlet duct. This traverse would be located at a 
distance upstream of the test unit's reactivation air inlet port or any 
transition section equal to 1.5 times the diameter of the duct. The 
velocity pressure at each point in a traverse would be calculated as 
the total pressure, measured at the impact tap of the pitot-static 
tube, minus the static pressure, measured at the static tap of the 
pitot-static tube. Section 7.3.1 of ANSI/AMCA 210 provides instructions 
for averaging these velocity pressures and calculating the air flow 
rate at the test conditions within the duct.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \19\ ``Velocity pressure'' is defined in section 3.1.17 of ANSI/
AMCA 210 as the ``portion of air pressure that exists by virtue of 
the rate of motion of the air.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

5. Measurement Frequency
    The current test procedure in appendix X requires psychrometry 
measurements to be recorded at 10-minute intervals or less during 
dehumidification mode testing, which is adequate for monitoring ambient 
conditions in a test chamber. However, the conditions of air flowing 
through the ducts for whole-home dehumidifiers have the potential to 
vary on time scales that are shorter than 10 minutes. As a result, DOE 
proposes in appendix X1 that whole-home dehumidifiers be tested with 
measurement acquisition rates of dry-bulb temperature, velocity 
pressure, and relative humidity equal to or more frequently than once 
per minute. DOE's observation of current dehumidifier testing suggests 
that this sampling frequency likely can be met by existing data 
recording equipment in most test laboratories.
d. Psychrometer Requirements
    The proposals discussed in this section are based on detailed 
analysis of industry test procedures, test laboratory observations, and 
comparison of different psychrometer setup configurations for portable 
dehumidifiers.
    Appendix X requires that a psychrometer be used to measure dry-bulb 
and wet-bulb temperature conditions throughout dehumidification mode 
testing. Instructions for placement of the psychrometer are provided 
through reference to section 7.1.4, Psychrometer Placement, of ANSI/
AHAM DH-1-2008, which specifies that the psychrometer shall be placed 1 
foot in front of the intake grill of the test unit. In addition, 
section 5.3, Positioning of Test Unit, of ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 specifies 
that the sampling tree for use with the psychrometer shall be placed 1 
foot from the air inlet side of the dehumidifier. However, through 
market research, DOE identified certain portable dehumidifiers with 
multiple air inlets on different surfaces of the unit. For these 
dehumidifiers, ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 does not provide specific 
instructions regarding where the sampling tree or psychrometer should 
be located.
    DOE has identified two possible approaches for psychrometer setup 
for portable dehumidifiers with multiple air inlets. The first approach 
would be to place a single psychrometer or sampling tree at a location 
that is as close as possible to 1 foot in front of all intake grilles. 
This approach would minimize test burden by requiring only one 
psychrometer and possibly one sampling tree, but could lead to 
measurements that do not accurately reflect the conditions of the air 
entering each inlet and could potentially cause confusion regarding the 
proper sensor placement for units with unique air inlet locations. The 
second approach would be to place a separate sampling tree 1 foot in a 
perpendicular direction from the center of each air inlet grille, with 
the sampled air combined and connected to a single psychrometer using a 
minimal length of thermally insulated ducting. The thermally insulated 
ducting shall be installed along the shortest possible path connection 
between the psychrometer and sampling tree(s), minimizing excess duct 
length that may introduce variability between the conditions of the air 
when it enters the sampling tree and when it reaches the aspirating 
psychrometer. This approach would monitor the average conditions of the 
air entering the dehumidifier through each inlet, with the added 
testing burden of requiring one or more additional sampling trees. 
Because air sampling trees are commonly used for testing other products 
and are readily available, if the sampling tree approach is selected 
the additional testing burden is minimal and would result in improved 
reproducibility of the test procedure. Therefore, DOE proposes in this 
NOPR to clarify in appendix X and appendix X1 that for portable 
dehumidifiers with multiple intake grilles, a separate sampling tree 
shall be placed 1 foot away in a perpendicular direction from the 
center of each air inlet. DOE also proposes to clarify in both 
appendices that for portable dehumidifiers with only one intake grille, 
the psychrometer or sampling tree shall be placed 1 foot away in a 
perpendicular direction from the center of the air inlet. DOE requests 
comment on these proposed clarifications to the psychrometer setup and 
input on the associated test burden impacts.
    In response to the October 2013 NOPR,\20\ AHAM commented that some 
test facilities use a single psychrometer box to monitor inlet 
conditions for two or more test units, and that the DOE dehumidifier 
test procedure does not specify whether each test unit requires its own 
individual psychrometer box. AHAM proposed that DOE clarify that each 
dehumidifier under test requires its own individual psychrometer box 
because the test procedure's intent is that each dehumidifier in the 
test chamber is treated as an individual test and the temperatures 
should be measured as such. (AHAM, Docket No. EERE-2013-BT-TP-0044, No. 
2 at p. 2) DOE notes that section 7.1.4 of ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008, which 
is referenced for testing portable dehumidifiers, states to ``[p]lace 
the psychrometer (4.2) 1 ft. (0.30 m) in front of the intake grille.'' 
This instruction could be interpreted to mean that the temperature and 
relative humidity would be sampled specifically for that location, 
which in turn would require that these properties be measured 
individually for each of multiple portable dehumidifiers being tested 
concurrently. DOE also notes that using average inlet temperature and 
relative humidity conditions for multiple portable dehumidifiers could 
impact the measured capacity, EF, and IEF. Therefore, DOE proposes to 
add clarifying text to appendix X and appendix X1 that would allow no 
more

[[Page 29290]]

than one portable dehumidifier to be connected to a single psychrometer 
during testing. DOE believes this proposal would ensure consistency 
among test facilities and improve test result accuracy.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \20\ The docket for the rulemaking for the October 2013 NOPR may 
be found online at: www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=EERE-
2013-BT-TP-0044.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

e. Condensate Collection
    The proposals discussed in this section are based on detailed 
analysis of industry test procedures, test laboratory observations, and 
comparison of different condensate collection setup configurations.
    The provisions in appendix X for measuring capacity and energy 
consumption in dehumidification mode require condensate to be collected 
for a period of 6 hours while the dehumidifier is operating under the 
specified ambient conditions. According to section 5.4, Condensate 
Collection, of ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008, if means for collecting the 
condensate are provided as part of the dehumidifier, they are to be 
installed as provided for in normal service. In addition, the 
dehumidifier may be placed on the weight-measuring instrument for 
direct reading of condensate during the test. If the only provision is 
for draining the condensate away from the unit, the condensate must be 
collected in a substantially closed vessel to prevent re-evaporation.
    These instructions do not address the use of an internal pump, 
which may be provided as a means to drain the condensate from the 
dehumidifier. In addition, DOE recognizes that a condensate collection 
bucket may not be sufficiently large to hold the entire amount of 
condensate produced during the 6-hour dehumidification mode test, and 
that when the bucket is full, the unit may turn off the compressor or 
activate a pump to empty the bucket to an external drain.
    To ensure that the amount of condensate measured during the 
dehumidification mode test is representative of the total amount of 
condensate that would be produced during the 6-hour test, DOE proposes 
in this document to specify in appendix X and appendix X1 that if means 
are provided on the dehumidifier for draining condensate away from the 
cabinet, the condensate would be collected in a substantially closed 
vessel which would be placed on the weight-measuring instrument. Such 
an approach would minimize re-evaporation of the condensate and would 
isolate the condensate weight measurement from the vibration of the 
dehumidifier during operation. DOE further proposes that if no means 
for draining condensate away from the cabinet are provided, any 
automatic shutoff of dehumidification mode operation that would be 
activated when the collection container is full shall be disabled and 
any overflow shall be collected in a pan, completely covered to prevent 
re-evaporation except where allowing for collection of overflow water, 
that is placed beneath the dehumidifier, both of which shall be placed 
on the weight-measuring instrument for direct reading of the condensate 
weight during the test. The proposal would also clarify in appendix X 
and appendix X1 that any internal pump shall not be used to drain the 
condensate into a substantially closed vessel unless such pump is 
provided for use by default in dehumidification mode.
f. Control Settings
    The proposal discussed in this section is based on an analysis of 
dehumidifier features and implications of varying control settings with 
respect to the representativeness of the test procedure, as well as 
test repeatability and reproducibility.
    Certain dehumidifiers have controls that allow selection of the fan 
speed during dehumidification mode. The highest fan speed will produce 
the most rapid rate of moisture removal, while the lower fan speeds may 
be provided to reduce noise. Appendix X, however, does not specify a 
particular fan speed setting during testing.
    Also, certain dehumidifiers have controls that allow consumers to 
select a target relative humidity level, for example by setting the 
desired relative humidity percentage or by adjusting a dial to a more 
or less dry setting. Appendix X requires test facilities to maintain a 
60-percent relative humidity level during active mode testing, in which 
the unit must operate continuously in dehumidification mode. While 
appendix X does not specify a particular relative humidity setpoint, 
the test operator must select a control setting that corresponds to a 
relative humidity level lower than 60 percent to ensure that the test 
unit does not enter off-cycle or fan-only mode.
    In comments submitted in response to the October 2013 NOPR, AHAM 
addressed the topic of control settings for testing in dehumidification 
mode by proposing that if the unit under test has a ``continuous on'' 
function, a setting that maintains constant dehumidification mode 
operation regardless of the ambient relative humidity, that such a 
setting should be selected. In the absence of a continuous on function, 
AHAM proposed that the unit be tested at the highest fan speed and 
lowest humidity setting. According to AHAM, these settings would 
correspond to the highest energy use and would be consistent with 
current industry practice. (AHAM, Docket No. EERE-2013-BT-TP-0044, No. 
2 at p. 2)
    The control settings suggested by AHAM would correspond to the 
highest energy use in dehumidification mode. In addition, although DOE 
is not aware of any dehumidifiers that operate differently at humidity 
setpoints below 60 percent, it is possible that certain dehumidifier 
controls may be programmed to do so, thereby no longer operating at the 
highest energy use. For this reason, DOE proposes to require in 
appendix X and appendix X1 that, for units with a continuous on 
feature, that control setting shall be selected for dehumidification 
mode testing. For units without a feature for continuous operation, the 
fan would be set at the maximum speed if the fan speed is user 
adjustable, and the relative humidity controls would be set to the 
lowest available value during dehumidification mode testing. Further, 
DOE's observations at third-party test facilities corroborate AHAM's 
comment that these fan speed requirements would be consistent with 
industry practice. Therefore, DOE concludes that this proposal would 
not impact energy consumption or capacity currently determined using 
appendix X.
2. Fan-Only Mode
    The proposals discussed in this section are based on observations 
of units acquired for investigative testing and detailed analysis of 
industry test procedures used to determine cyclical or continuous power 
consumption.
    Certain dehumidifier models maintain blower operation without 
activation of the compressor after the humidity setpoint has been 
reached, rather than entering off-cycle mode. Such fan-only mode 
operation may be intended to draw air over the humidistat to monitor 
ambient conditions, or may occur immediately following a period of 
dehumidification mode to defrost and dry the evaporator coil, which 
will prevent the humidistat from prematurely sensing a humidity level 
high enough to reactivate the compressor. The blower may operate 
continuously in fan-only mode, or may cycle on and off intermittently. 
In addition, some units allow the consumer to select operation of the 
blower continuously for air circulation purposes.
    In their submission to DOE in response to the August 2012 Framework 
Document, the Joint Commenters stated that, as of October 17, 2012, 
there were 12 models on the ENERGY STAR

