[House Practice: A Guide to the Rules, Precedents and Procedures of the House]
[Chapter 12. Committees of the Whole]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office, www.gpo.gov]


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                   CHAPTER 12 - COMMITTEES OF THE WHOLE

                              HOUSE PRACTICE

              A. Generally

  Sec.  1. In General
  Sec.  2. Jurisdiction and Authority; Reference
  Sec.  3. Matters Requiring Consideration in the Committee of the Whole
  Sec.  4. -- Amendments between the Houses
  Sec.  5. Resolving Into the Committee of the Whole
  Sec.  6. -- By Motion
  Sec.  7. The Chairman
  Sec.  8. -- Limitations on Jurisdiction and Authority of Chairman

              B. Consideration and Debate in Committee

  Sec.  9. In General; Quorums
  Sec. 10. First Reading
  Sec. 11. General Debate
  Sec. 12. -- Closing General Debate
  Sec. 13. Debate Under the Five-minute Rule; Amendments
  Sec. 14. -- Pro Forma Amendments
  Sec. 15. Relevancy in Debate
  Sec. 16. Calling Members to Order
  Sec. 17. Voting
  Sec. 18. Points of Order
  Sec. 19. Unfinished Business

              C. Motions in Committee

  Sec. 20. In General
  Sec. 21. Precedence of Motions
  Sec. 22. Motion Relating to Enacting Clause
  Sec. 23. -- When in Order
  Sec. 24. -- Debate

              D. Rising; Reporting to the House

  Sec. 25. Generally
  Sec. 26. Motions to Rise

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  Sec. 27. -- When in Order
  Sec. 28. -- Who May Offer
  Sec. 29. Reporting to the House
  Sec. 30. House Action on Committee Reports
        Research References
          4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4704-4922
          8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2318-2430
          Deschler Ch 19
          Manual Sec. Sec. 326-340; 970-993


                               A. Generally


  Sec. 1 . In General

                 Role and Functions; Historical Background

      The Committee of the Whole has been described as an ancient 
  parliamentary institution, having been derived from the practice of 
  the English House of Commons. 4 Hinds Sec. 4705; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 5. The Continental Congress frequently used the Committee of the 
  Whole for important business. The concept that the Committee of the 
  Whole should receive what were called ``the greater matters of 
  legislation'' has gradually resulted in the usage now crystallized in 
  rule XVIII clause 3, which requires the reference to its calendar of 
  all bills directly or indirectly raising revenue, general 
  appropriation bills, and public bills appropriating money or property. 
  See 4 Hinds Sec. 4705.
      The Committee of the Whole meets to consider matters referred to 
  it under rules designed to expedite consideration and to allow greater 
  participation by Members in debate. The Committee of the Whole is in 
  this respect comparable to a standing committee. 4 Hinds Sec. 4706. 
  The Committee of the Whole is never completely dissolved. The House 
  merely resolves into and out of Committee of the Whole, and bills 
  remain on its calendar until reported after consideration. 4 Hinds 
  Sec. 4705.
      Every Member of the House is a member of the Committee of the 
  Whole. However, the Committee may sit with a smaller number (100 
  Members) than is required to transact business in the House (218 
  Members). Rule XVIII clause 6(a); quorums generally, see Quorums.

                 Distinguishing the Committee of the Whole

      The term ``Committee of the Whole'' refers to the Committee of the 
  Whole House on the state of the Union, which considers public bills. 
  Desch

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  ler Ch 19 Sec. 1. Prior to 1935, the term was also used to refer to 
  the ``Committee of the Whole House,'' which formerly considered 
  business on the Private Calendar. Since 1935, however, bills on the 
  Private Calendar have been considered in the House as in the Committee 
  of the Whole. Thus, the term ``Committee of the Whole House'' has no 
  application in the modern practice of the House (Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 1) and was deleted from the rules when they were recodified in 
  1999.

                  House as in the Committee of the Whole

      When the House sits as in the Committee of the Whole, it does not 
  actually resolve into the committee; it sits ``as in'' Committee of 
  the Whole to allow consideration of bills under the five-minute rule 
  without general debate and with the bill considered as read and open 
  to amendment at any point. Manual Sec. Sec. 424, 427; 4 Hinds 
  Sec. 4924. This practice is permitted in the consideration of public 
  bills only by unanimous consent or pursuant to a special rule from the 
  Committee on Rules. Manual Sec. 424. A motion that a proposition be 
  considered under that procedure is not in order. Manual Sec. 424; 4 
  Hinds Sec. 4923.
      The Speaker remains in the Chair, and a quorum of the House (and 
  not of the Committee of the Whole) is required. 6 Cannon Sec. 639. The 
  measure is considered to have been read for amendment, and is open to 
  amendment at any point. Manual Sec. 424. A motion to close debate on 
  the pending measure (or an amendment) is in order. Manual Sec. 427.
      When the House is sitting as in the Committee of the Whole, it may 
  invoke many procedures that are not available to it when it is meeting 
  in the Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. 427. For example, it may:

     Order the yeas and nays by one-fifth of those present or upon 
         objection for lack of a quorum. 4 Hinds Sec. 4923.
     Receive messages from the President or the Senate. 4 Hinds 
         Sec. 4923.
     Permit withdrawal of amendments before action thereon. 4 Hinds 
         Sec. 4935.
     Refer to a committee. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4931, 4932.
     Entertain the previous question. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4926-4929; 
         6 Cannon Sec. 639.
     Entertain the motion to reconsider. 8 Cannon Sec. 2793.
     Entertain motions to adjourn. 4 Hinds Sec. 4923.

      The procedures applicable in the House as in the Committee of the 
  Whole apply generally to proceedings in standing committees of the 
  House. Manual Sec. 427; see also Committees.

                         Significance of the Mace

      The position of the mace in the Chamber signifies to the Members 
  whether the House has resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole.

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   When the mace is in position on the higher pedestal at the Speaker's 
  right, the House is in regular session. When the Members begin 
  deliberations in the Committee of the Whole, the mace is placed on the 
  lower pedestal next to the desk of the Sergeant-at-Arms. Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. 1.1.


  Sec. 2 . Jurisdiction and Authority; Reference

                          Generally; Public Bills

      Under rule XIII clause 1(a)(1), bills raising revenue, general 
  appropriation bills, and bills of a public character directly or 
  indirectly appropriating money or property are referred to the Union 
  Calendar and considered in the Committee of the Whole. See also rule 
  XVIII clause 3. Where the purpose of a bill is to raise revenue, even 
  though that purpose is affected indirectly, the bill is within the 
  jurisdiction of the Committee of the Whole. 8 Cannon Sec. 2399.
      Whether a bill should be referred to the Union Calendar is 
  governed by the text of the bill as referred to committees, and 
  amendments reported by the committee reporting it are not considered. 
  Thus, a bill that includes a charge on the Treasury is referred to the 
  Union Calendar notwithstanding a committee amendment striking that 
  charge. 8 Cannon Sec. 2392.

                     Measures Other Than Public Bills

      Although the jurisdiction of the Committee of the Whole is devoted 
  primarily to the consideration of public bills, other matters are 
  sometimes referred to the Committee pursuant to House order. For 
  example, the annual message of the President is customarily referred 
  to the Committee of the Whole by motion. Propositions to change the 
  rules of the House have been considered in Committee of the Whole 
  pursuant to a special order. 4 Hinds Sec. 4822; Deschler Ch 21 
  Sec. 21.15.

                    Referrals; Effect of Special Rules

      Measures referred by the Speaker to the Union Calendar for 
  subsequent consideration in the Committee of the Whole are considered 
  therein under special rules reported by the Committee on Rules or by 
  the standing rules applicable to the Committee of the Whole. See rule 
  XVIII.
      The Committee has no authority to change an order of the House 
  governing the consideration of a particular measure in the Committee 
  of the Whole, although minor modifications may be accomplished by 
  unanimous consent. Manual Sec. 993; see also Special Rules. Thus, 
  where the Committee of the Whole is considering a bill under a special 
  rule that fixes the time for debate and the amendments that may be 
  offered, a Member may be denied recognition to seek unanimous consent 
  to offer a measure that is

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  beyond the scope of the special rule (4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4712, 4713) or 
  to extend the time for general debate as fixed thereby (5 Hinds 
  Sec. Sec. 5212-5216).
      Bills are sometimes referred to the Committee of the Whole as a 
  result of action in the House resulting in its recommittal thereto 
  (Manual Sec. 988; 4 Hinds Sec. 4784) or in unusual situations pursuant 
  to a motion to recommit in the House either with or without 
  instructions (5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5552, 5553).

                           Presidential Messages

      The President's state of the Union message is referred by motion 
  to the Committee of the Whole. See, e.g., 106-2, Jan. 31, 2000, p 
  ____. Other Presidential messages are normally referred to the 
  committee having jurisdiction by order of the Speaker. Manual 
  Sec. 873. At one time, annual messages of the President were referred 
  to and reported by the Committee of the Whole with recommendations for 
  reference to the proper standing or select committee, but this 
  practice was discontinued in the 64th Congress. 8 Cannon Sec. 3350.

