[Federal Register Volume 79, Number 132 (Thursday, July 10, 2014)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 39289-39300]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2014-15828]



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Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 132 / Thursday, July 10, 2014 / Rules 
and Regulations

[[Page 39289]]



NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

10 CFR Part 110

RIN 3150-AJ33
[NRC-2014-0007]


Export Controls and Physical Security Standards

AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is amending its 
regulations pertaining to the export and import of nuclear materials 
and equipment. This rulemaking is necessary to conform the export 
controls of the United States to the international export control 
guidelines of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), of which the United 
States is a member, and to incorporate by reference the current version 
of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) document, ``Nuclear 
Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and 
Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5), January 2011.'' Also, this 
final rule makes certain editorial revisions, and corrects 
typographical errors.

DATES: The final rule is effective August 11, 2014, except that the 
changes to Sec.  110.44(a) and (b)(1) and appendix M to 10 CFR part 110 
are effective December 31, 2014. The incorporation by reference of the 
material in this document is approved as of December 31, 2014.

ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket ID NRC-2014-0007 when contacting the 
NRC about the availability of information for this final rule. You can 
access publicly-available information related to this final rule by any 
of the following methods:
     Federal Rulemaking Web site: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2014-0007. Address 
questions about NRC dockets to Carol Gallagher; telephone: 301-287-
3422; email: Carol.Gallagher@nrc.gov. For technical questions, contact 
the individual listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section of 
this final rule.
     NRC's Agencywide Documents Access and Management System 
(ADAMS): You may obtain publicly available documents online in the 
ADAMS Public Documents collection at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html. To begin the search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and 
then select ``Begin Web-based ADAMS Search.'' For problems with ADAMS, 
please contact the NRC's Public Document Room (PDR) reference staff at 
1-800-397-4209, 301-415-4737, or by email to pdr.resource@nrc.gov. The 
ADAMS accession number for each document referenced in this document 
(if that document is available in ADAMS) is provided the first time 
that a document is referenced.
     NRC's PDR: You may examine and purchase copies of public 
documents at the NRC's PDR, Room O1-F21, One White Flint North, 11555 
Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brooke G. Smith, Office of 
International Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, 
DC 20555-0001, telephone: 301-415-2347, email: Brooke.Smith@nrc.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Table of Contents

I. Background
II. Section-by-Section Analysis
III. Regulatory Flexibility Certification
IV. Regulatory Analysis
V. Backfitting and Issue Finality
VI. Plain Writing
VII. Environmental Impact Statement
VIII. Paperwork Reduction Act
IX. Congressional Review Act
X. Voluntary Consensus Standards

I. Background

    The NSG is a group of like-minded States that seeks to contribute 
to the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons through the implementation 
of guidelines for nuclear exports and nuclear-related exports. As a 
participating government in the NSG, the United States has committed to 
controlling for export items on the NSG control lists. Participating 
governments are charged with implementing the changes adopted to the 
list as soon as possible after approval.
    This final rule conforms the NRC's export and import regulations in 
10 CFR part 110, ``Export and Import of Nuclear Equipment and 
Material,'' and appendices A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, N, and O, 
which contain illustrative lists of items under the NRC's export 
licensing authority, to current nuclear nonproliferation policies of 
the Executive Branch. These revisions are necessary to implement 
changes made to the NSG Guidelines, ``Guidelines for Nuclear Transfers 
(INFCIRC/254/Revision 12/Part 1), June 2013,'' as adopted by the 
governments participating in the NSG at the June 2012 and 2013 Plenary 
Meetings. In addition, this rule amends Sec.  110.30, ``Members of the 
Nuclear Suppliers Group,'' to add Mexico and Serbia as member countries 
of the NSG that are eligible to receive radioactive materials under 
certain general licenses for export. The NSG Guidelines can be found 
at: www.nuclearsuppliersgroup.org.
    In January 2011, the IAEA published the document titled, ``Nuclear 
Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and 
Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5).'' This rule also amends 
Sec.  110.44 and appendix M to 10 CFR part 110 to incorporate by 
reference the update and recommendations contained in Revision 5 of 
this IAEA document.
    The NRC staff has determined that these changes are consistent with 
current U.S. policy, and will pose no unreasonable risk to the public 
health and safety or to the common defense and security of the United 
States.
    Because this rule involves a foreign affairs function of the United 
States, the notice and comment provisions of the Administrative 
Procedure Act do not apply (5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1)). In addition, 
solicitation of public comments would delay the U.S. conformance with 
its international obligations, and would be contrary to the public 
interest (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). The final rule is effective August 11, 
2014, except that the changes to Sec.  110.44(a) and (b)(1) and 
appendix M to 10 CFR part 110 are effective December 31, 2014.

[[Page 39290]]

II. Section by Section Analysis

Section 110.2 Definitions

    Paragraph (2)(ii) of the definition of ``Utilization facility'' is 
amended to make conforming changes consistent with the changes to 
appendix A to 10 CFR part 110.

Section 110.26 General License for the Export of Nuclear Reactor 
Components

    This rule amends Sec.  110.26 to make conforming changes to 
paragraph (a) consistent with the changes to appendix A to 10 CFR part 
110.

Section 110.30 Members of the Nuclear Suppliers Group

    This rule amends Sec.  110.30 to update the list of NSG members by 
adding Mexico and Serbia.

Section 110.42 Export Licensing Criteria

    This rule amends Sec.  110.42 to make conforming changes to 
Footnote 1 consistent with the changes to appendix A to 10 CFR part 
110.

Section 110.44 Physical Security Standards

    Paragraphs (a) and (b)(1) of Sec.  110.44 are amended to 
incorporate by reference the most recent revision to INFCIRC/225/
Revision 5, ``The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear 
Facilities.'' The effective date for these changes is delayed until 
December 31, 2014, to provide adequate time for countries to meet the 
recommendations in Revision 5. ``The Physical Protection of Nuclear 
Material and Nuclear Facilities,'' INFCIRC/225/Revision 4 (corrected), 
July 1999, will continue to be used as the physical protection standard 
in recipient countries until the effective date for INFCIRC/225/
Revision 5, as incorporated by reference in 10 CFR part 110.

Appendices A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, N and O to Part 110

    These appendices are amended to reflect the updated guidelines of 
the NSG consistent with the IAEA document, ``Guidelines for Nuclear 
Transfers, (INFCIRC/254/Revision 12/Part 1).'' The appendices in 10 CFR 
part 110 are illustrative only and are not meant to be inclusive lists 
of facilities and equipment under the NRC's export licensing 
jurisdiction.

Appendix M to Part 110--Categorization of Nuclear Material

    Appendix M is amended to update the Categorization of Nuclear 
Material table to be consistent with IAEA publication, INFCIRC/225/
Revision 5. The changes to appendix M of 10 CFR part 110 are effective 
December 31, 2014.

III. Regulatory Flexibility Certification

    As required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 (5 U.S.C. 
605(b)), the Commission certifies that this final rule will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. 
This rule affects only companies exporting nuclear equipment and 
material to and from the United States and they do not fall within the 
scope of the definition of ``small entities'' set forth in the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601(3)), or the Size Standards 
established by the NRC (10 CFR 2.810).

IV. Regulatory Analysis

    This rulemaking is necessary to reflect the nuclear 
nonproliferation policy of the Executive Branch including U.S. 
Government commitments to controlling export items on the NSG control 
lists and the IAEA publication, INFCIRC/225/Revision 5. This final rule 
is expected to have no changes in the information collection burden or 
cost to the public.

V. Backfit Analysis and Issue Finality

    The NRC has determined that a backfit analysis is not required for 
this rule because these amendments do not include any provisions that 
would impose backfits as defined in 10 CFR Chapter I.

VI. Plain Writing

    The Plain Writing Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-274) requires Federal 
agencies to write documents in a clear, concise, and well-organized 
manner. The NRC has written this document to be consistent with the 
Plain Writing Act as well as the Presidential Memorandum, ``Plain 
Language in Government Writing,'' published June 10, 1998 (63 FR 
31883).

VII. Environmental Impact: Categorical Exclusion

    The NRC has determined that this final rule is the type of action 
described in categorical exclusion 10 CFR 51.22(c)(1). Therefore, 
neither an environmental impact statement nor an environmental 
assessment has been prepared for the rule.

VIII. Paperwork Reduction Act Statement

    This final rule does not contain new or amended information 
collection requirements subject to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
(44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). Existing requirements were approved by the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under approval number 3150-0036.

Public Protection Notification

    The NRC may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to 
respond to, a request for information or an information collection 
requirement unless the requesting document displays a currently valid 
OMB control number.

IX. Congressional Review Act

    Under the Congressional Review Act of 1996, the NRC has determined 
that this action is not a major rule and has verified this 
determination with the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs of 
OMB.

X. Voluntary Consensus Standards

    The National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Pub. 
L. 104-113) requires that Federal Agencies use technical standards that 
are developed or adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies unless 
using such a standard is inconsistent with applicable law or otherwise 
impractical. This final rule does not constitute the establishment of a 
standard for which the use of a voluntary consensus standard would be 
applicable.

List of Subjects in 10 CFR Part 110

    Administrative practice and procedure, Classified information, 
Criminal penalties, Export, Import, Incorporation by reference, 
Intergovernmental relations, Nuclear materials, Nuclear power plants 
and reactors, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Scientific 
equipment.

    For the reasons set out in the preamble and under the authority of 
the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the Energy Reorganization 
Act of 1974, as amended, and 5 U.S.C. 552 and 553, the NRC is adopting 
the following amendments to 10 CFR part 110.