[[Page 29291]]

Dehumidifiers Product List, six of which had fans that could operate 
continuously without activation of the compressor. The Joint Commenters 
referenced the Wisconsin Study, which found that fan-only mode power 
consumption ranged from under 40 watts (W) to 120 W, suggesting that 
continuous fan operation could contribute significantly to dehumidifier 
annual energy consumption. For example, the Joint Commenters noted that 
an 80 W fan running in continuous fan-only mode for 1,000 hours 
annually would consume 80 kWh. Although the Joint Commenters asserted 
that continuous fan operation would circulate the air in the space 
being dehumidified, reducing gradients and perhaps affecting colder and 
more humid areas (such as adjacent to walls) such that dehumidification 
mode could be activated only when necessary, they believe that the same 
actions could be accomplished with intermittent fan operation 
controlled by a fixed timer initiated after each period of compressor 
operation or a variable timer based on past operating patterns. The 
Joint Commenters stated that if the annual energy consumption of 
continuous fan operation is not adequately captured already in the test 
procedure, DOE should amend it to measure the annual energy consumption 
of fan-only mode. (Joint Commenters, No. 9 at pp. 5-6)
    As discussed in section III.B.2 of this document, appendix X does 
not contain provisions to measure dehumidifier energy use during fan-
only mode. The existing methodology requires measurement of the power 
consumption in off-cycle mode and either inactive mode or off mode, 
depending on which mode is available on the unit under test. The test 
procedure then assigns the annual operating hours outside of 
dehumidification mode to off-cycle mode, inactive mode, or off mode 
according to the following: 1,840.5 hours to off-cycle mode and 1,840.5 
hours to either inactive mode or off mode. These hours are multiplied 
by the corresponding power consumption measurements and summed to 
obtain the annual combined low-power mode energy consumption. 
Recognizing that some dehumidifiers operate in fan-only mode in place 
of off-cycle mode, however, DOE is proposing in this document that the 
1,840.5 annual hours currently attributed to off-cycle mode in appendix 
X be assigned in appendix X1 to fan-only mode for those dehumidifiers. 
Based on investigative testing, and using this proposed calculation, 
DOE determined that fan-only mode may consume more than 300 times more 
energy than off-cycle or inactive mode. For this reason, this proposed 
provision in appendix X1 would more accurately reflect the typical 
energy consumption of dehumidifiers that operate in fan-only mode 
rather than off-cycle mode.
    The proposed fan-only mode average power measurement would require 
adjusting the relative humidity setpoint during this testing to a level 
higher than the ambient relative humidity to ensure that the 
refrigeration system does not cycle on. To minimize testing burden, DOE 
proposes in appendix X1 that the testing may be conducted either under 
the same ambient conditions as for dehumidification mode, or under the 
test conditions specified for standby mode and off mode testing. DOE 
tentatively concludes that the power consumption in fan-only mode does 
not depend on the ambient conditions (i.e., fan speed and power 
consumption do not change with ambient conditions) and seeks comment on 
whether the results from the two testing options would be comparable. 
To further minimize test burden, DOE also proposes that the laboratory 
should not perform more than one run-in period for all active mode 
testing. Because the term ``run-in'' is not defined in ANSI/AHAM DH-1-
2008, DOE further proposes to clarify in appendix X1 that the 
compressor shall operate during the run-in period.
    DOE has observed that the fan may operate continuously during fan-
only mode or may cycle on and off periodically. In DOE's testing, the 
period of such cyclic operation was observed to be approximately 10 
minutes, and DOE's research indicates that some units may cycle on for 
a period of a few minutes per hour. To obtain a representative average 
measure of fan-only mode power consumption in appendix X1, DOE proposes 
that the power be measured and averaged over a period of 1 hour for 
fan-only mode in which the fan operates continuously. For fan-only mode 
in which the fan operates cyclically, the average fan-only mode power 
would be measured over a period of 3 or more full cycles for no less 
than 1 hour. DOE also proposes to include in the IEF calculation in 
appendix X1 the fan-only mode energy use for those dehumidifiers that 
operate in fan-only mode rather than off-cycle mode. DOE further 
proposes to require that, for units with adjustable fan speed settings, 
the fan be set at the maximum speed during fan-only mode testing 
because the maximum speed is typically recommended to consumers as the 
setting that produces the maximum moisture removal rate.
    DOE does not have information regarding the number of annual hours 
in which the consumer selects fan-only mode to circulate air, rather 
than operating the dehumidifier for the general purpose of moisture 
removal. For this reason, DOE is not proposing at this time to include 
an additional energy use component associated with air circulation in 
the IEF calculation in appendix X1. DOE welcomes data and input on 
consumer usage patterns related to fan-only mode for air circulation.

C. Additional Technical and Editorial Corrections

1. Definition of ``Dehumidifier''
    As discussed in section III.A of this document, EPCA defines a 
dehumidifier in relevant part, as a ``mechanically encased assembly.'' 
(42 U.S.C. 6291(34)) The definition of ``dehumidifier'' codified at 10 
CFR 430.2, however, incorrectly states that the product be a 
``mechanically refrigerated encased assembly.'' In this document, DOE 
proposes to correct the definition in 10 CFR 430.2. DOE also proposes 
to add clarification that the definition of ``dehumidifier'' does not 
apply to portable air conditioners and room air conditioners. The 
primary function of an air conditioner is to provide cooling by 
removing both sensible and latent heat, while a dehumidifier removes 
moisture (i.e., only latent heat). Therefore, DOE proposes to clarify 
these exclusions in the amendments to 10 CFR 430.2.
2. Referenced Section in Test Procedures at 10 CFR 430.23
    DOE proposes to amend the test procedures codified at 10 CFR 
430.23(z) to reference the correct sections of amended appendix X and 
new appendix X1 for measuring capacity, energy factor (EF), and IEF.
3. Integrated Energy Factor Calculation
    The existing IEF equation in section 5.2 of appendix X incorporates 
the annual combined low-power mode energy consumption, ETLP, 
in kWh per year, and the active mode energy consumption, 
Eactive, in kWh as measured during the active mode test. To 
sum these components, the equation converts ETLP into kWh/
day by dividing by the number of active mode hours per year and 
multiplying by 24 hours per day. However, Eactive represents 
the energy use measured during the course of the 6-hour 
dehumidification mode test. To correctly sum the combined low-power 
mode energy consumption and dehumidification mode energy

[[Page 29292]]

consumption on an equivalent basis, the equation for IEF should convert 
ETLP to kWh consumed during 6 hours. Therefore, DOE proposes 
in section 5.2 of appendix X to amend the IEF equation to correctly 
divide ETLP by the number of dehumidification mode hours per 
year and multiply by 6 hours in accordance with the duration of the 
dehumidification mode test. DOE also proposes to: (1) Clarify in 
section 4.1 of appendix X that energy consumption as well as EF shall 
be measured during dehumidification mode testing; (2) redesignate 
Eactive as EDM to clarify that it is the energy 
consumption measured in dehumidification mode; and (3) redesignate 
Sactive as SDM to clarify that it is the annual 
hours spent in dehumidification mode. DOE proposes to incorporate these 
same clarifications and corrections in appendix X1, as well as sum the 
annual fan-only mode energy consumption, EFM, with 
ETLP to include the measure of fan-only mode energy 
consumption in the calculation of IEF.
4. Number of Annual Inactive Mode and Off Mode Hours
    In section 5.1 of appendix X, the number of annual hours for 
inactive mode and off mode each contains a typographical error, wherein 
a comma is used in place of a decimal point. DOE proposes in this 
document to correct these typographical errors.

D. Materials Incorporated by Reference

    As discussed in section III.B.1.c of this document, DOE is 
proposing in appendix X1 to reference certain sections of the following 
industry test methods to determine the product capacity and IEF of 
whole-home dehumidifiers in a ducted installation:
    (1) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 41.1-2013, ``Standard Method for 
Temperature Measurement''; and
    (2) ANSI/ASHRAE 51-2007/ANSI/AMCA 210-07, ``Laboratory Methods of 
Testing Fans for Certified Aerodynamic Performance Rating''.
    DOE proposes to amend 10 CFR 430.3 to include these industry test 
methods.

E. Certification and Verification

    In 10 CFR 429.36, DOE requires that manufacturers include 
dehumidifier capacity, in pints/day, in their certification reports; 
however, 10 CFR 429.36 does not specify how to determine the rated 
capacity for a basic model. The consequence of an incorrectly reported 
capacity may be the application of an incorrect standard for minimum 
required EF or, in the future, a minimum required IEF. Therefore, DOE 
proposes in this document to require that the average of the capacities 
measured for a given sample be used for certification puposes.
    For verification purposes, DOE proposes to require that the test 
facility measurement of capacity must be within 5 percent of the rated 
capacity, or 1.00 pints/day, whichever is greater. DOE notes that this 
tolerance is the same as the tolerance allowed within AHAM's 
dehumidifier verification program, which suggests that manufacturers 
are able to comply with this requirement without undue testing burden. 
If DOE determines that a rated capacity is not within 5 percent of the 
measured capacity, or 1.00 pints/day, whichever is greater, the 
capacity measured by the test facility shall be used to determine the 
energy conservation standard applicable to the tested basic model. DOE 
proposes to add a new section 429.134 of 10 CFR part 429 to address 
this capacity verification protocol.
    To ensure that the minimum EF or IEF requirements are accurately 
applied to each dehumidifier model, DOE proposes to clarify in the 
dehumidifier test procedures at 10 CFR 430.23(z) that, when using 
appendix X, capacity would be measured in accordance with paragraph 4.1 
of that appendix, and when using appendix X1, capacity would be 
measured in accordance with paragraph 5.4 of that appendix for 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers and in accordance with paragraph 
4.1.1.1 for all other dehumidifiers. DOE also proposes in this document 
to include rounding instructions in appendix X and appendix X1 that 
would clarify that the measurement of capacity is to be rounded to two 
decimal points, consistent with the number of significant digits in the 
product class definitions, and that IEF is to be rounded to two decimal 
places in accordance with the existing instructions in appendix X for 
rounding EF and IEF.