                         Limitations on Authority

      Many procedures and motions traditionally available in the House 
  may not be invoked in the Committee of the Whole. See Sec. 8, infra. 
  For example, the Committee of the Whole may not:

     Appoint, authorize, or discharge committees. 4 Hinds 
         Sec. Sec. 4697, 4710.
     Entertain the question of consideration (7 Cannon Sec. 952) 
         except pursuant to those provisions of the Unfunded Mandates 
         Reform Act of 1995 that permit the question of consideration in 
         the disposition of certain points of order (Manual 
         Sec. Sec. 910, 991).
     Transact proceedings regarding words demanded to be taken down 
         in debate. 2 Hinds Sec. Sec. 1257-1259; 8 Cannon Sec. 2539.
     Recess without permission of the House. 5 Hinds 
         Sec. Sec. 6669-6671.
     Instruct conferees. 8 Cannon Sec. 2320.
     Consider questions of privilege under rule IX. Manual 
         Sec. 711; 2 Hinds Sec. 1657; Deschler Ch 11 Sec. 4.3.
     Authorize extraneous matter to be included in the 
         Congressional Record. Manual Sec. 688.

      Similarly, unanimous-consent requests may not be entertained in 
  the Committee of the Whole by the Chair if their they materially alter 
  proce

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  dures required by special rule or order adopted by the House. For 
  example, the Committee of the Whole may not:

     Permit a perfecting amendment to be offered to the underlying 
         bill where a special rule permitted its consideration only as a 
         perfecting amendment to a committee amendment.
     Permit a substitute to be read by sections for amendment where 
         the special rule did not so provide.
     Extend the time limitation for consideration of amendments 
         beyond that set by a special order requiring the Chair to put 
         the question on the pending amendments at the expiration of 
         certain hours of consideration.
     Restrict authority granted in a special order to offer 
         amendments ``en bloc.''
     Change the scheme for control or duration of general debate 
         specified by the House.
     Reduce below 15 minutes the minimum time for recorded votes.
     Preempt the Chair's discretion to postpone and cluster votes 
         and schedule further consideration of a pending measure on a 
         subsequent day.
     Permit an amendment to an amendment rendered unamendable by a 
         special order or permit a subsequent amendment changing an 
         unamendable amendment already adopted.
     Permit consideration of an amendment out of the order 
         specified in a special rule.
     Permit consideration of an additional amendment or authorize a 
         supplemental report from the Committee on Rules in lieu of the 
         original report referred to in the special order.
     Permit another to offer an amendment vested in a specified 
         Member.
     Permit a division of the question on an amendment rendered 
         indivisible by a special order.

  Manual Sec. 993.

      Where the Committee of the Whole reports a recommendation that is 
  ruled out as in excess of its powers, it is held that the accompanying 
  bill stands recommitted to the Committee of the Whole. Manual 
  Sec. 335; 4 Hinds Sec. 4908.
      On the other hand, unanimous-consent requests may be entertained 
  in the Committee of the Whole by the Chair if they do not materially 
  alter procedures required by special rule or order adopted by the 
  House. For ex

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  ample, unanimous-consent requests have been entertained in the 
  Committee of the Whole to:

     Permit the modification of a designated amendment made in 
         order by a special rule, once offered, if the request is 
         propounded by the proponent of the amendment, including as 
         unfinished business where proceedings on a request for a 
         recorded vote have been postponed.
     Permit a page reference to be included in a designated 
         amendment made in order as printed where the printed amendment 
         did not include that reference.
     Permit a supporter of an amendment to claim debate time 
         allocated by special order to an opponent, where no opponent 
         seeks recognition.
     Shorten the time set by special order for debate on a 
         particular amendment.
     Lengthen the time set by special order for debate on a 
         particular amendment under terms of control congruent with 
         those set by the order of the House.
     Permit en bloc consideration of several amendments under a 
         ``modified-closed'' special order providing for the sequential 
         consideration of designated separate amendments.
     Permit one of two committees controlling time for general 
         debate pursuant to a special order to yield control of its time 
         to the other.
     Permit the offering of pro forma amendments for the purpose of 
         debate under a ``modified-closed'' special order limiting both 
         amendments and debate thereon.
     Reach ahead in the reading of a general appropriation bill to 
         consider one amendment without prejudice to others earlier in 
         the bill under a special order of the House contemplating that 
         each remaining amendment be offered only at the ``appropriate 
         point in the reading of the bill.''
     Permit the reading of an amendment that already was considered 
         as read under the special order of the House.

  Manual Sec. 993.

                      Authority to Originate Measures

      In the early practice, the Committee of the Whole could consider a 
  matter even though the matter had not been referred to it by the 
  House. 4 Hinds Sec. 4705. Today, the Committee of the Whole no longer 
  originates measures, but receives only such as have been referred to 
  it, usually by way of a special rule from the Committee on Rules. 
  Manual Sec. 326; 4 Hinds Sec. 4707. Under this practice, the House may 
  not resolve into the Committee of the Whole for the purpose of 
  originating a measure except by unanimous consent. Manual Sec. 412. 
  Absent an appropriate referral, the Committee of the Whole may not 
  report a recommendation, that, if carried into effect, would change a 
  rule of the House. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4907, 4908.

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                            Conference Reports

      Conference reports are considered in the House rather than in the 
  Committee of the Whole, and this is so notwithstanding a point of 
  order that the report contains matter ordinarily requiring 
  consideration in the Committee. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 6559, 6561.


  Sec. 3 . Matters Requiring Consideration in the Committee of the Whole

                                 Generally

      Rule XVIII clause 3 specifies the matters that must be considered 
  in the Committee of the Whole before consideration in the House. The 
  matters so specified include all motions or propositions involving a 
  tax or charge upon the people, all proceedings involving 
  appropriations of money or property, requiring such appropriation to 
  be made, or authorizing payments out of appropriations already made. 
  Also included within the rule are bills releasing any liability to the 
  United States for money or property, or referring any claim to the 
  Court of Claims. A point of order under this rule may be raised at any 
  time before the consideration of a bill has commenced. Manual 
  Sec. 976.
      The giving of unanimous consent for the consideration of a measure 
  waives any requirement as to consideration in Committee of the Whole. 
  4 Hinds Sec. 4823; 8 Cannon Sec. 2393. Similarly, the effect of a 
  special order may be to discharge the Committee of the Whole and bring 
  the bill directly before the House. Manual Sec. 975. In the modern 
  practice, special orders reported from the Committee on Rules often 
  provide for consideration of a measure on the Union Calendar in the 
  House where no amendments, or only one amendment, are made in order. 
  See, e.g., 107-1, H. Res. 199, Apr. 26, 2001, p ____.
      The requirement of rule XVIII clause 3 is that the class of 
  business specified by the rule must be ``first'' considered in the 
  Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. 973. It follows that a bill 
  considered in the Committee of the Whole, reported to the House, and 
  then recommitted by the House to a standing committee, is not, when 
  again reported to the House, necessarily subject to the point of order 
  that it must be considered in Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. 975; 
  4 Hinds Sec. 4828; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5545, 5546.

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      Measures Requiring Consideration in the Committee of the Whole

      The following bills require consideration in the Committee of the 
  Whole:

     Increasing the rate of postage. 4 Hinds Sec. 4861.
     Creating a new Federal office. 4 Hinds Sec. 4846.
     Authorizing an undertaking by a government agency that will 
         incur an expense, however small, to the government. 8 Cannon 
         Sec. 2401.
     Requiring an expenditure with some probability. Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. 1.
     Setting in motion a chain of circumstances destined ultimately 
         to involve certain expenditures. 4 Hinds Sec. 4827; 8 Cannon 
         Sec. 2399.

    Measures Held Not to Require Consideration in the Committee of the 
                                   Whole

      The following measures do not require consideration in the 
  Committee of the Whole:

     A bill that does not directly make an appropriation of money 
         or require one to be made, and that can be executed without 
         such funds. 4 Hinds Sec. 4856.
     A bill making an expenditure that is to be borne otherwise 
         than by the Federal Government. 4 Hinds Sec. 4831.
     A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution 
         to extend the term of office of certain officials. 8 Cannon 
         Sec. 2395.


