[House Practice: A Guide to the Rules, Precedents and Procedures of the House]
[Chapter 1. Adjournment]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov]


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                         CHAPTER 1 - ADJOURNMENT

                              HOUSE PRACTICE

              A. Generally; Adjournments of Three Days or Less

  Sec.  1. In General
  Sec.  2. Adjournment Motions and Requests; Forms
  Sec.  3. When in Order; Precedence and Privilege of Motion
  Sec.  4. In Committee of the Whole
  Sec.  5. Who May Offer Motion; Recognition
  Sec.  6. Debate on Motion; Amendments
  Sec.  7. Voting
  Sec.  8. Quorum Requirements
  Sec.  9. Dilatory Motions; Repetition of Motion

              B. Adjournments for More Than Three Days

  Sec. 10. In General; Resolutions
  Sec. 11. Privilege of Resolution
  Sec. 12. August Recess

              C. Adjournment Sine Die

  Sec. 13. In General; Resolutions
  Sec. 14. Procedure at Adjournment; Motions
        Research References
          U.S. Const. art. I, Sec. 5
          5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5359-5388
          8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2641-2648
          Manual Sec. Sec. 82-84, 911-913


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             A. Generally; Adjournments of Three Days or Less


  Sec. 1 . In General

                           Types of Adjournments

      Adjournment procedures in the House are governed by the House 
  rules and by the Constitution. There are: (1) adjournments of three 
  days or less, which are taken pursuant to motion; (2) adjournments of 
  more than three days, which require the consent of the Senate 
  (Sec. 10, infra); and (3) adjournments sine die, which end each 
  session of a Congress and which require the consent of both Houses. 
  Adjournments of more than three days or sine die are taken pursuant to 
  concurrent resolutions. Sec. Sec. 10, 13, infra.

                         Adjournment Versus Recess

      Adjournment is to be distinguished from recess. The House may 
  authorize a recess under a motion provided in rule XVI clause 4. The 
  Speaker also may declare a recess when no other business is pending 
  (rule I clause 12(a)) or when notified of an imminent threat to the 
  safety of the House (rule I clause 12(b)). Having postponed 
  proceedings on a pending question, the Speaker may declare a recess 
  for a short time under rule I clause 12(a) (there being no question 
  then pending before the House). Manual Sec. 638. During a period of 
  recess, the House remains open for certain business. The mace remains 
  in place on its pedestal, reports may be filed, and bills may be 
  placed in the hopper. See Recess.

                       Emergency Convening Authority

      During any recess or adjournment of not more than three days, if 
  the Speaker is notified by the Sergeant-at-Arms of an imminent 
  impairment of the place of reconvening, then he may, in consultation 
  with the Minority Leader, postpone the time for reconvening within the 
  three-day limit prescribed by the Constitution. In the alternative, 
  the Speaker, under the same conditions, may reconvene the House before 
  the time previously appointed solely to declare the House in recess 
  within that three-day limit. Rule I clause 12(c); Sec. 10, infra.
      Under rule I clause 12(d), the Speaker may convene the House in a 
  place within the District of Columbia, other than the Hall of the 
  House, whenever, in his opinion, the public interest shall warrant it. 
  In the 108th Congress, the two Houses granted blanket joint leadership 
  authority to assemble the 108th Congress at a place outside the 
  District of Columbia whenever the public interest shall warrant it. 
  108-1, H. Con. Res. 1, Jan. 7, 2003, p ____; see Adjournment.

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      The President may convene Congress at places outside the seat of 
  government during hazardous circumstances. 2 USC Sec. 27; Deschler Ch 
  1 Sec. 4.


  Sec. 2 . Adjournment Motions and Requests; Forms

                                  Motions

      The motion to adjourn authorized by rule XVI clause 4(a) is in 
  order in simple form only, as follows:

      Member: Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now adjourn.

      Note: The motion must be in writing if demanded.

      Member: Mr. Speaker, I offer a privileged motion.
      Speaker: The Clerk will report the motion.
      Clerk: Mr. ____ moves that the House do now adjourn.

