[House Practice: A Guide to the Rules, Precedents and Procedures of the House]
[Chapter 47. Reconsideration]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office, www.gpo.gov]


[[Page 791]]

 
                       CHAPTER 47 - RECONSIDERATION

                              HOUSE PRACTICE

  Sec.  1. Generally; Use of Motion
  Sec.  2. Pro Forma Motions Distinguished
  Sec.  3. Effect of Motion
  Sec.  4. Who May Offer Motion
  Sec.  5. When Motion Is In Order
  Sec.  6. Use in Standing Committees
  Sec.  7. Forms
  Sec.  8. Precedence and Privilege of Motion
  Sec.  9. Quorum Requirements
  Sec. 10. Debate and Voting; Withdrawal
  Sec. 11. Application to Particular Propositions
  Sec. 12. -- Other Motions and Requests
  Sec. 13. -- Bills and Resolutions; Amendments
  Sec. 14. -- Amendments Between the Houses; Conference Reports
  Sec. 15. -- Measures Sent to the Senate or the President
        Research References
          5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5605-5705
          8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2774-2795
          Deschler Ch 23 Sec. Sec. 33-41
          Manual Sec. Sec. 1003-1011


  Sec. 1 . Generally; Use of Motion

                                In General

      By long tradition, the vote of the House on a proposition usually 
  is not final and conclusive until there has been an opportunity to 
  reconsider it. A proposition is not regarded as passed until a motion 
  to reconsider it is disposed of or precluded. The motion to reconsider 
  under rule XIX clause 3 is the procedural device that permits the 
  House to review its action on a given proposal. Its purpose is to 
  allow the House to reflect on the wisdom of its action on the 
  proposition. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33.

                           Historical Background

      Although not mentioned in the first rules of the House, adopted in 
  1789, the motion to reconsider was at that time well known in 
  parliamentary

[[Page 792]]

  practice. 5 Hinds Sec. 5605. The motion was used in the Continental 
  Congress and in the House from its first organization. It was made the 
  subject of a rule of the House in 1802. Manual Sec. 1003. In 1811, the 
  rule was modified by limiting the time during which the motion might 
  be offered to ``the same or succeeding day'' as the vote to be 
  reconsidered. The rule was further revised in 1880, but has existed in 
  the rules since then with only minor changes. 5 Hinds Sec. 5605.

                       Use in Committee of the Whole

      The motion to reconsider is in order in the House and in the House 
  as in the Committee of the Whole but not in the Committee of the 
  Whole. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4716-4718; 8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2324, 2325, 
  2793; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. Sec. 33, 39.10. Indeed, a request to 
  reconsider a vote is not in order in the Committee even by unanimous 
  consent. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.12. However, on occasion, in lieu of a 
  motion to reconsider, the Chairman has allowed a unanimous-consent 
  request to vacate the proceedings whereby an amendment had been 
  adopted. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.13.

                   Entering and Calling Up Distinguished

      A distinction should be made at the outset between entering the 
  motion and offering or calling up the motion. Entering the motion and 
  offering the motion can be separate events. 8 Cannon Sec. 2785. One 
  Member may enter the motion, and another Member may call up the 
  motion. Sec. 4, infra. In the modern practice, the motion is rarely 
  entered but rather is considered as pending when offered. The motion 
  must be offered within the two-day period allowed by the rule, but a 
  motion merely entered during that time may remain pending 
  indefinitely. Sec. Sec. 5, 8, infra.