  Sec. 4 . -- Amendments between the Houses

      Rule XVIII clause 3, requiring that any proposition involving a 
  tax or an appropriation of money or property must be considered in the 
  Committee of the Whole, is applicable to Senate amendments to House 
  measures. Sec. 3, supra. Accordingly, where a House bill returned with 
  Senate amendments involving a new matter of appropriation has been 
  referred by the Speaker to a standing committee, it is, upon being 
  reported therefrom, referred directly to the Committee of the Whole. 
  Manual Sec. 874; 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 3094, 3108-3110. Similarly, a House 
  amendment to a Senate amendment is subject to clause 3. 4 Hinds 
  Sec. 4795. Normally, such Senate amendments are held at the Speaker's 
  desk (pursuant to the Speaker's discretionary authority under rule XIV 
  clause 2(b)) for disposition by the House by unanimous consent or 
  special order and are not referred to committee. Manual Sec. Sec. 874, 
  1073.
      The question as to whether a Senate amendment involves a tax or an 
  appropriation so as to require consideration in Committee of the Whole 
  is applied to each amendment received from the Senate. The fact that 
  the origi

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  nal House bill was considered in Committee of the Whole is not taken 
  into consideration in determining this question. 8 Cannon Sec. 2381.
      A Senate amendment to a House bill is subject to the point of 
  order that it must first be considered in the Committee of the Whole 
  if, originating in the House, the amendment would be subject to that 
  point of order. Rule XXII clause 3; Manual Sec. 1072. Hence, a Senate 
  amendment that on its face places a charge on the Treasury must be 
  considered in Committee of the Whole absent proof to the contrary. 8 
  Cannon Sec. 2387. However, a Senate amendment that merely modifies a 
  House proposition, such as an increase or decrease in the amount of an 
  appropriation and that does not involve a new and distinct 
  expenditure, is not required to be considered in the Committee of the 
  Whole. Manual Sec. 1073; 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4797, 4800; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 2382, 2385. Moreover, the requirement that certain Senate 
  amendments be considered in the Committee of the Whole applies only 
  before the stage of disagreement has been reached on the Senate 
  amendment (and not thereafter), and it is too late to raise a point of 
  order that Senate amendments should have been considered in the 
  Committee after the House has disagreed thereto and the amendments are 
  reported from conference in disagreement. Manual Sec. Sec. 1073, 1074. 
  The fact that one of several Senate amendments must be considered in 
  Committee does not prevent the House from proceeding with the 
  disposition of those not subject to the point of order. 4 Hinds 
  Sec. 4807.
      The requirement of rule XXII clause 3 that the amendment be 
  ``first considered'' in the Committee of the Whole does not apply if 
  the House has agreed to a special order providing that the amendment 
  is ``hereby'' considered as adopted. Manual Sec. 1073.


  Sec. 5 . Resolving Into the Committee of the Whole

                     Generally; Declaration by Speaker

      The House may resolve into the Committee of the Whole pursuant to 
  motion or by declaration of the Speaker pursuant to rule XVIII clause 
  2 after the House has adopted a special rule from the Committee on 
  Rules providing for consideration of a measure in the Committee of the 
  Whole and permitting such declaration. 4 Hinds Sec. 3214; 7 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 783, 794; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 4; Sec. 6, infra. When 
  employing the latter method, the Speaker may at any time after 
  adoption of the resolution, when no other question is pending, declare 
  the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole for consideration 
  of a measure. Under the modern practice, this is the generally used 
  mechanism for resolving into the Committee for the con

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  sideration of both nonprivileged bills and privileged general 
  appropriation bills.

          Resolving Automatically Into the Committee of the Whole

      The House automatically and without motion resolves itself into 
  the Committee of the Whole to consider a measure:

     When a special rule from the Committee on Rules provides for 
         the immediate consideration of the measure in the Committee of 
         the Whole. 7 Cannon Sec. Sec. 783, 794; Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. 4.1.
     After the Speaker has ruled on words taken down in the 
         Committee of the Whole. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 4.8.
     After a recommendation of the Committee of the Whole that the 
         enacting clause of the measure be stricken is rejected by the 
         House. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.9.
     When a bill on the Union Calendar is timely called up (or is 
         the unfinished business) on Calendar Wednesday. Manual 
         Sec. 901; 7 Cannon Sec. Sec. 939, 940, 942.


  Sec. 6 . -- By Motion

      The House may resolve into Committee of the Whole pursuant to 
  motion (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 4), as follows:

      Member: Mr. Speaker, I move that the House resolve itself into the 
    Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for the 
    [further] consideration of  __________.

      This motion is listed eighth in the daily order of business. 
  Manual Sec. 869. However, the motion is usually given more 
  preferential status by the adoption of a special rule reported from 
  the Committee on Rules. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 4. Where a motion that the 
  House resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole is pending, the 
  motion that the Committee be discharged and that the bill be laid on 
  the table is not preferential and not in order. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 4.13. The question of consideration may not be raised against the 
  motion to resolve into the Committee, for the motion to resolve is 
  itself a test of the will of the House on consideration. Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. 4.10.
      A Member may withdraw his motion that the House resolve itself 
  into the Committee of the Whole at any time before the motion is acted 
  upon. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 4.11.
      A motion to resolve into the Committee of the Whole to consider 
  general appropriation bills and continuing appropriations after 
  September 15 is privileged under rule XIII clause 5, if called up by 
  direction of the Committee on Appropriations. Manual Sec. Sec. 853, 
  856. The motion is in order under this rule on District Mondays and on 
  Wednesdays, subject to the limitations

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  of the Calendar Wednesday rule. Manual Sec. Sec. 856, 894, 901; 8 
  Cannon Sec. Sec. 876, 1123. The motion is neither debatable nor 
  amendable (4 Hinds Sec. 3078), is not subject to a demand for the 
  previous question (4 Hinds Sec. 3077), and may not be laid on the 
  table or indefinitely postponed (6 Cannon Sec. 726).
      Prior to 1975 the use of the motion to consider revenue bills in 
  the Committee of the Whole was of equal privilege, but there no longer 
  is a privileged status for the motion to resolve into Committee of the 
  Whole to consider bills raising revenue. Manual Sec. 856; Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. 4, note 17. Although highly privileged, the motion does not 
  take precedence over a motion to reconsider or a motion to change the 
  reference of a bill. 4 Hinds Sec. 3087; 7 Cannon Sec. 2124.
      After refusing to go into Committee of the Whole to consider a 
  particular bill, the House may then consider business prescribed by 
  the regular order. 4 Hinds Sec. 3088. Thus, the House may reach 
  legislation of lesser privilege by rejecting the motion to resolve 
  into the Committee of the Whole to consider an appropriation bill. 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 4.4. Nonprivileged matters are considered in the 
  Committee of the Whole pursuant to a special rule from the Committee 
  on Rules or pursuant to a unanimous-consent request.
      Under rule XVIII clause 4, the Committee of the Whole can 
  determine its own order of business unless the House so determines, 
  with general appropriation bills taking precedence. This procedure is 
  not used in modern practice.


  Sec. 7 . The Chairman

      The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole is appointed by the 
  Speaker. Manual Sec. 970. Following a custom of the British 
  Parliament, the House requires the Speaker ``in all cases'' to leave 
  the Chair after appointing the Chairman. Manual Sec. 970; Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. 5. Where the Member named by the Speaker to act as Chairman is 
  unavailable, the Speaker may ask another Member to assume the Chair as 
  Chairman pro tempore. Where the Member appointed to preside over the 
  Committee of the Whole is a female Member, the proper form of address 
  is ``Madam Chairman.'' Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 5.3.
      In general, the Chairman recognizes for debate and decides 
  questions of order arising in the Committee of the Whole independently 
  of the Speaker. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 5.1. Where words are ``taken 
  down'' in debate, the Chairman reports them to the Speaker, who rules 
  on their admissibility. Otherwise, points of order relating to 
  procedure in the Committee of the Whole are decided by the Chairman. 
  Manual Sec. 961; 5 Hinds Sec. 6927; Sec. 16, infra. An

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  appeal from the Chairman's ruling may be made to the full Committee (5 
  Hinds Sec. 6928; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 9.1), or, in exceptional cases, 
  the Committee of the Whole may rise and report the question to the 
  House (4 Hinds Sec. 4783).
      The Chairman has a duty to call to order any Member who violates 
  the privileges of debate with respect to the Senate. 8 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 2515, 2520. Under rule XVIII clause 1, he may cause the 
  galleries or lobbies to be cleared in case of disturbance or 
  disorderly conduct. Manual Sec. Sec. 971, 973.
      The Chairman directs the Committee of the Whole to rise when the 
  hour previously fixed for adjournment arrives, when the hour fixed by 
  the House for termination of the consideration of the bill in 
  Committee arrives or when a rule provides for automatic rising after 
  general debate. Manual Sec. 971.


  Sec. 8 . -- Limitations on Jurisdiction and Authority of Chairman

      The functions of the Chairman of the Committee of the Whole are 
  not unlimited; certain determinations are reserved to the Speaker, the 
  House, or the Committee itself. Manual Sec. 971. Thus, the Chairman 
  does not:

     Decide whether the Committee may sit in executive session 
         (reserved to the House). Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 7.18.
     Entertain unanimous consent requests to change an order of the 
         House governing the consideration of the measure in the 
         Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. 993.
     Respond to inquiries concerning the legislative schedule 
         outside the Committee of the Whole (97-2, July 29, 1982, p 
         18605); including whether or when a pending bill will be taken 
         up again after the Committee rises (Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. Sec. 7.14, 7.15).
     Rule on procedural questions that may arise when a bill is 
         reported back to the House (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 7.10) or 
         predict what action may take place in the House after the 
         Committee of the Whole rises (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 7.9).
     Consider a question that had arisen in the House just before 
         the Committee began to sit. Manual Sec. 971.
     Interpret the application of a rule of the House that sets 
         forth the vote required to adopt a resolution in the House. 
         Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 7.13.
     Determine whether the House can rescind a time limitation 
         imposed by the Committee. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 7.12.
     Determine the privileges of a Member under general ``leave to 
         print.'' 5 Hinds Sec. 6988.