  5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5371, 5372.

      The proponent of the motion may not include argument in favor of 
  the adjournment or impose conditions under which it is to be taken. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 5371; 8 Cannon Sec. 2647. The motion may not be amended to 
  set forth the day on which the House is to reconvene. Sec. 6, infra. 
  However, the simple motion to adjourn may be preceded at the Speaker's 
  discretion by a nondebatable and unamendable motion provided by rule 
  XVI clause 4(c) that, when the House adjourns, it stand adjourned to a 
  day and time certain. Manual Sec. 911. This motion is used when the 
  House wishes to make some change in the day or hour of its next 
  regularly scheduled meeting, which is set at the beginning of each 
  session of Congress by standing order. Manual Sec. 621.

      Member: Mr. Speaker, I move that when the House adjourns today it 
    stand adjourned to meet at __________(time) on __________(date).

      The motion cannot be used to circumvent the constitutional 
  restriction against adjournments for more than three days without the 
  consent of the Senate.

                        Unanimous-Consent Requests

      Adjournments of three days or less may be sought pursuant to a 
  unanimous-consent request:

      Member: Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that when the House 
    adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at ____. on ____, ____ (any time 
    on a day within three calendar days not including Sundays). 
    Adjournments of more than three days, see Sec. Sec. 10-12, infra.

             Legislative Days and Calendar Days Distinguished

      The duration of a legislative day does not conform to the 24 hours 
  of a calendar day, nor does a legislative day automatically terminate 
  by reason

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  of the arrival of the time for a regularly scheduled meeting of the 
  House. The legislative day continues until terminated by an 
  adjournment, irrespective of the passage of calendar days. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. Sec. 6738, 6739. The House has convened and adjourned twice on 
  the same calendar day pursuant to a motion to fix the day to which the 
  House shall adjourn, thereby meeting for two legislative days on the 
  same calendar day. Manual Sec. 913. However, a legislative day cannot 
  extend into a new Congress or a new session. 96-1, Jan. 3, 1980, p 
  37774.


  Sec. 3 . When in Order; Precedence and Privilege of Motion

      The motion to adjourn is a motion of highest privilege and is in 
  order whenever the floor can be secured. See Manual Sec. 912; 5 Hinds 
  Sec. Sec. 5359, 5360. Other motions may not intervene between the 
  motion to adjourn and the vote thereon. 5 Hinds Sec. 5361. The motion 
  to adjourn is specifically given precedence over all other secondary 
  motions permitted by rule XVI clause 4, including the motions to lay 
  on the table, for the previous question, to amend, to refer, or to 
  postpone. Manual Sec. 911. The motion to adjourn takes precedence over 
  all other motions because, as Jefferson noted, the House might 
  otherwise be kept sitting against its will and indefinitely. Manual 
  Sec. 439.
      The motion to fix the day and time to which the House shall 
  adjourn is of equal privilege to the simple motion to adjourn but is 
  entertained only at the Speaker's discretion. Manual Sec. Sec. 911, 
  912. The motion to fix the day, if made first, need not give way to 
  the simple motion. 5 Hinds Sec. 5381.
      The motion to adjourn may not interrupt a vote being taken in the 
  House. 5 Hinds Sec. 5360. However, the motion to adjourn is in order:

     Between the putting of the question on a proposition and the 
         ensuing vote. Manual Sec. 439.
     Between the different methods of voting, as between a vote by 
         division and a vote by yeas and nays. Manual Sec. 439.
     After a recorded vote is ordered and before the vote begins. 5 
         Hinds Sec. 5366.
     After a vote has been objected to for lack of a quorum. Manual 
         Sec. 913.
     Only one motion pending a motion to suspend the rules. Rule XV 
         clause 1(b).
     Only one motion pending a privileged report from the Committee 
         on Rules. Rule XIII clause 6(b).