  Sec. 2 . Pro Forma Motions Distinguished

      Normally, the Speaker declares, after the announcement of a vote, 
  ``without objection, a motion to reconsider is laid on the table.'' 
  Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 34. The effect of this declaration is to preclude 
  a subsequent motion to reconsider, and it is the accepted 
  parliamentary mode of making the vote in question final. Deschler Ch 
  23 Sec. 34.5. Thereafter, the proposition may be taken up again only 
  by special rule, unanimous consent, or suspension of the rules. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 5640; see also Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 38.5. A Member who is 
  opposed to the tabling of the motion to reconsider must object to the 
  Speaker's declaration in a timely manner and is well advised to notify 
  the Speaker in advance of his intention to seek genuine 
  reconsideration. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 34. If such objection is made, 
  one Member may move to reconsider and another Member may immediately 
  move to table that motion. 5

[[Page 793]]

  Hinds Sec. 5637. Disposition of the motion to reconsider is permitted 
  while the previous question is operating. 8 Cannon Sec. 2784.


  Sec. 3 . Effect of Motion

                       Effect When Motion Is Entered

      After the House has voted on a proposition and a motion to 
  reconsider it is entered, the effect is to suspend the proposition. 
  Manual Sec. 1007; 5 Hinds Sec. 5704; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. The 
  motion is thereafter considered as pending and, if not acted on, will 
  remain pending, even in succeeding sessions of the same Congress. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 5684. However, when a Congress expires without the House 
  having acted on the motion, the motion fails, and the original 
  proposition stands or falls according to the original vote. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5704 (footnote).
      A motion to reconsider a bill having been entered, the Speaker 
  will normally decline to sign its enrollment until the motion is 
  disposed of. 5 Hinds Sec. 5705. However, where a bill has been signed 
  by the Speaker and the Vice President and has received the approval of 
  the President, it cannot be impeached on the ground that a motion to 
  reconsider it is still pending. 5 Hinds Sec. 5705 (note).

                       Effect of Agreement to Motion

      When a motion to reconsider is adopted, the question immediately 
  recurs on the proposition to be reconsidered. 5 Hinds Sec. 5703; 
  Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. Thus, when the House agrees to a motion to 
  reconsider a vote on an amendment, the amendment is again pending and 
  the Chair may put it to a vote de novo. 5 Hinds Sec. 5704. Likewise, 
  when the House agrees to reconsider a vote ordering the yeas and nays 
  (by majority vote), the question immediately recurs on ordering the 
  yeas and nays (by one-fifth of those present). Manual Sec. 1007; 5 
  Hinds Sec. Sec. 5689-5691. However, if the proposition originally 
  voted on was a motion for the previous question, that motion may be 
  withdrawn after the House has voted to reconsider it, on the theory 
  that the action of the House has effectively ``nullified'' the vote on 
  the previous question. 5 Hinds Sec. 5357. For further discussion of 
  the effect of the motion to reconsider, see Manual Sec. 1007.

                    As Precluding Repetition of Motion

      When a motion to reconsider has been offered and acted upon, a 
  second motion to reconsider is not ordinarily in order. Deschler Ch 23 
  Sec. 39.16. Otherwise, it is reasoned, motions to reconsider could be 
  offered interminably. Thus, a vote ordering the previous question may 
  be reconsidered only once. Manual Sec. 1006; 5 Hinds Sec. 5655. One 
  motion to reconsider the yeas and nays

[[Page 794]]

  having been acted on, another motion to reconsider is not in order. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 6037. Similarly, the motion to reconsider a vote on a 
  proposition having been adopted, and that vote having again been 
  taken, a second motion to reconsider may not be offered unless the 
  nature of the proposition has been changed by amendment. Manual 
  Sec. 1006; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5685-5688; 8 Cannon Sec. 2788; Deschler 
  Ch 23 Sec. 33. The general rule that precludes the repetition of the 
  motion is applied even where the House rejects the first motion by 
  laying it on the table. 5 Hinds Sec. 5632; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.15. 
  However, the tabling of a motion to reconsider the vote whereby the 
  House has amended a Senate amendment does not preclude the House from 
  acting on a subsequent Senate amendment to the same proposition or 
  considering any other proper motion to dispose of an amendment that 
  might remain in disagreement after further Senate action. Manual 
  Sec. 1006.


