[Deschler-Brown Precedents, Volume 17]
[Ch. 36. Ceremonies and Awards]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov]


[Page 135-136]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards


[[Page 135]]



---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Commentary and editing by M. Elizabeth Woodworth, J.D., and Andrew 
S. Neal, J.D.; manuscript editing by Deborah Woodard Khalili.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Sec.  1. Scope
   Sec.  2. Commemorative Occasions
   Sec.  3. _Federal Holidays
   Sec.  4. _Patriotic Observances
   Sec.  5. _Patriotic Observances of Another Country
   Sec.  6. _Religious Observances
   Sec.  7. _Pan American Day
   Sec.  8. _Flag Day; Pause for Pledge Commemoration
   Sec.  9. _Presidential
   Sec. 10. Memorial Services
   Sec. 11. _Supreme Court Justices
   Sec. 12. _Current and Former Members of the House and the Senate
   Sec. 13. _Moments of Silence
   Sec. 14. _Holocaust Days of Remembrance
   Sec. 15. _Honoring Slain Capitol Police Officers
   Sec. 16. _Honoring Victims of National Tragedies
   Sec. 17. Former Members' Day
   Sec. 18. Birthday Felicitations
   Sec. 19. Military Awards; Receptions for Generals and Astronauts
   Sec. 20. Presentation of Gifts and Awards
   Sec. 21. Statuary
   Sec. 22. Dedication of Buildings and Structures
   Sec. 23. Ceremonies for Visiting Dignitaries
   Sec. 24. Congressional Gold Medals
   Sec. 25. Presidential Inaugurations

[[Page 136]]

   Sec. 26. Vice Presidential Swearing-in Ceremonies





[[Page 137]]

                     

[Page 137]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 1. Scope


    This chapter presents a broad sampling of the types of 
celebrations, ceremonies, and awards in which the House 
participates.(1) Ceremonies concerned with joint sessions of 
Congress to receive Presidential messages, such as the state of the 
Union address, are included in the chapter on Presidential 
communications.(2) Joint sessions to count the electoral 
vote are detailed elsewhere.(3) Although this chapter does 
include examples of memorial services for various individuals, the 
reader is encouraged to consult the chapter on Death for a complete 
discussion on the House procedure for ceremonies related to the death 
of individuals.(4) Receptions at the White House, parades, 
balls, and the like, are not included here. For a detailed examination 
of the uses of the House facilities and Capitol grounds, the reader is 
referred elsewhere.(5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. The reader is encouraged to consult Ch. 24, supra, generally. For 
        information on the ban on commemorative bills, see Rule XII 
        clause 5, House Rules and Manual Sec. 823 (2007); and House 
        Practice Ch. 6 Sec. 23 (2003). For information on the ban on 
        naming public works after sitting Members, see Rule XXI clause 
        6, House Rules and Manual Sec. 1068a (2007). See also 
        Sec. 22.6, infra.
 2. See Ch. 35, supra.
 3. See Ch. 10, supra.
 4. See Ch. 38, infra.
 5. See Ch. 4, supra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

      

                        

[Page 137-139]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 2. Commemorative Occasions

    The House has marked a number of important national anniversaries 
and notable events with ceremonies and observations. Among these have 
been ceremonies commemorating events in American history, such as the 
anniversaries of the Constitution(1) and the First 
Congress;(2) commemorations marking historically significant 
dates of other nations;(3) observances of a religious 
nature;(4) observances of Pan American Day and Flag 
Day;(5) and ceremonies commemorating 
Presidents.(6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 4.5, infra.
 2. See Sec. Sec.  4.1-4.4, infra.
 3. See Sec.  5, infra.
 4. See Sec.  6, infra.
 5. See Sec. Sec.  7 and 8, infra.
 6. See Sec.  9, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On two occasions Congress has engaged in ceremonial functions

[[Page 138]]

outside the seat of government to mark significant events in the 
Nation's history. The first occurred in 1987, when it participated in a 
ceremony in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to commemorate the bicentennial 
of the Constitution;(7) the second occurred in 2002 when it 
held a ceremonial meeting in Federal Hall in New York to mark the 
terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.(8)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. See Sec.  4.5, infra.
 8. See Sec.  16.4, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The 104th Congress added a prohibition against commemorative 
legislation within the House rules.(9) The rule prohibits 
the introduction of any bill or resolution or amendment if it 
establishes a commemoration. The rule defines a commemoration as a 
``remembrance, celebration, or recognition for any purpose through the 
designation of a specified period of time.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 9. Rule XII clause 5, House Rules and Manual Sec. 823 (2007). Prior to 
        the 106th Congress, this rule was found under former clause 
        2(b) of Rule XXII.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This prohibition, does not apply to measures that do not specify a 
specific date in the resolving clause.(10) For example, a 
resolution may declare in its resolving clause support for the goals 
and ideas of such a commemoration.(11)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
10. See Sec. Sec. 2.1, infra.
11. Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ban on commemoratives was waived in 2001 for the designation of 
Patriot Day.(12)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
12. See Sec. Sec. 3.1, 3.2, 
        infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 2.1 Form of resolution, averring in its preamble the meaning of a 
    specified week of celebration, and declaring in its resolving 
    clause support for the goals and ideas of such a week; and 
    containing a request that the President proclaim that the people 
    should celebrate those goals and ideas, without specifying a date 
    for such celebrations or otherwise ``designating a specified period 
    of time'' within the meaning of Rule XII clause 5(1) 
    (proscribing ``commemoratives'').
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. House Rules and Manual Sec. 823 (2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Sept. 22, 1999,(2) Mr. Doug Ose, of California, asked 
for unanimous consent that the Committee on Government Reform be 
discharged from further consideration of House Resolution 293. The 
proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 146 Cong. Rec. 22269, 22270, 22273, 106th Cong., 1st Sess.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 139]]

         SENSE OF THE HOUSE IN SUPPORT OF NATIONAL HISTORICALLY BLACK 
                         COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES WEEK

        Mr. OSE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
    Committee on Government Reform be discharged from further 
    consideration of the resolution (H. Res. 293), expressing the sense 
    of the House of Representatives in support of ``National 
    Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week,'' and ask for 
    its immediate consideration in the House.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from California?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. John Cooksey (LA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Elijah] CUMMINGS [of Maryland]. Mr. Speaker, reserving the 
    right to object, under my reservation, I yield to the gentleman 
    from California (Mr. Ose) to explain the bill  . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Cooksey). Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from California?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                  H. Res. 293

            Whereas there are 105 historically black colleges and 
        universities in the United States;
            Whereas black colleges and universities provide the quality 
        education so essential to full participation in a complex, 
        highly technological society;
            Whereas black colleges and universities have a rich 
        heritage and have played a prominent role in American history;
            Whereas black colleges and universities have allowed many 
        underprivileged students to attain their full potential through 
        higher education;
            Whereas the achievements and goals of historically black 
        colleges and universities are deserving of national 
        recognition; and
            Whereas Senate Resolution 178 would designate the week 
        beginning September 19, 1999, as ``National Historically Black 
        Colleges and Universities Week'': Now, therefore be it
            Resolved,
            The the House of Representatives-
            (1) supports the goals and ideas of National Historically 
        Black Colleges and Universities Week; and
            (2) requests that the President issue a proclamation 
        calling on the people of the United States and interested 
        groups to conduct appropriate ceremonies, activities, and 
        programs to demonstrate support for historically black colleges 
        and universities in the United States.
            The resolution was agreed to.
            A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

    Parliamentarian's Note: It was important that the identification of 
the week beginning Sept. 19, 1999, was confined to the preamble.


                       

[Page 139-146]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 3. --Federal Holidays

    Holidays are a subject within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform.(1) They were formerly 
within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Post Office and Civil 
Service,

[[Page 140]]

and prior to that, the Committee on the Judiciary.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Rule X clause 1(m)(5), House Rules and Manual Sec. 732 (2007).
 2. Id. at Sec. Sec.  729, 730.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following demonstrate examples of how the House observes and 
commemorates certain Federal holidays.
    Adjournments and recesses by the House over holidays are discussed 
elsewhere in this volume.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See Chs. 39, 40, 
        infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 United We Stand Day

Sec. 3.1 The House by unanimous consent waived the prohibition in Rule 
    XII clause 5(a)(1) against introduction of a measure 
    expressing or establishing a commemoration for a measure described 
    by sponsor and title (or paraphrase thereof).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. House Rules and Manual Sec. 823 (2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Oct. 24, 2001,(2) the following took place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 147 Cong. Rec. 20545, 107th Cong. 1st Sess. See also Sec. 2 supra.
            Parliamentarian's Note: This marked the first instance of 
        waiver of the commemorative rule since its inception in the 
        104th Congress.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

           AUTHORIZING INTRODUCTION OF JOINT RESOLUTION DESIGNATING 
                SEPTEMBER 11 AS UNITED WE STAND REMEMBRANCE DAY

        Mr. [David] DREIER [of California] (during the Special Order of 
    Mr. Pallone). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that, 
    notwithstanding the provisions of clause 5 of rule XII, 
    Representative Fossella of New York be authorized to introduce a 
    joint resolution to amend title 36, United States Code, to 
    designate September 11 as United We Stand Remembrance Day.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Osborne).(3) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from California?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Tom Osborne (NE).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no 
    objection.                          -------------------

        MAKING IN ORDER ON THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2001, CONSIDERATION OF 
         JOINT RESOLUTION DESIGNATING SEPTEMBER 11 AS UNITED WE STAND 
                                REMEMBRANCE DAY

        Mr. DREIER (during the Special Order of Mr. Pallone). Mr. 
    Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that it be in order at any time on 
    Thursday, October 25, 2001, without intervention of any point of 
    order to consider in the House the joint resolution introduced by 
    Representative Fossella of New York pursuant to the previous order 
    of the House (to amend title 36, United States Code, to designate 
    September 11 as United We Stand Remembrance Day); that the joint 
    resolution be considered as read for amendment; that the joint 
    resolution be debatable for 1 hour equally divided and controlled 
    by the chairman and ranking member of the Committee on Government 
    Reform; and that the previous question be considered as ordered on 
    the joint resolution to final passage without intervening motion 
    except one motion to recommit.

[[Page 141]]

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from California?
        There was no objection.

Sec. 3.2 The House by unanimous consent modified two previous orders 
    waiving the prohibition in Rule XII clause 5(a)(1) 
    against the introduction of a measure expressing or establishing a 
    commemoration for measure described by sponsor and title (or 
    paraphrase thereof); and the consideration of that measure, to 
    apply each of them instead to a new draft that warranted a 
    materially different title.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. House Rules and Manual Sec. 823 (2007).
 2. Parliamentarian's Note: The House had granted unanimous consent for 
        Rep. Vito Fossella (NY) to introduce a joint resolution that 
        was expected to designate a ``United We Stand Remembrance 
        Day''. See Sec. 3.1, supra. It later was discovered that the 
        companion Senate measure (S. J. Res. 29) designated the day as 
        ``Patriot Day''. Because the designation of the day actually 
        appeared in the title (or paraphrase thereof) by which joint 
        resolution was described in the order of the House, Rep. 
        Fossella needed a modified order of the House to introduce a 
        joint resolution that conformed to that of the Senate.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Oct. 25, 2001,(3) the following took place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 147 Cong. Rec. 20652-59, 107th Cong. 1st. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

            APPLYING SPECIAL ORDERS OF OCTOBER 24, 2001 RELATING TO 
         ``UNITED WE STAND REMEMBRANCE DAY'' TO HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 
                                       71

        Mr. [Steven] LaTOURETTE [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the special orders of the House of October 24, 2001, 
    relating to the United We Stand Remembrance Day be applied to House 
    Joint Resolution 71.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(4) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. John Shimkus (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

                    DESIGNATING SEPTEMBER 11 AS PATRIOT DAY

        Mr. LaTOURETTE. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the order of the House 
    of October 24, 2001, I call up the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 71) 
    amending title 36, United States Code, to designate September 11 as 
    Patriot Day, and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.
        The text of House Joint Resolution 71 is as follows:

                                  H.J. Res. 71

            Whereas on September 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked four 
        civilian aircraft, crashing two of them into the towers of the 
        World Trade Center in New York City, and a third into the 
        Pentagon outside Washington, D.C.;
            Whereas the fourth hijacked aircraft crashed in 
        southwestern Pennsylvania after passengers tried to take 
        control of the aircraft in order to prevent the hijackers from 
        crashing the aircraft into an important symbol of democracy and 
        freedom;

[[Page 142]]

            Whereas these attacks were by far the deadliest terrorist 
        attacks ever launched against the United States, killing 
        thousands of innocent people; and
            Whereas in the aftermath of the attacks the people of the 
        United States stood united in providing support for those in 
        need: Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
        United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SEC. 1. DESIGNATION OF SEPTEMBER 11 AS PATRIOT DAY.

       (a) Designation.--Chapter 1 of title 36, United States 
     Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new 
     section:

     ``Sec. 144. Patriot Day

       ``(a) Designation.--September 11 is Patriot Day.
       ``(b) Proclamation.--The President is requested to issue 
     each year a proclamation calling on--
       ``(1) State and local governments and the people of the 
     United States to observe Patriot Day with appropriate 
     programs and activities;
       ``(2) all departments, agencies, and instrumentalities of 
     the United States and interested organizations and 
     individuals to display the flag of the United States at 
     halfstaff on Patriot Day in honor of the individuals who lost 
     their lives as a result of the terrorist attacks against the 
     United States that occurred on September 11, 2001; and
       ``(3) the people of the United States to observe a moment 
     of silence on Patriot Day in honor of the individuals who 
     lost their lives as a result of the terrorist attacks against 
     the United States that occurred on September 11, 2001.''.
       (b) Conforming Amendment.--The table of contents for 
     chapter 1 of title 36, United States Code, is amended by 
     adding at the end the following new item:

``144. Patriot Day.''.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of 
    Wednesday, October 24, 2001, the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
    LaTourette) and the gentleman from New York (Mr. Owens) each will 
    control 30 minutes.

Veterans' Day

Sec. 3.3 Under a previous order of the House, the Speaker recognized a 
    majority and minority member of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs 
    for special-order speeches in commemoration of Veterans' Day.

    On Nov. 11, 1983,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 129 Cong. Rec. 32289, 98th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        IN COMMEMORATION OF VETERANS DAY

        The SPEAKER.(2) Under a previous order of the House, 
    the gentleman from California (Mr. Edwards) will be recognized for 
    30 minutes, and the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Hammerschmidt) 
    will be recognized for 30 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California (Mr. 
    Edwards).
        Mr. [Don] EDWARDS of California. Mr. Speaker, my colleague from 
    Mississippi, the chairman of the Committee on Veterans' Affairs, 
    G.V. (Sonny) Montgomery, would have liked to have been here on this 
    special day for all Americans to express his feelings on the 
    meaning of the Veterans Day observance, but his schedule mandated 
    that he return to his district . . .
        I hope you will join with me on this Veterans Day as we display 
    our pride in and our respect for American's most select group of 
    citizens -- our veterans.

[[Page 143]]

     It is a day to face our past and make it work for a future of 
    security and peace.

Sec. 3.4 The House, by unanimous consent, authorized the Speaker to 
    send on its behalf an appropriate message to General John J. 
    Pershing on the 27th anniversary of Armistice Day.

    On Nov. 12, 1945,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 91 Cong. Rec. 10610, 79th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER.(2) The Chair recognizes the gentleman 
    from Massachusetts [Mr. McCormack].
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [John W.] McCORMACK [of Massachusetts]. Mr. Speaker, the 
    gentleman from North Carolina [Mr. Bulwinkle] conferred with me a 
    few minutes ago and made a suggestion which aroused my immediate 
    interest and favorable response, as the result of which I conferred 
    with the Speaker and our distinguished colleague from Michigan [Mr. 
    Michener], the acting minority leader on the floor at the present 
    time. Today is Armistice Day. On November 11, 1918, the actual 
    Armistice Day of World War I took place. During that war our land 
    forces were led by a man whose name will occupy the foremost pages 
    in history. Through the divine province of God he is still with us. 
    He was the commander in chief of the Army of the United States 
    during World War I, which he led with such fine judgment and valor 
    so as to bring about the great victory that came to our country in 
    that war. It is only proper and fitting, the Speaker and the 
    distinguished acting minority leader agreeing, that the House of 
    Representatives should on this day convey to that great American, 
    that great warrior of World War I, our profound feeling of respect 
    and admiration that this body holds for him, which expression would 
    be symbolic and representative of the feelings of Americans 
    throughout the entire country.
        I therefore ask unanimous consent that the Speaker be 
    authorized to send to that great military leader of the last war, 
    that great American, Gen. John J. Pershing, an appropriate message 
    from the House of Representatives.
        The SPEAKER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
        There was no objection.

Sec. 3.5 Instance when the House, on a unanimous-consent request of a 
    Member, stood in silence on Armistice Day (now Veterans' Day) in 
    memory of those who lost their lives in World War II.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. H.R. 7786 (Pub. L. No. 83-380) changed the name of Armistice Day to 
        Veterans Day. See 99 Cong. Rec. 3245, 83d Cong. 2d Sess., Mar. 
        15, 1954.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Nov. 11, 1940,(2) the House, acting on the unanimous 
consent request of a Member, stood in silence for one minute on 
Armistice Day in memory of those who lost their lives in the First 
World War.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 86 Cong. Rec. 13613, 76th Cong. 3d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mrs. [Edith Nourse] ROGERS of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, 
    reserving

[[Page 144]]

    the right to object, and I do not intend to object, but I would 
    like to ask the majority leader and the Speaker if the House would 
    stand in silence for a moment. Today is Armistice Day. Twenty-two 
    years ago the armistice was signed. I wish, out of memory to those 
    men and women who fought a great crusade in order that the world 
    might be safe for democracy, they might know that we are standing 
    doing honor to them today. They lost their ultimate goal for the 
    time being, but out of all the horror and filth that is war their 
    courage, their infinite gentleness, and great heroism have kindled 
    a grimmer determination among millions of people all over the world 
    today to fight for democracy. Mr. Speaker, their sacrifice was not 
    in vain. I earnestly wish that the House might stand in silence for 
    1 minute, and I make that unanimous-consent request.
        The SPEAKER.(3) If the gentlewoman will withhold 
    that until the other unanimous-consent request is disposed of.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mrs. ROGERS of Massachusetts. Yes, Mr. Speaker.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Massachusetts [Mr. McCORMACK]?
        There was no objection.
        Mrs. ROGERS of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I renew my 
    unanimous-consent request now.
        The SPEAKER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
        There was no objection.

                                 armistice day

        The Members of the House rose and stood in silence for 1 
    minute.

Washington's Birthday

Sec. 3.6 The Speaker, pursuant to unanimous-consent agreement, 
    designated a Member to read Washington's Farewell 
    Address.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. The House has read the Farewell Address to coincide with 
        Washington's Birthday. See 5 Hinds' Precedents Sec. Sec. 7070-
        7075 and 8 Cannon's Precedents Sec. Sec. 3531-3534 for early 
        examples of reading the address and observances of Washington's 
        Birthday.
            The House discontinued the practice of reading of 
        Washington's farewell address after 1979 and began marking the 
        occasion by the appointment of Members to participate in the 
        wreath-laying ceremony held each Feb. 22 on the grounds of the 
        Washington Monument. It became customary for the House to 
        authorize the appointment of two Members by the Speaker, one 
        upon the recommendation of the minority leader. See, e.g., 135 
        Cong. Rec. 2225, 101st Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 21, 1989; and 130 
        Cong. Rec. 2760, 98th Cong. 2d Sess., Feb. 21, 1984. However, 
        in one instance three Members were authorized and appointed 
        (see 135 Cong. Rec. 1873, 101st Cong. 2d Sess., Feb. 20, 1990), 
        and in another case two Members were authorized and only one 
        was ultimately appointed (see 148 Cong. Rec. 1887, 107th Cong. 
        2d Sess., Feb. 26, 2002).
            The wreath laying ceremony has not occurred in regular use 
        since 2003.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Feb. 18, 1963,(2) the Speaker recognized Mr. Carl 
Albert, of

[[Page 145]]

Oklahoma, for a unanimous-consent request:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 109 Cong. Rec. 2455, 88th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that on 
    Thursday, February 21, 1963, Washington's Farewell Address may be 
    read by a Member to be designated by the Speaker.
        The SPEAKER.(3) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the special order agreed to today, the 
    Chair designates the gentleman from Utah [Mr. Burton] to read 
    Washington's Farewell Address immediately following the approval of 
    the Journal on February 21, 1963.

    On Feb. 21, 1963,(4) Speaker John W. McCormack, of 
Massachusetts, recognized Rep. Laurence J. Burton, of Utah, to read 
Washington's farewell address.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. 109 Cong. Rec. 2671, 88th Cong. 1st Sess. For other examples of the 
        reading of Washington's Farewell Address see 112 Cong. Rec. 
        3647-51, 89th Cong. 2d Sess., Feb. 22, 1966 (instance in which 
        the Speaker received messages from the Senate and President 
        before the recognition of a Member to read the address); 111 
        Cong. Rec. 3291-95, 89th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 22, 1965; and 
        105 Cong. Rec. 2825-29, 86th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 23, 1959.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the order of the House of February 18, 
    1963, the Chair recognizes the gentleman from Utah [Mr. Burton] to 
    read George Washington's Farewell Address.
        Mr. BURTON read the farewell address[.] . . .

    Parliamentarian's Note: No extensions of remarks or insertions in 
the Congressional Record were permitted prior to the reading of the 
address. The Speaker recognized Members for one-minute speeches 
immediately following the reading of the address.

Independence Day

Sec. 3.7 A Member, designated by the Speaker, read the Declaration of 
    Independence at a meeting of the House on July 4, 1951, the 175th 
    anniversary of the Declaration.

    On July 4, 1951,(1) Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, 
announced that a Member would read the Declaration of Independence:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 97 Cong. Rec. 7611, 7612, 82d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. This being the one hundred and seventy-fifth 
    anniversary of the signing and adoption of the Declaration of 
    Independence, the Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania 
    [Mr. Lind] to read the Declaration of Independence.
        Mr. [James F.] LIND [of Pennsylvania]. When in the course of 
    human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the 
    political bands which have connected them with another, and to 
    assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and

[[Page 146]]

    equal station to which the laws of Nature and of Nature's God 
    entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires 
    that they should declare the causes which impel them to the 
    separation.


                      

[Page 146-168]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 4. --Patriotic Observances

 Anniversary of the First Congress

Sec. 4.1 By unanimous consent, the House considered a concurrent 
    resolution providing for the participation of Members of the House 
    and the Senate in ceremonies in New York City commemorating the 
    bicentennial anniversary of government under the U.S. Constitution 
    at its original seat of government.

    On Apr. 18, 1989,(1) Rep. Corinne C. (Lindy) Boggs, of 
Louisiana, asked unanimous consent to consider a concurrent resolution, 
as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 135 Cong. Rec. 6834, 101st Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mrs. BOGGS. Mr. Speaker, I offer a concurrent resolution (H. 
    Con. Res. 96) providing for participation by delegations of Members 
    of both Houses of Congress in ceremonies to be held in April 1989 
    in New York City marking the 200th anniversaries of the 
    implementation of the Constitution as the form of government of the 
    United States, the convening of the First Congress, the 
    inauguration of President George Washington, and the proposal of 
    the Bill of Rights as the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, 
    and I ask unanimous consent for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentlewoman from Louisiana?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. James C. Wright, Jr. (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 96

            Whereas the Constitution officially became the form of 
        government of the United States on March 4, 1789;
            Whereas the First Congress convened in New York City on 
        March 4, 1789;
            Whereas New York City served as the first capital of the 
        United States;
            Whereas George Washington was inaugurated as the first 
        President of the United States in New York City on April 30, 
        1789;
            Whereas while meeting in New York City, the first Congress 
        passed legislation creating the executive departments of the 
        Federal Government and the Federal court system; and
            Whereas while meeting in New York City, the first Congress, 
        under the leadership of Representative James Madison of 
        Virginia, framed and proposed to the States the ten 
        constitutional amendments known today as the Bill of Rights: 
        Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

[[Page 147]]

        That (a) the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the 
        President pro tempore of the Senate, in consultation with the 
        Minority Leaders and the Bicentennial Committee Chairmen of 
        their respective Houses, are authorized and directed to appoint 
        Members of their respective Houses to serve on a delegation of 
        Members of the Congress, which will take part in ceremonies to 
        be held in New York City in April 1989 commemorating the 200th 
        anniversaries of the implementation of the Constitution as the 
        form of government of the United States, the convening of the 
        First Congress, the inauguration of George Washington as the 
        first President of the United States, and the proposal of the 
        Bill of Rights as the first ten amendments to the Constitution, 
        and shall invite the President to join the delegation in 
        participating in the ceremonies.
            (b) The specific planning of the ceremonies described in 
        subsection (a) shall be coordinated directly with the Historian 
        of the Senate, under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the 
        Senate, and the Historian of the House of Representatives, 
        under the jurisdiction of the Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives.

        Mrs. BOGGS (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the concurrent resolution be considered as read and 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the 
    gentlewoman from Louisiana?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER. The gentlewoman from Louisiana [Mrs. Boggs] is 
    recognized for 1 hour.
        Mrs. BOGGS. Mr. Speaker, this resolution provides for the 
    participation by delegations from the House and the Senate in the 
    ceremonies scheduled to be held in New York City the last weekend 
    in April to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the inauguration of 
    George Washington as the Nation's first President and the 
    implementation of our Government under the terms of the 
    Constitution.
        The resolution empowers the Speaker of the House and the 
    President pro tempore of the Senate, in consultation with the 
    Republican leadership and the House and Senate Bicentennial 
    Commissions, to designate delegations to participate in the New 
    York City ceremonies later this month. Responsibility for 
    coordinating this effort is vested with the House and Senate 
    Historians.
        Legislation with virtually the same effect, with only a slight 
    difference in wording, passed the House and Senate last year as 
    House Concurrent Resolution 115. There were 162 House cosponsors 
    and the vote in the House was 421 to 0. We must revisit this matter 
    again this year because the delegation was not appointed during the 
    100th Congress, therefore the 101st Congress must give its 
    approval.
        I do not know how many of you watched television, heard the 
    radio or saw the newspapers, but on Sunday there began a 
    reenactment of George Washington's journey to the Federal Hall in 
    New York City for his inauguration. It began at Mount Vernon and 
    traveled through Alexandria and Georgetown last Sunday and Monday. 
    The reenactment will conclude with the oath-taking in New York City 
    on Sunday, April 30, and in related festivities sponsored by the 
    New York Commission, there will be fireworks, concerts, and a tall 
    ships flotilla.
        Mr. Speaker, this resolution has been cleared with the 
    Committee on

[[Page 148]]

    Post Office and Civil Service and with the Republican leadership, 
    and I ask unanimous consent for its approval.
        The SPEAKER. The question is on the concurrent resolution.
        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 4.2 A joint meeting commemorated the 200th anniversary of the 
    commencement of the First Congress of the United States under the 
    Constitution.

    On Feb. 23, 1989,(1) Speaker James C. Wright, Jr., of 
Texas, was authorized, by unanimous consent, to declare recesses on 
Mar. 2, 1989, for the purpose of celebrating the 200th anniversary of 
the commencement of the First Congress of the United States under the 
Constitution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 135 Cong. Rec. 2611, 101st Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Mar. 2, 1989,(2) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Id. at pp. 3210-18.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the order of the House of Thursday, 
    February 23, 1989, the Chair declares the House in recess subject 
    to the call of the Chair, which will be at 10 a.m.
        Accordingly (at 9 o'clock and 32 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the Chair at 10 
    a.m.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1158

          JOINT MEETING OF THE 101ST CONGRESS IN COMMEMORATION OF THE 
                       BICENTENNIAL OF THE U.S. CONGRESS

        During the recess, the following proceedings took place in 
    commemoration of the Bicentennial of the U.S. Congress.
        The U.S. Army Band, under the direction of Col. Eugene W. 
    Allen, leader and conductor, Maj. C. Benjamin DuBose, conducting, 
    entered the door to the left of the Speaker, took the positions 
    assigned to them, and presented a prelude concert.
        The honored guests entered the door to the right of the Speaker 
    and took the positions assigned to them.
        The Doorkeeper, Hon. James P. Molloy, announced the President 
    pro tempore and Members of the U.S. Senate, who entered the Hall of 
    the House of Representatives, the President pro tempore taking the 
    chair at the right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate 
    the seats reserved for them.
        The U.S. Army Band, under the direction of Col. Eugene W. 
    Allen, leader and conductor, and Maj. C. Benjamin DuBose, presented 
    a prelude concert.
        The SPEAKER. The joint meeting to commemorate the Bicentennial 
    of the U.S. Congress will come to order.
        The Doorkeeper announced the flag of the United States.
        The flag was carried into the Chamber by the joint Armed Forces 
    color guard accompanied by the 3d U.S. Infantry Fife and Drum 
    Corps.
        The national anthem was presented by the U.S. Army Band.
        The color guard saluted the Speaker, faced about, and saluted 
    the House.

[[Page 149]]

        The SPEAKER. The color guard will post the colors.
        The flag was posted, and the Members were seated.
        The SPEAKER. The invocation will be given by the Reverend James 
    David Ford, Chaplain of the House of Representatives.
        The Chaplain, Rev. James David Ford, D.D., offered the . . . 
    invocation[.] . . .
        The Doorkeeper announced the House and Senate Journals of the 
    First Federal Congress, and they were carried by the Clerk of the 
    House and the Secretary of the Senate and placed in the well.
        The Doorkeeper announced the mace of the House and the gavel of 
    the Senate, and they were carried by the House and Senate Sergeants 
    at Arms and placed in the well.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from 
    Louisiana, the Honorable Lindy Boggs, Chairman of the Commission of 
    the Bicentenary of the House of Representatives.(3) 
    [Applause.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. H. Res. 83 established the Commission on the Bicentary of the House 
        of Representatives. See 135 Cong. Rec. 2508, 2509, 101st Cong. 
        1st Sess., Feb. 22, 1989. The Commission expired at the end of 
        the 101st Congress.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mrs. BOGGS. . . .
        It is my great pleasure to introduce to you Senator Robert C. 
    Byrd, the President pro tempore of the Senate and the Chairman of 
    the Senate Bicentennial Commission[.] . . .
        Senator BYRD [of West Virginia]. Mr. Speaker, Mrs. Boggs, 
    Members of the 101st Congress, fellow citizens, as Chairman of the 
    Senate Commission on the Bicentennial, it is a privilege and an 
    honor for me to address this joint meeting commemorating the 
    beginning of the First Congress on March 4, 1789. . . .
        The PRESIDENT pro tempore(4) (presiding). The Chair 
    recognizes the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Mr. 
    Jim Wright. [Applause.] . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. John C. Stennis (MS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Chair recognizes the Senator 
    from Maine, the Honorable George Mitchell, the majority leader of 
    the U.S. Senate. [Applause.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from 
    Washington, the Honorable Thomas S. Foley, majority leader of the 
    U.S. House of Representatives. [Applause.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The U.S. Army Band will now perform America the 
    Beautiful.
        The U.S. Army Band presented a musical interlude.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the distinguished gentleman 
    from Illinois, the Honorable Robert H. Michel, minority leader of 
    the U.S. House of Representatives. [Applause.]
        Mr. MICHEL. . . .
        Mr. Speaker, ladies and gentlemen, it is my pleasure to 
    introduce the Poet Laureate of the United States, Howard Nemerov. 
    [Applause.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Senator from Kansas, the 
    Honorable Bob Dole, minority leader of the U.S. Senate. [Applause.]
        Mr. DOLE. . . .

[[Page 150]]

        Now I have the pleasure of introducing an outstanding American, 
    a very special guest speaker, David McCullough. David is well known 
    to us in the Senate, who debated the Panama Canal, the Panama Canal 
    treaties of 1978. A dog-eared copy of his book on the creation of 
    the Panama Canal, ``The Path Between the Seas,'' rested on the 
    table in the well of the Senate and was consulted extensively by 
    those on both sides of that heated issue. That book won the 
    National Book Award for history. His most recent book, a biography 
    of Theodore Roosevelt entitled ``Mornings on Horseback'' won the 
    American Book Award. He is a narrator of the forthcoming CBS 
    documentary produced in honor of the congressional bicentennial.
        I am honored and proud to present David McCullough. [Applause.] 
    . . .
        The SPEAKER. It is my privilege to present soloists of the U.S. 
    Army Band, Sfc. Will Shead and Sfc. Evelyn Yount, who will perform 
    a patriotic note.
        Sfc. Will Shead and Sfc. Evelyn Yount presented a musical 
    interlude.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair at this time would like to recognize Mr. 
    Anthony Frank, the Postmaster General of the United States, who 
    will introduce to Members the special congressional postage stamps 
    that will be issued in commemoration of the bicentennial of 
    Congress. [Applause.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair at this time would like to recognize the 
    Honorable Nicholas Brady, Secretary of the Department of the 
    Treasury, who will introduce to us the special congressional coins 
    that will be issued in commemoration of the Bicentennial of 
    Congress. [Applause.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The stamp and coin designs will be available for 
    viewing in the Speaker's lobby after today's ceremony.
        Now we will rise for the benediction which will be spoken by 
    the Reverend Richard C. Halverson, Chaplain of the Senate.
        The Chaplain of the Senate, Rev. Richard C. Halverson, L.I.D., 
    D.D., offered the . . . benediction[.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. Members and guests will remain standing for the 
    retirement of the colors.
        The color guard retired the colors.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint meeting dissolved. 
    The House will continue in recess until approximately 12 noon.
        The honored guests, and the Members of the Senate retired from 
    the Chamber.
        At 11 o'clock and 44 minutes a.m., the proceedings in 
    commemoration of the Bicentennial of the U.S. Congress were 
    concluded.

Sec. 4.3 Proceedings had in the House commemorating the 168th 
    anniversary of the institution of the Congress under the 
    Constitution.

    On Mar. 4, 1957,(1) the proceedings in the House 
commemorating the 168th anniversary of Congress and the bicentennial of 
Alexander Hamilton's birth were held as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 103 Cong. Rec. 3034-40, 85th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER.(2) Under the previous order of the 
    House, the gentleman from New York [Mr. Coudert] is recognized for 
    60 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 151]]

        Mr. [Wayne N.] ASPINALL [of Colorado]. Mr. Speaker, a 
    parliamentary inquiry.
        The SPEAKER. The gentleman will state it.
        Mr. ASPINALL. Is not the Consent Calendar in order at this 
    time?
        The SPEAKER. Not before this recognition. This was made the 
    special order of business at this time.

                            general leave to extend

        Mr. [Frederic Rene] COUDERT [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that immediately following the remarks of Members 
    who participate in this proceeding, all Members be permitted to 
    extend their remarks in the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from New York?
        There is no objection.
        Mr. COUDERT. Mr. Speaker, today is the birthday of this ancient 
    and honorable body. One hundred and sixty-eight years ago today the 
    House of Representatives began life under the Constitution of the 
    United States in New York City. The day before, New York City rang 
    down the curtain on the old Government under the Articles of 
    Confederation by a salute of 13 guns and rang up the curtain on the 
    new Government the next morning by a salute of 11 guns. Members 
    will recall that neither Rhode Island nor North Carolina were 
    represented in the early days of the first Congress. Similar 
    celebrations ringing out the old and ringing in the new were held 
    in the cities of the Nation.
        The 83d Congress established a Commission to prepare plans and 
    a program for signalizing the bicentennial of Alexander Hamilton. . 
    . .
        Mr. [Peter W.] RODINO [Jr., of New York]. Mr. Speaker, today 
    the 168th anniversary of the institution of the Congress of the 
    United States under the Constitution, is a great moment in our 
    history. It is therefore appropriate that we should pause to 
    commemorate the occasion and pay tribute to the men whose wisdom, 
    purpose and courage brought about our unique system of 
    constitutional government. . . .
        Mr. COUDERT. Mr. Speaker, permit me to express on behalf of the 
    Hamilton Commission, which includes another distinguished 
    descendant of Hamilton, our appreciation of the arrangements made 
    possible by the Speaker, the majority leader, and the minority 
    leader for this commemorative hour.

Sec. 4.4 Proceedings in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the 
    commencement of the First Congress of the United States under the 
    Constitution held in the House Chamber in joint session.

    On Mar. 4, 1939,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 84 Cong. Rec. 2245-52, 76th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The VICE PRESIDENT.(2) Under the terms of House 
    Concurrent Resolution No. 4,(3) heretofore agreed to by 
    the Senate, today at 12 o'clock noon the

[[Page 152]]

    Senate is to participate in a joint session of the two Houses for 
    the purpose of commemorating the one hundred and fiftieth 
    anniversary of the meeting of the First Congress of the United 
    States. As the time from now until 12 o'clock will be required to 
    enable the Senate to reach the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives, the Chair suggests, if it is agreeable, that the 
    Senate now proceed in a body to the Chamber of the other House. . . 
    .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John N. Garner (TX).
 3. See 84 Cong. Rec. 974, 76th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 31, 1939.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Senate will now proceed to the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.
        The Senate, preceded by its Sergeant at Arms (Chesley W. 
    Jurney), the Vice President, and the President pro tempore, 
    proceeded to the Hall of the House of Representatives. . . .
        At 12 o'clock and 5 minutes p.m., the Doorkeeper, Mr. Joseph J. 
    Sinnott, announced the Vice President of the United States and the 
    Members of the Senate.
        The Members of the House rose.
        The Senate, the Vice President, and the President pro tempore, 
    preceded by its Chief Clerk, Mr. John C. Crockett, and Sergeant at 
    Arms, Col. Chesley W. Jurney, entered the Chamber.
        The Vice President took the chair to the right of the Speaker, 
    and the Members of the Senate took the seats reserved for them.
        Whereupon, the Speaker relinquished the gavel to the Vice 
    President, who, as the Presiding Officer of the Joint Session of 
    the two Houses, called the meeting to order.
        The Doorkeeper announced the following guests of honor, who 
    were escorted to the seats assigned to them:
        The Chief Justice of the United States and the Associate 
    Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States.
        The Ambassadors, the Ministers, and the Charge d'Affaires of 
    Foreign Governments.
        The Chief of Staff of the United States Army, the Chief of 
    Naval Operations of the United States Navy, the Major General 
    Commandant of the United States Marine Corps, and the Commandant of 
    the United States Coast Guard.
        The Commissioners of the District of Columbia.
        The members of the President's Cabinet.
        At 12 o'clock and 16 minutes p.m., the Doorkeeper announced the 
    President of the United States, accompanied by the Joint 
    Congressional Committee on Arrangements of the Senate and House, 
    who was escorted to a seat on the Speaker's rostrum.
        Miss Gladys Swarthout sang ``America.''
        The VICE PRESIDENT. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New 
    York, Mr. Bloom, a member of the Joint Committee on Arrangements, 
    to read the concurrent resolution providing for the assembling of 
    the two Houses of Congress in the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives on this day for the purpose of holding fitting and 
    proper exercises in commemoration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth 
    Anniversary of the Commencement of the First Congress of the United 
    States under the Constitution.
        Mr. [Sol] BLOOM [of New York]. On February 1, 1939, the 
    following concurrent resolution was adopted by the Congress 
    [reading]:

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

[[Page 153]]

        That in commemoration of the one hundred fiftieth anniversary 
        of the First Congress of the United States under the 
        Constitution, begun and held at the city of New York on 
        Wednesday, the 4th of March 1789, the two Houses of Congress 
        shall assemble in the Hall of the House of Representatives at 
        12 o'clock p.m., on Saturday, March 4, 1939.
            That a joint committee consisting of five Members of the 
        House of Representatives and five Members of the Senate shall 
        be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and 
        the President of the Senate, respectively, which is empowered 
        to make suitable arrangements for fitting and proper exercises 
        for the joint session of Congress herein authorized.
            That invitations to attend the exercises be extended to the 
        President of the United States and the members of his Cabinet, 
        the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the Supreme Court 
        of the United States, the Diplomatic Corps (through the 
        Secretary of State), the General of the Armies, the Chief of 
        Staff of the Army, the Chief of Naval Operations, the Major 
        General Commandant of the Marine Corps, and the Commandant of 
        the Coast Guard, and such other persons as the Joint Committee 
        on Arrangements shall deem proper.
            That the President of the United States is hereby invited 
        to address the American people at the joint session of the 
        Congress in commemoration of the one hundred fiftieth 
        anniversary of the First Congress of the United States under 
        the Constitution.
            Adopted February 1, 1939.

        Mr. BLOOM. Ladies and gentlemen, I have the honor to present 
    the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Mr. William B. 
    Bankhead.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. William B. Bankhead (AL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          address of the speaker of the house of representatives hon. 
                              william b. bankhead

        Mr. President, Mr. Vice President, gentleman of the Supreme 
    Court, Members of the Senate and House of Representatives, 
    gentlemen of the Diplomatic Corps, ladies, and gentlemen: . . .
        One hundred and fifty years ago this day there assembled in the 
    city of New York the First Congress of the United States of America 
    under its newly adopted Constitution. The mere statement of that 
    incident carries only a reflection of the years that have passed, 
    but in terms of what that occasion meant there has been no more 
    arresting episode in the history of modern civilization. The 
    properties of this occasion forbid even a casual review on my part 
    of the historical background of the event we are convened to 
    celebrate. . . .
        To my brethren in both branches of Congress this should be 
    embraced as an occasion of rededication to the best interests of 
    our Republic. Despite the limitations of our judgments and 
    intellects--because, forsooth, at no time nor under any 
    administration, have we infallibly measured up to the full needs of 
    the hour--nevertheless, we are the emissaries of our constituencies 
    and the symbols of representative government. May we this day find 
    the grace to renew the prayer of Daniel Webster, deposited in the 
    cornerstone of this wing of the Capitol on July 4, 1851:

            If, therefore, it shall be hereafter the will of God that 
        this structure shall fall from its base, that its foundation be 
        upturned, and this deposit brought to the eyes of men, be it 
        then known, that, on this day, the

[[Page 154]]

        Union of the United States of America stands firm, that their 
        Constitution still exists unimpaired, and with all its original 
        usefulness and glory; growing every day stronger and stronger 
        in the affections of the great body of the American people, and 
        attracting more and more the admiration of the world. And all 
        here assembled, whether belonging to public life or to private 
        life, with hearts devoutly thankful to Almighty God for the 
        preservation of the liberty and happiness of the country, unite 
        in sincere and fervent prayers that this deposit, and the walls 
        and arches, the domes and towers, the columns and entablatures 
        now to be erected over it may endure forever!
            God save the United States of America!

        The VICE PRESIDENT. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from 
    Texas, Mr. Rayburn.
        Mr. [Sam] RAYBURN [of Texas]. It is a privilege at this time to 
    present the President pro tempore of the Senate of the United 
    States, Mr. Key Pittman.(5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Key Pittman (NV).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          address of the president pro tempore of the senate hon. key 
                                    pittman

        Mr. President, Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, gentlemen of 
    the Supreme Court, Members of the House of Representatives and the 
    United States Senate, gentlemen of the Diplomatic Corps, ladies, 
    and gentlemen:
        This in my opinion is the most remarkable and happiest birthday 
    ever celebrated on behalf of a parliamentary body. This celebration 
    is honored by the President of the United States and by the Chief 
    Justice of the United States as heads of the other two great 
    independent departments of our Government, the commanders in chief 
    of every branch of our military service, and the diplomatic corps 
    of the world. . . .
        The VICE PRESIDENT. The Chair recognizes the Senator from 
    Kentucky, Mr. Barkley.
        Mr. [Alben W.] BARKLEY [of Kentucky]. Mr. President, since the 
    4th day of March 1789 there have been 8,124 men and women who have 
    served in the House of Representatives. One thousand three hundred 
    and eighty-four men and women have served in the United States 
    Senate. The number of those who have served in both Houses is 461. 
    The total number of persons who have served in the Cabinets of all 
    the Presidents is 313. The number of individuals who have served as 
    Governors of the various States is 1,558. There have been 42 
    Speakers of the House of Representatives; 32 different persons have 
    served as Vice Presidents, of whom 6 have succeeded to the 
    Presidency by virtue of the death of the President; 31 individuals 
    have served as President. On the Supreme Court there have been 70 
    Associate Justices and 11 Chief Justices of the United States. . . 
    .
        I present to you the Chief Justice of the United States.

        address of the chief justice of the united states hon. charles 
                                   e. hughes

        Mr. President, Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, Members of the 
    Senate and House of Representatives, gentlemen of the Diplomatic 
    Corps, ladies, and gentlemen:
        I thank you, Senator Barkley, from the depths of my heart for 
    your very generous words.

[[Page 155]]

        The most significant fact in connection with this anniversary 
    is that after 150 years, notwithstanding expansion of territory, 
    enormous increase in population and profound economic changes, 
    despite direct attack and subversive influences, there is every 
    indication that the vastly preponderant sentiment of the American 
    people is that our form of government shall be preserved. . . .
        The VICE PRESIDENT. Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the 
    United States.

        address of the president of the united states hon. franklin d. 
                                   roosevelt

        Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, gentlemen of the Supreme 
    Court, Members of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
    gentlemen of the Diplomatic Corps, ladies, and gentleman:
        We near the end of a 3-year commemoration of the founding of 
    the Government of the United States. It has been aptly suggested 
    that its successful organizing should rank as the eighth wonder of 
    the world--for surely the evolution of permanent substance out of 
    nebulous chaos justifies us in the use of superlatives. . . .
        Here in this great Hall are assembled the present members of 
    the Government of the United States of America--the Congress, the 
    Supreme Court, and the Executive. Our fathers rightly believe that 
    this Government which they set up would seek as a whole to act as a 
    whole for the good governing of the Nation. It is in the same 
    spirit that we are met here today, 150 years later, to carry on 
    their task. May God continue to guide our steps.
        Miss Gladys Swarthout and Mr. John Charles Thomas sang ``The 
    Star-Spangled Banner.''

                                  benediction

        Rev. ZeBarney Thorne Phillips, D.D., LL.D., Chaplain of the 
    Senate, pronounced the benediction[.]. . .
        The VICE PRESIDENT. The Joint Session of the Congress which 
    assembled for the purpose of holding fitting and proper exercises 
    in commemoration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
    Commencement of the First Congress of the United States under the 
    Constitution is now dissolved.
        Thereupon,
        The Joint Congressional Committee on Arrangements escorted the 
    President of the United States and the members of his cabinet from 
    the Hall of the House.
        The Doorkeeper escorted the other invited guests of honor from 
    the Hall of the House in the following order:
        The Chief Justice of the United States and the Associate 
    Justices of the Supreme Court;
        The Ambassadors, the Ministers, and the Charges d'Affaires of 
    foreign governments;
        The Chief of Staff of the United States Army; the Chief of 
    Naval Operations of the United States Navy; the Major General 
    Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; and the Commandant of 
    the United States Coast Guard;
        The Commissioners of the District of Columbia.
        The SPEAKER resumed the chair.
        The SPEAKER. Without objection, the proceedings in the House 
    today

[[Page 156]]

    will be included in the Record of this date.
        There was no objection.

                                  adjournment

        The SPEAKER. Without objection, the House will stand adjourned 
    until 12 o'clock on Monday.
        There was no objection.
        Accordingly (at 1 o'clock and 48 minutes p.m.) the House 
    adjourned until Monday, March 6, 1939, at 12 o'clock noon.

Anniversary of the Constitution

Sec. 4.5 The House agreed to a concurrent resolution, considered by 
    unanimous consent, providing for the attendance of Members and 
    Senators at a special ceremony to be held in Philadelphia, 
    Pennsylvania, in honor of the Bicentennial of the Constitution and 
    in commemoration of the Great Compromise of the Constitutional 
    Convention.

    On May 28, 1987,(1) the House agreed to the following:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 105 Cong. Rec. 14031-34, 100th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         PROVIDING FOR PROCEDURES IN HONOR OF THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE 
                                  CONSTITUTION

        Mr. [Thomas S.] FOLEY [of Washington]. Mr. Speaker, I offer a 
    concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 131) providing for the 
    attendance of Representatives, Senators, and other appropriate 
    persons at a special ceremony and related events to be held in 
    Philadelphia, PA, in honor of the bicentennial of the Constitution 
    and in commemoration of the Great Compromise of the Constitutional 
    Convention, and ask unanimous consent for its immediate 
    consideration.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The Clerk will report 
    the concurrent resolution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John Murtha (PA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 131

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That (a) the Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives and the President pro tempore of the Senate, 
        acting jointly, shall designate, from among the Representatives 
        and Senators from each State, one official delegate to 
        represent the Congress at a special ceremony to be held on 
        Thursday, July, 16, 1987, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 
        honor of the bicentennial of the Constitution and in 
        commemoration of the Great Compromise of the Constitutional 
        Convention.
            (b) The official delegates designated under subsection (a) 
        shall be led by the Speaker, the majority leader, and the 
        minority leader of the House of Representatives, and by the 
        majority leader and the minority leader of the Senate, who 
        shall also be official delegates.
            (c) Each designation under subsection (a) shall be made 
        upon the recommendation of the Representatives and Senators of 
        the State involved, acting jointly. Such recommendation shall 
        be delivered to

[[Page 157]]

        the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President 
        pro tempore of the Senate not later than fourteen days after 
        the date on which this resolution is agreed to.
            Sec. 2. The Speaker of the House of Representatives (in 
        consultation with the majority leader and the minority leader 
        of the House of Representatives), with respect to the House of 
        Representatives, and the President pro tempore of the Senate 
        (in consultation with the majority leader and the minority 
        leader of the Senate), with respect to the Senate, may 
        designate additional Representatives, Senators, and other 
        appropriate persons to participate in events related to the 
        special ceremony.
            Sec. 3. On behalf of the Congress, the Representatives and 
        Senators from Pennsylvania (acting jointly and in cooperation 
        with the Commission on the U.S. House of Representatives 
        Bicentenary, the U.S. Senate Bicentennial Commission, the 
        officers of the House of Representatives, and the officers of 
        the Senate) may make arrangements with the sponsors of the 
        special ceremony and related events for participation by the 
        official delegates and other persons designated under this 
        resolution.
            Sec. 4. Amounts necessary to carry out this resolution with 
        respect to the House of Representatives shall be available as 
        provided by law. There shall be available from the contingent 
        fund of the Senate such amounts as may be necessary to carry 
        out this resolution with respect to the Senate.

        Mr. FOLEY (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the concurrent resolution be considered as read and 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Washington?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the initial 
    request of the gentleman from Washington?
        There was no objection. . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the concurrent 
    resolution.
        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: This occasion marked the first time that 
        the Congress engaged in ceremonial functions outside the seat 
        of government. The second instance was the ceremonial meeting 
        that took place in Federal Hall, New York, New York following 
        the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. See Sec. 16.4, supra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This concurrent resolution represents a greatly scaled-down version 
of Congressional participation in the Philadelphia celebration of the 
bicentennial. The original plans called for each House to convene and 
actually conduct business there, but the logistics (especially the cost 
and security involved) became prohibitive.