      The motion to adjourn permitted by rule XVI clause 4 applies when 
  a question is ``under debate,'' and is in order when other business is 
  before

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  the House as well. Manual Sec. Sec. 911, 912. The motion is in order 
  and takes precedence over the motions delineated in rule XVI clause 4 
  and:

     The reading of the Journal. 4 Hinds Sec. 2757.
     The Speaker's approval of the Journal. Manual Sec. 621.
     A motion for a call of the House. 8 Cannon Sec. 2642.
     A resolution offered as a question of the privileges of the 
         House. Manual Sec. 699.
     The consideration of an impeachment proceeding. 91-2, Apr. 15, 
         1970, p 11940.
     A motion to reconsider. 5 Hinds Sec. 5605.
     A motion to instruct conferees. Manual Sec. 912.
     The filing of a privileged report from a committee. Manual 
         Sec. 912.
     The consideration of conference reports. 5 Hinds 
         Sec. Sec. 6451, 6453.
     A report from the Committee of the Whole. 8 Cannon Sec. 2645.
     The consideration of a veto message from the President. 4 
         Hinds Sec. 3523.

                             When Not in Order

      The motion to adjourn does not take precedence and may not be 
  entertained:

     When another Member holds the floor in debate. Manual 
         Sec. 912; 5 Hinds Sec. 5360.
     During time yielded for a parliamentary inquiry. 88-2, June 3, 
         1964, p 12522.
     When the House is voting, such as by the yeas and nays or 
         other recorded vote. 5 Hinds Sec. 6053.
     Pending a vote pursuant to a special order providing for such 
         vote ``without intervening motion.'' 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 3211, 
         3212.
     During the presentation of a conference report. 5 Hinds 
         Sec. 6452.
     Pending or during the administration of the oath to a Member. 
         1 Hinds Sec. 622.

      In certain situations, the motion cannot be repeated after one 
  such motion has been defeated. See Sec. 9, infra. Repetition is not 
  permitted:

     Pending consideration of a report from the Committee on Rules, 
         after one motion to adjourn has been defeated. Rule XIII clause 
         6(b); 8 Cannon Sec. 2260.
     Pending consideration of a motion to suspend the rules, after 
         one such motion has been defeated. Rule XV clause 1(b).


  Sec. 4 . In Committee of the Whole

      The motion to adjourn is not in order after the House has voted to 
  go into the Committee of the Whole. 4 Hinds Sec. 4728; 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5367. The motion is not in order in the Committee of the Whole. 4 
  Hinds Sec. 4716. It also

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  is not entertained when the Committee of the Whole rises to report 
  proceedings incident to securing a quorum (8 Cannon Sec. 2436) or when 
  it rises ``informally'' to receive a message. However, the motion to 
  adjourn is permitted when the House is meeting as in the Committee of 
  the Whole. 4 Hinds Sec. 4923.


  Sec. 5 . Who May Offer Motion; Recognition

      The motion to adjourn may be made by any Member (91-1, Oct. 14, 
  1969, pp 30054-56), including a minority member (98-2, May 23, 1984, p 
  13960.) The Chair even may declare the House adjourned by unanimous 
  consent when no Member is available. See, e.g., 106-2, Feb. 3, 2000, p 
  ____. A Member may move to adjourn whenever he can secure the floor, 
  but he may not move to adjourn while another Member has been 
  recognized for debate. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5369, 5370. The motion is not 
  in order where the Member has been yielded to or recognized for a 
  parliamentary inquiry. 8 Cannon Sec. 2646.