  Sec. 4 . Who May Offer Motion

      Rule XIX clause 3 requires the Member entering the motion to be 
  ``on the prevailing side'' but permits the motion to be called up by 
  ``any Member.'' Manual Sec. Sec. 1003, 1004. Under this rule, the 
  entering of the motion and the offering of the motion are regarded as 
  separate events. 8 Cannon Sec. 2785. However, under the modern 
  practice the motion rarely is ``entered'' but is considered pending 
  when offered. Thus, the Member offering a motion not previously 
  entered must qualify as being on the prevailing side of the issue to 
  be reconsidered. Manual Sec. 1004; 2 Hinds Sec. 1454. Those voting 
  with the losing side do not qualify. Manual Sec. 1004.
      With respect to pro forma motions to reconsider (see Sec. 2, 
  supra), any Member may object to the Chair's statement that ``without 
  objection'' a motion to reconsider a vote just taken be laid on the 
  table and need not have voted on the prevailing side to make such an 
  objection. However, if objection is made, only a Member who voted on 
  the prevailing side on a record vote may offer the motion to 
  reconsider the vote. Manual Sec. 1004.
      Likewise ineligible to move the reconsideration of a record vote 
  are Members who were absent at the time of the vote (5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5619), who failed to vote (8 Cannon Sec. 2774), or who were 
  paired on the vote with another Member (5 Hinds Sec. 5614).
      In the case of a tie vote (a tie vote resulting in the defeat of 
  the proposition), a Member voting in the negative qualifies as voting 
  on the prevailing side. 5 Hinds Sec. 5616. In the case of a 
  proposition that did not receive a requisite two-thirds vote for 
  approval, a Member voting in the negative qualifies. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. Sec. 5617, 5618.

[[Page 795]]

      When a vote is not recorded, any Member, regardless of how he 
  voted, may enter the motion. Manual Sec. 1002b; 8 Cannon Sec. 2775; 
  Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. Any point of order relating to the eligibility 
  of the Member to offer the motion should be raised before the ordering 
  of the vote on the motion. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 35.4. The Chair, having 
  voted on the prevailing side, may offer the motion to reconsider by 
  stating the pendency of the motion. A Delegate or the Resident 
  Commissioner may not offer the motion to reconsider. Manual Sec. 1004.


  Sec. 5 . When Motion Is In Order

      During the Continental Congress, there was no time limit on when 
  the motion to reconsider could be offered, and the Congress often 
  reconsidered matters passed on a preceding day or even several days or 
  months before. 5 Hinds Sec. 5605. Today rule XIX clause 3 provides 
  that the motion is in order ``on the same or succeeding day'' as that 
  vote; and, once entered, may be called up by any Member. This means 
  that the motion to reconsider may be offered or entered at any time 
  during the day on which the vote sought to be reconsidered is taken (5 
  Hinds Sec. 5674) or on the next legislative day after the question to 
  be reconsidered was voted on (Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 35.5). The entry of 
  the motion during the two days prescribed by the rule is in order, 
  even after the previous question is ordered or when a question of the 
  highest privilege is pending. 5 Hinds Sec. 5673; 8 Cannon Sec. 2785.
      Once the motion has been entered within the two-day period, it 
  remains pending indefinitely, even into a succeeding session of the 
  same Congress. 5 Hinds Sec. 5684; 8 Cannon Sec. 2787. When a motion to 
  reconsider relates to a bill belonging to a particular class of 
  business, the consideration of the motion is in order only when that 
  class of business is again in order. 5 Hinds Sec. 5677; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 2785, 2786. For example, a motion to reconsider the vote on 
  a bill on the Private Calendar properly entered may be taken up for 
  consideration only on a Private Calendar day. 8 Cannon Sec. 2786.
      In accordance with the general rule that the motion to reconsider 
  is in order at any time during the two days prescribed by the rule, 
  the motion has been held in order:

     After a demand for the previous question on a related matter 
         (5 Hinds Sec. 5656) or while the previous question is operating 
         (5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5657-5672).
     Pending a motion to go into the Committee of the Whole. 8 
         Cannon Sec. 2785.
     At a time set apart for other business if the matter sought to 
         be reconsidered is entertained during such time by unanimous 
         consent. 5 Hinds Sec. 5683.