Sec. 4.6 By unanimous consent, the House considered a concurrent 
    resolution, reported from the Committee on Public Works and 
    Transportation, authorizing a public ceremony to be conducted on 
    the west lawn of the Capitol.

[[Page 158]]

    On Aug. 6, 1987,(1) the House considered House 
Concurrent Resolution 161, authorizing a ceremony in honor of the 
Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 133 Cong. Rec. 22719, 22720, 100th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      CELEBRATION OF CITIZENSHIP CEREMONY

        Mr. [James] HOWARD [of New Jersey]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent for the immediate consideration of the concurrent 
    resolution (H. Con. Res. 161) authorizing a public ceremony on the 
    west lawn of the Capitol in honor of the bicentennial of the U.S. 
    Constitution.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from New Jersey? . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Brian Joseph Donnelly (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 161

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

     SECTION 1. AUTHORIZATION TO CONDUCT A CEREMONY ON THE UNITED 
                   STATES CAPITOL GROUNDS.

       On September 16, 1987, the Commission on the Bicentennial 
     of the United States Constitution may conduct a ceremony, 
     entitled ``Celebration of Citizenship,'' on the West Terraces 
     and Lawns of the United States Capitol to honor the 
     Bicentennial of the United States Constitution. For the 
     purposes of this resolution, the Commission on the 
     Bicentennial of the United States Constitution is authorized 
     to erect upon the United States Capitol Grounds, subject to 
     the approval of the Architect of the Capitol, such stands, 
     stages, sound amplification devices and other related 
     structures and equipment as may be required for the conduct 
     of the ceremony.

     SEC. 2. RESPONSIBILITY OF CAPITOL POLICE BOARD.

       The Capitol Police Board shall take such action as may be 
     necessary to carry out section 1.

     SEC. 3. CONDITIONS RELATING TO PHYSICAL PREPARATION.

       The Architect of the Capitol may prescribe conditions for 
     physical preparations for the event authorized by section 1.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

    On Sept. 16, 1987,(3) the Speaker(4) was 
authorized to declare a recess on a subsequent day for a ceremony on 
the west terrace of the Capitol in honor of the Bicentennial of the 
U.S. Constitution. The announcement was as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 133 Cong. Rec. 24057, 100th Cong. 1st Sess.
 4. James C. Wright, Jr. (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER

        The SPEAKER. Let the Chair announce that the Celebration of 
    Citizenship which will be observed on the west front of the Capitol 
    commencing at 1 o'clock will last for approximately 1 hour. The 
    latter half of that time will be nationally televised. This is an 
    occurrence for the purpose of observing the 200th anniversary of 
    the Constitution. Therefore, it will be the purpose of the Chair to 
    declare a recess at approximately 12:45 in order that Members may 
    take the seats reserved for Members of the Congress on the west 
    front for this ceremony commemorating the 200th anniversary of our 
    Constitution.

[[Page 159]]

        We would then expect to be back in session at approximately 
    2:15.

 1976 Bicentennial Celebration

Sec. 4.7 Resolution reported from the Committee on Rules providing for 
    consideration in the House of a concurrent resolution not reported 
    from that committee; after adoption, the Committee on Rules also 
    discharged a similar Senate concurrent resolution from 
    consideration in the House.

    On June 23, 1975,(1) the following took place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 121 Cong. Rec. 20261-64, 94th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Gillis W.] LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, by direction of 
    the Committee on Rules, I call up House Resolution 555 and ask for 
    its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                  H. Res. 555

            Resolved, That upon adoption of this resolution it shall be 
        in order to consider the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 
        292) to provide for the appointment of a Joint Committee on 
        Arrangements for the Commemoration of the Bicentennial of the 
        United States of America in the House. After the adoption of H. 
        Con. Res. 292, the Committee on Rules shall be discharged from 
        the further consideration of the Senate concurrent resolution, 
        S. Con. Res. 44, and it shall then be in order to consider said 
        Senate concurrent resolution in the House.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The gentleman from 
    Louisiana is recognized for 1 hour. . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John J. McFall (CA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, I move the previous 
    question on the resolution.
        The previous question was ordered.
        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        Mr. LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, by direction of the 
    Committee on Rules, I call up House Concurrent Resolution 292 and 
    ask that it be considered in the House.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 292

            Whereas the Congress has represented the people of the 
        United States since the First Continental Congress met in 
        Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia from September 5 to October 
        26, 1774; and . . .
            Sec. 5. The expenses of the joint committee shall be paid 
        from the contingent fund of the House of Representatives upon 
        vouchers approved by the chairman of the joint committee. . . .

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Louisiana is 
    recognized for 1 hour.
        Mr. LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself 5 minutes. . 
    . .
        Mr. LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, I move the previous 
    question on the concurrent resolution.
        The previous question was ordered.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the concurrent 
    resolution.

[[Page 160]]

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        Mr. LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the rule, I 
    call up the Senate concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 44) and ask 
    for its immediate consideration.

                    motion offered by mr. long of louisiana

        Mr. LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, I offer a motion.
        The Clerk read as follows:

            Resolved, by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring) That the Congress should play a significant and 
        substantive role in honoring the Nation's two hundredth 
        anniversary and in assisting the American Revolution 
        Bicentennial Administration.
            Sec. 2. (a) There is hereby established a joint 
        congressional committee to be known as the Joint Committee on 
        Arrangements for the Commemoration of the Bicentennial of the 
        United States of America (herein referred to as the ``joint 
        committee''). . . .
            Sec. 5. The expenses of the joint committee shall be paid 
        from the contingent fund of the House of Representatives upon 
        vouchers approved by the chairman of the joint committee.

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        A similar House concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 292) was 
    laid on the table.

Magna Carta Loan for Bicentennial Celebration

Sec. 4.8 By unanimous consent, the House considered a concurrent 
    resolution expressing the appreciation of the Congress to the 
    Parliament of the United Kingdom for the loan to the United States 
    of the Magna Carta of 1215 A.D.

    On Oct. 22, 1975,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 121 Cong. Rec. 33674, 33675, 94th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             LOAN OF THE MAGNA CARTA TO THE UNITED STATES FOR THE 
                            BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

        Mr. [Thomas P.] O'NEILL [Jr., of Massachusetts]. Mr. Speaker, 
    on behalf of the minority leader and myself, I offer a concurrent 
    resolution (H. Con. Res. 458) and ask unanimous consent for its 
    immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 458

            Whereas, The historic document known as the Magna Carta of 
        1215 A.D. represents an essential link in the long chain of 
        constitutional instruments; and
            Whereas, American colonists brought with them from England 
        the traditions of free government and the principle that all 
        persons stand as equals before the law, concepts which had been 
        embodied in the Magna Carta, and they regarded them as their 
        birthright and incorporated them in their colonial charters and 
        constitutions; and

[[Page 161]]

            Whereas, In drafting the Constitution and the Bill of 
        Rights of the United States, our founding fathers sought to 
        guarantee to the people of these United States the freedom of 
        the church, an independent judiciary, the right to a speedy 
        trial, and the concept of due process of law, which principles 
        were clearly derived from the Magna Carta; and
            Whereas, In recognition of the Bicentennial celebrations of 
        the United States of America, the House of Lords and the House 
        of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great 
        Britain and Northern Ireland have unanimously adopted motions 
        respectfully praying that Her Majesty, the Queen, direct that 
        an original copy of the Magna Carta be loaned to the people of 
        the United States, to be held by their representative, the 
        Congress of the United States, for a period of one year; and
            Whereas, This loan has been authorized by Her Majesty, The 
        Queen, in order that this historic document may be displayed in 
        the Capitol, enclosed in a showcase donated by the United 
        Kingdom for that purpose; Therefore be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the Congress of the United States recognizes 
        that it is natural that men should value the original documents 
        which guarantee their rights, and thus hereby expresses its 
        sincere gratitude to Her Majesty, The Queen, the Parliament and 
        the people of the United Kingdom for their loan to this Nation 
        of the Magna Carta, a document of historic and symbolic 
        significance to the peoples of both our Nations, and believes 
        that its temporary residence here in the country of its 
        philosophical descendants, the Declaration of Independence, the 
        Constitution and the Bill of Rights, will contribute an 
        important historical perspective to the Bicentennial 
        celebration, and be it further
            Resolved, That the showcase donated to the United States by 
        the United Kingdom to be used to display the Magna Carta may be 
        placed in the rotunda of the United States Capitol, and the 
        Architect of the Capitol is hereby authorized to make the 
        necessary arrangements therefor, including the payment of all 
        necessary expenses incurred in connection with the 
        installation, maintenance, and protection thereof; and be it 
        further
            Resolved, That the Secretary of State is requested to 
        transmit a copy of these resolutions to the Parliament of the 
        United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Massachusetts?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 4.9 Instance where the House rejected a Senate concurrent 
    resolution authorizing appointment of a joint House-Senate 
    delegation to go to the United Kingdom at the invitation of the 
    British Parliament to accept the loan of an original copy of the 
    Magna Carta.

    On Mar. 9, 1976,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 122 Cong. Rec. 5847, 5848, 94th Cong. 2d Sess.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 162]]

        PROVIDING FOR DELEGATION OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS TO GO TO UNITED 
         KINGDOM TO ACCEPT LOAN OF AN ORIGINAL COPY OF THE MAGNA CARTA

        Mr. [Thomas P.] O'NEILL [Jr., of Massachusetts]. Mr. Speaker, I 
    ask unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate 
    concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 98) to provide for a delegation 
    of Members of Congress to go to the United Kingdom for purposes of 
    accepting a loan of an original copy of the Magna Carta, and for 
    other purposes, and ask for its immediate consideration in the 
    House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Massachusetts?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Robert E.] BAUMAN [of Maryland]. Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object, earlier I objected to the consideration of 
    this Senate concurrent resolution on today. I am fully aware, of 
    course, that an objection would do nothing more than send the 
    Senate concurrent resolution to the Committee on Rules, where a 
    rule will be obtained and this resolution brought to the floor for 
    a vote.
        I do not personally support sending such a congressional 
    delegation at taxpayers' expense for this purpose, and I will vote 
    against it, but I do not object to the consideration of the Senate 
    concurrent resolution at this time.
        Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Massachusetts?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 98

            Whereas, in recognition of the Bicentennial celebrations of 
        the United States of America, the House of Lords and the House 
        of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great 
        Britain and Northern Ireland have unanimously adopted motions 
        respectfully praying that Her Majesty, the Queen, direct that 
        an original copy of the Magna Carta be placed on loan to the 
        people of the United States for a period of one year; and
            Whereas, this loan has now been graciously authorized by 
        Her Majesty, the Queen, and, by concurrent resolution of the 
        United States Congress, this historic document of freedom and 
        of the abiding principles of law will now be displayed in the 
        Rotunda of the United States Capitol, there to be contained 
        within a showcase to be donated by the United Kingdom for such 
        purpose: now, therefore, be it
            Resolved, by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That (a) a delegation of Members of Congress shall 
        be appointed to proceed at the invitation of the two Houses of 
        Parliament, to the United Kingdom, there to attend the 
        presentation of the Magna Carta, under suitable auspices, to 
        the people of the United States, to be held in the custody of 
        their representative, the Congress of the United States, for a 
        period of one year;
            (b) the delegation shall consist of the Speaker of the 
        House of Representatives and not to exceed twenty-four 
        additional Members appointed as follows:
            (1) Twelve appointed by the Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives.

[[Page 163]]

            (2) Twelve appointed by the President of the Senate on the 
        recommendation of the Majority and Minority Leaders.
            (3) The Speaker shall be the Chairman of the delegation and 
        the Majority Leader of the Senate shall be the Vice Chairman.
            Sec. 2. There are authorized to be paid from the contingent 
        fund of the Senate on vouchers approved by the Chairman and 
        Vice Chairman, such amounts as the Chairman and Vice Chairman 
        of the delegation jointly shall determine to be necessary (one 
        half of such expenditures shall be reimbursed by the House of 
        Representatives and such reimbursement is hereby authorized):
            (1) for the expenses of the delegation, including expenses 
        of staff members designated by the Chairman and Vice Chairman, 
        respectively to assist the delegation;
            (2) for the reimbursement of any department or agency of 
        the Federal Government for expenses incurred by it on behalf of 
        the delegation and expenses incurred in connection with the 
        functions of the delegation in the United Kingdom;
            (3) for payment of expenses in connection with the display 
        of the Magna Carta in the United States Capitol, including 
        those expenses associated with delegations invited from the 
        Government of the United Kingdom or other nations in connection 
        with joint Bicentennial ceremonies at the Capitol.
            Sec. 3. All authority for such expenditures shall expire at 
        the close of business on December 31, 1976.

        The SPEAKER. The question is on the Senate concurrent 
    resolution.
        The question was taken; and the Speaker announced that the ayes 
    appeared to have it.
        Mr. [Steven D.] SYMMS (of Idaho). Mr. Speaker, I object to the 
    vote on the ground that a quorum is not present and make the point 
    of order that a quorum is not present.
        The SPEAKER. Evidently a quorum is not present.
        The Sergeant at Arms will notify absent members.
        The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were, yeas 
    167, nays 219, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 45, as follows:

                              [Roll No. 97] . . .

        So the Senate concurrent resolution was rejected.
        The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
        The SPEAKER. The Clerk will notify the Senate of the action of 
    the House.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See 122 Cong. Rec. 6776-94, 94th Cong. 2d Sess., Mar. 17, 1976, 
        where the House vacated proceedings and agreed to S. Con. Res. 
        98, as amended.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 4.10 The Speaker announced from the Chair the program to be held 
    in the Capitol Rotunda prior to convening of the House on a 
    subsequent day to receive a copy of the Magna Carta from a 
    delegation from the British Parliament.

    On June 1, 1976,(1) the Speaker(2) made the 
following announcement:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 122 Cong. Rec. 16018, 16019, 94th Cong. 2d Sess.
 2. Carl Albert (OK).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 164]]

                          ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER

        The SPEAKER. A historic Bicentennial ceremony will take place 
    in the rotunda of the Capitol on Thursday, June 3, 1976, when the 
    Magna Carta is formally accepted by the Congress from the 
    Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern 
    Ireland. Members are advised that they should assemble in the Hall 
    of the House promptly at 10 a.m. on Thursday, June 3, 1976, in 
    order to proceed in a body to the rotunda for the ceremony. The 
    procession to the rotunda will be led by leadership representing 
    both sides of the aisle and senior Members of the House, with other 
    Members following in order of their relative seniority in the 
    House. . . .
        Without objection, the order of proceedings will be included at 
    this point in the Record:

                              Order of Proceedings

            Musical Program by the United States Air Force Orchestra to 
        begin at 10:15 a.m.
            Arrival of The Senate.
            Arrival of the House of Representatives.
            Procession of The American Delegation.
            Procession of The British Delegation.
            Arrival of The Lord Chancellor, The Speaker, The Lord Privy 
        Seal, and The Marquess of Lothian.
            Greetings by The Vice President, The Speaker, The Senate 
        Majority Leader, The House Majority Leader, The Senate Minority 
        Leader, and The House Minority Leader.
            Playing of the British and American National Anthems by the 
        United States Marine Band.
            Procession of Congressional and Parliamentary Leaders led 
        by the Senate and House Sergeants at Arms.
            The Honorable Carl Albert.
            The Rt. Hon. Lord Elwyn-Jones, Q.C.
            The Rt. Hon. George Thomas, M.P.
            Mr. John Watheston.
            Brigadier N. E. V. Short.
            The Honorable Nelson Rockefeller.
            The Honorable Mike Mansfield.
            The Rt. Hon. Lord Shepherd.
            The Marquess of Lothian.
            The Honorable Hugh Scott.
            The Honorable Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr.
            The Honorable John Rhodes.
            Welcome by the Honorable Hugh Scott, The Minority Leader of 
        the Senate.
            Invocation by the Reverend Edward L. R. Elson, Chaplain of 
        The Senate.
            ``Ballad of Magna Carta'' performed by United States Air 
        Force Orchestra and Chorus.
            Remarks by The Honorable Hugh Scott.
            Posting of the British Military Detail: The Grenadier 
        Guards, The Coldstream Guards, The Scots Guards, The Irish 
        Guards, and The Welsh Guards.
            Presentation of Magna Carta by The Rt. Hon. Lord Elwyn-
        Jones, Q.C., The Lord Chancellor.
            Opening of Presentation Case by the British Military 
        Detail.
            Acceptance of Magna Carta by The Honorable Carl Albert, The 
        Speaker of the House of Representatives.
            Posting of the American Military Detail: The United States 
        Army, The United States Marine Corps, The United States Navy, 
        The United States Air Force, and The United States Coast Guard.
            Benediction by The Reverend Edward G. Latch, Chaplain of 
        The House of Representatives.

[[Page 165]]

            The British and American Delegations will view Magna Carta, 
        followed by Members of the Senate and House of Representatives 
        and Guests.

        Those who do not wish to view the Magna Carta at the end of the 
    ceremony may exit through the north and south rotunda doors.

Sec. 4.11 By unanimous consent, the proceedings had in the British 
    Parliament, when the Magna Carta was presented on loan to the 
    congressional delegation in Westminster Hall and in the Capitol 
    Rotunda, were printed in the Congressional Record.

    On June 3, 1976,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 122 Cong. Rec. 16492, 94th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS OF THURSDAY, MAY 27, 1976, IN 
        WESTMINSTER HALL AND OF TODAY IN THE ROTUNDA DURING ACCEPTANCE 
                                 OF MAGNA CARTA

        Mr. [John J.] McFALL [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings on Thursday, May 27, 1976, 
    in Westminster Hall and the proceedings of today in the rotunda 
    during acceptance of the Magna Carta be printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from California?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    In the Senate, on June 3, 1976, the following transcript was 
printed in the Congressional Record:(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See 122 Cong. Rec. 16473-75, 94th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             RECESS UNTIL 2:13 P.M.

        Mr. [Michael J.] MANSFIELD [of Montana]. Now, Mr. President, 
    under the previous order I ask that the Senate stand in recess for 
    15 minutes for the purpose of introducing the parliamentary 
    delegation from the United Kingdom visiting here for the purpose of 
    allowing us to retain the original copy of the Magna Carta for the 
    rest of this Bicentennial Year, and also for the purpose of 
    allowing those of us who wish to do so, and I believe that will 
    include all of us, to shake hands with our distinguished guests, 
    the time not to exceed 15 minutes.
        There being no objection, the Senate, at 1:58 p.m., recessed 
    until 2:13 p.m.; whereupon, the Senate reassembled when called to 
    order by the Presiding Officer (Mr. Fannin).
        (During the recess, the following proceedings occurred:)
        Mr. MANSFIELD. Mr. President, if I may have the attention of 
    the Senate, and if Senators will take their seats temporarily, I 
    would like to welcome, on behalf of the Senate, the delegation from 
    the Parliament of the United Kingdom and their associates.
        This delegation, which the distinguished Republican leader and 
    I met with in England, is over in this country as our guests. It is 
    here for the presentation of the original copy of the Magna Carta, 
    to emphasize the link between our respective countries based

[[Page 166]]

    on two of the greatest documents in the world insofar as the rights 
    of people are concerned, the Magna Carta and the Declaration of 
    Independence.
        Their hospitality has been extraordinary; we hope that, in some 
    small way, we have been able to repay them.
        I would like at this time to introduce the members of the 
    delegation of the United Kingdom and their associates. I would 
    suggest that their wives rise at the time of the announcement of 
    the names of their husbands.

            The Rt. Hon. Lord Elwyn-Jones, Q.C., Lord Chancellor, 
        accompanied by Lady Elwyn-Jones.
            The Rt. Hon. George Thomas, M.P., Speaker.
            The Rt. Hon. Michael Foot, M.P., Lord President of the 
        Council (who I believe is absent due to official business of 
        the Council.) . . .
            And finally, one of the real spark plugs in this gathering, 
        Brigadier P.S. Ward, C.B.E., Secretary of the Parliamentary 
        Bicentenary Committee.

        [Applause, Senators rising.]
        Thereupon the distinguished visitors were greeted by Senators 
    in the well of the Chamber.
        (This concludes proceedings that occurred during the 
    recess.)                          -------------------

                                  MAGNA CARTA

        Mr. [John G.] TOWER [of Texas]. Mr. President, a British 
    visitor to this country once observed that the United States is a 
    virtual museum of British legal and political institutions; in 
    fact, Mr. President, we owe a great deal to the constitutions of 
    Clarendon, the Magna Carta, and the English Bill of Rights of 1688.
        I think never have I seen a more persuasive sense of history in 
    this Capitol than was the case this morning with the very moving 
    presentation of the Magna Carta by our British friends and the 
    acceptance by the Speaker.
        I, therefore, Mr. President, ask unanimous consent that there 
    be printed in the Record the remarks made by Senator Hugh Scott, as 
    the keynote, the presentation speech made by the Lord Chancellor, 
    Lord Elwyn-Jones, and the acceptance speech made by the Speaker of 
    the House of Representatives, Congressman Albert.
        There being no objection, the material was ordered to be 
    printed in the Record, as follows:

                       Remarks by U.S. Senator Hugh Scott

            Another distinguished British observer, Lord Bryce, visited 
        the United States during the time of our centennial 
        celebration. He observed that Americans love all that is old 
        and established. He explained our evident pride in our history 
        and government by reference to the deeply-rooted instincts of 
        our British heritage ``that practical shrewdness which 
        recognizes the vale of permanence and solidity in 
        institutions.''  . . .



                Address by the Lord Chancellor, Lord Elwyn-Jones

            It is my honour and pleasure first to bring to this great 
        Assembly of representatives of the American people the 
        greetings and abundant good wishes of my fellow 
        Parliamentarians and of the people of the United Kingdom. . . .

         Remarks by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Carl 
                                     Albert

            We meet here today to complete what was begun in such warm 
        good

[[Page 167]]

        will ten days ago. The Members of Parliament of the United 
        Kingdom welcomed my colleagues and me then at Westminster Hall, 
        the most historic structure in Britain. . . .
            I salute this friendship. I salute the generosity of the 
        British peoples, their sovereign and their government. I thank 
        them for giving Americans the opportunity to view, during the 
        coming year, an original copy of Magna Carta and the superb 
        replica and the showcase of gold, silver and enamel that will 
        find their permanent home here.

Sec. 4.12 The Speaker, pursuant to authority previously granted, 
    declared a recess to allow members to attend a ceremony in the 
    Rotunda in connection with the return of a copy of the Magna Carta 
    to Great Britain.

    On June 10, 1977,(1) the Speaker pro 
tempore(2) was authorized to declare a recess subject to the 
call of the Chair:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 123 Cong. Rec. 18408, 95th Cong. 1st Sess.
 2. James C. Wright, Jr. (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORIZING SPEAKER OR SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE TO DECLARE RECESS ON 
        MONDAY NEXT PERMITTING MEMBERS TO ATTEND CEREMONY IN CONNECTION 
              WITH RETURN OF THE MAGNA CARTA TO THE BRITISH PEOPLE

        Mrs. [Shirley] CHISHOLM [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that it may be in order at any time on Monday, 
    June 13, 1977, for the Speaker or the Speaker pro tempore to 
    declare a recess subject to the call of the Chair, for the purpose 
    of permitting Members to attend a ceremony in the rotunda of the 
    Capitol. There will be a short ceremony at about 3 p.m. in 
    connection with the return of the Magna Carta to the British people 
    who so graciously loaned it for our Bicentennial.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentlewoman from New York?
        There was no objection.

    On June 13, 1977,(3) pursuant to authority previously 
granted, the Speaker declared a recess to allow Members to attend the 
ceremony in the Rotunda of the Capitol in connection with the return of 
a copy of the Magna Carta to Great Britain:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 123 Cong. Rec. 18579, 18580, 95th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(4) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of June 10, 1977, the Chair declares the House in recess until the 
    hour of 3:30 p.m., for the purpose of allowing Members to attend 
    the ceremonies at approximately 3 p.m. in the rotunda of the 
    Capitol in connection with the return of the Magna Carta.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Accordingly (at 2 o'clock and 47 minutes p.m.), the House stood 
    in recess until 3:30 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the

[[Page 168]]

    Speaker at 3 o'clock and 30 minutes p.m.


                        

[Page 168-171]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 5. --Patriotic Observances Of Another Country

Sec. 5.1 Concurrent resolution extending best wishes of Congress to the 
    Norwegian parliament on occasion of the 150th anniversary of the 
    Norwegian constitution.

    On May 14, 1964,(1) Donald Fraser of Minnesota, offered 
the following concurrent resolution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 110 Cong. Rec. 10962, 88th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF NORWEGIAN CONSTITUTION

        Mr. FRASER. Mr. Speaker, I offer a concurrent resolution (H. 
    Con. Res. 302) and ask unanimous consent for its immediate 
    consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Minnesota?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

            Whereas one hundred and fifty years ago, on May 17, 1814, 
        the Norweigian Constitution was adopted at Eidsvoll, Norway; 
        and
            Whereas through the years the Kingdom of Norway has 
        demonstrated its firm dedication to the high ideals of 
        representative democracy, individual freedom, and social 
        justice; and
            Whereas the peoples of Norway and the United States are 
        joined in warm and binding friendship bred of common purpose 
        and shared ancestry; and
            Whereas the Congress of the United States recognizes the 
        significant contributions made by Norway to the achievement of 
        closer cooperation among the countries in the Atlantic 
        partnership: Therefore be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the congratulations and best wishes of 
        Congress of the United States are hereby cordially extended to 
        the Norwegian Storting, upon the occasion of the one hundred 
        and fiftieth anniversary of the adoption of the Norwegian 
        Constitution.
            Sec. 2. The Clerk of the House shall transmit a copy of 
        this resolution, through the Department of State, to the 
        President of the Norwegian Storting.

        The concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 5.2 Unanimous-consent request providing a one-hour period as the 
    second order of business for the purpose of observing the 42d 
    anniversary of Lithuanian independence.

    On Jan. 18, 1960,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 106 Cong. Rec. 670, 86th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [William T.] MURPHY [of Illinois]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous

[[Page 169]]

    consent that on February 16, on the occasion of the 42d observance 
    of the independence of Lithuania, that after the reading and 
    approval of the Journal, and prior to any legislative business for 
    that day, I may have permission to address the House for 1 hour and 
    to yield time to other Members.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Without objection, it is so ordered.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Sec. 5.3 Form of concurrent resolution providing for a joint session to 
    commemorate the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Cuba.

    On Apr. 19, 1948,(3) the President of the United 
States(4) addressed the joint session of Congress 
commemorating the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Cuba. The 
proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 94 Cong. Rec. 4568-70, 80th Cong. 2d Sess.
 4. Harry S Truman (MO).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          joint session of the house and senate (held pursuant to the 
                        provisions of h. con. res. 184)

           Commemoration Ceremony Upon the Occasion of the Fiftieth 
         Anniversary of the Liberation of Cuba, 1898-1948, at a Joint 
           Session of Congress in the House of Representatives at 12 
                 o'Clock Noon, Washington, D.C., April 19, 1948

                      the joint committee on arrangements

                            Edward Martin, chairman

            For the Senate: Edward Martin, of Pennsylvania; C. Wayland 
        Brooks, of Illinois; Tom Connally, of Texas; Theodore Francis 
        Green, of Rhode Island.
            For the House: Earl C. Michener, of Michigan; James E. Van 
        Zandt, of Pennsylvania; Bernard W. Kearney, of New York; Thomas 
        J. Lane, of Massachusetts.

                       the program for the joint session

            Prelude-----------United States Marine Band 
        Orchestra (Maj. William F. Santelmann, leader)
            Presiding officer-----------The Speaker Hon. 
        Joseph W. Martin, Jr.
            Medlay of songs of the Spanish-American War period.
            Presenting the colors.
            Invocation-----------------Rev. James Shera 
        Montgomery, D. D., the Chaplain of the House of 
        Representatives.
            Reading of joint resolution------------------The 
        Honorable Edward Martin, Chairman, Joint Committee on 
        Arrangements.
            The national anthem of the Republic of 
        Cuba------------Miss Emma Otero
            Address-----------------The President of the 
        Unites States
            Response-----------------His Excellency 
        Guillermo Belt, Ambassador of Cuba.

[[Page 170]]

            The national anthem of the United 
        States-----------------Miss Hollace Shaw, Columbia 
        Concerts
            Benedition-----------------Very Rev. Ignatius 
        Smith, O. P., dean of School of Philosophy, Catholic 
        University.
            Retiring of the colors.

        The SPEAKER of the House of Representatives presided. . . .

                                   invocation

        Rev. James Shera Montgomery, D. D., the Chaplain of the House 
    of Representatives, offered the . . . invocation[.] . . .

                        reading of the joint resolution

        The SPEAKER.(5) The Chair recognizes the Honorable 
    Edwin Martin, Senator from the State of Pennsylvania and chairman 
    of the Joint Committee on Arrangements.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Senator MARTIN. Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, Mr. President pro 
    tempore, Mr. Ambassador, distinguished guests:

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary 
        of the victory over Spain, resulting in the liberation of Cuba, 
        the two Houses of Congress shall assemble in the Hall of the 
        House of Representatives at 1 o'clock in the afternoon, on 
        Monday, April 19, 1948.
            That the joint committee created by House Concurrent 
        Resolution 108, Eightieth Congress, is empowered to make 
        suitable arrangements for fitting and proper exercises for the 
        joint session of Congress herein authorized.
            That invitations to attend the exercises be extended to the 
        President of the Untied States and the members of his Cabinet, 
        the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the Supreme Court 
        of the United States, the Diplomatic Corps (through the 
        Secretary of State), the General of the Armies, the Chief of 
        Staff to the Commander in Chief, the Chief of Staff, United 
        States Army, the Chief of Naval Operations, the Chief of Staff, 
        United States Air Force, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, 
        and the Commandant of the Coast Guard, and such other persons 
        as the joint committee shall deem proper.
            That the President of the United States is hereby invited 
        to address the American people at the joint session of the 
        Congress in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the 
        victory over Spain.

                                medley of songs

        The Marine Band Orchestra played a medley of songs.

               presentation of the president of the united states

        The SPEAKER. I have the honor to present the President of the 
    United States. [Applause, the Members rising.]

                 address by the president of the united states.

        The PRESIDENT. Mr. Speaker, Mr. President pro tempore, Mr. 
    Ambassador, Mr. Chairman, Members of the Congress, and 
    distinguished guests, it is eminently fitting that we should 
    assemble here today to pay solemn tribute to the heroic champions 
    of human freedom who brought about the liberation of Cuba. The 
    commemoration of half a century of Cuban independence recalls the 
    valor of the Cuban patriots and American soldiers and sailors who

[[Page 171]]

    gave liberally of their strength and their blood that Cuba might be 
    free. From that chapter in man's age-old struggle for freedom we 
    can draw inspiration for the hard tasks that confront us in our own 
    time. . . .
        Let us avail ourselves of this occasion to refresh our faith in 
    freedom and to rededicate this Nation and ourselves to the 
    principles of liberty, justice, and peace. [Applause, the Members 
    rising.]

                     presentation of the ambassador of cuba

        The SPEAKER. I have the honor to present His Excellency 
    Guillermo Belt, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of 
    Cuba. [Applause, the Members rising.]

                 address of response by the ambassador of cuba

        His Excellency GUILLERMO BELT, Ambassador Extraordinary and 
    Plenipotentiary of Cuba. Mr. President, Mr. President pro tempore 
    of the Senate, Mr. Speaker, Members of the Congress, distinguished 
    guests, it is with the deepest emotion that I appear before the 
    Congress of the United States on the fiftieth anniversary of the 
    joint resolution to express once more the undying gratitude, the 
    warm affection, and the sincere friendship of my people for the 
    American people. [Applause.] . . .

                    the national anthem of the united states

        Miss Hollace Shaw, accompanied by the Marine Band Orchestra, 
    sang the national anthem of the United States.

                                  benediction

        Very Rev. Ignatius Smith, O. P., dean of the school of 
    philosophy of the Catholic University, pronounced the . . . 
    benediction[.] . . .

                                   retirement

        The SPEAKER. The colors of the United States and the Republic 
    of Cuba will be retired. . . .

                            joint session dissolved

        The SPEAKER. The purposes of the joint session having been 
    accomplished, the Chair declares the joint session of the two 
    Houses now dissolved.
        Thereupon, at 12 o'clock and 40 minutes p. m., the joint 
    session of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their Chamber.

                  proceedings of joint session ordered printed

        The SPEAKER. Without objection, the proceedings of the joint 
    session will be printed as part of the Record of the day.
        There was no objection.


                      

[Page 171-176]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 6. --Religious Observances

National Day of Reconciliation

Sec. 6.1 The House suspended the rules and agreed to an unreported 
    concurrent resolution (discharged from the Committee on House 
    Administration) authorizing use of the House Chamber for an 
    assembly of House and Senate

[[Page 172]]

    Members and Chaplains to ``seek the blessings of 
    Providence.''(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. For other examples of ceremonies of a religious nature that have 
        been held in the Capitol Rotunda, see 147 Cong. Rec. 16761, 
        16762, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., Sept. 12, 2001 (H. Con. Res. 223, 
        permitting use of Capitol Rotunda for prayer vigil in memory of 
        those who lost their lives in the events of Sept. 11, 2001), 
        and 104 Cong. Rec. 4621, 4622, 104th Cong. 2d Sess., Mar. 13, 
        1996 (S. Con. Res. 45, authorizing use of Capitol Rotunda for 
        presentation of the Congressional Gold Medal to Reverend and 
        Mrs. Billy Graham). See also Sec. 6.2, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Parliamentarian's Note: The adoption of the following resolution is 
a historical anomaly, as the House has traditionally shunted ceremonies 
of a religious nature from the Chamber itself.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. On Nov. 19, 1804, the House adopted the following resolution: 
        ``That, in future, no person shall be permitted to perform 
        divine service in the chamber occupied by the House of 
        Representatives, unless with the consent of the Speaker.''  H. 
        Jour., 8th Cong., p. 17. The House in 1828 ordered that the 
        Chamber should be used only for legislative business and 
        religious services on Sundays. 5 Hinds' Precedents Sec. 7270. 
        In 1880, the House adopted what is now Rule IV, which provides 
        that the ``Hall of the House shall be used only for the 
        legislative business of the House . . . except when the House 
        agrees to take part of any ceremonies therein.'' See Rule IV 
        clause 1, House Rules and Manual Sec. 677 (2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Oct. 23, 2001,(3) Mr. John T. Doolittle, of 
California moved to suspend the rules and agree to a concurrent 
resolution, as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 147 Cong. Rec. 20388-90, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. DOOLITTLE. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and 
    agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 184) providing for 
    a National Day of Reconciliation, as amended.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 184

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That on a day of reconciliation selected jointly 
        by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the 
        President pro tempore of the Senate, and with the Chaplain of 
        the House of Representatives and the Chaplain of the Senate in 
        attendance--
            (1) the two Houses of the Congress shall assemble in the 
        Hall of the House of Representatives at a time when the two 
        Houses are not in session; and
            (2) during this assembly, the Members of the two Houses may 
        gather to humbly seek the blessings of Providence for 
        forgiveness, reconciliation, unity, and charity for all people 
        of the United States, thereby assisting the Nation to realize 
        its potential as the champion of hope, the vindicator of the 
        defenseless, and the guardian of freedom.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman 
    from California (Mr. Doolittle) will control 20 minutes.
        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California (Mr. 
    Doolittle).

[[Page 173]]

        Mr. DOOLITTLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Mr. Speaker, this is a resolution that calls for the two Houses 
    of Congress to assemble in this Chamber at a time when the House 
    and the Senate are not in session and that during this assembly the 
    Members of the two Houses may gather to humbly seek the blessings 
    of Providence for forgiveness, reconciliation, unity, and charity 
    for all people of the United States, thereby assisting the Nation 
    to realize its potential as a champion of hope, the vindicator of 
    the defenseless, and the guardian of freedom. . . .
        Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
    gentleman from Texas (Mr. DeLay), the author of the resolution.
        Mr. [Tom] DeLAY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
    yielding me time; and I thank my good friend from California for 
    bringing this resolution to the floor. This is a resolution that is 
    coauthored by me and the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Hall). . . .
        We have heard suggestions that other spaces within the Capitol 
    would be more fitting and appropriate venues than the House 
    Chamber. I could not disagree more strongly. Please let me explain 
    why.
        Our House Chamber is the symbolic heart of American democracy. 
    It is right here that we do our work. It is here that decisions 
    bearing heavily on our destiny are decided. It is here that all 
    three branches of our government assemble during moments of great 
    national gravity. . . .
        Members should also know that this resolution raises no 
    constitutional barriers. It has been vetted thoroughly and poses no 
    challenges to law.
        To alleviate another concern, Members should know that we 
    intend the entire scope of the Day of Reconciliation to occur 
    without TV broadcast. Members should have no fear that this format 
    could breach their privacy. Privacy in worship will be respected by 
    this gathering because it will not be recorded. It is a chance for 
    America's leaders to approach God.
        We know we have all fallen short of our potential. We know that 
    our Nation has also failed to achieve all that it could. Members 
    can take a firm step toward realizing those twin objectives by 
    supporting this resolution.
        Remember, all we ask is that willing Members be permitted to 
    gather to humbly seek the blessings of Providence for forgiveness, 
    reconciliation, unity, and charity for all the people of the United 
    States, thereby assisting the Nation to realize its potential as 
    the champion of hope, the vindicator of the defenseless, and the 
    guardian of freedom.

                                {time}  1545

        A national day of reconciliation will be good for each of us as 
    elected officials and men and women, but it will be even better for 
    America. It is time to come together, and I believe that this 
    resolution will be an immeasurable help in solidifying our country.
        So, Mr. Speaker, for that reason I ask Members to support the 
    resolution.
        Mr. DOOLITTLE. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 5 minutes to 
    the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Hall).
        Mr. [Tony P.] HALL of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman 
    for yielding me this time. . . .

[[Page 174]]

        The fact that this is being done when we are not in session I 
    think is important. That means the cameras are not on us. That 
    means the press is not here. So we are not doing it for pious 
    reasons; we are doing it because we sincerely hope that Members 
    will come here on their own in a voluntary way and humbly ask God 
    for guidance and wisdom to do what we should be doing, not only as 
    representatives of this country in our districts, but, what do You 
    want us to do? . . .
        I think this is what this resolution is all about. This is the 
    reason why I went in on it. The only stipulation I made with the 
    gentleman from Texas (Mr. DeLay) was that we do it privately, to 
    not do it in front of the TV cameras. We do not do it in public. We 
    do not do it to bring publicity to ourselves. That is the worst 
    kind of thing to do. I think this legislation addresses that.
        For that reason, I support it and I hope the whole body 
    supports it. . . .
        Mr. DOOLITTLE. Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to yield 4\1/2\ 
    minutes to the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Blunt), the chief 
    deputy whip and a cosponsor of this resolution.
        Mr. [Roy] BLUNT [of Missouri]. Mr. Speaker, I thank the 
    gentleman for yielding me this time. . . .
        Our Nation has a strong background in faith and worship by 
    government officials. It is a background that other speakers, 
    including the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Hall), have already talked 
    about. George Washington established a day of thanksgiving and 
    prayer as the first President. Every President since President 
    Kennedy has said a prayer just outside the doors of this Chamber 
    before entering the House to give the State of the Union address. 
    The House Chaplain opens every session of Congress with a morning 
    prayer. Above the podium, Mr. Speaker, are engraved the words, ``In 
    God We Trust.'' During the Civil War, President Lincoln set aside 
    several days of national mourning and prayer. In the 1950s and in 
    the 1980s, Congress passed resolutions providing for national days 
    of prayer; and later, those resolutions became public laws. . . .
        Mr. DOOLITTLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my 
    time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(4) Are there further 
    requests for time? If not the question is on the motion offered by 
    the gentleman from California (Mr. Doolittle) that the House 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. 
    Res. 184, as amended.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. James V. Hansen (UT).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution, as 
    amended, was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 6.2 The House, by unanimous consent, agreed to a Senate concurrent 
    resolution authorizing use of the Rotunda for an ``assembly'' of 
    House and Senate Members and Chaplains for a National Day of 
    Reconciliation to ``seek the blessings of 
    Providence.''(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Parliamentarian's Note: The Senate balked at the idea of using the 
        House Chamber for this ceremony as put forward in the House 
        companion, H. Con. Res. 184. See Sec. 6.1, supra.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 175]]

    On Nov. 16, 2001,(2) the following events occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 147 Cong. Rec. 22910, 22911, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         PROVIDING FOR USE OF ROTUNDA OF CAPITOL FOR A NATIONAL DAY OF 
                                 RECONCILIATION

        Mr. [Thomas] REYNOLDS [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate 
    concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 83) providing for a National 
    Day of Reconciliation, and ask for its immediate consideration in 
    the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from New York?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Vito Fossella (NY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. No subsequent printings of the private ceremony that was held on 
        Dec. 4, 2001, were placed in the Congressional Record.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                              S. Con. Res. 83
      Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring),

     SECTION 1. USE OF ROTUNDA OF THE CAPITOL.

       The rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to be used at any 
     time on November 27, 2001, or December 4, 2001, for a 
     National Day of Reconciliation where--
       (1) the 2 Houses of Congress shall assemble in the rotunda 
     with the Chaplain of the House of Representatives and the 
     Chaplain of the Senate in attendance; and
       (2) during this assembly, the Members of the 2 Houses may 
     gather to humbly seek the blessings of Providence for 
     forgiveness, reconciliation, unity, and charity for all 
     people of the United States, thereby assisting the Nation to 
     realize its potential as--
       (A) the champion of hope;
       (B) the vindicator of the defenseless; and
       (C) the guardian of freedom.

     SEC. 2. PHYSICAL PREPARATIONS FOR THE ASSEMBLY.

       Physical preparations for the assembly shall be carried out 
     in accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the 
     Capitol may prescribe.

The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Easter

Sec. 6.3 Program of Easter Service held on the Capitol steps.

    On Apr. 22, 1943,(1) Mr. Karl E. Mundt, of South Dakota, 
addressed the House regarding the nonsectarian Easter service which was 
to be held on Sunday, Apr. 25, 1943. This service, while not an 
official function of the House, was announced in the House. The program 
for that Easter service is included below, following Mr. Mundt's 
remarks.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 89 Cong. Rec. 3707, 78th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. MUNDT. Mr. Speaker, next Sunday morning, April 25, for the 
    first time in the history of this Government, an Easter morning 
    service will be held on the main steps of the Capitol. These 
    services are being sponsored by a committee of Senators and 
    Representatives and the Capitol Fellowship Forum. I take this 
    opportunity of inviting all Members of Congress and their families 
    who will be in town on Easter to

[[Page 176]]

    join us in these services which are also open to the public. They 
    are to be strictly nonsectarian in character.
        Through the cooperation of the Speaker, the wartime ban with 
    respect to holding large public gatherings on the Capitol Grounds 
    during this crisis has been modified for this occasion. The 
    services will begin at 8:30, and Capt. Robert D. Workman, the Chief 
    of Navy Chaplains, will be the principal speaker. The Navy Band 
    will play a musical prelude beginning at 8 o'clock. We hope this 
    special service will help in its small way to demonstrate that what 
    has become of necessity, the wartime capital of the world is also 
    the best and most unselfish hope of all humanity that this conflict 
    will be followed by an era of peace, good will, and Christian 
    brotherly love.
        I ask unanimous consent, to include the program with my 
    remarks.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

                                Program

                            Easter Services

   United States Capitol Steps, 8:30 Sunday morning, April. 25, 1943

        (Congressman Karl E. Mundt, of South Dakota, presiding)

       Musical prelude--------United States Navy
                                                              Band

                     Lt. Charles Brendler, director

       America--------------Entire assembly
       Invocation---Capt. John F. B. Carruthers,
                                                       C. S. M. F.

                     Chairman, Christian Commission

       Statement of purpose---------George H.
                                                           Kendall

                  President, Capitol Fellowship Forum

       A Toast to the Flag---------The Telephone
                                                         Glee Club

           Robert Davidson, director; words by John Jay Daly

       The American's Creed---------Entire assembly

             Led by John Page, eldest son of the author of

                                                         the Creed
       Address---------Capt. Robert D. Workman

                        Chief of Navy Chaplains

       Boston Commandery (Carter)---------United
                                                  States Navy Band
       Gloria in Excelsis (Mozart)-----------The
                                               Telephone Glee Club
       Benediction---------Glenn E. Wagner

                 President, Washington Bible Institute

       The Star-Spangled Banner---------Entire
                                                          assembly
       Musical postlude----------United States Navy
                                                              Band


                       

[Page 176-179]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 7. --Pan American Day

    Pan American Day is the day, annually designated in mid-April, when 
the respective legislatures of the American republics express 
solidarity and extend felicitations to one another. It was first 
observed on Apr. 24, 1890, in conjunction with the formation of the Pan 
American Union. The House discontinued these observances after 
1973.                          -------------------

Resolutions to Designate Date

Sec. 7.1 A resolution designating a day for the celebration of Pan 
    American Day in the House was submitted from the floor and 
    considered by unanimous consent and was not introduced through the 
    hopper and referred to committee.

[[Page 177]]

    On Mar. 5, 1969,(1) Mr. Dante B. Fascell, of Florida, 
was recognized to submit a resolution from the floor designating the 
date of a Pan American Day celebration.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 115 Cong. Rec. 5369, 91st Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. FASCELL. Mr. Speaker, I offer a resolution (H. Res. 295) 
    and ask unanimous consent for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                  H. Res. 295

            Resolved, That the House of Representatives hereby 
        designates Monday, April 14, 1969, for the celebration of Pan-
        American Day, on which day, after the reading of the Journal 
        remarks appropriate to such occasion may occur.

        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Florida?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The resolution was agreed to.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See 115 Cong. Rec. 8883-91, 91st Cong. 1st Sess., Apr. 14, 1969, 
        for proceedings.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

1966 Pan American Day

Sec. 7.2 A resolution providing for the celebration in the House of Pan 
    American Day was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

    On Mar. 3, 1966,(1) a resolution designating a day for 
the commemoration of Pan American Day was referred to committee, as 
follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 112 Cong. Rec. 4885-87, 89th Cong. 2d Sess.
            Parliamentarian's Note: Resolutions setting a date for the 
        celebration of Pan American Day were normally called up by 
        unanimous consent, without reference to a committee. The 
        resolution was normally submitted and called up by the Chair, 
        Subcommittee on Inter-American Affairs, Committee on Foreign 
        Affairs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

        Under clause 2 of rule XIII, reports of committees were 
    delivered to the Clerk for printing and reference to the proper 
    calendar, as follows: . . .

        By Mr. SELDEN:

            H. Res. 754. Resolution designating Thursday, April 7, 
        1966, for the celebration of Pan American Day; to the Committee 
        on Foreign Affairs.

    On Mar. 15, 1966,(2) the Speaker(3) 
recognized Mr. Armistead I. Selden, of Alabama, for purposes of calling 
up a resolution designating a day for commemoration of Pan American 
Day:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 112 Cong. Rec. 5786, 89th Cong. 2d Sess.
 3. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. SELDEN. Mr. Speaker, I call up the House Resolution 754 and 
    ask unanimous consent for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

[[Page 178]]

                                  H. Res. 754

            Resolved, That the House of Representatives hereby 
        designates Thursday, April 7, 1966, for the celebration of Pan-
        American Day, on which day, after the reading of the Journal, 
        remarks appropriate to such occasion may occur.

        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Alabama?
        There was no objection.
        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 7.3 A resolution was adopted by the House on Pan American Day.

    On Apr. 7, 1966,(1) Pan American Day, the following 
proceedings occurred in the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 112 Cong. Rec. 7994-8001, 89th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 ANNIVERSARY OF FOUNDING OF PAN AMERICAN UNION

        The SPEAKER.(2) Pursuant to House Resolution 754, 
    this day has been designated as Pan American Day.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Alabama [Mr. Selden].
        Mr. [Armistead I.] SELDEN [Jr., of Alabama]. Mr. Speaker, I 
    call up House Resolution 785 and ask unanimous consent for its 
    immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                  H. Res. 785

            Whereas April 14, 1966, marks the seventy-sixth anniversary 
        of the Union of American Republics now known as the 
        Organization of American States; and
            Whereas Congress has recognized that the historic, 
        economic, political, and geographic relationships among the 
        American Republics are unique and of special significance; and
            Whereas the Organization of American States serves as an 
        institution for maintaining the peace and security of the 
        Western Hemisphere, for promoting economic progress and 
        improvements in the welfare and level of living of all the 
        peoples of the region, and for strengthening principles of 
        individual liberty, free institutions, and genuine independence 
        in the hemisphere; and
            Whereas achievement of the goals expressed in the Charter 
        of the Organization of American States through inter-American 
        cooperation affords the most meaningful barrier to threats to 
        individual liberties and national independence emanating from 
        forces inimical to the principles and concepts held by the 
        American Republics; and
            Whereas the American Republics are currently engaged in 
        seeking ways to fortify the inter-American system of 
        cooperation in order to consolidate the gains of the past and 
        to create dynamic and vigorous institutions to meet present and 
        future exigencies: Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved, That in honor of the founding of the Pan American 
        Union, the House of Representatives of the United States 
        extends to the other Republics of the Western Hemisphere and to 
        the citizens of those Republics its most cordial greetings and 
        its fervent hope that the deliberations going forward during 
        this year will strengthen the inter-American system for the 
        years ahead.

        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Alabama?