PART 110--EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL

0
1. The authority citation for part 110 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  Atomic Energy Act secs. 51, 53, 54, 57, 63, 64, 65, 
81, 82, 103, 104, 109, 111, 126, 127, 128, 129, 161, 181, 182, 183, 
187, 189, 223, 234 (42 U.S.C. 2071, 2073, 2074, 2077, 2092-2095, 
2111, 2112, 2133, 2134, 2139, 2139a, 2141, 2154-2158, 2201, 2231-
2233, 2237, 2239, 2273, 2282); Energy Reorganization Act sec. 201 
(42 U.S.C. 5841; Solar, Wind, Waste, and Geothermal Power Act of 
1990 sec. 5 (42 U.S.C.2243); Government Paperwork Elimination Act 
sec.

[[Page 39291]]

1704, 112 Stat. 2750 (44 U.S.C. 3504 note); Energy Policy Act of 
2005, 119 Stat. 594.

    Sections 110.1(b)(2) and 110.1(b)(3) also issued under 22 U.S.C. 
2403. Section 110.11 also issued under Atomic Energy Act secs. 
54(c), 57(d), 122 (42 U.S.C. 2074, 2152). Section 110.50(b)(3) also 
issued under Atomic Energy Act sec. 123 (42 U.S.C. 2153). Section 
110.51 also issued under Atomic Energy Act sec. 184 (42 U.S.C. 
2234). Section 110.52 also issued under Atomic Energy Act sec. 186, 
(42 U.S.C. 2236). Sections 110.80-110.113 also issued under 5 U.S.C. 
552, 554. Sections 110.130-110.135 also issued under 5 U.S.C. 553. 
Sections 110.2 and 110.42(a)(9) also issued under Intelligence 
Authorization Act sec. 903 (42 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.).


0
2. In Sec.  110.2, revise paragraph (2)(ii) of the definition of 
``Utilization facility'' to read as follows:


Sec.  110.2  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Utilization facility means:
* * * * *
    (2) * * *
    (ii) Reactor primary coolant pump or circulator;
* * * * *

0
3. In Sec.  110.26, revise the introductory text of paragraph (a) to 
read as follows:


Sec.  110.26  General license for the export of nuclear reactor 
components.

    (a) A general license is issued to any person to export to a 
destination listed in paragraph (b) of this section any nuclear reactor 
component of U.S. origin described in paragraphs (5) through (11) of 
appendix A to this part if--
* * * * *


Sec.  110.30  [Amended]

0
4. Amend Sec.  110.30 by adding the words ``Mexico'' and ``Serbia'' in 
alphabetical order.

0
5. In Sec.  110.42, revise footnote 1 to read as follows:


Sec.  110.42  Export licensing criteria.

* * * * *
    \1\ Export of nuclear reactors, reactor pressure vessels, reactor 
primary coolant pumps and circulators, ``on-line'' reactor fuel 
charging and discharging machines, and complete reactor control rod 
systems, as specified in paragraphs (1) through (4) of appendix A to 
this part, are subject to the export licensing criteria in Sec.  
110.42(a). Exports of nuclear reactor components, as specified in 
paragraphs (5) through (11) of appendix A to this part, when exported 
separately from the items described in paragraphs (1) through (4) of 
appendix A to this part, are subject to the export licensing criteria 
in Sec.  110.42(b).

0
6. In Sec.  110.44, revise paragraphs (a) and (b)(1) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  110.44  Physical security standards.

    (a) Physical security measures in recipient countries must provide 
protection at least comparable to the recommendations in the current 
version of IAEA publication, ``Nuclear Security Recommendations on 
Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'' 
(INFCIRC/225/Revision 5), January 2011, which is incorporated by 
reference in this part. This incorporation by reference was approved by 
the Director of the Office of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 
U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Notice of any changes made to the 
material incorporated by reference will be published in the Federal 
Register. Copies of INFCIRC/225/Revision 5 may be obtained from the 
Marketing and Sales Unit, Publishing Section, IAEA, Vienna 
International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna Austria; Fax: 43 1 2600 
29302; telephone: 43 1 2600 22417; email: sales.publications@iaea.org; 
Web site: http://www.iaea.org/books. You may inspect a copy at the NRC 
Library, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852-2738, 
telephone: 301-415-4737 or 1-800-397-4209, between 8:30 a.m. and 4:15 
p.m.; or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). 
For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-
741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.
    (b) * * *
    (1) Receipt by the appropriate U.S. Executive Branch Agency of 
written assurances from the relevant recipient country government that 
physical security measures providing protection at least comparable to 
the recommendations set forth in INFCIRC/225/Revision 5.
* * * * *

0
7. Revise appendix A to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix A to Part 110--Illustrative List of Nuclear Reactor Equipment 
Under NRC Export Licensing Authority

    Note: A nuclear reactor basically includes the items within or 
attached directly to the reactor vessel, the equipment which 
controls the level of power in the core, and the components which 
normally contain or come in direct contact with or control the 
primary coolant of the reactor core.
    (1) Reactor pressure vessels, i.e., metal vessels, as complete 
units or major shop-fabricated parts, especially designed or 
prepared to contain the core of a nuclear reactor and capable of 
withstanding the operating pressure of the primary coolant.
    (2) On-line (e.g., CANDU) reactor fuel charging and discharging 
machines, i.e., manipulative equipment especially designed for 
inserting or removing fuel in an operating nuclear reactor.
    (3) Complete reactor control rod system, i.e., rods especially 
designed or prepared for the control of the reaction rate in a 
nuclear reactor, including the neutron absorbing part and the 
support or suspension structures therefor.
    (4) Reactor primary coolant pumps or circulators, i.e., pumps or 
circulators especially designed or prepared for circulating the 
primary coolant in a nuclear reactor.
    (5) Reactor pressure tubes, i.e., tubes especially designed or 
prepared to contain both fuel elements and the primary coolant in a 
nuclear reactor.
    (6) Zirconium tubes, i.e., zirconium metal and alloys in the 
form of tubes or assemblies of tubes especially designed or prepared 
for use as fuel cladding in a nuclear reactor.
    (7) Reactor internals, e.g., core support structures, control 
and rod guide tubes, fuel channels, calandria tubes, thermal 
shields, baffles, core grid plates, and diffuser plates especially 
designed or prepared for use in a nuclear reactor.
    (8) Reactor control rod drive mechanisms, including detection 
and measuring equipment to determine neutron flux levels within the 
core of a nuclear reactor.
    (9) Heat exchangers, e.g., steam generators especially designed 
or prepared for the primary, or intermediate, coolant circuit of a 
nuclear reactor or heat exchangers especially designed or prepared 
for use in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor.
    (10) External thermal shields especially designed or prepared 
for use in a nuclear reactor for reduction of heat loss and also for 
containment vessel protection.
    (11) Any other components especially designed or prepared for 
use in a nuclear reactor or in any of the components described in 
this appendix.


0
8. Revise appendix B to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix B to Part 110--Illustrative List of Gas Centrifuge Enrichment 
Plant Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority

    1. Assemblies and components especially designed or prepared for 
use in gas centrifuges.
    Note: The gas centrifuge normally consists of a thin-walled 
cylinder(s) of between 75 mm and 650 mm diameter contained in a 
vacuum environment and spun at high peripheral speed (of the order 
of 300 m/per second and more) with the central axis vertical. In 
order to achieve high speed, the materials of construction for the 
rotating rotor assembly, and hence its individual components, have 
to be manufactured to very close tolerances in order to minimize the 
unbalance. In contrast to other centrifuges, the gas centrifuge for 
uranium enrichment is characterized by having within the rotor 
chamber a rotating disc-shaped baffle(s) and a stationary tube 
arrangement for feeding and

[[Page 39292]]

extracting uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas and featuring 
at least three separate channels of which two are connected to 
scoops extending from the rotor axis towards the periphery of the 
rotor chamber. Also contained within the vacuum environment are a 
number of critical items which do not rotate and which, although 
they are especially designed, are not difficult to fabricate nor are 
they fabricated out of unique materials. A centrifuge facility, 
however, requires a large number of these components so that 
quantities can provide an important indication of end use.

1.1 Rotating Components

    (a) Complete Rotor Assemblies: Thin-walled cylinders, or a 
number of interconnected thin-walled cylinders, manufactured from 
one of the high strength-to-density ratio materials described in the 
footnote to this section.
    If interconnected, the cylinders are joined together by flexible 
bellows or rings as described in Sec.  1.1(c) of this appendix. The 
rotor is fitted with an internal baffle(s) and end caps, as 
described in Sec.  1.1(d) and (e) of this appendix, if in final 
form. However, the complete assembly may be delivered only partly 
assembled.
    (b) Rotor Tubes: Especially designed or prepared thin-walled 
cylinders with thickness of 12 mm or less, a diameter of between 75 
mm and 650 mm, and manufactured from one of the high strength-to-
density ratio materials described in the footnote to this section.
    (c) Rings or Bellows: Components especially designed or prepared 
to give localized support to the rotor tube or to join together a 
number of rotor tubes. The bellows in a short cylinder of wall 
thickness 3 mm or less, a diameter of between 75 mm and 650 mm, 
having a convolute, and manufactured from one of the high strength-
to-density ratio materials described in the footnote to this 
section.
    (d) Baffles: Disc shaped components of between 75 mm and 650 mm 
diameter especially designed or prepared to be mounted inside the 
centrifuge rotor tube, in order to isolate the take-off chamber from 
the main separation chamber and, in some cases, to assist the 
UF6 gas circulation within the main separation chamber of 
the rotor tube, and manufactured from one of the high strength-to-
density ratio materials described in the footnote to this section.
    (e) Top Caps/Bottom Caps: Disc shaped components of between 75 
mm and 650 mm diameter especially designed or prepared to fit to the 
ends of the rotor tube, and so contain the UF6 within the 
rotor tube, and in some cases to support, retain or contain as an 
integrated part, an element of the upper bearing (top cap) or to 
carry the rotating elements of the motor and lower bearing (bottom 
cap), and manufactured from one of the high strength-to-density 
ratio materials described in the footnote to this section.