F. Compliance Dates of Amended Test Procedures

    DOE is proposing amendments to its dehumidifier test procedure in 
appendix X that would clarify the psychrometer setup for portable 
dehumidifiers, the control settings for dehumidification mode testing, 
the provisions for collecting water for the capacity measurement, and 
the dates for use of the test procedures. The proposed amendments to 
appendix X would also include certain editorial and technical 
corrections. As discussed previously, DOE does not expect that these 
clarifications and corrections would alter the measured EF, but rather 
would improve the interpretation and use of the test procedure. 
Therefore, the proposals for appendix X would not affect a 
manufacturer's ability to comply with current energy conservation 
standards using appendix X. Manufacturers would be required to use the 
revised appendix X for representations 180 days after the publication 
of any final amended test procedures in the Federal Register. 
(Alternatively, manufacturers may certify compliance with any amended 
energy conservation standards prior to the compliance date of those 
amended energy conservation standards by testing in accordance with 
appendix X1.)
    DOE is also proposing to amend the dehumidifier test procedure in 
10 CFR part 430, subpart B to create a new appendix X1 that would 
include a lower ambient temperature for certain active mode testing, a 
new measure of fan-only mode energy consumption, and provisions for 
testing whole-home dehumidifiers, including ``refrigerant-desiccant'' 
dehumidifiers. Appendix X1 would also incorporate the same 
clarifications and technical corrections as proposed for appendix X. 
Manufacturers would be required to use the new appendix X1 for 
determining compliance with any amended standards adopted in the 
ongoing energy conservation standards rulemaking.

IV. Procedural Issues and Regulatory Review

A. Review Under Executive Order 12866

    The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has determined that test 
procedure rulemakings do not constitute ``significant regulatory 
actions'' under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866, Regulatory 
Planning and Review, 58 FR 51735 (Oct. 4, 1993). Accordingly, this 
action was not subject to review under the Executive Order by the 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in the Office of 
Management and Budget.

B. Review Under the Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) requires 
preparation of an initial regulatory flexibility analysis (IFRA) for 
any rule that by law must be proposed for public comment, unless the 
agency certifies that the rule, if promulgated, will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. 
As required by Executive Order 13272, ``Proper Consideration of Small 
Entities in Agency Rulemaking,'' 67 FR 53461 (August 16, 2002), DOE 
published procedures and policies on February 19, 2003, to ensure that 
the potential impacts of its rules on small entities are

[[Page 29293]]

properly considered during the DOE rulemaking process. 68 FR 7990. DOE 
has made its procedures and policies available on the Office of the 
General Counsel's Web site: http://energy.gov/gc/office-general-counsel.
    DOE reviewed this proposed rule under the provisions of the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act and the procedures and policies published on 
February 19, 2003. DOE's initial regulatory flexibility analysis is set 
forth below. DOE seeks comment on its analysis and the economic impacts 
of the rule on small manufacturers.
    A description of the reasons why the proposed test procedures are 
being considered, as well as a succinct statement of the objectives of, 
and legal basis for, the proposed rule is set forth elsewhere in the 
preamble and not repeated here. DOE is also not aware of any Federal 
rules that would duplicate, overlap or conflict with the proposed rule.
Description and Estimate of the Number of Small Entities to Which the 
Proposed Rule Would Apply
    The Small Business Administration (SBA) considers a business entity 
to be small business, if, together with its affiliates, it employs less 
than a threshold number of workers specified in 13 CFR part 121. These 
size standards and codes are established by the North American Industry 
Classification System (NAICS). The threshold number for NAICS 
classification code 335211, ``Electric Housewares and Household Fan 
Manufacturing,'' is 750 employees; this classification specifically 
includes manufacturers of dehumidifiers.
    DOE surveyed the AHAM member directory to identify manufacturers of 
residential dehumidifiers. DOE then consulted publicly available data, 
purchased company reports from vendors such as Dun and Bradstreet, and 
contacted manufacturers, where needed, to determine if they meet the 
SBA's definition of a ``small business manufacturing facility'' and 
have their manufacturing facilities located within the United States. 
Based on this analysis, DOE estimates that there are five small 
businesses that manufacture dehumidifiers.
Description of the Projected Reporting, Recordkeeping and Other 
Compliance Requirements
    The proposed rule would establish a new test procedure for 
dehumidifiers with a revised testing temperature for certain active 
mode testing and the requirement that whole-home dehumidifiers be 
tested in active mode with ducting in place. The lower temperature test 
that DOE is proposing for dehumidification mode in new appendix X1 
requires ambient temperature and humidity levels identical to those 
contained in section 8.2, Low Temperature Test, of ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008, 
which some manufacturers already may be using. In addition, product 
specifications for dehumidifiers from each of the small businesses 
indicate that they produce dehumidifiers rated for operation at ambient 
temperatures of 65 [deg]F or below, suggesting that these manufacturers 
have conducted lower temperature testing already.
    DOE also considered the cost of additional ducting and associated 
components and instrumentation that would be required for whole-home 
dehumidifier active mode testing. Based on its research of retail 
prices for components required to construct the instrumented inlet and 
outlet ducts, as well as estimate for the purchase of a complete 
assembly from a third-party laboratory, DOE determined that the cost of 
each non-instrumented duct would be approximately $1,500, and that the 
cost of an instrumented, calibrated duct would not exceed $2,700. 
Therefore, the equipment cost for testing a refrigeration-only whole-
home dehumidifier with no inlet duct and a non-instrumented outlet duct 
would be approximately $1,500, or $3,000 for whole-home dehumidifiers 
with two outlets. For refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, which would 
require instrumented ducts at the inlet and outlet of the process 
airstream and the inlet of the reactivation air stream, the total 
equipment cost would be approximately $8,100. Costs of test ducts could 
be reduced if existing aspirating psychrometers used for portable 
dehumidifiers testing are used within test ducts. However, alternating 
aspirating psychrometers between portable and whole-home test 
configurations would require additional calibration and labor that DOE 
estimates to cost approximately $300 per calibration. DOE also 
tentatively concludes that whole-home dehumidifier manufacturers 
already test their products in chambers that can accommodate 
comparably-sized ducting, since product literature indicates that 
performance has been measured at non-zero ESP.
    For dehumidifiers capable of operating in fan-only mode, the 
proposed rule would also require in appendix X1 measuring power input 
when the product is in fan-only mode. These tests could be conducted 
either in the same facilities used for the dehumidification mode 
testing of these products, or in facilities in which standby mode and 
off mode testing is conducted, so there would be no additional 
facilities costs required by the proposed rule. In addition, the 
requirements for the wattmeter specified for these tests would be the 
same as used for standby mode and off mode testing, so manufacturers 
would likely be able to use the same equipment for fan-only mode 
testing as they would already use for standby mode and off mode 
testing. In the event that an additional wattmeter would be required 
for testing in the facilities used for the current dehumidifier active 
mode testing, the investment required for a possible instrumentation 
upgrade would likely be relatively modest. An Internet search of 
equipment that specifically meets the proposed requirements reveals a 
cost of approximately $2,000.
    Test facilities that use a single psychrometer box to test multiple 
units simultaneously that do not already own additional psychrometer 
boxes would need to purchase an additional psychrometer box for each 
additional unit that would be tested concurrently. Based on DOE 
research and input from test laboratories, DOE estimates that test 
facilities may purchase and calibrate the required equipment for 
approximately $1,000 each.
    Additionally, test laboratories with only one sampling tree for 
each psychrometer box may be required to purchase additional sampling 
trees to account for units with multiple air inlets. In this document, 
DOE proposes that a sampling tree be placed in front of each air inlet 
on a test unit. DOE expects laboratories may purchase additional 
sampling trees at an estimated cost of $300 each to comply with the 
proposed test requirements.
Alternatives to the Proposed Rule
    As discussed above, DOE considered alternate test approaches for 
both portable and whole-home dehumidifiers.
    Although DOE proposed modifying the dehumidification mode ambient 
temperature conditions from 80[emsp14][deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 
69.6 [deg]F wet-bulb temperature to 65 [deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 
55 [deg]F wet-bulb temperature, DOE's alternate proposal for 
dehumidification mode would require combining results from testing at 
both of these conditions. This alternate proposed approach would 
increase test burden by requiring testing each unit in dehumidification 
mode at two test conditions, although only a single run-in period, fan-
only mode test, and combined low-power mode test would be required.

[[Page 29294]]

    DOE considered testing at an alternate ambient relative humidity if 
a more representative condition was determined. However, for the 
reasons discussed in section III.1.b of this document, DOE proposes to 
maintain the current ambient relative humidity of 60 percent. DOE 
tentatively concludes that test laboratories are familiar with the 
overall condition requirements and additional humidifying equipment 
would not be required to increase test chamber capabilities.
    For the proposed testing methodology for whole-home dehumidifiers, 
DOE examined the accuracy and repeatability of available relative 
humidity sensors. Although DOE is proposing the use of psychrometers to 
measure dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperature conditions, DOE also 
considered chilled mirror hygrometers as an alternate instrument for 
measuring relative humidity. For the reasons discussed in section 
III.1.dIII.B.1.d of this document, DOE decided to propose the use of 
psychrometers to avoid the burden associated with chilled mirror 
hygrometers (i.e., the requirements for a skilled operator, frequent 
cleaning, and regular calibration).
    In addition, for whole-home dehumidifiers, DOE's proposals specify 
the minimum number of test ducts that, according to its investigative 
testing, would produce representative results for capacity and 
integrated energy factor. If instrumented test ducts were required on 
all inlet and outlet ports, testing facilities could incur an 
additional $3000 cost for the equipment.

C. Review Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995

    Manufacturers of residential dehumidifiers must certify to DOE that 
their products comply with any applicable energy conservation 
standards. In certifying compliance, manufacturers must test their 
products according to the DOE test procedures for dehumidifiers, 
including any amendments adopted for those test procedures. DOE has 
established regulations for the certification and recordkeeping 
requirements for all covered consumer products and commercial 
equipment, including residential dehumidifiers. (76 FR 12422 (March 7, 
2011)). The collection-of-information requirement for the certification 
and recordkeeping is subject to review and approval by OMB under the 
Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA). This requirement has been approved by 
OMB under OMB control number 1910-1400. Public reporting burden for the 
certification is estimated to average 20 hours per response, including 
the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, 
gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing 
the collection of information.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of the law, no person is 
required to respond to, nor shall any person be subject to a penalty 
for failure to comply with, a collection of information subject to the 
requirements of the PRA, unless that collection of information displays 
a currently valid OMB Control Number.

D. Review Under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969

    In this proposed rule, DOE proposes test procedure amendments that 
it expects will be used to develop and implement future energy 
conservation standards for residential dehumidifiers. DOE has 
determined that this rule falls into a class of actions that are 
categorically excluded from review under the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and DOE's implementing 
regulations at 10 CFR part 1021. Specifically, this proposed rule would 
amend the existing test procedures without affecting the amount, 
quality or distribution of energy usage, and, therefore, would not 
result in any environmental impacts. Thus, this rulemaking is covered 
by Categorical Exclusion A5 under 10 CFR part 1021, subpart D, which 
applies to any rulemaking that interprets or amends an existing rule 
without changing the environmental effect of that rule. Accordingly, 
neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact 
statement is required.