      For a limitation on the authority of the Committee of the Whole, 
  see Manual Sec. 993; Sec. 2, supra. For the practice governing the 
  Chair in deciding points of order and responding to parliamentary 
  inquiries (both Speaker and

[[Page 308]]

  Chairman of the Committee of the Whole), see Points of Order; 
  Parliamentary Inquiries; Manual Sec. 628.


                 B. Consideration and Debate in Committee


  Sec. 9 . In General; Quorums

                                 Generally

      The conditions under which a particular measure is to be 
  considered and debated are ordinarily determined pursuant to a special 
  rule from the Committee on Rules or other House order. The Committee 
  of the Whole may not set aside or materially modify such an order, 
  even by unanimous consent. Manual Sec. 993.

                            Quorum Requirements

      Until 1890 a quorum of the Committee of the Whole was the same as 
  a quorum of the House. Manual Sec. 329. In that year a rule was 
  adopted fixing a quorum of the Committee of the Whole at 100 Members. 
  Manual Sec. 982. Where the Chair has announced the absence of a quorum 
  in the Committee of the Whole, no further business may be conducted 
  until a quorum is established. Manual Sec. 982. When a vote is taken 
  in Committee of the Whole notwithstanding the absence of a quorum, a 
  timely point of order having been made, the vote is invalid. 6 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 676, 677. However, a quorum is inferred (or presumed) if no 
  question is raised with respect thereto; that is, a quorum is presumed 
  to be present unless otherwise determined. See 4 Hinds Sec. 2895; 6 
  Cannon Sec. Sec. 565, 624.
      Under the modern practice, when a Committee of the Whole finds 
  itself without a quorum and a timely point of order is made, the 
  Chairman directs that the Members record their presence by electronic 
  device. Manual Sec. 982. It is a quorum of the Committee of the 
  Whole--100 Members--and not a quorum of the House, which must appear. 
  Deschler Ch 20 Sec. 7.1. In ascertaining the presence of a quorum, the 
  Chairman includes those Members present but not voting as well as 
  those voting. 6 Cannon Sec. Sec. 641, 671; Deschler Ch 20 Sec. 7.7.
      Where, following a timely point of order, the Chair announces that 
  a quorum is not present, a motion that the Committee of the Whole rise 
  is in order and does not require a quorum for adoption. 8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2369; Deschler Ch 20 Sec. 7.13. If a quorum develops on a 
  negative vote on the motion to rise, the Committee of the Whole 
  proceeds with its business. 6 Cannon Sec. Sec. 670, 671; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2369. For a discussion of motions to rise generally, see 
  Sec. Sec. 26-28, infra.

[[Page 309]]

      Rule XVIII clause 6 sharply limits the circumstances under which a 
  point of order of no quorum may be raised once the House has resolved 
  into Committee. After a quorum has been established in the Committee 
  of the Whole on any given day (by quorum call or recorded vote), the 
  Chairman may not thereafter entertain a point of order that a quorum 
  is not present unless (1) the Committee of the Whole is operating 
  under the five-minute rule (which has been interpreted to include any 
  ``modified-closed'' amendment process under the terms of a special 
  order) and (2) the Chairman has put the pending motion or proposition 
  to a vote. Manual Sec. 982. During general debate, there is no 
  requirement of a quorum; but the Chairman is given the discretion to 
  recognize for a point of order of no quorum. Rule XVIII clause 
  6(b)(1).
      The Chairman must entertain a point of order of no quorum during 
  the five-minute rule if a quorum has not yet been established in the 
  Committee of the Whole on the bill then pending; the fact that a 
  quorum of the Committee has previously been established on another 
  bill on that day is irrelevant. Manual Sec. 982. This precedent 
  applies even when a measure is considered in the Committee of the 
  Whole under a modified-closed rule that specifies the amendments that 
  may be offered and establishes the time for their debate, such rule 
  declaring the measure read for amendment under the five-minute rule. 
  Where a recorded vote on a prior amendment or motion during the five-
  minute rule on that bill on that day has established a quorum, a 
  subsequent point of order of no quorum during debate is precluded 
  except by unanimous consent. Manual Sec. 982.


  Sec. 10 . First Reading

      When a bill is taken up in the Committee of the Whole, rule XVIII 
  clause 5(a) requires its reading in full before general debate begins, 
  unless such reading has been properly dispensed with by unanimous 
  consent or by a rule from the Committee on Rules. The first reading is 
  normally dispensed with. Manual Sec. 942. A motion to dispense with 
  the first reading of the bill is not in order. 8 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 2335, 2436.


  Sec. 11 . General Debate

                           Control by the House

      The duration and allocation of time for general debate in 
  Committee of the Whole is controlled by the House, not the Committee. 
  91-2, Dec. 17, 1970, p 42222. The Committee may not, even by unanimous 
  consent, extend the general debate time as fixed by the House. Manual 
  Sec. Sec. 979, 993.

[[Page 310]]

      The control of the House over general debate time in the Committee 
  of the Whole may be exercised through the adoption of a unanimous-
  consent request or through the adoption of a special rule from the 
  Committee on Rules. See, e.g., Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. Sec. 76.1, 
  76.7. Where the House has divided general debate time among certain 
  Members, it is not in order for a Member to whom time has been yielded 
  to ask unanimous consent for additional time because time is 
  controlled by those to whom it is allotted by the House and is not 
  subject to extension by the Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. 979. 
  However, time may be reallocated by unanimous consent.
      When the House has vested control of general debate in the 
  Committee of the Whole in certain Members, their control may not be 
  abrogated during that debate by another Member moving to rise, unless 
  one of them yields for that purpose, nor may Members yielded time in 
  general debate yield to another for such motion. Manual Sec. 334.

                               The Hour Rule

      In the absence of a House order limiting general debate in 
  Committee of the Whole, debate in the Committee of the Whole is under 
  the hour rule. A Member having control of such time may not consume 
  more than one hour. Manual Sec. 978.
      Prior to 1841 there was no limit on the time that a Member might 
  occupy when in possession of the floor in the Committee of the Whole. 
  This practice hindered the ability of the Committee of the Whole to 
  complete action on bills. 5 Hinds Sec. 5221. In that year the rule of 
  the House that no Member could speak for more than one hour was 
  applied to the Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. Sec. 957, 978. This 
  one-hour limitation applies to each Member recognized to speak in the 
  Committee of the Whole. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15. No matter how much 
  time may have been placed within the control of those representing the 
  two sides of a question, it must be assigned to Members in accordance 
  with the rule limiting each Member to no more than one hour of debate 
  time. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5005, 5006. However, a Member recognized for 
  one hour of debate may yield time to a Member who has just occupied an 
  hour in his own right. 8 Cannon Sec. 2470.

                               Yielding Time

      A Member engaged in general debate under the hour rule in 
  Committee of the Whole may yield any portion of his time to another 
  Member, who may in turn seek the consent of the Member originally 
  holding the floor to yield to a third Member. 8 Cannon Sec. 2553. Of 
  course, if the first Member retains control of the floor, yielding to 
  a second Member only for a ques

[[Page 311]]

  tion, it is the first Member who would subsequently yield to a third. 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15. Conversely, where a matter is being debated 
  pursuant to a special order vesting control of the time for debate in 
  certain Members, one of those Members may yield a specific block of 
  time to a second Member, in which case the second Member may yield to 
  a third (although not a block of time) while remaining on his feet, 
  and permission of the first Member is not necessary. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 15.
      Members may speak in general debate on a bill as many times as 
  they are yielded to by those in control of the debate. Manual 
  Sec. 959; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15.8. Those in control of such debate 
  time may yield as many times as they desire to whom they desire. 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15.4.


  Sec. 12 . -- Closing General Debate

      The right to close general debate inures to the majority manager 
  of the primary committee who has opened. Manual Sec. 979. General 
  debate in Committee of the Whole is closed or terminated pursuant to 
  an order of the House or sooner if no Member desires to participate 
  further. Manual Sec. 978; 4 Hinds Sec. 4745; 5 Hinds Sec. 5221. 
  Amendments may not be offered in the Committee of the Whole until 
  general debate has been closed or yielded back, and motions for the 
  disposition of the pending bill are not in order before that time. 4 
  Hinds Sec. Sec. 4744, 4778; 5 Hinds Sec. 5221. However, those Members 
  in control of the time for general debate need not use all of the time 
  for the purpose prescribed by House order. Rather, they may agree 
  among themselves to close further general debate, yield their 
  remaining time, and allow consideration of the bill under the five-
  minute rule to begin. Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 76.1.
      For general discussion of the practice of limiting or closing 
  general debate, see Consideration and Debate.