Footnote

    The materials used for centrifuge rotating components include 
the following:
    (a) Maraging steel capable of an ultimate tensile strength of 
1.95 GPa or more.
    (b) Aluminum alloys capable of an ultimate tensile strength of 
0.46 GPa or more.
    (c) Filamentary materials suitable for use in composite 
structures and having a specific modulus of 3.18 x 10\6\ m or 
greater and a specific ultimate tensile strength of 7.62 x 10\4\ m 
or greater.

(``Specific Modulus'' is the Young's modulus in N/m\2\ divided by 
the specific weight in N/m\3\ when measured at a temperature of 23 
 20 [deg]C and a relative humidity of 50  5 
percent. ``Specific tensile strength'' is the ultimate tensile 
strength in N/m\2\ divided by the specific weight in N/m\3\ when 
measured at a temperature of 23  20 [deg]C and a 
relative humidity of 50  5 percent.)

1.2 Static Components

    (a) Magnetic Suspension Bearings: 1. Especially designed or 
prepared bearing assemblies consisting of an annular magnet 
suspended within a housing containing a damping medium. The housing 
will be manufactured from a UF6 resistant material (see 
footnote to Sec.  2 of this appendix). The magnet couples with a 
pole piece or a second magnet fitted to the top cap described in 
Sec.  1.1(e) of this appendix. The magnet may be ring-shaped with a 
relation between outer and inner diameter smaller or equal to 1.6:1. 
The magnet may be in a form having an initial permeability of 0.15 
Henry/meter or more, or a remanence of 98.5 percent or more, or an 
energy product of greater than 80,000 joules/m\3\. In addition to 
the usual material properties, it is a prerequisite that the 
deviation of the magnetic axes from the geometrical axes is limited 
to very small tolerances (lower than 0.1 mm) or that homogeneity of 
the material of the magnet is specially called for.
    2. Active magnetic bearings especially designed or prepared for 
use with gas centrifuges. These bearings usually have the following 
characteristics:
    (i) Designed to keep centred a rotor spinning at 600 Hz or more; 
and
    (ii) Associated to a reliable electrical power supply and/or to 
an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) unit in order to function for 
more than 1 hour.
    (b) Bearings/Dampers: Especially designed or prepared bearings 
comprising a pivot/cup assembly mounted on a damper. The pivot is 
normally a hardened steel shaft polished into a hemisphere at one 
end with a means of attachment to the bottom cap described in Sec.  
1.1(e) of this appendix at the other. The shaft may, however, have a 
hydrodynamic bearing attached. The cup is pellet-shaped with 
hemispherical indentation in one surface. These components are often 
supplied separately to the damper.
    (c) Molecular Pumps: Especially designed or prepared cylinders 
having internally machined or extruded helical grooves and 
internally machined bores. Typical dimensions are as follows: 75 mm 
to 650 mm internal diameter, 10 mm or more wall thickness, with a 
length equal to or greater than the diameter. The grooves are 
typically rectangular in cross-section and 2 mm or more in depth.
    (d) Motor Stators: Especially designed or prepared ring shaped 
stators for high speed multi-phase alternating current (AC) 
hysteresis (or reluctance) motors for synchronous operation within a 
vacuum at a frequency of 600 Hz or greater and a power of 40 volts 
amps or greater. The stators may consist of multi-phase windings on 
a laminated low loss iron core comprised of thin layers typically 
2.0 mm thick or less.
    (e) Centrifuge housing/recipients: Components especially 
designed or prepared to contain the rotor tube assembly of a gas 
centrifuge. The housing consists of a rigid cylinder of wall 
thickness up to 30 mm with precision machined ends to locate the 
bearings and with one or more flanges for mounting. The machined 
ends are parallel to each other and perpendicular to the cylinder's 
longitudinal axis to within 0.05 degrees or less. The housing may 
also be a honeycomb type structure to accommodate several rotor 
tubes.
    (f) Scoops: Especially designed or prepared tubes for the 
extraction of UF6 gas from within the rotor tube by a 
Pitot tube action (that is, with an aperture facing into the 
circumferential gas flow within the rotor tube, for example by 
bending the end of a radially disposed tube) and capable of being 
fixed to the central gas extraction system.
    2. Especially designed or prepared auxiliary systems, equipment, 
and components for gas centrifuge enrichment plants.
    Note: The auxiliary systems, equipment, and components for a gas 
centrifuge enrichment plant are the systems of the plant needed to 
feed UF6 to the centrifuges to link the individual 
centrifuges to each other to form cascades (or stages) to allow for 
progressively higher enrichments and to extract the product and 
tails of UF6 from the centrifuges, together with the 
equipment required to drive the centrifuges or to control the plant.
    Normally UF6 is evaporated from the solid using 
heated autoclaves and is distributed in gaseous form to the 
centrifuges by way of cascade header pipework. The ``product'' and 
``tails'' of UF6 gaseous streams flowing from the 
centrifuges are also passed by way of cascade header pipework to 
cold traps (operating at about 203 K (-70 [deg]C)) where they are 
condensed prior to onward transfer into suitable containers for 
transportation or storage. Because an enrichment plant consists of 
many thousands of centrifuges arranged in cascades, there are many 
kilometers of cascade header pipework incorporating thousands of 
welds with a substantial amount of repetition of layout. The 
equipment, component and piping systems are fabricated to very high 
vacuum and cleanliness standards.
    Some of the items listed below either come into direct contact 
with the UF6 process gas or directly control the 
centrifuges and the passage of the gas from centrifuge to centrifuge 
and cascade to cascade. Materials resistant to corrosion by 
UF6 include copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, 
aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum alloys, nickel or alloys 
containing 60 percent or more nickel, and fluorinated hydrocarbon 
polymers.
    (a) Feed Systems/Product and Tails Withdrawal Systems: 
Especially designed or prepared process systems or equipment for 
enrichment plants made of or protected by materials resistant to 
corrosion by UF6 including:

[[Page 39293]]

    1. Feed autoclaves, ovens, or systems used for passing 
UF6 to the enrichment process.
    2. Desublimers, cold traps, or pumps used to remove 
UF6 from the enrichment process for subsequent transfer 
upon heating.
    3. Solidification or liquefaction stations used to remove 
UF6 from the enrichment process by compressing and 
converting UF6 to a liquid or solid form.
    4. ``Product'' and ``tails'' stations used for transferring 
UF6 into containers.
    (b) Machine Header Piping Systems: Especially designed or 
prepared piping systems and header systems for handling 
UF6 within the centrifuge cascades.
    This piping network is normally of the ``triple'' header system 
with each centrifuge connected to each of the headers. There is 
therefore a substantial amount of repetition in its form. It is 
wholly made of or protected by UF6 resistant materials 
(see Note to this section) and is fabricated to very high vacuum and 
cleanliness standards.
    (c) Special shut-off and control valves:
    1. Shut-off valves especially designed or prepared to act on the 
feed, ``product'' or ``tails'' UF6 gaseous streams of an 
individual gas centrifuge.
    2. Bellows-sealed valves, manual or automated, shut-off or 
control, made of or protected by materials resistant to corrosion by 
UF6, with an inside diameter of 10 to 160 mm, especially 
designed or prepared for use in main or auxiliary systems of gas 
centrifuge enrichment plants.
    Typical especially designed or prepared valves include bellow-
sealed valves, fast acting closure-types, fast acting valves, and 
others.
    (d) UF6 Mass Spectrometers/Ion Sources: Especially 
designed or prepared mass spectrometers capable of taking on-line 
samples from UF6 gas streams and having all of the 
following:
    1. Capable of measuring ions of 320 atomic mass units or greater 
and having a resolution of better than 1 part in 320.
    2. Ion sources constructed of or protected by nickel, nickel-
copper alloys with a nickel content of 60 percent or more by weight, 
or nickel-chrome alloys.
    3. Electron bombardment ionization sources.
    4. Having a collector system suitable for isotope analysis.
    (e) Frequency Changers: Frequency changers (also known as 
converters or inverters) especially designed or prepared to supply 
motor stators as defined under Sec.  1.2(d) of this appendix, or 
parts, components, and subassemblies of such frequency changers 
having all of the following characteristics:
    1. A multiphase output of 600 Hz or greater; and
    2. High stability (with frequency control better than 0.2 
percent).
    (f) Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a gas centrifuge enrichment plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.