  Sec. 6 . Debate on Motion; Amendments

      Debate on the simple motion to adjourn is precluded by rule XVI 
  clause 4(b). Manual Sec. 911; 5 Hinds Sec. 5359. Clause 4(c) precludes 
  debate on the motion to fix the day to which the House shall adjourn. 
  Manual Sec. 911; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5379, 5380. For a discussion of 
  debate on resolutions providing for an adjournment, see Sec. 10, 
  infra. The stricture against debate on a motion to adjourn includes a 
  prefatory statement leading up to the motion. Such statement, if made, 
  is not carried in the Congressional Record. 107-2, Feb. 13, 2002, p 
  ____.
      The simple motion to adjourn is not subject to amendment. Manual 
  Sec. 585. Thus, the motion may not be amended by language alluding to 
  the purpose of the adjournment. Manual Sec. 912. The motion also may 
  not be amended by language specifying the day (5 Hinds Sec. 5360) or 
  hour (5 Hinds Sec. 5364) to which adjournment is to be taken. Such 
  amendments are ruled out whenever the House is operating under its 
  customary standing order that fixes the daily hour of meeting for each 
  day of the week. Manual Sec. 912. Similarly, the separate motion under 
  rule XVI clause 4(c) that when the House adjourns it stand adjourned 
  to a day and time certain also is not is subject to amendment. An 
  older precedent (5 Hinds Sec. 5754) indicating otherwise predates the 
  1973 change in rule XVI clause 4(c), which enabled the motion at the 
  Speaker's discretion. See, Manual Sec. 911.

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  Sec. 7 . Voting

      The vote on a motion to adjourn may be taken by any of the voting 
  methods authorized by the House rules, including a division vote or a 
  vote by the yeas and nays. 99-1, Dec. 20, 1985, p 38733; 88-2, Feb. 8, 
  1964, pp 2616, 2639. The adoption of a resolution providing for 
  adjournment sine die on a day certain does not preclude a demand for 
  the yeas and nays on the motion to adjourn on that day. 87-1, Sept. 
  27, 1961, p 21528. A negative vote on a motion to adjourn is not 
  subject to the motion to reconsider. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5620, 5622; see 
  also Reconsideration.


  Sec. 8 . Quorum Requirements

      A quorum is required for a motion to fix the time of adjournment 
  to a day and time certain. Manual Sec. 913.
      The simple motion to adjourn may be agreed to notwithstanding the 
  absence of a quorum. See Manual Sec. Sec. 52, 1025. Indeed, no motion 
  is in order in the absence of a quorum except to adjourn or for a call 
  of the House. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 2950, 2951, 2988; 6 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 680, 682. The motion to adjourn is in order on failure of a 
  quorum, even where the House is operating under a special order 
  requiring the consideration of the pending business. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5365.
      The motion to adjourn takes precedence over a motion for a call of 
  the House. Sec. 3, supra. In one instance, following a point of order 
  that a quorum was not present, and before the Chair so ascertained, a 
  Member moved a call of the House while another Member immediately 
  moved to adjourn. The Chair recognized for the more privileged motion. 
  88-1, June 12, 1963, p 10739.
      It is not in order to demand an ``automatic'' roll call under rule 
  XX clause 6 on an affirmative vote on a simple motion to adjourn 
  because that motion may be agreed to by less than a quorum. Manual 
  Sec. 1025. However, a vote by the yeas and nays in such a case would 
  be in order, if demanded by one-fifth of those present, no quorum 
  being required. Manual Sec. Sec. 75, 76. Where the vote on an 
  adjournment is decided in the negative, and a point of order that a 
  quorum is not present is sustained, an ``automatic'' roll call on the 
  motion then occurs under rule XX clause 6. 100-1, Nov. 2, 1987, pp 
  30386-90.

      Member: I move that the House do now adjourn.
      Speaker: On this vote (by division, or by voice) the noes have it.
      Member: I make a point of order that a quorum is not present and 
    (pursuant to clause 6 of rule XX) I object to the vote on that 
    ground.

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      Speaker: A quorum is not present, and the yeas and nays are 
    ordered. Members will record their votes by electronic device.

      Although a motion to adjourn is in order pending a point of order 
  that a quorum is not present, it is not entertained after the Clerk 
  has begun to call the roll. 5 Hinds Sec. 5366; 86-2, June 3, 1960, p 
  11828. After the call has been completed, the motion to adjourn is 
  again in order; and it is not necessary that the Chair announce that a 
  quorum has failed to respond before entertaining the motion. 91-1, 
  Oct. 14, 1969, pp 30054-56.