[[Page 796]]

     After a bill to be reconsidered has gone to the Senate. 5 
         Hinds Sec. Sec. 5666, 5667.
     After the Senate has been informed of agreement by the House 
         to a Senate amendment. 5 Hinds Sec. 5672.
     After a bill has gone to the President. 5 Hinds Sec. 5668.

      However, an entered motion is not in order:

     While another Member has the floor or while another question 
         is pending before the House. 5 Hinds Sec. 5673; 8 Cannon 
         Sec. 2785.
     While the House is dividing on a motion. 8 Cannon Sec. 2791.
     In Committee of the Whole. Sec. 1, supra.

  See also Sec. Sec. 8, 12, infra.

  Sec. 6 . Use in Standing Committees

      The motion to reconsider is in order in the procedure of standing 
  committees; and in the absence of a committee rule governing the 
  motion, the committee will be governed by the analogous House rule. 8 
  Cannon Sec. 2213. Thus, the motion to reconsider may be entered in a 
  committee on the same day as the vote to be reconsidered, or on the 
  next day the committee convenes with a quorum present at which 
  business of that class is in order. Manual Sec. Sec. 416, 1005; 
  Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. Sometimes the motion must be applied to a 
  series of propositions seriatim to achieve a desired result. In a 
  committee, reconsideration of an amendment may require that the motion 
  to report first be reconsidered, and then the ordering of the previous 
  question on the measure, before a motion can be offered to reconsider 
  the amendment. Cf. 8 Cannon Sec. 2789.
      A motion to reconsider is sometimes used in a committee, when it 
  has obtained a quorum, to order reports on bills approved earlier in 
  the day in the absence of a quorum. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.1.


  Sec. 7 . Forms

      Following are the forms for entering the motion to reconsider, for 
  subsequently calling it up and bringing it to a vote, and for offering 
  the so-called pro forma motion.

                            Entering the Motion

      Member: I enter a motion to reconsider the vote by which the bill 
    H.R.  ____ was passed [or rejected].

                            Offering the Motion

      Member: I move to reconsider the vote by which the bill H.R.  ____ 
    was passed [or rejected].

[[Page 797]]

      Speaker: The gentleman moves to reconsider the vote on H.R.  ____. 
    As many as are in favor of the motion say ``aye.''

                     Pro Forma Motion--By the Speaker

      Speaker: Without objection, a motion to reconsider is laid on the 
    table.

      Note: Any Member may object to the Chair's statement that 
  ``without objection'' a motion to reconsider a vote just taken be laid 
  on the table (the Member need not be on the prevailing side). However, 
  if objection is heard, only a qualified Member may call for 
  reconsideration of the vote, and another Member may move to lay that 
  motion to reconsider on the table. Manual Sec. 1004.


  Sec. 8 . Precedence and Privilege of Motion

      Under rule XIX clause 3, when no other question is pending, the 
  motion to reconsider takes precedence of all other questions except 
  the consideration of a conference report or a motion to adjourn. 
  Manual Sec. Sec. 1003, 1005; 8 Cannon Sec. 2787. For example, the 
  motion to reconsider takes precedence of a motion to go into the 
  Committee of the Whole. 8 Cannon Sec. 2785. However, the motion is 
  subject to the question of consideration (8 Cannon Sec. 2437) and the 
  motion to lay on the table (8 Cannon Sec. 2652), unless the Chair has 
  put the question on the motion to reconsider (Manual Sec. 1009). The 
  precedence given the motion by the rule permits it to be offered, even 
  after the previous question has been moved or while it is operating. 5 
  Hinds Sec. Sec. 5656-5662; 8 Cannon Sec. 2784. A motion to reconsider 
  a secondary motion (such as a motion to postpone) that was rejected is 
  highly privileged and may be entertained by the Chair even after the 
  manager of the main proposition has yielded time to another Member and 
  before that Member has begun his remarks. 96-2, May 29, 1980, p 12663.