[[Page 179]]

        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Alabama [Mr. Selden] is 
    recognized for 1 hour.
        Mr. SELDEN. Mr. Speaker, April 14 marks the 76th anniversary of 
    the establishment of the first concrete step in the formation of an 
    inter-American system of solidarity and cooperation, now known as 
    the Organization of American States.
        It has become customary for the House of Representatives to 
    commemorate the anniversary of that most enduring of international 
    organizations. I have always believed that this annual tribute 
    should be more than mere ritual. Rather, it should be a time for 
    stocktaking.(3) . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: In this case the resolution regarding the 
        commemoration of Pan American Day was introduced in advance of 
        the designated date and referred to the Committee on Foreign 
        Affairs. When the committee met to consider the resolution, it 
        approved the preamble and text by voice vote. The committee did 
        not, however, order the resolution reported to the House; thus, 
        when Rep. Selden, chairman of the Subcommittee on Inter-
        American Affairs called up the resolution by unanimous consent, 
        he discharged the committee from further consideration. See Ch. 
        17 Sec.  37.9.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


                      

[Page 179-184]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 8. --Flag Day; Pause for Pledge Commemoration

    The 14th day of June of each year is designated by statute as 
``Flag Day.''(1) On June 2, 1949, the House agreed to House 
Joint Resolution 170(2) which designated each June 14 as 
Flag Day.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 36 USC Sec. 110.
 2. See 95 Cong. Rec. 7166, 81st Cong. 1st 
        Sess.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pause for the Pledge Commemoration

Sec. 8.1 Although clause 1, paragraph 3 of Rule XXIV(1) 
    requires the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag to be led immediately 
    after the Speaker's approval of the Journal each day, the House 
    may, by unanimous consent, permit a second Pledge of Allegiance at 
    a subsequent time.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Now Rule XIV clause 1, House Rules and Manual Sec. 869 (2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On June 14, 1995,(2) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 141 Cong. Rec. 15964, 104th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              PAUSE FOR THE PLEDGE

        (Mr. CARDIN asked and was given permission to address the House 
    for 1 minute.)
        Mr. [Benjamin L.] CARDIN [of Maryland].(3) Mr. 
    Speaker, I take this

[[Page 180]]

    time, and at the permission of the Speaker, to lead the House in 
    the pledge of allegiance at this time of the day, and let me 
    explain why, if I might.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: This recognition was granted to Rep. 
        Cardin, in whose district the National Anthem originated, 
        despite the fact that it was nearly 7:20 p.m.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. Speaker, as you are well aware, today is Flag Day and this 
    week is National Flag Week. Each year the National Flag Day 
    Foundation, located in my district, participates in the Pause for 
    the Pledge at Fort McHenry, the birthplace of the Star Spangled 
    Banner at 7 o'clock in the evening on June 14th.
        The National Flag Day Foundation encourages all Americans to 
    join in the 7 o'clock Pause for the Pledge and this grassroots 
    concept of national unity started in Baltimore in 1980. And I might 
    point out that Presidents have joined in this pause.
        Due to the voting of the House today, I am unable to be at Fort 
    McHenry to participate in the ceremony. Therefore, I would request 
    that the Members of the House join me and their fellow citizens in 
    a Pause for the Pledge. If I could ask everyone to please rise and 
    to face the flag.                          -------------------

                              PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

        The CHAIRMAN.(4) Without objection, the gentleman 
    from Maryland [Mr. Cardin] will lead the House in the Pledge of 
    Allegiance to the flag on this very special occasion.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Bill Emerson (MO).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. Cardin led the Pledge of Allegiance as follows:
        I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of 
    America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under 
    God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Recess to Observe Flag Day

Sec. 8.2 The Speaker was authorized to declare a recess for Flag Day so 
    that the House might observe Flag Day with appropriate ceremonies.

    On May 25, 1967,(1) the Speaker appointed an informal 
committee to make arrangements for an appropriate Flag Day program. The 
proceedings occurred as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 113 Cong. Rec. 14058, 90th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         FLAG DAY -- AUTHORITY FOR SPEAKER TO DECLARE A RECESS ON JUNE 
                                    14, 1967

        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend 
    my remarks.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, June 14 will mark the 190th 
    anniversary of Flag Day. On Saturday, June 14, 1777, the 
    Continental Congress adopted a resolution providing:

            That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen 
        stripes, alternate red and white: That the Union be thirteen 
        stars, white in a blue field, representing a new 
        constellation.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See Journals of the Continental Congress, Vol. VIII, p. 464.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 181]]

        During the ensuing 189 years, that blue field has been 
    buttressed by 37 additional stars and the American flag has truly 
    become the symbol of liberty.
        During the war-torn year of 1917, President Wilson issued the 
    first Presidential proclamation calling upon the entire Nation to 
    hold appropriate ceremonies on June 14 to honor our flag. For many 
    years our now deceased colleague, Louis C. Rabaut, provided the 
    inspiration and impetus for Flag Day ceremonies in this Chamber.
        In these troubled days, I believe it important that this House, 
    on June 14, should again give honor to our stars and stripes and to 
    the principles our flag represents.
        Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that it may be in order at 
    any time on Wednesday, June 14, 1967, for the Speaker to declare a 
    recess for the purpose of observing and commemorating Flag Day in 
    such manner as the Speaker may deem appropriate and proper.
        Mr. [M. G. (Gene)] SNYDER [of Kentucky]. Mr. Speaker, will the 
    gentleman yield to me?
        Mr. ALBERT. I yield to the gentleman.
        Mr. SNYDER. I appreciate the comments of the distinguished 
    gentleman, and I hope the gentleman will not think it is 
    presumptuous on my part to suggest to the leadership that a very 
    appropriate action on the part of the House on that day might be 
    the passage of one of the antiflag-desecration bills now pending 
    before Congress.
        Mr. ALBERT. I thank the gentleman for his suggestion, and I 
    suggest that he take it up with the appropriate committee.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma [Mr. Albert]?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair may state for the information of the 
    Members of the House that after consultation with the distinguished 
    minority leader the Chair has informally designated the following 
    Members to constitute a committee to make the necessary 
    arrangements for appropriate exercises in accordance with the 
    unanimous consent agreement just adopted:
        The gentleman from Texas [Mr. Brooks], the gentleman from 
    Alabama [Mr. Nichols], the gentleman from Indiana [Mr. Roudebush], 
    and the gentleman from Missouri [Mr. Hall].

    On June 12, 1967,(4) a display of historical American 
flags in Statuary Hall, arranged in connection with the observance of 
Flag Day by the House, was brought to the attention of the House by the 
chairman of the informal committee to plan ceremonies appropriate to 
the occasion. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. See 113 Cong. Rec. 15484, 90th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             DISPLAY IN STATUARY HALL OF HISTORICAL AMERICAN FLAGS

        Mr. [Jack] BROOKS [of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend 
    my remarks.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Texas?
        There was no objection.

[[Page 182]]

        Mr. Speaker, in conjunction with the celebration of Flag Week, 
    we have on display in Statuary Hall a grouping of historical 
    American flags. The 46 flags which are now on display have been 
    brought here through the courtesy of our colleague, George A. 
    Goodling, of Pennsylvania.
        These flags trace the history of our Nation from 1600 to the 
    present. They include all of our official flags, numerous flags of 
    liberty which appeared in our country before the Revolution, and 
    also some original Army and Navy standards. The Hanover, Pa., 
    Historical Society Patriotic Order of the Sons of America prepared 
    and planned the exhibit. Mr. Wilford C. Clausen, of Hanover, 
    established the grouping.
        I urge all my colleagues to take the opportunity to visit this 
    interesting exhibit which is part of our effort to honor our flag.

Flag Day on Saturday; Mid-week Observance

Sec. 8.3 Where Flag Day fell on a Saturday, the House designated the 
    preceding Thursday as the date for its observance.

    On May 28, 1969,(1) the Speaker (2) was 
authorized to declare a recess, subject to the call of the Chair, for 
the purpose of commemorating Flag Day in the House Chamber:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 115 Cong. Rec. 14161, 91st Cong. 1st Sess. See Sec. 8.4, infra, for 
        the ceremonies.
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              FLAG DAY CEREMONIES

        (Mr. ALBERT asked and was given permission to address the House 
    for 1 minute.)
        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, the 192d 
    anniversary of Flag Day will be celebrated on Saturday, June 14, 
    1969. . . .
        Mr. Speaker, because I believe it important that the House of 
    Representatives continue this tradition, to again give honor to our 
    Stars and Stripes and to the principles which our flag symbolizes, 
    I ask unanimous consent that it may be in order at any time on 
    Thursday, June 12, 1969, for the Speaker to declare a recess for 
    the purpose of observing and commemorating Flag Day in such manner 
    as the Speaker may deem appropriate.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair may state for the information of the 
    Members of the House that after consultation with the distinguished 
    minority leader the Chair has informally designated the following 
    Members to constitute a committee to make the necessary 
    arrangements for appropriate ceremonies in accordance with the 
    unanimous-consent agreement just adopted: The gentleman from Texas, 
    Mr. Brooks; the gentleman from Alabama, Mr. Nichols; the gentleman 
    from Indiana, Mr. Roudebush; and the gentleman from Missouri, Mr. 
    Hall.

Flag Day Ceremonies

Sec. 8.4 The House stood in recess to commemorate Flag Day.

[[Page 183]]

    On June 12, 1969,(1) the House conducted ceremonies to 
honor the flag. Following the ceremonies on the floor of the House, the 
Speaker expressed thanks, on behalf of all Members of the House, to the 
ad hoc committee which made the arrangements for the celebration. The 
Majority Leader obtained permission for the printing in the Record of 
ceremonies held during the recess and for all Members to revise and 
extend remarks on Flag Day.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 115 Cong. Rec. 15745-51, 91st Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                    FLAG DAY

        During the recess the following proceedings took place in honor 
    of the United States Flag, the Speaker of the House of 
    Representatives presiding:

            Flag Day of U.S. House of Representatives, June 12, 1969

        The United States Marine Band, directed by First Lieutenant 
    Jack T. Kline, and the United States Air Force ``Singing 
    Sergeants,'' entered the door to the left of the Speaker and took 
    the positions assigned to them.
        The honored guests, officers, and men of the First Cavalry 
    Division (Airmobile), entered the door to the right of the Speaker 
    and took the positions assigned to them.
        The Air Force ``Singing Sergeants,'' directed by Capt. Robert 
    B. Kuzminski, presented Prayer for our Country.
        The Doorkeeper (Honorable William M. Miller) announced The Flag 
    of the United States.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The Marine Band played The Stars and Stripes Forever.
        The Flag was carried into the Chamber by Colorbearer and a 
    guard from each of the branches of the Armed Forces[.] . . .
        The Color Guard saluted the Speaker, faced about, and saluted 
    the House.
        The Flag was posted and the Members were seated.
        Mr. [Jack] BROOKS of Texas, accompanied by the Honorable W. Pat 
    Jennings, Clerk of the House of Representatives, took his place at 
    the Speaker's rostrum.
        The SPEAKER.(2) The Chair recognizes the 
    distinguished gentleman from Texas, Mr. Brooks.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. BROOKS. Mr. Speaker, the distinguished gentleman from 
    Missouri, Mr. Hall, will now lead the Members and our guests in the 
    Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
        The Honorable Durward Hall led the Members and guests in the 
    Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
        Mr. BROOKS. Mr. Speaker, at this time I would like to express 
    my appreciation to the other members of your Flag Day Committee, 
    the Honorable Bill Nichols of Alabama, the Honorable Durward Hall 
    of Missouri, and the Honorable Richard Roudebush of Indiana, for 
    their hard work and dedicated efforts. . . .
        Mr. BROOKS. Mr. Speaker, Flag Day, 1969, is a day for all 
    Americans to reaffirm their commitment to the principles of 
    democracy, liberty, and human dignity. . . .
        May our Flag continue to strike a responsive chord in the 
    hearts of free

[[Page 184]]

    men everywhere and offer hope, opportunity and promise to those who 
    strive for the highest goals.
        [Applause.]
        Mr. BROOKS. The Members and guests will please rise to join 
    with the ``Singing Sergeants,'' accompanied by the Marine Band, in 
    singing the National Anthem. Will everyone please remain standing 
    while the Color are retired from the Chamber?
        The Members rose and sang The National Anthem, accompanied by 
    the Marine Band and the Air Force ``Singing Sergeants.''
        The Colors were retired from the Chamber, the Marine Band 
    playing The National Emblem March.
        The Air Force ``Singing Sergeants'' retired from the Chamber, 
    the Marine Band playing the Armed Forces Medley.
        The Marine Band retired from the Chamber. . . .
        At 12 o'clock and 32 minutes p.m., the proceedings in honor of 
    the United States Flag were 
    concluded.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker at 12 o'clock and 33 minutes p.m.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair, on behalf of the House, desires to 
    express our thanks to the chairman and the members of the committee 
    for arranging, preparing and conducting the splendid exercises 
    today, and also to express the thanks of the House to all who 
    participated in the exercises. . . 
    .                          -------------------

             PERMISSION TO PRINT PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING THE RECESS

        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
    proceedings had during the recess be printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.


                      

[Page 184-196]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 9. --Presidential

    The following represent a sampling of commemorative occasions for 
an anniversary of a Presidential birth,(1) 
death,(2) inauguration,(3) or memorial 
dedication.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. Sec. 9.1, 9.3, 9.4, 9.8, infra.
 2. See Sec. 9.2, infra. For observances related to the death of 
        Presidents in office, see also 5 Hinds' Precedents 
        Sec. Sec. 7176-7180, 8 Cannon's Precedents Sec. 3575. See also 
        Ch. 38, infra.
 3. See Sec. Sec. 9.5-9.7, infra.
 4. See Sec. 9.9, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 9.1 By unanimous consent, the Speaker was authorized to declare 
    recesses for the purpose of a joint meeting to commemorate the 
    100th anniversary of President Eisenhower's birth.

    On Mar. 22, 1990,(1) the following proceedings occurred 
in the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 136 Cong. Rec. 5019, 101st Cong. 2d Sess.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 185]]

         PERMISSION FOR THE SPEAKER TO DECLARE RECESSES AT ANY TIME ON 
                            TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1990

        Mr. [Richard A.] GEPHARDT [of Missouri]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that it may be in order for the Speaker to 
    declare recesses at any time on Tuesday, March 27, 1990, for the 
    purpose of a joint meeting to commemorate the 100th anniversary of 
    the birth of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Missouri?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ted Weiss (NY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On Mar. 27, 1990,(3) during the recess, the following 
proceedings took place during the joint meeting to commemorate the 
anniversary of 100th anniversary of President Eisenhower's birth:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 136 Cong. Rec. 5435-42, 101st Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(4) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of Thursday, March 22, 1990, the House will stand in recess subject 
    to the call of the Chair.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Thomas S. Foley (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The House is now in recess.
        Accordingly (at 9 o'clock and 1 minute a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

          JOINT MEETING OF THE 101ST CONGRESS IN COMMEMORATION OF THE 
           100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER

        During the recess the following proceedings took place in honor 
    of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Dwight David Eisenhower, 
    the Speaker of the House of Representatives presiding.
        The Doorkeeper, the Honorable James T. Molloy, announced the 
    Members of the U.S. Senate, preceded by the President pro tempore 
    (Mr. [David] PRYOR [of Arkansas]), who entered the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives, taking the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER. In accordance with the provisions of Senate Joint 
    Resolution 237, the joint meeting to commemorate the 100th 
    anniversary of the birth of Dwight D. Eisenhower will come to 
    order. . . .
        The Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives, Rev. James 
    David Ford, D.D., delivered the . . . invocation[.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Bob Dole of 
    Kansas, Republican leader of the Senate and Chairman of the Dwight 
    David Eisenhower Centennial Commission.
        Senator DOLE. Good morning. On behalf of the National 
    Eisenhower Centennial Commission, it is my privilege to welcome you 
    to ceremonies honoring a great American hero--who just happens to 
    be the favorite son of Kansans everywhere. Throughout this 
    centennial year, Dwight Eisenhower is being recalled as a 
    historical giant--the architect of Operations Overlord and the 
    statesman behind Atoms for Peace. But for the millions the world 
    over who ``still like Ike,'' he remains a reassuring symbol of the 
    extraordinary qualities that lie within seemingly ordinary people. 
    . . .
        The SPEAKER. We are honored to have today members of the 
    Eisenhower

[[Page 186]]

    family, the general's son, John Eisenhower, his grandson, David 
    Eisenhower, and his granddaughters, Barbara Ann Eisenhower, Susan 
    Eisenhower, and Mary Jane Atwater, together with numerous great-
    grandchildren.
        Will they please rise and be acknowledged?
        [Applause.]
        We are also honored to have with us today many members of the 
    Eisenhower administration and associates of the late President. 
    Will they kindly rise and be recognized. . . .
        The Chair now recognizes Walter Cronkite, distinguished 
    television journalist, who conducted numerous interviews with the 
    late President Eisenhower. . . .
        The SPEAKER. Among those who served in the Eisenhower 
    administration who are present today, the Chair would like to 
    recognize the presence of the former Chief Justice of the United 
    States, Warren Burger, the former Attorney General of the United 
    States, Herbert Brownell, and the former Secretary of State, 
    Secretary Rogers.
        [Applause.]
        The Chair recognizes Mr. Winston S. Churchill, Member of 
    Parliament, and grandson of the late Sir Winston Churchill, former 
    Prime Minister of Great Britain. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from the 19th 
    District of Pennsylvania, the Honorable William F. Goodling, whose 
    district is the site of the Eisenhower farm, and late President's 
    retirement home, and now a historic landmark. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from the First 
    District of Kansas, the Honorable Pat Roberts, in whose district is 
    Abilene, the childhood home of the late President Eisenhower and 
    site of the Dwight David Eisenhower Center. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The benediction will be given by the Reverend 
    Edward L.R. Elson, former Chaplain of the U.S. Senate.
        The former Chaplain of the Senate, the Reverend Edward L.R. 
    Elson, offered the . . . benediction[.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. Members and guests will remain standing for the 
    retirement of colors.
        The colors were retired from the Chamber.
        The SPEAKER. Members and guests, please remain standing and 
    join in singing ``God Bless America.''
        The U.S. Army Band and the U.S. Military Academy Glee Club 
    rendered ``God Bless America.''
        The SPEAKER. At this time the Members of the Senate will 
    retire.
        The Members of the Senate retired from the Chamber.
        The SPEAKER. The purposes for the joint meeting having been 
    fulfilled, the joint meeting is dissolved, and the House will 
    remain in recess until 1 p.m.
        The honored guests retired from the Chamber.
        At 11 o'clock and 43 minutes a.m., the proceedings in 
    commemoration of the centennial of President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
    were concluded.

John F. Kennedy

Sec. 9.2 Consideration under suspension of the rules of a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing a civic group to use the

[[Page 187]]

    Capitol Rotunda to honor President Kennedy as the founder of the 
    Peace Corps on the 25th anniversary of his death.

    On Oct. 3, 1988,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 134 Cong. Rec. 27839, 27840, 100th Cong. 2d Sess. See also 129 
        Cong. Rec. 32198, 98th Cong. 1st Sess., Nov. 10, 1983 (H. Con. 
        Res. 214, authorizing use of the Rotunda to commemorate the 
        20th anniversary of the death of President Kennedy).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Ms. [Mary Rose] OAKAR [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and concur in the Senate concurrent resolution (S. Con. 
    Res. 137) to provide the use of the rotunda of the Capitol in honor 
    of John F. Kennedy.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 137

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That permission is conferred on the National 
        Council of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers to use the Rotunda 
        of the Capitol, from 12:00 noon, November 21, 1988, until 12:00 
        noon, November 22, 1988, for a vigil of readings from personal 
        Peace Corps Journals by Returned Peace Corps Volunteers in 
        honor of John F. Kennedy, the founder of the Peace Corps, on 
        the 25th anniversary of his death.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, a 
    second is not required on this motion.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Charles E. Bennett (FL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Harry S Truman

Sec. 9.3 The Speaker pro tempore, on behalf of the Speaker, announced 
    the designation of a day certain for a joint meeting to commemorate 
    the 100th anniversary of the birth of Harry S Truman pursuant to a 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the Speaker to make such a 
    designation.

    On Apr. 26, 1984,(1) the following proceedings occurred 
in the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 130 Cong. Rec. 10205, 98th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORIZING THE SPEAKER TO DECLARE A RECESS ON TUESDAY, MAY 8, 
        1984, FOR JOINT MEETING TO COMMEMORATE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
                            BIRTH OF HARRY S. TRUMAN

         Mr. [THOMAS S.] FOLEY [of Washington]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that it may be in order for the Speaker to 
    declare a recess subject to the call of the Chair on Tuesday, May 
    8, 1984, for the purpose of a joint meeting to commemorate the 
    100th anniversary of the birth of Harry S. Truman.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Washington?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. George E. Brown, Jr. (CA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On May 8, 1984,(3) the following proceedings then 
occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 130 Cong. Rec. 11327-33, 98th Cong. 2d Sess.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 188]]

                                  THE JOURNAL

        The SPEAKER.(4) The Chair has examined the Journal 
    of the last day's proceedings and announces to the House his 
    approval thereof.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands 
    approved.                          -------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the order of the House of April 26, 
    1984, the Chair declares the House in recess until 10:05 a.m.
        Accordingly (at 9 o'clock and 2 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess until 10:05 
    a.m.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1000

          JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE HELD PURSUANT TO THE 
        PROVISIONS OF HOUSE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 126 IN COMMEMORATION 
            OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF HARRY S. TRUMAN

        During the recess the following proceedings took place in honor 
    of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Harry S. Truman, the 
    Speaker of the House presiding.
        The U.S. Army Band and Chorus (Pershing's Own), under the 
    direction of Col. Eugene W. Allen, leader and commander, entered 
    the door to the left of the Speaker, took the positions assigned to 
    them, and presented a prelude concert.
        The honored guests, Margaret Truman Daniel, E. Clifton Daniel, 
    and their four sons, Clifton, William, Harrison, and Thomas entered 
    the door to the right of the Speaker, and took the positions 
    assigned to them.
        The Doorkeeper, the Honorable James T. Malloy, announced the 
    President pro tempore (Mr. Thurmond) and the Members of the U.S. 
    Senate, who entered the Hall of the House of Representatives, the 
    President pro tempore taking the chair at the right of the Speaker, 
    and the Members of the Senate the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the United States entered the 
    Hall of the House of Representatives and took the seats reserved 
    for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        The SPEAKER. In accordance with House Concurrent Resolution 
    126, the joint meeting to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 
    birth of Harry S. Truman will come to order.
        The Doorkeeper will announce the colors.
        The Doorkeeper announced the colors of the United States.
        The SPEAKER. The Members will rise.
        The Members rose, and the colors were carried to the Chamber by 
    the Joint Armed Forces Color Guard.
        The National Anthem was presented by the U.S. Army Band and 
    Chorus.
        The Color Guard saluted the Speaker, faced about, and saluted 
    the House.
        The SPEAKER. The invocation will be given by the Reverend James 
    David Ford, Chaplain of the House of Representatives.
        The Chaplain, Rev. James David Ford, D.D., offered the . . . 
    invocation[.] . . .

[[Page 189]]

        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from the Fourth 
    District of Missouri, the Honorable Ike Skelton, chairman of the 
    Joint Committee on Arrangements. . . .
        The SPEAKER. We are honored to have with us today the Truman 
    family: In addition to Margaret Truman Daniel, E. Clifton Daniel, 
    and their four sons, Clifton, William, Harrison, and Thomas.
        Will they kindly rise and be acknowledged?
        [Applause.]

                                {time}  1020

        The SPEAKER. We are also honored to have with us today many 
    associates and Cabinet members of the late President; the Honorable 
    John Snyder, Secretary of the Treasury; Mrs. Oscar Chapman, widow 
    of the Secretary of the Interior, the Honorable Charles Brannan, 
    Secretary of Agriculture; Gov. Averell Harriman, Secretary of 
    Commerce and Ambassador to Russia and Great Britain; the Honorable 
    Elmer Staats, Deputy Director of the Budget and Comptroller 
    General.
        We also have many members of the late President's personal 
    staff: The Honorable David Stow; Gen. Donald Dawson, the Honorable 
    George Elsey; the Honorable Roger Tubby; and the Honorable Philip 
    Nash.
        Will all of them please rise. [Applause.]
        America had called upon Harry Truman's leadership as early as 
    1918 when he commanded Battery D of the 129th Field Artillery in 
    France during the First World War.
        The U.S. Army Band and Chorus will pay tribute to Captain 
    Truman's military service with a medley of World War I songs, the 
    ``Over There Fantasie.''
        (The ``Over There Fantasie'' was presented by the U.S. Army 
    Band and Chorus.)
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from the Fifth 
    District of Missouri, the Honorable Alan Wheat, who currently 
    represents the hometown of the late President Truman. . . .

                                {time}  1120

        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the daughter of the late 
    President Truman, Margaret Truman Daniel.
        [Applause.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Mark Hatfield, 
    a Senator from Oregon, vice chairman of the Joint Committee on 
    Arrangements.
        [Applause.] . . .
        The U.S. Army Chorus reentered the Chamber, and the colors were 
    brought to the well of the House.
        The SPEAKER. The benediction will be given by Rev. Richard C. 
    Halverson, Chaplain of the Senate.
        The Chaplain of the Senate, the Reverend Richard C. Halverson, 
    D.D., LL.D., offered the . . . benediction[.] . . .
        The U.S. Army Chorus, accompanied by the Members and guests, 
    rendered ``God Bless America,'' and the colors were retired by the 
    Joint Armed Forces Color Guard.
        The SPEAKER. On behalf of the Congress, the Chair would like to 
    particularly thank, and the Congress appreciates, the chairman, Ike 
    Skelton, for the beautiful job that he has done,

[[Page 190]]

    and the Chair thanks all who have participated.
        The Chair declares the joint meeting dissolved.
        The House will continue in recess until the hour of 1 o'clock.
        The honored guests, the Members of the U.S. Senate, and the 
    members of the President's Cabinet retired from the Chamber.
        At 11 o'clock and 40 minutes a.m., the proceedings in 
    commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Harry S. 
    Truman were concluded.

Centennial of Birth of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Sec. 9.4 A joint meeting commemorated the 100th anniversary of the 
    birth of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

    On Jan. 25, 1982,(1) Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., of 
Massachusetts, announced that pursuant to the authority granted him in 
House Concurrent Resolution 220, he would designate the date of Jan. 
28, 1982, as the day for the joint meeting to commemorate the 100th 
anniversary of the birth of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 128 Cong. Rec. 62, 97th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Jan. 28, 1982,(2) the Speaker declared the House in 
recess subject to the call of the Chair. The following proceedings 
occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 128 Cong. Rec. at pp. 273-278, 97th Cong. 2d Sess. See also 92 
        Cong. Rec. 8056-58, 79th Cong. 2d Sess., July 1, 1946 
        (proceedings of joint session to hold memorial services in 
        honor of former President Roosevelt).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the order of the House of January 25, 
    1982, the Chair declares the House in recess subject to the call of 
    the Chair.
        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 2 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

          JOINT MEETING OF THE 97TH CONGRESS IN COMMEMORATION OF THE 
          100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT

        During the recess the following proceedings took place in honor 
    of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 
    the Speaker of the House of Representatives presiding.
        The U.S. Army Band (Pershing's Own), under the direction of 
    Col. Eugene W. Allen, leader and commander, entered the door to the 
    left of the Speaker, took the positions assigned to them, and 
    presented a prelude concert.
        The honored guests, the Honorable James Roosevelt, Mr. Elliott 
    Roosevelt, Mrs. John Roosevelt, and grandchildren and great-
    grandchildren of the late President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 
    entered the door to the right of the Speaker and took the positions 
    assigned to them.
        The Doorkeeper, Hon. James P. Molloy, announced the Vice 
    President

[[Page 191]]

    and Members of the U.S. Senate, who entered the Hall of the House 
    of Representatives, the Vice President taking the chair at the 
    right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate the seats 
    reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the ambassadors, ministers, and 
    charges d'affaires of foreign governments.
        The ambassadors, ministers, and charges d'affaires of foreign 
    governments entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and 
    took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        The SPEAKER. In accordance with House Concurrent Resolution 
    220, the joint meeting to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 
    birth of Franklin Delano Roosevelt will come to order. . . .
        The SPEAKER. In closing, please remain standing and join the 
    Midshipmen Glee Club in singing ``God Bless America.''
        The U.S. Naval Academy Midshipmen Glee Club, accompanied by the 
    Members and guests, rendered ``God Bless America.''
        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint meeting dissolved.
        The honored guests, the members of the President's Cabinet, and 
    the ambassadors, ministers, and charges d'affaires of foreign 
    governments retired from the Chamber.
        At 12 o'clock and 28 minutes p.m., the proceedings in 
    commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the birth of Franklin 
    Delano Roosevelt were concluded. . . 
    .                          -------------------

                   PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING RECESS

        Mr. [Richard] BOLLING [of Missouri]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request from the gentleman from Missouri?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. John P. Murtha (PA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt's Inauguration

Sec. 9.5 Form of unanimous-consent request providing a one-hour period 
    as the first order of business for the purpose of paying tributes 
    to the memory of Theodore Roosevelt on the 53d anniversary of his 
    inauguration as President.

    On Feb. 26, 1958,(1) a unanimous-consent request was 
offered for time to be set aside on Mar. 4, 1958,(2) or a 
tribute to the memory of the late Theodore Roosevelt on the 53d 
anniversary of his inauguration.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 104 Cong. Rec. 2926, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
 2. Id. at pp. 3388-92.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Leo W.] O'BRIEN of New York. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent

[[Page 192]]

    that on Tuesday, March 4, immediately after the reading of the 
    Journal, 1 hour be reserved for tributes to the memory of the late 
    Theodore Roosevelt, whose 53d inauguration anniversary will be 
    observed on that date.
        The SPEAKER.(3) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from New York?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Lincoln Inaugural

Sec. 9.6 A ceremony commemorating the 100th anniversary of Lincoln's 
    second inauguration was held on the East Front of the Capitol.

    On Mar. 4, 1965,(1) Mr. Melvin Price, of Illinois, made 
the following announcement regarding the noontime ceremonies to 
commemorate the centennial of the second inauguration of President 
Lincoln:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 111 Cong. Rec. 4206, 4240-45, 89th Cong. 1st Sess. See also 105 
        Cong. Rec. 1209, 1210, 86th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 27, 1959 (H. 
        Con. Res. 57, providing for arrangements to be made for a joint 
        meeting celebrating the 150th birthday of Abraham Lincoln).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         COMMEMORATION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 2D INAUGURATION 
                               OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

        Mr. PRICE. I ask unanimous consent to address the House for 1 
    minute.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Illinois?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. PRICE. Mr. Speaker, as the majority leader stated, at noon 
    ceremonies will begin in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of 
    the 2d inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. I hope all Members will 
    have the opportunity to attend that ceremony at the east front of 
    the Capitol. I urge the Members to encourage their office force to 
    attend this ceremony. Not only are the Members of Congress invited 
    to attend the ceremony, but the public as 
    well.                          -------------------

        PROCEEDINGS IN CONNECTION WITH THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 2D 
                        INAUGURATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

        Mr. PRICE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
    proceedings in connection with the commemoration of the 100th 
    anniversary of the 2d inauguration of Abraham Lincoln be printed in 
    full in the body of the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Illinois?
        Mr. [Leslie C.] ARENDS [of Illinois]. Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object, will the membership of the House attend the 
    ceremonies or are we going as individuals?
        The SPEAKER. The Chair would say that the Members will attend 
    individually.
        Mr. ARENDS. I thank the Speaker.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Illinois?

[[Page 193]]

        There was no objection. . . 
    .                          -------------------

                                  ANNOUNCEMENT

        The SPEAKER. As the Members of the House know, shortly the 
    ceremony in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the 2d 
    inauguration of Abraham Lincoln will take place on the east front 
    steps of the Capitol. As the House is about to adjourn, Members may 
    attend the exercises individually and of course, all Members are 
    invited to attend. . . 
    .                          -------------------

                                  ADJOURNMENT

        Mr. [Gillis W.] LONG of Louisiana. Mr. Speaker, I move that the 
    House do now adjourn.
        The motion was agreed to; accordingly (at 11 o'clock and 33 
    minutes a.m.), the House adjourned until tomorrow, Friday, March 5, 
    1965, at 12 o'clock 
    noon.                          -------------------

           COMMEMORATION CEREMONY OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 2D 
         INAUGURATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN, 1865-1965, MARCH 4, 1965, ON 
        THE EAST FRONT OF THE CAPITOL, CITY OF WASHINGTON, HON. MELVIN 
                                PRICE, CHAIRMAN

        Mr. PRICE. Ladies and gentlemen, that was, as always, an 
    excellent and an appropriate performance by the U.S. Marine Band, 
    under the conductorship of Lt. Col. Albert F. Schoepper. We will 
    now open this part of the program commemorating the second 
    inauguration of President Abraham Lincoln, 100 years ago, with the 
    invocation by the Reverend Bernard Braskamp, Chaplain of the House 
    of Representatives.

         invocation by dr. bernard braskamp, chaplain of the house of 
                                representatives

        Psalm 112: 6: The righteous shall be in everlasting 
    remembrance. . . .
        Mr. PRICE. Ladies and gentlemen, the commemoration is 
    ended.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. The ceremony included a reenactment of Abraham Lincoln's 
        inauguration by actors.
            For instances in which the Gettysburg Address was read by 
        Members of Congress on the anniversary of the original address, 
        see 91 Cong. Rec. 10808, 79th Cong. 1st Sess., Nov. 19, 1945, 
        and 87 Cong. Rec. 9007, 77th Cong. 1st Sess., Nov. 19, 1941.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 9.7 A joint resolution which provided for a ceremony to 
    commemorate the 100th anniversary of Lincoln's second inaugural.

    On June 23, 1964,(1) Mr. Ray J. Madden, of Indiana, 
offered, by unanimous consent, a joint resolution regarding the 100th 
anniversary of Lincoln's second inaugural.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 110 Cong. Rec. 14699, 14700, 88th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on 
    Rules, I ask unanimous consent for the immediate consideration of 
    House Joint Resolution 925, which would create a joint committee to 
    commemorate the 100th

[[Page 194]]

    anniversary of the second inaugural of Abraham Lincoln.
        The Clerk read the House joint resolution, as follows:

            Whereas March 4, 1965, will be the one hundredth 
        anniversary of the second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as 
        President of the United States; and
            Whereas President Lincoln in his inaugural address looked 
        to the end of a great fratricidal struggle and spoke, ``with 
        malice toward none and charity for all,'' of ``a just and 
        lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations''; and
            Whereas, in the administration he had completed, Abraham 
        Lincoln had preserved the Union of the States, protected the 
        Constitution of the United States, and demonstrated to all men 
        everywhere the success of the American experiment in popular 
        government; and
            Whereas the previous actions of the Congress in observing 
        the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the birth of this 
        unique American and the one hundredth anniversary of his first 
        inauguration as President had a vast and dramatic impact upon 
        the people of this Nation and throughout the world; and
            Whereas these observances advanced the appreciation and 
        understanding of the history and heritage of this Nation; and
            Whereas today a part of the aspirations which Abraham 
        Lincoln held for the people of the United States has been 
        achieved: Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
        United States of America in Congress assembled, That on 
        Wednesday, March 4 next, the one hundredth anniversary of 
        Abraham Lincoln's second inauguration shall be commemorated by 
        such observance as may be determined by the committee on 
        arrangements in cooperation with the National Civil War 
        Centennial Commission, the Civil War Centennial Commission of 
        the District of Columbia, and the Lincoln Group of the District 
        of Columbia.
            Immediately upon passage of this resolution, the President 
        of the Senate shall appoint four Members of the Senate and the 
        Speaker of the House shall appoint four Members of the House of 
        Representatives jointly to constitute a committee on 
        arrangements.
            Immediately upon passage of this resolution and after the 
        Members of the Senate and House have been appointed, the 
        Speaker shall direct the committee on arrangements to meet and 
        select a chairman from one of their own group and such other 
        officers as will be appropriate and needed who will immediately 
        proceed to plan in cooperation with the National Civil War 
        Centennial Commission, the Civil War Centennial Commission of 
        the District of Columbia, and the Lincoln Group of the District 
        of Columbia, an appropriate ceremony, issue invitations to the 
        President of the United States, the Vice President of the 
        United States, Secretaries of departments, heads of independent 
        agencies, offices, and commissions, the Chief Justice and 
        Associate Justices of the Supreme Court, the diplomatic corps, 
        assistant heads of departments, Commissioners of the District 
        of Columbia, members of the Lincoln Group of the District of 
        Columbia, centennial commissions from the various States, Civil 
        War roundtables, State and local historical and patriotic 
        societies, and such other students and scholars in the field of 
        history as may have a special interest in the occasion, 
        organize a reenactment of Mr. Lincoln's first inauguration on 
        the eastern portico of the Capitol, select a speaker and other 
        participants, prepare and publish a program and submit a report 
        not later than June 1, 1965.

[[Page 195]]

        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Indiana [Mr. Madden]?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker, this House joint resolution creates a 
    joint committee to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the second 
    inaugural of Abraham Lincoln. March 4, 1965, will be the 100th 
    anniversary of the second inauguration of the martyred President. 
    In 1960 a resolution commemorating the first anniversary was 
    enacted and the ceremony on March 4, 1961, extended to millions of 
    people throughout the United States a reminder of historical facts 
    concerning the great contribution Abraham Lincoln made to the 
    Nation and the world.
        This resolution will set up another commemoration of his 
    accomplishments which will expand the appreciation and 
    understanding of the history and heritage of the Nation during the 
    period this great man was our leader.
        There will be a special joint committee made up of four Members 
    from the Senate and four Members from the House, and they in turn 
    will select a chairman of the special committee to supervise this 
    historical occasion.
        This celebration and ceremony will take place on the East 
    Portico of the Capitol on March 4, of next year.
        Mr. Speaker, there are two technical and grammatical amendments 
    to be considered. I yield to the gentleman from Iowa [Mr. 
    Schwengel] to offer those amendments.
        Mr. [Frederick D.] SCHWENGEL [of Iowa]. Mr. Speaker, I offer an 
    amendment.
        The Clerk read as follows:

            Page 2, line 10, strike out ``Immediately upon'' and insert 
        in lieu thereof ``Upon''.
            Page 2, line 15, strike out ``Immediately upon'' and insert 
        in lieu thereof ``Upon''.
            Page 3, strike out line 2 and insert in lieu thereof the 
        following: ``the committee on arrangements shall''.

        The amendment was agreed to. . . .
        Mr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker, I move the previous question.
        The previous question was ordered.
        The joint resolution was ordered to be engrossed and read a 
    third time, and was read the third time, and passed.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: The Committee on Rules reported H.J. Res. 
        925 on Mar. 21, 1964 (H. Rept. No. 88-1421).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anniversary of Jefferson's Birth

Sec. 9.8 Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural address was read to the 
    House by a Member designated by the Speaker pursuant to a special 
    order.

    On Apr. 14, 1948,(1) Mr. Carl Albert, of Oklahoma, was 
recognized to read Jefferson's first inaugural address:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 94 Cong. Rec. 4433, 4434, 80th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER.(2) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of Monday, April 12, 1948, the Chair appoints the gentleman from 
    Oklahoma [Mr. Albert]

[[Page 196]]

    to read Jefferson's first inaugural address.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Oklahoma [Mr. Albert].
        Mr. Albert read Jefferson's first inaugural 
    address[.](3) . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: The reading took 18 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Apr. 14, 1947,(4) Mr. John E. Rankin, of Mississippi, 
was recognized to read Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural address:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. 93 Cong. Rec. 3347, 3348, 80th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER.(5) Pursuant to the order of the House, 
    the Chair recognizes the gentleman from Mississippi [Mr. Rankin] to 
    read Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural address.(6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Joseph W. Martin, Jr. (MA).
 6. See 93 Cong. Rec. 3072, 80th Cong. 1st Sess., Apr. 2, 1947, where 
        unanimous consent was granted that Jefferson's first inaugural 
        address be read prior to the legislative program of Apr. 14, 
        1947, because Jefferson's birthday fell on Sunday, Apr. 13.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 9.9 Instance where the House agreed to meet at 2:30 p.m. instead 
    of the usual noon meeting so that Members could attend dedication 
    exercises of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial.

    On Apr. 10, 1943,(1) the following proceedings occurred 
on the floor of the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 89 Cong. Rec. 3258, 78th Cong. 1st Sess. Remarks pertinent to the 
        dedication of Jefferson Memorial were incorporated in the 
        Congressional Record by unanimous consent.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    hour of meeting, tuesday, april 13, 1943

        Mr. [John W.] McCORMACK [of Massachusetts]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that when the House adjourns on Monday next it 
    adjourn to meet on Tuesday, Apr. 13, 1943,(2) at 2:30 
    o'clock p. m. The reason for making this request is the dedication 
    to take place that day of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. See Id. at pp. 3335, 3336.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER.(3) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Massachusetts?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.



[Page 196-197]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 10. Memorial Services

    Following the death of a noted politician(1) or 
jurist,(2) the House and the Senate may provide for memorial 
services or commemorations in the Rotunda or elsewhere on the Capitol 
grounds by concurrent resolutions. For a comprehensive discussion of 
funeral services held in the House Chamber, see Ch. 38, infra. The 
various marks of respect that the House observes upon the death of 
Members of the House or of officers or officials of the House are also 
covered in that chapter.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 12, infra.
 2. See Sec. 11, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The House has also observed moments of silence to commemorate the 
lives of soldiers, victims

[[Page 197]]

of national tragedies, or notable individuals.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See Sec. 13, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Congress has memorialized the lives of fallen Capitol Police 
officers,(4) victims of the Holocaust(5) and 
victims of national tragedies with special occasions.(6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. See Sec. 15, infra.
 5. See Sec. 14, infra.
 6. See Sec. 16, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

      


                       

[Page 197-199]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 11. --Supreme Court Justices

    The House has marked its respect for deceased justices of the 
Supreme Court by holding memorial services in the Hall of the 
House(1) and authorizing, by concurrent resolution, the use 
of the catafalque(2) for the lying in state of Supreme Court 
justices at the Supreme Court building.(3) The reader is 
encouraged to consult Ch. 38, infra, for further information on the 
deaths of Supreme Court Justices.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 11.2, infra.
 2. The catafalque was originally constructed in 1865 to support the 
        casket of Abraham Lincoln while the President's body lay in 
        state in the Rotunda. It consists of a simple bier of rough 
        pine boards nailed together and covered with black cloth. For 
        many years the catafalque was kept below the House Crypt in a 
        small vaulted chamber called Washington's Tomb, which was 
        originally intended, but never used, as the burial place for 
        the first President. In 2008, the catafalque was put on public 
        display in the Capitol Visitors Center, where it currently 
        remains.
 3. See Sec. 11.1, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 11.1 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and adopted a 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the Architect of the Capitol to 
    transfer the catafalque from the crypt of the Capitol to the 
    Supreme Court for use in memorial services for the late Honorable 
    William H. Rehnquist, Chief Justice of the United States.

    On Sept. 6, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 19569, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
            For other instances where the House authorized use of the 
        catafalque for Supreme Court Justices, see 145 Cong. Rec. 3946, 
        106th Cong. 1st Sess., Mar. 9, 1999 (H. Con. Res. 45, former 
        Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Harry A. Blackmun); 143 
        Cong. Rec. 15857, 15858, 105th Cong. 1st Sess., July 25, 1997 
        (H. Con. Res. 123, former Associate Justice of the Supreme 
        Court, William J. Brennan); 141 Cong. Rec. 17322, 104th Cong. 
        1st Sess., June 27, 1995 (S. Con. Res. 18, former Chief Justice 
        of the Supreme Court, Warren Burger); and 139 Cong. Rec. 1146, 
        103d Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 26, 1993 (H. Con. Res. 23, former 
        Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 198]]

        Mr. [Tom] DeLAY [of Texas]. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate concurrent 
    resolution (S. Con. Res. 52) providing for the use of the 
    catafalque situated in the crypt beneath the Rotunda of the Capitol 
    in connection with memorial services to be conducted in the Supreme 
    Court Building for the late honorable William H. Rehnquist, Chief 
    Justice of the United States, and ask for its immediate 
    consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Texas?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Judith Biggert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 52

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the Architect of the Capitol is authorized 
        and directed to transfer to the custody of the Supreme Court of 
        the United States the catafalque which is situated in the crypt 
        beneath the Rotunda of the Capitol so that such catafalque may 
        be used in the Supreme Court Building in connection with 
        services to be conducted there for the late honorable William 
        H. Rehnquist, Chief Justice of the United States.

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 11.2 Form of a concurrent resolution providing for the holding of 
    memorial services for Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.

    On Mar. 7, 1935,(1) Mr. Allen E. Treadway, of 
Massachusetts, sent to the desk a concurrent resolution and asked 
unanimous consent for its immediate consideration:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 79 Cong. Rec. 3169, 74th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         House Concurrent Resolution 15

        Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
    concurring), That for the purpose of holding memorial services in 
    honor of the late Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, the two Houses of 
    Congress shall assemble in the Hall of the House of Representatives 
    at a time to be fixed by the representatives of the Senate and 
    House of Representatives in charge thereof.
        That a joint committee consisting of five Members of the House 
    of Representatives and five Members of the Senate shall be 
    appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the 
    President of the Senate, respectively, which is empowered to make 
    suitable arrangements for fitting and proper exercises for the 
    joint session of Congress herein authorized.
        That invitations to attend the exercises be extended to the 
    President of the United States of America and the members of his 
    Cabinet, the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the Supreme 
    Court of the United States, the Diplomatic Corps (through the 
    Secretary of State), the General of the Armies, the Chief of Staff 
    of the Army,

[[Page 199]]

    the Chief of Naval Operations, the Major General Commandant of the 
    Marine Corps, and the Commandant of the Coast Guard, and such other 
    persons as the joint committee on arrangements shall deem proper.
        That the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
    States is hereby invited to address the American people at the 
    joint session of the Congress in commemoration of the life and 
    services of the late Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the present 
    consideration of the House concurrent resolution?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Joseph W. Byrns (TN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The House concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        On motion by Mr. Treadway, a motion to reconsider the vote by 
    which the House concurrent resolution was agreed to was laid on the 
    table.


                     

[Page 199-202]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 12. --Current and Former Members of the House and the Senate

    The House has marked its respect for deceased current and former 
Members of the House and the Senate in various ways,(1) 
including by holding memorial services in the Rotunda(2) and 
Statuary Hall(3) and by observing a moment of 
silence.(4) Announcements of deaths in one-minute and 
special-order speeches, adoption of resolutions of sympathy, and 
resolutions providing for adjournment out of respect for a specified 
Member, are addressed in Ch. 38, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See also 5 Hinds' Precedents Sec. Sec. 7107-7138; 8 Cannon's 
        Precedents Sec. Sec. 3560-3565.
 2. See Sec. 12.3, infra.
 3. See Sec. 12.2, infra.
 4. See Sec. 12.1, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 12.1 The Speaker took the floor (by unanimous consent pending 
    operation of the previous question on passage of a bill) to 
    announce the death of a Member.

    On Mar. 25, 1998,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 144 Cong. Rec. 4668, 105th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The CHAIRMAN pro tempore (Mr. Snowbarger).(2) Are 
    there further amendments?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Vincent Snowbarger (KS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There being no further amendments, under the rule the Committee 
    rises.
        Accordingly, the Committee rose[.] . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Under the rule, the 
    previous question is ordered.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Ray LaHood (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Is a separate vote demanded on any amendment? If not, the Chair 
    will put them en gros.
        The amendments were agreed to.
        (Mr. GINGRICH asked and was given permission to speak out of 
    order.)

[[Page 200]]

              announcement of passing of congressman steve schiff

        Mr. [Newt] GINGRICH [of Georgia]. Mr. Speaker, I have the sad 
    duty to inform the House that earlier today, Steve Schiff, our 
    colleague, died in Albuquerque. All of my colleagues know he fought 
    a very, very long and very courageous struggle against cancer.
        I had an opportunity to talk just a few minutes ago with his 
    wife, and the family is bearing up very, very well. His staff has 
    been wonderful in a very difficult situation for over a year, and 
    has done really courageous work in representing Steve and 
    representing the district.
        Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the House to join me in a 
    moment of silent prayer for Steve and his family, and then 
    afterwards I will comment further.
        Amen.
        Let me just say, that Mrs. Schiff indicated they will decide 
    later on this evening whether the funeral will be on Friday or on 
    Monday. Obviously, the House will suspend for the purposes of the 
    funeral, and we will invite Members who care to go, to go and join 
    the family at that time.
        It is a very sad time for all of us, and I think that those of 
    us who knew Steve well knew the integrity, the decency, the love 
    for this country that he brought to the job of Representative, the 
    degree to which he gave all of us honor in the way in which he 
    served. And I know that all of my colleagues will want to reach out 
    in their own way to the Schiff family and to the people of New 
    Mexico and, in particular, as I said a minute ago, to the very fine 
    staff who has just truly done heroic work over the last year under 
    the most difficult possible circumstances.
        I know that my colleagues will want to join in prayers for Mrs. 
    Schiff and for the immediate family. We will report more as we 
    learn more.
        Mr. [Steny H.] HOYER [of Maryland]. Mr. Speaker, will the 
    gentleman yield?
        Mr. GINGRICH. I yield to the gentleman from Maryland.
        Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I know on this side of the aisle, we 
    join all of our colleagues on that side of the aisle. All of us, in 
    losing a colleague, share the sadness and share the concern for our 
    colleague's family.
        Mr. Speaker, another one of our colleagues is grieving this day 
    as well, as many probably know. The family of the gentleman from 
    Maryland (Mr. Cardin) lost their son, 30 years of age, last night 
    and buried him this afternoon. So as we pray for our colleague and 
    for the Schiff family, if we could remember the Cardin family as 
    well, I know they would appreciate it. I thank the gentleman from 
    Georgia (Mr. Gingrich) for yielding.
        Mr. GINGRICH. Mr. Speaker, reclaiming my time, I thank the 
    gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Hoyer) for briefing us and I thank the 
    House for its attention.

                    announcement by the speaker pro tempore

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair would announce that 
    following final passage of this bill, a resolution will be offered 
    by the gentleman from New Mexico (Mr. Skeen).

Sec. 12.2 Notification to Members of a memorial service for a

[[Page 201]]

    deceased former Member of the House to be held in Statuary Hall.

    On Apr. 24, 1991,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 137 Cong. Rec. 9006, 102d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             ANNOUNCEMENT OF MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR RICHARD BOLLING

        Mr. [Alan] WHEAT [of Missouri]. Mr. Speaker, it is always a sad 
    occasion when a Member of this body dies, and this last Sunday one 
    of the most distinguished Members of this body passed away. Our 
    former colleague, Richard Bolling, who served in this House of 
    Representatives from 1948 until 1982, passed away this past Sunday.
        Mr. Speaker, I want to notify my colleagues that there will be 
    two memorial services on his behalf. The first will be held this 
    afternoon at 4 o'clock p.m. in Statuary Hall in the Capitol of the 
    United States. The second memorial service will be held in his home 
    district this Friday afternoon, 1 o'clock, at the Unitarian Church 
    in Kansas City. Members of Congress, friends, family, and, of 
    course, the general public are all invited to attend.

Sec. 12.3 By unanimous consent, the House considered a concurrent 
    resolution permitting the remains of a sitting Member and former 
    Senator to lie in state in the Rotunda of the Capitol.