E. Review Under Executive Order 13132

    Executive Order 13132, ``Federalism,'' 64 FR 43255 (August 4, 1999) 
imposes certain requirements on agencies formulating and implementing 
policies or regulations that preempt State law or that have Federalism 
implications. The Executive Order requires agencies to examine the 
constitutional and statutory authority supporting any action that would 
limit the policymaking discretion of the States and to carefully assess 
the necessity for such actions. The Executive Order also requires 
agencies to have an accountable process to ensure meaningful and timely 
input by State and local officials in the development of regulatory 
policies that have Federalism implications. On March 14, 2000, DOE 
published a statement of policy describing the intergovernmental 
consultation process it will follow in the development of such 
regulations. 65 FR 13735. DOE has examined this proposed rule and has 
determined that it would not have a substantial direct effect on the 
States, on the relationship between the national government and the 
States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the 
various levels of government. EPCA governs and prescribes Federal 
preemption of State regulations as to energy conservation for the 
products that are the subject of this proposed rule. States can 
petition DOE for exemption from such preemption to the extent, and 
based on criteria, set forth in EPCA. (42 U.S.C. 6297(d)) No further 
action is required by Executive Order 13132.

F. Review Under Executive Order 12988

    Regarding the review of existing regulations and the promulgation 
of new regulations, section 3(a) of Executive Order 12988, ``Civil 
Justice Reform,'' 61 FR 4729 (Feb. 7, 1996), imposes on Federal 
agencies the general duty to adhere to the following requirements: (1) 
Eliminate drafting errors and ambiguity; (2) write regulations to 
minimize litigation; (3) provide a clear legal standard for affected 
conduct rather than a general standard; and (4) promote simplification 
and burden reduction. Section 3(b) of Executive Order 12988 
specifically requires that Executive agencies make every reasonable 
effort to ensure that the regulation: (1) Clearly specifies the 
preemptive effect, if any; (2) clearly specifies any effect on existing 
Federal law or regulation; (3) provides a clear legal standard for 
affected conduct while promoting simplification and burden reduction; 
(4) specifies the retroactive effect, if any; (5) adequately defines 
key terms; and (6) addresses other important issues affecting clarity 
and general draftsmanship under any guidelines issued by the Attorney 
General. Section 3(c) of Executive Order 12988 requires Executive 
agencies to review regulations in light of applicable standards in 
sections 3(a) and 3(b) to determine whether they are met or it is 
unreasonable to meet one or more of them. DOE has completed the 
required review and determined that, to the extent permitted by law, 
the proposed rule meets the relevant standards of Executive Order 
12988.

G. Review Under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) 
requires each Federal agency to assess the effects of Federal 
regulatory actions on State, local, and Tribal governments and the 
private sector. Pub. L. 104-4, sec. 201 (codified at 2 U.S.C. 1531). 
For a proposed regulatory action likely to

[[Page 29295]]

result in a rule that may cause the expenditure by State, local, and 
Tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of $100 
million or more in any one year (adjusted annually for inflation), 
section 202 of UMRA requires a Federal agency to publish a written 
statement that estimates the resulting costs, benefits, and other 
effects on the national economy. (2 U.S.C. 1532(a), (b)) The UMRA also 
requires a Federal agency to develop an effective process to permit 
timely input by elected officers of State, local, and Tribal 
governments on a proposed ``significant intergovernmental mandate,'' 
and requires an agency plan for giving notice and opportunity for 
timely input to potentially affected small governments before 
establishing any requirements that might significantly or uniquely 
affect small governments. On March 18, 1997, DOE published a statement 
of policy on its process for intergovernmental consultation under UMRA. 
62 FR 12820; also available at http://energy.gov/gc/office-general-counsel">energy.gov/gc/office-general-counsel. 
DOE examined this proposed rule according to UMRA and its statement of 
policy and determined that the rule contains neither an 
intergovernmental mandate, nor a mandate that may result in the 
expenditure of $100 million or more in any year, so these requirements 
do not apply.

H. Review Under the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 
1999

    Section 654 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 1999 (Pub. L. 105-277) requires Federal agencies to issue a Family 
Policymaking Assessment for any rule that may affect family well-being. 
This rule would not have any impact on the autonomy or integrity of the 
family as an institution. Accordingly, DOE has concluded that it is not 
necessary to prepare a Family Policymaking Assessment.

I. Review Under Executive Order 12630

    DOE has determined, under Executive Order 12630, ``Governmental 
Actions and Interference with Constitutionally Protected Property 
Rights'' 53 FR 8859 (March 18, 1988), that this regulation would not 
result in any takings that might require compensation under the Fifth 
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

J. Review Under Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 
2001

    Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations 
Act, 2001 (44 U.S.C. 3516 note) provides for agencies to review most 
disseminations of information to the public under guidelines 
established by each agency pursuant to general guidelines issued by 
OMB. OMB's guidelines were published at 67 FR 8452 (Feb. 22, 2002), and 
DOE's guidelines were published at 67 FR 62446 (Oct. 7, 2002). DOE has 
reviewed this proposed rule under the OMB and DOE guidelines and has 
concluded that it is consistent with applicable policies in those 
guidelines.

K. Review Under Executive Order 13211

    Executive Order 13211, ``Actions Concerning Regulations That 
Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use,'' 66 FR 28355 
(May 22, 2001), requires Federal agencies to prepare and submit to OMB, 
a Statement of Energy Effects for any proposed significant energy 
action. A ``significant energy action'' is defined as any action by an 
agency that promulgated or is expected to lead to promulgation of a 
final rule, and that: (1) Is a significant regulatory action under 
Executive Order 12866, or any successor order; and (2) is likely to 
have a significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use 
of energy; or (3) is designated by the Administrator of OIRA as a 
significant energy action. For any proposed significant energy action, 
the agency must give a detailed statement of any adverse effects on 
energy supply, distribution, or use should the proposal be implemented, 
and of reasonable alternatives to the action and their expected 
benefits on energy supply, distribution, and use.
    This regulatory action to amend the test procedure for measuring 
the energy efficiency of residential dehumidifiers is not a significant 
regulatory action under Executive Order 12866. Moreover, it would not 
have a significant adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use 
of energy, nor has it been designated as a significant energy action by 
the Administrator of OIRA. Therefore, it is not a significant energy 
action, and, accordingly, DOE has not prepared a Statement of Energy 
Effects.

L. Review Under Section 32 of the Federal Energy Administration Act of 
1974

    Under section 301 of the Department of Energy Organization Act 
(Pub. L. 95-91; 42 U.S.C. 7101), DOE must comply with section 32 of the 
Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974, as amended by the Federal 
Energy Administration Authorization Act of 1977. (15 U.S.C. 788; FEAA) 
Section 32 essentially provides in relevant part that, where a proposed 
rule authorizes or requires use of commercial standards, the notice of 
proposed rulemaking must inform the public of the use and background of 
such standards. In addition, section 32(c) requires DOE to consult with 
the Attorney General and the Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission 
(FTC) concerning the impact of the commercial or industry standards on 
competition.
    As discussed in section III.1.c of this document, the proposed rule 
incorporates testing methods contained in the following commercial 
standards: ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 41.1-2013, Standard Method for 
Temperature Measurement; and ANSI/ASHRAE 51-2007/ANSI/AMCA 210-07, 
Laboratory Methods of Testing Fans for Certified Aerodynamic 
Performance Rating. While this proposed test procedure is not 
exclusively based on these standards, one component of the test 
procedure, namely ducted installation requirements for testing whole-
home dehumidifiers, adopts provisions from these standards without 
amendment. DOE has evaluated these standards and is unable to conclude 
whether they fully comply with the requirements of section 32(b) of the 
FEAA, (i.e., that they were developed in a manner that fully provides 
for public participation, comment, and review). DOE will consult with 
the Attorney General and the Chairwoman of the FTC concerning the 
impact of these test procedures on competition, prior to prescribing a 
final rule.

V. Public Participation

A. Attendance at Public Meeting

    The time, date and location of the public meeting are listed in the 
DATES and ADDRESSES sections at the beginning of this document. If you 
plan to attend the public meeting, please notify Ms. Brenda Edwards at 
(202) 586-2945 or Brenda.Edwards@ee.doe.gov. As explained in the 
ADDRESSES section, foreign nationals visiting DOE Headquarters are 
subject to advance security screening procedures.
    In addition, you can attend the public meeting via webinar. Webinar 
registration information, participant instructions, and information 
about the capabilities available to webinar participants will be 
published on DOE's Web site http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/product.aspx/productid/55 Participants are 
responsible for ensuring their systems are compatible with the webinar 
software.

[[Page 29296]]

B. Procedure for Submitting Prepared General Statements for 
Distribution

    Any person who has plans to present a prepared general statement 
may request that copies of his or her statement be made available at 
the public meeting. Such persons may submit requests, along with an 
advance electronic copy of their statement in PDF (preferred), 
Microsoft Word or Excel, WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to 
the appropriate address shown in the ADDRESSES section at the beginning 
of this document. The request and advance copy of statements must be 
received at least one week before the public meeting and may be 
emailed, hand-delivered, or sent by mail. DOE prefers to receive 
requests and advance copies via email. Please include a telephone 
number to enable DOE staff to make a follow-up contact, if needed.

C. Conduct of Public Meeting

    DOE will designate a DOE official to preside at the public meeting 
and may also use a professional facilitator to aid discussion. The 
meeting will not be a judicial or evidentiary-type public hearing, but 
DOE will conduct it in accordance with section 336 of EPCA (42 U.S.C. 
6306). A court reporter will be present to record the proceedings and 
prepare a transcript. DOE reserves the right to schedule the order of 
presentations and to establish the procedures governing the conduct of 
the public meeting. After the public meeting and until the end of the 
comment period, interested parties may submit further comments on the 
proceedings and any aspect of the rulemaking.
    The public meeting will be conducted in an informal, conference 
style. DOE will present summaries of comments received before the 
public meeting, allow time for prepared general statements by 
participants, and encourage all interested parties to share their views 
on issues affecting this rulemaking. Each participant will be allowed 
to make a general statement (within time limits determined by DOE), 
before the discussion of specific topics. DOE will permit, as time 
permits, other participants to comment briefly on any general 
statements.
    At the end of all prepared statements on a topic, DOE will permit 
participants to clarify their statements briefly and comment on 
statements made by others. Participants should be prepared to answer 
questions by DOE and by other participants concerning these issues. DOE 
representatives may also ask questions of participants concerning other 
matters relevant to this rulemaking. The official conducting the public 
meeting will accept additional comments or questions from those 
attending, as time permits. The presiding official will announce any 
further procedural rules or modification of the above procedures that 
may be needed for the proper conduct of the public meeting.
    A transcript of the public meeting will be included in the docket, 
which can be viewed as described in the Docket section at the beginning 
of this document. In addition, any person may buy a copy of the 
transcript from the transcribing reporter.