  Sec. 13 . Debate Under the Five-minute Rule; Amendments

                                 Generally

      Amendments to measures pending in Committee of the Whole are in 
  order following the close of general debate. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15. 
  Amendments are offered under the so-called five-minute rule. This rule 
  provides that any Member ``shall be allowed'' five minutes to explain 
  any amendment he may offer, after which the Member who first obtains 
  the floor is allowed five minutes to oppose it. Manual Sec. Sec. 978, 
  980. Thereafter, a Member may obtain five minutes for debate by 
  offering a pro forma amendment ``to strike the last word.'' No actual 
  change in text is contemplated by the

[[Page 312]]

  offering of such amendment. Manual Sec. 981. Pro forma amendments, 
  generally, see Sec. 14, infra.
      The Committee of the Whole may not, even by unanimous consent, 
  prohibit the offering of an amendment otherwise in order under the 
  five-minute rule. 98-2, July 31, 1984, p 21701. To guard against abuse 
  of the rule by Members offering an amendment for the sole purpose of 
  gaining debate time (5 Hinds Sec. 5221), the rule itself provides that 
  amendments may be withdrawn only by unanimous consent. Manual 
  Sec. 978.
      The five-minute rule is applicable to amendments that are offered 
  to amendments. Manual Sec. 978. However, where an amendment to a bill 
  has been offered, the right to explain or oppose that amendment has 
  precedence of a motion to amend it. 4 Hinds Sec. 4751.
      Under the modern practice of the House, bills increasingly are 
  considered in the Committee of the Whole under a ``modified-closed'' 
  amendment process. Such process vitiates, in part, the five-minute 
  rule by considering the bill as having been read for amendment, 
  restricting amendments that may be offered, and by limiting and 
  controlling debate time on amendments made in order.
      Limiting or closing five-minute debate, see Consideration and 
  Debate.

                  Yielding Time During Five-minute Debate

      Members who have been recognized for debate under the five-minute 
  rule may not yield time to another Member and be seated. 100-1, Dec. 
  10, 1987, p 34686. Although a Member recognized in debate under the 
  rule may yield to another Member while remaining on his feet, he may 
  not yield designated amounts of time. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5036, 5037; 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15. He may not yield to another Member to offer an 
  amendment. 93-1, Dec. 12, 14, 1973, pp 41171, 41716; 94-2, Sept. 8, 
  1976, p 29243.
      Where debate on an amendment is limited or allocated by special 
  order, or by the Chair, to a proponent and an opponent, the Members 
  controlling the debate may yield and reserve time; but debate time on 
  an amendment under the five-minute rule cannot be reserved. Manual 
  Sec. 980.

                           Reading for Amendment

      In Committee of the Whole, bills are read for amendment by section 
  pursuant to a practice dating from 1789, because each section normally 
  contains a substantive legislative provision. Manual Sec. 980. General 
  appropriation bills, on the other hand, are ordinarily read by 
  paragraphs, because such bills are normally drafted so that each 
  paragraph contains an appropriation. However, whether a bill shall be 
  read by paragraphs, sections, or titles is

[[Page 313]]

  determined by unanimous consent or special rule reported by the 
  Committee on Rules, which may provide that the bill is to be 
  ``considered as read,'' and open to amendment at any point. Changing 
  the reading cannot be accomplished by motion. Manual Sec. 980; 
  Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 25.
      When a paragraph or section has been passed in the reading, it is 
  not in order to return thereto except by unanimous consent. Manual 
  Sec. 980. However, the Chairman may direct a return to a section 
  where, through his inadvertence, no action was taken on a pending 
  amendment. 4 Hinds Sec. 4750.


  Sec. 14 . -- Pro Forma Amendments

                                 Generally

      Pro forma amendments have been permitted in the Committee of the 
  Whole since at least as early as 1868, when they were used during the 
  consideration of articles of impeachment against President Andrew 
  Johnson. 5 Hinds Sec. 5778. Pro forma amendments are those offered 
  during debate under the five-minute rule to make some superficial 
  change in a measure--by tradition ``to strike the last word''--where 
  the underlying purpose is to obtain time for debate or to offer an 
  explanation, no actual change in the measure being contemplated. 
  Manual Sec. 981; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 15.

                               When in Order

      Like substantive amendments, pro forma amendments are in order 
  following the reading of the section or paragraph of the pending 
  measure and are liberally permitted during debate under the five-
  minute rule. See Amendments. A Member who has expended five minutes on 
  a pro forma amendment may not lengthen this time by making another pro 
  forma amendment. 5 Hinds Sec. 5222; 8 Cannon Sec. 2560; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 15. A Member who has offered a substantive amendment and then 
  debated it for five minutes may not extend his time by offering a pro 
  forma amendment, as it is not in order for the offerer of an amendment 
  to amend his own amendment except by unanimous consent. Manual 
  Sec. 981. Conversely, a Member recognized on a pro forma amendment may 
  not automatically extend his time by offering a substantive amendment, 
  not having been recognized for that purpose. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 15.11.
      Pro forma amendments are not in order when a bill is being 
  considered under a ``closed'' or ``modified-closed'' rule prohibiting 
  all, or permitting only certain, amendments unless the rule specifies 
  to the contrary. Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 77.20. Similarly, a pro 
  forma amendment may be offered by unanimous consent only after a 
  substitute has been adopted and before the vote on the amendment, as 
  amended, because the amendment has been

[[Page 314]]

  amended in its entirety; and no further amendments, including pro 
  forma amendments, are in order. Manual Sec. 981.


  Sec. 15 . Relevancy in Debate

      Latitude in general debate is normally limited by a special rule 
  from the Committee on Rules or other order of the House, which 
  routinely confines general debate to the subject of the measure. 
  Manual Sec. 948. Latitude in debate under the five-minute rule is 
  limited by rule XVIII clause 5(a), which permits five minutes to 
  ``explain'' an amendment and five minutes to speak ``in opposition'' 
  to the amendment. Manual Sec. 978. For a more thorough discussion of 
  relevancy of debate in the Committee of the Whole, see Consideration 
  and Debate.


  Sec. 16 . Calling Members to Order

      Jefferson suggested that, as a matter of parliamentary law, to 
  avert the ``danger of a decision by the sword'' in the Committee of 
  the Whole, the Speaker could take the Chair to restore order. Manual 
  Sec. 331. In several early instances, the Speaker did in fact exercise 
  this authority. 2 Hinds Sec. Sec. 1648-1652. Under the modern 
  practice, the Chairman directs the Committee of the Whole to rise and 
  report to the House when objections have been made to words spoken in 
  debate. Manual Sec. 971; Cannon Sec. Sec. 2533, 2538; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 17.
      Under this procedure, a Member must take his seat when he is 
  called to order by the Chairman. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 17.1. The Chair 
  or any Member may cause the words to be taken down at the Clerk's desk 
  and read in the Committee of the Whole, which then rises automatically 
  without debate. 8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2533, 2538, 2539. The words are 
  then reported to the House and are again read. 2 Hinds Sec. Sec. 1257-
  1259. The words reported are then taken up in the House, with 
  consideration being limited to the words reported. 8 Cannon Sec. 2528. 
  The Member uttering the words may withdraw them in the Committee of 
  the Whole or in the House only by unanimous consent. 8 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 2528, 2538, 2540; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 17.7. The Speaker then 
  rules on whether the words are unparliamentary (Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 17.5), which is subject to appeal (Manual Sec. Sec. 629, 961; 5 
  Hinds Sec. Sec. 5157, 5178, 5194; Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 50.8).
      If a Member's words are ruled out of order, motions in the House 
  to strike unparliamentary words from the Congressional Record and to 
  permit the offending Member to proceed in order are available before 
  the Committee of the Whole resumes its sitting. Instances of disorder 
  during debate in the Committee of the Whole may be disposed of in the 
  House pursuant

[[Page 315]]

  to a motion to expunge the offending language from the Record (8 
  Cannon Sec. Sec. 2538, 2539) or, in especially flagrant instances, 
  pursuant to a resolution of censure (2 Hinds Sec. Sec. 1257, 1259). 
  However, censure is not a remedy available for words spoken if debate 
  or business has intervened. Rule XVII clause 4(b).
      After disposition of the matter in the House, the Committee of the 
  Whole automatically resumes its sitting. Manual Sec. 961; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2541; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 17.5.
      For general discussion of disorder in debate, see Consideration 
  and Debate.


  Sec. 17 . Voting

      The methods and procedures by which Members vote in Committee of 
  the Whole are prescribed by the rules of the House, particularly rule 
  XX and rule XVIII clause 6. They include:

     Voice vote--Based on volume of sound of Members responding aye 
         or no. Rule I clause 6; Manual Sec. 630.
     Division (or standing) vote--May be invoked by the Chair or 
         any Member, and is in order following a voice vote. Under this 
         procedure, Members stand to be counted, first those voting in 
         the affirmative, then those voting in the negative. Rule XX 
         clause 1; Manual Sec. 1012.
     Recorded vote--The Members insert a personalized electronic 
         voting card to be recorded as ``yea,'' ``nay,'' or ``present.'' 
         The request for such a vote must be supported by at least 25 
         Members. A recorded vote may be preceded by a point of order of 
         no quourm, which requires the Chair to first count for 100 
         Members. Rule XVIII clause 6; Manual Sec. Sec. 982, 983. The 
         Chair's count is not subject to challenge. Manual Sec. 629.
     Record vote by tellers or a ``roll call''--During a record 
         vote by tellers, the Members cast their votes by depositing a 
         signed green (yea) or red (no) card in a ballot box. Rule XX 
         clause 4; Manual Sec. 1019. During a ``roll call'' the Chair 
         directs the Clerk to call the roll alphabetically. Rule XX 
         clause 3; Manual Sec. 1015. These procedures have been 
         supplanted by the use of the electronic voting equipment and 
         are used only as a backup voting system when that equipment 
         becomes inoperative.