    On May 31, 1989,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 135 Cong. Rec. 10416-18, 10430, 101st Cong. 1st Sess. See also Ch. 
        38 Appendix, infra.
            Parliamentarian's Note: Mr. Pepper was the first sitting 
        House member since Thaddeus Stevens in 1868 to lie in state in 
        the Rotunda of the Capitol.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Thomas S.] FOLEY [of Washington]. Madam Speaker, I offer a 
    concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 139) permitting the remains of 
    the Honorable Claude Pepper, to lie in state in the Rotunda of the 
    Capitol in recognition of his distinguished service, and I ask 
    unanimous-consent for its immediate consideration.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The Clerk will report 
    the resolution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Mary Rose Oakar (OH).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 139

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That in recognition of the long and distinguished 
        service rendered to the Nation by Claude Pepper, a 
        Representative from the State of Florida and formerly a Senator 
        from that State, his remains be permitted to lie in state in 
        the rotunda of the Capitol from June 1 until June 2, 1989, and 
        the Architect of the Capitol under the direction of the Speaker 
        of the House of Representatives and the President pro tempore 
        of the Senate, shall take all necessary steps for the 
        accomplishment of that purpose.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Washington?

[[Page 202]]

        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Washington [Mr. 
    Foley] is recognized for 1 hour.
        Mr. FOLEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as I may consume. . . 
    .
        Mr. FOLEY. Madam Speaker, I move the previous question on the 
    concurrent resolution.
        The previous question was ordered.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the concurrent 
    resolution.
        The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced 
    that the ayes appeared to have it.
        Mr. FOLEY. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
        The yeas and nays were ordered.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. (Ms. Oakar). Pursuant to clause 5, 
    rule I, further proceedings of this question will be postponed 
    until approximately 3 p.m. or at the end of legislative business 
    today. . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Oakar). The pending business is 
    the question on agreeing to House Concurrent Resolution 139.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the concurrent 
    resolution, House Concurrent Resolution 139, on which the yeas and 
    nays are ordered.
        The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were -- yeas 
    397, nays 0, not voting 36. . . 
        So the concurrent resolution was agreed to.


                       

[Page 202-206]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 13. --Moments of Silence

    The House has observed moments of silence as a way to honor notable 
individuals,(1) fallen heroes and soldiers of 
wars,(2) and victims of national tragedies.(3) In 
one instance, the House stood in silent prayer in observance of the 
Nazi invasion of France.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. Sec. 13.1, 13.3, infra.
 2. See Sec. Sec. 13.2, 13.4, infra.
 3. See Sec. Sec. 13.5-13.7, infra.
 4. See Sec. 13.8, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Coretta Scott King

Sec. 13.1 The Chair asked Members to observe a moment of silence in 
    memory of Coretta Scott King, wife of civil rights leader Martin 
    Luther King, Jr., on occasion of her death.

    On Jan. 31, 2006,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 152 Cong. Rec. 402, 109th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             MOMENT OF SILENCE IN MEMORY OF MRS. CORETTA SCOTT KING

        The SPEAKER.(2) In memoriam to the death this 
    morning of Mrs. Coretta Scott King, I ask all Members to stand and 
    observe a moment of silence.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. J. Dennis Hastert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Moment of Silence to Mark Iraq War Losses

Sec. 13.2 Instance of moment of silence to commemorate the

[[Page 203]]

    loss of 2,500 American soldiers in the Iraq War.

    On June 15, 2006,(1) in the midst of general debate on 
House Resolution 861, the following proceedings took place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 152 Cong. Rec. 11412, 109th Cong. 2d. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [John P.] MURTHA [of Pennsylvania]. Mr. Speaker, I yield to 
    the gentleman from Missouri.
        Mr. [Ike] SKELTON [of Missouri]. I thank the gentleman for 
    yielding.
        Mr. Speaker, the media just reported the sad news that we have 
    just reached a sad milestone: 2,500 Americans have lost their lives 
    in the Iraq war. Mr. Speaker, I respectfully ask at the outset of 
    this very important debate that the House observe a moment of 
    silence for all those who have given the ultimate sacrifice on 
    behalf of our country.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Missouri?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Michael K. Simpson (ID).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Rosa Parks

Sec. 13.3 A Member asked the Chair to lead the House in a moment of 
    silence in memory of the passing of Rosa Parks.

    On Oct. 25, 2005,(1) the Chair asked Members to rise for 
a moment of silence:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 23629, 109th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  ANNOUNCING THE PASSING OF ROSA LOUISE PARKS

        (Mr. CONYERS asked and was given permission to address the 
    House for 1 minute.)
        Mr. [John] CONYERS [Jr., of Michigan]. Mr. Speaker, I am sorry 
    to announce the passing of Rosa Louise Parks yesterday evening, and 
    I would like to announce that we have already prepared a Special 
    Order immediately following the business tomorrow, and we invite 
    all of the Members on both sides of the aisle to 
    attend.                          -------------------

                MOMENT OF SILENCE IN MEMORY OF ROSA LOUISE PARKS

        Mr. CONYERS. Mr. Speaker, may I ask for the Speaker to call for 
    a moment of silence in memory of Rosa Louise Parks.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Would Members please rise and join 
    me in a moment of silence in memory of Mrs. Rosa Louise Parks.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. J. Dennis Hastert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Memorial Day

Sec. 13.4 The Chair asked Members to observe a moment of silence in 
    honor of Memorial Day and fallen heroes.

    On May 20, 2004,(1) the Speaker made the following 
request:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 150 Cong. Rec. 10639, 108th Cong. 2d. Sess. For additional 
        information on federal holidays, see Sec. 3, supra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The Chair would ask the 
    House to observe

[[Page 204]]

    a moment of silence in honor of Memorial Day and our fallen heroes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Michael K. Simpson (ID).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The House also on that day,(3) by unanimous consent 
permitted all Members to insert remarks and extraneous material in the 
Congressional Record on fallen heroes (the topic of a later special-
order speech).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 150 Cong. Rec. 10639, 108th Cong. 2d. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [James T.] WALSH [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days in 
    which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous 
    material on a special order speech on the topic of fallen heroes 
    and that all such remarks be printed in the Congressional Record of 
    May 20, 2004.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from New York?
        Mr. [Charles B.] RANGEL [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object and I will not object, I just want to take this 
    opportunity to thank my friend and colleague from New York for 
    affording this House the opportunity to express ourselves on this 
    Memorial Day in honor of these fallen heroes. I appreciate working 
    with him and I thank him very much for this opportunity.
        Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from New York?
        There was no objection.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. In recent practice, the House has observed monthly moments of 
        silence for fallen heroes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Victims of Mining Accident

Sec. 13.5 A Member took the floor for one minute by unanimous consent 
    to initiate a moment of silence for the fates of nine miners 
    trapped in a well for over 48 hours.

    On July 26, 2002,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 148 Cong. Rec. 14945, 107th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         moment of silence for miners trapped in somerset, pennsylvania

        Mr. [Christopher] SHAYS [of Connecticut]. Mr. Chairman, in 
    consultation with the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Murtha) and 
    the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Gekas), I ask for a moment of 
    silence for the 9 miners in Somerset, Pennsylvania, trapped 240 
    feet underground. They have been trapped there for over 48 hours 
    under very extreme conditions.
        Mr. Chairman, this is in the district of the gentleman from 
    Pennsylvania (Mr. Murtha), and he and others in this Chamber 
    request the prayers of the Members of this Chamber for those 
    miners, for their families, and for the heroic work of our rescue 
    workers.
        I ask for a moment of silence.
        The CHAIRMAN pro tempore.(2) Would all Members 
    please stand.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John Linder (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Victims of Anthrax Attacks on Postal Service

Sec. 13.6 A Member took the floor for one minute by unanimous

[[Page 205]]

    consent to initiate a moment of silence in memory of the loss of 
    Postal Service employees' lives to anthrax exposure resulting from 
    ``terrorist'' mailings.

    On Oct. 23, 2001,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 147 Cong. Rec. 20398, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

              MOMENT OF SILENCE TO HONOR POSTAL SERVICE EMPLOYEES

        (Mr. WAMP asked and was given permission to address the House 
    for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)
        Mr. [Zach] WAMP [of Tennessee]. Mr. Speaker, I think it would 
    be appropriate tonight with this many Members present and with our 
    new Members present and on the job, if we as a body, in a unified 
    way, stood together for a moment of silence in memory of the Postal 
    Service employees that have lost their lives; and in honor of all 
    of the families and all of those U.S. Postal Service employees 
    around the country that work for us day in and day out, that we 
    would bow our heads as the United States Congress in their honor 
    and in their memory and pray for our country at this time in our 
    country's history. Please stand.

Victims of Oklahoma City Bombing

Sec. 13.7 After the prayer and before the approval of the Journal, the 
    Speaker requested the House to join in a silent prayer for 168 
    seconds in honor and memory of the 168 Americans who died when a 
    bomb exploded in a Federal building in Oklahoma City.

    On Apr. 19, 1996,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 104 Cong. Rec. 8224, 104th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         MOMENT OF SILENCE IN TRIBUTE TO OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING VICTIMS

        The SPEAKER.(2) The Chair asks the House to join in 
    a silent prayer for 168 seconds in honor and memory of the 168 
    Americans who died 1 year ago in Oklahoma City.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Newt Gingrich (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nazi Occupied France

Sec. 13.8 The House stood for one minute in silent prayer in observance 
    of the invasion of Nazi-occupied France by our troops during World 
    War II.

    On June 6, 1944,(1) Mr. John W. McCormack, of 
Massachusetts, asked in a one-minute speech that the Members of the 
House stand in prayer.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 90 Cong. Rec. 5387, 78th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, at this dramatic, historic, and 
    eventful moment, I ask that the Members of the House stand in 
    silent prayer.

[[Page 206]]

        The Members of the House rose and stood for 1 minute in silent 
    prayer.

                               european invasion

        Mr. [Joseph W.] MARTIN [Jr.], of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I 
    ask unanimous consent to address the House for 1 minute.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Without objection, it is so ordered.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, this is an anxious 
    day for the people of America. It is a day of anxiety for liberty-
    loving people all over the world.
        The fighting men and women of America and the Allied armies 
    have landed on the historic shores of northern France. They have 
    commenced the long trail which we have every reason to believe will 
    not end until they enter victoriously the Hitler capital of Berlin.


                       

[Page 206-207]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 14. --Holocaust Days of Remembrance

    The House has provided for a ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda to 
mark the annual Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust. The 
ceremony is generally held on or around the 27th of April. Holocaust 
survivors and liberators, members of Congress, White House officials, 
members of the diplomatic corps and community leaders are in attendance 
at the ceremony.
    A concurrent resolution is needed to authorize the use of the 
Rotunda for the ceremony.                          -------------------

Sec. 14.1 The House considered by unanimous consent and adopted a 
    Senate concurrent resolution providing that the Capitol Rotunda be 
    available at a certain time for a ceremony to commemorate the Days 
    of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust.

    On Mar. 26, 1979,(1) the House first authorized the use 
of the Rotunda for a ceremony to commemorate the days of remembrance of 
victims of the Holocaust, as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 125 Cong. Rec. 6231, 96th Cong. 1st Sess.
            For additional examples of concurrent resolutions 
        authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda for the Days of 
        Remembrance commemoration, see, e.g., 149 Cong. Rec. 4384-86, 
        108th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 25, 2003 (H. Con. Res. 40); 148 
        Cong. Rec. 1053-55, 107th Cong. 2d Sess., Feb. 12, 2002 (H. 
        Con. Res. 325); 147 Cong. Rec. 1040-43, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Jan. 31, 2001 (H. Con. Res. 14); 146 Cong. Rec. 248, 249, 106th 
        Cong. 2d Sess., Jan. 31, 2000 (H. Con. Res. 244); 145 Cong. 
        Rec. 1514-16, 106th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 2, 1999 (H. Con. Res. 
        19); 144 Cong. Rec. 3043, 3044, 105th Cong. 2d Sess., Mar. 10, 
        1998 (H. Con. Res. 206); 143 Cong. Rec. 4688, 4689, 105th Cong. 
        1st Sess., Mar. 21, 1997 (H. Con. Res. 11); 141 Cong. Rec. 
        5643, 5644, 104th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 23, 1995 (H. Con. Res. 
        20); 137 Cong. Rec. 5785-87, Mar. 12, 1991 (H. Con. Res. 45); 
        135 Cong. Rec. 7538, 7539, 101st Cong. 1st Sess., Apr. 26, 1989 
        (H. Con. Res. 50); 133 Cong. Rec. 4139, 4140, 100th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Feb. 26, 1987 (H. Con. Res. 49); and 128 Cong. Rec. 
        5899, 5900, 97th Cong. 2d Sess. Mar. 30, 1982 (H. Con. Res. 
        299).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 207]]

          COMMEMORATION OF DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE OF VICTIMS OF HOLOCAUST

        Mr. [Sidney R.] YATES [of Illinois]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate 
    concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 16) relating to a ceremony to 
    be held in the Capitol rotunda as part of the commemoration of the 
    Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust, and ask for its 
    immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Illinois?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 16

            Whereas, Public Law 95-371 designates April 28 and 29 of 
        1979 as ``Days of Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust'';
            Whereas, on November 1, 1978, the President of the United 
        States established the President's Commission on the Holocaust, 
        which was charged with the responsibility of recommending 
        appropriate ways for the nation to commemorate the Days of 
        Remembrance of Victims of the Holocaust;
            Whereas, the President's Commission has recommended that a 
        one-half hour ceremony be held in the Capitol Rotunda on April 
        24, consisting of prayers, speeches, readings and musical 
        presentations as part of the Days of Remembrance activities;
            Whereas, the President's Commission has recommended that 
        the United States Senate and United States House of 
        Representatives should stand in recess during the ceremony: 
        Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That from noon on April 24, 1979, the Capitol 
        Rotunda shall be available until 1:00 p.m. for a ceremony as 
        part of the commemoration of the Days of Remembrance of Victims 
        of the Holocaust. . . .
            The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
            A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                      

[Page 207-210]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 15. --Honoring Slain Capitol Police Officers

    Capitol Police officers John Michael Gibson and Jacob Joseph 
Chestnut were slain in the line of duty by an intruder armed with a gun 
at 3:40 p.m. on July 24, 1998. The House adopted House Concurrent 
Resolution 310, honoring the officers in a number of ways: by 
authorizing the Sergeant at Arms to make payments in connection

[[Page 208]]

with funeral expenses, authorizing the Chief Administrative Officer to 
pay a gratuity to their surviving spouses,(1) and 
authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a memorial service(2) 
in memory of the officers. The House also adopted House Concurrent 
Resolution 311 honoring the memory of the officers and marking the 
day's adjournment in respect of their memory.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Ch. 38, Sec. 3.5 infra.
 2. Ibid.
 3. See 144 Cong. Rec. 17440-67, 105th Cong. 2d Sess., July 27, 1998.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The bodies of Officers Chestnut and Gibson were placed ``in honor'' 
in the Capitol Rotunda. The distinction of ``lying in honor'' was 
created for the occasion and served to distinguish this event from 
those where the bodies of government officials ``lay in state.''
    On Oct. 15, 1998, the House adopted a concurrent resolution 
redesignating the United States Capitol Police headquarters building as 
the ``Eney, Chestnut, Gibson Memorial Building''.(4) In the 
year following the shootings, the House adopted a concurrent resolution 
designating the Document Door of the Capitol as the Chestnut-Gibson 
``Memorial Door''.(5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. See Sec. 22.3, infra.
 5. See Sec. 22.2, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Speaker has led the House in a moment of silence at 3:40 p.m. 
on the anniversary of the shootings.(6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. See, e.g., 152 Cong. Rec. 15548, 109th Cong. 2d Sess., July 24, 
        2006; 151 Cong. Rec. 17180, 109th Cong. 1st Sess., July 25, 
        2005; 149 Cong. Rec. 19461, 19462, 108th Cong. 1st Sess., July 
        24, 2003; 147 Cong. Rec. 14308, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., July 24, 
        2001; and 146 Cong. Rec. 15902, 106th Cong. 2d Sess., July 24, 
        2000.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 15.1 The House by unanimous consent adopted a Senate concurrent 
    resolution providing for the printing and distribution of eulogies 
    for the two slain police officers.

    On July 27, 1998,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 144 Cong. Rec. 17467, 17468, 105th Cong. 2d. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         PRINTING OF EULOGIES AND TEXT OF MEMORIAL SERVICES AS TRIBUTE 
        TO DETECTIVE JOHN MICHAEL GIBSON AND PRIVATE FIRST CLASS JACOB 
              JOSEPH CHESTNUT OF THE UNITED STATES CAPITOL POLICE

        Mr. [Bill] THOMAS [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent for the immediate consideration of the Senate concurrent 
    resolution (S. Con. Res. 112) to authorize the printing of the 
    eulogies of the Senate and the House of Representatives for 
    Detective John Michael Gibson and Private First Class Jacob Joseph 
    Chestnut.

[[Page 209]]

        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from California?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Newt Gingrich (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 112

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the eulogies for Detective John Michael 
        Gibson and Private First Class Jacob Joseph Chestnut of the 
        United States Capitol Police, as expressed in the House of 
        Representatives and the Senate together with the text of the 
        memorial services, shall be printed as a tribute to Detective 
        Gibson and Officer Chestnut, with illustrations and suitable 
        binding. The document shall be prepared under the direction of 
        the Joint Committee on Printing. These shall be printed 300 
        casebound copies; 50 to be delivered to each of the families of 
        Detective Gibson and Officer Chestnut, and 200 for the use of 
        the United States Capitol Police.

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 15.2 After the prayer, approval of the Journal, and the pledge of 
    allegiance to the flag on a second legislative day dedicated to 
    honoring the memory of Officers Chestnut and Gibson, the Chair (1) 
    entertained one-minute speeches and five-minute special order 
    speeches; (2) declared a recess until a time certain; (3) after the 
    recess entertained a motion for a call of the House; (4) declared 
    another recess during which Members proceeded to the Rotunda for a 
    viewing of the slain officers; (5) adjourned in honor of the memory 
    of the two slain officers; and (6) announced that Members would 
    proceed en masse through the double doors opposite the rostrum to a 
    memorial service in the Rotunda.

    On July 28, 1998,(1) the Chair entertained one-minute 
speeches and five-minute special order speeches and then declared a 
recess until a time certain:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 144 Cong. Rec. 17480-82, 17500, 17501, 105th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The chair would now 
    entertain 1-minute requests and then 5-minute special orders until 
    11:30. . . . 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Richard Burr (NC).                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Burr of North Carolina). Pursuant 
    to clause 12 of rule I, the Chair declares the House in recess 
    until approximately 11:30 a.m.

[[Page 210]]

        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 17 minutes a.m.), the House 
    stood in recess until approximately 11:30 
    a.m.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore (Mr. Burr of North Carolina) at 11 o'clock and 
    30 minutes a.m.                          -------------------

                               CALL OF THE HOUSE

        Mr. [Ken] CALVERT [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I move a call 
    of the House.
        A call of the House was ordered.
        The call was taken by electronic device, and the following 
    Members responded to their names:

                              [Roll No. 341] . . 
                 .                          -------------------

                    ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members will proceed through the 
    center doors to the Rotunda for the viewing of Detective John 
    Gibson and Officer Jacob 
    Chestnut.                          -------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 12 of rule I, the 
    House stands in recess until approximately 1 p.m.
        Accordingly (at 11 o'clock and 56 minutes a.m.) the House stood 
    in recess until approximately 1 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore (Mr. Burr of North Carolina) at 1 p.m. . . 
    .                          -------------------

                                  ADJOURNMENT

        Mr. [Gil] GUTKNECHT [of Minnesota]. Mr. Speaker, in honor of 
    the memory of John Michael Gibson and Jacob Joseph Chestnut, I move 
    that the House do now adjourn.
        The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced 
    that the ayes appeared to have it.
        Mr. GUTKNECHT. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
        The yeas and nays were ordered.
        The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 
    392, nays 0, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 41, as follows:

                              [Roll No. 342] . . .

        So the motion was agreed to.
        The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
        (Following adjournment of the House, the Speaker pro tempore 
    announced that Members should proceed through the double doors to 
    the memorial service).



[Page 210-223]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 16. --Honoring Victims of National Tragedies

    The House has honored the victims of national tragedies in a 
variety of ways, including moments

[[Page 211]]

of silence(1) and authorizing the use of the Capitol grounds 
for memorial services for fallen peace officers.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 13, supra.
 2. See Sec. 16.1, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The House marked the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, with 
several ceremonies and observances. On the calendar day following the 
attacks, the House adopted a joint resolution that condemned the 
attacks, declared Sept. 12, 2001, a National Day of Unity and Mourning, 
and marked the day's adjournment out of respect of the victims of the 
attacks.(3) On that same date, the House also agreed to a 
concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda for a 
prayer vigil in memory of those who lost their lives in the 
events.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See Sec. 16.3, infra. See also Ch. 39, infra.
 4. See Sec.  16.2, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The House marked the one-year anniversary of the attacks with a 
special ceremonial meeting of the House and Senate in Federal Hall in 
New York, New York.(5) In ensuing years, the House has 
traditionally observed a moment of silence on or around the year 
anniversary of the attacks.(6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. See Sec.  16.4, infra.
 6. See, e.g., 151 Cong. Rec. 19779, 109th Cong., 1st Sess., Sept. 8, 
        2005; 150 Cong. Rec. 17851, 108th Cong. 2d Sess., Sept. 9, 
        2004; 149 Cong. Rec. 21835, 108th Cong., 1st Sess., Sept. 11, 
        2003; and 148 Cong. Rec. 16567, 107th Cong. 2d. Sess., Sept. 
        11, 2002.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

National Peace Officers' Memorial Service

Sec. 16.1 By concurrent resolution, the House authorized the use of the 
    Capitol Grounds for the annual National Peace Officers' Memorial 
    Service.

    The Fraternal Order of Police Auxiliary has hosted the National 
Police Officers' Memorial Service on the steps of the Capitol. The use 
of the Capitol grounds for the service was authorized by concurrent 
resolution. The ceremony honored those Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement officers who were killed in the line of duty during the 
course of the previous year.
    On May 10, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. H3077-79, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORIZING USE OF CAPITOL GROUNDS FOR NATIONAL PEACE OFFICERS' 
                                MEMORIAL SERVICE

        Mr. [Charlie] DENT [of Pennsylvania]. Madam Speaker, I move to 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. 
    Res. 136) authorizing the use of the Capitol

[[Page 212]]

    Grounds for the National Peace Officers' Memorial Service.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 136

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), 

     SECTION 1. USE OF CAPITOL GROUNDS FOR NATIONAL PEACE 
                   OFFICERS' MEMORIAL SERVICE.

       (a) In General.--The Grand Lodge of the Fraternal Order of 
     Police and its auxiliary (in this resolution referred to as 
     the ``sponsor'') shall be permitted to sponsor a public 
     event, the 24th annual National Peace Officers' Memorial 
     Service (in this resolution referred to as the ``event''), on 
     the Capitol Grounds, in order to honor the law enforcement 
     officers who died in the line of duty during 2004.
       (b) Date of Event.--The event shall be held on May 15, 
     2005, or on such other date as the Speaker of the House of 
     Representatives and the Committee on Rules and Administration 
     of the Senate jointly designate.

     SEC. 2. TERMS AND CONDITIONS.

       (a) In General.--Under conditions to be prescribed by the 
     Architect of the Capitol and the Capitol Police Board, the 
     event shall be--
       (1) free of admission charge and open to the public; and
       (2) arranged not to interfere with the needs of Congress.
       (b) Expenses and Liabilities.--The sponsor shall assume 
     full responsibility for all expenses and liabilities incident 
     to all activities associated with the event.

     SEC. 3. EVENT PREPARATIONS.

       Subject to the approval of the Architect of the Capitol, 
     the sponsor is authorized to erect upon the Capitol Grounds 
     such stage, sound amplification devices, and other related 
     structures and equipment, as may be required for the event.

     SEC. 4. ENFORCEMENT OF RESTRICTIONS.

       The Capitol Police Board shall provide for enforcement of 
     the restrictions contained in section 5104(c) of title 40, 
     United States Code, concerning sales, advertisements, 
     displays, and solicitations on the Capitol Grounds, as well 
     as other restrictions applicable to the Capitol Grounds, in 
     connection with the event.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Dent) and the gentlewoman from 
    Pennsylvania (Ms. Schwartz) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Shelley Moore Capito (WV).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. 
    Dent).
        Mr. DENT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Madam Speaker, House Concurrent Resolution 136 authorizes the 
    use of the Capitol grounds for the annual National Peace Officers' 
    Memorial Service to take place on May 15, 2005. The Grand Lodge of 
    the Fraternal Order of Police and its auxiliary are the sponsors 
    wishing to honor some of America's bravest men and women. The 
    memorial service will honor the 154 Federal, State, and local law 
    enforcement officers who made the ultimate sacrifice while 
    protecting their communities in 2004. . . .
        Mr. DENT. Madam Speaker, I have no further requests for time, 
    and I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered 
    by the gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Dent) that the House 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. 
    Res. 136.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution was 
    agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001

Sec. 16.2 The House by unanimous consent agreed to a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a prayer vigil in

[[Page 213]]

    memory of those who lost their lives in the events of Sept. 11, 
    2001.

    On the legislative day of Sept. 11, 2001,(1) the 
following proceedings took place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 147 Cong. Rec. 16761, 16762, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        PERMITTING USE OF ROTUNDA OF CAPITOL FOR PRAYER VIGIL IN MEMORY 
         OF THOSE WHO LOST THEIR LIVES IN THE EVENTS OF SEPTEMBER 11, 
                                      2001

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the Committee on House Administration be discharged 
    from further consideration of the concurrent resolution (H. Con. 
    Res. 223) permitting the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a 
    prayer vigil in memory of those who lost their lives in the events 
    of September 11, 2001, and ask for its immediate consideration in 
    the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ray LaHood (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Steny H.] HOYER [of Maryland]. Mr. Speaker, reserving the 
    right to object, and obviously I will not nor do I intend to 
    object, but I want to reserve the right to object so the gentleman 
    from Ohio (Mr. NEY) can kindly explain the purpose of the 
    concurrent resolution.
        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman 
    yield?
        Mr. HOYER. I yield to the gentleman from Ohio.
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, House Concurrent Resolution 223 permits 
    the use of the Capitol rotunda for a prayer vigil in memory of 
    those who lost their lives in yesterday's tragic act of terrorism 
    against the United States.
        This country has suffered the most terrible and horrific 
    terrorist attack in its history. Although we still do not know the 
    full story, these unspeakable acts of brutality strike at the very 
    heart of our society. Our heartfelt prayers and sympathy go out to 
    all who have been directly touched by this tragedy and their 
    families.
        Prayer can now be the source of unification and peace for a 
    Nation that is beginning the healing process. The rotunda in our 
    Nation's Capitol is a symbol of unification. House Members, 
    Senators and the American people have historically gathered there 
    for solemn occasions. It is, therefore, fitting that the people's 
    representatives from both bodies gather together there today. No 
    matter what the troubles in the world, you can have peace with God 
    and you can achieve it with prayer.
        My fellow colleagues, please join me and the millions across 
    the country and the world as we remember those who died in a 
    senseless and cowardly act of terrorism. May their memory serve as 
    a reminder that the American spirit lives on and cannot be 
    extinguished.
        Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, further reserving the right to object, 
    I, of course, concur in the Chairman's characterization of the 
    resolution.
        It is appropriate that we authorize the use of the rotunda of 
    the Capitol, the center and heart of this Nation's

[[Page 214]]

    Capitol, to remember those who have paid the final price for living 
    in freedom and defending freedom.
        Our democracy, of course, will not crumble in the face of this 
    disaster. Our democracy will endure this test and emerge stronger 
    and more dedicated to freedom and justice throughout the world.
        We do this to honor and remember those of our fellow citizens, 
    those who live among us who perished yesterday, and those whose 
    lives have been forever changed by grievous acts of cowardice.
        Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Ohio?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 223

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used at any time on September 12, 2001, for a prayer vigil 
        in memory of those who lost their lives in the events of 
        September 11, 2001. Physical preparations for the vigil shall 
        be carried out in accordance with such conditions as the 
        Architect of the Capitol may prescribe.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 16.3 Special order by unanimous consent for consideration of 
    unreferred joint resolution: (1) expressing sense of Congress on 
    terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001; (2) declaring Sept. 11, 2001 a 
    National Day of Unity and Mourning; and (3) marking the day's 
    adjournment out of respect of the victims of terrorist attacks.

    On the legislative day of Sept. 11, 2001,(1) the 
following proceedings took place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 147 Cong. Rec. 16762, 16851-53, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Dick] ARMEY [of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I offer a joint 
    resolution (H. J. Res. 61), expressing the sense of the Senate and 
    House of Representatives regarding the terrorist attacks launched 
    against the United States on September 11, 2001, and I ask 
    unanimous consent for its immediate consideration pursuant to the 
    following order:
        Debate on the joint resolution shall be limited to 3 hours 
    equally divided and controlled by the majority leader and the 
    minority leader;
        After opening speeches, the majority leader and the minority 
    leader each may yield the remainder of his time to the chairman and 
    ranking minority member of the Committee on International 
    Relations, respectively, who may control that time;
        The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the 
    joint resolution to final passage without intervening motion; and
        Following passage of the joint resolution and upon receipt of a 
    message

[[Page 215]]

    that the Senate has passed an identical joint resolution, the House 
    shall be considered to have passed the Senate joint resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The Clerk will report 
    the joint resolution.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ray LaHood (IL).
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: The last paragraph after the resolved 
        clause of the joint resolution contained a commemorative banned 
        under Rule XII clause 5 (House Rules and Manual Sec. 823 
        (2007)).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read as follows:

                                  H.J. Res. 61

            Whereas on September 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked and 
        destroyed four civilian aircraft, crashing two of them into the 
        towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, and a third 
        into the Pentagon outside Washington, D.C.;
            Whereas thousands of innocent Americans were killed and 
        injured as a result of these attacks, including the passengers 
        and crew of the four aircraft, workers in the World Trade 
        Center and in the Pentagon, rescue workers, and bystanders;
            Whereas these attacks destroyed both towers of the World 
        Trade Center, as well as adjacent buildings, and seriously 
        damaged the Pentagon; and
            Whereas these attacks were by far the deadliest terrorist 
        attacks ever launched against the United States, and, by 
        targeting symbols of American strength and success, clearly 
        were intended to intimidate our Nation and weaken its resolve: 
        Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
        United States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress--
            (1) condemns in the strongest possible terms the terrorists 
        who planned and carried out the September 11, 2001, attacks 
        against the United States, as well as their sponsors;
            (2) extends its deepest condolences to the victims of these 
        heinous and cowardly attacks, as well as to their families, 
        friends, and loved ones;
            (3) is certain that the people of the United States will 
        stand united as our Nation begins the process of recovering and 
        rebuilding in the aftermath of these tragic acts;
            (4) commends the heroic actions of the rescue workers, 
        volunteers, and State and local officials who responded to 
        these tragic events with courage, determination, and skill;
            (5) declares that these premeditated attacks struck not 
        only at the people of America, but also at the symbols and 
        structures of our economic and military strength, and that the 
        United States is entitled to respond under international law;
            (6) thanks those foreign leaders and individuals who have 
        expressed solidarity with the United States in the aftermath of 
        the attacks, and asks them to continue to stand with the United 
        States in the war against international terrorism;
            (7) commits to support increased resources in the war to 
        eradicate terrorism;
            (8) supports the determination of the President, in close 
        consultation with Congress, to bring to justice and punish the 
        perpetrators of these attacks as well as their sponsors; and
            (9) declares that September 12, 2001, shall be a National 
        Day of Unity and Mourning, and that when Congress adjourns 
        today, it stands adjourned out of respect to the victims of the 
        terrorist attacks.

                                {time}  1500

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. LaHood). Is there objection to the 
    request of the gentleman from Texas?

[[Page 216]]

        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Texas (Mr. Armey) 
    and the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Gephardt) each will control 90 
    minutes.
        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Armey).
        Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Mr. Speaker, this is a time when we should choose our words 
    carefully and deliver them deliberately. . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the 
    joint resolution.
        The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced 
    that the ayes appeared to have it.
        Mr. [Christopher H.] SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, on that 
    I demand the yeas and nays.
        The yeas and nays were ordered.
        The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were -- yeas 
    408, nays 0, not voting 22, as follows:

                              [Roll No. 338] . . .

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Simpson).(4) Pursuant 
    to the order of the House of earlier today, S.J. Res. 22 is passed.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Michael K. Simpson (ID).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Without objection, the motion to reconsider S.J. Res. 22 is 
    laid on the table, and H.J. Res. 61 is laid on the table.
        There was no objection. . . 
    .                          -------------------

           ADJOURNMENT OUT OF RESPECT TO VICTIMS OF TERRORIST ATTACKS

        Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that, 
    consistent with the language of the joint resolution just passed, 
    when the House adjourns on this legislative day, it stand adjourned 
    out of respect to the victims of the terrorist attacks.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Texas?
        There was no 
    objection.                          -------------------

                                  ADJOURNMENT

        Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now adjourn.
        The motion was agreed to.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the previous order of the 
    House, the House stands adjourned until 10 a.m. today out of 
    respect to the victims of the terrorist attacks.
        Accordingly (at 1 o'clock and 10 minutes a.m.) on Thursday, 
    September 13, 2001, (legislative day of Tuesday, September 11, 
    2001), under its previous order, the House adjourned until today, 
    September 13, 2001, at 10 a.m. out of respect to the victims of the 
    terrorist attacks.

Sec. 16.4 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and adopted a 
    concurrent resolution (unreferred) providing that the Congress 
    ``conduct a special meeting in Federal Hall in New York, New York'' 
    on Sept. 6, 2002, in remembrance of Sept. 11, 2001.

[[Page 217]]

    On July 25, 2002,(1) Rep. Dick Armey, of Texas, offered 
the following concurrent resolution:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 148 Cong. Rec. 14640-45, 107th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         PROVIDING FOR A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE CONGRESS IN NEW YORK, 
            NEW YORK ON FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2002 IN REMEMBRANCE OF 
                               SEPTEMBER 11, 2001

        Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I offer a concurrent resolution (H. 
    Con. Res. 448) providing for representation by Congress at a 
    special meeting(2) in New York, New York on Friday, 
    September 6, 2002, in remembrance of the victims and the heroes of 
    September 11, 2001, in recognition of the courage and spirit of the 
    City of New York, and for other purposes, and I ask unanimous 
    consent for its immediate consideration in the House.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. This measure provided for a strictly ceremonial meeting and not an 
        actual session of the House (as was proposed by H. Con. Res. 
        249). In this sense, it resembled the ceremonial festivities 
        surrounding the bicentennial anniversary of the Constitution on 
        July 16, 1987, in Philadelphia. See Sec. 4.5, supra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Texas?
        Mr. [Charles B.] RANGEL [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object, I will not object, but on behalf of the New 
    York delegation and the people of New York, I would like to thank 
    the leadership of the House of Representatives and that of the 
    other body for supporting this resolution that would allow a joint 
    session of the House and Senate to take place in the City of New 
    York . . . 
        Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from New York for 
    yielding.
        It is a particular pleasure for me to now be finally able to 
    bring this resolution to the floor. The resolution, Mr. Speaker, 
    calls on the United States Congress to convene a ceremonial joint 
    meeting in New York City on Friday, September 6, 2002. The joint 
    commemorative meeting will be in remembrance of the thousands of 
    people killed and injured as well as the thousands more grieving 
    friends and families left after the terrorist attacks upon the 
    World Trade Center . . . 
        Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of 
    objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. LaHood).(2) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Texas?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ray LaHood (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 448

            Whereas on September 11, 2001, thousands of innocent people 
        were killed and injured in combined terrorist attacks involving 
        four hijacked airliners, the World Trade Center, and the 
        Pentagon;
            Whereas in the aftermath of the attacks, thousands more 
        were left grieving for beloved family and friends, livelihoods 
        were compromised, and businesses and property were damaged and 
        lost;
            Whereas the greatest loss of life, personal injury, and 
        physical destruction occurred in and was sustained by the City 
        of New York;

[[Page 218]]

            Whereas government and the American people responded 
        decisively, through the bravery, sacrifice and toil of the fire 
        and rescue workers, law enforcement, building trades, 
        caregivers, armed forces, and millions more who through their 
        many expressions of care and compassion brought forth comfort, 
        hope, and the promise of recovery;
            Whereas the City of New York attended to the aftermath of 
        the destruction of the World Trade Center with profound respect 
        for the victims and compassion to the survivors;
            Whereas the City of New York has invited the Congress to 
        meet at the site of the original Federal Hall, where the First 
        Congress of the United States convened on March 4, 1789; Now, 
        therefore be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That, in remembrance of the victims and the heroes 
        of September 11, 2001, and in recognition of the courage and 
        spirit of the City of New York, the Congress shall conduct a 
        special meeting in Federal Hall in New York, New York, on 
        September 6, 2002.
            The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
            A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

    The same day,(3) the following House concurrent 
resolution was offered:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See 148 Cong. Rec. 14646, 107th Cong. 2d Sess., July 25, 2002.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         PROVIDING FOR REPRESENTATION BY CONGRESS AT A SPECIAL MEETING 
               IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK ON FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2002

        Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I offer a concurrent resolution (H. 
    Con. Res. 449) providing for representation by Congress at a 
    special meeting in New York, New York on Friday, September 6, 2002, 
    and ask unanimous consent for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Texas?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 449

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That (a) The Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives (in consultation with the minority leader of 
        the House of Representatives), with respect to the House of 
        Representatives, and the President pro tempore of the Senate 
        (in consultation with the majority leader and the minority 
        leader of the Senate), with respect to the Senate, may send 
        such Representatives, Senators and other appropriate persons, 
        to a special meeting of Congress and related events to be held 
        on Friday, September 6, 2002 in New York, New York, in 
        remembrance of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and 
        in recognition of the City of New York for the harm it 
        sustained and its recovery.
            (b) Attendees under subsection (a) shall be led by the 
        Speaker and the minority leader of the House of 
        Representatives, and by the President pro tempore (or his 
        designee), majority leader, and the minority leader of the 
        Senate.
            Sec. 2. The Congress may accept the offer of the City of 
        New York and entities controlled by the City of New York to 
        host and pay the expenses of the Congress to prepare, attend, 
        and participate in the special meeting of September 6, 2002, 
        and related events of that day, referred to in Section 1.

[[Page 219]]

            Sec. 3. On behalf of the Congress, the officers of the 
        House of Representatives and the officers of the Senate may 
        make arrangements with the City of New York and other required 
        entities and agencies for participation by the Congress for the 
        purposes designated under this resolution.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

    On Sept. 9, 2002,(4) the proceedings of the special 
ceremonial meeting of Congress in Federal Hall in New York were printed 
in the Congressional Record as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. See 148 Cong. Rec. 16352-57, 107th Cong. 2d Sess.
            On Oct. 10, 2002, the House also agreed to H. Con. Res. 
        487, authorizing the printing of a volume of transcripts of the 
        New York City meeting and statements of the Sept. 11 terrorist 
        attacks. See Id. at p. 20366.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS OF SPECIAL CEREMONIAL MEETING OF UNITED 
         STATES CONGRESS HELD IN FEDERAL HALL, NEW YORK, NEW YORK, ON 
                               SEPTEMBER 6, 2002

        Mr. [Dick] ARMEY [of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that proceedings of the special ceremonial meeting of the 
    United States Congress held in Federal Hall, New York, New York, on 
    Sept. 6, 2002, be printed in the Record, and that all Members have 
    5 legislative days to insert their remarks on the topic of the 
    ceremonial meeting.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Isakson).(5) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Texas?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Johnny Isakson (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no 
    objection.                          -------------------

           COMMEMORATIVE JOINT MEETING OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED 
         STATES IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE VICTIMS AND HEROES OF SEPTEMBER 
         11, 2001, AND IN RECOGNITION OF THE COURAGE AND SPIRIT OF THE 
        CITY OF NEW YORK, FEDERAL HALL, NEW YORK, NY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 
                                    6, 2002

        The SPEAKER. The special ceremonial meeting will be in order.
        The invocation will be given by the Reverend Daniel P. 
    Coughlin, Chaplain of the House of Representatives.
        The Chaplain of the House of Representatives, the Reverend 
    Daniel P. Coughlin, offered the following invocation: . . .

                              pledge of allegiance

        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Jerrold Nadler, 
    Representative from New York, and the Honorable Harry Reid, Senator 
    from Nevada, to lead us in the Pledge of Allegiance to our flag. . 
    . .
        The SPEAKER. Our National Anthem will now be sung by LaChanze. 
    . . .
        The SPEAKER. My colleagues, we are here in Federal Hall in New 
    York, New York, pursuant to House Concurrent Resolution 448 of the 
    107th Congress to conduct a special ceremonial meeting in 
    remembrance of the victims

[[Page 220]]

    and the heroes of September 11, 2001, and in recognition of the 
    courage and the spirit of the City of New York.
        When representatives of the New York delegation introduced in 
    the House and the Senate in 2001 Concurrent Resolutions that 
    suggested that the Congress convene outside the seat of government 
    to symbolize the Nation's solidarity with New Yorkers who epitomize 
    the human spirit of courage, resilience and strength, my initial 
    reaction of support was tempered by the realization that under 
    article 1, section 5, clause 4 of the Constitution, ``Neither House 
    shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn to any other place 
    than that in which the two houses shall be sitting.''
        There is no precedent for the convening of an actual session of 
    Congress outside the seat of government, but on one special 
    occasion the Congress has engaged in ceremonial functions outside 
    the seat of government. Members of both houses traveled to 
    Philadelphia on July 16, 1987, for organized festivities 
    surrounding the bicentennial anniversary of the Constitution 
    pursuant to a similar Concurrent Resolution.
        On the strength of the precedent of the uniquely historical and 
    national significance of that occasion, it is appropriate to 
    dedicate another ceremonial gathering to a matter of transcendent 
    importance at another place of basic institutional relevance to the 
    Congress.
        Thus, we are gathered in Federal Hall where the First Congress 
    met in 1789 before moving the third session of that Congress to 
    Congress Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1790.
        Ladies and gentlemen, we are, therefore, meeting here under 
    that precedent.
        The Chair recognizes the Honorable Richard B. Cheney, the Vice 
    President of the United States and President of the United States 
    Senate.
        (Applause.)
        Vice President CHENEY. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Each time 
    Congress meets, we are mindful of the great charge that we have all 
    been given as public servants. Assembled today in Federal Hall we 
    are reminded of the ones who served before us and those who served 
    first. It is a humbling experience to stand on the site where the 
    First Congress met, where the first President was sworn, where the 
    Bill of Rights was introduced. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Clerk of the House of Representatives has laid 
    upon the desk the list of representatives in attendance.
        Vice President CHENEY. The Secretary of the Senate has laid 
    upon the desk the list of Senators in attendance.
        The list of Representatives and Senators in attendance is as 
    follows: . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Benjamin Gilman 
    and the Honorable Charles Rangel, Representatives from New York, 
    and the Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton and the Honorable Charles 
    Schumer, Senators from New York, in a reading and presentation of 
    House Concurrent Resolution 448.

          reading and presentation of house concurrent resolution 448

        Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, leaders of the 
    House and the Senate, on behalf of Ben Gilman, Senator Schumer and 
    Senator Clinton, and the entire New York congressional delegation, 
    we would like to

[[Page 221]]

    thank you for your support of this resolution that gives us in New 
    York an opportunity to say thank you for the way you responded to 
    the attack on our city and our State.
        You give our mayor and our governor an opportunity to be here 
    on this historic event to say you did not treat us like New 
    Yorkers, you treated us like Americans.
        The text of the Concurrent Resolution was read as follows:
        Mr. RANGEL. ``Whereas on September the 11, 2001, thousands of 
    innocent people were killed and injured in a combined terrorist 
    attack involving four hijacked aircraft, the World Trade Center, 
    and the Pentagon;
        ``Whereas in the aftermath of the attacks, thousands more were 
    left grieving for beloved family and friends, livelihoods were 
    compromised, and businesses and property were damaged and lost;''
        Mr. [Benjamin A.] GILMAN [of New York]. ``Whereas the greatest 
    loss of life, personal injury, and physical destruction occurred in 
    and was sustained by the City of New York;
        ``Whereas Government and the American people responded 
    decisively through the bravery, sacrifice and toil of the fire and 
    rescue workers, law enforcement, building trades, caregivers, Armed 
    Forces, and millions more who through their many expressions of 
    care and compassion brought forth comfort, hope, and the promise of 
    recovery;''
        Senator [Hillary Rodham] CLINTON [of New York]. ``Whereas the 
    City of New York attended to the aftermath of the destruction of 
    the World Trade Center with profound respect for the victims and 
    compassion to the survivors; and
        ``Whereas the City of New York has invited the Congress to meet 
    at the site of the original Federal Hall, where the First Congress 
    of the United States convened on March 4, 1789: Now, therefore, be 
    it''
        Senator [Charles E.] SCHUMER [of New York]. ``Resolved by the 
    House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That, in 
    remembrance of the victims and the heroes of September 11, 2001, 
    and in recognition of the courage and spirit of the City of New 
    York, the Congress shall conduct a special meeting in Federal Hall, 
    New York, New York, on September 6, 2002.
        Passed by the House of Representatives, July 25, 2002.
        Passed by the Senate, July 26, 2002.''
        (Applause.)
        The SPEAKER. Without objection, the Members present, on behalf 
    of themselves and the Congress of the United States, do hereby 
    affirm the aforesaid Concurrent Resolution.
        Would Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki please come forward 
    and accept the Concurrent Resolution.
        Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki of New York accepted the 
    Concurrent Resolution.
        (Applause.)
        The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Vito Fossella, 
    Representative from New York, and the Honorable Susan Collins, 
    Senator from Maine, in a reading and presentation of the 
    commemorative plaque.

                reading and presentation of commemorative plague

        Senator COLLINS. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, on behalf of 
    the United

[[Page 222]]

    States Congress, we present this commemorative plaque to Director 
    Mainella for her stewardship of our Nation's treasures, especially 
    this building, Federal Hall.
        The plaque is inscribed as follows:
        ``Commemorative Joint Meeting of the Congress of the United 
    States of America in Federal Hall, New York, New York, this Sixth 
    Day of September, Two Thousand and Two.''
        Mr. FOSSELLA. ``Convened in remembrance of the victims and 
    heroes of September 11, 2001, and in recognition of the courage and 
    spirit of the City of New York.
        ``This gift to Federal Hall from the Congress of the United 
    States of America was made from a section of Aquia Creek, Virginia, 
    sandstone and used as an original building material of the United 
    States Capitol. It was removed on the East Central Front extension 
    in 1958.''
        The SPEAKER. Director Mainella, please come forward and accept 
    the commemorative plaque.
        Director Mainella accepted the commemorative plaque.
        (Applause.)
        The SPEAKER. Billy Collins, Poet Laureate of the United States 
    of America, will now read a poem written for this occasion entitled 
    ``The Names.''

          reading of ``the names'' by billy collins, poet laureate of 
                               the united states

        Mr. COLLINS. This poem is dedicated to the victims of September 
    11, and to their survivors. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair now recognizes the Honorable Richard 
    Gephardt, Representative from Missouri and Democratic Leader of the 
    United States House of Representatives.
        Mr. GEPHARDT. Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, and my fellow 
    colleagues of the United States Congress, today we speak of the 
    unspeakable, we remember the unimaginable, and we reaffirm our 
    utmost resolve to defend the birthright of this land and our gift 
    outright to this world: Ideals of liberty and tolerance that will 
    never die.  . . .
        Vice President CHENEY.(6) The Chair now recognizes 
    the Honorable Trent Lott, the Senator from Mississippi and the 
    Republican Leader of the United States Senate.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. Richard B. Cheney (WY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Senator LOTT. Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, Members of the 
    Congress, and distinguished guests, on behalf of the Senate and a 
    united Congress, it is truly an honor to stand in this place in 
    this city, New York City, today. . . .
        We are here to remember and to continue to mourn those that 
    lost their lives, those innocent men, women, and children that were 
    killed in that horrible event, September 11, a year ago.
        Vice President CHENEY. The Chair now recognizes the Honorable 
    Tom Daschle, the Senator from South Dakota and Majority Leader of 
    the United States Senate.
        Senator DASCHLE. Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, distinguished 
    visitors and my colleagues, the United States Congress has come 
    here to commemorate a shattering experience. One that has 
    transformed America. . . .
        Thank you.
        (Applause.)
        The SPEAKER. We are gathered here today in this ceremonial 
    session

[[Page 223]]

    to pay tribute to the people of New York and to the people of New 
    York City who have suffered great loss, but persevered in the face 
    of adversity. In doing so, we pay tribute to the American spirit.
        It is altogether appropriate that we meet here today in Federal 
    Hall. After all, it was here that the First Congress met to ratify 
    the Bill of Rights and to inaugurate our first President of the 
    United States, George Washington.
        As in 1789, when ordinary Americans did extraordinary things to 
    create a new Nation conceived in liberty and dedication to freedom, 
    on September 11, ordinary Americans exhibited extraordinary courage 
    in fighting a horrific evil. . . .
        We elected Members of the 107th Congress, like those Members 
    gathered in this location of the First Congress, simply reflect the 
    desires of a people who cherish liberty and are willing to fight 
    for freedom.
        Let us always remember those we lost on September 11, and may 
    God continue to bless America.
        Thank you.
        (Applause.)

         ``god bless america'' sung by chamber choir, stuyvesant high 
                             school, new york city.