D. Submission of Comments

    DOE will accept comments, data, and information regarding this 
proposed rule before or after the public meeting, but no later than the 
date provided in the DATES section at the beginning of this proposed 
rule. Interested parties may submit comments using any of the methods 
described in the ADDRESSES section at the beginning of this document.
    Submitting comments via regulations.gov. The regulations.gov Web 
page will require you to provide your name and contact information. 
Your contact information will be viewable to DOE Building Technologies 
staff only. Your contact information will not be publicly viewable 
except for your first and last names, organization name (if any), and 
submitter representative name (if any). If your comment is not 
processed properly because of technical difficulties, DOE will use this 
information to contact you. If DOE cannot read your comment due to 
technical difficulties and cannot contact you for clarification, DOE 
may not be able to consider your comment.
    However, your contact information will be publicly viewable if you 
include it in the comment or in any documents attached to your comment. 
Any information that you do not want to be publicly viewable should not 
be included in your comment, nor in any document attached to your 
comment. Persons viewing comments will see only first and last names, 
organization names, correspondence containing comments, and any 
documents submitted with the comments.
    Do not submit to regulations.gov information for which disclosure 
is restricted by statute, such as trade secrets and commercial or 
financial information (hereinafter referred to as Confidential Business 
Information (CBI)). Comments submitted through regulations.gov cannot 
be claimed as CBI. Comments received through the Web site will waive 
any CBI claims for the information submitted. For information on 
submitting CBI, see the Confidential Business Information section.
    DOE processes submissions made through regulations.gov before 
posting. Normally, comments will be posted within a few days of being 
submitted. However, if large volumes of comments are being processed 
simultaneously, your comment may not be viewable for up to several 
weeks. Please keep the comment tracking number that regulations.gov 
provides after you have successfully uploaded your comment.
    Submitting comments via email, hand delivery, or mail. Comments and 
documents submitted via email, hand delivery, or mail also will be 
posted to regulations.gov. If you do not want your personal contact 
information to be publicly viewable, do not include it in your comment 
or any accompanying documents. Instead, provide your contact 
information on a cover letter. Include your first and last names, email 
address, telephone number, and optional mailing address. The cover 
letter will not be publicly viewable as long as it does not include any 
comments.
    Include contact information each time you submit comments, data, 
documents, and other information to DOE. If you submit via mail or hand 
delivery, please provide all items on a CD, if feasible. It is not 
necessary to submit printed copies. No facsimiles (faxes) will be 
accepted.
    Comments, data, and other information submitted to DOE 
electronically should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft Word or 
Excel, WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents that 
are not secured, written in English and free of any defects or viruses. 
Documents should not contain special characters or any form of 
encryption and, if possible, they should carry the electronic signature 
of the author.
    Campaign form letters. Please submit campaign form letters by the 
originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters 
per PDF or as one form letter with a list of supporters' names compiled 
into one or more PDFs. This reduces comment processing and posting 
time.
    Confidential Business Information. According to 10 CFR 1004.11, any 
person submitting information that he or she believes to be 
confidential and exempt by law from public disclosure should submit via 
email, postal mail, or hand delivery two well-marked copies: one copy 
of the document marked confidential including all the information 
believed to be confidential, and one copy of the document marked

[[Page 29297]]

non-confidential with the information believed to be confidential 
deleted. Submit these documents via email or on a CD, if feasible. DOE 
will make its own determination about the confidential status of the 
information and treat it according to its determination.
    Factors of interest to DOE when evaluating requests to treat 
submitted information as confidential include: (1) A description of the 
items; (2) whether and why such items are customarily treated as 
confidential within the industry; (3) whether the information is 
generally known by or available from other sources; (4) whether the 
information has previously been made available to others without 
obligation concerning its confidentiality; (5) an explanation of the 
competitive injury to the submitting person which would result from 
public disclosure; (6) when such information might lose its 
confidential character due to the passage of time; and (7) why 
disclosure of the information would be contrary to the public interest.
    It is DOE's policy that all comments may be included in the public 
docket, without change and as received, including any personal 
information provided in the comments (except information deemed to be 
exempt from public disclosure).

E. Issues on Which DOE Seeks Comment

    Although DOE welcomes comments on any aspect of this proposal, DOE 
is particularly interested in receiving comments and views of 
interested parties concerning the following issues:
    1. The clarification of whole-home dehumidifiers, including 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, as covered products, and the new 
definitions for portable dehumidifiers, whole-home dehumidifiers, 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. (See section III.A.)
    2. The new definitions for dehumidification mode and fan-only mode. 
(See section III.B.)
    3. The revision of the ambient dry-bulb temperature for testing 
conditions from 80 [deg]F to 65 [deg]F in new appendix X1, along with 
the associated impacts to IEF and capacity. In addition, DOE welcomes 
input on the alternative approach in which dehumidifiers would be 
tested under both the 80 [deg]F and 65 [deg]F ambient temperature 
conditions, with the IEF and capacity calculated as weighted averages 
of these metrics measured at each of the two temperatures. For this 
alternative approach, DOE seeks input on appropriate weighting factors. 
DOE also seeks further comment on alternatively testing whole-home 
dehumidifiers at 73[emsp14][deg]F ambient dry-bulb temperature to 
represent the average residential thermostat setting during 
dehumidifier usage. (See section III.B.1.a.)
    4. The continued specification of 60-percent relative humidity for 
the ambient testing conditions for dehumidification mode, even at a 
reduced ambient temperature. (See section III.B.1.b.)
    5. The test setup and testing methodology for whole-home 
dehumidifiers in appendix X1, including refrigerant-desiccant 
dehumidifiers. In particular, DOE welcomes comment on the proposed 
ducting configurations, alternative ambient temperature, and ESP, 
including equipment costs and testing burden. (See section III.B.1.c.)
    6. The testing burden associated with the requirement for multiple 
psychrometer sampling trees for portable dehumidifiers with multiple 
air inlets, and for connecting no more than one test unit per 
psychrometer. (See section III.B.1.d.)
    7. The condensation collection requirements for dehumidifiers with 
and without means for draining the condensate, including the use of any 
internal pump only if it is activated by default in dehumidification 
mode. (See section III.B.1.e.)
    8. The proposed control settings for dehumidification mode testing, 
which would require selecting continuous operation for those units with 
such a function. Otherwise the lowest relative humidity setting and, 
for units with user-adjustable fan speed, the highest fan speed would 
be selected. (See section III.B.1.f.)
    9. The provisions for measuring energy consumption in fan-only mode 
in appendix X1, including the use of the maximum speed setting for 
those units with adjustable fan speed settings, the measurement period 
specifications, and the inclusion of fan-only mode energy consumption 
in the calculation of IEF. DOE also seeks comment on whether fan-only 
mode energy consumption is independent of ambient conditions. (See 
section III.B.2.)

VI. Approval of the Office of the Secretary

    The Secretary of Energy has approved publication of this proposed 
rule.

List of Subjects

10 CFR Part 429

    Confidential business information, Energy conservation, Household 
appliances, Imports, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

10 CFR Part 430

    Administrative practice and procedure, Confidential business 
information, Energy conservation, Household appliances, Imports, 
Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Small 
businesses.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on May 2, 2014.
Kathleen B. Hogan,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency and 
Renewable Energy.

    For the reasons stated in the preamble, DOE proposes to amend parts 
429 and 430 of Chapter II of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations as 
set forth below:

PART 429--CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE, AND ENFORCEMENT FOR CONSUMER 
PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT

0
1. The authority citation for part 429 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 6291-6317.

0
2. Section 429.36 is amended by adding paragraph (a)(3) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  429.36  Dehumidifiers.

    (a) * * *
    (3) The value of capacity of a basic model reported in accordance 
with paragraph (b)(2) of this section shall be the mean of the measured 
capacity for each tested unit of the basic model. Round the mean 
capacity value to two decimal places as follows:
    (i) A fractional number at or above the midpoint between two 
consecutive decimal places shall be rounded up to the higher of the two 
decimal places; or
    (ii) A fractional number below the midpoint between two consecutive 
decimal places shall be rounded down to the lower of the two decimal 
places.
* * * * *
0
3. Add Sec.  429.134 to read as follows:


Sec.  429.134  Product-specific enforcement provisions.

    (a) General. The following provisions apply to assessment and 
enforcement testing of the relevant products.
    (b)-(e) [Reserved]
    (f) Dehumidifiers. (1) Verification of capacity. The capacity of 
the basic model will be measured pursuant to the test requirements of 
10 CFR part 430 for each unit tested. The results of the measurement(s) 
will be averaged and compared to the value of capacity certified by the 
manufacturer. The certified capacity will be considered valid only if 
the measurement is within

[[Page 29298]]

five percent, or 1.00 pint per day, whichever is greater, of the 
certified capacity.
    (i) If the certified capacity is found to be valid, the certified 
capacity will be used as the basis for determining the minimum energy 
factor allowed for the basic model.
    (ii) If the certified capacity is found to be invalid, the mean of 
the measured capacity of each unit in the sample will be used as the 
basis for determining the minimum energy factor allowed for the basic 
model.
    (2) [Reserved]

PART 430--ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS

0
4. The authority citation for part 430 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 6291-6309; 28 U.S.C. 2461 note.

0
5. Section 430.2 is amended by
0
a. Revising the definition of ``Dehumidifier''; and
0
b. Adding the definitions for ``Portable dehumidifier'', ``Refrigerant-
desiccant dehumidifier'', and ``Whole-home dehumidifier'' in 
alphabetical order;
    The revisions and additions read as follows:


Sec.  430.2  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Dehumidifier means a product, other than a portable air conditioner 
or room air conditioner, which is a self-contained, electrically 
operated, and mechanically encased assembly consisting of:
    (1) A refrigerated surface (evaporator) that condenses moisture 
from the atmosphere;
    (2) A refrigerating system, including an electric motor;
    (3) An air-circulating fan; and
    (4) Means for collecting or disposing of the condensate.
* * * * *
    Portable dehumidifier means a dehumidifier designed to operate 
within the dehumidified space without the attachment of additional 
ducting, although means may be provided for optional duct attachment.
* * * * *
    Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifier means a whole-home dehumidifier 
that removes moisture from the process air by means of a desiccant 
material in addition to a refrigeration system.
* * * * *
    Whole-home dehumidifier means a dehumidifier designed to be 
installed with ducting to deliver return process air to its inlet and 
to supply dehumidified process air from its outlet to one or more 
locations in the dehumidified space.
0
6. Section 430.3 is amended by:
0
a. Redesignating paragraphs (f)(10) and (f)(11) as paragraphs (f)(12) 
and (f)(13);
0
b. Redesignating paragraphs (f)(6) through (f)(9) as paragraphs (f)(7) 
through (f)(10); and
0
c. Adding new paragraphs (f)(6) and (f)(11) to read as follows:


Sec.  430.3  Materials incorporated by reference.

* * * * *
    (f) * * *
    (6) ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 41.1-2013, Standard Method for Temperature 
Measurement, ASHRAE approved January 29, 2013, ANSI approved January 
30, 2013, IBR approved for appendix X1 to subpart B.
* * * * *
    (11) ANSI/ASHRAE 51-07/ANSI/AMCA 210-07, (``ANSI/AMCA 210'') 
Laboratory Methods of Testing Fans for Certified Aerodynamic 
Performance Rating, AMCA approved July 28, 2006, ASHRAE approved March 
17, 2008, IBR approved for appendix X1 to subpart B.
* * * * *
0
7. Section 430.23 is amended by revising paragraph (z) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  430.23  Test procedures for the measurement of energy and water 
consumption.