  Sec. 9 . Quorum Requirements

      In general, the motion to reconsider cannot be agreed to in the 
  House in the absence of a quorum when the vote to be reconsidered 
  requires a quorum. 5 Hinds Sec. 5606; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. A quorum 
  is not necessary on a motion to reconsider the vote whereby the yeas 
  and nays were ordered because the yeas and nays may be ordered by one-
  fifth of the Members present. 5 Hinds Sec. 5693.

[[Page 798]]

  Sec. 10 . Debate and Voting; Withdrawal

                                  Debate

      The motion to reconsider is debatable for one hour. Deschler Ch 23 
  Sec. 41.1. Debate is under the control of the Member offering the 
  motion if the proposition proposed to be reconsidered was debatable. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 5696; 8 Cannon Sec. 2792. If the proposition proposed to be 
  reconsidered was not debatable, then the motion calling for 
  reconsideration is itself not debatable. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5694, 5695, 
  5698; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. Thus, the motion to reconsider a vote 
  ordering the previous question is not debatable. Manual Sec. 1010.
      An earlier view was that a motion to reconsider a vote may be 
  debatable even if the previous question was operating at the time of 
  such vote, on the theory that the vote of the House ``exhausted the 
  previous question so as to open up the motion to debate.'' 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5494. However, the current view is that, if the proposition to be 
  reconsidered was voted on under the operation of the previous 
  question, the motion to reconsider is not debatable because a primary 
  function of the previous question is to terminate debate. Manual 
  Sec. 1010; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5656, 5701; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 38.7; 
  Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 6.49 (note). If the motion is agreed to, and 
  if that proposition is again taken up, it is voted on without debate 
  unless the ordering of the previous question itself is reconsidered. 
  Deschler-Brown Ch 29 Sec. 6.49.

                                  Voting

      A simple majority vote is sufficient to adopt a motion to 
  reconsider, even when the vote reconsidered requires two-thirds for 
  affirmative action. Manual Sec. 1008; 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5617, 5618; 8 
  Cannon Sec. 2795. A majority vote also is required to reconsider a 
  vote ordering the yeas and nays, although one-fifth is sufficient to 
  order the yeas and nays. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5689-5692; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. 2790. If the House votes to reconsider, the yeas and nays may be 
  ordered again by one-fifth. 5 Hinds Sec. 5689.

                           Withdrawal of Motion

      The motion to reconsider having been entered within the time 
  specified by the rules--that is, on the same or succeeding day as the 
  vote on the proposition to be reconsidered--it may not be withdrawn 
  without the consent of the House thereafter. Manual Sec. 1003.

[[Page 799]]

  Sec. 11 . Application to Particular Propositions

                                 Generally

      Rule XIX clause 3 applies whenever ``a motion has been carried or 
  lost. . . .'' Manual Sec. 1003. The term ``motion'' in this rule has 
  been construed so as to permit reconsideration of a wide variety of 
  propositions. See Sec. Sec. 12-14, infra. The motion is applicable 
  whether the passage of the proposition required a simple majority or a 
  two-thirds vote. 8 Cannon Sec. 2778. However, the motion is not in 
  order when dilatory and manifestly for the purpose of delay. 5 Hinds 
  Sec. Sec. 5731-5733, 5735, 5739; 8 Cannon Sec. Sec. 2797, 2815, 2822.