        The SPEAKER. The Stuyvesant High School Chamber Choir will now 
    sing ``God Bless America.''
        The Chamber Choir, Stuyvesant High School, sang ``God Bless 
    America.''
        (Applause.)
        The Members and guests sang ``God Bless America.''
        The SPEAKER. Ladies and gentlemen of the House and the Senate, 
    this concludes the special ceremonial meeting of the Congress. 
    Members are asked to remain in their seats and make their exit with 
    the colors.
        The Chair will assure that the record of these proceedings will 
    be printed in the Congressional Record.
        The proceedings are closed.
        The Colors were retired by the Color Guard composed of members 
    of the New York City Fire Department, New York City Police 
    Department, New York State Unified Court System Officers, Port 
    Authority of New York and New Jersey Police, and the United States 
    Capitol Police.
        [Whereupon, the Commemorative Joint Meeting of the Congress was 
    adjourned.](6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. See Sec. 4.5, supra, for the first instance in which Congress 
        engaged in a ceremonial function outside the seat of 
        government.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

      


                     

[Page 223-228]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 17. Former Members' Day

    The House traditionally has received the United States Association 
of Former Members of Congress in the House Chamber to submit its annual 
report(1) to Congress.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. As a federally chartered corporation established under Title 36 of 
        the United States Code, the Association is required to submit 
        an annual report to Congress. See 36 USC Sec.  70312.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 224]]

    The program of events has been relatively consistent over the 
years. The House by unanimous consent authorizes the Speaker to declare 
a recess subject to the call of the Chair for the purpose of receiving 
the former Members. Prior to the start of legislative business on the 
appointed date, the Speaker announces that the House will stand in 
recess subject to the call of the Chair to receive the former Members. 
The Speaker generally opens the proceedings by welcoming the former 
Members and recognizing members of the House leadership for remarks. 
The Speaker then recognizes a member of the Association to preside over 
the meeting. The presiding officer directs the Clerk to call the roll 
of former Members of Congress and, following the roll call, announces 
the result. The presiding officer then generally recognizes the 
president of the Association to speak and yield time for appropriate 
remarks. When the program is concluded and the recess has expired, the 
Speaker calls the House to order and a Member moves that the 
proceedings had during the recess be printed in the Congressional 
Record.
    The Association presents its Distinguished Service Award to honor 
an outstanding congressional career during the proceedings. Recipients 
of the Distinguished Service Award have included, among others, former 
Speakers of the House Thomas (Tip) O'Neill, Jr.(2) and 
Thomas Foley,(3) former Minority Leader Robert 
Michel,(4) former Representative Bill 
Richardson,(5) former Senator Sam Nunn,(6) 
Chaplain of the House Emeritus James David Ford,(7) and 
former House Parliamentarian Lewis Deschler.(8)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. See 133 Cong. Rec. 11660-68, 100th Cong. 1st Sess., May 7, 1987.
 3. See 148 Cong. Rec. 7325-33, 107th Cong. 2d Sess., May 9, 2002.
 4. See 142 Cong. Rec. 11325-29, 104th Cong. 2d Sess., May 15, 1996.
 5. See 143 Cong. Rec. 9045-48, 105th Cong. 1st Sess., May 21, 1997.
 6. See 150 Cong. Rec. 7373-75, 7399-401, 108th Cong. 2d Sess. Apr. 22, 
        2004.
 7. See 146 Cong. Rec. 8111-19, 106th Cong. 2d Sess., May 17, 2000.
 8. See 122 Cong. Rec. 15082-85, 94th Cong. 1st Sess., May 21, 
        1976.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 17.1 The House, by unanimous consent, authorized the Speaker to 
    declare a recess for the purpose of receiving former Members in the 
    Chamber.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Parliamentarian's Note: This traditional unanimous-consent request 
        supplements the Speaker's ability to declare a ``short'' recess 
        under Rule I clause 12(a), House Rules and Manual Sec. 638 
        (2007).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 225]]

    On Apr. 25, 2006,(2) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 152 Cong. Rec. 5925, 109th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORIZING THE SPEAKER TO DECLARE A RECESS ON THURSDAY, APRIL 
           27, 2006, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING FORMER MEMBERS OF 
                                    CONGRESS

        Mr. [Rick] RENZI [of Arizona]. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that it may be in order on Thursday, April 27, for the 
    Speaker to declare a recess subject to the call of the Chair for 
    the purpose of receiving in this Chamber former Members of 
    Congress.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Arizona?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Thelma Drake (VA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On Apr. 27, 2006,(4) the proceedings to receive former 
Members during a recess of the House pursuant to the previous order by 
unanimous consent occurred as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. 152 Cong. Rec. 6268, 6269, 6286, 109th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(5) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of Tuesday, April 25, 2006, the House will stand in recess subject 
    to the call of the Chair to receive the former Members of Congress.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. J. Dennis Hastert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Accordingly (at 9 o'clock and 12 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

                    RECEPTION OF FORMER MEMBERS OF CONGRESS

        The Speaker of the House presided.
        The SPEAKER. On behalf of the House, I consider it a high honor 
    and distinct personal privilege to have the opportunity of 
    welcoming so many of our former Members and colleagues as may be 
    present here for the occasion. We all pause to welcome you. . . .
        The Chair now recognizes the Honorable Jim Slattery, vice 
    president of the association, to take the chair.
        Mr. [Jim] SLATTERY [of Kansas] (presiding). Thank you, Mr. 
    Speaker. It's great to see you. On behalf of the association, we 
    certainly wish you good health and continued wonderful service to 
    our country, also. It's great to see you, Mr. Speaker, and thank 
    you.
        The Clerk will now read the roll of the former Members of 
    Congress.
        The Clerk called the roll of the former Members of Congress[.] 
    . . .
        The Chair again wishes to thank all of those former Members 
    that are here today and give you all another opportunity to record 
    your presence if you did not do that at the beginning of the events 
    here today. The Chair also wishes to thank all the former Members 
    of the House for their presence.
        I am advised that the House will reconvene 15 minutes after the 
    bells ring.
        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 27 minutes a.m.), the House 
    continued in recess.

[[Page 226]]

                                   -------------------{time}  1055

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore (Mr. Thornberry)[.] . . .

    On the same day,(6) by unanimous-consent, the 
proceedings had during a recess of the House to receive former Members 
were inserted in the Congressional Record:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. 152 Cong. Rec. 6290, 109th Cong. 2d Sess., Apr. 27, 2006.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [David] DREIER [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Congressional Record and that all Members and former 
    Members who spoke during the recess have the privilege of revising 
    and extending their remarks.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(7) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from California?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. Jo Bonner (AL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Sec. 17.2 The Speaker was authorized, by unanimous consent, to declare 
    a recess, subject to the call of the Chair, to receive former 
    Members of the House in the Chamber.

    On Feb. 25, 1971,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 117 Cong. Rec. 3834, 92d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORITY FOR SPEAKER TO DECLARE A RECESS ON THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 
           TO RECEIVE FORMER MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

        Mr. [Hale] BOGGS [of Louisiana]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that it shall be in order for the Speaker to declare a 
    recess on Thursday of next week, March 4, subject to the call of 
    the Chair, for the purpose of receiving in this Chamber former 
    Members of the House of Representatives.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Louisiana?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On Mar. 4, 1971,(3) the following proceedings occurred 
during ceremonies to receive former Members of the House during the 
first observance of Former Members' Day:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 117 Cong. Rec. 5137-41, 92d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(4) Pursuant to the authority granted 
    the Speaker on Thursday, February 25, 1971, the Chair declares a 
    recess, subject to the call of the Chair, to receive the former 
    Members of the House of Representatives.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Accordingly (at 12 o'clock and 42 minutes p.m.), the House 
    stood in recess subject to the call of the Chair.

[[Page 227]]

                                     -------------------RECEPTION OF 
                 FORMER MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

        The SPEAKER of the House presided.
        The SPEAKER. On behalf of the Chair and of the Chamber, I 
    consider it a high honor and a distinct personal privilege to have 
    the opportunity of welcoming so many of our former Members and 
    colleagues as may be present here for this occasion. We all pause 
    to welcome them. This is a bipartisan affair, and in that spirit 
    the Chair is going to recognize the floor leaders of both parties.
        The Chair now recognizes the distinguished gentleman from 
    Louisiana (Mr. Boggs).
        Mr. [Hale] BOGGS [of Louisiana]. Mr. Speaker, this is a happy 
    duty for me. Today, we inaugurate a custom which I trust will 
    become an annual event of recessing the proceedings of the House in 
    order to extend a warm and a friendly welcome back to Members who 
    have served in this great body. . . .
        I hope all our former Members and all of our present Members 
    will equal that record.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair is now pleased to recognize the 
    distinguished minority leader of the House of Representatives, the 
    distinguished gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Gerald R. Ford).
        Mr. GERALD R. FORD. Mr. Speaker, I am indeed happy to welcome 
    so many friends and former colleagues back to the Chamber. We hope 
    and trust, as the gentleman from Louisiana, the distinguished 
    majority leader, has said, that this will be an annual affair, and 
    on each and every occasion you will be as welcome in the future as 
    you are here today. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair now directs the Clerk to call the roll 
    of former Members of the House of Representatives.
        The Clerk called the roll of former Members of the Congress[.] 
    . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Chair announces that 83 former Members of the 
    House of Representatives have answered to their names.
        The Chair desires to announce now that it will be his purpose 
    to recognize for 1 hour for the purpose of controlling time the 
    gentleman from Arkansas, Mr. Hays, on behalf of the majority and 
    the gentleman from Minnesota, Mr. Judd, on behalf of the minority.
        Before recognizing the gentleman from Arkansas, the Chair 
    desires to state that the Chair would like to recognize several 
    Members whose names have been called but, unfortunately, they are 
    not all present. However, I think it is significant that this is 
    the anniversary of the first meeting of the Congress of the United 
    States, March 4, 1789.
        In that first Congress, the first person ever to be elected 
    Speaker was the Honorable Frederick A. Muhlenberg, of Pennsylvania. 
    In 1947, when the present occupant of the chair came to the 
    Congress, Frederick A. Muhlenberg IV, a direct descendant of the 
    original Speaker, was present.
        The Chair would also, before recognizing the gentleman from 
    Arkansas, Mr. Hays, to call to the chair to represent from the 
    chair former Members, a very distinguished former Member, the 
    Honorable Colgate Darden, not

[[Page 228]]

    only a former Member of the House but a former Governor of the 
    great State of Virginia and a former president of the University of 
    Virginia.
        The Chair now recognizes for 1 hour the gentleman from 
    Arkansas, Mr. Hays. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The time of the gentleman has expired.
        The Chair wishes to reiterate his own gratitude at the response 
    our invitation has had from those of you who have come here and 
    participated and lent your presence to this occasion. It has been a 
    memorable one. We will expect to repeat it next 
    year.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker at 2 o'clock and 33 minutes 
    p.m.                          -------------------

          PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING RECESS AND PERMISSION TO 
                                     REVISE

        Mr. BOGGS. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
    proceedings had during the recess be printed in the Record and that 
    all speakers have the privilege of revising their remarks.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Louisiana?
        There was no objection.


                       

[Page 228-232]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 18. Birthday Felicitations

    The House has often extended formal greetings to a President or 
former President on his birthday through the adoption of a 
congratulatory resolution(1) considered by unanimous consent 
or under suspension of the rules.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 18.1, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The House has also extended birthday wishes to Speakers of the 
House,(2) Members,(3) and the 
Parliamentarian.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. See Sec. 18.2, infra.
 3. See Sec. 18.3, infra.
 4. See Sec. 18.4, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Presidential Birthdays

Sec. 18.1 Form of resolution extending the congratulations of the House 
    to the President on his birthday.

    On Jan. 30, 1934,(1) the House adopted a resolution 
congratulating the President on his birthday. The proceedings were as 
follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 78 Cong. Rec. 1636, 73d Cong. 2d Sess.
            See also, e.g., 151 Cong. Rec. 17162-64, 109th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., July 25, 2005 (H. Res. 329, honoring former President 
        William Jefferson Clinton on the occasion of his 59th 
        birthday); 150 Cong. Rec. 21196-99, 108th Cong. 2d Sess., Oct. 
        6, 2004 (H. Res. 798, honoring former President James Earl 
        Carter on the occasion of his 80th birthday); 150 Cong. Rec. 
        15104-106, 108th Cong. 2d Sess., July 12, 2004 (H. Res. 702, 
        honoring former President Gerald R. Ford on his 91st birthday); 
        and 149 Cong. Rec. 2720-23, 108th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 11, 
        2003 (H.J. Res. 19, recognizing the 92d birthday of former 
        President Ronald Wilson Reagan).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 229]]

        Mr. [Riley J.] WILSON [of Louisiana]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent for the present consideration of the resolution 
    which I send to the desk and ask to have read.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Joseph W. Byrns (TN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                              House Resolution 246

            Resolved, That the House of Representatives extends its 
        congratulations to the President of the United States, Franklin 
        D. Roosevelt, upon his fifty-second birthday, with assurance of 
        appreciation for his aggressive action and service to our 
        country, and joins the Nation in best wishes for continued 
        health, happiness, and accomplishments.

        [Applause.]
        The resolution was agreed to.

Speakers' Birthdays

Sec. 18.2 The Minority Leaders joined in extending best wishes to the 
    Speaker on the occasion of his birthday.

    On May 10, 1971,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 117 Cong. Rec. 14144, 92d Cong. 1st Sess.
            See also 133 Cong. Rec. 37089, 100th Cong. 1st Sess., Dec. 
        21, 1987 (tribute to Speaker James C. Wright, Jr. [TX] on his 
        65th birthday); and 101 Cong. Rec. 129-131, 84th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 6, 1955 (remarks of Members honoring Speaker Sam 
        Rayburn [TX] on his birthday).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MR. SPEAKER

        (Mr. GERALD R. FORD asked and was given permission to address 
    the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend his remarks.)
        Mr. GERALD R. FORD [of Michigan]. Mr. Speaker, I take this time 
    for the purpose of joining with the distinguished majority leader 
    in extending to the distinguished Speaker(2) our very 
    best wishes on his birthday anniversary.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Members' Birthdays

Sec. 18.3 Consideration by unanimous consent of a resolution honoring 
    the House's eldest statesman on his 88th birthday.

[[Page 230]]

    On Sept. 8, 1988,(1) the House paid tribute to Rep. 
Pepper,(2) as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 134 Cong. Rec. 22930, 22931, 100th Cong. 2d Sess.
            See also 109 Cong. Rec. 22018-21, 88th Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Nov. 18, 1963 (tribute to Rep. Carl Vinson [GA] on his 80th 
        birthday); 109 Cong. Rec. 15561, 88th Cong. 1st Sess., Aug. 22, 
        1963 (tribute to Rep. Charles A. Halleck [IN] on his birthday); 
        109 Cong. Rec. 9182-90, 88th Cong. 1st Sess., May 23, 1963 
        (tribute to Rep. Francis E. Walter [PA] on the occasion of his 
        69th birthday); and 93 Cong. Rec. 3120, 80th Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Apr. 3, 1947 (honoring Rep. Adolph J. Sabath [IL] on his 81st 
        birthday).
 2. Claude Pepper (FL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

           TRIBUTE TO THE HONORABLE CLAUDE DENSON PEPPER ON HIS 88TH 
                                    BIRTHDAY

        Mr. [Richard A.] GEPHARDT [of Missouri]. Mr. Speaker, I call up 
    the resolution (H. Res. 530) to recognize Claude Denson Pepper, on 
    the occasion of his 88th birthday, for the contributions that he 
    has made to the quality of life of all Ameicans [sic], and ask 
    unanimous consent for its immediate consideration.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) The Clerk will report 
    the resolution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Thomas S. Foley (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read as follows:

                                  H. Res. 530

            Whereas Claude Denson Pepper has served in public office 
        for a period spanning almost sixty years, including service in 
        the Florida Legislature, the United States Senate, and the 
        United States House of Representatives;
            Whereas Claude Denson Pepper has played an essential role 
        in the formulation and development of policies and programs to 
        protect the health, rights, economic security, and dignity of 
        our Nation's elderly;
            Whereas Claude Denson Pepper has been the principal author 
        of key legislation addressing issues ranging from the Lend-
        Lease plan, to the establishment of the National Institutes of 
        Health, to the elimination of the mandatory retirement age;
            Whereas Claude Denson Pepper celebrates his 88th birthday 
        on September 8, 1988; and
            Whereas the dedication, commitment, and energy of Claude 
        Denson Pepper stand as an inspiration to people of all ages; 
        Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved, That the House of Representatives of the United 
        States, on the occasion of his 88th birthday, commends and 
        acknowledges Claude Denson Pepper for his continuing 
        contributions to the quality of life of all Americans.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Foley). Is there objection to the 
    request of the gentleman from Missouri?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Missouri [Mr. 
    Gephardt] is recognized for 1 hour.
        Mr. GEPHARDT. Mr. Speaker, I want to offer this resolution 
    today on behalf of the gentleman from Washington [Mr. Foley], the 
    gentleman from California [Mr. Coelho], the gentlewoman from Ohio 
    [Ms. Oakar], and the gentleman from Illinois [Mr. Michel], and many 
    other Members of the House who wish today to extend their heartiest 
    congratulations to our senior Member of the House and one of

[[Page 231]]

    our most beloved Members of the House. . . .
        Mr. Speaker, I move the previous question on the resolution.
        The previous question was ordered.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the resolution.
        The resolution was agreed to.

Parliamentarian

Sec. 18.4 The Majority and Minority Leaders took the floor to 
    congratulate the Parliamentarian, Lewis Deschler, on his birthday 
    and his 40 years of service as Parliamentarian.

    On Mar. 4, 1968,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 114 Cong. Rec. 4919, 90th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         BIRTHDAY GREETINGS TO THE PARLIAMENTARIAN, MR. LEWIS DESCHLER

        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend 
    my remarks.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Oklahoma?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, March 4 is a historic day in this 
    Nation, because for many years it was the day when new Congresses 
    convened, and Presidents were inaugurated. March 3, yesterday, 
    Sunday, was also an important day to the Members of the House of 
    Representatives. Yesterday was the birthday of the great 
    Parliamentarian, Mr. Lew Deschler. It marked the 43d year of 
    dedicated service to this body by this great American whom the 
    Speaker has properly called on many occasions the No. 1 
    Parliamentarian of the world.
        For 40 years Lew Deschler has sat at the right hand of Speakers 
    of the House under both political parties. His advice on 
    parliamentary matters, procedural matters, and indeed on 
    substantive matters has been indispensable to every Speaker and 
    every Member of the House of Representatives. This House would not, 
    could not be the same without Lew Deschler.
        Mr. Speaker, I take this time, which is 1 day late because the 
    House was not in session yesterday, to which my good friend, our 
    great Parliamentarian, many happy returns of the day, and many more 
    of them.
        Mr. GERALD R. FORD [of Michigan]. Mr. Speaker, will the 
    gentleman yield?
        Mr. ALBERT. I am delighted to yield to the distinguished 
    minority leader.
        Mr. GERALD R. FORD. Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the majority 
    leader yielding at this time.
        We on this side all subscribe to all of the generous and richly 
    deserved comments and observations made by the distinguished 
    majority leader concerning our good friend, the Parliamentarian, 
    Mr. Lew Deschler. We wish Lew, as does the majority leader, many 
    happy years ahead. I am sure that he will continue helping to 
    assist us in our day-to-day labors here in the House of 
    Representatives.
        We all may have some regrets about annual birthday 
    anniversaries coming

[[Page 232]]

    and going, but despite that I am certain the future of the 
    Parliamentarian will be as bright as it has been in the past, and 
    we will continue to enjoy working with him in the future as we have 
    in the past.
        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, I thank my friend for his comments.


                         

[Page 232-256]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 19. Military Awards; Receptions for Generals and Astronauts

    The House has honored its heroes in a variety of ways. The House 
has conducted ceremonies for Congressional Medal of Honor 
recipients(1) and has honored its astronauts with receptions 
in the Caucus Room(2) and in the House 
Chamber.(3) Various generals have been received by the House 
and allowed to address the Chamber.(4) The House has 
conferred honorary veteran status to an actor who inspired 
troops(5) and has commemorated the 50th anniversary of the 
Department of Veterans' Affairs.(6) The House also has 
conducted several war-related observances,(7) including 
authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda for a ceremony honoring 
military heroism(8) and the lowering of the flag for missing 
POWs and MIAs.(9)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 19.1, infra.
 2. See Sec. 19.3, infra.
 3. See Sec. 19.2, infra.
 4. See Sec. Sec. 19.4-19.7, infra. See also 5 Hinds' Precedents 
        Sec. Sec. 7076-7088 for receptions of eminent soldiers.
 5. See Sec. 19.8, infra.
 6. See Sec. 19.9, infra.
 7. See Sec. Sec. 19.10-19.17, infra.
 8. See Sec. 19.12, infra.
 9. See Sec. 19.13, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medal of Honor

Sec. 19.1 Proceedings had at a joint meeting in the House Chamber when 
    the President decorated Sgt. Jake W. Lindsey, United States Army, 
    with the Congressional Medal of Honor.

    The Medal of Honor is presented by the President in the name of 
Congress and is the highest military honor that can be bestowed upon an 
individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States. The 
joint resolution authorizing the presentation of ``medals of honor'' 
for Army personnel was signed by President Lincoln on July 14, 
1862.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Senate joint resolution of July 12, 1862, 12 Stat. 623, 624. That 
        joint resolution reads, in part, that ``the President of the 
        United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to cause two 
        thousand ``medals of honor'' to be prepared with suitable 
        emblematic devices, and to direct that the same be presented, 
        in the name of the Congress, to such non-commissioned officers 
        and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their 
        gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities, during 
        the present insurrection.'' The correct title of the award is 
        the Medal of Honor. Because the U.S. President presents the 
        medal in the name of the United States Congress, it is 
        sometimes called the Congressional Medal of Honor. The latter 
        title is typically connected only with the Congressional Medal 
        of Honor Society, the organization that represents those who 
        have earned the medal.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 233]]

    On May 18, 1945,(2) Mr. Joseph W. Martin, Jr., of 
Massachusetts, addressed the House for one minute by unanimous consent 
to announce a forthcoming ceremony honoring a Congressional Medal of 
Honor recipient and to obtain unanimous consent for a recess for a 
joint meeting.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 91 Cong. Rec. 4755, 4756, 79th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             program for next week

        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to address the House for 1 minute.
        The SPEAKER.(3) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Massachusetts?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I take this time to 
    inquire of the majority leader what the program for next week will 
    be.
        Mr. [John W.] McCORMACK [of Massachusetts]. On Monday it is the 
    intention to hold a joint meeting of the Congress, which meeting 
    will probably be held in the House at 1 o'clock, in connection with 
    conferring the Congressional Medal on the one-hundredth member of 
    our armed forces to receive it. In the event of such a joint 
    meeting, the President of the United States will be present.
        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. It is generally the custom, when 
    we confer Congressional Medals, to have it done by the President in 
    an exercise like this?
        Mr. McCORMACK. No; I do not think that it is the custom.
        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. I do not know how these medals 
    have been awarded in the past. Has it ever been customary for the 
    President to be here and do it?
        Mr. McCORMACK. No. That is my understanding. This is based on 
    the fact that this is the one-hundredth member of our armed forces 
    who has received it.
        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. The one-hundredth in this 
    particular war?
        Mr. McCORMACK. Yes. It is felt that the occasion would justify 
    a joint meeting for that purpose. Of course, the honor that will be 
    conferred upon this man directly will inure indirectly to every man 
    who has received the Congressional Medal of Honor.
        Mr. MARTIN of Massachusetts. It will probably be difficult to 
    make the other 99 think so.
        Mr. McCORMACK. That is probably so, but I am sure they will 
    appreciate the situation.

    In the Senate on May 21, 1945,(4) the date set for the 
meeting, the Senate Majority Leader

[[Page 234]]

announced the informal invitation of the House for the Senate to attend 
the ceremony:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. 91 Cong. Rec. 4787, 79th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

              joint meeting of the two houses -- presentation of 
                 congressional medal of honor by the president

        Mr. [Alben W.] BARKLEY [of Kentucky]. Mr. President, at 1 
    o'clock the President of the United States will be in the Hall of 
    the House of Representatives, where he is to present the 
    Congressional Medal of Honor to the one hundredth American 
    infantryman to receive it. The Senate has been invited informally 
    by the House of Representatives to attend the ceremony. My 
    information is that it will be very brief.
        Following the proceedings in the House, the Senate will return 
    to its Chamber. . . .
        Following the ceremony in the House of Representatives Chamber, 
    I hope the Members of the Senate will not return to the Senate 
    until the President pro tempore has been able to leave the rostrum 
    in the Hall of the House and head the procession back to this 
    Chamber, and that Senators will march back in a body, rather than 
    straggle along, as has sometimes occurred in the past. It is more 
    in keeping with the dignity of the Senate, as I am sure all of us 
    realize, to have Senators return in a body in an orderly way.
        It is desired that we depart from this Chamber at a quarter to 
    one, in order to arrive at the Hall of the House of Representatives 
    at the proper time.

    In the House on that date,(5) unanimous consent was 
granted that it be in order for the Speaker to declare a recess subject 
to the call of the Chair. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Id. at pp. 4816, 4817.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     recess

        Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that it be 
    in order for the Speaker to declare a recess at any time during the 
    day, subject to the call of the Chair.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Massachusetts?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the House in recess until 2 
    o'clock this afternoon.
        Accordingly (at 12 o'clock and 8 minutes p. m.) the House stood 
    in recess until 2 o'clock.

                     joint session of the house and senate

        At 12 o'clock and 52 minutes p.m., the Doorkeeper announced the 
    President pro tempore and the Members of the United States Senate.
        The Senate, preceded by the President pro tempore and its 
    Secretary and Sergeant at Arms, entered the Hall of the House.
        The President pro tempore of the Senate(6) took the 
    chair at the right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate 
    took the seats reserved for them.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. Kenneth McKeller (TN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. On the part of the House, the Chair appoints the 
    following members of the committee to escort the President of the 
    United States into the Chamber: The gentleman from Massachusetts 
    [Mr.

[[Page 235]]

    McCormack]; the gentleman from Mississippi [Mr. Colmer], and the 
    gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. Martin].
        The PRESIDENT pro tempore of the Senate.(7) On the 
    part of the Senate, the Chair appoints as members of the committee 
    to escort the President of the United States into the Chamber: The 
    Senator from Kentucky [Mr. Barkley], the Senator from Maine [Mr. 
    White], and the Senator from Utah [Mr. Thomas].
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. Parliamentarian's Note: The formation at the Clerk's desk in front 
        of the Speaker, facing Members of the House: the Chief of 
        Staff, Sgt. Lindsey, the President, and a Presidential aide. 
        After the decoration, the Chief of Staff, Sgt. Lindsey, and the 
        President's aide left the rostrum and took seats provided for 
        them. The President then addressed the joint meeting.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        At 12 o'clock and 57 minutes p. m., the Doorkeeper announced 
    the Cabinet of the President of the United States.
        At 1 o'clock and 1 minute p. m., the Doorkeeper announced the 
    Chief of Staff, Gen. George C. Marshall, and Technical Sgt. Jake 
    William Lindsey, of Lucedale, Miss.
        General Marshall and Sergeant Lindsey were escorted to the 
    Clerk's desk.
        At 1 o'clock and 3 minutes p. m., the Doorkeeper announced the 
    President of the United States.
        The President of the United States, escorted by the committee 
    of Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair presents the Chief of Staff, the General 
    of the Armies, George C. Marshall.
        General Marshall. I will read the citation:

            Technical Sgt. Jake W. Lindsey, Sixteenth Infantry, led a 
        platoon reduced to 6 of its original strength of 40 in the 
        attack on an enemy position near Hamich, Germany, on the 16th 
        of November, 1944. . . .
            In his fearlessness, inspiring courage, and superb 
        leadership, Sergeant Lindsey carried on a brilliant defense of 
        his platoon's hardwon ground, securing the position and 
        inflicting heavy casualties on the numerically superior enemy.

        [Applause, the Members standing during reading of citation.]
        Thereupon the President of the United States bestowed the 
    Congressional Medal of Honor on Technical Sgt. Jake William 
    Lindsey.
        The PRESIDENT of the United States. Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, 
    Members of the Congress, we are assembled here today to confer the 
    Nation's highest decoration on a young American soldier. It so 
    happens that Technical Sgt. Jake W. Lindsey, of Lucedale, Miss., is 
    the one hundredth infantryman to receive the Medal of Honor in this 
    war for bravery above and beyond the call of duty. Through him we 
    pay a grateful Nation's tribute to the courage of all our fighting 
    men. . . .
        It is with gratitude and pride that as President of the United 
    States, and in the name of Congress, I have presented the Medal of 
    Honor to Technical Sgt. Jake W. Lindsey. [Applause.]
        At 1 o'clock and 13 minutes p. m., the President retired from 
    the Hall of the House of Representatives.

[[Page 236]]

        At 1 o'clock and 14 minutes p. m., the members of the 
    President's Cabinet retired from the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.
        At 1 o'clock and 14 \1/2\ minutes p. m., the Chief of Staff, 
    Gen. George C. Marshall, and Technical Sgt. Jake William Lindsey 
    retired from the Hall of the House of Representatives.
        At 1 o'clock and 15 minutes p. m., the Speaker announced that 
    the joint session was dissolved.
        Thereupon, the President pro tempore of the Senate and the 
    Members of the Senate returned to their Chamber.

                                  after recess

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker at 2 o'clock p. m.
        The SPEAKER. Without objection, the proceedings had during the 
    recess will be printed in the Record, and the President's message 
    will be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs and ordered 
    printed.
        There was no objection.

Receptions for Astronauts

Sec. 19.2 The House stood in recess to receive the Gemini IV astronauts 
    in the House Chamber.

     On June 16, 1965,(1) the following occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 111 Cong. Rec. 13774, 89th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that it may be in order at any time on Thursday for the 
    Speaker to declare a recess for the purpose of receiving the Gemini 
    4 astronauts, Maj. James A. DeWitt, U.S. Air Force, and Maj. Edward 
    H. White, U.S. Air Force.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there any objection to the 
    request of the gentleman from Oklahoma?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On June 17, 1965,(3) Mr. Gerald R. Ford, of Michigan, 
asked for clarification as to procedure related to the reception for 
the Gemini IV astronauts:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 111 Cong. Rec. 13957, 89th Cong. 1st Sess. See also 111 Cong. Rec. 
        23648, 23649, 89th Cong. 1st Sess., Sept. 14, 1965, when the 
        House stood in recess to receive the Gemini 5 astronauts; and 
        117 Cong. Rec. 4580, 4581, 92d Cong. 1st Sess., Mar. 2, 1971, 
        for a reception for the Apollo 14 astronauts.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. GERALD R. FORD. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman from 
    Oklahoma tell the House what the plans are for today, as far as 
    taking a recess and reconvening are concerned?
        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Yes; we hope to dispose of the 
    conference report on the excise bill and another bill which the 
    gentleman from Arkansas advised yesterday would be called up today 
    under a unanimous consent request. The House will recess shortly 
    thereafter. We expect the astronauts here on the floor about 2:30 
    this afternoon. . . .                          -------------------

                    RECEPTION OF THE ``GEMINI 4'' ASTRONAUTS

        At 2:57 o'clock p.m., the Doorkeeper of the House of 
    Representatives, the

[[Page 237]]

    Honorable William M. Miller, escorted into the House Chamber the 
    families of the Gemini 4 astronauts.
        At 2:58 o'clock p.m., the Speaker of the House of 
    Representatives called the membership to order.
        The Gemini 4 astronauts, Maj. James A. McDivitt and Maj. Edward 
    H. White, entered the Hall of the House of Representatives at 3 
    o'clock p.m., preceded by Sergeant at Arms Zeake W. Johnson, Jr., 
    and escorted to the Speaker's rostrum by the Honorable William M. 
    Miller, Doorkeeper, Vice President Humprey, the Honorable Carl 
    Albert, the Honorable Gerald R. Ford, the Honorable Hale Boggs, the 
    Honorable Leslie C. Arends, the Honorable George P. Miller, and the 
    Honorable James G. Fulton.
        [Applause, Members rising.]
        Astronaut White was seated to the left of the Speaker and 
    Astronaut McDivitt to the right of the Speaker.
        [Applause, Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the House, we have had many 
    distinguished visitors to this historic Chamber but there are no 
    two gentleman who are more distinguished or more welcome here than 
    the two gentlemen whom we have with us today.
        It is a personal pleasure and a great honor for me to present 
    to you two brave Americans who have in a most notable manner added 
    glory and prestige to explorations in space, and to our country's 
    history, the Gemini 4 astronauts, Maj. -- lieutenant colonel 
    nominee -- James A. McDivitt, and Maj. -- lieutenant colonel 
    nominee -- Edward H. White.
        [Applause, Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. It is again my personal pleasure and great honor 
    to present for remarks these two distinguished gentlemen. The first 
    one whom I shall present to my colleagues in the House, taking them 
    in order of their names in relation to the alphabet, is Maj. -- 
    lieutenant colonel nominee -- James A. McDivitt.
        [Applause, Members rising.]
        Major McDIVITT. Mr. Speaker, and Members of Congress, I am 
    absolutely overwhelmed at being here today. . . .
        The SPEAKER. It is also my personal pleasure and great honor to 
    present to you the other distinguished guest of the House -- and we 
    welcome you both with hospitality, warmth, and friendship -- the 
    distinguished American, Maj. -- lieutenant colonel nominee -- 
    Edward H. White.
        [Applause, Members and guests rising.]
        Maj. EDWARD H. WHITE. Mr. Speaker, leaders of the United States 
    of America, friends, I knew that when I got up here I would have 
    the feeling that I could not even see over this rostrum, I feel so 
    humble and so small today. . . .
        [Applause, Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. The Sergeant at Arms will escort the distinguished 
    visitors to the well of the House so that the Members of the House 
    may have an opportunity of meeting and shaking hands with them.
        The Doorkeeper and the Sergeant at Arms escorted the two 
    astronauts to the well of the House, and their wives joined them.
        The Members of the House greeted the astronauts and their 
    wives.
        The SPEAKER. The committee of escort will conduct the 
    distinguished visitors from the Chamber.

[[Page 238]]

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker at 3 o'clock and 40 minutes p.m.
        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
    proceedings had during the recess of the House may be printed in 
    the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
        There was no objection.

Sec. 19.3 A reception in the Caucus Room for astronauts Grissom and 
    Young was announced to the House by the Chairman of the Committee 
    on Science and Astronautics.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Parliamentarian's Note: Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom and John W. 
        Young were the first U.S. space team to orbit the earth in a 
        two-man capsule. The flight took place on Tuesday, Mar. 22, 
        1965. The astronauts were honored by the President at a White 
        House ceremony on Mar. 26, 1965. They attended a lunch on the 
        Senate side of the Capitol and then returned for the reception 
        on the House side at 5 o'clock p.m.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Mar. 25, 1965,(2) George P. Miller, of California, 
Chairman of the Committee on Science and Astronautics, announced a 
forthcoming reception:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 111 Cong. Rec. 5957, 5958, 89th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. MILLER. Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Speaker, I wish to 
    extend to all Members an invitation to attend a reception in the 
    caucus room of the Cannon Office Building tomorrow afternoon at 5 
    o'clock, for the two astronauts who have just so successfully flown 
    through outer space.
        The two astronauts, Virgil Grissom and John Young, will be 
    there.
        Unfortunately, we must limit the invitation to Members of the 
    Congress and their immediate families. Consequently, we cannot 
    allow the members of the congressional staffs to attend because 
    there are so many people who want to see the astronauts that I am 
    afraid Members of Congress wouldn't have that opportunity.
        I urge you to be present. I know there will be business on the 
    floor but we are going to try to arrange it so that we can get off 
    the floor in time to see these men who have made such a great 
    contribution to space science and to the honor and dignity of our 
    country.

    On Mar. 26, 1965,(3) Speaker John W. McCormack, of 
Massachusetts, during debate in the Committee of the Whole, informed 
the House of plans to recess briefly so that Members might meet the 
astronauts in the Caucus Room of the Cannon House Office 
Building.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Id. at pp. 6109, 6112.
 4. Rule IV clause 1, House Rules and Manual, Sec. 677 (2007), states: 
        ``The Hall of the House shall be used only for the legislative 
        business of the House and for the caucus and conference 
        meetings of its Members, except when the House agrees to take 
        part in any ceremonies to be observed therein. The Speaker may 
        not entertain a motion for the suspension of this clause.''
            As to the use of House facilities generally, see Ch. 4, 
        supra.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 239]]

        Mr. GERALD R. FORD [of Michigan]. Mr. Chairman, a parliamentary 
    inquiry.
        The CHAIRMAN.(5) The gentleman will state his 
    parliamentary inquiry.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Richard Bolling (MO).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. GERALD R. FORD. I note that the Speaker is in the well of 
    the House. Would he give us the benefit of his information 
    concerning plans for the Members of the House to visit with the 
    astronauts?
        Mr. McCORMACK. I am very glad the gentleman propounded his 
    question in the parliamentary inquiry.
        It is my hope that the Committee of the Whole will rise within 
    the next 15 or 20 minutes. Then, in the House, a unanimous-consent 
    request will be made to authorize the Speaker to declare a recess 
    in order that the Members and their dear ones can attend the 
    reception for the two astronauts. After that we will come back, and 
    the House will go back into the Committee of the Whole for the 
    further consideration of this bill. . . .
        Mr. [Adam C.] POWELL [of New York]. Mr. Chairman, I move that 
    the Committee do now rise.
        The motion was agreed to. . . 
    .                          -------------------

                      SPEAKER EMPOWERED TO DECLARE RECESS

        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the Speaker may declare a recess subject to the call 
    of the Chair.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma?
        There was no 
    objection.                          -------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER. The House will stand in recess subject to the call 
    of the Chair. The bells will be rung 15 minutes before reconvening.
        Accordingly (at 4 o'clock and 45 minutes p.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker at 6 o'clock and 9 minutes p.m.

Receptions for Generals

Sec. 19.4 Proceedings had during recess of the House for a House 
    ceremony to welcome General H. Norman Schwarzkopf.

    On May 7, 1991,(1) the following occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 137 Cong. Rec. 9955, 102d Cong. 1st. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mrs. (Patricia) SCHROEDER [of Colorado]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that it may be in order on Wednesday May 8, for 
    the Speaker to declare a recess, subject to the call of the Chair, 
    for the purpose of welcoming Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf,

[[Page 240]]

    commander in chief, U.S. General Command.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Mazzoli).(2) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentlewoman from Colorado?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Romano Mazzoli (KY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On May 8, 1991,(3) the Speaker(4) presided 
over a reception in the House Chamber. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 137 Cong. Rec. 10243, 10244, 102d Cong. 1st Sess.
 4. Thomas S. Foley (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

            RECEPTION OF GEN. H. NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF BY THE HOUSE OF 
                                REPRESENTATIVES

        The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints the following Members to 
    welcome Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf into the Chamber:
        The gentleman from Missouri, Mr. Gephardt; the gentleman from 
    Pennsylvania, Mr. Gray; the gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Bonior, 
    the gentleman from Maryland, Mr. Hoyer; the gentleman from 
    Illinois, Mr. Michel; the gentleman from Georgia, Mr. Gingrich; the 
    gentleman from California, Mr. Lewis; the gentleman from Oklahoma, 
    Mr. Edwards; the gentleman from Mississippi, Mr. Whitten; the 
    gentleman from Pennsylvania, Mr. McDade; the gentleman from 
    Florida, Mr. Fascell; the gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Broomfield; 
    the gentleman from Indiana, Mr. Hamilton; the gentleman from New 
    York, Mr. Solarz; the gentleman from Mississippi, Mr. Montgomery; 
    the gentleman from Arizona, Mr. Stump; the gentleman from 
    Wisconsin, Mr. Aspin; the gentleman from Alabama, Mr. Dickinson; 
    the gentleman from Pennsylvania, Mr. Murtha; the gentleman from 
    Florida, Mr. Young; the gentleman from Florida, Mr. Gibbons; and 
    the gentleman from California, Mr. Fazio.
        ``My Country'' was presented by the U.S. Army band, led by Co. 
    L. Bryan Shelburne, Jr.
        The Doorkeeper, the Honorable James T. Molloy, announced Gen. 
    H. Norman Schwarzkopf, who entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives accompanied by the escort committee, and was seated 
    at the desk in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair wants to welcome everyone in the Chamber 
    on this special occasion.
        We are honored to have with us today representatives from the 
    armed services who distinguished themselves in service in the 
    Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm.
        Would they please rise so they may be recognized.
        (Applause, the Members rising.)
        The SPEAKER. We are also very honored to have with us in the 
    President's gallery, the wife of General Schwarzkopf, Brenda 
    Schwarzkopf.
        (Applause, the Members rising.)
        The SPEAKER. We are pleased to welcome Senator Mitchell, 
    majority leader of the U.S. Senate, and Members of the U.S. Senate.
        We are also pleased to welcome to the Chamber His Excellency 
    Shaikh Saud Nasir Al-Sabah, Ambassador of the State of Kuwait.
        (Applause.)
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, it is my great privilege 
    and I

[[Page 241]]

    deem it a high honor and personal pleasure to present to you a man 
    who has made every American proud of our great country, Gen. H. 
    Norman Schwarzkopf, commander in chief of the U.S. Central Command 
    and one of the great heroes of Operation Desert Storm.
        (Applause, the Members rising.)
        General SCHWARZKOPF. Mr. Speaker, Members of Congress and 
    distinguished guests, it is a great day to be a soldier, and it is 
    a great day to be an American.
        I want to thank you for the singular distinction of being 
    allowed to speak to the special session of the Congress of the 
    United States of America. . . .
        (Applause, the Members rising.)
        The U.S. Army Band presented a medley of marches.
        Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, accompanied by the escort 
    committee, retired from the Chamber.
        The honored guests retired from the Chamber.
        At 11 o'clock and 58 minutes a.m., the reception honoring Gen. 
    H. Norman Schwarzkopf was concluded.
        The SPEAKER. The House will remain in recess until 12:15 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1215

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore [Mr. Hoyer] at 12 o'clock and 15 minutes p.m.

Sec. 19.5 Proceedings of a joint meeting to hear an address by General 
    William Westmoreland, Commander, U.S. Military Assistance Command, 
    Vietnam.

    On Apr. 28, 1967,(1) the Governors of the States were 
invited to attend the joint meeting to hear a report by the General. 
The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 113 Cong. Rec. 11153-55, 90th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR AN ADDRESS BY 
            GEN. WILLIAM C. WESTMORELAND, COMMANDER, U.S. MILITARY 
                          ASSISTANCE COMMAND, VIETNAM

        The SPEAKER of the House presided.
        The Doorkeeper, Hon. William M. Miller, announced the Vice 
    President and Members of the U.S. Senate, who entered the Hall of 
    the House of Representatives, the Vice President taking the chair 
    at the right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate the 
    seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER.(2) The Chair appoints as members of the 
    committee on the part of the House to escort our distinguished 
    visitor into the Chamber the gentleman from Oklahoma, Mr. Albert; 
    the gentleman from Louisiana, Mr. Boggs; the gentleman from New 
    York, Mr. Celler; the gentleman from South Carolina, Mr. Rivers; 
    the gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Gerald R. Ford; the gentleman from 
    Illinois, Mr. Arends; and the gentleman from South Carolina, Mr. 
    Watson.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The VICE PRESIDENT.(3) The Chair appoints as members 
    of the committee

[[Page 242]]

    of escort on the part of the Senate the Senator from Louisiana, Mr. 
    Long; the Senator from West Virginia, Mr. Byrd; the Senator from 
    Georgia, Mr. Russell; the Senator from South Carolina, Mr. 
    Hollings; the Senator from California Mr. Kuchel; the Senator from 
    Iowa, Mr. Hickenlooper; the Senator from North Dakota, Mr. Young; 
    the Senator from Maine, Mrs. Smith; and the Senator from South 
    Carolina, Mr. Thurmond.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Hubert H. Humphrey (MN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Doorkeeper announced the Governors of the several States of 
    the Union.
        The Governors of the several States of the Union entered the 
    Hall of the House of Representatives and took the seats reserved 
    for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Ambassadors, Ministers, and 
    Charges d'Affaires of foreign governments.
        The Ambassadors, Ministers and Charges d'Affaires of foreign 
    governments entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and 
    took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        At 12 o'clock and 31 minutes p.m., the Doorkeeper announced 
    Gen. William C. Westmoreland, Commander, the U.S. Military 
    Assistance Command, Vietnam.
        Gen. William C. Westmoreland, escorted by the committee of 
    Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives, and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, I have the great pleasure 
    and high privilege of presenting to you Gen. William C. 
    Westmoreland, U.S. Army, Commander, the U.S. Military Assistance 
    Command, Vietnam.

        address by gen. william c. westmoreland, u.s. army, commander, 
                   u.s. military assistance command, vietnam

        General WESTMORELAND. Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, Members of 
    Congress:
        I am deeply honored to address the Congress of the United 
    States. I stand in the shadow of military men who have been here 
    before me, but none of them could have more pride than is mine in 
    representing the gallant American fighting men in Vietnam today. . 
    . .
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        At 12 o'clock and 59 minutes p.m., General Westmoreland, 
    accompanied by the escort committee, retired from the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The purposes of the joint meeting having been 
    completed, the Chair declares the joint meeting of the two Houses 
    now dissolved.
        Accordingly, at 1 o'clock and 4 minutes p.m., the joint meeting 
    of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker at 1 o'clock and 5 minutes p.m.

[[Page 243]]

                                   -------------------PROCEEDINGS HAD 
                          DURING RECESS TO BE PRINTED

        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the proceedings had during the recess be printed in 
    the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.

Sec. 19.6 The House held a Joint Meeting in the House Chamber to hear 
    an address by General Matthew B. Ridgway.

    On May 22, 1952,(1) the Speaker(2) presided 
over a joint meeting in the House Chamber to receive General Ridgway, 
who had just been relieved of command of the troops in Japan and Korea 
and was on his way to relieve General Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of 
the Allied Powers in Europe:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 98 Cong. Rec. 5812-15, 82d Cong. 2d. Sess.
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR AN ADDRESS BY 
                            GEN. MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY

        The SPEAKER of the House of Representatives presided.
        At 12 o'clock and 20 minutes p. m. the Members were called to 
    order by the Speaker.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Vice President and the Members of 
    the United States Senate.
        The Senate, preceded by the Vice President and its Secretary 
    and Sergeant at Arms, entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.
        The VICE PRESIDENT took the chair at the right of the Speaker 
    and the Members of the Senate took the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER. On the part of the House the Chair appoints as 
    members of the committee to escort our distinguished visitor into 
    the Chamber, the gentleman from Massachusetts, Mr. McCormack; the 
    gentleman from Massachusetts, Mr. Martin; the gentleman from 
    Louisiana, Mr. Brooks; and the gentleman from Missouri, Mr. Short.
        The VICE PRESIDENT.(3) On the part of the Senate the 
    Chair appoints as members of the committee of escort the Senator 
    from Arizona, Mr. McFarland; the Senator from Texas, Mr. Connally, 
    the Senator from Texas, Mr. Johnson; the Senator from New 
    Hampshire, Mr. Bridges; and the Senator from New Jersey, Mr. Smith.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Alben W. Barkley (KY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Doorkeeper announced the Ambassadors, Ministers and Charges 
    d'Affaires of foreign governments who entered the Hall of the House 
    of Representatives and took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the members of the President's 
    Cabinet, who entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and 
    took the seats reserved for them.
        At 12 o'clock and 30 minutes p. m. the Doorkeeper announced 
    General Matthew B. Ridgway.
        General Ridgway, escorted the committee of Senators and 
    Representatives, entered the Hall of the House of

[[Page 244]]

    Representatives and stood at the Clerk's desk. [Applause, the 
    Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of Congress, I have the great pleasure and 
    the high privilege of presenting to you Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway. 
    [Applause, the Members 
    rising.]                          -------------------

                       ADDRESS OF GEN. MATTHEW B. RIDGWAY

        General RIDGWAY. Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, distinguished 
    Members of the Congress, to be here, before the Members of the 
    Congress of my country, is the greatest honor. To the Senate and 
    the House of Representatives from whence came the invitation, and 
    to the President who gave his sanction, I express my profound and 
    respectful thanks. . . .
        At 12 o'clock and 55 minutes p. m., General Ridgway, 
    accompanied by the escort committee, retired from the Chamber.
        The Doorkeeper escorted the invited guests from the Chamber in 
    the following order:
        The Ambassadors, Ministers, and Charges d'Affaires of foreign 
    governments.
        The members of the President's 
    Cabinet.                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint meeting of the two 
    Houses now dissolved.
        Thereupon (at 12 o'clock and 58 minutes p. m.) the joint 
    meeting of the two Houses of Congress was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order at 
    1:30 o'clock p. m.                          -------------------

                   PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS DURING THE RECESS

        Mr. [Jere] COOPER [of Tennessee]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the proceedings had during the recess today be 
    included in the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Tennessee?
        There was no objection.

Sec. 19.7 The House held a Joint Meeting in the House Chamber to 
    receive General of the Army Douglas MacArthur.

    On Apr. 19, 1951,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 97 Cong. Rec. 4123-25, 82d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         joint meeting in house chamber to receive general of the army 
                               douglas macarthur

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives presided.
        At 12:20 p.m., the Doorkeeper announced the Vice President and 
    the Members of the United States Senate.
        The Senate, preceded by the Vice President and its Secretary 
    and Sergeant at Arms, entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.

[[Page 245]]

        The Vice President took the chair at the right of the Speaker 
    and the Members of the Senate took the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER.(2) The Chair appoints as members of the 
    committee on the part of the House to escort our distinguished 
    visitor into the Chamber the gentleman from Massachusetts, Mr. 
    McCormack; the gentleman from Massachusetts, Mr. Martin; the 
    gentleman from Georgia, Mr. Vinson; the gentleman from Indiana, Mr. 
    Halleck; and the gentleman from Louisiana, Mr. Brooks.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The VICE PRESIDENT.(3) On the part of the Senate the 
    Chair appoints as members of the committee of escort the junior 
    Senator from Arizona, Mr. McFarland; the senior Senator from Texas, 
    Mr. Connally; the junior Senator from Georgia, Mr. Russell; the 
    junior Senator from Nebraska, Mr. Wherry; the senior Senator from 
    New Hampshire, Mr. Bridges; and the senior Senator from Wisconsin, 
    Mr. Wiley.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Alben W. Barkley (KY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Doorkeeper announced General of the Army Douglas MacArthur.
        General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, escorted by the 
    committee of Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives and stood at the Clerk's desk. [Applause, 
    the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, it is my great pleasure 
    and a distinct privilege to present to you General of the Army 
    Douglas MacArthur. [Applause, the Members rising.]

                address of general of the army douglas macarthur

        General MacARTHUR. Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, distinguished 
    Members of the Congress, I stand on this rostrum with a sense of 
    deep humility and great pride; humility in the wake of those great 
    American architects of our history who have stood here before me; 
    pride in the reflection that this forum of legislative debate 
    represents human liberty in the purest form yet devised. 
    [Applause.] Here are centered the hopes, and aspirations, and faith 
    of the entire human race. . . .
        I am closing my 52 years of military service [Applause.] . . .

                            joint meeting dissolved

        The SPEAKER. The joint meeting of the two Houses is now 
    dissolved.
        Thereupon (at 1 o'clock and 15 minutes p. m.) the joint meeting 
    of the two Houses was dissolved.

                                  after recess

        The recess having expired (at 1 o'clock and 15 minutes p. m.), 
    the House was called to order by the Speaker.
        Mr. [John W.] McCORMACK [of Massachusetts]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Massachusetts?
        There was no objection.

Conferral of Honorary Veteran Status

Sec. 19.8 The House by unanimous consent discharged the

[[Page 246]]

    Committee on House Oversight from further consideration of, and 
    adopted, a Senate concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the 
    Capitol Rotunda for a congressional ceremony to honor Leslie Townes 
    (Bob) Hope by conferring upon him the status of honorary veteran of 
    the Armed Forces of the United States.