      A vote by the yeas and nays, which may be demanded in the House 
  under the Constitution or obtained automatically under rule XX clause 
  6, is not in order in Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. Sec. 76, 
  1026.
      Under rule XVIII clause 6(g), the Chairman may postpone a request 
  for a recorded vote on any amendment; and he may resume proceedings on 
  that request at any time. An electronic vote ordered on the postponed 
  request may be reduced to five minutes, provided the first vote in a 
  series is 15 minutes. Manual Sec. 984.

[[Page 316]]

      For a discussion of voting procedures generally, see Voting.


  Sec. 18 . Points of Order

                                 Generally

      In Committee of the Whole, questions of order relating to 
  procedure (except for words taken down) are decided by the Chairman, 
  not the Speaker. Manual Sec. 971; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 6927, 6928; 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 19. The Speaker cannot rule on a point of order 
  arising in the Committee of the Whole unless the point of order is 
  reported to the House for a decision. 5 Hinds Sec. 6987. Appeals from 
  a decision of the Chairman on a point of order are ordinarily resolved 
  in the Committee of the Whole, but in rare cases an appeal from a 
  decision on a point of order may be reported to the House for its 
  determination. 4 Hinds Sec. 4783.
      Debate on a point of order raised in the Committee of the Whole is 
  within the discretion of the Chairman and must be confined to the 
  point of order. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 19.2.

                               When in Order

      Generally, points of order in the Committee of the Whole against a 
  provision in a bill or amendment are properly made when that provision 
  or amendment is reached in the reading. For a discussion of points of 
  order in the Committee of the Whole against provisions in general 
  appropriation bills and amendments thereto, see Manual Sec. 1044. A 
  point of order against an amendment comes too late after there has 
  been debate on the amendment (Manual Sec. 924) or when the amendment 
  has been reported to the House (92-2, June 1, 1972, pp 19479, 19483). 
  However, rule XXI clauses 4 and 5(a) permit the raising ``at any 
  time'' of a point of order against a legislative bill carrying 
  appropriations or a tax or tariff if the bill was reported by a 
  committee not having jurisdiction to report such matters. Manual 
  Sec. Sec. 1065, 1066; see also Appropriations.
      Points of order against consideration of bills are properly raised 
  in the House pending resolution into the Committee and may not 
  subsequently be raised in Committee of the Whole. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 20. This rule has been applied to points of order against 
  consideration of the measure for:

     Violations of committee reporting requirements, such as the 
         Ramseyer rule (that proposed changes in law be indicated 
         typographically). Manual Sec. 846; Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. Sec. 20.1-20.3.
     Availability requirements prior to floor consideration of 
         measures. Manual Sec. 850.


[[Page 317]]



      For points of order generally, see Points of Order; Parliamentary 
  Inquiries; for points of order relating to particular measures or 
  matters, see Appropriations and Conferences Between the Houses.


  Sec. 19 . Unfinished Business

      Business unfinished when the Committee of the Whole rises remains 
  unfinished, to be considered first in order when the House next goes 
  into the Committee to consider that business. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4735, 
  4736; see also Unfinished Business. Thus, when the Committee of the 
  Whole rises before the time fixed for debate expires, debate continues 
  when the Committee resumes its deliberations. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 26.1. When a recommendation of the Committee of the Whole that 
  the enacting clause of a bill be stricken is rejected by the House, 
  the House, without motion, resolves itself into the Committee for the 
  further consideration of the bill. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 26.2.
      Absent a special rule to the contrary, when the Committee of the 
  Whole rises on the adoption of a simple motion to rise, a bill pending 
  at that time remains the unfinished business for subsequent 
  consideration in the Committee. Manual Sec. 977. Similarly, if such a 
  motion intervenes pending a request for a recorded vote, that request 
  remains the pending business upon resumption of consideration of the 
  bill in Committee. Deschler-Brown Ch 30 Sec. 33.15.


                          C. Motions in Committee


  Sec. 20 . In General

                             Motions Permitted

      The principal motions used in Committee of the Whole are as 
  follows:

     Motions to amend under the five-minute rule. Manual Sec. 978; 
         see also Sec. 13, supra.
     Motions to dispense with the reading of an amendment printed 
         in the bill as reported or as printed in the Congressional 
         Record. Manual Sec. 986.
     Motions to close five-minute debate. Manual Sec. 987; see also 
         Consideration and Debate.
     Motions relating to the enacting clause. Manual Sec. 988; for 
         a comprehensive discussion, see Sec. 22, infra.
     Motions to rise. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 22; see also Sec. 26, 
         infra.

                          Motions Not Entertained

      The Committee of the Whole may not entertain motions involving 
  functions properly performed by the House. Of the motions specified by 
  rule

[[Page 318]]

  XVI clause 4--to adjourn, to lay on the table, for the previous 
  question, to postpone, to refer, or to amend--only the motion to amend 
  is authorized in the Committee of the Whole. Manual Sec. 911. The 
  Committee may not entertain a motion to:

     Limit general debate (as distinguished from five-minute 
         debate). Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2; for a general discussion, see 
         Consideration and Debate.
     Close general debate. Manual Sec. 979; 5 Hinds Sec. 5217.
     Dispense with the reading of a bill unless authorized pursuant 
         to a special rule from the Committee on Rules. Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. 2.11.
     Return to a section of the bill passed in the reading. 
         Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.10.
     Effect a conference or instruct conferees. 8 Cannon 
         Sec. Sec. 2319, 2320; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.
     Order a call of the House. 8 Cannon Sec. 2369.
     Expunge remarks from the Congressional Record. Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. 3.2.
     Order the previous question. 4 Hinds Sec. 4716; Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. 2.6.
     Reconsider. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4716-4718; 8 Cannon 
         Sec. Sec. 2324, 2325; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.5.
     Recommit. 4 Hinds Sec. 4721; 8 Cannon Sec. 2326.
     Postpone or rise and resume sitting on a day certain. Manual 
         Sec. 915; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 22.2.
     Lay on the table. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4719, 4720; 8 Cannon 
         Sec. 2330; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.7.
     Recess (absent permission of the House). 5 Hinds 
         Sec. Sec. 6669-6671; 8 Cannon Sec. 3357; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.
     Adjourn. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.4.

                     Motions Recommending House Action

      As noted above, the motions to postpone, recommit, or lay on the 
  table, are not in order in the Committee of the Whole. However, under 
  certain circumstances, the Committee of the Whole may entertain a 
  motion to rise and report with the recommendation that the House 
  entertain such an action. Whether such a motion will or will not lie 
  in the Committee of the Whole is ordinarily determined by the terms of 
  the special rule under which the measure is being considered. Under 
  the modern practice, a special rule normally provides that after 
  consideration the Committee of the Whole shall rise and report the 
  measure to the House, with the previous question to be considered as 
  ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage. In that 
  case, the Committee of the Whole may not report to the House a 
  recommendation that the bill be recommitted. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 23.12. In the exceptional circumstance where this language is not 
  included in the spe

[[Page 319]]

  cial rule, the Committee of the Whole may entertain a motion to rise 
  and report with:

     A recommendation that the consideration of the bill be 
         postponed. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4765, 4774; 8 Cannon Sec. 2372; 
         Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 22.
     A recommendation that the bill be referred or recommitted. 4 
         Hinds Sec. 4774; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.12.
     A recommendation that the bill lie on the table. 4 Hinds 
         Sec. 4777.

                    Requirement That Motions Be Written

      Although motions made in the Committee of the Whole are often put 
  forward orally, any Member may demand that a motion be made in 
  writing. See, e.g., Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 2.1.

                                Withdrawal

      A motion may be withdrawn in the Committee of the Whole only by 
  unanimous consent. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 2.10. Rule XVIII clause 5(a) 
  specifically prohibits the withdrawal of an amendment except by 
  unanimous consent, whether or not debate has proceeded. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5221; 8 Cannon Sec. 2859. This principle has also been applied to 
  the motion to close debate under the five-minute rule (8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2564) and to the motion to recommend the striking of the enacting 
  clause (98-1, July 29, 1983, p 21675).


  Sec. 21 . Precedence of Motions

                              Motions to Rise

      The simple motion to rise is of highest privilege. Manual 
  Sec. Sec. 334, 983; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. Sec. 23.1, 23.2. It takes 
  precedence over motions to amend (Manual Sec. 983; Hinds Sec. 4770) 
  and over amendments pending under the five-minute rule (Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 23.3), though it may not interrupt other Members in debate 
  (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.6; Sec. 26, infra). The motion takes 
  precedence over a demand for a recorded vote on a pending amendment 
  (97-1, July 15, 1981, p 15921), and over a point of order of no quorum 
  pending such a demand (see 95-1, Sept. 21, 1977, p 30126). The motion 
  is in order pending the Chair's count of a quorum (Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 23.5) and pending a decision of the Chair on a point of order 
  (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.7). The simple motion to rise also takes 
  precedence over a pending motion to rise and report with the 
  recommendation that the enacting clause be stricken. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 23.13.