                               House Orders

      The motion to reconsider applies to the vote on a House order, 
  although the execution of that order has begun. 3 Hinds Sec. 2028; 5 
  Hinds Sec. 5665. The motion may be applied to a vote ordering the yeas 
  and nays (5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5689-5691; 6029; 8 Cannon Sec. 2790) or to 
  a vote refusing the yeas and nays (5 Hinds Sec. 5692) or to the vote 
  by which the House refuses to order a third reading of a bill (8 
  Cannon Sec. 2777). The motion to reconsider also may be used to reopen 
  the proceedings whereby the House has voted to expunge certain matter 
  from the Congressional Record. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.7.
      The motion may not be applied to the vote by which the House has 
  decided a question of parliamentary procedure submitted by the Speaker 
  for the decision of the House. Manual Sec. 1006; 8 Cannon Sec. 2776; 
  Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33. However, the motion may be applied to a vote 
  laying an appeal on the table. Compare 5 Hinds Sec. 5630 with 5 Hinds 
  Sec. 5631.

                                 Referrals

      Under rule XIX clause 4, measures referred to a committee may not 
  be brought back into the House on a motion to reconsider. Manual 
  Sec. 1011. This rule, which was adopted in its present form in 1880, 
  was intended to prevent a Member from bringing back into the House, on 
  a motion to reconsider, any matter that he had obtained unanimous 
  consent to introduce or submit for reference. 5 Hinds Sec. 5647. The 
  rule was intended to apply to the initial formal reference to a 
  committee and not to a motion to recommit. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.6. 
  However, it is too late to reconsider a vote by which a measure was 
  recommitted to committee after the committee report has been made. 5 
  Hinds Sec. 5651.

                     In Relation to Previous Question

      The motion to reconsider may be applied only once to a vote 
  ordering the previous question. 5 Hinds Sec. 5655; 8 Cannon Sec. 2790. 
  It may not be ap

[[Page 800]]

  plied to a vote ordering the previous question that has been partially 
  executed. For example, if the previous question has been ordered on a 
  bill and an amendment thereto, and the amendment has been disposed of, 
  the vote upon which the previous question was ordered is not subject 
  to reconsideration. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5653, 5654. Furthermore, if the 
  special order governing consideration of a measure orders the previous 
  question on the measure, and on any amendment thereto, to final 
  adoption or passage without intervening motion except one motion to 
  recommit (which is the modern practice), the vote upon which an 
  amendment was disposed of is not subject to reconsideration. 4 Hinds 
  Sec. 3203.


  Sec. 12 . -- Other Motions and Requests

                                 Generally

      The motion to reconsider is applied to permit the House to review 
  its vote on certain motions, including:

     An affirmative vote on a motion for the previous question, 
         unless the previous question has been partially executed, as by 
         a vote on certain amendments. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5653-5655; 
         Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33.
     A vote on the motion to lay on the table, whether decided in 
         the affirmative or in the negative. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5628, 
         5629, 5695, 6288; 8 Cannon Sec. 2785; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 38.1.
     An affirmative vote on a motion to go into the Committee of 
         the Whole. 5 Hinds Sec. 5641; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33.
     An affirmative vote on the question of consideration. Manual 
         Sec. 907.
     An agreement by the House to a unanimous-consent request. 8 
         Cannon Sec. 2794; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33.
     An affirmative vote on a motion to suspend the rules. Manual 
         Sec. 886.

                            When Not Applicable

      The motion to reconsider may not be applied to votes rejecting 
  certain motions, such as:

     A vote rejecting a motion to go into the Committee of the 
         Whole. 5 Hinds Sec. 5641.
     A vote rejecting the question of consideration. 5 Hinds 
         Sec. Sec. 5626, 5627; Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 39.14.
     A vote rejecting the motion to suspend the rules. Manual 
         Sec. 886; 5 Hinds Sec. 5645; 8 Cannon Sec. 2781; Deschler Ch 23 
         Sec. 33.
     A vote rejecting a motion to recess. 5 Hinds Sec. 5625.
     A vote rejecting a motion to adjourn. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5620-
         5622.
     A vote rejecting a motion to fix the day to which the House 
         would adjourn. 5 Hinds Sec. 5624. But see 5 Hinds Sec. 5623.