    On Oct. 23, 1997,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 143 Cong. Rec. 22806, 22807, 105th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the Committee on House Oversight be discharged from 
    further consideration of the Senate concurrent resolution (S. Con. 
    Res. 56) authorizing the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a 
    ceremony honoring Leslie Townes (Bob) Hope by conferring upon him 
    the status of an honorary veteran of the Armed Forces of the United 
    States, and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution. . 
    . . 
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mrs. Morella).(2) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Constance A. Morella (MD).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 56

        Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
    concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to be 
    used on October 29, 1997, for a ceremony to honor Leslie Townes 
    (Bob) Hope for conferring upon him the status of an honorary 
    veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States. Physical 
    preparations for the conduct of the ceremony shall be carried out 
    in accordance with such conditions as may be prescribed by the 
    Architect of the Capitol.
        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Commemoration of 75th Anniversary of the Department of Veterans' 
    Affairs

Sec. 19.9 The House suspended the rules and adopted a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony to 
    commemorate the 75th anniversary of (what is now) the Department of 
    Veterans Affairs.

    On July 10, 2006,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 152 Cong. Rec. 13793-95, 109th Cong. 2d. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Vernon J.] EHLERS [of Michigan]. Madam Speaker, I move to 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. 
    Res. 427) permitting the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a 
    ceremony to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the establishment 
    of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

[[Page 247]]

        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 427

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), that the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on July 19, 2006, for a ceremony to commemorate the 
        75th anniversary of the establishment of the Department of 
        Veterans Affairs. Physical preparations for the ceremony shall 
        be carried out in accordance with such conditions as the 
        Architect of the Capitol may prescribe.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Ehlers) and the gentleman from New 
    Jersey (Mr. Pallone) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Judith Biggert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan.
        Mr. EHLERS. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        For three-quarters of a century, the Department of Veterans 
    Affairs has supported the distinguished men and women of our Armed 
    Forces through the many services they offer. Since its inception in 
    1930, the VA has worked tirelessly to enhance patient care and 
    veterans benefits, providing excellence in service to those who 
    serve our Nation proudly. . . .
        Mr. EHLERS. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered 
    by the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Ehlers) that the House suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res. 427.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution was 
    agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

War-Related Observances

Sec. 19.10 Proceedings had during a recess of the House for a joint 
    meeting to close the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of World 
    War II.

    On Sept. 29, 1995,(1) the following proceedings 
occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 141 Cong. Rec. 26982, 104th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          AUTHORIZING THE SPEAKER TO DECLARE RECESSES AT ANY TIME ON 
                          WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1995

        Mr. [Christopher] SHAYS [of Connecticut]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that it may be in order for the Speaker to 
    declare recesses at any time on Wednesday, October 11, 1995, for 
    the purpose of a joint meeting to commemorate the 50th anniversary 
    of World War II.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Connecticut?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Terry Everett (AL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

    On Oct. 11, 1995,(3) the House stood in recess subject 
to the call of the Chair:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 141 Cong. Rec. 27579-84, 104th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(4) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of Friday, September 29, 1995, the House will stand

[[Page 248]]

    in recess subject to the call of the Chair.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Newt Gingrich (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Accordingly (at 8 o'clock and 3 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

                                {time}  0900

        JOINT MEETING OF THE 104TH CONGRESS TO CLOSE THE COMMEMORATION 
                    OF THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF WORLD WAR II

        During the recess the following proceedings took place in honor 
    of the 50th anniversary of World War II, the Speaker of the House 
    presiding.
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms, Kevin Brennan, announced 
    the Vice President of the United States and the Members of the U.S. 
    Senate, who entered the Hall of the House of Representatives, 
    taking the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER. The joint meeting to close the commemoration of 
    the 50th anniversary of World War II will come to order.
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms announced the Joint Armed 
    Forces Color Guard.
        The historical colors were carried into the Chamber; the flag 
    was carried into the Chamber by the color bearer and a guard from 
    each of the branches of the Armed Forces.
        The national anthem was presented by the U.S. Army Chorus.
        The color guard saluted the Speaker, faced about, and saluted 
    the House.
        The flag was posted, and the Members and guests were seated.
        The Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives, Rev. James 
    David Ford, D.D., delivered the . . . invocation[.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. It is most appropriate we hold this joint meeting 
    of Congress to thank and honor the World War II generation who 50 
    years ago fought the most destructive war in history and saved the 
    world for freedom. This morning we remember all who served our 
    Nation, but our focus is on the World War II veteran, their 
    families and those who served on the home front. . . .
        Mr. Vice President.
        Vice President GORE.(5) Mr. Speaker, Mr. Leader, 
    Members of Congress, members of the President's Cabinet, General 
    Shalikashvili and members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and all 
    members of the Armed Services who are gathered here and, most of 
    all, to our World War II veterans and to their families, on behalf 
    of the U.S. Senate, I, too, welcome you. . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Albert A. Gore, Jr. (TN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. Representative Henry J. Hyde enlisted in the U.S. 
    Navy on Veterans Day, November 11, 1942, and was commissioned an 
    ensign in the U.S. Navy Reserve in October 1944. He served in the 
    South Pacific, New Guinea, and the Philippines. He continued his 
    military career in the Naval Reserves until 1968, retiring with the 
    rank of commander. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The U.S. Army Chorus and the U.S. Coast Guard Band 
    will now present ``Songs of the GI.''
        The U.S. Army Chorus and the U.S. Coast Guard Band presented 
    ``Songs of the GI.'' [Applause.]
        The SPEAKER. Representative G.V. ``Sonny'' Montgomery is one of 
    the

[[Page 249]]

    veterans' best friends. He entered World War II as an enlisted 
    person, was awarded the Bronze Star for valor, earned three Battle 
    Stars and attained the rank of captain by the end of the war. He 
    was recently awarded the Department of Defense Medal for 
    Distinguished Public Service by Secretary Perry because of the 
    success of the Montgomery GI bill in recruiting, retention and 
    readjustment to civilian life.
        The Chair recognizes and wishes also to take a moment to 
    express his personal feelings that we will all miss you upon your 
    retirement next year and hopes that all will recognize the 
    Honorable Sonny Montgomery, representative from the state of 
    Mississippi and ranking minority member of the Committee on 
    Veterans' Affairs. . . .
        The SPEAKER. It is an honor for me to introduce our next 
    speaker. He is a distinguished World War II veteran who was awarded 
    the Medal of Honor for his uncommon valor, leadership and 
    inspiration during the bloody battle of Guam in July 1944.
        During that battle, Marine Capt. Louis H. Wilson commanded his 
    company through some of the Pacific war's most vicious combat. 
    During several continuous days of battle, he led his men, 
    spearheading attacks and repelling enemy counterattacks. . . .
        The SPEAKER. The Honorable Robert H. Michel, former Republican 
    leader of the House of Representatives, was elected to the 85th 
    Congress and for 36 years served the constituents of Peoria, IL, 
    with great distinction until his retirement at the end of the 103d 
    Congress.
        During World War II, he also served with great distinction. He 
    was a combat infantryman in England, France, Belgium, and Germany. 
    Having been wounded by machine gun fire, he was discharged as a 
    disabled veteran after being awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, 
    and four battle stars.
        At this time, the Honorable Robert H. Michel will lead the U.S. 
    Army Chorus in singing ``God Bless America.'' . . .
        The SPEAKER. The benediction will be given by the Reverend 
    Lloyd John Ogilvie, Chaplain of the U.S. Senate.
        The Chaplain of the Senate, the Reverend Lloyd John Ogilvie, 
    offered the . . . benediction[.] . . .
        The SPEAKER. Members and guests will stand for the retirement 
    of the colors.
        The colors were retired from the Chamber.
        The SPEAKER. At this time, the Members of the Senate will 
    retire.
        The Members of the Senate retired from the Chamber.
        The SPEAKER. The purpose for the joint meeting having been 
    fulfilled, the joint meeting is concluded. The House will continue 
    in recess until approximately 11 a.m.
        The honored guests retired from the Chamber, at 10 o'clock and 
    16 minutes a.m. The proceedings to close the Commemoration of the 
    50th Anniversary of World War II were 
    concluded.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1101

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the

[[Page 250]]

    Speaker pro tempore [Mr. Shays] at 11 
    a.m.                          -------------------

                   PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING RECESS

        Mr. [Joe] KNOLLENBERG [of Michigan]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Congressional Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(6) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Michigan?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. Christopher Shays (CT).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Sec. 19.11 By unanimous consent the House considered a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing use of the Capitol Rotunda in ceremonies to 
    honor Americans yet unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

    On June 26, 1991,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 137 Cong. Rec. 16460-62, 102d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [William (Bill)] CLAY [of Missouri]. Madam Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the Committee on House Administration be 
    discharged from further consideration of the concurrent resolution 
    (H. Con. Res. 158) authorizing the use of the rotunda of the 
    Capitol by the National League of POW/MIA Families for a ceremony 
    to honor the members of the armed services and civilians still 
    imprisoned, missing, and unaccounted for as a result of the Vietnam 
    conflict.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.

                                {time}  1650

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mrs. Unsoeld).(2) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Missouri?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Jolene Unsoeld (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Bill] BARRETT [of Nebraska]. Madam Speaker, reserving the 
    right to object, I yield to the gentleman from Missouri [Mr. Clay] 
    for the purpose of explaining his request.
        Mr. CLAY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
        House Concurrent Resolution 158 provides for the use of the 
    Capitol rotunda by the National League of POW/MIA Families on July 
    13, 1991 at 11 a.m. for a ceremony to honor the members of the 
    armed services and civilians still imprisoned, missing and 
    unaccounted for as a result of the Vietnam conflict. . . .
        Mr. BARRETT. Madam Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of 
    objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Missouri?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 158

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol may be used by the 
        National League of POW/MIA Families on July 13, 1991, from 
        11:00 o'clock ante meridian until 12:00 o'clock noon, for a 
        ceremony to honor the members of the Armed Services and 
        civilians still imprisoned, missing and unaccounted for as a 
        result of the Vietnam conflict. Physical preparations

[[Page 251]]

        for the ceremony shall be carried out in accordance with such 
        conditions as the Architect of the Capitol may prescribe.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 19.12 Example of a concurrent resolution, considered by unanimous 
    consent, authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda for a ceremony.

    On May 23, 1990,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 136 Cong. Rec. 12090, 12091, 101st Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Joe] KOLTER [of Pennsylvania]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the Committee on House Administration be 
    discharged from further consideration of the Senate concurrent 
    resolution (S. Con. Res. 133) providing for the use of the Capitol 
    rotunda, and ask for its immediate consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Pennsylvania?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Mike Parker (MS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Paul E.] GILLMOR [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, reserving the 
    right to object, I would ask the gentleman from Pennsylvania to 
    explain the resolution.
        Mr. KOLTER. Mr. Speaker, if the gentleman will yield, the 
    resolution provides for the use of the rotunda for Members of 
    Congress to assemble in conjunction with a ceremony commemorating 
    American military heroism. The Senate adopted the resolution on 
    Monday and the ceremony is tomorrow.

                                {time}  2200

        It is essential that we adopt it at this time in order to 
    insure that the rotunda is available for the ceremony in the event 
    of inclement weather.
        Mr. GILLMOR. Mr. Speaker, further reserving the right to 
    object, I join in supporting this resolution. I think it is only 
    appropriate, and I particularly feel, as an Air Force veteran, that 
    we should have this ceremony in the rotunda tomorrow recognizing 
    the bravery of Americans.
        Mr. Speaker, I would ask my colleagues to join in supporting 
    the resolution.
        Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Parker). Is there objection to the 
    request of the gentleman from Pennsylvania?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 133

            Whereas America can never forget the sacrifices of our 
        brave military heroes: Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the Rotunda of the Capitol may be used on 
        Thursday, May 24, 1989, at 10:30 a.m., to allow the assembling 
        of Members of Congress for ceremonies celebrating American 
        Military Heroism.
            Sec. 2. The Architect of the Capitol may prescribe 
        conditions for physical preparations with respect to

[[Page 252]]

        the use of the Rotunda authorized by the first section.

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 19.13 By unanimous consent, the House considered and agreed to a 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda 
    for ceremonies to observe the unveiling of the National League of 
    Families POW/MIA flag.

    On Feb. 22, 1989,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 135 Cong. Rec. 2505-08, 101st Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Ronnie G.] FLIPPO [of Alabama]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the Committee on House Administration be 
    discharged from further consideration of the Senate concurrent 
    resolution (S. Con. Res. 5) to provide for the use of the rotunda 
    of the Capitol to inaugurate the display of the POW/MIA flag, and 
    ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Alabama?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. George (Buddy) Darden (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                 S. Con. Res. 5

            Whereas America can never forget the sacrifices of our 
        brave servicemen still missing in action, nor the heroic 
        suffering of our prisoners of war;
            Whereas the families of Americans missing in Southeast 
        Asia, having suffered greatly themselves, joined together in 
        1970 as the National League of Families to facilitate and 
        promote the fullest possible accounting for POW/MIAs;
            Whereas the official National League of Families POW/MIA 
        flag symbolizes the nationwide recognition that is justly 
        deserved by the missing and unaccounted for servicemen of all 
        armed conflicts; and
            Whereas the POW/MIA flag is an effective means of further 
        raising public consciousness on this key American issue: Now, 
        therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol may be used on 
        Thursday, March 9, 1989, at 3 p.m., for ceremonies to observe 
        the unveiling of the National League of Families POW/MIA flag 
        which shall be displayed in the Capitol Rotunda until a 
        satisfactory accounting of all America's POW/MIA's has taken 
        place. The POW/MIA flag so displayed shall be in such size and 
        at such place as the Architect of the Capitol, the Speaker and 
        the Minority Leader of the United States House of 
        Representatives, and the Majority and Minority Leaders of the 
        United States Senate shall designate.
            Sec. 2. The Architect of the Capitol may prescribe 
        conditions for physical preparations with respect to the use of 
        the rotunda authorized by the first section.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Alabama [Mr. 
    Flippo] is recognized for 1 hour.
        Mr. FLIPPO. Mr. Speaker, I yield 30 minutes to the 
    distinguished gentleman from Illinois [Mr. Michel], who is the 
    author of the House companion bill.

[[Page 253]]

        Mr. [Robert H.] MICHEL [of Illinois]. Mr. Speaker, I yield 
    myself such time as I may consume.
        Mr. Speaker, this resolution provides for the display of the 
    POW/MIA flag in the rotunda of the Capitol and allows the rotunda 
    to be used for appropriate ceremonies on March 9 for the unveiling 
    of the flag.
        It is identical as the gentleman indicated, to a resolution I 
    introduced on January 27 here in the House.
        Display of this flag until such time as there has been a 
    satisfactory accounting of all our American POW's and MIA's, is a 
    means of demonstrating our national concern and support for our 
    servicemen who are missing in action or unaccounted for.
        I can think of no better place for this flag to be displayed. 
    The rotunda, with its statues of great Americans like Washington, 
    Jefferson, Lincoln, Jackson, and Grant and the new bust of Martin 
    Luther King is a place fit for American heroes. . . .
        Mr. MICHEL. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the Senate 
    concurrent resolution.
        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 19.14 The House agreed to a Senate concurrent resolution providing 
    for the purchase of a floral wreath to be placed near catafalques 
    bearing the remains of the unknown dead of World War II and Korea 
    as they lay in state in the Rotunda of the Capitol.

    On May 22, 1958,(1) the Speaker (2) 
recognized Mr. John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, to offer the 
following resolution:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 104 Cong. Rec. 9368, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent for the 
    immediate consideration of Senate Concurrent Resolution 90.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate and the 
        Sergeant at Arms of the House of Representatives are each 
        hereby authorized and directed to purchase a floral wreath to 
        be placed by the catafalques bearing the remains of the 
        unknowns of World War II and Korea which are to lie in state in 
        the rotunda of the Capitol of the United States from May 28 to 
        May 30, 1958, the expenses of which shall be paid from the 
        contingent funds of the Senate and the House of 
        Representatives, respectively.

        The concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 19.15 Announcement that Members would meet informally in the House 
    Chamber to proceed in a body to the Rotunda to witness the arrival 
    of the remains of the Unknowns of World War II and Korea.

[[Page 254]]

    On May 27, 1958,(1) the Speaker (2) announced 
that the House would gather informally the next morning (before the 
convening of the House for the day) to attend a commemorative 
ceremony:(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 104 Cong. Rec. 9612, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
 3. H. Con. Res. 242 authorized the use of the Rotunda for the lying in 
        state of the soldiers. See 104 Cong. Rec. 2442, 85th Cong. 2d 
        Sess., Feb. 19, 1958. See also Ch. 38 Appendix, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. The Chair desires to make the following 
    announcement:
        Members will meet here in the House Chamber, informally, at 
    9:30 a.m. on tomorrow, Wednesday, May 28, 1958, and will then 
    proceed in a body to the rotunda of the Capitol to witness the 
    arrival of the remains of the unknown servicemen of World War II 
    and Korea which will there lie in state until May 30, 1958.

    In the Senate, on May 28, 1958,(4) the following 
proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. 104 Cong. Rec. 9661, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Lyndon B.] JOHNSON [of Texas]. Mr. President, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the Senate stand in recess subject to the 
    call of the Chair.
        The VICE PRESIDENT.(5) Is there objection? The Chair 
    hears none, and it is so ordered.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Richard M. Nixon (CA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Thereupon (at 9 o'clock and 46 minutes, a. m.) the Senate, 
    preceded by its Secretary (Felton M. Johnston), its Sergeant at 
    Arms (Joseph C. Duke), and Vice President Richard M. Nixon, of 
    California, proceeded to the rotunda in the Capitol Building to 
    participate in the commemorative exercises in connection with 
    placing on the catafalques the caskets containing the bodies of the 
    unknown dead of World War II and the Korean war. When the Members 
    of the two Houses had assembled in the rotunda, the Vice President 
    and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, on behalf of the 
    Congress of the United States, placed wreaths before the caskets.
        The Senate reassembled at 10 o'clock and 7 minutes a. m., when 
    called to order by the President pro tempore.

    In the House, on May 28, 1958,(6) Members, by unanimous 
consent and special order respectively, spoke about the ceremony held 
in the Rotunda earlier in the day.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. 104 Cong. Rec. 9761, 85th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           THE TWO UNKNOWN AMERICANS

        Mr. [Eugene J.] KEOUGH [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent to extend my remarks at this point.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from New York?
        There was no objection.
        Mr. KEOUGH. Mr. Speaker, it is with great humility that we 
    receive in the Capitol the remains of the two unknown Americans of 
    World War II and of Korea. . . .

[[Page 255]]

        The two unknowns in our midst will give us pause. For here is 
    the symbol of tremendous faith and respect and dedication from 
    which we may all take inspiration. . . 
    .                          -------------------

           THE UNKNOWN SERVICEMEN OF THE KOREAN WAR AND WORLD WAR II

        The SPEAKER. Under previous order of the House, the gentlewoman 
    from Massachusetts [Mrs. Rogers] is recognized for 10 minutes. . . 
    .
        Mrs. [Edith Nourse] ROGERS of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, I 
    believe everyone of us, as we viewed this morning in the rotunda of 
    the Capitol the flag-covered caskets of the two unknown soldiers, 
    one from the Korean war and one from World War II, soldiers known 
    only to God, was deeply moved. . . .
        Mr. Speaker, our prayers, our love and devotion and undying 
    gratitude will be with them always. They typify every soldier known 
    only to God.

Sec. 19.16 A concurrent resolution providing that the flag of the 
    United States shall be displayed at half mast over the Capitol 
    Building on the date of arrival in port of the first vessel 
    returning to the United States with the remains of American 
    soldiers, sailors, marines, and airmen who gave their lives to 
    their country in the Korean hostilities.

    On Mar. 20, 1951,(1) Mr. J. Percy Priest, of Tennessee, 
asked unanimous consent for the immediate consideration of Senate 
Concurrent Resolution 20. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 97 Cong. Rec. 2673, 2674, 82d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           honoring our korean heroes

        Mr. PRIEST. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent for the 
    immediate consideration of the concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 
    20) to display the flag on the Capitol at half-mast on the occasion 
    of the first arrival of the remains of members of the armed 
    services killed in Korea.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the flag of the United States shall be 
        displayed at half-mast on the Capitol Building on the date of 
        the arrival in port of the first vessel returning to the United 
        States the remains of gallant and heroic American soldiers, 
        sailors, marines, and airmen who gave their lives to their 
        country in the Korean hostilities. . . .

        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Tennessee?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 19.17 When the unconditional surrender of Germany

[[Page 256]]

    (World War II) was anticipated as imminent, the Speaker arranged 
    that Members of the House might remain in their seats in recess to 
    hear the expected Presidential proclamation.

    On May 7, 1945,(1) Mr. John W. McCormack, of 
Massachusetts, requested permission for the House to hear the expected 
proclamation of the unconditional surrender of Germany in World War II.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 91 Cong. Rec. 4264, 79th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. McCORMACK. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that it may 
    be in order during the remainder of the day for the Speaker to 
    declare such recess as he may desire, the reconvening of the House 
    to be subject to the call of the Chair.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Massachusetts?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Joseph W.] MARTIN [Jr.], of Massachusetts. Mr. Speaker, 
    reserving the right to object, I do this for the purpose of making 
    an inquiry as to the object of this request and ask for any detail 
    that the gentleman might like to give us.
        Mr. McCORMACK. In the event the hoped-for proclamation from an 
    official angle of VE-day has arrived, I thought it might be that 
    the Speaker would desire to have the House stand in recess. There 
    are many rumors. The leadership, as far as I am able to ascertain, 
    has nothing definite although it is hoped that the official 
    announcement may be made possibly some time during the afternoon, 
    in which event the Speaker may desire to have the House stand in 
    recess.
        The SPEAKER. Permit the Chair to make this statement: The Chair 
    has been in communication with the White House this morning. The 
    Chair knows nothing more than any other Member of the House. But in 
    case the President of the United States issues a proclamation this 
    afternoon it will be on the air and the Chair has arranged that the 
    Members may remain in their seats to hear this proclamation. The 
    Chair thinks it would be wise, therefore, for the House to be in 
    recess for this reason.

    Parliamentarian's Note: The radio gallery connected their radio 
system to the House amplifiers. However, the proclamation did not come 
that day; it came at 9 a.m. the next day, before the House met.


                        

[Page 256-263]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 20. Presentation of Gifts and Awards

    On occasion, the House (or the Congress) has received works of art 
or historic objects donated by private individuals, organizations or 
foundations, for preservation in the public trust.(1) These 
donations will generally have a patriotic significance and upon their

[[Page 257]]

receipt, an announcement of acceptance or dedication ceremony may be 
held.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Acceptance of foreign gifts, emoluments, offices, or titles by 
        House employees is subject to the limitations of Section 9, 
        Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution; the Foreign Gifts and 
        Decorations Act of 1966 (Pub L. No. 90-83, 81 Stat. 208, Sept. 
        11, 1967; codified at 5 USC Sec.  7342) and by House ethics 
        rules (See House Ethics Manual, Committee on Standards of 
        Official Conduct, 110th Cong. 2d Sess., U.S. G.P.O. (Washington 
        2007)). See also 5 Hinds' Precedents Sec. Sec. 7100-7106 and 8 
        Cannon's Precedents Sec. Sec. 3558, 3559.
 2. See Sec. Sec. 20.2-20.4, infra. The Committee on House 
        Administration has jurisdiction over statuary, pictures, and 
        the acceptance or purchase of works of art for the Capitol. The 
        Committee on Natural Resources is responsible for the erection 
        of monuments to the memory of individuals. See Rule X clause 1, 
        House Rules and Manual Sec. 731 
        (2007).                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The John W. McCormack Annual Award of Excellence

Sec. 20.1 The Majority Leader announced to the House that the Speaker, 
    at ceremonies in his honor, had been given a book signed by all 
    House employees and that an annual award of excellence had been 
    established in the Speaker's name to be presented to the employee 
    performing the most valuable service to the House.

    On Dec. 17, 1970,(1) Majority Leader Carl Albert, of 
Oklahoma, announced that Speaker John W. McCormack, of Massachusetts, 
had been presented with a book signed by all the employees of the House 
and that an award had been designated in his honor, as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 116 Cong. Rec. 42190, 42191, 91st Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, one of the most deserved and touching 
    ceremonies I have ever witnessed took place in the caucus room of 
    the Cannon House Office Building today. On this occasion, the 
    employees of the House of Representatives honored the Speaker by 
    giving him a book signed by all of them and presented in his name a 
    plaque to be called ``The John W. McCormack Annual Award of 
    Excellence'' on which each year the name of the House employee, who 
    performs the most valuable service for the House, will be 
    inscribed. This plaque will be hung in a conspicuous place on the 
    House side of the Capitol and will be a permanent part of the House 
    and its heritage.
        The employees paid the Speaker a tribute which expressed both 
    their high regard and deep affection. In responding, the Speaker 
    made a remarkably beautiful spontaneous speech which brought tears 
    to the eyes of many in attendance. It was evident that everyone 
    present from the lowliest employee to the ranking officials of the 
    House loved our great Speaker and were saddened that he will not be 
    with them next year. They all appreciate his

[[Page 258]]

    decency, his humility, his consideration, and his kindness. He has 
    certainly been a friend of the House employees.

Presentation of Historic Chairs to the House

Sec. 20.2 Proceedings in connection with the presentation to the House 
    of two antique chairs, used in the new House Chamber when it was 
    first occupied in 1857, were inserted in the Congressional Record.

    On July 22, 1968,(1) the following proceedings occurred 
in the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 114 Cong. Rec. 22684, 22685, 90th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Fred] SCHWENGEL [of Iowa]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to extend my remarks at this point in the Record and 
    include extraneous matter.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Iowa?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. SCHWENGEL. Mr. Speaker, on July 18 in a brief ceremony in 
    the Speaker's Lobby, Mrs. George J. Le Blanc, of Alexandria, Va., 
    presented two chairs used by the House of Representatives over 100 
    years ago when they were still meeting in the old House Chamber, 
    now known as Statuary Hall. Because of the special interest present 
    Members of the House may have in this and because it was a historic 
    occasion, it should be properly recorded in the Journal. I am 
    having the remarks made at the occasion placed in the Congressional 
    Record:

                   Congressisonal Chair Presentation Ceremony

                         remarks by hon. fred schwengel

            Mr. Speaker, fellow Congressmen, friends and guests: We are 
        gathered again today to make another presentation to the 
        Capitol. I speak as President of the United States Capitol 
        Historical Society to serve as a vehicle to present to the 
        House of Representatives of the Congress of the United States 
        of America, two antique chairs used by Congressmen in the House 
        Chamber over one hundred years ago, to be here as daily 
        reminders of our history and heritage. . . .

                    presentation by mrs. george j. le blanc

            I am very happy to attend this homecoming for it gives me 
        the opportunity to see these two chairs returned to their 
        rightful place, the Capitol of the United States, where they 
        once had the honor of serving Congressmen of the House of 
        Representatives. . . .
            And so it is with great pleasure that I return these chairs 
        to their rightful place, realizing by your acceptance of them 
        they will be preserved for posterity as a part of our great 
        American Heritage.

                      remarks of the speaker of the house

            Mr. Schwengel, I am glad to be here in this historic 
        Speaker's Lobby for this important ceremony and accept these 
        fine heirlooms for the House of Representatives. I am glad to 
        have these chairs that were used by Congressmen over one 
        hundred

[[Page 259]]

        years ago. They will be reminders of our early patriots and 
        Representatives of the House who were statesmen in the very 
        real and important sense. The memories of these men should be 
        noted and called to our attention more often than they are and 
        with the acceptance of these chairs placed here in this Lobby, 
        we will have an interesting daily reminder of these men and 
        women. . . .
            In closing may I say again these two chairs are a reminder 
        of history -- the history of yesterday, and I want to assure 
        Mrs. Le Blanc that these chairs will become an intricate part 
        of the House of Representatives in its daily work to serve the 
        people.

                         remarks of hon. fred schwengel

            Thank you, Mr. Speaker, for those eloquent words of 
        appreciation and assurance. Once again, you have gone beyond 
        the call of duty as you have done so often -- especially for 
        the Historical Society and for those projects and programs that 
        have for their purpose the recalling of the magnificent story 
        of our Capitol and the history of our country. You have been a 
        great Speaker and you have been great in the support of those 
        things that recall a great foundation based on freedom on which 
        our nation was built. . . .

Donation of Marble Bust to Congress

Sec. 20.3 A marble bust was donated to Congress by an organization and 
    placed in the rotunda of the Old House Office Building.

    On May 15, 1962,(1) a marble bust of former Speaker 
Joseph W. Martin, Jr. was presented to the Congress of the United 
States by the National Federation of Republican Women.(2) 
The following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 108 Cong. Rec. 8453-57, 87th Cong. 2d Sess.
 2. The bust was placed in the ``Old House Office Building,'' which was 
        subsequently renamed the Cannon House Office Building. See 
        http://www.aoc.gov/cc/cobs/chob.cfm (last visited Jan. 5, 
        2010).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Don L.] SHORT [of North Dakota]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. Morse] 
    may extend his remarks in the body of the Record and include 
    extraneous matter.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from North Dakota?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. [F. Bradford] MORSE [of Massachusetts]. Mr. Speaker, 
    hundreds, indeed thousands, of men have served in this great House, 
    but none has inspired greater respect, devotion and affection than 
    has our distinguished colleague from the Commonwealth of 
    Massachusetts, the beloved former Speaker of this body, Joe Martin. 
    The qualities that have earned Speaker Martin such a high place in 
    the regard of his colleagues have endeared him to millions of 
    Americans.
        The honors that have been accorded this great yet humble man 
    bear eloquent testimony to his stature. Honors, indeed, are not new 
    to Joe Martin, but I believe that of all the tributes he has 
    received none have had greater meaning than that which was accorded

[[Page 260]]

    him on Sunday, April 15, 1962, when the National Federation of 
    Republican Women presented to the Congress of the United States a 
    marble likeness of Joe Martin, executed by the noted sculptress, 
    Mme. Suzanne Silvercruys, to be placed in the rotunda of the House 
    Office Building.
        Scores of Joe's colleagues from both branches of the Congress 
    joined with hundreds of Republican ladies from throughout our 
    nation in the presentation ceremony. In order that our colleagues 
    who were not able to attend the ceremonies may share the sentiments 
    of those who paid tribute to Joe on this notable occasion, I am 
    incorporating at this point in the Congressional Record the program 
    describing the ceremonies together with a record of the proceedings 
    which was transcribed from a tape recording of the ceremonies 
    contributed as a public service by Mr. Isaac Street, of Business 
    and Social Recordings[.](4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. The taped ceremonies were printed in the Congressional Record at 
        108 Cong. Rec. 8453-57, 87th Cong. 2d Sess., May 15, 1962.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Donation of 49-Star Flag to House

Sec. 20.4 A 49-star flag, for use on the rostrum, was presented to the 
    House of Representatives by the Daughters of the American 
    Revolution.

    On July 16, 1959,(1) Mr. Clifford G. McIntire, of Maine, 
gave a one-minute speech announcing that a 49-star flag had been 
presented to the House by the Daughters of the American Revolution. The 
proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 105 Cong. Rec. 13592, 13593, 86th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. McINTIRE. Mr. Speaker, it is an honor and privilege to 
    direct the attention of the House to the fact that as this session 
    opens today the new 49-star flag of our beloved country is 
    officially displayed over the Speaker's rostrum for the first time.
        A flag of the United States was presented to the House of 
    Representatives in 1901 by the National Society of the Daughters of 
    the American Revolution and hung over the Speaker's rostrum for the 
    first time.
        On August 19, 1919, the House was presented with a new flag by 
    this society to replace the flag displayed since 1901, which had 
    become soiled and worn. This new flag was formally accepted by 
    House resolution, September 18, 1919, and hung over the Speaker's 
    rostrum, back of the Speaker's chair. By House Resolution of 
    September 18, 1919, the old flag was returned to the society, to be 
    displayed and carefully preserved in the archives of the society.
        On December 28, 1950, a new flag was once again presented to 
    the House by this society to replace the flag that had been 
    displayed in the Chamber since 1919, and was hung over the 
    Speaker's rostrum back of the Speaker's chair, on January 3, 1951, 
    the day when the House met for the first time in the remodeled 
    Chamber. The old flag was returned to the society for preservation, 
    December 28, 1950.
        In the office of the Speaker this morning, Mrs. Doris White, 
    distinguished citizen of Maine and president-general of the 
    Daughters of the

[[Page 261]]

    American Revolution, presented this beautiful 49-star flag to the 
    House of Representatives.
        This continues a project which began in 1901 as a project truly 
    in keeping with the great traditions and high ideals of this 
    distinguished organization of American women.

Memorial Bell Tower

Sec. 20.5 A resolution authorizing the printing of proceedings in 
    connection with the dedication ceremonies of the Robert A. Taft 
    Memorial.

    On Apr. 13, 1959,(1) Mr. Clarence J. Brown, of Ohio, 
asked unanimous consent to address the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 105 Cong. Rec. 5776, 86th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    DEDICATION CEREMONY, TAFT MEMORIAL TOWER

        Mr. BROWN of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to 
    address the House for 1 minute and to revise and extend my remarks.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        Mr. BROWN of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I have requested this time to 
    announce that tomorrow morning the dedicatory exercises for the 
    Taft Memorial Bell Tower on the Capitol Grounds, just across 
    Constitution Avenue, will begin at 10 o'clock. All Members of 
    Congress, of course, are invited, along with their wives. Tickets 
    have been sent to each Member of the House and each Member of the 
    Senate, two tickets to each. Special reserved seats have been 
    arranged and are being held for the use of Members of Congress.
        If I may take just a second or two, I should like to tell you 
    something of the program:
        The Indian Hill High School Band, which comes from the little 
    community where Senator Taft lived, will give a part of the musical 
    program, which will start about 10 minutes of 10. Then the U.S. 
    Marine Band will follow.
        The presiding officer to open the meeting will be 
    Representative B. Carroll Reece of Tennessee, who is the president 
    of the Robert A. Taft Memorial Foundation, Inc.
        The invocation will be given by Rev. Frederick Brown Harris, 
    Chaplain of the Senate.
        The meaning of the tower will be explained in a short address 
    by Representative Reece, who will present, in a body, the 100 
    trustees of the memorial foundation.
        The meeting will then be turned over to me as the chairman of 
    the Physical Memorial Subcommittee, and I in turn will introduce, 
    first, Senator Styles Bridges, who will speak for 4 or 5 minutes 
    for the Senate, then Senator Harry Flood Byrd, who will speak also 
    for the Senate for about the same length of time, to be followed by 
    William Howard Taft III, the eldest son of Senator Taft, former 
    Ambassador to Ireland, as you recall. He will respond for a minute 
    or so in behalf of the family.
        Following I will present the former President of the United 
    States, the

[[Page 262]]

    chairman of the board of trustees of the foundation, the Honorable 
    Herbert Hoover, who will deliver a eulogy on Senator Taft.
        Next, the President of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
    honorary chairman of the foundation, will be presented, and in turn 
    he will dedicate the memorial by turning over symbolic keys to the 
    Vice President of the United States and to Speaker Rayburn, of the 
    House, both of whom will respond on behalf of the Congress.
        Following the address of Mr. Speaker Rayburn, the benediction 
    will be given by the Acting Chaplain of the House.
        This memorial, as you know, which cost approximately 1 million 
    is being presented to the Congress of the United States by the Taft 
    Memorial Foundation, and the Congress will serve as its custodian 
    for the benefit of the American people.
        Following the speaking program there will be a 20-minute 
    carillon concert so that those assembled may have the opportunity 
    to hear these famous bells for the first time.

    On Apr. 14, 1959,(3) the following resolution was 
offered.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See 105 Cong. Rec. 5858, 86th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. Reece of Tennessee. Mr. Speaker, I offer a resolution (H. 
    Res. 243) and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

            Resolved, That there be printed as a House 
        document,(4) will [sic] illustrations, the 
        proceedings in connection with the dedication ceremonies of the 
        Robert A. Taft Memorial on April 14, 1959.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. H. Doc. No. 86-121.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Presentation of Gift to Speaker by Member

Sec. 20.6 The Speaker was presented an Irish shillelagh on St. 
    Patrick's Day.

    On Mar. 17, 1952,(1) Mr. Fred E. Busbey, of Illinois, 
presented Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, with a shillelagh, as 
indicated below:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 98 Cong. Rec. 2403, 82d Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. BUSBEY. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to address the 
    House for 1 minute and to revise and extend my remarks.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Illinois?
        There was no objection.
        Mr. BUSBEY. Mr. Speaker, today Americans the length and breadth 
    of the land are joining the Irish in honoring their patron saint 
    and we pay our respects to the gallant people of Irish extraction 
    on this St. Patrick's Day. . . .
        I hold in my hand a genuine black-thorn shillelagh which came 
    from the county of Tipperary, Ireland. By virtue of the esteem the 
    Members of this body hold for the Speaker, I believe it very

[[Page 263]]

    appropriate for him to use a shillelagh on St. Patrick's Day to 
    preside over the House of Representatives. This shillelagh was 
    presented to me during my visit in Ireland by Mr. Nicholas Lakas, 
    one of our younger and most promising Foreign Service officers, who 
    was in charge of the United States consulate at Cork, Ireland. I, 
    in turn, present it to our Speaker with my compliments, a 
    shillelagh from O'Busbey to Speaker O'Rayburn.
        The SPEAKER. I appreciate the suggestion of the gentleman from 
    Illinois.


                        

[Page 263-278]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 21. Statuary

    The old Hall of the House of Representatives is today used for the 
reception and protection of statuary and has come to be known as 
National Statuary Hall. Statuary Hall was created under a July 2, 1864, 
law that authorized the President to ``invite all the states to provide 
and furnish statues, in marble or bronze, not exceeding two in number 
for each state, of deceased citizens deemed worthy of this national 
commemoration.''(1) In 1876, supervision and direction of 
the collection were assigned to the Architect of the 
Capitol.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Act July 2, 1864, ch. 210, Sec. Sec. 2, 13 Stat. 347, codified as 2 
        USC Sec. 2131.
 2. See R.S. Sec. 1814; Aug. 15, 1876, ch. 287, 19 Stat. 147, codified 
        as 2 USC Sec. 2131.
            Parliamentarian's Note: If the State legislature votes to 
        replace one of its statues its request must be approved by the 
        Joint Committee on the Library. State replacement statues for 
        former Presidents Eisenhower, Reagan, and Ford have been 
        approved.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Originally, all State statues were placed in National Statuary 
Hall. However, the Hall soon became overcrowded, and the aesthetic 
appearance of the Hall began to suffer as a result. In 1933, Congress 
adopted a concurrent resolution providing for the relocation of statues 
and to govern the future reception and location of statues by the 
Architect of the Capitol, upon the approval of the Joint Committee of 
the Library and with the advice of the Commission of Fine 
Arts.(3) Under authority of this resolution, it was decided 
that only one statue from each State should be placed in Statuary Hall. 
The collection is now located in several areas of the Capitol: in 
National Statuary Hall, the Capitol Rotunda, the first and second floor 
House and Senate corridors, the Hall of Columns, the Crypt and the 
Capitol Visitor Center.(4) In 2000, legislation was passed 
that allowed for

[[Page 264]]

any State to request that the Joint Committee on the Library replace a 
statue that had previously been provided for display.(5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. H. Con. Res. 47, adopted Feb. 24, 1933, 47 Stat. Part 2, 1784.
            See 5 Hinds' Precedents Sec. Sec. 7089-7099 and 8 Cannon's 
        Precedents Sec. Sec. 3545-3557.
 4. See Ch. 4, Sec. 6 supra.
 5. Pub. L. No. 106-554, codified as 2 USC Sec. 2132.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    With the addition of New Mexico's second statue in 2005, the 
collection is now complete and consists of 100 statues contributed by 
50 States.(6) In addition, in 2005, Congress, by law, 
directed the Joint Committee on the Library to obtain a statue of Rosa 
Parks and to place the statue in National Statuary Hall in a suitable 
permanent location.(7) Upon completion, the Rosa Parks 
statue will be the only non-state statue contribution to National 
Statuary Hall. Other non-State statutes in the Capitol complex include 
Martin Luther King in the Rotunda and Sojourner Truth in the Visitor's 
Center.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. For a complete list of statuary in the collection, see http://
www.aoc.gov/cc/art/nsh/index.cfm
 7. Pub. L. No. 109-116. See Sec. 21.1, 
        infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Honoring Rosa Parks

Sec. 21.1 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and passed an 
    unreported bill authorizing the placement in Statuary Hall of a 
    statue of Rosa Parks (after adopting an amendment imposing a 10-
    year moratorium on the placement of most other statues).

    On Nov. 17, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 26849-53, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          PLACEMENT OF STATUE OF ROSA PARKS IN NATIONAL STATUARY HALL

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the Committee on House Administration be discharged 
    from further consideration of the bill (H.R. 4145) to direct the 
    Architect of the Capitol to obtain a statue of Rosa Parks and to 
    place the statue in the United States Capitol in National Statuary 
    Hall, and ask for its immediate consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the bill.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John Randy Kuhl, Jr. (NY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Ms. [Juanita] MILLENDER-McDONALD [of California]. Mr. Speaker, 
    reserving the right to object, I yield to the gentleman from Ohio 
    to explain the purpose of this legislation.
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of House 
    Resolution 4145, a bill to direct the Joint Committee on the 
    Library to obtain a statue of Rosa Parks and to place the statue in 
    the United States Capitol in National Statuary Hall. . . .
        Ms. [Juanita] MILLENDER-McDONALD [of California]. Mr. Speaker, 
    I withdraw my reservation of objection.

[[Page 265]]

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Kuhl of New York). Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the bill, as follows:

                                   H.R. 4145

            Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
        the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. PLACEMENT OF STATUE OF ROSA PARKS IN NATIONAL 
                   STATUARY HALL.

       (a) Obtaining Statue. -- The Architect of the Capitol shall 
     enter into an agreement to obtain a statue of Rosa Parks, 
     under such terms and conditions as the Architect considers 
     appropriate consistent with applicable law.
       (b) Placement. -- Not later than 2 years after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Architect shall place the 
     statue obtained under subsection (a) in the United States 
     Capitol in a suitable permanent location in National Statuary 
     Hall.

     SEC. 2. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
     necessary to carry out this Act, and any amounts so 
     appropriated shall remain available until expended.

           amendment in the nature of a substitute offered by mr. ney

        Mr. NEY. Mr. Chairman, I offer an amendment in the nature of a 
    substitute.
        The Clerk read as follows:

            Amendment in the nature of a substitute offered by Mr. Ney:
            Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
        following:

     SECTION 1. PLACEMENT OF STATUE OF ROSA PARKS IN NATIONAL 
                   STATUARY HALL.

       (a) Obtaining Statue. -- Not later than 2 years after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Joint Committee on the 
     Library shall enter into an agreement to obtain a statue of 
     Rosa Parks, under such terms and conditions as the Joint 
     Committee considers appropriate consistent with applicable 
     law.
       (b) Placement. -- The Joint Committee shall place the 
     statue obtained under subsection (a) in the United States 
     Capitol in a suitable permanent location in National Statuary 
     Hall.

     SEC. 2. ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT OF STATUES IN NATIONAL 
                   STATUARY HALL.

       (a) Eligibility. -- No statue of any individual may be 
     placed in National Statuary Hall until after the expiration 
     of the 10-year period which begins on the date of the 
     individual's death.
       (b) Exceptions. Subsection (a) does not apply with respect 
     to--
       (1) the statue obtained and placed in National Statuary 
     Hall under this Act; or
       (2) any statue provided and furnished by a State under 
     section 1814 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (2 
     U.S.C. 2131) or any replacement statue provided by a State 
     under section 311 of the Legislative Branch Appropriations 
     Act, 2001 (2 U.S.C. 2132).

     SEC. 3. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

       There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
     necessary to carry out this Act, and any amounts so 
     appropriated shall remain available until expended.

        Mr. NEY (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the amendment in the nature of a substitute be 
    considered as read and printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Ohio?
        There was no objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the amendment in 
    the nature of a substitute offered by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
    Ney).
        The amendment in the nature of a substitute was agreed to.
        The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, was 
    read the third time, and passed.

Honoring Po'Pay

Sec. 21.2 The House suspended the rules and adopted an unreported 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda to 
    commemorate the unveiling of a statue

[[Page 266]]

    of Po'Pay that was provided for display in Statuary Hall by the 
    State of New Mexico.

         PROVIDING FOR ACCEPTANCE OF STATUE OF PO'PAY FOR PLACEMENT IN 
                             NATIONAL STATUARY HALL

    On Sept. 21, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 20806, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
            See also 116 Cong. Rec. 40211, 40212, 91st Cong. 2d Sess., 
        Dec. 7, 1970 (S. Con. Res. 2, authorizing acceptance for 
        National Statuary Hall of a statue of the late Senator E.L. 
        Bartlett, presented by the State of Alaska); and 114 Cong. Rec. 
        21332, 21333, 90th Cong. 2d Sess., July 15, 1968 (S. Con. Res. 
        75, authorizing acceptance for the National Statuary Hall of a 
        collection of statues of Father Damien and King Kamehameha I, 
        presented by the State of Hawaii).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 242) 
    providing for acceptance of a statue of Po'Pay, presented by the 
    State of New Mexico, for placement in National Statuary Hall, and 
    for other purposes.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 242

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

     SECTION 1. ACCEPTANCE OF STATUE OF PO'PAY FROM THE PEOPLE OF 
                   NEW MEXICO FOR PLACEMENT IN NATIONAL STATUARY 
                   HALL.

       (a) In General. -- The statue of Po'Pay, furnished by the 
     people of New Mexico for placement in National Statuary Hall 
     in accordance with section 1814 of the Revised Statutes of 
     the United States (2 U.S.C. 2131), is accepted in the name of 
     the United States, and the thanks of the Congress are 
     tendered to the people of New Mexico for providing this 
     commemoration of one of New Mexico's most eminent personages.
       (b) Presentation Ceremony. -- The State of New Mexico is 
     authorized to use the Rotunda of the Capitol on September 22, 
     2005, for a presentation ceremony for the statue. The 
     Architect of the Capitol and the Capitol Police Board shall 
     take such action as may be necessary with respect to physical 
     preparations and security for the ceremony.
       (c) Display in Rotunda. -- The statue shall be displayed in 
     the Rotunda of the Capitol for a period of not more than 6 
     months, after which period the statue shall be moved to its 
     permanent location in the National Statuary Hall Collection.

     SEC. 2. TRANSMITTAL TO GOVERNOR OF NEW MEXICO.

       The Clerk of the House of Representatives shall transmit an 
     enrolled copy of this concurrent resolution to the Governor 
     of New Mexico.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) and the gentlewoman from 
    California (Ms. Millender-McDonald) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Candice S. Miller (MI).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney).
        Mr. NEY. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        I rise today in support of House Concurrent Resolution 242. As 
    the chairman of the Joint Committee on the Library, which has the 
    privilege and responsibility for the acceptance and placement of 
    statues, the National Statuary Hall collection, I want to first 
    thank my colleagues from the New Mexico delegation and their 
    constituents for the statue of the Indian Pueblo leader Po'Pay. 
    This resolution was introduced by the gentlewoman from New Mexico 
    (Mrs. Wilson) and also supported by the gentleman from New

[[Page 267]]

    Mexico (Mr. Udall) and the gentleman from New Mexico (Mr. Pearce). 
    I also want to thank all three of those Members for bringing this 
    resolution before us.
        Po'Pay was the San Juan Pueblo Indian leader and organizer of 
    the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 that drove the Spanish colonials from 
    Pueblo lands. It was not until after his death that the Spanish 
    recolonized the land. But because of Po'Pay, they granted the 
    Pueblo more rights and freedoms during their recolonization. . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mrs. Miller of Michigan). The question 
    is on the motion offered by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) that 
    the House suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, 
    H. Con. Res. 242.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution was 
    agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Honoring Sarah Winnemucca

Sec. 21.3 The House suspended the rules and adopted an unreported 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda to 
    commemorate the unveiling of a statue of Sarah Winnemucca that was 
    provided for display in Statuary Hall by the State of Nevada.

    On Mar. 1, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 3068, 3069, 3079, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 5) 
    providing for the acceptance of a statue of Sarah Winnemucca, 
    presented by the people of Nevada, for placement in National 
    Statuary Hall, and for other purposes, as amended.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                 H. Con. Res. 5

            Whereas Sarah Winnemucca was the daughter of Chief 
        Winnemucca and the granddaughter of the redoubtable Chief 
        Truckee of the Northern Paiute Tribe who led John C. Fremont 
        and his men across the Great Basin to California;
            Whereas Sarah, before her 14th birthday, had acquired five 
        languages, including three Indian dialects, Spanish, and 
        English, and was one of only two Northern Paiutes in Nevada at 
        the time who was able to read, write, and speak English;
            Whereas Sarah was an intelligent and respected woman who 
        served as an interpreter for the United States Army and the 
        Bureau of Indian Affairs and served as an aide, scout, 
        peacemaker, and interpreter for General Oliver O. Howard during 
        the Bannock War of 1878, in Idaho;
            Whereas, in 1883, Sarah published Life Among the Paiutes: 
        Their Wrongs and Claims, the first book written and published 
        by a Native American woman;
            Whereas Sarah became a tireless spokeswoman for the 
        Northern Paiute Tribe and in 1879, gave more than 300 speeches 
        throughout the United States concerning the plight of her 
        people;
            Whereas Sarah established a nongovernmental school for 
        Paiute children near Lovelock, Nevada, which operated for three 
        years and became a model for future educational facilities for 
        Native American children; and

[[Page 268]]

            Whereas Sarah, in fighting for justice, peace, and equality 
        for all persons, represented the highest ideals of America and 
        is hereby recognized as a distinguished citizen of Nevada: Now, 
        therefore, be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

     SECTION 1. ACCEPTANCE OF STATUE OF SARAH WINNEMUCCA FROM THE 
                   PEOPLE OF NEVADA FOR PLACEMENT IN NATIONAL 
                   STATUARY HALL.

       (a) In General. -- The statue of Sarah Winnemucca, 
     furnished by the people of Nevada for placement in National 
     Statuary Hall in accordance with section 1814 of the Revised 
     Statutes of the United States (2 U.S.C. 2131), is accepted in 
     the name of the United States, and the thanks of the Congress 
     are tendered to the people of Nevada for providing this 
     commemoration of one of Nevada's most eminent personages.
       (b) Presentation Ceremony. -- The State of Nevada is 
     authorized to use the rotunda of the Capitol on March 9, 
     2005, for a presentation ceremony for the statue. The 
     Architect of the Capitol and the Capitol Police Board shall 
     take such action as may be necessary with respect to physical 
     preparations and security for the ceremony.
       (c) Display in Rotunda. -- The statue shall be displayed in 
     the rotunda of the Capitol for a period of not more than 6 
     months, after which period the statue shall be moved to its 
     permanent location.

     SEC. 2. TRANSMITTAL TO GOVERNOR OF NEVADA.