* * * * *
    (z) Dehumidifiers. When using appendix X, the capacity, expressed 
in pints per day (pints/day), and the energy factor for dehumidifiers, 
expressed in liters per kilowatt hour (L/kWh), shall be measured in 
accordance with section 4.1 of appendix X of this subpart. When using 
appendix X1, the capacity, expressed in pints/day for dehumidifiers 
other than refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers and the energy factor 
for dehumidifiers, expressed in L/kWh, shall be measured in accordance 
with section 4.1.1.1 of appendix X1 of this subpart, and the integrated 
energy factor, expressed in L/kWh, shall be determined according to 
section 5.3 of appendix X1 to this subpart. When using appendix X1, the 
capacity, expressed in pints/day, for refrigerant-desiccant 
dehumidifiers shall be measured in accordance with section 5.4 of 
appendix X1 of this subpart.
* * * * *
0
8. Appendix X to subpart B of part 430 is amended:
0
a. By revising the note after the heading;
0
b. In section 2, Definitions, by redesignating sections 2.4 through 
2.10 as sections 2.5 through 2.11, adding new section 2.4, and revising 
newly redesignated section 2.10;
0
c. In section 3, Test Apparatus and General Instructions, by revising 
section 3.1 and adding new sections 3.1.1, 3.1.2, 3.1.3, and 3.1.4;
0
d. In section 4, Test Measurement, by revising sections 4.1, 4.2.1, and 
4.2.2; and
0
e. In section 5, Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements, 
by revising sections 5.1 and 5.2;
    The additions and revisions read as follows:

Appendix X to Subpart B of Part 430--Uniform Test Method for Measuring 
the Energy Consumption of Dehumidifiers

    Note: After November 17, 2014, any representations made with 
respect to the energy use or efficiency of portable dehumidifiers 
must be made in accordance with the results of testing pursuant to 
this appendix. Alternatively, manufacturers may certify compliance 
with any amended energy conservation standards prior to the 
compliance date of those amended energy conservation standards by 
testing in accordance with appendix X1. Any representations made 
with respect to the energy use or efficiency of such portable 
dehumidifiers must be in accordance with whichever version is 
selected.
    Any representations made on or after the compliance date of any 
amended energy conservation standards, with respect to the energy 
use or efficiency of portable or whole home dehumidifiers, must be 
made in accordance with the results of testing pursuant to appendix 
X1.

* * * * *

2. Definitions

* * * * *
    2.4 Dehumidification mode means an active mode in which a 
dehumidifier:
    (1) Has activated the main moisture removal function according to 
the humidistat or humidity sensor signal; and
    (2) Has either activated the refrigeration system or activated the 
fan or blower without activation of the refrigeration system.
* * * * *
    2.10 Product capacity for dehumidifiers means a measure of the 
ability of the dehumidifier to remove moisture from its surrounding 
atmosphere, measured in pints collected per 24 hours of operation under 
the specified ambient conditions.
* * * * *

3. Test Apparatus and General Instructions

    3.1 Active mode. The test apparatus and instructions for testing

[[Page 29299]]

dehumidifiers in dehumidification mode shall conform to the 
requirements specified in Section 3, ``Definitions,'' Section 4, 
``Instrumentation,'' and Section 5, ``Test Procedure,'' of ANSI/AHAM 
DH-1 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3), with the following 
exceptions.
    3.1.1 Psychrometer placement. The psychrometer shall be placed 
perpendicular to, and 1 ft. in front of, the center of the intake 
grille. For dehumidifiers with multiple intake grilles, a separate 
sampling tree shall be placed perpendicular to, and 1 ft. in front of, 
the center of each intake grille, with the samples combined and 
connected to a single psychrometer using a minimal length of insulated 
ducting. The psychrometer shall be used to monitor inlet conditions of 
one test unit only.
    3.1.2 Condensate collection. If means are provided on the 
dehumidifier for draining condensate away from the cabinet, the 
condensate shall be collected in a substantially closed vessel to 
prevent re-evaporation and shall be placed on the weight-measuring 
instrument. If no means for draining condensate away from the cabinet 
are provided, any automatic shutoff of dehumidification mode operation 
that is activated when the collection container is full shall be 
disabled and any overflow shall be collected in a pan, covered as much 
as possible to prevent re-evaporation and not impede collection of 
overflow water, that is placed beneath the dehumidifier, all of the 
condensate (i.e., the condensate collected in the vessel/collection 
container and the overflow pan) shall be placed on the weight-measuring 
instrument for direct reading of the condensate weight during the test. 
Any internal pump shall not be used to drain the condensate into a 
substantially closed vessel unless such pump is activated by default in 
dehumidification mode.
    3.1.3 Control settings. If the dehumidifier has a control setting 
for continuous operation in dehumidification mode, that setting shall 
be selected. Otherwise, the controls shall be set to the lowest 
available relative humidity level, and, if the dehumidifier has a user-
adjustable fan speed, the maximum fan speed setting shall be selected.
    3.1.4 Recording and rounding. Record measurements at the resolution 
of the test instrumentation. Round off calculations to the same number 
of significant digits as the previous step. Round the final energy 
factor and integrated energy factor values to two decimal places as 
follows:
    (i) A fractional number at or above the midpoint between two 
consecutive decimal places shall be rounded up to the higher of the two 
decimal places; or
    (ii) A fractional number below the midpoint between two consecutive 
decimal places shall be rounded down to the lower of the two decimal 
places.
    Round the final capacity value to two decimal places as follows:
    (i) A fractional number at or above the midpoint between two 
consecutive decimal places shall be rounded up to the higher of the two 
decimal places; or
    (ii) A fractional number below the midpoint between two consecutive 
decimal places shall be rounded down to the lower of the two decimal 
places.
* * * * *

4. Test Measurement

    4.1 Active mode. Measure the energy consumption in dehumidification 
mode, EDM, expressed in kilowatt-hours (kWh), the energy 
factor, expressed in liters per kilowatt-hour (L/kWh), and product 
capacity, expressed in pints per day (pints/day), in accordance with 
the test requirements specified in Section 7, ``Capacity Test and 
Energy Consumption Test,'' of ANSI/AHAM DH-1 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3).
* * * * *
    4.2.1 If the dehumidifier has an inactive mode, as defined in 
section 2.7 of this appendix, but not an off mode, as defined in 
section 2.8 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive 
mode power of the dehumidifier, PIA, in watts. Otherwise, if 
the dehumidifier has an off mode, as defined in section 2.8 of this 
appendix, measure and record the average off mode power of the 
dehumidifier, POM, in watts.
    4.2.2 If the dehumidifier has an off-cycle mode, as defined in 
section 2.9 of this appendix, measure and record the average off-cycle 
mode power of the dehumidifier, POC, in watts.

5. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements

    5.1 Annual combined low-power mode energy consumption. Calculate 
the annual combined low-power mode energy consumption for 
dehumidifiers, ETLP, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year, 
according to the following:

ETLP = [(PIO x SIO) + (POC 
x SOC)] x K


Where:

PIO = PIA, dehumidifier inactive mode power, 
or POM, dehumidifier off mode power, in watts, as 
measured in section 4.2.1 of this appendix.
POC = dehumidifier off-cycle mode power, in watts, as 
measured in section 4.2.2 of this appendix.
SIO = 1,840.5 dehumidifier inactive mode or off mode 
annual hours.
SOC = 1,840.5 dehumidifier off-cycle mode annual hours.
K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

    5.2 Integrated energy factor. Calculate the integrated energy 
factor, IEF, expressed in liters per kilowatt-hour, rounded to two 
decimal places, according to the following:

IEF = LW/[EDM + ((ETLP x 6)/
SDM)]

Where:

LW = water removed from the air during the 6-hour 
dehumidification mode test, in liters, as measured in section 4.1 of 
this appendix.
EDM = dehumidifier mode test energy consumption during 
the 6-hour dehumidification mode test, in kilowatt-hours, as 
measured in section 4.1 of this appendix.
ETLP = standby mode and off mode annual energy 
consumption, in kilowatt-hours per year, as calculated in section 
5.1 of this appendix.
6 = hours per dehumidification mode test, used to convert annual 
standby and off mode energy consumption for integration with 
dehumidification mode energy consumption.
SDM = 1,095 dehumidification mode annual hours.

0
9. Appendix X1 is added to subpart B of part 430 to read as follows:

Appendix X1 to Subpart B of Part 430--Uniform Test Method for Measuring 
the Energy Consumption of Dehumidifiers

    Note: After November 17, 2014, any representations made with 
respect to the energy use or efficiency of portable dehumidifiers 
must be made in accordance with the results of testing pursuant to 
Appendix X. Alternatively, manufacturers may certify compliance with 
any amended energy conservation standards prior to the compliance 
date of those amended energy conservation standards by testing in 
accordance with this appendix. Any representations made with respect 
to the energy use or efficiency of such portable dehumidifiers must 
be in accordance with whichever version is selected.
    Any representations made on or after the compliance date of any 
amended energy conservation standards, with respect to the energy 
use or efficiency of portable or whole home dehumidifiers, must be 
made in accordance with the results of testing pursuant to this 
appendix.

1. Scope

    This appendix covers the test requirements used to measure the 
energy performance of dehumidifiers.

2. Definitions

    2.1 ANSI/AHAM DH-1 means the test standard published by the 
American National Standards Institute and the Association of Home 
Appliance

[[Page 29300]]