  Sec. 9 . Dilatory Motions; Repetition of Motion

      Rule XVI clause 1, which precludes the Speaker from entertaining 
  dilatory motions, is applicable to motions to adjourn. Manual 
  Sec. 903. Although of the highest privilege, the motion to adjourn is 
  not in order when offered for purposes of delay or obstruction. 5 
  Hinds Sec. Sec. 5721, 5731; 8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2796, 2813. On one 
  occasion, a point of order was sustained against the motion where a 
  House rule gave the Speaker the discretion to recognize for a motion 
  to adjourn. 8 Cannon Sec. 2822.
      The motion to adjourn, once offered, may ordinarily be repeated, 
  but not until after intervening business, debate, a decision of the 
  Chair on a question of order, or the ordering of the yeas and nays. 
  Manual Sec. 912; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5373, 5374, 5376-5378; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2814.
      In some cases the rules specifically provide that only one motion 
  to adjourn is to be permitted. This restriction applies during the 
  consideration of reports from the Committee on Rules and during the 
  consideration of motions to suspend the rules. Manual Sec. Sec. 857, 
  890. In such cases the motion to adjourn--once having been rejected--
  may not again be entertained until the pending matter has been fully 
  disposed of. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5740, 5741. However, if a motion to 
  adjourn is made and rejected, and a quorum then fails, a second motion 
  to adjourn is admitted. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5744-5746.


                 B. Adjournments for More Than Three Days


  Sec. 10 . In General; Resolutions

                            House-Senate Action

      Under article I, section 5, clause 4 of the Constitution, neither 
  House can adjourn (or recess) for more than three days without the 
  consent of the other. The consent of both Houses is required even 
  though the adjournment is sought by only one of them. Manual Sec. 84. 
  In calculating the three days, either the day of adjourning or the day 
  of meeting (excluding Sundays) must

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  be taken into the count. Manual Sec. 83; 5 Hinds Sec. 6673. The House 
  can adjourn by motion from Thursday to Monday, or from Friday to 
  Tuesday, because Sunday is a dies non. However, it cannot adjourn from 
  Monday to Friday without the Senate's assent. Consistent with this 
  requirement, the House has authorized the Speaker to declare the House 
  in recesses subject to calls of the Chair during discrete periods, 
  each not more than three days. Manual Sec. 83.
      Adjournments for more than three days are provided for by 
  concurrent resolution. The resolution may provide for the adjournment 
  of one House or for the adjournment of both Houses. Manual Sec. 84. 
  Senate concurrent resolutions for adjournment are laid before the 
  House by the Speaker as privileged. 101-1, Mar. 16, 1989, p 4480. Such 
  resolutions, whether originating in the House or Senate, are not 
  debatable. Manual Sec. 84. They require a quorum for adoption.
      The concurrent resolution is generally offered by the Majority 
  Leader or his designee:

      Member: Mr. Speaker, I offer a privileged concurrent resolution 
    (H. Con. Res. ____) providing for an adjournment of the House from 
    __________ to __________ and a recess or adjournment of the Senate 
    from __________ to __________, and ask for its immediate 
    consideration.

      The resolution may set forth the times at which the adjournment is 
  to begin and end, but frequently the resolution will provide optional 
  dates so as to give each House some discretion in determining the 
  exact period of adjournment. Manual Sec. 84. Sometimes the resolution 
  has provided for a certain period of adjournment of the House and a 
  different period for the Senate. Thus, the resolution may provide for 
  an adjournment of the House for more than three days to a day certain, 
  and a recess of the Senate for more than three days to a day certain 
  as subsequently determined by the Senate before recessing. Manual 
  Sec. 84. For a discussion of the authority of the President to 
  determine the period of adjournment when the two Houses are unable to 
  agree with respect thereto, see Manual Sec. 171; for convening, see 
  Assembly of Congress.

