[House Practice: A Guide to the Rules, Precedents and Procedures of the House]
[Chapter 52. Special Orders of Business]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov]


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                   CHAPTER 52 - SPECIAL ORDERS OF BUSINESS

                              HOUSE PRACTICE

  Sec. 1. In General
  Sec. 2. Reporting Special Orders of Business
  Sec. 3. Forms
  Sec. 4. Consideration of Special Orders of Business
  Sec. 5. Modification of Special Orders of Business
  Sec. 6. Procedures Prescribed by Special Orders of Business
        Research References
          4 Hinds Sec. Sec. 3152-3265
          7 Cannon Sec. Sec. 758-845
          Deschler Ch 21 Sec. Sec. 16-19
          Manual Sec. Sec. 734, 855, 857-859


  Sec. 1 . In General

                        Jurisdiction and Authority

      A resolution that specifies the manner in which a measure is to be 
  taken up and the procedures to be followed during its consideration is 
  called a ``special order of business'' or ``special rule.'' Such a 
  resolution, once adopted by the House, gives privilege to the measure 
  to be considered. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 16. The Committee on Rules has 
  jurisdiction to report such resolutions under rule X clause 1(m). 
  Manual Sec. 733. By adoption of a special order by majority vote, the 
  House establishes the parameters of its agenda on an ad hoc basis. 
  Special orders of business are distinct from ``special-order 
  speeches,'' which are discussed in Consideration and Debate.
      Because of the wide diversity of their use in the legislative 
  process, special rules are discussed in many other chapters in this 
  work; such as Amendments; Committees of the Whole; Conferences Between 
  the Houses; Consideration and Debate; Germaneness of Amendments; Order 
  of Business; Postponement; and Senate Bills and Amendments Between the 
  Houses. Measures not taken up under a special order of business may be 
  taken up by unanimous consent or considered under suspension of the 
  rules or are privileged in their own right under other standing rules. 
  See Appropriations; Order of Business; Privileged Business;

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  Questions of Privilege; Unanimous-Consent Agreements; and Suspension 
  of Rules.

               Restrictions on Authority of Rules Committee

      The broad power of the Committee on Rules to report resolutions 
  varying the order of business or providing a special order is 
  expressly restricted by rule XIII clause 6(c), which protects the 
  motion to recommit and the Calendar Wednesday call of committees. See 
  Refer and Recommit and Calendar Wednesday. The restriction relating to 
  Calendar Wednesday business preserves the requirement for a two-thirds 
  vote to dispense with business under rule XV clause 7. The rule 
  protects the ability of a reporting committee to call up, under the 
  general rules of the House, a measure it reported, thus bypassing the 
  necessity of a special order providing for consideration of the 
  measure. The restriction relating to the motion to recommit, which is 
  considered a fundamental prerogative of the minority, preserves the 
  opportunity to include proper instructions in the motion to recommit a 
  bill or joint resolution as described in rule XIX clause 2(b). Manual 
  Sec. 857.
      In the 104th Congress, the restriction relating to the motion to 
  recommit was extended to prohibit the Committee on Rules from 
  recommending a rule or order that would prevent a motion by the 
  Minority Leader or his designee to recommit a bill or joint resolution 
  with instructions to report back an amendment otherwise in order, 
  except in the case of a Senate bill or joint resolution for which the 
  text of a House-passed measure is being substituted. Manual Sec. 857. 
  For a discussion of the restriction before it was extended to include 
  amendatory instructions, see Manual Sec. 859.
      A special order providing for consideration of a bill under 
  suspension of the rules does not violate rule XIII clause 6 because no 
  motion to recommit is available under suspension when the previous 
  question is not in order. Manual Sec. 859; 8 Cannon Sec. 2267.
      Section 425 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 precludes 
  consideration of a measure imposing Federal intergovernmental mandates 
  above a specified threshold amount. Manual Sec. 1127; 2 USC 
  Sec. 658e(a). Section 426 precludes the consideration of a special 
  order of business that waives points of order under section 425 of the 
  Congressional Budget Act. However, this restriction is ``enforced'' by 
  a Member raising a point or order against the rule and then the House 
  disposing of the question of consideration on the rule. The attention 
  of the House is thus focused on the waiver. After limited debate, the 
  House may decide to proceed with consideration of the rule. See 
  Unfunded Mandates.