Manufacturers, titled ``Dehumidifiers,'' ANSI/AHAM DH-1-2008 
(incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
    2.2 ANSI/AMCA 210 means the test standard published by ANSI, the 
American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning 
Engineers, and the Air Movement and Control Association International, 
Inc., titled ``Laboratory Methods of Testing Fans for Aerodynamic 
Performance Rating,'' ANSI/ASHRAE 51-07/ANSI/AMCA 210-07 (incorporated 
by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
    2.3 ANSI/ASHRAE 37 means the test standard published by ANSI and 
ASHRAE titled ``Methods of Testing for Rating Electrically Driven 
Unitary Air-Conditioning and Heat Pump Equipment'', ANSI/ASHRAE 37-
2009, (incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
    2.4 ANSI/ASHRAE 41.1 means the test standard published by ANSI and 
ASHRAE, titled ``Standard Method for Temperature Measurement,'' ANSI/
ASHRAE 41.1-2013 (incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
    2.5 Active mode means a mode in which a dehumidifier is connected 
to a mains power source, has been activated, and is performing the main 
functions of removing moisture from air by drawing moist air over a 
refrigerated coil using a fan, or circulating air through activation of 
the fan without activation of the refrigeration system.
    2.6 Combined low-power mode means the aggregate of available modes 
other than active mode.
    2.7 Dehumidification mode means an active mode in which a 
dehumidifier:
    (1) Has activated the main moisture removal function according to 
the humidistat or humidity sensor signal; and
    (2) Has either activated the refrigeration system or activated the 
fan or blower without activation of the refrigeration system.
    2.8 Energy factor for dehumidifiers means a measure of energy 
efficiency of a dehumidifier calculated by dividing the water removed 
from the air by the energy consumed, measured in liters per kilowatt-
hour (L/kWh).
    2.9 External static pressure (ESP) means the process air outlet 
static pressure minus the process air inlet static pressure, measured 
in inches of water column (in. w.c.).
    2.10 Fan-only mode means an active mode in which the dehumidifier:
    (1) Has cycled off its main moisture removal function by humidistat 
or humidity sensor;
    (2) Has activated its fan or blower to operate either cyclically or 
continuously; and
    (3) May reactivate the main moisture removal function according to 
the humidistat or humidity sensor signal.
    2.11 IEC 62301 means the test standard published by the 
International Electrotechnical Commission, titled ``Household 
electrical appliances-Measurement of standby power,'' Publication 62301 
(Edition 2.0 2011-01) (incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3).
    2.12 Inactive mode means a standby mode that facilitates the 
activation of active mode by remote switch (including remote control), 
internal sensor, or timer, or that provides continuous status display.
    2.13 Off mode means a mode in which the dehumidifier is connected 
to a mains power source and is not providing any active mode or standby 
mode function, and where the mode may persist for an indefinite time. 
An indicator that only shows the user that the dehumidifier is in the 
off position is included within the classification of an off mode.
    2.14 Off-cycle mode means a standby mode in which the dehumidifier:
    (1) Has cycled off its main moisture removal function by humidistat 
or humidity sensor;
    (2) Does not have its fan or blower operating; and
    (3) Will reactivate the main functions according to the humidistat 
or humidity sensor signal.
    2.15 Product capacity for dehumidifiers means a measure of the 
ability of the dehumidifier to remove moisture from its surrounding 
atmosphere, measured in pints collected per 24 hours of operation under 
the specified ambient conditions.
    2.16 Process air means the air supplied to the dehumidifier from 
the dehumidified space and discharged to the dehumidified space after 
some of the moisture has been removed by means of the refrigeration 
system.
    2.17 Reactivation air means the air drawn from unconditioned space 
to remove moisture from the desiccant wheel of a refrigerant-desiccant 
dehumidifier and discharged to unconditioned space.
    2.18 Standby mode means any modes where the dehumidifier is 
connected to a mains power source and offers one or more of the 
following user-oriented or protective functions which may persist for 
an indefinite time:
    (1) To facilitate the activation of other modes (including 
activation or deactivation of active mode) by remote switch (including 
remote control), internal sensor, or timer;
    (2) Continuous functions, including information or status displays 
(including clocks) or sensor-based functions. A timer is a continuous 
clock function (which may or may not be associated with a display) that 
provides regular scheduled tasks (e.g., switching) and that operates on 
a continuous basis.

3. Test Apparatus and General Instructions

    3.1 Active mode.
    3.1.1 Portable dehumidifiers and whole-home dehumidifiers other 
than refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. The test apparatus and 
instructions for testing in dehumidification mode and fan-only mode 
shall conform to the requirements specified in Section 3, 
``Definitions,'' Section 4, ``Instrumentation,'' and Section 5, ``Test 
Procedure,'' of ANSI/AHAM DH-1 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  
430.3), with the following exceptions. Note that if a product is able 
to operate as both a portable and whole-home dehumidifier by means of 
installation or removal of an optional ducting kit, it shall be tested 
and rated for both configurations.
    3.1.1.1 Testing configuration for whole-home dehumidifiers other 
than refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. Dehumidifiers other than 
refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers shall be tested with ducting 
attached to the process air outlet port. The duct configuration and 
component placement shall conform to the requirements specified in 
section 3.1.3 of this appendix and Figure 1 or Figure 3 in section 
3.1.3, except that the flow straightener and dry-bulb temperature and 
relative humidity instruments shall not be required. External static 
pressure in the process air flow shall be measured as specified in 
section 3.1.2.2.3.1 of this appendix.
    3.1.1.2 Psychrometer placement. The psychrometer shall be placed 
perpendicular to, and 1 ft. in front of, the center of the process air 
intake grille. For dehumidifiers with multiple process air intake 
grilles, a separate sampling tree shall be placed perpendicular to, and 
1 ft. in front of, the center of each process air intake grille, with 
the samples combined and connected to a single psychrometer using a 
minimal length of insulated ducting. The psychrometer shall be used to 
monitor inlet conditions of one test unit only.
    3.1.1.3 Condensate collection. If means are provided on the 
dehumidifier for draining condensate away from the cabinet, the 
condensate shall be collected in a substantially closed vessel to 
prevent re-evaporation and shall be placed on the weight-measuring 
instrument. If no means for draining condensate away from the cabinet 
are provided, any automatic shutoff of

[[Page 29301]]

dehumidification mode operation that is activated when the collection 
container is full shall be disabled and any overflow shall be collected 
in a pan, covered as much as possible to prevent re-evaporation and not 
impede collection of overflow water, and that is placed beneath the 
dehumidifier, both of which shall be placed on the weight-measuring 
instrument for direct reading of the condensate weight during the test. 
Any internal pump shall not be used to drain the condensate into a 
substantially closed vessel unless such pump is provided for use by 
default in dehumidification mode.
    3.1.1.4 Control settings. If the dehumidifier has a control setting 
for continuous operation in dehumidification mode, that setting shall 
be selected. Otherwise, the controls shall be set to the lowest 
available relative humidity level, and if the dehumidifier has a user-
adjustable fan speed, the maximum fan speed setting shall be selected.
    3.1.1.4 Run-in period. A single run-in period during which the 
compressor operates shall be performed before active mode testing. No 
additional run-in period shall be conducted between dehumidification 
mode testing and fan-only mode testing.
    3.1.2 Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. The test apparatus and 
instructions for testing refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers in 
dehumidification mode and fan-only mode shall conform to the 
requirements specified in Section 3, ``Definitions,'' Section 4, 
``Instrumentation,'' and Section 5, ``Test Procedure,'' of ANSI/AHAM 
DH-1 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3), except as follows. 
No weight-measuring instruments are required.
    3.1.2.1 Testing configuration. Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers 
shall be tested with ducting attached to the process air inlet and 
outlet ports and the reactivation air inlet port. The duct 
configuration and components shall conform to the requirements 
specified in section 3.1.3 of this appendix and Figure 1 through Figure 
3 in section 3.1.3. A cell-type airflow straightener that conforms with 
the specifications in Section 5.2.1.6, ``Airflow straightener'', and 
Figure 6A, ``Flow Straightener--Cell Type'', of ANSI/AMCA 210 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3) shall be installed in each 
duct consistent with Figure 1 through Figure 3 in section 3.1.1 of this 
appendix.
    3.1.2.2 Instrumentation.
    3.1.2.2.1 Temperature. Dry-bulb temperature sensors shall be 
installed in a grid centered in the duct, with the plane of the grid 
perpendicular to the axis of the duct. The number and locations of the 
sensors within the grid shall be determined according to Section 5.3.5, 
``Centers of Segments--Grids,'' of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 41.1 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    3.1.2.2.2 Relative humidity. Relative humidity shall be measured 
with an aspirating psychrometer with an accuracy within 1 
percent relative humidity. The relative humidity sensor shall be placed 
at the duct centerline within 1 inch of the dry-bulb temperature grid 
plane.
    3.1.2.2.3 Pressure. The pressure instruments used to measure the 
external static pressure and velocity pressures shall have an accuracy 
within 0.01 in. w.c. and a resolution of no more than 0.01 
in. w.c.
    3.1.2.2.3.1 External static pressure. Static pressures in ducts 
shall be measured using pitot-static tube traverses that conform with 
the specifications in Section 4.3.1, ``Pitot Traverse,'' of ANSI/AMCA 
210 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3), with pitot-static 
tubes that conform with the specifications in Section 4.2.2, ``Pitot-
Static Tube,'' of ANSI/AMCA 210. Static pressures at each pitot-static 
tube in a traverse shall be measured at the static pressure tap and 
averaged. Duct pressure losses between the unit under test and the 
plane of each static pressure measurement shall be calculated in 
accordance with section 7.5.2, ``Pressure Losses,'' of ANSI/AMCA 210. 
The external static pressure shall be the difference between the 
measured inlet and outlet static pressure measurements, minus the sum 
of the inlet and outlet duct pressure losses. For any port with no duct 
attached, a static pressure of 0.00 in. w.c. with no duct pressure loss 
shall be used in the calculation of external static pressure. During 
dehumidification mode testing, the external static pressure shall equal 
0.5 in. w.c.  0.02 in. w.c.
    3.1.2.2.3.2 Velocity pressure. Velocity pressures shall be measured 
using the same pitot traverses as used for measuring external static 
pressure, and which are specified in section 3.1.2.2.3.1 of this 
appendix. Velocity pressures shall be determined at each pitot-static 
tube in a traverse as the difference between the pressure at the impact 
pressure tap and the pressure at the static pressure tap. Volumetric 
flow rates in each duct shall be calculated in accordance with Section 
7.3.1, ``Velocity Traverse,'' of ANSI/AMCA 210 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    3.1.2.3 Control settings. If the dehumidifier has a control setting 
for continuous operation in dehumidification mode, that setting shall 
be selected. Otherwise, the controls shall be set to the lowest 
available relative humidity level, and if the dehumidifier has a user-
adjustable fan speed, the maximum fan speed setting shall be selected.
    3.1.2.4 Run-in period. A single run-in period during which the 
compressor operates shall be performed before active mode testing. No 
additional run-in period shall be conducted between dehumidification 
mode testing and fan-only mode testing.
    3.1.3 Ducting for whole-home dehumidifiers. Any port designed for 
intake of air from outside or unconditioned space, other than for 
supplying reactivation air for refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers, 
shall be covered and sealed with tape. Ducting shall be constructed of 
galvanized mild steel and shall be 10 inches in diameter. Inlet and 
outlet ducts shall be positioned either horizontally or vertically to 
accommodate the default dehumidifier port orientation. All ducts shall 
be installed with the axis of the section interfacing with the 
dehumidifier perpendicular to plane of the collar to which each is 
attached. If manufacturer-recommended collars do not measure 10 inches 
in diameter, transitional pieces shall be used to connect the ducts to 
the collars. The transitional pieces shall not contain any converging 
element that forms an angle with the duct axis greater than 7.5 degrees 
or a diverging element that forms an angle with the duct axis greater 
than 3.5 degrees. Mechanical throttling devices shall be installed in 
each outlet duct consistent with Figure 1 and Figure 3 of this section 
to adjust the external static pressure. The ducts shall be covered with 
thermal insulation having a minimum R value of 6 h-ft\2\-[deg]F/Btu 
(1.1 m\2\-K/W). Seams and edges shall be sealed with tape.