0
9. Revise appendix C to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix C to Part 110--Illustrative List of Gaseous Diffusion 
Enrichment Plant Assemblies and Components Under NRC Export Licensing 
Authority

    Note: In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope 
separation, the main technological assembly is a special porous 
gaseous diffusion barrier, heat exchanger for cooling the gas (which 
is heated by the process of compression), seal valves and control 
valves, and pipelines. Inasmuch as gaseous diffusion technology uses 
uranium hexafluoride (UF6), all equipment, pipeline and 
instrumentation surfaces (that come in contact with the gas) must be 
made of materials that remain stable in contact with UF6. 
A gaseous diffusion facility requires a number of these assemblies, 
so that quantities can provide an important indication of end use.
    The auxiliary systems, equipment, and components for gaseous 
diffusion enrichment plants are the systems of plant needed to feed 
UF6 to the gaseous diffusion assembly to link the 
individual assemblies to each other to form cascades (or stages) to 
allow for progressively higher enrichments and to extract the 
``product'' and ``tails'' UF6 from the diffusion 
cascades. Because of the high inertial properties of diffusion 
cascades, any interruption in their operation, and especially their 
shut-down, leads to serious consequences. Therefore, a strict and 
constant maintenance of vacuum in all technological systems, 
automatic protection for accidents, and precise automated regulation 
of the gas flow is of importance in a gaseous diffusion plant. All 
this leads to a need to equip the plant with a large number of 
special measuring, regulating, and controlling systems.
    Normally UF6 is evaporated from cylinders placed 
within autoclaves and is distributed in gaseous form to the entry 
point by way of cascade header pipework. The ``product'' and 
``tails'' UF6 gaseous streams flowing from exit points 
are passed by way of cascade header pipework to either cold traps or 
to compression stations where the UF6 gas is liquified 
prior to onward transfer into suitable containers for transportation 
or storage. Because a gaseous diffusion enrichment plant consists of 
a large number of gaseous diffusion assemblies arranged in cascades, 
there are many kilometers of cascade header pipework, incorporating 
thousands of welds with substantial amounts of repetition of layout. 
The equipment, components, and piping systems are fabricated to very 
high vacuum and cleanliness standards.
    The items listed below either come into direct contact with the 
UF6 process gas or directly control the flow within the 
cascade. All surfaces which come into contact with the process gas 
are wholly made of, or lined with, UF6-resistant 
materials. For the purposes of this appendix, the materials 
resistant to corrosion by UF6 include copper, copper 
alloys, stainless steel, aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum alloys, 
nickel or alloys containing 60 percent or more nickel and 
fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers.
    1. Assemblies and components especially designed or prepared for 
use in gaseous diffusion enrichment.

1.1 Gaseous Diffusion Barriers and Barrier Materials

    (a) Especially designed or prepared thin, porous filters, with a 
pore size of 10-100 nm, a thickness of 5 mm or less, and for tubular 
forms, a diameter of 25 mm or less, made of metallic, polymer or 
ceramic materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 (See Note 
in Sec.  2 of this appendix).
    (b) Especially prepared compounds or powders for the manufacture 
of such filters. Such compounds and powders include nickel or alloys 
containing 60 percent or more nickel, aluminum oxide, or 
UF6-resistant fully fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers 
having a purity of 99.9 percent by weight or more, a particle size 
less than 10 [micro]m, and a high degree of particle size 
uniformity, which are especially prepared for the manufacture of 
gaseous diffusion barriers.

1.2 Diffuser Housings

    Especially designed or prepared hermetically sealed vessels for 
containing the gaseous diffusion barrier, made of or protected by 
UF6-resistant materials (See Note in Sec.  2 of this 
appendix).

1.3 Compressors and Gas Blowers

    Especially designed or prepared compressors or gas blowers with 
a suction volume capacity of 1 m\3\ per minute or more of 
UF6, and with a discharge pressure of up to 500 kPa, 
designed for long-term operation in the UF6 environment, 
as well as separate assemblies of such compressors and gas blowers. 
These compressors and gas blowers have a pressure ratio of 10:1 or 
less and are made of, or protected by, materials resistant to 
UF6 (See Note in Sec.  2 of this appendix).

1.4 Rotary Shaft Seals

    Especially designed or prepared vacuum seals, with seal feed and 
seal exhaust connections, for sealing the shaft connecting the 
compressor or the gas blower rotor with the driver motor so as to 
ensure a reliable seal against in-leaking of air into the inner 
chamber of the compressor or gas blower which is filled with 
UF6. Such seals are normally designed for a buffer gas 
in-leakage rate of less than 1000 cm\3\ per minute.

1.5 Heat Exchangers for Cooling UF6

    Especially designed or prepared heat exchangers made of or 
protected by UF6 resistant materials (see Note to Sec.  2 
of this appendix) and intended for a leakage pressure change rate of 
less than 10 Pa per hour under a pressure difference of 100 kPa.
    2. Auxiliary systems, equipment, and components especially 
designed or prepared for use in gaseous diffusion enrichment.
    Note: The items listed below either come into direct contact 
with the UF6 process gas or directly control the flow 
within the cascade. Materials resistant to corrosion by 
UF6 include copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, 
aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum alloys, nickel or alloys 
containing 60 percent or more nickel, and fluorinated hydrocarbon 
polymers.

2.1 Feed Systems/Product and Tails Withdrawal Systems

    Especially designed or prepared process systems or equipment for 
enrichment plants

[[Page 39294]]

made of, or protected by, materials resistant to corrosion by 
UF6, including:
    (1) Feed autoclaves, ovens, or systems used for passing 
UF6 to the enrichment process;
    (2) Desublimers, cold traps, or pumps used to remove 
UF6 from the enrichment process for subsequent transfer 
upon heating;
    (3) Solidification or liquefaction stations used to remove 
UF6 from the enrichment process by compressing and 
converting UF6 to a liquid or solid form;
    (4) ``Product'' or ``tails'' stations used for transferring 
UF6 into containers.

2.2 Header Piping Systems

    Especially designed or prepared piping systems and header 
systems for handling UF6 within the gaseous diffusion 
cascades. This piping network is normally of the ``double'' header 
system with each cell connected to each of the headers.

2.3 Vacuum Systems

    (a) Especially designed or prepared vacuum manifolds, vacuum 
headers and vacuum pumps having a suction capacity of 5 m\3\ per 
minute or more.
    (b) Vacuum pumps especially designed for service in 
UF6-bearing atmospheres made of, or protected by, 
materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 (See Note to this 
section). These pumps may be either rotary or positive displacement, 
may have fluorocarbon seals, and may have special working fluids 
present.

2.4 Special Shut-Off and Control Valves

    Especially designed or prepared bellows-sealed valves, manual or 
automated, shut-off or control valves, made of, or protected by, 
materials resistant to corrosion by UF6, for installation 
in main and auxiliary systems of gaseous diffusion enrichment 
plants.

2.5 UF6 Mass Spectrometers/Ion Sources

    Especially designed or prepared mass spectrometers capable of 
taking on-line samples from UF6 gas streams and having 
all of the following:
    (a) Capable of measuring ions of 320 atomic mass units or 
greater and having a resolution of better than 1 part in 320;
    (b) ion sources constructed of or protected by nickel, nickel-
copper alloys with a nickel content of 60 percent or more by weight, 
or nickel-chrome alloys;
    (c) electron bombardment ionization sources; and
    (d) having a collector system suitable for isotopic analysis.
    3. Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a gaseous diffusion enrichment plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.


0
10. Revise appendix D to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix D to Part 110--Illustrative List of Aerodynamic Enrichment 
Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority

    Note: In aerodynamic enrichment processes, a mixture of gaseous 
UF6 and light gas (hydrogen or helium) is compressed and 
then passed through separating elements wherein isotopic separation 
is accomplished by the generation of high centrifugal forces over a 
curved-wall geometry. Two processes of this type have been 
successfully developed: The separation nozzle process and the vortex 
tube process. For both processes, the main components of a 
separation stage included cylindrical vessels housing the special 
separation elements (nozzles or vortex tubes), gas compressors, and 
heat exchangers to remove the heat of compression. An aerodynamic 
plant requires a number of these stages, so that quantities can 
provide an important indication of end use. Because aerodynamic 
processes use UF6, all equipment, pipeline and 
instrumentation surfaces (that come in contact with the gas) must be 
made of, or protected by, materials that remain stable in contact 
with UF6. All surfaces which come into contact with the 
process gas are made of, or protected by, UF6-resistant 
materials; including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, 
aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum alloys, nickel or alloys 
containing 60 percent or more nickel by weight, and fluorinated 
hydrocarbon polymers.
    The following items either come into direct contact with the 
UF6 process gas or directly control the flow within the 
cascade:
    (1) Separation nozzles and assemblies.
    Especially designed or prepared separation nozzles and 
assemblies thereof. The separation nozzles consist of slit-shaped, 
curved channels having a radius of curvature less than 1 mm, 
resistant to corrosion by UF6 and having a knife-edge 
within the nozzle that separates the gas flowing through the nozzle 
into two fractions.
    (2) Vortex tubes and assemblies.
    Especially designed or prepared vortex tubes and assemblies 
thereof. The vortex tubes are cylindrical or tapered, made of, or 
protected by, materials resistant to corrosion by UF6, 
and with one or more tangential inlets. The tubes may be equipped 
with nozzle-type appendages at either or both ends.
    The feed gas enters the vortex tube tangentially at one end or 
through swirl vanes or at numerous tangential positions along the 
periphery of the tube.
    (3) Compressors and gas blowers.
    Especially designed or prepared compressors or gas blowers made 
of, or protected by, materials resistant to corrosion by the 
UF6/carrier gas (hydrogen or helium) mixture.
    (4) Rotary shaft seals.
    Especially designed or prepared rotary shaft seals, with seal 
feed and seal exhaust connections, for sealing the shaft connecting 
the compressor rotor or the gas blower rotor with the driver motor 
to ensure a reliable seal against out-leakage of process gas or in-
leakage of air or seal gas into the inner chamber of the compressor 
or gas blower which is filled with a UF6/carrier gas 
mixture.
    (5) Heat exchangers for gas cooling.
    Especially designed or prepared heat exchangers, made of, or 
protected by, materials resistant to corrosion by UF6.
    (6) Separation element housings.
    Especially designed or prepared separation element housings, 
made of, or protected by, materials resistant to corrosion by 
UF6, for containing vortex tubes or separation nozzles.
    (7) Feed systems/product and tails withdrawal systems.
    Especially designed or prepared process systems or equipment for 
enrichment plants made of, or protected by, materials resistant to 
corrosion by UF6, including:
    (i) Feed autoclaves, ovens, or systems used for passing 
UF6 to the enrichment process;
    (ii) Desublimers (or cold traps) used to remove UF6 
from the enrichment process for subsequent transfer upon heating;
    (iii) Solidification or liquefaction stations used to remove 
UF6 from the enrichment process by compressing and 
converting UF6 to a liquid or solid form; and
    (iv) ``Product'' or ``tails'' stations used for transferring 
UF6 into containers.
    (8) Header piping systems.
    Especially designed or prepared header piping systems, made of 
or protected by materials resistant to corrosion by UF6, 
for handling UF6 within the aerodynamic cascades. The 
piping network is normally of the ``double'' header design with each 
stage or group of stages connected to each of the headers.
    (9) Vacuum systems and pumps.
    (i) Especially designed or prepared vacuum systems consisting of 
vacuum manifolds, vacuum headers and vacuum pumps, and designed for 
service in UF6-bearing atmospheres.
    (ii) Especially designed or prepared vacuum pumps for service in 
UF6-bearing atmospheres and made of, or protected by, 
materials resistant to corrosion by UF6. These pumps may 
use fluorocarbon seals and special working fluids.
    (10) Special shut-off and control valves.
    Especially designed or prepared bellows-sealed valves, manual or 
automated, shut-off or control valves made of, or protected by, 
materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 with a diameter 
of 40 mm or greater for installation in main and auxiliary systems 
of aerodynamic enrichment plants.
    (11) UF6 mass spectrometers/ion sources.
    Especially designed or prepared mass spectrometers capable of 
taking on-line samples from UF6 gas streams and having 
all of the following:
    (i) Capable of measuring ions of 320 atomic mass units or 
greater and having a resolution of better than 1 part in 320;
    (ii) Ion sources constructed of or protected by nickel, nickel-
copper alloys with a nickel content of 60 percent or more by weight, 
or nickel-chrome alloys;
    (iii) Electron bombardment ionization sources; and
    (iv) Collector system suitable for isotopic analysis.
    (12) UF6/carrier gas separation systems.
    Especially designed or prepared process systems for separating 
UF6 from carrier gas (hydrogen or helium).
    These systems are designed to reduce the UF6 content 
in the carrier gas to 1 ppm or less and may incorporate equipment 
such as:
    (i) Cryogenic heat exchangers and cryoseparators capable of 
temperatures of 153 K (-120 [deg]C) or less;
    (ii) Cryogenic refrigeration units capable of temperatures of 
153 K (-120 [deg]C) or less;
    (iii) Separation nozzle or vortex tube units for the separation 
of UF6 from carrier gas; or

[[Page 39295]]

    (iv) UF6 cold traps capable of freezing out UF6.
    (13) Any other components especially designed or prepared for 
use in an aerodynamic enrichment plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.


0
11. Revise appendix E to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix E to Part 110--Illustrative List of Chemical Exchange or Ion 
Exchange Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export 
Licensing Authority

    Note: The slight difference in mass between the isotopes of 
uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction equilibria that 
can be used as a basis for separation of the isotopes. Two processes 
have been successfully developed: Liquid-liquid chemical exchange 
and solid-liquid ion exchange.
    A. In the liquid-liquid chemical exchange process, immiscible 
liquid phases (aqueous and organic) are countercurrently contacted 
to give the cascading effect of thousands of separation stages. The 
aqueous phase consists of uranium chloride in hydrochloric acid 
solution; the organic phase consists of an extractant containing 
uranium chloride in an organic solvent. The contactors employed in 
the separation cascade can be liquid-liquid exchange columns (such 
as pulsed columns with sieve plates) or liquid centrifugal 
contactors. Chemical conversions (oxidation and reduction) are 
required at both ends of the separation cascade in order to provide 
for the reflux requirements at each end. A major design concern is 
to avoid contamination of the process streams with certain metal 
ions. Plastic, plastic-lined (including use of fluorocarbon 
polymers) and/or glass-lined columns and piping are therefore used.
    (1) Liquid-liquid exchange columns.
    Countercurrent liquid-liquid exchange columns having mechanical 
power input especially designed or prepared for uranium enrichment 
using the chemical exchange process. For corrosion resistance to 
concentrated hydrochloric acid solutions, these columns and their 
internals are normally made of, or protected by, suitable plastic 
materials (such as fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers) or glass. The 
stage residence time of the columns is normally designed to be 30 
seconds or less.
    (2) Liquid-liquid centrifugal contactors.
    Especially designed or prepared for uranium enrichment using the 
chemical exchange process. These contactors use rotation to achieve 
dispersion of the organic and aqueous streams and then centrifugal 
force to separate the phases. For corrosion resistance to 
concentrated hydrochloric acid solutions, the contactors are 
normally made of, or protected by, suitable plastic materials (such 
as fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers) or glass. The stage residence 
time of the centrifugal contactors is designed to be short (30 
seconds or less).
    (3) Uranium reduction systems and equipment.
    (i) Especially designed or prepared electrochemical reduction 
cells to reduce uranium from one valence state to another for 
uranium enrichment using the chemical exchange process. The cell 
materials in contact with process solutions must be corrosion 
resistant to concentrated hydrochloric acid solutions.
    The cell cathodic compartment must be designed to prevent re-
oxidation of uranium to its higher valence state. To keep the 
uranium in the cathodic compartment, the cell may have an impervious 
diaphragm membrane constructed of special cation exchange material. 
The cathode consists of a suitable solid conductor such as graphite.
    These systems consist of solvent extraction equipment for 
stripping the U+4 from the organic stream into an aqueous 
solution, evaporation and/or other equipment to accomplish solution 
pH adjustment and control, and pumps or other transfer devices for 
feeding to the electrochemical reduction cells. A major design 
concern is to avoid contamination of the aqueous stream with certain 
metal ions. For those parts in contact with the process stream, the 
system is constructed of equipment made of, or protected by, 
materials such as glass, fluorocarbon polymers, polyphenyl sulfate, 
polyether sulfone, and resin-impregnated graphite.
    (ii) Especially designed or prepared systems at the product end 
of the cascade for taking the U+4 out of the organic 
stream, adjusting the acid concentration, and feeding to the 
electrochemical reduction cells.
    These systems consist of solvent extraction equipment for 
stripping the U+4 from the organic stream into an aqueous 
solution, evaporation and/or other equipment to accomplish solution 
pH adjustment and control, and pumps or other transfer devices for 
feeding to the electrochemical reduction cells. A major design 
concern is to avoid contamination of the aqueous stream with certain 
metal ions. For those parts in contact with the process stream, the 
system is constructed of equipment made of, or protected by, 
materials such as glass, fluorocarbon polymers, polyphenyl sulfate, 
polyether sulfone, and resin-impregnated graphite.
    (4) Feed preparation systems.
    Especially designed or prepared systems for producing high-
purity uranium chloride feed solutions for chemical exchange uranium 
isotope separation plants.
    These systems consist of dissolution, solvent extraction and/or 
ion exchange equipment for purification and electrolytic cells for 
reducing the uranium U+6 or U+4 to 
U+3. These systems produce uranium chloride solutions 
having only a few parts per million of metallic impurities such as 
chromium, iron, vanadium, molybdenum, and other bivalent or higher 
multi-valent cations. Materials of construction for portions of the 
system processing high-purity U+3 include glass, 
fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers, polyphenyl sulfate or polyether 
sulfone plastic-lined and resin-impregnated graphite.
    (5) Uranium oxidation systems.
    Especially designed or prepared systems for oxidation of 
U+3 to U+4 for return to the uranium isotope 
separation cascade in the chemical exchange enrichment process.
    These systems may incorporate equipment such as:
    (i) Equipment for contacting chlorine and oxygen with the 
aqueous effluent from the isotope separation equipment and 
extracting the resultant U+4 into the stripped organic 
stream returning from the product end of the cascade; and
    (ii) Equipment that separates water from hydrochloric acid so 
that the water and the concentrated hydrochloric acid may be 
reintroduced to the process at the proper locations.
    B. In the solid-liquid ion-exchange process, enrichment is 
accomplished by uranium adsorption/desorption on a special, fast-
acting, ion-exchange resin or adsorbent. A solution of uranium in 
hydrochloric acid and other chemical agents is passed through 
cylindrical enrichment columns containing packed beds of the 
adsorbent. For a continuous process, a reflux system is necessary to 
release the uranium from the adsorbent back in the liquid flow so 
that ``product'' and ``tails'' can be collected. This is 
accomplished with the use of suitable reduction/oxidation chemical 
agents that are fully regenerated in separate external circuits and 
that may be partially regenerated within the isotopic separation 
columns themselves. The presence of hot concentrated hydrochloric 
acid solutions in the process requires that the equipment be made 
of, or protected by, special corrosion-resistant materials.
    (1) Fast reacting ion exchange resins/adsorbents.
    Especially designed or prepared for uranium enrichment using the 
ion exchange process, including porous macroreticular resins, and/or 
pellicular structures in which the active chemical exchange groups 
are limited to a coating on the surface of an inactive porous 
support structure, and other composite structures in any suitable 
form including particles or fibers. These ion exchange resins/
adsorbents have diameters of 0.2 mm or less and must be chemically 
resistant to concentrated hydrochloric acid solutions as well as 
physically strong enough so as not to degrade in the exchange 
columns. The resins/adsorbents are especially designed to achieve 
very fast uranium isotope exchange kinetics (exchange rate half-time 
of less than 10 seconds) and are capable of operating at a 
temperature in the range of 373 K (100 [deg]C) to 473 K (200 
[deg]C).
    (2) Ion exchange columns.
    Cylindrical columns greater than 1000 mm in diameter for 
containing and supporting packed beds of ion exchange resin/
adsorbent, especially designed or prepared for uranium enrichment 
using the ion exchange process. These columns are made of, or 
protected by, materials (such as titanium or fluorocarbon plastics) 
resistant to corrosion by concentrated hydrochloric acid solutions 
and are capable of operating at a temperature in the range of 373 K 
(100 [deg]C) to 473 K (200 [deg]C) and pressures above 0.7 MPa.
    (3) Ion exchange reflux systems.
    (i) Especially designed or prepared chemical or electrochemical 
reduction systems for regeneration of the chemical reducing agent(s) 
used in ion exchange uranium enrichment cascades.