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                      Application to Various Measures

      The privilege of the Committee on Rules to report special orders 
  of business extends to special orders for the consideration of 
  individual bills or classes of bills or the consideration of a 
  specified amendment to a bill and the prescription of a mode of 
  considering such amendment. 5 Hinds Sec. 6774; 8 Cannon Sec. 2258; see 
  Sec. 6, infra.
      Customarily, a committee that has reported, or has jurisdiction 
  over, a measure requests the Committee on Rules to provide a special 
  order of business for its consideration. However, the Committee on 
  Rules also may provide for consideration of an unreported bill (the 
  adoption of the resolution discharges the committees to which the bill 
  was referred). 8 Cannon Sec. 2259; Deschler Ch 21 Sec. Sec. 16.15-
  16.17. It may even provide for the consideration of a bill that has 
  not yet been introduced or permit consideration of a measure that 
  comes into existence by virtue of adoption by the House of the special 
  order. Manual Sec. 855; 8 Cannon Sec. 3388. For example, it may 
  provide for consideration of a joint resolution originated upon 
  adoption of the special order consisting of the text of a Senate-
  passed joint resolution identical to a measure previously rejected by 
  the House under a separate statutory approval procedure. 99-2, Apr. 
  15, 1986, p 7531.
      The Committee on Rules also may recommend a ``hereby'' resolution 
  that provides for a concurrent resolution correcting the enrollment of 
  a bill to be considered as adopted by the House upon the adoption of 
  the special order. Similarly, it may provide that a Senate amendment 
  pending at the Speaker's table and otherwise requiring consideration 
  in Committee of the Whole be ``hereby'' considered as adopted upon 
  adoption of the special order or considered as adopted with a further 
  specified amendment. Manual Sec. 855; Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 16.11. In 
  both cases, there is no bill or joint resolution pending initial final 
  passage. Therefore, the stricture under rule XIII clause 6(c) against 
  denying a motion to recommit with instructions is not operative.
      A special order of business may make in order two or more 
  propositions. It also may link two measures separately considered into 
  one engrossment. Manual Sec. 476.
      Special orders of business that prescribe procedures for the 
  consideration of conference reports and amendments between the Houses 
  may:

     Waive points of order against a conference report and against 
         its consideration. 107-1, Dec. 12, 2001, p ____.
     Provide for the immediate consideration of a conference report 
         when it is eventually reported from the committee of 
         conference. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 16.

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     Permit a motion to ``hook-up'' a House-passed measure with a 
         similar Senate-passed measure and a motion to go to conference. 
         107-1, July 12, 2001, p ____.
     Provide for a motion to dispose of Senate amendments to a 
         House bill. 104-1, Dec. 13, 1995, p 36290.
     Permit a third-degree amendment to be offered to a Senate 
         amendment. 103-1, Sept. 30, 1993, p 23148.
     Allow conferees to refile a conference report in a corrected 
         form without a new meeting or new signatures. 104-1, Nov. 17, 
         1995, p 33741.

      The Committee on Rules has reported as privileged a special order 
  of business nearly identical to one previously rejected by the House, 
  but it was held not to constitute ``another of the same substance'' 
  within the meaning of Jefferson's Manual because it provided a 
  different scheme for general debate. Manual Sec. 515.
      At the convening of a new Congress, a special order of business 
  has been offered as privileged at the direction of the majority party 
  conference to provide for consideration in the House of a resolution 
  to adopt the rules of a new Congress. Manual Sec. 60.

                                  Waivers

      The Committee on Rules may report and call up as privileged 
  resolutions temporarily waiving or altering any rule of the House, 
  including statutory provisions enacted as an exercise of the 
  rulemaking authority of the House, that would prohibit the 
  consideration of a bill or otherwise establish an exclusive procedure 
  for consideration of a particular type of measure. Manual Sec. 857. 
  For example, the Committee on Rules has reported as privileged a joint 
  resolution repealing the statutory requirement--a joint rule--that 
  each House adjourn sine die not later than July 31. Manual Sec. 1106.
      Points of order do not lie against the consideration of a special 
  order for waiving points of order against a measure, as it is for the 
  House to determine, by a majority vote on the adoption of the 
  resolution, whether certain rules should be waived. Deschler Ch 21 
  Sec. 16.9. However, a statutory rule may contain language restricting 
  the authority of the Committee on Rules to recommend a waiver. See 
  Unfunded Mandates.
      Under rule XIII clause 6(g), a special order of business shall, 
  ``to the maximum extent possible,'' be specific with respect to any 
  waiver of a point of order against the underlying measure or against 
  its consideration. Manual Sec. 863.