                  Motion Relating to the Enacting Clause

      The motion that the Committee of the Whole rise and report to the 
  House with the recommendation that the enacting clause be stricken is 
  of

[[Page 320]]

  high privilege. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.4. The motion is preferential 
  because, if adopted, it constitutes a final disposition of the bill in 
  the Committee of the Whole. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 11.11, note. The 
  motion may be offered where another Member has been recognized to 
  offer an amendment (Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 12.13) or when an 
  amendment is pending. However, the motion may not interrupt debate. 
  Manual Sec. 989. The motion also takes precedence over a motion to 
  limit debate (Manual Sec. 989) and over a motion to rise and report 
  with a favorable recommendation (8 Cannon Sec. 2620). See also 
  Sec. 22, infra.

                             Motions to Amend

      With one exception, a motion to amend a bill takes precedence over 
  a motion to rise and report the bill. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4752-4758; 8 
  Cannon Sec. 2364; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.14. The exception is in rule 
  XXI clause 2(d), which specifies that when a general appropriation 
  bill has been read for amendment, a motion to rise and report, if 
  offered by the Majority Leader or his designee, takes precedence over 
  an amendment.
      The initial right of the proponent to explain an amendment offered 
  under the five-minute rule, or of a Member to rise in opposition 
  thereto, takes precedence over a motion to amend that amendment. 4 
  Hinds Sec. 4751.


  Sec. 22 . Motion Relating to Enacting Clauses

                Generally; Effect of Rejection or Adoption

      Every bill that becomes law contains the phrase: ``Be it enacted 
  by the Senate and House . . . in Congress assembled. . . .'' It is in 
  order to move that the Committee of the Whole rise and report a bill 
  back to the House with the recommendation that this clause, known as 
  the enacting clause, be stricken. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5326-5346; 8 
  Cannon Sec. Sec. 2618-2638; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10. Such a motion is 
  not, strictly speaking, an amendment, because it can be dispositive of 
  the entire bill. See Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10 (note 13). If the House 
  agrees to the recommendation, its action is equivalent to a rejection 
  of the bill. Manual Sec. 988; 5 Hinds Sec. 5326; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 10.6. If the House rejects the recommendation, it automatically 
  resolves itself back into the Committee of the Whole for the further 
  consideration of the bill. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.9.
      The motion must be in writing and in the proper form. Manual 
  Sec. 988.

      Member: I move that the Committee of the Whole do now rise and 
    report the bill back to the House with the recommendation that the 
    enacting clause (or the resolving clause) be stricken. Deschler Ch 
    19 Sec. 10.2.


[[Page 321]]



      Motions that deviate from this form are subject to a point of 
  order. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.3. Thus, a simple motion to strike the 
  enacting clause, although at one time permitted in the Committee of 
  the Whole, is, under the modern practice, not in proper form and not 
  in order. 5 Hinds Sec. 5332; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.1. A motion to 
  strike ``all after the enacting clause'' is likewise out of order. 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.3. The recommendation that the enacting clause 
  be stricken may not be combined with a provision that the bill be 
  recommitted to a committee. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10.10.

                    Application to Particular Measures

      The motion that the Committee of the Whole rise and report to the 
  House the recommendation that the enacting clause be stricken is 
  applicable to the enacting clause of a Senate-passed bill. Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. 10.14. The motion has also been used to recommend the striking 
  of the resolving clause of a simple resolution (Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 11.10), the resolving clause of a concurrent resolution on the 
  budget (96-1, May 9, 1979, p 10490), and the resolving clause of a 
  joint resolution (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 11.4).

                          Who May Offer or Oppose

      A Member offering the motion to rise and report with the 
  recommendation that the enacting clause be stricken must qualify as 
  being opposed to the bill when challenged. A Member in favor of the 
  bill may not offer the motion. Manual Sec. 989; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 12.2. A challenge being made by another Member, the Member 
  offering the motion must declare his opposition to the bill. Deschler 
  Ch 19 Sec. 12.1. Generally, in recognizing a Member for the motion, 
  the Chair will accept the statement of that Member that he is opposed 
  to the bill. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 12.5. Similar rules are applied with 
  respect to the qualification of a Member to oppose the motion. To 
  obtain recognition to oppose the motion, a Member must qualify by 
  stating that he is opposed thereto. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 12.11.
      The practice of offering the motion merely to obtain time for 
  debate, though subject to criticism, has been permitted. Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. Sec. 12.8-12.10. In fact, under the modern practice, extended 
  debate is the usual intent of the offeror, who then withdraws the 
  motion by unanimous consent.

                           Repetition of Motion

      A second motion on the same day to recommend the striking of the 
  enacting clause is not entertained in the absence of any material 
  modification of the bill. 8 Cannon Sec. 2636; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. Sec. 14.1, 14.2. Thus, a second motion is in order if the bill 
  has been amended since disposition of the first motion (Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 14.4) but is not in order if the only action of the

[[Page 322]]

  Committee of the Whole in the interim has been the rejection of a 
  proposed amendment to the bill (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 14.5). If the 
  first such motion is withdrawn by unanimous consent, a second motion 
  relating to the enacting clause is in order. Manual Sec. 989; Deschler 
  Ch 19 Sec. 14.7. The motion may be renewed on a subsequent day 
  regardless of any modification of the bill. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 14.8.


  Sec. 23 . -- When in Order

      The motion that the Committee of the Whole rise and report with 
  the recommendation that the enacting clause be stricken is not in 
  order during general debate on the measure. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10. 
  The motion is in order only after the Clerk has begun reading the bill 
  for amendment under the five-minute rule (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 11.2), 
  assuming that another Member has not obtained the floor for purposes 
  of debate (96-1, June 13, 1979, p 14710). The motion is no longer in 
  order when the stage of amendment is passed. The stage of amendment is 
  passed in Committee where a bill is being considered under a rule 
  permitting only committee amendments, and where no committee 
  amendments are offered at the conclusion of general debate. Manual 
  Sec. 989. The adoption of an amendment in the nature of a substitute 
  also may foreclose the opportunity to offer the motion. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 11.6.


  Sec. 24 . -- Debate

                        Generally; Time Limitations

      The debate on a motion that the Committee of the Whole rise and 
  report with the recommendation that the enacting clause be stricken is 
  governed by the five-minute rule. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5333-5335; 8 
  Cannon Sec. Sec. 2628-2631; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 13. Debate on the 
  motion is thus limited to 10 minutes, five minutes in favor and five 
  minutes in opposition. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 13.1. The Chair has 
  declined to recognize for requests to extend the five-minute time 
  (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 13.2), and a Member may not extend his time by 
  using time available to him to debate the bill and amendments thereto 
  (Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 31.33). Debate is limited to two five-
  minute speeches even though the proponent and the Member in opposition 
  both speak in favor of the motion. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 13.3. The Chair 
  will not announce in advance who will be recognized in opposition to 
  the motion. Manual Sec. 989.
      Time may not be reserved. Where a Member recognized for five 
  minutes in opposition to the motion yields back his time, another 
  Member may not claim the unused portion thereof. Manual Sec. 989.

[[Page 323]]

      Members of the committee managing the bill have priority in 
  recognition for debate in opposition to the motion. Manual Sec. 989.

                  Effect of Limitation of Time for Debate

      A limitation of all debate time on a bill and amendments thereto 
  to a time certain does not preclude debate on a motion to recommend 
  the striking of the enacting clause during the time remaining under 
  the limitation. 97-1, Oct. 5, 1981, p 23154. However, the motion is 
  not debatable after all time for debate on the bill and all amendments 
  thereto has expired. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 13.7. On the other hand, 
  where debate has been closed only as to amendments to a bill, and not 
  on the bill itself, a Member offering the motion to strike the 
  enacting clause is entitled to five minutes to debate that motion. 
  Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 6.28. A similar practice is followed where 
  the limitation is only on an amendment in the nature of a substitute 
  being read as an original bill for the purpose of amendment under a 
  special order. Manual Sec. 989.

                              Scope of Debate

      Since the motion to rise and report with the recommendation that 
  the enacting clause be stricken applies to the entire bill, debate may 
  be directed to any part of the bill--or to a pending amendment--and 
  need not be confined to the merits of the preferential motion. 
  Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 37.11. Thus, the motion may be used by a 
  Member to secure five minutes to debate a pending amendment 
  notwithstanding a limitation of time for debate on the pending 
  amendment and all amendments thereto. Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 37.8. 
  However, debate on the motion may not include matters beyond the 
  provisions of the bill. 5 Hinds Sec. 5336.