[[Page 39296]]

    The ion exchange enrichment process may use, for example, 
trivalent titanium (Ti+3) as a reducing cation in which 
case the reduction system would regenerate Ti+3 by 
reducing Ti+4.
    (ii) Especially designed or prepared chemical or electrochemical 
oxidation systems for regeneration of the chemical oxidizing 
agent(s) used in ion exchange uranium enrichment cascades.
    The ion exchange enrichment process may use, for example, 
trivalent iron (Fe+3) as an oxidant in which case the 
oxidation system would regenerate Fe+3 by oxidizing 
Fe+2.
    C. Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a chemical exchange or ion exchange enrichment plant or in any of 
the components described in this appendix.

0
12. Revise appendix F to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix F to Part 110--Illustrative List of Laser-Based Enrichment 
Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority

    Note: Present systems for enrichment processes using lasers fall 
into two categories: The process medium is atomic uranium vapor and 
the process medium is the vapor of a uranium compound, sometimes 
mixed with another gas or gases. Common nomenclature for these 
processes include: First category-atomic vapor laser isotope 
separation; and second category-molecular laser isotope separation 
including chemical reaction by isotope selective laser activation. 
The systems, equipment, and components for laser enrichment plants 
include: (a) Devices to feed uranium-metal vapor for selective 
photo-ionization or devices to feed the vapor of a uranium compound 
(for selective photo-dissociation or selective excitation/
activation); (b) devices to collect enriched and depleted uranium 
metal as ``product'' and ``tails'' in the first category, and 
devices to collect enriched and depleted uranium compounds as 
``product'' and ``tails'' in the second category; (c) process laser 
systems to selectively excite the uranium-235 species; and (d) feed 
preparation and product conversion equipment. The complexity of the 
spectroscopy of uranium atoms and compounds may require 
incorporation of a number of available laser and laser optics 
technologies.
    All surfaces that come into direct contact with the uranium or 
UF6 are wholly made of, or protected by, corrosion-
resistant materials. For laser-based enrichment items, the materials 
resistant to corrosion by the vapor or liquid of uranium metal or 
uranium alloys include yttria-coated graphite and tantalum; and the 
materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 include copper, 
copper alloys, stainless steel, aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum 
alloys, nickel or alloys containing 60 percent or more nickel by 
weight, and fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers. Many of the following 
items come into direct contact with uranium metal vapor or liquid or 
with process gas consisting of UF6 or a mixture of 
UF6 and other gases:
    (1) Uranium vaporization systems (atomic vapor based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared uranium metal vaporization 
systems for use in laser enrichment.
    These systems may contain electron beam guns and are designed to 
achieve a delivered power (1 kW or greater) on the target sufficient 
to generate uranium metal vapour at a rate required for the laser 
enrichment function.
    (2) Liquid or vapor uranium metal handling systems and 
components (atomic vapor based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared systems for handling molten 
uranium, molten uranium alloys, or uranium metal vapor.
    The liquid uranium metal handling systems may consist of 
crucibles and cooling equipment for the crucibles. The crucibles and 
other system parts that come into contact with molten uranium, 
molten uranium alloys, or uranium metal vapor are made of, or 
protected by, materials of suitable corrosion and heat resistance, 
such as tantalum, yttria-coated graphite, graphite coated with other 
rare earth oxides, or mixtures thereof.
    (3) Uranium metal ``product'' and ``tails'' collector assemblies 
(atomic vapor based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared ``product'' and ``tails'' 
collector assemblies for uranium metal in liquid or solid form.
    Components for these assemblies are made of or protected by 
materials resistant to the heat and corrosion of uranium metal vapor 
or liquid, such as yttria-coated graphite or tantalum, and may 
include pipes, valves, fittings, ``gutters,'' feed-throughs, heat 
exchangers and collector plates for magnetic, electrostatic, or 
other separation methods.
    (4) Separator module housings (atomic vapor based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared cylindrical or rectangular 
vessels for containing the uranium metal vapor source, the electron 
beam gun, and the ``product'' and ``tails'' collectors. These 
housings have multiplicity of ports for electrical and water feed-
throughs, laser beam windows, vacuum pump connections, and 
instrumentation diagnostics and monitoring with opening and closure 
provisions to allow refurbishment of internal components.
    (5) Supersonic expansion nozzles (molecular based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared supersonic expansion nozzles for 
cooling mixtures of UF6 and carrier gas to 150 K (-123 
[deg]C) or less which are corrosion resistant to UF6.
    (6) ``Product'' or ``tails'' collectors (molecular based 
methods).
    Especially designed or prepared components or devices for 
collecting uranium product material or uranium tails material 
following illumination with laser light.
    In one example of molecular laser isotope separation, the 
product collectors serve to collect enriched uranium pentafluoride 
(UF5) solid material. The product collectors may consist 
of filter, impact, or cyclone-type collectors, or combinations 
thereof, and must be corrosion resistant to the UF5/
UF6 environment.
    (7) UF6/carrier gas compressors (molecular based 
methods).
    Especially designed or prepared compressors for UF6/
carrier gas mixtures, designed for long term operation in a 
UF6 environment. Components of these compressors that 
come into contact with process gas are made of, or protected by, 
materials resistant to UF6 corrosion.
    (8) Rotary shaft seals (molecular based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared rotary shaft seals, with seal 
feed and seal exhaust connections, for sealing the shaft connecting 
the compressor rotor with the driver motor to ensure a reliable seal 
against out-leakage of process gas or in-leakage of air or seal gas 
into the inner chamber of the compressor which is filled with a 
UF6/carrier gas mixture.
    (9) Fluorination systems (molecular based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared systems for fluorinating 
UF5 (solid) to UF6 (gas).
    These systems are designed to fluorinate the collected 
UF5 powder to UF6 for subsequent collection in 
product containers or for transfer as feed for additional 
enrichment. In one approach, the fluorination reaction may be 
accomplished within the isotope separation system to react and 
recover directly off the ``product'' collectors. In another 
approach, the UF5 powder may be removed/transferred from 
the ``product'' collectors into a suitable reaction vessel (e.g., 
fluidized-bed reactor, screw reactor or flame tower) for 
fluorination. In both approaches, equipment is used for storage and 
transfer of fluorine (or other suitable fluorinating agents) and for 
collection and transfer of UF6.
    (10) UF6 mass spectrometers/ion sources (molecular 
based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared mass spectrometers capable of 
taking on-line samples from UF6 gas streams and having 
all of the following characteristics:
    (i) Capable of measuring ions of 320 atomic mass units or 
greater and having a resolution of better than 1 part in 320;
    (ii) Ion sources constructed of or protected by nickel, nickel-
copper alloys with a nickel content of 60 percent or more by weight, 
or nickel-chrome alloys;
    (iii) Electron bombardment ionization sources; and
    (iv) Collector system suitable for isotopic analysis.
    (11) Feed systems/product and tails withdrawal systems 
(molecular based methods).
    Especially designed or prepared process systems or equipment for 
enrichment plants made of or protected by materials resistant to 
corrosion by UF6, including:
    (i) Feed autoclaves, ovens, or systems used for passing 
UF6 to the enrichment process;
    (ii) Desublimers (or cold traps) used to remove UF6 
from the enrichment process for subsequent transfer upon heating;
    (iii) Solidification or liquefaction stations used to remove 
UF6 from the enrichment process by compressing and 
converting UF6 to a liquid or solid; and
    (iv) ``Product'' or ``tails'' stations used to transfer 
UF6 into containers.
    (12) UF6/carrier gas separation systems (molecular 
based methods).

[[Page 39297]]

    Especially designed or prepared process systems for separating 
UF6 from carrier gas.
    These systems may incorporate equipment such as:
    (i) Cryogenic heat exchangers or cryoseparators capable of 
temperatures of 153 K (-120 [deg]C) or less;
    (ii) Cryogenic refrigeration units capable of temperatures of 
153 K (-120 [deg]C) or less; or
    (iii) UF6 cold traps capable of freezing out 
UF6.
    (13) Lasers or Laser systems.
    Especially designed or prepared for the separation of uranium 
isotopes.
    The laser system typically contains both optical and electronic 
components for the management of the laser beam (or beams) and the 
transmission to the isotope separation chamber. The laser system for 
atomic vapor based methods usually consists of tunable dye lasers 
pumped by another type of laser (e.g., copper vapor lasers or 
certain solid-state lasers). The laser system for molecular based 
methods may consist of CO2 lasers or excimer lasers and a 
multi-pass optical cell. Lasers or laser systems for both methods 
require spectrum frequency stabilization for operation over extended 
periods of time.
    (14) Any other components especially designed or prepared for 
use in a laser-based enrichment plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.