BILLING CODE 6450-01-P

[[Page 29302]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.002


[[Page 29303]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.003


[[Page 29304]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.004

BILLING CODE 6450-01-C

    3.1.4 Recording and rounding. When testing either a portable 
dehumidifier or a whole-home dehumidifier, record measurements at the 
resolution of the test instrumentation. Measurements for portable 
dehumidifiers and whole-home dehumidifiers other than refrigerant-
desiccant dehumidifiers shall be recorded at intervals no greater than 
10 minutes. Measurements for refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers shall 
be recorded at intervals no greater than 1 minute. Round off 
calculations to the same number of significant digits as the previous 
step. Round the final energy factor and integrated energy factor values 
to two decimal places as follows:
    (i) A fractional number at or above the midpoint between two 
consecutive decimal places shall be rounded up to the higher of the two 
decimal places; or
    (ii) A fractional number below the midpoint between two consecutive 
decimal places shall be rounded down to the lower of the two decimal 
places.
    Round the final capacity value to two decimal places as follows:
    (i) A fractional number at or above the midpoint between two 
consecutive decimal places shall be rounded up to the higher of the two 
decimal places; or
    (ii) A fractional number below the midpoint between two consecutive 
decimal places shall be rounded down to the lower of the two decimal 
places.
    3.2 Standby mode and off mode.
    3.2.1 Installation requirements. For the standby mode and off mode 
testing, the dehumidifier shall be installed in accordance with Section 
5, Paragraph 5.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  
430.3), disregarding the provisions regarding batteries and the 
determination, classification, and testing of relevant modes.
    3.2.2 Electrical energy supply.
    3.2.2.1 Electrical supply. For the standby mode and off mode 
testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage and frequency indicated 
in Section 7.1.3, ``Standard Test Voltage,'' of ANSI/AHAM DH-1 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3). The electrical supply 
frequency shall be maintained 1 percent.
    3.2.2.2 Supply voltage waveform. For the standby mode and off mode 
testing, maintain the electrical supply voltage waveform indicated in 
Section 4, Paragraph 4.3.2 of IEC 62301 (incorporated by reference, see 
Sec.  430.3).

[[Page 29305]]

    3.2.3 Standby mode and off mode wattmeter. The wattmeter used to 
measure standby mode and off mode power consumption shall meet the 
requirements specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.4 of IEC 62301 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).
    3.2.4 Standby mode and off mode ambient temperature. For standby 
mode and off mode testing, maintain room ambient air temperature 
conditions as specified in Section 4, Paragraph 4.2 of IEC 62301 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3).

4. Test Measurement

    4.1 Active mode.
    4.1.1 Dehumidification mode.
    4.1.1.1 Portable dehumidifiers and whole-home dehumidifiers other 
than refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. Establish the testing 
conditions set forth in section 3.1.1 of this appendix. Measure the 
energy consumption in dehumidification mode, EDM, expressed 
in kilowatt-hours (kWh), the energy factor, expressed in liters per 
kilowatt-hour (L/kWh), and product capacity, expressed in pints per day 
(pints/day), in accordance with the test requirements specified in 
Section 7, ``Capacity Test and Energy Consumption Test,'' of ANSI/AHAM 
DH-1 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3), except that the 
standard test conditions shall be maintained at 65[emsp14][deg]F  2.0[emsp14][deg]F dry-bulb temperature and 56.6[emsp14][deg]F 
 1.0[emsp14][deg]F wet-bulb temperature, and psychrometer 
placement shall be as specified in section 3.1.1.2 of this appendix.
    4.1.1.2 Refrigerant-desiccant dehumidifiers. Establish the testing 
conditions set forth in section 3.1.2 of this appendix. Measure the 
energy consumption, EDM, expressed in kWh, in accordance 
with the test requirements specified in Section 7.1, ``Capacity Test,'' 
of ANSI/AHAM DH-1 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  430.3), except 
that (1) the standard test conditions at the air entering the process 
air inlet duct and the reactivation air inlet shall be maintained at 
65[emsp14][deg]F  2.0[emsp14][deg]F dry-bulb temperature 
and 56.6[emsp14][deg]F  1.0[emsp14][deg]F wet-bulb 
temperature, (2) the instructions for psychrometer placement shall not 
apply, (3) the data recorded shall include dry-bulb temperatures, 
relative humidities, static pressures, and velocity pressures in each 
duct, and (4) the condensate collected during the test need not be 
weighed.
    4.1.2 Fan-only mode. If the dehumidifier operates in fan-only mode, 
as defined in section 2.10 of this appendix, establish the testing 
conditions set forth in either section 4.1.2.1 of this appendix or 
section 4.1.2.2 of this appendix. If the dehumidifier has a user-
adjustable fan speed during fan-only mode, the maximum fan speed 
setting shall be selected. Measure the average fan-only mode power, 
expressed in watts (W), for a period of 1 hour for fan-only mode in 
which the fan operates continuously. For fan-only mode in which the fan 
operates cyclically, measure the average fan-only mode power over a 
period of three or more full cycles for a minimum of 1 hour.
    4.1.2.1 Establish the testing conditions set forth in section 3.2 
of this appendix, with the dehumidifier controls set during this 
testing at a setpoint that is higher than the ambient relative humidity 
to ensure that the refrigeration system does not cycle on.
    4.1.2.2 Establish the test requirements specified in Section 7.1.2, 
``Standard Test Conditions,'' Section 7.1.3, ``Standard Test Voltage,'' 
Section 7.1.4, ``Psychrometer Placement,'' and Section 7.1.5, ``Data to 
be Recorded,'' of ANSI/AHAM DH-1 (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  
430.3). The dehumidifier controls shall be set during this testing at a 
setpoint that is higher than 60 percent relative humidity to ensure 
that the refrigeration system does not cycle on.
    4.2 Standby mode and off mode. Establish the testing conditions set 
forth in section 3.2 of this appendix, ensuring that the dehumidifier 
does not enter active mode during the test. For dehumidifiers that take 
some time to enter a stable state from a higher power state as 
discussed in Section 5, Paragraph 5.1, Note 1 of IEC 62301, 
(incorporated by reference; see Sec.  430.3), allow sufficient time for 
the dehumidifier to reach the lower power state before proceeding with 
the test measurement. Follow the test procedure specified in Section 5, 
Paragraph 5.3.2 of IEC 62301 for testing in each possible mode as 
described in sections 4.2.1 and 4.2.2 of this appendix.
    4.2.1 If the dehumidifier has an inactive mode, as defined in 
section 2.12 of this appendix, but not an off mode, as defined in 
section 2.13 of this appendix, measure and record the average inactive 
mode power of the dehumidifier, PIA, in watts. Otherwise, if 
the dehumidifier has an off mode, as defined in section 2.13 of this 
appendix, measure and record the average off mode power of the 
dehumidifier, POM, in watts.
    4.2.2 If the dehumidifier has an off-cycle mode, as defined in 
section 2.14 of this appendix, measure and record the average off-cycle 
mode power of the dehumidifier, POC, in watts.
5. Calculation of Derived Results From Test Measurements
    5.1 Annual combined low-power mode energy consumption. Calculate 
the annual combined low-power mode energy consumption for 
dehumidifiers, ETLP, expressed in kilowatt-hours per year. 
If the dehumidifier is capable of operating in off-cycle mode and not 
fan-only mode, ETLP shall be calculated as:

ETLP = [(PIO x SIO) + (POC 
x SOC)] x K

    If the dehumidifier is capable of operating in fan-only mode and 
not off-cycle mode, ETLP shall be calculated as:

ETLP = (PIO x SIO) x K

Where:

PIO = PIA, dehumidifier inactive mode power, 
or POM, dehumidifier off mode power, in watts, as 
measured in section 4.2.1 of this appendix.
POC = dehumidifier off-cycle mode power, in watts, as 
measured in section 4.2.2 of this appendix.
SIO = 1,840.5 dehumidifier inactive mode or off mode 
annual hours.
SOC = 1,840.5 dehumidifier off-cycle mode annual hours.
K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

    5.2 Fan-only mode annual energy consumption. If the dehumidifier is 
capable of operating in fan-only mode and not off-cycle mode, 
EFM shall be calculated as:

EFM = (PFM x SFM) x K

Where:

PFM = dehumidifier fan-only mode power, in watts, as 
measured in section 4.1.2 of this appendix.
SFM = 1,840.5 dehumidifier fan-only mode annual hours.
K = 0.001 kWh/Wh conversion factor for watt-hours to kilowatt-hours.

    5.3 Integrated energy factor. Calculate the integrated energy 
factor, IEF, expressed in liters per kilowatt-hour, rounded to two 
decimal places, according to the following:

IEF = LW/[EDM + ((ETLP + 
EFM) x 6/SDM)]

Where:

LW = water removed from the air during the 6-hour 
dehumidification mode test, in liters, as measured in section 4.1.1 
of this appendix.
EDM = dehumidification mode test energy consumption 
during the 6-hour dehumidification mode test, in kilowatt-hours, as 
measured in section 4.1.1 of this appendix.
ETLP = standby mode and off mode annual energy 
consumption, in kilowatt-hours per year, as calculated in section 
5.1 of this appendix.
EFM = fan-only mode annual energy consumption, in 
kilowatt-hours per year, as calculated in section 5.2 of this 
appendix for dehumidifiers that operate in fan-only mode and not 
off-cycle mode; otherwise, EFM = 0.

[[Page 29306]]

6 = hours per dehumidification mode test, used to convert annual 
standby and off mode energy consumption for integration with 
dehumidification mode energy consumption.
SDM = 1,095 dehumidification mode annual hours.

    5.4 Capacity for Refrigerant-Desiccant Dehumidifiers. The weight of 
water removed during the test period, expressed in pounds, and 
capacity, expressed in pints/day, shall be calculated as:
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.005


Where:

W = weight of water removed during the test period, in pounds;
n = number of samples during the test period in section 4.1.1.2.2 of 
this appendix;
AHI,i = absolute humidity of the process air on the inlet 
side of the unit, in pounds of water per cubic foot of dry air, 
measured for sample i in section 4.1.1.2.2 of this appendix;
XI,i = volumetric flow rate of the process air on the 
inlet side of the unit, in cubic feet per minute, measured for 
sample i in section 4.1.1.2.2 of this appendix. The volumetric flow 
rate shall be calculated in accordance with Section 7.3, ``Fan 
airflow rate at test conditions,'' of ANSI/AMCA 210 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3);
AHO,i = absolute humidity of the process air on the 
outlet side of the unit, in pounds of water per cubic foot of dry 
air, measured for sample i in section 4.1.1.2.2 of this appendix;
XO,i = volumetric flow rate of the process air on the 
outlet side of the unit, in cubic feet per minute, measured for 
sample i in section 4.1.1.2.2 of this appendix. The volumetric flow 
rate shall be calculated in accordance with Section 7.3, ``Fan 
airflow rate at test conditions,'' of ANSI/AMCA 210 (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  430.3);
t = time interval in seconds between samples, with a maximum of 60; 
and
60 = conversion from minutes to seconds.
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP21MY14.006

Where:

C = capacity in pints per day;
24 = number of hours per day;
1.04 = conversion from pounds of water to pints of water; and
T = total test period time in hours.

[FR Doc. 2014-10686 Filed 5-20-14; 8:45 a.m.]
BILLING CODE 6450-01-P