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  Sec. 2 . Reporting Special Orders of Business

                           Generally; Typography

      Under rule XIII clause 3(g), a report from the Committee on Rules 
  repealing or amending a standing rule must include a Ramseyer-type 
  comparative print; that is, appropriate typography showing the 
  proposed omissions or insertions. This clause does not apply to 
  resolutions that merely provide temporary waivers of rules during the 
  consideration of particular legislative business. Manual Sec. 848.

                    Privilege and Precedence of Reports

      A report from the Committee on Rules enjoys high privilege. 8 
  Cannon Sec. 2260. It takes precedence over a privileged motion to 
  discharge a committee and has been called up before District of 
  Columbia business that is privileged on District Day. Deschler Ch 21 
  Sec. Sec. 17.7, 17.8. A report from the Committee on Rules takes 
  precedence over a motion to consider a measure that is ``highly 
  privileged'' pursuant to a statute enacted as an exercise of the 
  rulemaking authority of the House, acknowledging the constitutional 
  authority of the House to change its rules at any time. Manual 
  Sec. 857.
      Although highly privileged, a report from the Committee on Rules 
  yields to the presentation of conference reports (5 Hinds Sec. 6449) 
  and to a question of the privileges of the House (8 Cannon Sec. 3491). 
  A report is not in order after the House has voted to go into 
  Committee of the Whole. 5 Hinds Sec. 6781.
      At the convening of a new Congress, a special order of business 
  has been offered as privileged at the direction of the majority party 
  conference to provide for consideration in the House of a resolution 
  to adopt the rules of a new Congress. Manual Sec. 60.
      Once a special order of business is under debate, the House can 
  postpone further consideration and proceed to other business only by 
  unanimous consent. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 17.11. However, under rule XVI 
  clause 2, the manager of the resolution can withdraw it from 
  consideration before a decision has been made thereon. Deschler Ch 21 
  Sec. 18.41. If the resolution is later reoffered, debate under the 
  hour rule begins anew. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 17.11 (note).

                    Reporting to the House; Calling Up

      Under rule XIII clause 6(d), the Committee on Rules must present a 
  special-order resolution to the House within three legislative days of 
  the time when it orders a report with respect to the underlying 
  measure. Manual Sec. 861.

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      Ordinarily, a report from the Committee on Rules is called up for 
  consideration by a member of that committee who has been so 
  authorized. However, under rule XIII clause 6(d), if the report has 
  been on the House Calendar for seven legislative days without being 
  called up, any member of the committee may call it up provided the 
  member gives notice of one calendar day of his intention to do so. 
  This rule may be invoked by a minority member of the committee. Manual 
  Sec. 861.
      Under rule XIII clause 6(e), in the event an adverse report is 
  made by the Committee on Rules on a special order of business, any 
  Member of the House may call up the report and move the adoption of 
  the resolution on a day when motions to discharge committees are in 
  order. Manual Sec. 861; see Discharging Measures From Committees.

                          Same-day Consideration

      Although it is always in order to call up for consideration a 
  resolution reported from the Committee on Rules relating to the order 
  of business, it may not be considered on the same legislative day as 
  reported under rule XIII clause 6(a) unless so determined by a vote of 
  not less than two-thirds of the Members voting, a quorum being 
  present. This requirement does not apply to resolutions called up 
  during the last three days of a session. Manual Sec. 857. The 
  Committee on Rules may report a resolution waiving this requirement. 
  93-2, Dec. 19, 1974, p 41572.
       The two-thirds vote needed for same-day consideration does not 
  alter the requirement that a simple majority must actually adopt the 
  resolution. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18.7. If consideration is ordered by a 
  two-thirds vote, a point of order that the resolution has not been 
  printed does not lie. Manual Sec. 857.
      Under rule XIII clause 6(a)(2), the two-thirds vote requirement 
  for same-day consideration does not apply if the only effect of a rule 
  is to waive the three-day layover requirement for a particular 
  reported bill or the three-day layover and two-hour availability 
  requirement for a conference report and amendments in disagreement. 
  Manual Sec. 857.
      A report filed by the Committee on Rules at any time before the 
  convening of the House on the next legislative day may be called up 
  for immediate consideration without the two-thirds requirement. If the 
  House continues in session into a second calendar day and then meets 
  again that day, or convenes for two legislative days on the same 
  calendar day, any report filed on the first legislative day may be 
  called up on the second without the question of consideration being 
  raised. Manual Sec. 857.