                 Conditional Adjournments; Recall Provisos

      An adjournment resolution may include various conditions or 
  provisos, such as that the Senate shall adjourn pursuant to the 
  resolution after it has disposed of a certain bill. Manual Sec. 84; 
  95-2, June 29, 1978, p 19466.
      A concurrent resolution adjourning both Houses for more than three 
  days, or sine die, normally includes authority for the Speaker and the 
  Majority Leader of the Senate, acting jointly, to reassemble the 
  Members when

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  ever the public interest shall warrant it. Manual Sec. 84. Recently, 
  such recall authority has allowed the respective designees of the 
  Majority Leader and the Speaker to so reassemble. It has also allowed 
  reassembly at such place as may be designated. E.g., 107-2, Nov. 22, 
  2002, p ____. In the 108th Congress, the two Houses granted blanket 
  joint leadership authority to assemble the 108th Congress at a place 
  outside the District of Columbia whenever the public interest shall 
  warrant it. 108-1, H. Con. Res. 1, Jan. 7, 2003, p ____. A concurrent 
  resolution also may provide for the sine die adjournment of one House 
  following a single House recall. Manual Sec. 84.

                            Amendments; Voting

      Adjournment resolutions originating in one House are subject to 
  amendment by the other. 95-2, June 29, 1978, p 19466; 95-2, Aug. 17, 
  1978, p 26794. Such an amendment is not in order after the previous 
  question is ordered (except pursuant to a motion to commit with proper 
  instructions). 96-2, Oct. 1, 1980, p 28576. Voting on the motion may 
  be by voice, division, or any of the methods of voting established by 
  rule XX or by article I, section 5 of the Constitution.


  Sec. 11 . Privilege of Resolution

      A concurrent resolution providing for an adjournment of the House 
  or of the Senate (or of both Houses) is called up as privileged. 
  Manual Sec. 84; 5 Hinds Sec. 6701. The resolution is privileged even 
  though it provides for an adjournment of the two Houses to different 
  days certain. 93-2, Apr. 11, 1974, p 10775. An adjournment resolution 
  remains privileged, despite its inclusion of additional matter, so 
  long as such additional matter would be privileged in its own right. 
  For example, an adjournment resolution including a declaration 
  asserted as a question of the privileges of the House relating to the 
  ability of the House to receive veto messages during the adjournment 
  retains its privilege. 101-1, Nov. 21, 1989, p 31156. An adjournment 
  resolution including a provision establishing an order of business for 
  the following session of the Congress was not considered privileged. 
  102-1, Nov. 26, 1991, p 35840.
      Amendments of the Senate to adjournment resolutions are called up 
  in the House as privileged. 97-2, Feb. 10, 1982, p 1471.
      A House concurrent resolution providing for an adjournment may 
  lose its privileged status if the House is not in compliance with 
  sections 309 and 310(f) of the Congressional Budget Act, which 
  preclude such resolutions until the House has approved its regular 
  appropriations bills and completed action on any required 
  reconciliation legislation. Manual Sec. 1127. However, these 
  provisions of the Act may be waived by unanimous consent or by res

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  olution reported by the Committee on Rules. E.g., 101-1, June 23, 
  1989, p 13271.
      A concurrent resolution granting the two Houses blanket joint 
  leadership authority to assemble a Congress at a place outside the 
  District of Columbia whenever the public interest shall warrant it was 
  offered as privileged. 108-1, H. Con. Res. 1, Jan. 7, 2003, p ____.


  Sec. 12 . August Recess

      The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 provides that unless 
  otherwise provided by Congress, the two Houses shall either (a) 
  adjourn sine die by July 31 of each year, or (b) in odd-numbered 
  years, adjourn in August (for a specified period) pursuant to a 
  concurrent resolution adopted by roll call vote in each House. 2 USC 
  Sec. 198. The House has not adjourned sine die by July 31 under this 
  Act for many years, and the provisions in the Act to that effect have 
  been routinely waived by concurrent resolution, thereby permitting the 
  two Houses to continue in session. Manual Sec. Sec. 1105, 1106. In the 
  absence of such a resolution, a simple motion to adjourn, made at the 
  conclusion of business on July 31, is in order and would permit the 
  House to meet on the following day. Manual Sec. 1106.
      The House and Senate may adopt a concurrent resolution adjourning 
  in August in an odd-numbered year as specified by the Act. Such a 
  resolution is called up as privileged, requires a yea and nay vote for 
  adoption, and is not debatable. Manual Sec. 1106. Concurrent 
  resolutions waiving the provisions of the Act are not privileged and 
  are called up by unanimous consent (100-1, July 29, 1987, p 21459) or 
  by resolution reported by the Committee on Rules (105-1, July 31, 
  1997, p ____).