       The Clerk of the House of Representatives shall transmit a 
     copy of this concurrent resolution to the Governor of Nevada.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) and the gentlewoman from Nevada 
    (Ms. Berkley) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John Abney Culberson (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney).
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Mr. Speaker, it gives me great honor to rise and welcome 
    Nevada's second statue to the National Statuary Hall Collection, 
    located inside of the United States Capitol. This statue, of Sarah 
    Winnemucca, is a welcome addition. . . .
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Culberson). The question is on the 
    motion offered by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) that the House 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. 
    Res. 5, as amended.
        The question was taken.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-
    thirds of those present have voted in the affirmative.
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
        The yeas and nays were ordered. . . .
        The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 
    418, nays 0, not voting 15. . . .
        So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were 
    suspended and the concurrent resolution, as amended, was agreed to.
        The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Portrait Busts

Sec. 21.4 By unanimous consent, the House considered a Senate 
    concurrent resolution to authorize use of the Capitol Rotunda for 
    the unveiling of a bust of President George H. W. Bush.

    On June 26, 1991,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 137 Cong. Rec. 16462, 102d Cong. 1st Sess.
            On May 13, 1886, the Senate passed a resolution ordering 
        the commissioning of marble portrait busts of those who have 
        served as Vice President of the United States. The busts were 
        intended to honor their service, under the Constitution, as 
        Presidents of the Senate. The first 20 portrait busts (honoring 
        those who served between 1789 and 1885) are housed in niches in 
        the Senate gallery. The remaining busts are placed throughout 
        the Senate wing of the Capitol. For additional information, see 
        United States Senate Catalogue of Fine Art, by William Kloss 
        and Diana K. Skvarta, S. Doc. No. 107-11 (2002).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 269]]

        Mr. [William (Bill)] CLAY [of Missouri]. Madam Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent for the immediate consideration of the Senate 
    concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 49) authorizing the use of the 
    rotunda of the Capitol for the unveiling of the portrait bust of 
    President George Bush on June 27, 1991.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Missouri?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Jolene Unsoeld (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Bill] BARRETT [of Nebraska]. Madam Speaker, reserving the 
    right to object, I yield to the gentleman from Missouri [Mr. Clay] 
    for the purpose of explaining his request.
        Mr. CLAY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
        Senate Concurrent Resolution 49 authorizes the use of the 
    rotunda by the Senate Rules Committee for unveiling of the portrait 
    bust of President George Bush tomorrow, June 27, at 1:30 p.m.

                                {time}  1700

        The Senate has asked the House to process the resolution, and 
    as a matter of comity, the House shall approve this resolution.
        Mr. BARRETT. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for his 
    explanation.
        Madam Speaker, George Herbert Walker Bush, now our 41st 
    President, was the 43d man to serve as Vice President, and only the 
    14th of our Vice Presidents to later become President of the United 
    States. We all look forward to the unveiling of the portrait bust 
    of President Bush, and its placement in the Senate corridors, where 
    it will join the marble busts of the other men who served the 
    country as Vice President and fulfilled their constitutional duty 
    as presiding officer of the Senate.
        Madam Speaker, I will not object to the request by the 
    gentleman from Missouri and withdraw my reservation.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mrs. Unsoeld). Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Missouri.
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 49

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the Senate Committee on Rules and 
        Administration is authorized to use the rotunda of the Capitol 
        for the unveiling of the portrait bust of President George Bush 
        at 2:30 p.m. on June 27, 1991. The Architect of

[[Page 270]]

        the Capitol and the Capitol Police Board shall take such action 
        as may be necessary with respect to physical preparations and 
        security for the ceremony.
            The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
            A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 21.5 The House, by unanimous consent, agreed to a Senate 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda for the 
    unveiling of a portrait bust of Vice President Dan Quayle.

    On Sept. 5, 2003,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 149 Cong. Rec. 21319, 21320, 108th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

           AUTHORIZING THE USE OF THE ROTUNDA OF THE CAPITOL FOR THE 
        UNVEILING OF THE PORTRAIT BUST OF VICE PRESIDENT DAN QUAYLE ON 
                               SEPTEMBER 10, 2003

        Mr. [Robert H.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate concurrent 
    resolution (S. Con. Res. 63) authorizing the use of the rotunda of 
    the Capitol for the unveiling of the portrait bust of Vice 
    President Dan Quayle on September 10, 2003, and ask for its 
    immediate consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Mac Thornberry (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Robert A.] BRADY of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object, and I will not object, I yield to the 
    gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) for the purposes of explaining the 
    resolution.
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the gentleman from 
    Pennsylvania (Mr. Brady), one of our distinguished members of the 
    Committee on House Administration for yielding to me.
        Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of Senate Concurrent 
    Resolution 63 which authorizes the use of the Rotunda of the 
    Capitol for the unveiling of the portrait bust of former Vice 
    President Dan Quayle on September 10, 2003.
        The mainstay of the Senate's fine arts collection is the Vice 
    Presidential bust collection. In 1886, the Joint Committee on the 
    Library began commissioning busts to be sculpted of the Vice 
    Presidents to occupy the niches that surround the Senate Chamber. 
    Once these spaces were filled, new additions were placed throughout 
    the Senate wing of the Capitol.
        The collection acknowledges the patriotic service performed by 
    each individual who has served as Vice President and pays tribute 
    to the Vice President's role as President of Senate. It also 
    provides a unique survey of American sculpture for the 19th century 
    to the present day.
        The Senate currently maintains over 80 sculptures by some of 
    America's preeminent artists, commemorating many of the great 
    figures of our national history. . . .
        In August 1988, at the Republican National Convention in New 
    Orleans,

[[Page 271]]

    George Bush called upon Mr. Quayle to serve as his Vice 
    Presidential running mate in the general election, which George 
    Bush went on to win.
        Dan Quayle was sworn in as the 44th Vice President of the 
    United States on January 20 of 1989 and served with distinction in 
    that capacity over the following 4 years. . . .
        Mr. Speaker, I urge full support of this resolution.
        Mr. BRADY of Pennsylvania. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my 
    reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Ohio?
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the Senate Committee on Rules and 
        Administration is authorized to use the rotunda of the Capitol 
        for the unveiling of the portrait bust of Vice President Dan 
        Quayle on September 10, 2003. The Architect of the Capitol and 
        the Capitol Police Board shall take such action as may be 
        necessary with respect to physical preparations and security 
        for the ceremony.

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
         A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Honoring Sakakawea

Sec. 21.6 The House suspended the rules and adopted an unreported 
    concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda to 
    commemorate the unveiling of a statue of Sakakawea that was 
    provided for display in Statuary Hall by the State of North Dakota.

    On July 15, 2003,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 149 Cong. Rec. 18032-34, 108th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         PERMITTING USE OF THE ROTUNDA TO COMMEMORATE THE UNVEILING OF 
         THE STATUE OF SAKAKAWEA PROVIDED BY THE STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA 
                          FOR DISPLAY IN STATUARY HALL

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 236) 
    permitting the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a ceremony to 
    commemorate the unveiling of the statue of Sakakawea provided by 
    the State of North Dakota for display in Statuary Hall.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 236

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on October 16, 2003, for a ceremony to commemorate the 
        unveiling of the statue of Sakakawea provided by the State of 
        North Dakota for display in Statuary Hall. Physical 
        preparations for the ceremony shall be carried out in 
        accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol 
        may prescribe.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from

[[Page 272]]

    Ohio (Mr. Ney) and the gentleman from Connecticut (Mr. Larson) each 
    will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. E. Clay Shaw, Jr. (FL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney).
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of House Concurrent Resolution 
    236. This legislation permits the use of the rotunda of the Capitol 
    on October 16, 2003, for a ceremony to commemorate the unveiling of 
    the statue of Sakakawea provided by the State of North Dakota. . . 
    .
        Sakakawea, simply put, was a leader of leaders. She was a key 
    part of the boldest and most dangerous expedition in American 
    history. She served as an interpreter, guide, and provider to Lewis 
    and Clark; but her most important role was that of a peacemaker. As 
    a woman and a mother, her presence made it clear that Lewis and 
    Clark were not leading a war party. As Clark wrote in his journal: 
    ``Our interpreter we find reconciles all the Indians as to our 
    friendly intentions. A woman with a party of men is a token of 
    peace.'' She was courageous and indomitable, but it was her gentle 
    spirit and interpretive skills that appeased potential enemies. . . 
    .
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered 
    by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) that the House suspend the 
    rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res. 236.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution was 
    agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Honoring President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Sec. 21.7 The House suspended the rules and adopted a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing the placement of a statue of President 
    Dwight D. Eisenhower of Kansas in the Capitol.

    On Mar. 25, 2003,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 149 Cong. Rec. 7403-407, 108th Cong. 1st Sess.
            Parliamentarian's Note: This concurrent resolution, 
        providing for the replacement of one of Kansas' existing 
        statues (of former Kansas Governor George Washington Glick) is 
        believed to be the first of its kind.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

           PROVIDING FOR ACCEPTANCE OF STATUE OF PRESIDENT DWIGHT D. 
                      EISENHOWER FOR PLACEMENT IN CAPITOL

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 84) 
    providing for the acceptance of a statue of President Dwight D. 
    Eisenhower, presented by the people of Kansas, for placement in the 
    Capitol, and for other purposes.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 84

            Whereas Dwight D. Eisenhower gave a lifetime of service to 
        the Nation as a military officer, leader of the victorious 
        Allied armies in World

[[Page 273]]

        War II, first supreme commander of the North Atlantic Treaty 
        Organization, and as President of the United States;
            Whereas Dwight D. Eisenhower was raised in Abilene, Kansas;
            Whereas Dwight D. Eisenhower was the 34th President of the 
        United States from 1953 to 1961, and during his presidency he 
        saw the end of the Korean War, maintained peace during the Cold 
        War, desegregated the military, marking the beginning of the 
        modern civil rights movement, and implemented the interstate 
        highway program, among other accomplishments;
            Whereas Dwight D. Eisenhower and his wife Mamie are buried 
        in the Place of Meditation, on the grounds of the Eisenhower 
        Center and Presidential Library and Museum in Abilene, Kansas, 
        a premier historical institution recognized around the world; 
        and
            Whereas the great State of Kansas desires to honor its most 
        famous son for his many contributions and to keep his legacy 
        alive for future generations: Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

     SECTION 1. ACCEPTANCE OF STATUE OF DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER FROM 
                   THE PEOPLE OF KANSAS FOR PLACEMENT IN THE 
                   CAPITOL.

       (a) IN GENERAL. -- The statue of Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
     furnished by the people of Kansas for placement in the 
     Capitol in accordance with section 1814 of the Revised 
     Statutes of the United States (40 U.S.C. 187), is accepted in 
     the name of the United States, and the thanks of Congress are 
     extended to the people of Kansas for providing this 
     commemoration of one of the most eminent persons from Kansas.
       (b) PRESENTATION CEREMONY. -- The State of Kansas is 
     authorized to use the Rotunda of the Capitol on June 4, 2003, 
     for a presentation ceremony for the statue. The Architect of 
     the Capitol and the Capitol Police Board shall take such 
     action as may be necessary with respect to physical 
     preparations and security for the ceremony.
       (c) DISPLAY IN ROTUNDA. -- The statue shall be displayed in 
     the Rotunda of the Capitol for a period of not more than 6 
     months, after which time the statue shall be moved to its 
     permanent location.

     SEC. 2. TRANSMITTAL TO GOVERNOR OF KANSAS.

       The Clerk of the House of Representatives shall transmit a 
     copy of this resolution to the Governor of Kansas.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) and the gentleman from 
    Connecticut (Mr. Larson) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Jo Ann Emerson (MO).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney).
        Mr. NEY. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Madam Speaker, I rise in support of House Concurrent Resolution 
    84. This legislation provides for the acceptance of the statue of 
    President Dwight D. Eisenhower, presented by the people of Kansas, 
    for placement in the Capitol.
        The Capitol's National Statuary Hall Collection started in 1864 
    to let each State honor two of its famous own. About half the 
    statues joined the collection in the late 1800s and the early 
    1900s.
        A bronze statue of Dwight D. Eisenhower, better known as 
    ``Ike,'' will replace the statue of the former Governor, George 
    Washington Glick. . . .
        Mr. NEY. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered 
    by the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Ney) that the House suspend the 
    rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, H. Con. Res. 84.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution was 
    agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

[[Page 274]]

Portrait Monument to the Pioneers of the Women's Suffrage Movement

Sec. 21.8 The House agreed to a concurrent resolution directing the 
    Architect of the Capitol to restore the statue of three 
    suffragettes (portrait monument)(1) and to move it from 
    the Capitol crypt to the Rotunda for one year and then to a 
    permanent sit to be selected by a commission.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. This group portrait monument to the pioneers of the woman suffrage 
        movement was sculpted by Adelaide Johnson from an 8-block of 
        marble in Carrara, Italy. The monument features portrait busts 
        of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott and Susan B. Anthony, 
        the leaders of the woman suffrage movement. The monument was 
        presented to the Capitol as a gift from the women of the United 
        States by the National Woman's Party and was accepted on behalf 
        of Congress by the Joint Committee on the Library on Feb. 10, 
        1921. The unveiling ceremony was held in the Rotunda on Feb. 
        15, 1921, the 101st anniversary of the birth of Susan B. 
        Anthony, and was attended by representatives of over 70 women's 
        organizations. The Committee authorized the installation of the 
        monument in the Crypt, where it remained on continuous display. 
        In accordance with H. Con. Res. 216, the sculpture was 
        relocated to the Capitol Rotunda in May 1997.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Sept. 26, 1996,(2) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 142 Cong. Rec. 25244-46, 104th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 PROVIDING FOR RELOCATION OF PORTRAIT MONUMENT

        Mrs. [Constance A.] MORELLA [of Maryland]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the Committee on House Oversight be 
    discharged from further consideration of the concurrent resolution 
    (H. Con. Res. 216) providing for relocation of the portrait 
    monument, and ask for its immediate consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentlewoman from Maryland? . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Mark Foley (FL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 216

            Whereas in 1995, women of America celebrated the 75th 
        anniversary of their right to participate in our government 
        through suffrage;
            Whereas Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. 
        Anthony were pioneers in the movement for women's suffrage and 
        the pursuit of equal rights; and
            Whereas the relocation of the Portrait Monument to a place 
        of prominence and esteem would serve to honor and revere the 
        contribution of thousands of women: Now, therefore, be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the Architect of the Capitol shall -- 
            (1) restore the Portrait Monument and place it in the 
        Rotunda of the Capitol for one year at which time it shall be 
        moved to a permanent site along with an appropriate educational 
        display, as determined by

[[Page 275]]

        the commission created in section 3, and an alternative statue 
        recommended by the commission shall be placed in the Rotunda;
            (2) make all necessary arrangements for a rededication 
        ceremony of the Portrait Monument in the Rotunda in conjunction 
        with the Woman Suffrage Statue Campaign; and
            (3) use no Federal funds to pay any expense of restoring or 
        moving the statue.
            Sec. 2. The Rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to be used 
        at a time mutually agreed upon by the majority leader of the 
        Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives for a 
        ceremony to commemorate and celebrate the statue's return to 
        the Rotunda.
            Sec. 3. A commission of 11 interested parties, including 
        Senators and Representatives, will be appointed. The majority 
        leader of the Senate will appoint three members and the 
        minority leader of the Senate will appoint two members to the 
        commission. The Speaker of the House of Representatives will 
        appoint one member, the majority leader of the House of 
        Representatives will appoint two members, the minority leader 
        of the House of Representatives will appoint two members, and 
        the Architect of the Capitol will serve as the eleventh member 
        of the commission. Immediately following the relocation of the 
        Portrait Monument, the commission shall -- 
            (1) select a permanent site for the Portrait Monument;
            (2) plan and develop an educational display to be located 
        near the statue at its permanent site, describing some of the 
        most dramatic events of the suffragettes' lives;
            (3) select an alternative statue for permanent placement in 
        the Rotunda of the Capitol to commemorate the struggle of women 
        in America for equal rights;
            (4) provide its recommendation to the Senate and the House 
        of Representatives no later than one year after the relocation 
        of the Portrait Monument; and
            (5) use no Federal funds to pay any expense of the 
        educational display and/or relocation of the Portrait Monument.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 21.9 A concurrent resolution relating to the use of the Capitol 
    building and grounds has no force and effect beyond the Congress in 
    which it is adopted since the House is not a continuing body, and 
    authorities contained therein must be reaffirmed in a subsequent 
    Congress to have continuing effect.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Parliamentarian's Note: H. Con. Res. 216 of the 104th Congress 
        authorized the movement of the monument and an accompanying 
        ceremony in the Rotunda. See Sec. 21.8, supra. The Senate 
        leadership originally resisted a concurrent resolution in the 
        105th Congress and attempted to use a letter to be signed 
        jointly by the President pro tempore and the Speaker. Because 
        the House is not a continuing body, and because the authority 
        of that concurrent resolution did not constitute a rule of the 
        House such as would be carried forward by the customary 
        provision in H. Res. 5 of the 105th Congress, the authority for 
        a ceremony required renewal in the 105th Congress. The Senate 
        finally ``confirmed'' the language authorizing the ceremony on 
        June 25, 1997. As an example of the Senate originating in a 
        subsequent Congress a new concurrent resolution for use of the 
        Rotunda, see S. Con. Res. 2, 105th Congress, continuing 
        authority to use the Rotunda for inaugural ceremonies, 
        originally contained in S. Con. Res. 48 of the previous 
        Congress.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 276]]

    On June 24, 1997,(2) the House, by unanimous consent, 
authorized extension into the 105th Congress of the authority, granted 
by concurrent resolution in the 104th Congress, to use the Rotunda for 
a ceremony to commemorate the placement of the Portrait Monument in the 
Capitol Rotunda. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 143 Cong. Rec. 11900, 105th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Bill] THOMAS [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the authorization contained in House Concurrent 
    Resolution 216, which was passed in the 104th Congress, relating to 
    the use of the rotunda for a ceremony to commemorate the placement 
    of the Portrait Monument in the Capitol rotunda, be extended into 
    this, the 105th Congress, subject to concurrence by the Senate.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from California?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. George Radanovich (CA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Steny H.] HOYER [of Maryland]. Reserving the right to 
    object, Mr. Speaker, and I will not object, but if there is any 
    further explanation necessary, I will yield to the gentleman from 
    California.
        Mr. THOMAS. Mr. Speaker, since the Portrait Monument was 
    actually placed in the rotunda in the 105th Congress we had created 
    an opportunity for a ceremony in the 104th. Given the rules since 
    the 104th expired, there is no current ability to hold a ceremony. 
    What we are asking for is to bring that ceremony authorized in 
    Concurrent Resolution 216 into the 105th, based upon concurrence by 
    the Senate.
        Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from California?
        There was no objection.

Dedication of Sam Rayburn Statue

Sec. 21.10 Ceremonies were held to dedicate a statue of former Speaker 
    Rayburn in the foyer of the Rayburn Office Building.

    On Jan. 6, 1965,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 111 Cong. Rec. 142, 89th Cong. 1st Sess.
            The proceedings were printed pursuant to H. Con. Rec. 83. 
        See 111 Cong. Rec. 4765, 89th Cong. 1st Sess., Mar. 11, 1965.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      DEDICATION OF THE SAM RAYBURN STATUE

        Mrs. [Patsy T.] MINK [of Hawaii]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent

[[Page 277]]

    that the gentleman from Wisconsin [Mr. Zablocki] may extend his 
    remarks at this point in the Record and include extraneous matter.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentlewoman from Hawaii?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Clement J.] ZABLOCKI [of Wisconsin]. Mr. Speaker, today it 
    was my privilege to be present for the impressive ceremony to 
    dedicate the statue of Sam Rayburn which stands in the main stair 
    hall of the new congressional office building which bears his name.
        The speech of dedication by Mrs. Lyndon Baines Johnson was a 
    fine tribute to an outstanding American statesman and former 
    Speaker of the House. The First Lady succeeded in capturing in 
    words the feelings which were in the hearts of all on this 
    inspiring occasion. Your own remarks, Mr. Speaker, bespoke the 
    dignity and power of the office in which both Sam Rayburn and you 
    have distinguished yourselves.
        The statue of ``Mr. Sam'' which was unveiled today is also 
    deserving of high praise. Its sculptor, Mr. Felix W. de Weldon, is 
    recognized as one of the Nation's finest creators of public 
    monuments. He has given us a statue which portrays Sam Rayburn as 
    the man of vigor and purpose which we all remember him to be.
        It is fitting that his statue should stand as the focal point 
    of a building which he worked and planned for, and which now bears 
    his name. His presence will be a constant reminder to us and future 
    generations that true greatness can be achieved through service in 
    Congress.

Unveiling of Repaired Statue of Abraham Lincoln

Sec. 21.11 Ceremonies were held in the Rotunda of the Capitol in 
    connection with the unveiling of the repaired statue of Abraham 
    Lincoln.

    On May 10, 1962,(1) the second unveiling of the Vinnie 
Ream Statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Capitol Rotunda occurred as 
follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 108 Cong. Rec. 8232-35, 87th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Fred] SCHWENGEL [of Iowa]. Mr. Speaker, it was my distinct 
    privilege on April 16 to participate in a ceremony in the rotunda 
    of this beautiful Capitol Building during which the Vinnie Ream 
    statue of Abraham Lincoln was unveiled for a second time.
        When the statue was completed and unveiled originally in 1871, 
    the figure of Lincoln held a scroll in his hand. During the course 
    of the years, this scroll was broken off and either lost or 
    misplaced. Through the cooperation of a great many dedicated 
    people, the statue was repaired with a new scroll to replace the 
    piece which had been broken off.
        Since this is the centennial year of the abolition of slavery 
    in the District of Columbia and the drafting of the Emancipation 
    Proclamation, it was felt that we should unveil the statue again 
    and thus call attention to these important events in our Nation's 
    history. It is particularly apropos that we do not lose sight of 
    their significance 100

[[Page 278]]

    years later when certain civil rights are still in jeopardy.
        It is appropriate, therefore, that a public record be made of 
    what took place in the rotunda during this ceremony. I wish to 
    place in the Record at this point a copy of the program for the 
    unveiling and the remarks which were made by those who 
    participated. In doing so, I especially want to call attention to 
    the good offices of one individual who tied all of the many details 
    together and made the program possible.
        Permit me to recognize the efforts of Mr. Ralph Becker, 
    chairman of the Emancipation Proclamation Committee, who served as 
    master of ceremonies for the unveiling. Mr. Becker was also 
    chairman of the Lincoln banquet on February 10 this year and is 
    responsible for the success of that function. I would also like to 
    note that Mr. Becker's interest in our Nation's history is well 
    established and shared by many. His extensive collection of 
    campaign badges and memorabilia has been donated to the Smithsonian 
    Institution and is presently on display there.
        He is a gentleman and a scholar, and what he has done to 
    preserve history and make the record more complete will be long 
    remembered and deeply appreciated. The program of the second 
    unveiling of the Vinnie Ream Lincoln statue . . . is another one of 
    his noble efforts[.](2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. For the complete program in the Rotunda, see Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

      


                        

[Page 278-291]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 22. Dedication of Buildings and Structures

    Congress has named certain buildings or structures after 
individuals.(1) These include a Federal 
building,(2) House Office Buildings,(3) and rooms 
in the Capitol.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. In 2001, the House amended Rule XXI to provide that ``It shall not 
        be in order to consider a bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
        conference report that provides for the designation or 
        redesignation of a public work in honor of an individual then 
        serving as a Member, Delegate, Resident Commissioner, or 
        Senator.'' See 147 Cong. Rec. 25, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 
        3, 2001 (H. Res. 5 Sec. 2(q)) and Rule XXI clause 6, House 
        Rules and Manual Sec. 1068a (2007).
 2. See Sec. 22.1, infra.
 3. See Sec. Sec. 22.4, 22.5, infra.
 4. See Sec. 22.6, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Federal Building

Sec. 22.1 The House suspended the rules and passed a bill designating a 
    Federal building after a sitting Member.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Parliamentarian's Note: Consideration of this measure under 
        suspension of the rules rendered inapplicable any point of 
        order under Rule XXI, clause 6, House Rules and Manual, 
        Sec. 1068a (2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Oct. 7, 2002,(2) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 148 Cong. Rec. 19387-89, 107th Cong. 2d Sess.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 279]]

                           JOE SKEEN FEDERAL BUILDING

        Mr. [Steven] LaTOURRETTE [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I move to 
    suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 5427) to designate the 
    Federal building located at Fifth and Richardson Avenues in 
    Roswell, New Mexico, as the ``Joe Skeen Federal Building''.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                   H.R. 5427

            Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
        the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. DESIGNATION.

       The Federal building located at Fifth and Richardson 
     Avenues in Roswell, New Mexico, shall be known and designated 
     as the ``Joe Skeen Federal Building''.

     SEC. 2. REFERENCES.

       Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, paper, 
     or other record of the United States to the Federal building 
     referred to in section 1 shall be deemed to be a reference to 
     the ``Joe Skeen Federal Building''.

     SEC. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE.

       This Act shall take effect on January 1, 2003. . . .

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Brown of South 
    Carolina).(3) The question is on the motion offered by 
    the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. LaTourette) that the House suspend the 
    rules and pass the bill, H.R. 5427.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Henry E. Brown, Jr. (SC).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the bill was passed.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Chestnut-Gibson Memorial Door

Sec. 22.2 The House suspended the rules and agreed to a concurrent 
    resolution designating the ``document entrance'' on the east plaza 
    of the Capitol as the ``Chestnut-Gibson Memorial Door'', in honor 
    of two Capitol Police officers slain in the line of 
    duty.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 15 supra, for more information about the officers' deaths.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On July 20, 1999,(2) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 145 Cong. Rec. 16745-50, 106th Cong. 2d. Sess. See also Sec. 15, 
        infra; and Ch. 38, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Bob] FRANKS of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 
    158), as amended, designating the Document Door of the United 
    States Capitol as the ``Memorial Door''.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 158

            Whereas on July 24, 1998, a lone gunman entered the United 
        States Capitol through the door known as the Document Door, 
        located on the first floor of the East Front;
            Whereas Officer Jacob Joseph Chestnut was the first United 
        States Capitol Police officer to confront the gunman just 
        inside the Document Door and lost his life as a result;
            Whereas Detective John Michael Gibson also confronted the 
        gunman and lost his life in the ensuing shootout;
            Whereas the last shot fired by Detective John Gibson -- his 
        final act as an officer of the law -- finally brought down the 
        gunman and ended his deadly rampage;

[[Page 280]]

            Whereas while the gunman's intentions are not fully known, 
        nor may ever be known, it is clear that he would have killed 
        more innocent people if United States Capitol Police Officer 
        Jacob Chestnut and Detective John Gibson had not ended the 
        violent rampage;
            Whereas the United States Capitol Police represent true 
        dedication and professionalism in their duties to keep the 
        United States Capitol and the Senate and House of 
        Representatives office buildings safe for all who enter them;
            Whereas the United States Capitol shines as a beacon of 
        freedom and democracy all around the world;
            Whereas keeping the sacred halls of the United States 
        Capitol, known as the People's House, accessible for all the 
        people of the United States and the world is a true testament 
        of Congress and of our Nation's dedication to upholding the 
        virtues of freedom;
            Whereas the door near where this tragic incident took place 
        has been known as the Document Door; and
            Whereas it is fitting and appropriate that the Document 
        Door henceforth be known as the Memorial Door in honor of 
        Officer Jacob Chestnut and Detective John Gibson: Now, 
        therefore, be it
            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the door known as the Document Door and 
        located on the first floor of the East Front of the United 
        States Capitol is designated as the ``Memorial Door'' in honor 
        of Officer Jacob Joseph Chestnut and Detective John Michael 
        Gibson of the United States Capitol Police, who gave their 
        lives in the line of duty on July 24, 1998, near that door.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Calvert).(3) Pursuant 
    to the rule, the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Franks) and the 
    gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Shows) each will control 20 
    minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Ken Calvert (CA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. 
    Franks).
        Mr. FRANKS of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time 
    as I may consume.
        House Concurrent Resolution 158, as amended, introduced by the 
    Majority Whip, the Speaker, the Majority Leader, the Minority 
    Leader, the Minority Whip and other Members of both sides of the 
    aisle, designates the Document Door located on the first floor of 
    the east front of the Capitol as ``Memorial Door'', in honor of 
    Officer Jacob Chestnut and Detective John Gibson.
        In my brief tenure of chairman of the subcommittee charged with 
    the responsibility of bringing to the House bills designating 
    Federal facilities in honor of individuals, I have considered it a 
    great pleasure to honor Americans who have distinguished themselves 
    in public service. A naming bill is often a capstone for those 
    fortunate to have bestowed upon them such an honor.
        But this action that we take today, while richly deserved, 
    gives me no joy. This week is the first anniversary of an event 
    that we hope will never be repeated. Officer Chestnut became the 
    first Capitol Hill Police Officer killed in the line of duty. 
    Detective Gibson became the second.
        Those few minutes on Friday, July 24, 1998 changed forever the 
    way we look and feel about the Document Door and the visitor's 
    entrance to the Capitol. The horror of senseless shootings that cut 
    short the lives of these officers will remain forever in the minds 
    of those who are alive today because of them.

[[Page 281]]

        These two officers were ordinary men, and in those horrifying 
    minutes did extraordinary things. The action we take today reminds 
    us we should never forget the duty these officers swear to uphold. 
    We also need to remember particularly how fragile life is in the 
    face of the dangers that confront the fine men and women of the 
    Capitol Police. . . .

Capitol Police Headquarters Building

Sec. 22.3 The House suspended the rules and agreed to a concurrent 
    resolution redesignating the Capitol Police headquarters building 
    as the ``Eney, Chestnut, Gibson Memorial Building.''

    On Oct. 15, 1998,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 144 Cong. Rec. 26486-88, 105th Cong. 2d Sess.
            See also Sec. 15, supra; and Ch. 38, infra, for additional 
        information on the deaths of Capitol Police officers.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Jay] KIM [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and concur in the Senate concurrent resolution (S. Con. 
    Res. 120) to redesignate the United States Capitol Police 
    headquarters building located at 119 D Street, Northeast, 
    Washington, D.C., as the ``Eney, Chestnut, Gibson Memorial 
    Building.''
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 120

            Whereas the United States Capitol Police force has 
        protected the Capitol and upheld the beacon of democracy in 
        America;
            Whereas 3 officers of the United States Capitol Police have 
        lost their lives in the line of duty;
            Whereas Sgt. Christopher Eney was killed on August 24, 
        1984, during a training exercise;
            Whereas officer Jacob ``J.J.'' Chestnut was killed on July 
        24, 1998, while guarding his post at the Capitol; and
            Whereas Detective John Gibson was killed on July 24, 1998, 
        while protecting the lives of visitors, staff, and the Office 
        of the Majority Whip of the House of Representatives: Now, 
        therefore, be it
            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the United States Capitol Police headquarters 
        building located at 119 D Street, Northeast, Washington, D.C., 
        shall be known and designated as the ``Eney, Chestnut, Gibson 
        Memorial Building''.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from California (Mr. Kim) and the gentleman from Ohio 
    (Mr. Traficant) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Gil Gutknect (MN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California (Mr. Kim).
        Mr. KIM. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Senate Concurrent Resolution 120 redesignates the United States 
    Capitol Police Headquarter Building located at 119 D Street, 
    Northeast, Washington, D.C., as the Eney, Chestnut, Gibson Memorial 
    Building in honor of the three Capitol Police officers who made an 
    ultimate sacrifice by giving their lives in the line of service.
        Officer Eney was killed in training exercises in August 1984. 
    Officers

[[Page 282]]

    Chestnut and Gibson were struck down in the line of fire defending 
    the Members of this body, congressional staff and visitors just a 
    few weeks ago on July 24.
        This certainly is a most fitting tribute to these fallen 
    heroes. I support the resolution and urge my colleagues to join me 
    in support.
        Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time. . . .
        Mr. KIM. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Gutknecht). The question is on the 
    motion offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Kim) that the 
    House suspend the rules and concur in the Senate concurrent 
    resolution, S. Con. Res. 120.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the Senate concurrent 
    resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

House Office Buildings

Sec. 22.4 A resolution was adopted under suspension of the rules to 
    designate House Annex 1 as the Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., House Office 
    Building and House Annex 2 as the Gerald R. Ford House Office 
    Building.

    On Sept. 10, 1990,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 136 Cong. Rec. 23632-35, 101st Cong. 2d Sess.
            For general information about House office buildings, see 
        Ch. 4, supra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Glenn M.] ANDERSON [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I move to 
    suspend the rules and agree to the resolution (H. Res. 402) 
    designating two House of Representatives office buildings as the 
    ``Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. House of Representatives Office Building'' 
    and the ``Gerald R. Ford House of Representatives Office 
    Building,'' respectively, and for other purposes.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                  H. Res. 402

            Resolved,

     SECTION 1. DESIGNATIONS.

       (a) Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. House of Representatives Office 
     Building. -- The House of Representatives office building 
     located at C Street and New Jersey Avenue, Southeast, in the 
     District of Columbia, and known as House of Representatives 
     Office Building Annex No. 1, shall be known and designated as 
     the ``Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. House of Representatives Office 
     Building''.
       (b) Gerald R. Ford House of Representatives Office 
     Building. -- The House of Representatives office building 
     located at 3d and D Streets, Southwest, in the District of 
     Columbia, and known as House of Representatives Office 
     Building Annex No. 2, shall be known and designated as the 
     ``Gerald R. Ford House of Representatives Office Building''.

     SEC. 2. REFERENCES.

       Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, paper, 
     or other record of the United States to a building referred 
     to in section 1 shall be deemed to be a reference to the 
     building as designated in that section.

     SEC. 3. STATUES.

       The Speaker of the House of Representatives may purchase or 
     accept as a gift to the House of Representatives, for 
     permanent display in the appropriate building designated in 
     section 1, a suitable statue or bust of the individual for 
     whom the building is named. Such purchase or acceptance shall 
     be carried out--
       (1) in the case of the building referred to in section 
     1(a), in consultation with the majority leader of the House 
     of Representatives; and
       (2) in the case of the building referred to in section 
     1(b), in consultation with the minority leader of the House 
     of Representatives.

[[Page 283]]

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, a 
    second is not required on this motion.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Romano L. Mazzoli (KY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The gentleman from California [Mr. Anderson] will be recognized 
    for 20 minutes, and the gentleman from Arkansas [Mr. Hammerschmidt] 
    will be recognized for 20 minutes.
        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California [Mr. 
    Anderson].
        Mr. ANDERSON. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        Mr. Speaker, this legislation being brought to the House floor 
    for consideration today would result in an important and 
    appropriate tribute to two former Members of the House: Speaker 
    Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill, Jr. and President Gerald R. Ford. . . .
        Mr. ANDERSON. Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time, 
    and I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. (Mr. Mazzoli). The question is on the 
    motion offered by the gentleman from California [Mr. Anderson] that 
    the House suspend the rules and agree to the resolution, House 
    Resolution 402.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 22.5 Members were invited to include personal messages or other 
    writings in the copper box to be sealed in the cornerstone of the 
    Rayburn House Office Building.

    On May 24, 1962,(1) the President and the Speaker of the 
House participated in laying the cornerstone of the Rayburn House 
Office Building. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 108 Cong. Rec. 9119, 9120, 87th Cong. 2d Sess.

        The proceedings commenced at 10:30 o'clock, a.m.
        Mr. STEWART.(2) Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, honored 
    guests, ladies and gentlemen, we have met today to lay the 
    cornerstone of the Rayburn House Office Building. I welcome each of 
    you to the ceremony, and express the hope that in the years to come 
    those who labor in this building will pause occasionally and pay 
    tribute to the Honorable Sam Rayburn, whose great leadership and 
    foresight made this structure possible.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. J. George Stewart, Architect of the Capitol.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        At this time I will ask the Reverend Bernard Braskamp, D.D., 
    Chaplain of the House of Representatives, to offer the invocation.

                                   invocation

        Mr. BRASKAMP. Let us pray. . . .
        Hear us in the name of the Prince of Peace. Amen.
        Mr. STEWART. I now have the great honor to introduce to this 
    assembly the Honorable John W. McCormack, Speaker of the House of 
    Representatives, and also Chairman of the House Office Building 
    Commission. Speaker McCormack. [Applause.]

                          remarks by speaker mccormack

        The SPEAKER. Mr. President, Mr. Chief Justice, reverend clergy, 
    my distinguished colleagues of both branches of the Congress, 
    ladies and gentlemen:

[[Page 284]]

        As great Americans of the past have contributed to the making 
    and stabilizing of our Constitution, now the oldest Constitution on 
    earth, a living, dynamic organism representing the hopes and the 
    national objectives of our people, so did our late friend, Speaker 
    Sam Rayburn, make his contributions during his long and honored 
    public career. . . .
        This building will always be a living monument to his memory, a 
    constant reminder to present and future legislators that Speaker 
    Sam Rayburn was a legislator's legislator.
        We are signally honored in having with us today the Chief 
    Executive of our country, a former colleague of ours, and a 
    personal friend and strong admirer of Sam Rayburn. Under our 
    Constitution the President represents and symbolizes the hopes and 
    aspirations of our people and the national objectives of our 
    country. With the wisdom he gained by his service in both branches 
    of the Congress, the people have complete confidence in him and his 
    courageous qualities of leadership. How happy is Sam Rayburn in the 
    Great Beyond in the knowledge that President John F. Kennedy is 
    with us on this occasion.
        I have the great honor and personal privilege of presenting to 
    you the President of the United States. [Applause, the audience 
    rising.]

                 remarks by the president of the united states

        The PRESIDENT. I thank you.
        Mr. Speaker, Mr. Chief Justice, Members of the House and 
    Senate, I appreciate very much the opportunity to join you in 
    dedicating this building today to Speaker Sam Rayburn. We say in 
    this country that ours is a Government of laws, and not of men; and 
    it is in that sense that we strive for equality and integrity in 
    the administration of Government and of justice. But this is also a 
    Government of man, and it needs men of particular talents to make 
    this system of ours work. . . .
        This ceremony, this edifice, this assembly of public servants 
    from all branches of Government, all States, and all parties pay 
    homage to the memory of Speaker Sam Rayburn.
        No monument, no memorial, no statue would please him half so 
    much, I believe, as to have his name preserved here in this fashion 
    on Capitol Hill. The Congress was his life, the House was his home. 
    He served far longer than any who preceded him, but with 
    distinction and wisdom as well. He preferred to preside over this 
    body to any place of prestige or power.
        As a former Member of the House of Representatives, I join with 
    all of you in saying that while he may be long missed, he will not 
    be forgotten. Our task is to carry on the work to which he was so 
    deeply dedicated.
        Thank you. [Applause, the audience rising.]

                                   a reading

        Mr. STEWART. At this time, Dr. Norman Gerstenfeld, rabbi of the 
    Washington Hebrew Congregation, will give a reading. Dr. 
    Gerstenfeld.
        Dr. GERSTENFELD. Mindful of our experience at the last 
    inaugural, I have attempted extreme brevity. This is a reading, 
    this is not a prayer; this is a reading from the morning service of 
    the Union Prayer Book[.] . . .

[[Page 285]]

                         the laying of the cornerstone

        Mr. STEWART. We will now proceed with the laying of the 
    cornerstone.
        Thereupon, at 10 o'clock and 40 minutes a.m., the Speaker of 
    the House, the Honorable John W. McCormack, laid the cornerstone.

                                  benediction

        Mr. STEWART. The Very Reverend Monsignor Edward J. Herrmann, 
    assistant chancellor of the Archdiocese of Washington, will 
    pronounce the benediction. . . .
        Mr. STEWART. This concludes the ceremony. I thank you all for 
    coming.
        Thereupon (at 10 o'clock and 49 minutes a.m.) the ceremony was 
    concluded.                          -------------------

                CORNERSTONE OF THE RAYBURN HOUSE OFFICE BUILDING

        Mr. [Carl] ALBERT [of Oklahoma]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to address the House for 1 minute.
        Mr. SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.
        Mr. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, the copper box that will be sealed 
    into the cornerstone of the Rayburn House Office Building will be 
    placed in the Speaker's Lobby on May 28, 29, and 30, 1962, and 
    during that period Members of the House of Representatives may 
    deposit in the box any message, signature, or other writing which 
    they wish to have preserved for posterity, in an envelope not to 
    exceed the size of a postal card.
        It is requested that each Member deposit only one message.

Rooms of the Capitol

Sec. 22.6 The Speaker took the floor following adoption of a resolution 
    naming a room in the Capitol after him to express his gratitude for 
    the action by the House.

    On Oct. 9, 1986,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 132 Cong. Rec. 29952-54, 99th Cong. 2d. Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        DESIGNATING ROOM H-324 IN THE CAPITOL AS THE THOMAS P O'NEILL, 
                                    JR. ROOM

        Mr. [James C.] WRIGHT [Jr., of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I send to 
    the desk a resolution (H. Res. 582) designating room H-324 in the 
    Capitol, as the Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. Room, and ask unanimous 
    consent for its immediate consideration.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Moakley).(2) The Clerk 
    will report the resolution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John Joseph Moakley (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read the resolution as follows:

                                  H. Res. 582

            Resolved, That room H-324 on the third floor of the House 
        part of Capitol is hereby designed the Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. 
        Room.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Texas?
        There was no objection. . . .

[[Page 286]]

        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the 
    table.                          -------------------

                 DESIGNATION OF THE THOMAS P. O'NEILL, JR. ROOM

        (Mr. WRIGHT asked and was given permission to address the House 
    for 1 minute.)
        Mr. WRIGHT. Mr. Speaker, little needs be said. A very few rooms 
    in the Capitol on the House side have been officially designated by 
    the House to honor individuals who are so much a part of our 
    institution that their names will forever epitomize the heart and 
    soul of the United States of House of Representatives.
        One of those people, clearly, is Thomas P. ``Tip'' O'Neill, Jr. 
    As long as free men and women live and serve in this Chamber -- the 
    most democratic, in the sense of a little ``d,'' of all 
    institutions of Government -- the memory of Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., 
    will live and thrive and survive to inspire us and future 
    generations of public servants.
        Therefore, it seems appropriate to me, and I know to all of our 
    colleagues on both sides of the aisle will surely agree, that it is 
    a fitting tribute for us this day to designate officially the room 
    on the third floor of the House side of the Capitol as the Thomas 
    P. O'Neill, Jr. Room.                          -------------------

                 THE THOMAS P. O'NEILL, JR., ROOM IN PERPETUITY

        (Mr. MICHEL asked and was given permission to address the House 
    for 1 minute.)
        Mr. [Robert H.] MICHEL [of Illinois]. Mr. Speaker, may I simply 
    associate myself with the very appropriate remarks of the 
    distinguished majority leader, the gentleman from Texas [Mr. 
    Wright].
        But not being privy to where the recesses of this Capitol all 
    are, cubby-holes or ornate rooms and all the rest, might I inquire 
    of the distinguished majority leader if this room, so appropriately 
    named for Thomas P. O'Neill, is sufficiently large enough in size 
    and befitting to accommodate what we normally expect for the 
    Speaker of the House?
        Mr. WRIGHT. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield?
        Mr. MICHEL. I yield to the gentleman from Texas.
        Mr. WRIGHT. Mr. Speaker, it is a spacious and gracious room, 
    ample in its proportions, warm in its hospitality. It is on the 
    third floor, just opposite the Visitors' Gallery, where the public 
    may see it, and where a sign may forever proclaim it as the Thomas 
    P. O'Neill, Jr. Room.
        Mr. MICHEL. I definitely thank the gentleman for that 
    explanation.
        Might I assure the gentleman from Texas, and of course, the 
    Speaker himself, that when that great day comes when we on the 
    Republican side have a majority in this House, it shall remain the 
    Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. 
    Room.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1030

                    EXPRESSION OF GRATITUDE FROM THE SPEAKER

        (Mr. O'NEILL asked and was given permission to address the 
    House for 1 minute.)

[[Page 287]]

        Mr. O'NEILL. Mr. Speaker, I want to tell all of you how 
    grateful I am for having a room named after me in this building. . 
    . .

    Parliamentarian's Note: No House precedent was discernable on the 
authority of the House by simple resolution to name a room in the 
Capitol. The Committee on Appropriations has designated a room under 
its control the Mahon Room; and the East Front Commission designated 
the Rayburn Room. The Architect of the Capitol advised the 
Parliamentarian that several rooms on the Senate side of the Capitol 
had been named after Senators pursuant to Senate resolution. Under Rule 
I clause 3,(3) the Speaker controls rooms in the Capitol 
assigned to the House, but the naming of those rooms should be by House 
action.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. House Rules and Manual Sec. 623 (2007).
 4. See, e.g., 152 Cong. Rec. 22267-22269, 109th Cong. 2d Sess., Dec. 
        5, 2006 (H. Res. 1087); 149 Cong. Rec. 5827, 108th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Mar. 11, 2003 (H. Res. 19); 146 Cong. Rec. 7818-22, 
        106th Cong. 2d Sess., May 15, 2000 (H. Res. 491); 136 Cong. 
        Rec. 34164, 34165, 101st Cong. 2d Sess., Oct. 25, 1990 (H. Res. 
        525).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Independence Hall in Philadelphia

Sec. 22.7 By House resolution, the Speaker was authorized to appoint a 
    delegation to attend the dedication of the restored Assembly Room 
    at Independence Hall in Philadelphia.

    On June 17, 1965,(1) Mr. William A. Barrett, of 
Pennsylvania, called up House Resolution 426, and asked for its 
immediate consideration. The proceedings were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 111 Cong. Rec. 13956, 89th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. BARRETT. Mr. Speaker, I call up House Resolution 426 and 
    ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

            Resolved, That the Speaker of the House of Representatives 
        is authorized to appoint eight Members of the House of 
        Representatives as a delegation to attend the dedication of the 
        historic Assembly Room of Independence Hall, to be held in 
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on June 28, 1965, at the invitation 
        of the city of Philadelphia, and to designate the chairman of 
        said delegation.
            Sec. 2. The expenses of the delegation shall not exceed 
        1,000 and shall be paid from the contingent fund of the House 
        upon vouchers signed by the chairman of the delegation and 
        approved by the Committee on House Administration.

        The resolution was agreed to.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Parliamentarian's Note: The Speaker originated action on this 
        resolution following receipt of a letter from the mayor of 
        Philadelphia, requesting that a delegation from the House be 
        appointed to attend this historic dedication.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 288]]

        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

East Front of the Capitol

Sec. 22.8 Proceedings held during the ground-breaking ceremony for the 
    extension of the East Front of the Capitol.

    On Feb. 24, 1959,(1) a ground-breaking ceremony was held 
for the extension of the East Front of the Capitol. The proceedings 
were as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 105 Cong. Rec. 2850, 2851, 86th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Homer] THORNBERRY [of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that I may insert in the Record at this point the 
    proceedings of the ground-breaking ceremony at the east front of 
    the Capitol today.
        The SPEAKER.(2) Is there objection to the request of 
    the gentleman from Texas?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Sam Rayburn (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        (The matter referred to follows:)

        Ground-Breaking Ceremony for the Extension of the East Front of 
                the Capitol, Tuesday, February 24, 1959, 11 a.m.

            The Architect of the Capitol, J. George Stewart, acted as 
        master of ceremonies.
            Mr. Stewart. To the honored Members of the Congress, our 
        neighbors on Capitol Hill, the distinguished members of the 
        Supreme Court, their assistants, officials of the Library of 
        Congress, and ladies and gentlemen, a warm welcome.
            In undertaking this historic ground-breaking ceremony, it 
        is proper that we should invoke the blessing of the Divine 
        Providence. I ask the Chaplain of the House of Representatives, 
        the Reverend Bernard Braskamp, to offer an invocation.
            The Rev. Bernard Braskamp, D.D., Chaplain of the House of 
        Representatives, offered the . . . prayer[.] . . .
            To Thy name we ascribe all the praise and glory. Amen.
            Mr. Stewart. It is my high honor, and personal privilege, 
        to present a member of the Commission for the Extension of the 
        United States Capitol, the Honorable Everett McKinley 
        Dirksen,(3) the minority leader, U.S. Senate.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Everett McKinley Dirksen (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Mr. Dirksen. Mr. Chairman, distinguished guests, ladies and 
        gentlemen, I presume that any modification of a historic shrine 
        and structure that has over the generations insinuated itself 
        into the hearts and into the affections of the people brings a 
        clash between sentiment and necessity. And, oddly enough, I 
        think a case can be made for both sides. On the sentimental 
        side, and I use the term most advisedly, I think of it in terms 
        of reverence, devotion, and respect for those things that are a 
        part of the great pageantry of this Republic which have become 
        so deeply instilled into the hearts of the people. I believe 
        that sentiment, when the time comes to make a modification of 
        one of our shrines, is a polite and good and felicitous 
        deterrent, so that we do not act too hastily and too fast. . . 
        .
            So today I have come here to use the spade, and to turn the 
        first piece of ground, hoping that in January 1961 -- and I 
        have been promised that as much as anyone could be promised 
        anything -- the incoming President of the United States will 
        walk through a hall just above us

[[Page 289]]

        and will be inaugurated on the steps of the new east front of 
        the Capitol.
            (The Speaker thereupon took the silver spade and broke the 
        ground.)

                                  benediction

            Mr. Stewart. The Chaplain of the U.S. Senate, the Reverend 
        Frederick Brown Harris, will now pronounce the benediction. . . 
        .
            (Thereupon the ground-breaking ceremonies were concluded.)

    On June 23, 1959,(4) Speaker Sam Rayburn, of Texas, laid 
before the House an announcement advising that cornerstone laying 
ceremonies for the Capitol's East Front extension would be held on July 
4, 1959. The following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. 105 Cong. Rec. 11669, 11670, 86th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER laid before the House the following announcement:

            J. George Stewart, Architect of the Capitol, announced 
        today, on behalf of the Commission for the Extension of the 
        U.S. Capitol, that the cornerstone of the East Front Extension 
        of the U.S. Capitol will be laid by the Honorable Dwight D. 
        Eisenhower, President of the United States, with Masonic 
        ceremonies, at 12 o'clock, noon, Saturday, July 4, 1959. The 
        members of the Commission are Speaker Sam Rayburn, Chairman, 
        Vice President Richard M. Nixon, Senator Everett McKinley 
        Dirksen, Representatives Charles A. Halleck, and J. George 
        Stewart. July 4th commemorates the date on which President 
        Millard Fillmore laid the cornerstone of the House and Senate 
        wings of the U.S. Capitol in 1851. The Masonic ceremonies will 
        commemorate the ceremonies held not only at that cornerstone 
        laying, but also at the laying of the cornerstone of the 
        original section of the Capitol Building, September 18, 1793, 
        by President George Washington.