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  Sec. 3 . Forms

                               Filing a Rule

      Member: Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules, I 
    present a privileged report.
      Speaker: The Clerk will report the title of the resolution. [After 
    Clerk reports title.] The report is referred to the House Calendar 
    and ordered to be printed.

                             Calling Up a Rule

      Member: Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules, I 
    call up House Resolution  ____ and ask for its immediate 
    consideration.
      Speaker: The Clerk will report the resolution. [Unanimous consent 
    to waive the reading in full is normally not entertained.] The 
    gentleman from  ____ is recognized for one hour.

                  Calling Up Rule on Same Day It Is Filed

      Member: Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules, I 
    present a privileged report.
      Speaker: The Clerk will report the title of the resolution. [After 
    Clerk reports title.] The report is referred to the House Calendar 
    and ordered to be printed.
      Member: Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules, I 
    call up House Resolution ------ and ask for its immediate 
    consideration.
      Speaker: The Clerk will report the resolution. [Unanimous consent 
    to waive the reading in full is normally not entertained.] The 
    question is, will the House consider the resolution. [If two-thirds 
    of those voting, a quorum being present, vote in the affirmative.] 
    The House has voted to consider the resolution, and the gentleman 
    from  __________ is recognized for one hour.


  Sec. 4 . Consideration of Special Orders of Business

                                  Debate

      Special orders of business reported from the Committee on Rules 
  are considered in the House, as distinguished from the Committee of 
  the Whole. Therefore, a Member recognized to call up a special order 
  of business by direction of the Committee on Rules manages one hour of 
  debate. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18. Other Members may be recognized only 
  if yielded time. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18.15. It is customary for the 
  Member calling up the resolution to yield 30 minutes of the hour to a 
  minority member of the Committee on Rules for purposes of debate only. 
  Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18.15 (note). The minority member is permitted to 
  yield his time in segments to other Members.

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      Debate on a special order of business may range to the merits of 
  the measure to be made in order because the question of consideration 
  of the bill is involved. However, it should not range to the merits of 
  a measure not to be considered under that special order. Manual 
  Sec. 948.

                        Amendments and Divisibility

      Under rule XVI clause 5(b), a special order of business resolution 
  is not divisible. Manual Sec. 919. The manager of the special order of 
  business may offer one or more amendments thereto, and authorization 
  of the committee is not required. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18.23. The 
  resolution is not otherwise subject to amendment from the floor unless 
  the manager yields for that purpose or unless the House fails to order 
  the previous question. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18.19.

                      Dilatory Motions Not Permitted

      The question of consideration may not be raised against a report 
  from the Committee on Rules. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 4961, 4962; 8 Cannon 
  Sec. Sec. 2440, 2441. The clause forbidding dilatory motions has been 
  construed strictly. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5740-5742. As such, the 
  following have been excluded:

     A motion to commit or recommit after the ordering of the 
         previous question. 5 Hinds Sec. Sec. 5593-5601; 8 Cannon 
         Sec. Sec. 2270, 2750, 2753.
     An appeal from the Chair's decision not to entertain the 
         question of consideration or a motion to lay the pending 
         resolution on the table. 5 Hinds Sec. 5739.
     A motion to postpone to a day certain. Manual Sec. 858.
     A motion to table an amendment offered by the manager of the 
         rule. Manual Sec. 858.

      A motion to reconsider the vote on the motion for the previous 
  question on the rule (and on any pending amendment thereto) is not 
  dilatory and may be laid on the table without carrying with it the 
  resolution itself. Manual Sec. 858; 5 Hinds Sec. 5739.
      In the event that the motion for the previous question is rejected 
  on a privileged resolution from the Committee on Rules, the provisions 
  of clause 6(b) prohibiting ``dilatory'' motions no longer strictly 
  apply. As such, the resolution is subject to proper amendment, further 
  debate, or a motion to table or refer, subject to being preempted by a 
  preferential motion offered by another Member. Manual Sec. 858.
      Only one motion to adjourn is admissible during the consideration 
  of a report from the Committee on Rules, and the motion may not be 
  offered when another Member has the floor. Manual Sec. 858. Where the 
  House adjourns during the consideration of a report from the Committee 
  on Rules,

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  further consideration of the report becomes unfinished business on the 
  following day, and debate resumes from the point where interrupted. 
  Manual Sec. 858.

                 Rejection of Motion for Previous Question

      In the event that the motion for the previous question is 
  rejected, the Member who has led the opposition will be recognized for 
  one hour unless preempted by a preferential motion, such as the motion 
  to table, which may be offered by any Member. The Member recognized 
  may yield such time as he desires, may offer an amendment to the 
  resolution, and may move the previous question on the amendment and 
  the resolution. Deschler Ch 21 Sec. 18.