0
13. Revise appendix G to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix G to Part 110--Illustrative List of Plasma Separation 
Enrichment Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export Licensing 
Authority

    Note: In the plasma separation process, a plasma of uranium ions 
passes through an electric field tuned to the \235\U ion resonance 
frequency so that they preferentially absorb energy and increase the 
diameter of their corkscrew-like orbits. Ions with a large-diameter 
path are trapped to produce a product enriched in \235\U. The 
plasma, made by ionizing uranium vapor, is contained in a vacuum 
chamber with a high-strength magnetic field produced by a 
superconducting magnet. The main technological systems of the 
process include the uranium plasma generation system, the separator 
module with superconducting magnet, and metal removal systems for 
the collection of ``product'' and ``tails.''
    (1) Microwave power sources and antennae.
    Especially designed or prepared microwave power sources and 
antennae for producing or accelerating ions having the following 
characteristics: Greater than 30 GHz frequency and greater than 50 
kW mean power output for ion production.
    (2) Ion excitation coils.
    Especially designed or prepared radio frequency ion excitation 
coils for frequencies of more than 100 kHz and capable of handling 
more than 40 kW mean power.
    (3) Uranium plasma generation systems.
    Especially designed or prepared systems for the generation of 
uranium plasma for use in plasma separation plants.
    (4) Uranium metal ``product'' and ``tails'' collector 
assemblies.
    Especially designed or prepared ``product'' and ``tails'' 
collector assemblies for uranium metal in solid form. These 
collector assemblies are made of, or protected by, materials 
resistant to the heat and corrosion of uranium metal vapor, such as 
yttria-coated graphite or tantalum.
    (5) Separator module housings.
    Especially designed or prepared cylindrical vessels for use in 
plasma separation enrichment plants for containing the uranium 
plasma source, radio-frequency drive coil, and the ``product'' and 
``tails'' collectors.
    These housings have a multiplicity of ports for electrical feed-
throughs, diffusion pump connections, and instrumentation 
diagnostics and monitoring. They have provisions for opening and 
closure to allow for refurbishment of internal components and are 
constructed of a suitable non-magnetic material such as stainless 
steel.
    (6) Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a plasma separation enrichment plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.


0
14. In appendix H to part 110, add a new paragraph (4) to read as 
follows:

Appendix H to Part 110--Illustrative List of Electromagnetic Enrichment 
Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority

* * * * *
    (4) Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in an electromagnetic enrichment plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.


0
15. Revise appendix I to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix I to Part 110--Illustrative List of Reprocessing Plant 
Components Under NRC Export Licensing Authority

    Note: Reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuel separates plutonium 
and uranium from intensely radioactive fission products and other 
transuranic elements. Different technical processes can accomplish 
this separation. However, over the years Purex has become the most 
commonly used and accepted process. Purex involves the dissolution 
of irradiated nuclear fuel in nitric acid, followed by separation of 
the uranium, plutonium, and fission products by solvent extraction 
using a mixture of tributyl phosphate in an organic diluent.
    Purex facilities have process functions similar to each other, 
including: Irradiated fuel element chopping, fuel dissolution, 
solvent extraction, and process liquor storage. There may also be 
equipment for thermal denitration of uranium nitrate, conversion of 
plutonium nitrate to oxide metal, and treatment of fission product 
waste liquor to a form suitable for long term storage or disposal. 
However, the specific type and configuration of the equipment 
performing these functions may differ between Purex facilities for 
several reasons, including the type and quantity of irradiated 
nuclear fuel to be reprocessed and the intended disposition of the 
recovered materials, and the safety and maintenance philosophy 
incorporated into the design of the facility. A plant for the 
reprocessing of irradiated fuel elements includes the equipment and 
components which normally come in direct contact with and directly 
control the irradiated fuel and the major nuclear material and 
fission product processing streams.
    (1) Irradiated fuel element chopping machines.
    Remotely operated equipment especially designed or prepared for 
use in a reprocessing plant and intended to cut, chop, or shear 
irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies, bundles, or rods. This equipment 
breaches the cladding of the fuel to expose the irradiated nuclear 
material to dissolution. Especially designed metal cutting shears 
are the most commonly employed, although advanced equipment, such as 
lasers, may be used.
    (2) Dissolvers.
    Critically safe tanks (e.g. small diameter, annular, or slab 
tanks) especially designed or prepared for use in a reprocessing 
plant, intended for dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuel and which 
are capable of withstanding hot, highly corrosive liquid, and which 
can be remotely loaded and maintained.
    Dissolvers normally receive the chopped-up spent fuel. In these 
critically safe vessels, the irradiated nuclear material is 
dissolved in nitric acid and the remaining hulls removed from the 
process stream.
    (3) Solvent extractors and solvent extraction equipment.
    Especially designed or prepared solvent extractors such as 
packed or pulse columns, mixer settlers, or centrifugal contactors 
for use in a plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. Solvent 
extractors must be resistant to the corrosive effect of nitric acid. 
Solvent extractors are normally fabricated to extremely high 
standards (including special welding and inspection and quality 
assurance and quality control techniques) out of low carbon 
stainless steels, titanium, zirconium, or other high quality 
materials.
    Solvent extractors both receive the solution of irradiated fuel 
from the dissolvers and the organic solution which separates the 
uranium, plutonium, and fission products. Solvent extraction 
equipment is normally designed to meet strict operating parameters, 
such as long operating lifetimes with no maintenance requirements or 
adaptability to easy replacement, simplicity of operation and 
control, and flexibility for variations in process conditions.
    (4) Chemical holding or storage vessels.
    Especially designed or prepared holding or storage vessels for 
use in a plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. The holding 
or storage vessels must be resistant to the corrosive effect of 
nitric acid. The holding or storage vessels are normally fabricated 
of materials such as low carbon stainless steels, titanium or 
zirconium, or other high quality materials. Holding or storage 
vessels may be designed for remote operation and maintenance and may 
have the following features for control of nuclear criticality:
    (i) Walls or internal structures with a boron equivalent of at 
least 2 percent, or
    (ii) A maximum diameter of 175 mm (7 in) for cylindrical 
vessels, or

[[Page 39298]]

    (iii) A maximum width of 75 mm (3 in) for either a slab or 
annular vessel.
    (5) Neutron measurement systems for process control.
    Neutron measurement systems especially designed or prepared for 
integration and use with automated process control systems in a 
plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel elements. These 
systems involve the capability of active and passive neutron 
measurement and discrimination in order to determine the fissile 
material quantity and composition. The complete system is composed 
of a neutron generator, a neutron detector, amplifiers, and signal 
processing electronics.
    The scope of this entry does not include neutron detection and 
measurement instruments that are designed for nuclear material 
accountancy and safeguarding or any other application not related to 
integration and use with automated process control systems in a 
plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel elements.
    (6) Plutonium nitrate to plutonium oxide conversion systems. 
Complete systems especially designed or prepared for the conversion 
of plutonium nitrate to plutonium oxide, in particular adapted so as 
to avoid criticality and radiation effects and to minimize toxicity 
hazards.
    (7) Plutonium metal production systems. Complete systems 
especially designed or prepared for the production of plutonium 
metal, in particular adapted so as to avoid criticality and 
radiation effects and to minimize toxicity hazards.
    (8) Process control instrumentation specially designed or 
prepared for monitoring or controlling the processing of material in 
a reprocessing plant.
    (9) Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a reprocessing plant or in any of the components described in 
this appendix.


0
16. In appendix J to part 110, add a new paragraph (c) to read as 
follows:

Appendix J to Part 110--Illustrative List of Uranium Conversion Plant 
Equipment and Plutonium Conversion Plant Equipment Under NRC Export 
Licensing Authority

* * * * *
    (c) Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a uranium conversion plant or plutonium conversion plant or in 
any of the components described in this appendix.


0
17. Revise appendix K to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix K to Part 110--Illustrative List of Equipment and Components 
Under NRC Export Licensing Authority for Use in a Plant for the 
Production of Heavy Water, Deuterium and Deuterium Compounds