                          C. Adjournment Sine Die


  Sec. 13 . In General; Resolutions

      Adjournments sine die (literally, without day) are used to 
  terminate the sessions of a Congress, and are provided for by 
  concurrent resolution. A session terminates automatically at the end 
  of the constitutional term. See 96-1, Jan. 3, 1980, p 37774; 104-1, 
  Jan. 3, 1996, p 38609. Such adjournments are generally taken in 
  October in even-numbered years (election years) and usually somewhat 
  later in odd-numbered years. Adjournment resolutions may be called up 
  from the floor as privileged. 5 Hinds Sec. 6698.
      The resolution is not debatable. 8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 3371-3374. 
  However, a Member may be recognized during its consideration under a 
  reservation of

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  objection to a unanimous-consent request. Manual Sec. 84. It requires 
  a quorum for adoption. 92-2, Oct. 18, 1972, p 37061.
      A sine die resolution may specify the particular legislative or 
  calendar day of adjournment or may specify two or more optional dates. 
  Sine die adjournment in the latter case is effected by a motion of the 
  Majority Leader or his designee. Manual Sec. 84. Sine die resolutions 
  may be amended to provide for an adjournment on a date other than that 
  specified. 98-2, Oct. 11, 1984, p 32314. The resolution need not 
  specify the date of convening because, under section 2 of the 20th 
  amendment to the Constitution, a regular session of a Congress 
  automatically begins at noon on January 3 of every year unless 
  Congress sets a different date by law. Manual Sec. 242; 96-2, Jan. 3, 
  1980, p 3.
      Under rule X clause 1(m), the Committee on Rules has jurisdiction 
  of matters relative to final adjournment of Congress. Manual Sec. 733.
      The time of adjournment sine die having been fixed by concurrent 
  resolution, the House may not finally adjourn before that time. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 6714. However, a sine die resolution may be recalled prior 
  to action thereon by the other House. 5 Hinds Sec. 6699. Also, it is 
  subject to rescission by a subsequent concurrent resolution. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 6700. A resolution rescinding an order for adjournment sine die 
  is open to amendment, and an amendment assigning a new date is 
  germane. 5 Hinds Sec. 5920. Waiver of statutory provision as to 
  adjournment sine die on July 31, see Sec. 12, supra.
      Under the current practice, sine die adjournment resolutions 
  normally contain House-Senate leadership recall authority. For a 
  discussion of recall authority generally, see Sec. 10, supra.
      The House customarily authorizes the Speaker to appoint a 
  committee to notify the President of the completion of business and 
  the intention of the two Houses to adjourn sine die unless the 
  President has some further communication to make. 100-1, Dec. 21, 
  1987, p 37618. This committee is usually composed of the Majority and 
  Minority Leaders of the House, and joins a similar committee appointed 
  by the Senate. 106-1, Nov. 18, 1999, p ____.


  Sec. 14 . Procedure at Adjournment; Motions

      The House may adjourn at the time specified in the adjournment 
  resolution even though other business, such as a roll call, may be 
  pending. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 6325, 6719, 6720. Adjournment sine die is 
  in order notwithstanding the absence of a quorum if both Houses have 
  adopted a concurrent resolution providing for sine die adjournment on 
  that day. Manual Sec. 55; 5 Hinds Sec. 6721.

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      The time for adjournment specified in the resolution having 
  arrived, the motion to adjourn is made by the Majority Leader or his 
  designee:

      Mr. Speaker, in accordance with House Concurrent Resolution ____, 
    I move that the House do now adjourn.

      The yeas and nays may be ordered on this motion. The adoption of a 
  concurrent resolution providing for adjournment sine die on a day 
  certain does not preclude a demand for the yeas and nays on the motion 
  to adjourn on that day. 87-1, Sept. 27, 1961, p 21528.