[[Page 801]]



      Certain motions or questions are not subject to the motion to 
  reconsider because of the adoption of ``expedited procedures'' 
  prescribed by statute and intended to bring a legislative matter to a 
  final conclusion without all the procedural protections normally 
  accorded. See Manual Sec. 1130 for examples of such laws. One such 
  example is found in section 305(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 
  1974, which precludes the motion to reconsider the vote by which a 
  concurrent resolution on the budget is agreed to or disagreed to and 
  the vote on adoption of a conference report on the same.


  Sec. 13 . -- Bills and Resolutions; Amendments

      The motion to reconsider may be applied to the vote by which a 
  bill or joint resolution was passed (5 Hinds Sec. 5666), including a 
  private bill (4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 3468, 3469); to a vote on the 
  engrossment of the bill (5 Hinds Sec. 5663); to a vote refusing to 
  order a third reading of the bill (8 Cannon Sec. 2777); and to a vote 
  by which a measure was recommitted to committee (Deschler Ch 23 
  Sec. 39.6). The motion also is applied to permit reconsideration of a 
  vote on a resolution. 5 Hinds Sec. 5609.
      The motion to reconsider may be applied to permit reconsideration 
  of a vote on an amendment; however, if the motion is not offered until 
  after the passage of the amended bill, such reconsideration can be 
  secured only after a successful motion to reconsider the vote on the 
  passage of the bill. Cf. 8 Cannon Sec. 2789. Similarly, to entertain a 
  motion to reconsider a vote on an amendment to an amendment, it is 
  first necessary to vote to reconsider the vote by which the original 
  amendment, as amended, was disposed of. Deschler Ch 23 Sec. 33.


  Sec. 14 . -- Amendments Between the Houses; Conference Reports

      A motion to reconsider may be applied to a vote on a Senate 
  amendment to a House bill. The fact that the House has informed the 
  Senate that it has voted to agree to such an amendment does not 
  prevent a motion to reconsider that vote. 5 Hinds Sec. 5672. However, 
  such a motion must be timely offered. After a conference has been 
  agreed to and the managers for the House appointed, it is too late to 
  move to reconsider the vote whereby the House acted on an amendment in 
  disagreement. 5 Hinds Sec. 5664.
      The motion to reconsider may be applied to a vote on a conference 
  report or to a vote recommitting a conference report. Deschler Ch 23 
  Sec. Sec. 39.4, 39.5. After disposition of a conference report and 
  amendments reported therefrom in disagreement, it is in order to move 
  to reconsider the vote on a motion disposing of one of the amendments. 
  Manual Sec. 1006.

[[Page 802]]

      Tabling a motion to reconsider ordinarily prevents the House from 
  reconsideration of the vote in question. However, the laying on the 
  table of a motion to reconsider the vote whereby the House has amended 
  a Senate amendment does not preclude the House from acting on a 
  subsequent Senate amendment to the same proposition or considering any 
  other proper motion to dispose of an amendment that might remain in 
  disagreement after further Senate action. Manual Sec. 1006.


  Sec. 15 . -- Measures Sent to the Senate or the President

      The motion to reconsider may be applied to a measure that has been 
  sent to the Senate. If that motion is agreed to, a motion to recall 
  the measure is privileged. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5666, 5667, 5669. 
  Reconsideration of the vote on the measure may be permitted even if 
  the measure has passed both Houses and even if the measure has been 
  sent to the President. 4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 3466-3469; 5 Hinds Sec. 5668. 
  It would appear, however, that once the bill has been signed by the 
  President, it cannot be called into question pursuant to a pending 
  motion to reconsider the measure. 5 Hinds Sec. 5704 (note). If the 
  President returns the bill to the House with his objections, and the 
  House votes on the passage of the bill notwithstanding the objections 
  of the President, that vote is not subject to the motion to reconsider 
  because the Constitution expressly provides for that vote as one in 
  the nature of reconsideration. U.S. Const. art. I, Sec. 7, cl. 2; 
  Manual Sec. 109; 5 Hinds Sec. 5644; 8 Cannon Sec. 2778.