    Note: Heavy water can be produced by a variety of processes. 
However, two processes have proven to be commercially viable: The 
water-hydrogen sulphide exchange process (GS process) and the 
ammonia-hydrogen exchange process.
    A. The GS process is based upon the exchange of hydrogen and 
deuterium between water and hydrogen sulphide within a series of 
towers which are operated with the top section cold and the bottom 
section hot. Water flows down the towers while the hydrogen sulphide 
gas circulates from the bottom to the top of the towers. A series of 
perforated trays are used to promote mixing between the gas and the 
water. Deuterium migrates to the water at low temperatures and to 
the hydrogen sulphide at high temperatures. Gas or water, enriched 
in deuterium, is removed from the first stage towers at the junction 
of the hot and cold sections and the process is repeated in 
subsequent stage towers. The product of the last stage, water 
enriched up to 30 percent in deuterium, is sent to a distillation 
unit to produce reactor grade heavy water; i.e., 99.75 percent 
deuterium oxide.
    B. The ammonia-hydrogen exchange process can extract deuterium 
from synthesis gas through contact with liquid ammonia in the 
presence of a catalyst. The synthesis gas is fed into exchange 
towers and then to an ammonia converter. Inside the towers the gas 
flows from the bottom to the top while the liquid ammonia flows from 
the top to the bottom. The deuterium is stripped from the hydrogen 
in the synthesis gas and concentrated in the ammonia. The ammonia 
then flows into an ammonia cracker at the bottom of the tower while 
the gas flows into an ammonia converter at the top. Further 
enrichment takes place in subsequent stages and reactor-grade heavy 
water is produced through final distillation. The synthesis gas feed 
can be provided by an ammonia plant that can be constructed in 
association with a heavy water ammonia-hydrogen exchange plant. The 
ammonia-hydrogen exchange process can also use ordinary water as a 
feed source of deuterium.
    C.1. Much of the key equipment for heavy water production plants 
using either the GS process or the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process 
are common to several segments of the chemical and petroleum 
industries; particularly in small plants using the GS process. 
However, few items are available ``off-the-shelf.'' Both processes 
require the handling of large quantities of flammable, corrosive, 
and toxic fluids at elevated pressures. Therefore, in establishing 
the design and operating standards for plants and equipment using 
these processes, careful attention to materials selection and 
specifications is required to ensure long service life with high 
safety and reliability factors. The choice is primarily a function 
of economics and need. Most equipment, therefore, is prepared to 
customer requirements.
    In both processes, equipment which individually is not 
especially designed or prepared for heavy water production can be 
assembled into especially designed or prepared systems for producing 
heavy water. Examples of such systems are the catalyst production 
system used in the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process and the water 
distillation systems used for the final concentration of heavy water 
to reactor-grade in either process.
    C.2. Equipment especially designed or prepared for the 
production of heavy water utilizing either the water-hydrogen 
sulphide exchange process or the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process:
    (i) Water-hydrogen Sulphide Exchange Towers.
    Exchange towers with diameters of 1.5 m or greater and capable 
of operating at pressures greater than or equal to 2 MPa (300 psi) 
especially designed or prepared for heavy water production utilizing 
the water-hydrogen sulphide exchange process.
    (ii) Blowers and Compressors.
    Single stage, low head (i.e., 0.2 MPa or 30 psi) centrifugal 
blowers or compressors for hydrogen-sulphide gas circulation (i.e., 
gas containing more than 70 percent H2S). The blowers or compressors 
have a throughput capacity greater than or equal to 56 m\3\/second 
(120,000 standard cubic feet per minute) while operating at 
pressures greater than or equal to 1.8 MPa (260 psi) suction and 
have seals designed for wet H2S service.
    (iii) Ammonia-Hydrogen Exchange Towers.
    Ammonia-hydrogen exchange towers greater than or equal to 35 m 
(114.3 ft) in height with diameters of 1.5 m (4.9 ft) to 2.5 m (8.2 
ft) capable of operating at pressures greater than 15 MPa (2225 
psi). The towers have at least one flanged, axial opening of the 
same diameter as the cylindrical part through which the tower 
internals can be inserted or withdrawn.
    (iv) Tower Internals and Stage Pumps Used in the Ammonia-
hydrogen Exchange Process.
    Tower internals include especially designed stage contactors 
which promote intimate gas/liquid contact. Stage pumps include 
especially designed submersible pumps for circulation of liquid 
ammonia within a contacting stage internal to the stage towers.
    (v) Ammonia Crackers Utilizing the Ammonia-hydrogen Exchange 
Process.
    Ammonia crackers with operating pressures greater than or equal 
to 3 MPa (450 psi) especially designed or prepared for heavy water 
production utilizing the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process.
    (vi) Ammonia Synthesis Converters or Synthesis Units.
    Ammonia synthesis converters or synthesis units especially 
designed or prepared for heavy water production utilizing the 
ammonia-hydrogen exchange process.
    These converters or units take synthesis gas (nitrogen and 
hydrogen) from an ammonia/hydrogen high-pressure exchange column (or 
columns), and the synthesized ammonia is returned to the exchange 
column (or columns).
    (vii) Infrared Absorption Analyzers.
    Infrared absorption analyzers capable of ``on-line'' hydrogen/
deuterium ratio analysis where deuterium concentrations are equal to 
or greater than 90 percent.
    (viii) Catalytic Burners Used in the Ammonia-hydrogen Exchange 
Process.
    Catalytic burners for the conversion of enriched deuterium gas 
into heavy water especially designed or prepared for heavy water 
production utilizing the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process.
    (ix) Complete Heavy Water Upgrade Systems or Columns.
    Complete heavy water upgrade systems or columns especially 
designed or prepared for

[[Page 39299]]

the upgrade of heavy water to reactor-grade deuterium concentration. 
These systems, which usually employ water distillation to separate 
heavy water from light water, are especially designed or prepared to 
produce reactor-grade heavy water (i.e., typically 99.75 percent 
deuterium oxide) from heavy water feedstock of lesser concentration.
    D. Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a plant for the production of heavy water, deuterium, and 
deuterium compounds or in any of the components described in this 
appendix.


0
18. Revise appendix M to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix M to Part 110--Categorization of Nuclear Material

                                       Categorization of Nuclear Material
                                       [From IAEA INFCIRC/225/Revision 5]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Material                    Form              Category I          Category II        Category III \3\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Plutonium\1\.............  Unirradiated \2\...  2 kg or more.......  Less than 2 kg but   500 g or less but
                                                                         more than 500 g.     more than 15 g.
2. Uranium-235 (\235\U).....  Unirradiated \2\:
                                 --Uranium         5 kg or more.......  Less than 5 kg but   1 kg or less but
                                  enriched to 20                         more than 1 kg.      more than 15 g.
                                  percent \235\U
                                  or more.
                                 --Uranium         ...................  10 kg or more......  Less than 10 kg but
                                  enriched to 10                                              more than 1 kg.
                                  percent \235\U
                                  but less than
                                  20 percent
                                  \235\U.
                                 --Uranium         ...................  ...................  10 kg or more.
                                  enriched above
                                  natural, but
                                  less than 10
                                  percent \235\U.
3. Uranium-233 (\233\U).....  Unirradiated \2\...  2 kg or more.......  Less than 2 kg but   500 g or less but
                                                                         more than 500 g.     more than 15 g.
4. Irradiated Fuel (The       ...................  ...................  Depleted or natural  ...................
 categorization of                                                       uranium, thorium
 irradiated fuel in the                                                  or low enriched
 table is based on                                                       fuel (less than 10
 international transport                                                 percent fissile
 considerations. The State                                               content) 4 5
 may assign a different
 category for domestic use,
 storage and transport
 taking all relevant factors
 into account).
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ All plutonium except that with isotopic concentration exceeding 80 percent in plutonium-238.
\2\ Material not irradiated in a reactor or material irradiated in a reactor but with a radiation level equal to
  or less than 1 Gy/h (100 rad/h) at 1 m unshielded.
\3\ Quantities not falling in Category III and natural uranium, depleted uranium and thorium should be protected
  at least in accordance with prudent management practice.
\4\ Although this level of protection is recommended, it would be open to States, upon evaluation of the
  specific circumstances, to assign a different category of physical protection.
\5\ Other fuel which by virtue of its original fissile material content is classified as Category I or II before
  irradiation may be reduced one category level while the radiation level from the fuel exceeds 1 Gy/h (100 rad/
  h) at one meter unshielded.



0
19. In appendix N to part 110, add a new paragraph c. to read as 
follows:

Appendix N to Part 110--Illustrative List of Lithium Isotope Separation 
Facilities, Plants and Equipment Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority

* * * * *
    c. Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a reprocessing plant or in any of the components described in 
this appendix.


0
20. Revise appendix O to part 110 to read as follows:

Appendix O to Part 110--Illustrative List of Fuel Element Fabrication 
Plant Equipment and Components Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority

    Note: Nuclear fuel elements are manufactured from source or 
special nuclear material. For oxide fuels, the most common type of 
fuel equipment for pressing pellets, sintering, grinding and grading 
will be present. Mixed oxide fuels are handled in glove boxes (or 
equivalent containment) until they are sealed in the cladding. In 
all cases, the fuel is hermetically sealed inside a suitable 
cladding which is designed to be the primary envelope encasing the 
fuel so as to provide suitable performance and safety during reactor 
operation. Also, in all cases, precise control of processes, 
procedures and equipment to extremely high standards is necessary in 
order to ensure predictable and safe fuel performance.
    (a) Items that are considered especially designed or prepared 
for the fabrication of fuel elements include equipment that:
    (1) Normally comes in direct contact with, or directly processes 
or controls, the production flow of nuclear material;
    (2) Seals the nuclear material within the cladding;
    (3) Checks the integrity of the cladding or the seal;
    (4) Checks the finished treatment of the sealed fuel; or
    (5) Is used for assembling reactor fuel elements.
    (b) This equipment or systems of equipment may include, for 
example:

[[Page 39300]]

    (1) Fully automatic pellet inspection stations especially 
designed or prepared for checking final dimensions and surface 
defects of fuel pellets;
    (2) Automatic welding machines especially designed or prepared 
for welding end caps onto the fuel pins (or rods);
    (3) Automatic test and inspection stations especially designed 
or prepared for checking the integrity of completed fuel pins (or 
rods). This item typically includes equipment for:
    (i) X-ray examination of pin (or rod) end cap welds;
    (ii) Helium leak detection from pressurized pins (or rods); and
    (iii) Gamma-ray scanning of the pins (or rods) to check for 
correct loading of the fuel pellets inside.
    (4) Systems especially designed or prepared to manufacture 
nuclear fuel cladding.
    (c) Any other components especially designed or prepared for use 
in a fuel element fabrication plant or in any of the components 
described in this appendix.

    Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 18th day of June, 2014.

    For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Mark A. Satorius,
Executive Director for Operations.
[FR Doc. 2014-15828 Filed 7-9-14; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 7590-01-P