                                  Voting

      A special order of business requires a majority vote for adoption. 
  4 Hinds Sec. 3169. Under rule XX clause 8, the Speaker has the 
  authority to postpone for up to two legislative days a record vote on 
  the motion for the previous question or on the adoption of a rule. 
  Manual Sec. 1030; see Voting.


  Sec. 5 . Modification of Special Orders of Business

                               By Resolution

      The Committee on Rules may report a privileged resolution 
  modifying the operation or effect of a previous special order adopted 
  by the House. Such a resolution may provide additional procedures to 
  govern the further consideration of a measure already pending in 
  Committee of the Whole and may include limitations on further debate 
  or amendments. 8 Cannon Sec. 2258; Deschler Ch 21 Sec. Sec. 16.26, 
  16.27.

                     By Unanimous Consent in the House

      A unanimous-consent request to modify the terms established by a 
  special order providing for the consideration of a measure in the 
  Committee of the Whole may be made after its adoption by the House and 
  before completion of consideration of the underlying measure in the 
  Committee. 99-2, Sept. 24, 1986, p 25890.
      A unanimous-consent request may not be entertained in the 
  Committee of the Whole if the request would materially modify 
  procedures required by a special order of business adopted by the 
  House. Such requests must be

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  made in the House. For example, the following requests may not be 
  entertained in the Committee of the Whole:

     To permit a perfecting amendment to be offered to the 
         underlying bill where a special order permitted its 
         consideration only as a perfecting amendment to a committee 
         amendment.
     To permit a substitute to be read for amendment by section 
         where the special order did not so provide.
     To extend the time limitation for consideration of amendments 
         beyond that set by a special order requiring the Chair to put 
         the question on the pending amendments at the expiration of 
         certain hours of consideration.
     To restrict authority granted in a special order to ``en 
         bloc'' amendments.
     To change the scheme for control or duration of general debate 
         specified by the House.
     To preempt the Chair's discretion to postpone and cluster 
         votes or to schedule further consideration of a pending measure 
         to a subsequent day.
     To postpone a vote on an appeal of a ruling of the Chair.
     To permit an amendment to an amendment rendered unamendable by 
         a special order or to permit a subsequent amendment changing 
         such unamendable amendment after its adoption.
     To permit consideration of an amendment out of the order 
         specified in a special order.
     To permit consideration of an additional amendment or to 
         authorize a supplemental report from the Committee on Rules in 
         lieu of the original report referred to in the special order.
     To permit another to offer an amendment vested in a specified 
         Member.
     To permit a division of the question on an amendment rendered 
         indivisible by a special order.

  Manual Sec. 993.

      Although the House may alter the terms of an adopted special order 
  to make an additional amendment in order in the Committee of the 
  Whole, the Chair may decline to entertain a unanimous-consent request 
  to admit an additional nongermane amendment unless assured the request 
  has been cleared. This is consistent with the Speaker's announced 
  policy of conferring recognition for unanimous-consent requests for 
  the consideration of unreported bills and resolutions only when 
  assured that the majority and minority floor and committee leaderships 
  have no objection. Manual Sec. Sec. 857, 956.
      The Member offering an amendment in the Committee of the Whole 
  pursuant to a special order of the House has the burden of proving 
  that it meets the description of the amendment made in order. Manual 
  Sec. 993.

            By Unanimous Consent in the Committee of the Whole

      The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole may entertain a 
  unanimous-consent request to modify a special order of business if the 
  request

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  proposes merely an incidental or minor change to the special order. 
  For example, the following unanimous-consent requests have been 
  entertained in Committee of the Whole:

     To permit the modification of a designated amendment rendered 
         unamendable by a special order, once offered, if the request is 
         propounded by the proponent of the amendment, including as 
         unfinished business where proceedings on a request for a 
         recorded vote have been postponed.

      Note: In this case, the modification is not technically an 
  amendment to the designated amendment and is thus not specifically 
  foreclosed by the special order.