                     D. Rising; Reporting to the House


  Sec. 25 . Generally

                 Formal and Informal Rising Distinguished

      When the Committee of the Whole terminates or suspends its 
  proceedings, it ``rises,'' either formally or informally. Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. 21.1. When the Committee of the Whole rises formally, it 
  normally does so by motion or by operation of a special order. 
  Sec. 26, infra. When the Committee of the Whole rises informally, it 
  does so by unanimous consent (4 Hinds Sec. 4788) or simply at the 
  direction of the Chairman without a formal motion from the floor 
  (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 21.1).

[[Page 324]]

      The Committee of the Whole may rise informally to permit the House 
  to transact unrelated business, such to swear in a Member (by 
  unanimous consent of the House), to receive a message, or to lay down 
  a signed enrolled bill. Manual Sec. 330; 4 Hinds Sec. 4791; Deschler 
  Ch 19 Sec. 21.1. Having no power to receive a message, the Committee 
  of the Whole rises informally to permit the House to do so. Manual 
  Sec. 330; 4 Hinds Sec. 4786. At this rising, the House may not have 
  the message read or transact other business except by unanimous 
  consent. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4787-4791.

                     Effect of Special Rules or Orders

      The Committee of the Whole rises automatically and without motion 
  when it rises pursuant to a special rule providing that at the 
  conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the Committee of 
  the Whole ``shall'' rise and report back to the House (94-1, July 30, 
  1975, p 25881) or pursuant to a House order limiting general debate to 
  a time certain and providing that the Committee rise at the conclusion 
  of that time (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 21.3). However, a motion to rise is 
  required to enable the Committee of the Whole to rise prior to the 
  time fixed by the applicable special rule. 7 Cannon Sec. 793.


  Sec. 26 . Motions to Rise

                             Generally; Forms

      The motion to rise in the Committee of the Whole is analogous to 
  the motion to adjourn in the House. In the Committee of the Whole, the 
  motion takes two forms: (1) the simple motion to rise and (2) the 
  motion to rise and report. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4766, 4767; Deschler Ch 
  19 Sec. Sec. 22.1, 23.13. The motions are expressed as follows:

      Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee do now rise.
      Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee do now rise and report the 
    bill back to the House with the recommendation that __________.

      The motion to rise and report may recommend to the House either a 
  favorable or adverse disposition of the bill. It may recommend that 
  the consideration of the reported measure be postponed, or that it be 
  recommitted or tabled. However, under the modern practice, such motion 
  is normally precluded by the applicable special rule. Sec. 20, supra. 
  For the motion to rise and report with the recommendation that the 
  enacting clause be stricken, see Sec. 22, supra.
      The motion to rise (or to rise and report) must be in writing if 
  the demand is made. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 22.3. The simple motion to 
  rise does not require a quorum for adoption, although a negative voice 
  vote is subject to

[[Page 325]]

  a point of order of no quorum pending a request for a recorded vote. 
  Manual Sec. 983; 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 2975, 2976; Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 22.7. However, a quorum is required on an affirmative vote on a 
  motion to rise and report. See 4 Hinds Sec. 2973. Neither motion is 
  debatable. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4766-4768; Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 22.4. 
  Either may be withdrawn by unanimous consent. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. 22.9. They may not include restrictions on the amendment process 
  or limitations on future debate on amendments. Manual Sec. 334.


  Sec. 27 . -- When in Order

      The motion that the Committee of the Whole rise is privileged 
  during debate under the five-minute rule. Manual Sec. 334. The motion 
  is in order notwithstanding an informal agreement among the floor 
  managers of a bill to conclude consideration at a different time. 
  Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.4. The motion is in order:

    While an amendment is pending, except where another Member has 
         the floor. Manual Sec. 334.
     Pending a decision on a point of order. Deschler Ch 19 
         Sec. Sec. 23.7, 23.8.
     After agreement to a motion to limit debate on an amendment. 
         Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.10.
     Pending a count of a quorum. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 23.5.
     After the absence of a quorum has been ascertained and pending 
         a vote on an amendment (Manual Sec. 982) but comes too late 
         when the Chair has announced the absence of a quorum and the 
         roll call has begun (91-2, Sept. 16, 1970, p 32229).
     Pending a demand for a record vote but prior to the time the 
         Chair begins the count to determine whether a sufficient number 
         support the demand. 94-1, Aug. 1, 1975, p 26947.
     During general debate if offered by a manager or by a Member 
         to whom a manager has yielded for that purpose. Manual 
         Sec. 334.

      A motion that the Committee of the Whole rise may be made between 
  the time an amendment is offered and read and before recognition of 
  its proponent for debate thereon. 97-1, May 12, 1981, pp 9320, 9323. 
  Where a special rule provides that the Committee rise and report at 
  the conclusion of the consideration of a bill for amendment, a motion 
  that the Committee of the Whole rise and report the bill with certain 
  amendments, before the bill has been completely read for amendment, is 
  not in order. However, a simple motion that the Committee of the Whole 
  rise is in order at that time. 96-1, Dec. 5, 1979, p 34755.

[[Page 326]]

  Sec. 28 . -- Who May Offer

      In the Committee of the Whole, any Member may move to rise and the 
  Chairman is constrained to recognize for that purpose, unless another 
  Member controls the floor. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 24.2; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2369. Although the motion may be offered by any Member entitled 
  to the floor in his own right, the motion is commonly made by the 
  Member handling the bill before the Committee. Deschler Ch 19 
  Sec. Sec. 22.5, 22.8, 23.1. The motion also may be made by a Member 
  who holds the floor by virtue of having offered an amendment. Deschler 
  Ch 19 Sec. 24.1.
      A Member holding the floor may not be interrupted by a motion to 
  rise even though he has not yet begun to speak. 8 Cannon Sec. 2370. A 
  Member may not, in time yielded to him for debate, move that the 
  Committee of the Whole rise (Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 10) or yield to 
  another for such a motion (Deschler Ch 29 Sec. 23). However, the 
  majority or minority member controlling the time for general debate 
  may yield for a motion that the Committee of the Whole rise, and he 
  may do so without losing his right to continue at the next sitting of 
  the Committee on the same matter. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5012, 5013.
      For precedence of a motion to rise and report a general 
  appropriation bill, if offered by the Majority Leader, over an 
  amendment, see Sec. 21, supra.


  Sec. 29 . Reporting to the House

                                 Generally

      When a matter is concluded in the Committee of the Whole, it is 
  reported to the House. The permission of the House is neither required 
  nor sought when the Chairman reports on a measure. The report is made 
  and received and is then before the House for action. Manual Sec. 334. 
  When the Committee of the Whole rises without concluding the matter, 
  the Chairman reports that it ``has come to no resolution thereon.'' 
  Under this procedure the Chairman does not report the measure back to 
  the House. Deschler Ch 19 Sec. 21.4. The measure remains as unfinished 
  business for subsequent consideration in the Committee of the Whole. 
  Sec. 19, supra.
      The Speaker recognizes only reports from the Committee of the 
  Whole made by the Chairman thereof. 5 Hinds Sec. 6987. The Speaker has 
  no official knowledge of proceedings in the Committee of the Whole 
  beyond those reported by its Chairman. A matter alleged to have arisen 
  therein but not reported may not be brought to the attention of the 
  House. 8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2429, 2430.

[[Page 327]]

  Sec. 30 . House Action on Committee Reports

                                 Generally

      When the Committee of the Whole reports to the House, the House 
  usually acts at once on the report without reference to select or 
  other committees. Manual Sec. 326. The recommendation of the Committee 
  being before the House, the motion to carry out the recommendation is 
  usually considered as pending without being offered from the floor. 4 
  Hinds Sec. 4896.
      The recommendation of the Committee of the Whole may be favorable 
  or adverse, and the bill may be reported with or without amendments:

      Chairman: Mr. Speaker, the Committee of the Whole House on the 
    state of the Union, having had under consideration the bill H.R.  
    ______, directs me to report it back to the House with sundry 
    amendments and with the recommendation that the amendments be agreed 
    to and the bill as amended do pass.
      Speaker: The gentleman from  ______ reports that the Committee of 
    the Whole House on the state of the Union, having had under 
    consideration the bill H.R.  ______, directs him to report . . . .

      For House action on amendments reported from the Committee of the 
  Whole, including the demand for separate votes, see Amendments. For 
  steps to be taken in the passage of a bill in the House, see Previous 
  Question and Reading, Passage, and Enactment.

                 Recommittal to the Committee of the Whole

      Bills are sometimes recommitted to the Committee of the Whole as 
  the result of the action of the House (4 Hinds Sec. 4784) or on motion 
  either with or without instructions (5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5552, 5553). If 
  the bill is reported from the Committee of the Whole with an adverse 
  recommendation, and such recommendation is disagreed to by the House, 
  the bill stands recommitted to the Committee without further action by 
  the House, unless the bill is disposed of pursuant to a motion to 
  refer. Manual Sec. 988. When a recommendation of the Committee of the 
  Whole that the enacting clause of a bill be stricken is rejected by 
  the House, the House, without motion, resolves itself into the 
  Committee of the Whole for the further consideration of the bill. 
  Manual Sec. 989; 7 Cannon Sec. 943.