     To permit a page reference to be included in a designated 
         amendment made in order as printed where the printed amendment 
         did not include that reference.
     To permit a supporter of an amendment to claim time for debate 
         allocated by special order to an opponent, where no opponent 
         seeks recognition.
     To shorten the time set by special order for debate on a 
         particular amendment.
     To lengthen the time set by special order for debate on a 
         particular amendment under terms of control congruent with 
         those set by the order of the House.
     To permit en bloc consideration of several amendments under a 
         special order providing for the sequential consideration of 
         designated separate amendments.
     To permit one of two committees controlling time for general 
         debate pursuant to a special order to yield control of its time 
         to the other.
     To permit the offering of pro forma amendments for the purpose 
         of debate under a special order limiting both amendments and 
         debate thereon (but not addressing pro forma amendments).
     To reach ahead in the reading of a general appropriation bill 
         to consider one amendment without prejudice to others earlier 
         in the bill under a special order of the House contemplating 
         that each remaining amendment be offered only at the 
         ``appropriate point in the reading of the bill.''
     To permit the reading of an amendment that already was 
         considered as read under the special order of the House.

  Manual Sec. 993.

      By unanimous consent the House may delegate to the Committee of 
  the Whole authority to entertain unanimous-consent requests to change 
  procedures contained in an adopted special order. Manual Sec. 993.


  Sec. 6 . Procedures Prescribed by Special Orders of Business

      In recent Congresses, special orders of business have provided for 
  the consideration of amendments in a variety of ways, from ``open'' 
  rules

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  (which are silent on the amendment structure) to ``closed'' (which 
  preclude all amendments). In between these two extremes, special 
  orders have:

     Specified consideration that is open in part and restricted in 
         part. 106-1, Aug. 4, 1999, p ____
     Permitted only specified amendments. 107-1, Aug. 1, 2001, p 
         ____.
     Required first-degree amendments to be printed in the 
         Congressional Record. 107-1, July 19, 2001, p ____.
     Specified that certain amendments be ``considered as 
         adopted,'' often referred to as ``self-executed.'' 107-1, Aug. 
         1, 2001, p ____.
     Authorized the floor manager to offer en bloc amendments 
         consisting of the text of other amendments made in order. 107-
         1, Sept. 19, 2001, p ____.
     Left the amendment process open only for a specified period of 
         time. 106-2, May 10, 2000, p ____.

      Although the Committee on Rules may announce a policy that it 
  intends to make in order only preprinted amendments, the committee may 
  in fact, without violating a rule of the House, report a special order 
  making in order an unprinted amendment. Manual Sec. 857.
      An amendment may be ``self-executed'' by adoption of a special 
  order of business even if, considered separately, it would violate a 
  rule of the House. For example, a special order may ``self-execute'' 
  an amendment that contains:

     An appropriation in violation of rule XXI clause 4. Manual 
         Sec. 855.
     An appropriation in violation of rule XXI clause 2. Manual 
         Sec. 855.
     Nongermane provisions in violation of rule XVI clause 7. 
         Manual Sec. 855.

      Normally, a rule that precludes any amendment, or permits only one 
  amendment, provides for the consideration of the measure in the House. 
  A rule that permits more than one amendment normally provides for 
  consideration in the Committee of the Whole.
      One procedure involving the consideration of amendments is called 
  ``king of the hill.'' Although regular order does not permit further 
  amendments to a text once it has been amended in its entirety, a 
  ``king of the hill'' rule permits several substitute amendments to be 
  voted on in the Committee of the Whole, with only the last one adopted 
  to be considered as finally adopted and reported to the House. The 
  Committee on Rules also has reported a special order of business 
  providing for a variation of that procedure. This procedure permits 
  consideration of conflicting amendments in a series, with only the one 
  winning the most votes being finally voted on in the House.

[[Page 869]]

      Special orders of business often make in order as original text 
  something other than the text of the introduced measure. For example, 
  the base text may be specified to be:

     A substitute reported by the committee of jurisdiction (the 
         most common text made in order). 107-1, May 10, 2001, p ____.
     A substitute reported by the committee of primary jurisdiction 
         modified by amendments reported by a committee of secondary 
         jurisdiction. 107-2, Apr. 10, 2002, p ____.
     The text of another introduced bill or a specified preprinted 
         amendment (such as in the report accompanying the special 
         order). 107-1, Oct. 3, 2001, p ____.
     An amendment first adopted in the Committee of the Whole. 104-
         1, Aug. 2, 1995, p 21678.
     Introduced text as modified by amendments printed in the 
         report accompanying the special order. 107-1, Dec. 6, 2001, p 
         ____.

      The Committee on Rules may report resolutions that provide special 
  procedures to expedite consideration or accomplish specific results. 
  For example, a resolution may authorize priority in recognition for 
  the offering of amendments to Members who had their amendments 
  preprinted in the Congressional Record.