    When the first column in the portico of the extended East Front of 
the Capitol was to be installed, the Speaker, on May 24, 
1960,(5) announced the date for the installation and invited 
Members to witness the installation:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. 106 Cong. Rec. 10966, 86th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. RAYBURN. As chairman of the Commission for Extension of the 
    U.S. Capitol, I wish to invite the members, officers, and employees 
    of the House of Representatives to witness the setting in place of 
    the first large marble column in the portico of the extended east 
    central front of the Capitol, at 9:30 a.m., Thursday, May 26, 1960.
        This is a historic occasion in which I feel each Member will be 
    deeply interested. You are invited to enter the construction area 
    at the door to the fenced enclosure just north of the entrance to 
    the House wing, from where you will be directed to a safe and 
    appropriate vantage point.
        The old records indicate that the original sandstone columns 
    were erected in 1824 and that the stonecutters at the Capitol 
    participated in a procession and exhibit celebrating July 4, 1824.
        The new columns are duplicates of the originals except that 
    they are of Georgia white marble instead of sandstone. They are 
    monolithic, weigh about 18 tons each, are 24 in number, and are 24 
    feet 9 inches high. The columns are of the Corinthian order and

[[Page 290]]

    taper uniformly from a diameter of 3 feet at the base to 2 feet 6 
    inches at the top.
        The original columns were designed by Charles Bulfinch in 
    carrying out the overall plan for the east portico prepared by, his 
    predecessor, Benjamin H. Latrobe. Mr. Latrobe and Mr. Bulfinch were 
    the second and third Architects of the Capitol, respectively.
        The column to be set on Thursday, May 26, will be the one 
    located immediately to the southeast of the main entrance leading 
    to the rotunda.

    On the legislative day of Aug. 31, 1960,(6) the Speaker 
announced the ceremonies to be held in connection with the raising of 
the first flag over the extended East Central Front of the Capitol:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. 106 Cong. Rec. 18906, 86th Cong. 2d Sess. (Calendar Day Sept. 2, 
        1960).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. The Chair desires to announce that a brief 
    ceremony will be held on Friday, September 2, 1960, at 10 a.m., in 
    connection with the raising of the first flag over the extended 
    east central front of the U.S. Capitol. Members and their staffs 
    are cordially invited to attend this ceremony.

    In the Senate, on Aug. 31, 1960,(7) Senate Majority 
Leader Lyndon B. Johnson, of Texas, advised that a press release 
concerning the flag raising had been issued by the Speaker of the 
House, and referred the Speaker's invitation to all Members, officers, 
and employees of both Houses of Congress to attend the ceremony:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. 106 Cong. Rec. 18506, 86th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. President, on Friday, September 2, at 
    10 a.m., the first flag will be raised over the extended east front 
    of the U.S. Capitol.
        For the information of the Members of the Senate, there will be 
    a brief ceremony at that time. The U.S. Marine Band will be present 
    and the Marine Corps will provide a color guard.
        Speaker Rayburn has invited all Members, officers, and 
    employees of both branches of Congress to attend the ceremonies. I 
    ask unanimous consent that a press release issued by the Speaker of 
    the House be printed at this point in the Record.
        There being no objection, the press release was ordered to be 
    printed in the Record, as follows:

            Speaker Sam Rayburn, Chairman of the Commission for 
        Extension of the U.S. Capitol, announced today that a brief 
        ceremony would be held on Friday, September 2, 1960, at 10 
        a.m., in connection with the raising of the first flag over the 
        extended east central front of the U.S. Capitol.
            The U.S. Marine Band will play selections from 9:45 to 10 
        a.m. The U.S. Marine Corps will provide a color guard, the 
        members of which will lower the flag from the temporary pole 
        installed in the peristyle of the dome during construction 
        (when the old east front and old flagpole were removed about 2 
        years ago) and will raise a new flag over the extended east 
        front. The color guard will receive the new flag from the 
        Speaker of the House and proceed up the main central steps and 
        through the Capitol to the roof. As they ascend the steps, the 
        band will

[[Page 291]]

        play ``America the Beautiful.'' As the flag is raised for the 
        first time on the permanent pole located on the roof of the 
        extended east front, and as, simultaneously, the flag on the 
        temporary pole is lowered a trumpter will sound ``To the 
        Colors.''
            The band will then play ``The Star Spangled Banner'' and in 
        conclusion, ``Stars and Stripes Forever.''
            Speaker Rayburn invites Members, officers, and employees of 
        the Senate and House of Representatives, and the general public 
        to attend the ceremonies to be held in the area immediately in 
        front of the main east central steps.



[Page 291-310]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 23. Ceremonies for Visiting Dignitaries

    The House and Senate often adopt unanimous-consent requests to 
recess to meet with the other legislative body in joint meetings in the 
Hall of the House in order to hear addresses from visiting foreign 
dignitaries.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. A joint meeting is distinguishable from a joint session, which is a 
        more formal occasion that is arranged by the adoption of a 
        concurrent resolution. Typically, joint sessions are held to 
        receive Presidential messages and to count the electoral votes 
        for the President and Vice President. For a discussion of joint 
        sessions to receive Presidential messages, such as the 
        President's annual state of the Union address, see Ch. 35, 
        infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As part of the preparation for a joint meeting, the Chair announces 
the customary policy on floor privileges for joint meetings. In recent 
years the Chair has also announced that the practice of reserving seats 
by placard for joint meetings would not be allowed and that Members 
could reserve seats only by their physical presence following a 
security sweep of the Chamber.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Parliamentarian's Note: The ``no placard'' announcement became 
        standard for joint sessions as of Sept. 19, 2001 (see 147 Cong. 
        Rec. 17226, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.), and was first extended to a 
        joint meeting during the address by the Honorable John Howard, 
        Prime Minister of Australia, on June 12, 2002. See 148 Cong. 
        Rec. 10133-36, 107th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    When the joint meeting commences, the Speaker and the Vice 
President traditionally announce the appointment of the Members of the 
House and Senate who will serve as the escort committee that ushers the 
foreign dignitary down the center aisle to the rostrum.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. For a variation on this practice, see 149 Cong. Rec. 18595-98, 
        108th Cong. 1st Sess., July 17, 2003, for the joint meeting for 
        Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. In that instance, members 
        of the House and Senate escort committees assembled in the 
        Office of the Speaker to meet with the Prime Minister, instead 
        of first assembling in the Chamber. This change was prompted by 
        the Prime Minister's tight schedule and his meeting with Senate 
        leadership prior to the joint meeting. Therefore, when the 
        Speaker and the Vice President announced the members of the 
        escort committee, their language reflected they had appointed 
        the committee, which had convened in the Office of the Speaker.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 292]]

    The Sergeant at Arms then traditionally announces the Acting Dean 
of the Diplomatic Corps, who travels down the center aisle to take his 
or her seat.(4) Members of the President's Cabinet and any 
attending Justices of the United States Supreme Court may also be 
announced.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Parliamentarian's Note: It was the practice for numerous attending 
        Ambassadors, Ministers and Charges d'Affaires of foreign 
        governments to be announced and to travel down the center aisle 
        to be seated, but this process was quite time consuming. See, 
        e.g., 140 Cong. Rec. 17891-95, 103d Cong. 2d Sess., July 26, 
        1994 (joint meeting to receive his Excellency Yitzhak Rabin, 
        Prime Minister of Israel, and his Majesty King Hussein I of the 
        Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan). Beginning with the joint meeting 
        to receive President Jacques Chirac of France that took place 
        on Feb. 1, 1996, only the Acting Dean of the Diplomatic Corps 
        (the foreign diplomat with the longest record of continuous 
        service in the United States) was announced and seated; this 
        has become the practice henceforth. See 142 Cong. Rec. 2202-
        205, 104th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The visiting foreign dignitary may speak from notes or with the 
assistance of a teleprompter, and may speak in English or in a foreign 
language with the assistance of electronic and written translation. In 
several instances, simultaneous translation has been provided with the 
assistance of hand-held translation devices that were provided by the 
foreign government.(5)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. See 142 Cong. Rec. 2202-205, 104th Cong. 2d Sess., Feb. 1, 1996 
        (joint meeting to receive President Jacques Chirac of France) 
        and 143 Cong. Rec. 2759-62, 105th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 27, 
        1997 (joint meeting to receive his Excellency Eduardo Frei, 
        President of the Republic of Chile).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Congress has also held Rotunda ceremonies for foreign 
leaders,(7) religious leaders,(8) and human 
rights leaders.(9)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. See Sec. 23.7, infra.
 8. See Sec. Sec. 23.8, 23.9, infra.
 9. See Sec. 23.10, infra.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Joint Meetings for Visiting Dignitaries

Sec. 23.1 The House by unanimous consent authorizes the Speaker to 
    declare a recess on a specified day for the purpose of receiving a 
    foreign dignitary in joint meeting.

    The proceedings of July 20, 2006,(1) illustrate the 
procedure

[[Page 293]]

for authorizing the Speaker to declare a recess for the purpose of 
receiving a foreign dignitary in a joint meeting:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 152 Cong. Rec. 15222, 109th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORIZING THE SPEAKER TO DECLARE A RECESS ON WEDNESDAY, JULY 
          26, 2006, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING IN JOINT MEETING HIS 
         EXCELLENCY NOURI AL-MALIKI, PRIME MINISTER OF THE REPUBLIC OF 
                                      IRAQ

        Mr. [John A.] BOEHNER [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that it may in order at any time on Wednesday, July 26, 
    2006, for the Speaker to declare a recess, subject to the call of 
    the Chair, for the purpose of receiving in joint meeting His 
    Excellency Nouri al-Maliki, Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. TERRY).(2) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Lee Terry (NE).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. See Sec. 23.2, infra, for proceedings.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 23.2 The two Houses met in joint meeting to receive His Excellency 
    Nouri Al-Maliki, Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq. These 
    proceedings illustrate the general ceremonial procedure for 
    conducting such a joint meeting.

    On July 26, 2006,(1) the following occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 152 Cong. Rec. 15996-99, 109th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The Chair desires to 
    make an announcement.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Tom Price (GA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        After consultation among the Speaker and the majority and 
    minority leaders, the Chair announces that during the joint meeting 
    to hear an address by His Excellency Nouri Al-Maliki, only the 
    doors immediately opposite the Speaker and those on his right and 
    left will be open.
        No one will be allowed on the floor of the House who does not 
    have the privilege of the floor of the House.
        Due to the large attendance that is anticipated, the Chair 
    feels the rule regarding the privilege of the floor must be 
    strictly adhered to.
        Children of Members will not be permitted on the floor, and the 
    cooperation of all Members is requested.
        The practice of reserving seats prior to the joint meeting by 
    placard will not be allowed. Members may reserve their seats by 
    physical presence only following the security sweep of the 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of 
    Thursday, July 20, 2006, the House stands in recess subject to the 
    call of the Chair.
        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 6 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the Chair.

[[Page 294]]

                                {time}  1051

        JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR AN ADDRESS BY HIS 
         EXCELLENCY NOURI AL-MALIKI, PRIME MINISTER OF THE REPUBLIC OF 
                                      IRAQ

        The Speaker of the House presided.
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms, Mr. Bill Sims, announced 
    the Vice President and Members of the U.S. Senate who entered the 
    Hall of the House of Representatives, the Vice President taking the 
    chair at the right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate 
    the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER.(3) The Chair appoints as members of the 
    committee on the part of the House to escort His Excellency Nouri 
    Al-Maliki, Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq, into the 
    Chamber:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. J. Dennis Hastert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Blunt). . . .
        The gentleman from California (Mr. Lantos).(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. The full escort committee included the following members: Roy Blunt 
        (MO) (Majority Whip), Deborah Pryce (OH) (Republican Conference 
        Chair), Duncan Hunter (CA) (Chair of the Committee on Armed 
        Services), Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (FL) (Committee on International 
        Relations), Peter Hoekstra (MI) (Chair of the Permanent Select 
        Committee on Intelligence), Nancy Pelosi (CA) (Minority 
        Leader), Steny H. Hoyer (MD) (Minority Whip), James E. Clyburn 
        (SC) (Chairman of the Democratic Caucus), John B. Larson, (CT) 
        (Democratic Caucus Vice-Chair) and Tom Lantos (CA) (Ranking 
        Member of the Committee on International Relations).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The VICE PRESIDENT.(5) The President of the Senate, 
    at the direction of that body, appoints the following Senators as 
    members of the committee on the part of the Senate to escort His 
    Excellency Nouri Al-Maliki, Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq, 
    into the House Chamber:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Richard B. Cheney (WY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Senator from Tennessee (Mr. Frist).
        The Senator from Kentucky (Mr. McConnell).
        The Senator from Alaska (Mr. Stevens).
        The Senator from Pennsylvania (Mr. Santorum).
        The Senator from Texas (Mrs. Hutchison).
        The Senator from Arizona (Mr. Kyl).
        The Senator from North Carolina (Mrs. Dole).
        The Senator from Montana (Mr. Burns).
        The Senator from Nevada (Mr. Reid).
        The Senator from Illinois (Mr. Durbin).
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms announced the Acting Dean 
    of the Diplomatic Corps, His Excellency Jesse Bibiano Marehalau, 
    Ambassador of Micronesia.
        The Acting Dean of the Diplomatic Corps entered the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives and took the seat reserved for him.
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms announced the Cabinet of 
    the President of the United States.

[[Page 295]]

        The Members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        At 11 o'clock and 6 minutes a.m., the Assistant to the Sergeant 
    at Arms announced His Excellency Nouri Al-Maliki, Prime Minister of 
    the Republic of Iraq.
        The Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq, escorted by the 
    committee of Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, it is my great privilege 
    and I deem it a high honor and a personal pleasure to present to 
    you His Excellency Nouri Al-Maliki, Prime Minister of the Republic 
    of Iraq.
        [Applause, the Members 
    rising.]                          -------------------

         ADDRESS BY HIS EXCELLENCY NOURI AL-MALIKI, PRIME MINISTER OF 
                              THE REPUBLIC OF IRAQ

        Prime Minister AL-MALIKI. In the Name of God, the Most 
    Gracious, the Most Merciful.
        Your Excellency the Speaker of the House, Mr. Vice President, 
    honorable ladies and gentlemen, Members of Congress, it is with 
    great pleasure that I am able to take this opportunity to be the 
    first democratically and constitutionally elected Prime Minister of 
    Iraq to address you, the elected representatives of the American 
    people, and I thank you for affording me this unique chance to 
    speak at this respected assembly. . . .
        Thank you very much.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        At 11 o'clock and 36 minutes a.m., His Excellency Nouri Al-
    Maliki, Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq, accompanied by the 
    committee of escort, retired from the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms escorted the invited 
    guests from the Chamber in the following order:
        The Members of the President's Cabinet;
        The Acting Dean of the Diplomatic 
    Corps.                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER. The purpose of the joint meeting having been 
    completed, the Chair declares the joint meeting of the two Houses 
    now dissolved.
        Accordingly, at 11 o'clock and 40 minutes a.m., the joint 
    meeting of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                          ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE SPEAKER

        The SPEAKER. The House will continue in recess until 12:15 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1215

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore (Mr. Culberson) at 12 o'clock and 15 minutes 
    p.m.

[[Page 296]]

                                     -------------------PRINTING OF 
                         PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING RECESS

        Mr. [Ted] POE [of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
    that the proceedings had during the recess be printed in the 
    Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(6) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Texas?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. John Abney Culberson (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Sec. 23.3 Instance in which a Speaker pro tempore presided over a joint 
    meeting.

    On Apr. 6, 2005,(1) during a joint meeting to receive 
His Excellency Viktor Yushchenko, the President of Ukraine, Majority 
Leader Tom DeLay, of Texas, was appointed as Speaker pro tempore to 
preside over the joint meeting.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 5711-14, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR AN ADDRESS BY HIS 
               EXCELLENCY VIKTOR YUSHCHENKO, PRESIDENT OF UKRAINE

        The Speaker pro tempore (Mr. DeLay) presided.
        The Assistant to the Sergeant at Arms, Bill Sims, announced the 
    Vice President and Members of the U.S. Senate who entered the Hall 
    of the House of Representatives, the Vice President taking the 
    chair at the right of the Speaker pro tempore, and the Members of 
    the Senate the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair appoints as members of the 
    committee on the part of the House to escort His Excellency Viktor 
    Yushchenko into the Chamber:
        The gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Blunt); . . .
        The President of Ukraine, escorted by the committee of Senators 
    and Representatives, entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members of the Congress, it is my 
    great privilege and I deem it a high honor and a personal pleasure 
    to present to you His Excellency Viktor Yushchenko, President of 
    Ukraine.
        [Applause, the Members 
    rising.]                          -------------------

           ADDRESS BY HIS EXCELLENCY VIKTOR YUSHCHENKO, PRESIDENT OF 
                                    UKRAINE

        (The following address was delivered in Ukrainian, with a 
    simultaneous translation in English.) . . 
    .                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. The purpose of the joint meeting 
    having been completed, the Chair declares the joint meeting of the 
    two Houses now dissolved.
        Accordingly, at 11 o'clock and 44 minutes a.m., the joint 
    meeting of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their Chamber.

Sec. 23.4 Proceedings had during a recess of the House for a

[[Page 297]]

    joint meeting to receive his Excellency Yitzhak Rabin, Prime 
    Minister of Israel, and his Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite 
    Kingdom of Jordan.

    On July 26, 1994,(1) the following proceedings occurred 
at the first joint meeting with two invitees:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 140 Cong. Rec. 17891-93, 103d Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The proceedings were as follows:

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(2) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    on Friday, July 22, 1994, the House will stand in recess subject to 
    the call of the Chair.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Thomas S. Foley (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 4 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

        JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR ADDRESSES BY HIS 
         MAJESTY KING HUSSEIN I OF THE HASHEMITE KINGDOM OF JORDAN AND 
             HIS EXCELLENCY YITZHAK RABIN, PRIME MINISTER OF ISRAEL

        The SPEAKER of the House presided.
        The Doorkeeper, Hon. James P. Molloy, announced the Vice 
    President and Members of the U.S. Senate who entered the Hall of 
    the House of Representatives, the Vice President taking the chair 
    at the right of the Speaker, and the Members of the Senate the 
    seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints as members of the House to 
    escort His Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite Kingdom of 
    Jordan and His Excellency Yitshak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel, 
    into the Chamber: the gentleman from Missouri, Mr. Gephardt; the 
    gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Bonior; the gentleman from Maryland, 
    Mr. Hoyer; the gentleman from California, Mr. Fazio; the gentleman 
    from Indiana, Mr. Hamilton; the gentleman from Illinois, Mr. Yates; 
    the gentleman from West Virginia, Mr. Rahall; the gentleman from 
    Illinois, Mr. Michel; the gentleman from Georgia, Mr. Gingrich; the 
    gentleman from Texas, Mr. Armey; the gentleman from Illinois, Mr. 
    Hyde; the gentleman from New York, Mr. Gilman; the gentlewoman from 
    Maine, Ms. Snowe; and the gentleman from New York, Mr. Levy.
        The VICE PRESIDENT.(3) The President of the Senate 
    as the direction of that body appoints the following Senators as 
    members of the committee on the part of the Senate to escort His 
    Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and His 
    Excellency Yitshak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel, into the 
    Chamber: the Senator from Maine, Mr. Mithcell; the Senator from 
    Kentucky, Mr. Ford; the Senator from Rhode Island, Mr. Pell; the 
    Senator from Hawaii, Mr. Inouye; the Senator from Georgia, Mr. 
    Nunn; the Senator from Vermont, Mr. Leahy; the Senator from New 
    York, Mr. Moynihan; the Senator from New

[[Page 298]]

    Jersey, Mr. Lautenberg; the Senator from Wisconsin, Mr. Kohl; the 
    Senator from California, Mrs. Feinstein; the Senator from Kansas, 
    Mr. Dole; the Senator from Wyoming, Mr. Simpson; the Senator from 
    Mississippi, Mr. Cochran; the Senator from Mississippi, Mr. Lott; 
    the Senator from Oklahoma, Mr. Nickles; the Senator from South 
    Carolina, Mr. Thurmond; the Senator from Oregon, Mr. Hatfield; the 
    Senator from Indiana, Mr. Lugar; the Senator from Kentucky, Mr. 
    McConnell; the Senator from Pennsylvania, Mr. Specter.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Albert A. Gore (TN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Doorkeeper announced the Ambassadors, Ministers and Charges 
    d'Affaires of foreign governments.
        The ambassadors, ministers, and charges d'affaires of foreign 
    governments entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and 
    took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg, an 
    Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.
        The Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court 
    entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took the seat 
    reserved for her in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        At 11 o'clock and 8 minutes a.m. the Doorkeeper announced his 
    Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan; and his 
    Excellency Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel.
        His Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan 
    and His Excellency Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel, 
    escorted by the committee of Senators and Representatives, entered 
    the Hall of the House of Representatives, and stood at the Clerk's 
    desk.
        [Applause, the Members arising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, it is my great privilege, 
    and I deem it a high honor and a personal pleasure, to present to 
    you His Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan 
    and His Excellency Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel.
        [Applause, the Members arising.]
        The SPEAKER. His Excellency, Hussein I.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Parliamentarian's Note: As a Head of State, King Hussein spoke 
        first.                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        ADDRESS BY HIS MAJESTY KING HUSSEIN I OF THE HASHEMITE KINGDOM 
            OF JORDAN BEFORE THE JOINT MEETING OF THE UNITED STATES 
                                    CONGRESS

        KING HUSSEIN I. Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, honored guests, 
    Members of Congress, ladies and gentleman, it is an honor for me to 
    stand before you, the Representatives of the Great American Nation, 
    on this historic occasion . . .
        To all of you, and to the American people, I offer my thanks 
    for your kindness, hospitality, and for all your support.

[[Page 299]]

        May God bless you all. . . .
        (Applause, the Members rising.)
        The SPEAKER. His Excellency Yitzhak 
    Rabin.                          -------------------

          ADDRESS BY HIS EXCELLENCY YITZHAK RABIN, PRIME MINISTER OF 
                                     ISRAEL

        PRIME MINISTER RABIN. Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, distinguished 
    Members of Congress, His Majesty, the King of Jordan, I start with 
    the Jewish word ``Shalom.'' . . .
        God, bless the peace.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        At 12 noon his Majesty King Hussein I of the Hashemite Kingdom 
    of Jordan and His Excellency Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister of 
    Israel, retired from the Hall of the House of Representatives.
        The Doorkeeper escorted the invited guests from the Chamber in 
    the following order:
        The members of the President's Cabinet.
        The Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United 
    States.
        The Ambassadors, Ministers and Charges d'Affaires of foreign 
    governments.                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER. The purpose of this joint meeting having been 
    completed, the Chair declares the joint meeting of the two Houses 
    dissolved, and the House will meet in session at about 1:30 p.m.
        Accordingly, at 12 o'clock and 9 minutes p.m., the joint 
    meeting of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1330

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore (Mr. Montgomery) at 1:30 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                 PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING THE RECESS

        Mr. [James A.] TRAFICANT [Jr., of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(4) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery (MS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Joint Meetings With Non-Head of State Foreign Leaders

Sec. 23.5 Proceedings held during recess to receive the Deputy 
    President of the African National Congress.

    On June 26, 1990,(1) the Honorable Nelson Mandela, 
Deputy President of the African National

[[Page 300]]

Congress, addressed a joint meeting:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 136 Cong. Rec. 15632-35, 101st Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(2) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of Thursday, June 14, 1990, the House will stand in recess subject 
    to the call of the Chair.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Thomas S. Foley (WA).                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR AN ADDRESS BY 
           NELSON MANDELA, DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF THE AFRICAN NATIONAL 
                                    CONGRESS

        The SPEAKER of the House presiding.
        The Doorkeeper, the Honorable James T. Molly, announced the 
    President pro tempore(3) and Members of the U.S. Senate, 
    who entered the Hall of the House of Representatives, the President 
    pro tempore taking the Chair at the left of the Speaker, and 
    Members of the Senate the seats reserved for them.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: The Vice President, in attendance as the 
        President of the Senate, sits to the Speaker's right. A 
        President pro tempore of the Senate attending in place of the 
        Vice President sits to the Speaker's left.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints as members of the committee on 
    the part of the House to escort Mr. Nelson Mandela, deputy 
    president of the African National Congress, into the Chamber:
        The gentleman from Missouri, Mr. Gephardt; . . .
        The gentlewoman from Hawaii, Mrs. Saiki.
        The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The President of the Senate pro 
    tempore, at the direction of that body, appoints the following 
    Senators as a committee on the part of the Senate to escort Mr. 
    Nelson Mandela, deputy president of the African National Congress, 
    into the House Chamber:
        The Senator from Maine, Mr. Mitchell; . . .
        The Senator from Kansas, Mrs. Kassebaum.
        The Doorkeeper announced the ambassadors, ministers, and 
    charges d'affaires of foreign governments entered the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives and took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        At 11 o'clock and 9 minutes a.m., the Doorkeeper announced Mr. 
    Nelson Mandela, deputy president of the African National Congress.
        Mr. Nelson Mandela, deputy president of the African National 
    Congress, escorted by the committee of Senators and 
    Representatives, entered the Hall of the House of Representatives, 
    and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, it is my great privilege, 
    and I deem it a high honor and personal pleasure to present to you, 
    Mr. Nelson Mandela, deputy president of the African National 
    Congress.

[[Page 301]]

        [Applause, the Members 
    rising.]                          -------------------

          ADDRESS BY NELSON MANDELA, DEPUTY PRESIDENT OF THE AFRICAN 
                               NATIONAL CONGRESS

        Mr. MANDELA. Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, esteemed Members of 
    the U.S. Congress; your excellencies, ambassadors and members of 
    the Diplomatic Corps; distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen:
        It is a fact of the human condition that each shall, like a 
    meteor, a mere brief passing moment in time and space, flit across 
    the human stage and pass out of existence. Even the golden lads and 
    lasses, as much as the chimney sweepers, come, and tomorrow are no 
    more. After them all, they leave the people, enduring, multiplying, 
    permanent, except to the extent that the same humanity might abuse 
    its own genius to immolate life itself. . . .
        Thank you.
        (Applause, the Members rising.)
        At 11 o'clock and 48 minutes a.m., Mr. Nelson Mandela, deputy 
    president of the African National Congress, accompanied by the 
    committee of escort, retired from the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.
        The Doorkeeper escorted the invited guests from the Chamber in 
    the following order:
        The members of the President's Cabinet.
        The ambassadors, ministers and charges d'affaires of foreign 
    governments.                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint meeting of the two 
    Houses dissolved.
        Accordingly, at 11 o'clock and 59 minutes a.m., the joint 
    meeting of the two Houses was dissolved. The Members of the Senate 
    retired to their 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                          announcement by the speaker

        The SPEAKER. The House will continue in recess until 12:45 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1250

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore [Mr. Durbin] at 12 o'clock and 50 minutes 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                   PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING RECESS

        Mr. [Joseph E.] BRENNAN [of Maine]. Mr. Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(4) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Maine?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. Richard J. Durbin (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Sec. 23.6 Proceedings had during recess of the House for a joint 
    meeting to receive the Honorable Lech Walesa.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. Parliamentarian's Note: As the Chairman of the Polish trade union 
        Solidarnosc, Mr. Walesa joined an exclusive group of persons 
        who, being neither head of state nor head of government, 
        nevertheless addressed a joint meeting.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 302]]

    On Nov. 15, 1989,(2) the Honorable Lech Walesa addressed 
a joint meeting. The following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 135 Cong. Rec. 28968-72, 103d Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                     RECESS

        The SPEAKER.(3) Pursuant to the order of the House 
    of Thursday, November 9, 1989, the House will stand in recess 
    subject to the call of the Chair.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Thomas S. Foley (WA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 5 minutes a.m.), the House stood 
    in recess subject to the call of the 
    Chair.                          -------------------

        JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE TO HEAR AN ADDRESS BY THE 
                  HONORABLE LECH WALESA, CHAIRMAN, SOLIDARNOSC

        The Speaker of the House presided.
        The Doorkeeper, the Honorable James T. Molloy, announced the 
    Vice President and Members of the U.S. Senate, who entered the Hall 
    of the House of Representatives, the Vice President taking the 
    chair at the right of the Speaker, and Members of the Senate the 
    seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints as members of the committee on 
    the part of the House to escort the honorable Lech Walesa, 
    Chairman, Solidarnosc, into the Chamber:
        The gentleman from Missouri [Mr. Gephardt]; . . .
        The VICE PRESIDENT.(4) The President of the Senate, 
    at the direction of that body, appoints the following Senators as 
    members of the committee on the part of the Senate to join a like 
    committee on the part of the House to escort the Honorable Lech 
    Walesa into the House Chamber: . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. J. Danforth Quayle (IN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Doorkeeper announced the ambassadors, ministers, and 
    charges d'affaires of foreign governments entered the Hall of the 
    House of Representatives and took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        At 11 o'clock and 5 minutes a.m., the Doorkeeper announced the 
    Honorable Lech Walesa, Chairman, Solidarnosc.
        The Honorable Lech Walesa, Chairman, Solidarnosc, escorted by 
    the committee of Senators and Representatives, entered the Hall of 
    the House of Representatives, and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Members of the Congress, it is my great privilege, 
    and I deem it a high honor and personal pleasure to present to you 
    the Honorable Lech Walesa, Chairman, Solidarnosc.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]

[[Page 303]]

                                    -------------------ADDRESS BY THE 
                  HONORABLE LECH WALESA, CHAIRMAN, SOLIDARNOSC

        (The following is an English translation of the address 
    delivered in Polish by Chairman Lech Walesa before the joint 
    meeting, through an interpreter.)
        Mr. WALESA. Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, Members of the Cabinet, 
    distinguished Members of the House and Senate, ladies and 
    gentlemen[.] . . .
        I stand before you as the third foreign non-head-of-state 
    invited to address the joint Houses of Congress of the United 
    States. The Congress, which for many people in the world, oppressed 
    and stripped of their rights, is a beacon of freedom and a bulwark 
    of human rights. And here I stand before you, to speak to America 
    in the name of my nation. To speak to citizens of the country and 
    the continent whose threshold is guarded by the famous Statue of 
    Liberty. It is for me an honor so great, a moment so solemn, that I 
    can find nothing to compare it with. . . .
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        At 12 o'clock and 10 minutes, p.m., the Honorable Lech Walesa, 
    Chairman, Solidarnosc, accompanied by the committee of escort, 
    retired from the Hall of the House of Representatives.
        The Doorkeeper escorted the invited guests from the Chamber in 
    the following order:
        The Members of the President's Cabinet.
        The Ambassadors, Ministers, and charges d'affaires of foreign 
    governments.                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint meeting of the two 
    Houses dissolved.
        Accordingly, at 12 o'clock and 10 minutes p.m., the joint 
    meeting of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate retired to their Chamber.

                          announcement by the speaker

        The SPEAKER. The House will continue in recess until 12:45 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                                {time}  1250

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired, the House was called to order by the 
    Speaker pro tempore [Mrs. Schroeder] at 12 o'clock and 50 minutes 
    p.m.                          -------------------

                   PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS HAD DURING RECESS

        Mr. [Joseph E.] BRENNAN [of Maine]. Madame Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings had during the recess be 
    printed in the Record.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(5) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Maine?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Patricia Schroeder (CO).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.

Rotunda Receptions for Visiting Dignitaries

Sec. 23.7 A reception was held by Congress in the Rotunda on

[[Page 304]]

    the occasion of a visit to the United States by the King and Queen 
    of Great Britain.

    On May 24, 1939,(1) the Speaker(2) pursuant 
to the provisions of Senate Concurrent Resolution 17, appointed members 
to the joint committee preparing for the welcoming of the King and 
Queen of Great Britain to the Capitol:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 84 Cong. Rec. 6106, 76th Cong. 1st Sess.
 2. William B. Bankhead (AL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to the provisions of Senate Concurrent 
    Resolution 17, the Chair appoints as members of the joint committee 
    to make the necessary arrangements for welcoming Their Majesties 
    the King and Queen of Great Britain and the members of their party 
    on the occasion of their visit to the Capitol, Mr. Rayburn, Mr. 
    Bloom, and Mr. Martin of Massachusetts.

    On June 9, 1939,(3) the morning of the reception for the 
King and Queen of Great Britain, the House convened at 10:30 a.m. 
Following the reading and approval of the Journal, the Clerk read an 
announcement on the part of the Chair concerning the reception for the 
King and Queen. Speaker Bankhead then offered further informal 
suggestions relating to the ceremony, and the House stood in recess to 
attend the reception.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 84 Cong. Rec. 6889, 76th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. The Chair will ask the Clerk to read the following 
    announcement on the part of the Chair.
        The Clerk read as follows:

            The Chair desires to announce, at the suggestion and 
        request of the Joint Committee on Arrangements, that only 
        Members of the House will be permitted to enter the rotunda.
            Under the order adopted by the joint committee, ex-Members 
        of the House and children will not be permitted in the rotunda.
            The Chair further desires to suggest that Members refrain 
        from smoking and after their presentation to Their Majesties 
        they take the place provided for them in the rotunda and remain 
        there until Their Majesties leave.

        The SPEAKER. The Chair takes the liberty of suggesting that in 
    forming the procession to proceed to the rotunda that, as far as it 
    may be feasible, the older Members of the House -- that is, those 
    ranking in seniority of service -- form at the head of the line. Of 
    course, it will be very difficult to carry that out, but the older 
    Members will recognize their terms of service. There is no 
    restriction or regulation about that, but that has been suggested 
    on the part of the Committee on Arrangements.

                                     recess

        The SPEAKER. The House will now stand in recess.
        Accordingly (at 10 o'clock and 37 minutes a.m.), pursuant to 
    Senate Concurrent Resolution 17,(4) the House stood in 
    recess subject to the call of the Chair.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. See 84 Cong. Rec. 6032, 76th Cong. 1st Sess., for proceedings.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The proceedings of June 9, 1939 in the Senate,(5) the 
day of the reception, were recorded as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. 84 Cong. Rec. 6888, 76th Cong. 1st Sess.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 305]]

        congressional welcome to king george vi and queen elizabeth of 
                                 great britain

        Mr. [Alben W.] BARKLEY [of Kentucky]. Mr. President, the senior 
    Senator from Nevada [Mr. Pittman], chairman of the Joint Committee 
    on Arrangements and Reception, has a statement to make.
        Mr. [Key] PITTMAN. Mr. President, Their Majesties the King and 
    Queen of Great Britain will be met at the foot of the central steps 
    in front of the Capitol at 11 o'clock a. m. by the Joint Committee 
    on Arrangements and Reception, and will be escorted into the 
    rotunda, where they will be received by the Vice President of the 
    United States and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. The 
    Vice President and the Speaker of the House will then escort them 
    to the positions which they will occupy during the reception. The 
    Members of the Senate will be presented to Their Majesties by the 
    chairman of the joint committee.
        When the Senate leaves its Chamber, the Members of the Senate 
    will proceed through the rotunda to a section which is roped off on 
    the southwest side of the rotunda, the portion nearest to the 
    House. That is for the reason that the Members of the Senate and 
    the House will move to the left after they greet Their Majesties. 
    The Members of the Senate, being first to be presented, will be in 
    the section nearest to the House, and the House Members will be in 
    the section nearest to the Senate side of the rotunda. After 
    Members of the Senate are presented, they will proceed to the north 
    side of the rotunda; that is, the side nearest the Senate. The 
    House Members will then proceed to the section the Senate had 
    originally occupied, and there the Members of the House will stand 
    until they are presented. . . .
        It is planned that the Members of the Senate and of the House 
    of Representatives shall be in their positions at the time when 
    Their Majesties are escorted into the rotunda.
        After the Vice President and the Speaker have taken their 
    positions near the door they will receive Their Majesties in the 
    rotunda. The senior Senator from Idaho [Mr. Borah], being the 
    senior Member of the Senate, will lead the Senate in the 
    presentation of the Members to Their Majesties.
        At 10 o'clock and 40 minutes a.m., the Committee on 
    Arrangements and Reception on the part of the Senate, consisting of 
    Hon. Key Pittman, of Nevada, chairman of the joint committee; Hon. 
    Alben W. Barkley, of Kentucky; and Hon. Charles L. McNary, of 
    Oregon, withdrew from the Chamber and proceeded to the steps 
    leading to the main entrance on the east front of the Capitol, 
    where they joined the committee on the part of the House of 
    Representatives, consisting of Hon. Sol Bloom, of New York; Hon. 
    Sam Rayburn, of Texas; and Hon. Joseph W. Martin, Jr., of 
    Massachusetts, and received Their Majesties, who were escorted into 
    the rotunda in the following order:
        On the left of the King, Senator Pittman;
        On the right of the King, the Queen;
        On the right of the Queen, Representative Bloom.
        Immediately following Their Majesties were Senators Barkley and 
    McNary and Representatives Rayburn and Martin.

[[Page 306]]

        The Right Honorable William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister 
    of Canada, Minister in Attendance, was next in line, followed by 
    the British Ambassador, Sir Ronald Lindsay, and Lady Lindsay, and 
    Their Majesties' entourage.
        In the rotunda the reception lines for the Senate and House of 
    Representatives, respectively, were as follows:

                             senate reception line

        Senator Pittman.
        The King.
        The Queen.
        The Vice President.
        Senator Barkley.
        Senator McNary.
        Col. Edwin A. Halsey, Secretary of the Senate.
        Representative Bloom.
        The Right Honorable William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister 
    of Canada, Minister in Attendance.
        Sir Ronald Lindsay.
        Lady Lindsay.
        Representative Rayburn.
        Col. Chesley W. Jurney, Sergeant at Arms of the Senate.
        Col. Kenneth Romney, Sergeant at Arms of the House of 
    Representatives.
        Mr. George T. Summerlin.
        Lady Nunburnholme.
        Col. Piers W. Legh.
        Mr. Alan Lascelles.

                              House Reception Line

        Representative Bloom.
        The King.
        The Queen.
        The Speaker.
        Representative Rayburn.
        Representative Martin.
        Mr. Lewis Deschler.
        Senator Pittman.
        The Right Honorable William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister 
    of Canada, Minister in Attendance.
        Sir Ronald Lindsay.
        Lady Lindsay.
        Senator Barkley.
        Senator McNary.
        Col. Chesley W. Jurney.
        Col. Kenneth Romney.
        Mr. George T. Summerlin.
        Lady Nunburnholme.
        Mr. Mallet.
        Mrs. Mallet.
        Col. Piers W. Legh.
        Mr. Alan Lascelles.
        The VICE PRESIDENT(6) (at 10 o'clock and 45 minutes 
    a. m.) Under the terms of the order entered yesterday the Senate 
    stands adjourned until Monday, June 12, 1939, at 12 o'clock 
    meridian.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 6. John N. Garner (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Thereupon the Members of the Senate, preceded by the Vice 
    President, the Secretary, and the Chaplain proceeded to the rotunda 
    of the Capitol, where, in accordance with the terms of the 
    concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 17), in conjunction with the 
    Speaker and Members of the House of Representatives, they welcomed 
    Their Majesties the King and Queen of Great Britain.

    On June 13, 1939,(7) the House agreed to a Senate 
concurrent resolution authorizing expenses from the contingent funds of 
the two Houses to pay for the reception in

[[Page 307]]

the rotunda of the Capitol. Mr. Lindsay C. Warren, of North Carolina, 
was recognized to ask unanimous consent for the immediate consideration 
of the resolution:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. 84 Cong. Rec. 7151, 7152, 76th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

           expenses incident to reception of king and queen of great 
                                    britain

        Mr. WARREN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent for the 
    immediate consideration of Senate Concurrent Resolution 20.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                        Senate Concurrent Resolution 20

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That the expenses incurred by the joint committee 
        appointed pursuant to Senate Concurrent Resolution 17, Seventy-
        sixth Congress, to arrange for the reception of Their Majesties 
        the King and Queen of Great Britain in the rotunda of the 
        Capitol of June 9, 1939, shall be paid one-half from the 
        contingent fund of the Senate and one-half from the contingent 
        fund of the House of Representatives upon vouchers approved by 
        the chairman of the joint committee.

        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from North Carolina?
        There was no objection.
        The Senate concurrent resolution was agreed to.

Rotunda Receptions for Religious Leaders

Sec. 23.8 The House agreed to suspend the rules and adopt a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda to receive 
    His All Holiness Bartholomew, the 270th Ecumenical Patriarch of 
    Constantinople.

    On Sept. 16, 1997,(1) the following proceedings 
occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 143 Cong. Rec. 18936-38, 18958, 18959, 105th Cong. 1st Sess.
            See also 136 Cong. Rec. 15751, 101st Cong. 2d Sess., June 
        27, 1990 (H. Con. Res. 344, authorizing the use of the Capitol 
        Rotunda in ceremonies to greet His All Holiness Patriarch 
        Dimitrios).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        AUTHORIZING USE OF CAPITOL ROTUNDA TO ALLOW MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 
               TO RECEIVE HIS ALL HOLINESS PATRIARCH BARTHOLOMEW

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 134) 
    authorizing the use of the rotunda of the Capitol to allow Members 
    of Congress to greet and receive His All Holiness Patriarch 
    Bartholomew, as amended.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 134

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on October 21, 1997, from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon for 
        a ceremony to allow Members of Congress to greet and receive 
        His All Holiness Patriarch Bartholomew, the 270th Ecumenical 
        Patriarch of Constantinople. Physical preparations for the 
        conduct of the ceremony shall be carried out in accordance with 
        such conditions as may be prescribed by the Architect of the 
        Capitol.

[[Page 308]]

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Ohio [Mr. Ney] and the gentlewoman from Michigan 
    [Ms. Kilpatrick] each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ray LaHood (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Ohio [Mr. Ney].
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume.
        This resolution provides for the use of the rotunda on October 
    21, 1997, for a ceremony to allow Members of Congress to greet and 
    receive His All Holiness Patriarch Bartholomew, the 270th 
    Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople.
        At the request of the resolution's sponsor, the gentleman from 
    Florida [Mr. Bilirakis], the resolution has been amended to change 
    the time of the ceremony from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. . . .
        Mr. NEY. Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time, and 
    I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. LaHood). The question is on the 
    motion offered by the gentleman from Ohio [Mr. Ney] that the House 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, House 
    Concurrent Resolution 134, as amended.
        The question was taken. . . .

                                 recorded vote

        Mr. NEY. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
        A recorded vote was ordered.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
        The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were -- ayes 
    421, noes 0, not voting 12[.] . . .
        So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were 
    suspended and the concurrent resolution, as amended, was agreed to.
        The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 23.9 Consideration by unanimous consent of a concurrent resolution 
    authorizing the use of the Capitol Rotunda for a welcoming ceremony 
    for the Dalai Lama of Tibet.

    On Apr. 11, 1991,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 137 Cong. Rec. 7846, 102d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Charlie] ROSE [of North Carolina, Chairman of the House 
    Administration]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent for the 
    immediate consideration of the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 
    115) authorizing the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a 
    ceremony of welcome for the Dalai Lama.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from North Carolina?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Michael R. McNulty (NY).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [William M.] THOMAS of California. Mr. Speaker, reserving 
    the right to object, I yield to the gentleman from North Carolina 
    [Mr. Rose] for the purpose of having the chairman explain the 
    resolution.
        Mr. ROSE. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding. Mr. 
    Speaker, I

[[Page 309]]

    would be pleased to explain the purpose. Mr. Speaker, this 
    resolution provides for the use of the rotunda for Members of 
    Congress to assemble and to greet his holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama 
    of Tibet. The Dalai Lama is the spiritual and temporal leader of 
    the Tibetan people. The People's Republic of China invaded Tibet in 
    1949, and has brutally occupied Tibet for the past 42 years. The 
    Dalai Lama and tens of thousands of his fellow Tibetans fled their 
    homeland after a nationalist uprising was brutally suppressed by 
    the Chinese Red Army. Since that time, the Dalai Lama has led the 
    Tibetan nation in a nonviolent struggle against China's brutal 
    occupation of Tibet. His strict adherence to the Ghandian 
    principles in his struggle against Chinese oppression and his 
    personal philosophy of universal responsibility earned him the 1989 
    Nobel Peace Prize. He will come to Washington next week, and the 
    U.S. Congress will honor the Dalai Lama by receiving him in the 
    Capitol Rotunda, and I encourage my colleagues to attend. This 
    event will take place on Thursday, April 18th between 11 a.m. and 
    12 noon.
        Mr. THOMAS of California. Mr. Speaker, under my reservation of 
    objection, I yield to the gentleman from New York [Mr. Gilman].
        Mr. [Benjamin A.] GILMAN [of New York]. Mr. Speaker, I want to 
    commend the gentleman from North California [Mr. Rose] for making 
    these arrangements. Many Members had hoped that we could have had 
    his Holiness address a joint session of Congress, but that was not 
    possible.
        I would hope that all of our colleagues would join in welcoming 
    his Holiness, who has been not only the spiritual leader of Tibet 
    but a leader in the world for a peaceful, nonviolent means of 
    opposing aggression by other nations.
        Mr. THOMAS of California. Mr. Speaker, I withdraw my 
    reservation of objection.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. [Thomas] Andrews of Maine). Is 
    there objection to the request of the gentleman from North 
    Carolina?
        There was no objection.
        The clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 115

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol may be used on 
        April 18, 1991, from 10:30 o'clock ante meridiem until 12:30 
        o'clock post meridiem, for a ceremony of welcome for the Dalai 
        Lama. Physical preparations for the ceremony shall be carried 
        out in accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the 
        Capitol may prescribe.
            Sec. 2. The transcript of proceedings of the ceremony shall 
        be printed as a House document, with illustrations and suitable 
        binding. In addition to the usual number, there shall be 
        printed, for the use of the Joint Committee on Printing, such 
        number of copies of the document as does not exceed a cost of 
        $3,000.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Rotunda Reception for Human Rights Leader

Sec. 23.10 By unanimous consent, the House considered and

[[Page 310]]

    agreed to a concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the 
    Capitol Rotunda for a welcoming ceremony for Natan Shcharansky, a 
    leader in the Soviet Jewish emigration movement.

    On May 1, 1986,(1) the House considered by unanimous 
consent and adopted House Concurrent Resolution 329, authorizing the 
use of the Capitol Rotunda for a welcoming ceremony for Natan (Anatoly) 
Shcharansky. The resolution read as follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 132 Cong. Rec. 9189, 9190, 99th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                H. Con. Res. 329

        Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
    concurring),



     SECTION 1. FINDINGS

       The Congress finds that -- 
       (1) Natan (Anatoly) Shcharansky was a leader in the Soviet 
     Jewish emigration movement and a founding member of the 
     Moscow Helsinki monitoring group who was arrested on March 
     15, 1977, and sentenced to thirteen years imprisonment for 
     his human rights activities;
       (2) Shcharansky's wife, Avital, campaigned tirelessly for 
     the release of her husband and other Soviet Jewish prisoners, 
     and those efforts were supported by two successive 
     administrations, the Congress, and the American people;
       (3) on February 11, 1986, those efforts were successful and 
     Natan (Anatoly) Shcharansky was released from Soviet prison 
     and allowed to emigrate to Israel;
       (4) despite the fact that at least 400,000 other Soviet 
     Jews seek to emigrate to Israel, the Soviet Government has 
     severely restricted Jewish emigration in violation of its 
     international commitments; and
       (5) the support of the Congress for the right of Soviet 
     Jews to emigrate is long established and remains strong.

     SEC. 2. CONGRESSIONAL WELCOME: USE OF CAPITOL ROTUNDA

       (a) Congressional Welcome. -- The Congress welcomes Natan 
     (Anatoly) Shcharansky to the United States and to the 
     Nation's capital.
       (b) Use of Capitol Rotunda. -- The rotunda of the Capitol 
     is authorized to be used on May 13, 1986, for a ceremony of 
     welcome for Natan (Anatoly) Shcharansky. Physical 
     preparations for the ceremony shall be carried out in 
     accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the 
     Capitol may prescribe.

     SEC. 3. CALL FOR CONTINUED EFFORTS TO OBTAIN FREEDOM FOR ALL 
                   SOVIET JEWS.

       It is the sense of the Congress that the President should 
     continue to call upon the Soviet Union -- 
       (1) to release immediately all those Soviet Jews who have 
     been imprisoned for their efforts to emigrate;
       (2) to allow those Soviet Jews who wish to emigrate in 
     order to join their families abroad, or to be repatriated to 
     their historic homeland of Israel, to do so; and
       (3) to permit the exercise of religious and cultural rights 
     by Soviet Jews.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) The question is on the 
    concurrent resolution.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery (MS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                     

[Page 310-316]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 24. Congressional Gold Medals

    The Congressional Gold Medal is the highest award bestowed on 
civilians by the U.S. Congress. The commissioning and bestowing of a 
Congressional Gold Medal requires the passage of a bill awarding the 
medal itself. In addition, if a presentation ceremony is held in the 
Rotunda, the adoption of a

[[Page 311]]

concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda for such a 
ceremony is also required.
    Legislation awarding a Congressional Gold Medal falls under the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Financial Services. That committee has 
adopted rules governing the consideration and content of such 
legislation. Under Committee Rule 3(f)(1)(A),(1) the 
Subcommittee on Domestic and International Monetary Policy, Trade and 
Technology will not hold a hearing on Congressional Gold Medal 
legislation unless it is cosponsored by at least two-thirds of the 
Members of the House.(2) Rule 3(f)(1)(C) requires the 
subcommittee to apply several standards in considering legislation 
authorizing Congressional Gold Medals. Among these are that ``the 
recipient shall be a natural person;''(3) the recipient 
shall have performed an achievement that ``has an impact on American 
history and culture that is likely to be recognized as a major 
achievement in the recipient's field long after the 
achievement;''(4) that the recipient ``shall not have 
received a medal previously for the same or substantially the same 
achievement;''(5) that the recipient ``shall be living or, 
if deceased, shall have been deceased for not less than five years and 
not more than 25 years;''(6) and the achievements ``were 
performed in the recipient's field of endeavor, and represent either a 
lifetime of continuous superior achievements or a single achievement so 
significant that the recipient is recognized and acclaimed by others in 
the same field, as evidenced by the recipient having received the 
highest honors in the field.''(7)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Rules of the Committee on Financial Services at 151 Cong. Rec. 
        H765-H768 [Daily Ed.], 109th Cong. 1st Sess., Feb. 17, 2005.
 2. Id.
 3. Rule 3(f)(1)(C)(i).
 4. Rule 3(f)(1)(C)(ii).
 5. Rule 3(f)(1)(C)(iii).
 6. Rule 3(f)(1)(C)(iv).
 7. Rule 3(f)(1)(C)(v).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Congressional Gold Medal has been bestowed on military 
personnel, entertainers, aeronautical and space pioneers, explorers, 
lifesavers, pioneers in agriculture, science and medicine, public 
servants, athletes, activists and foreign recipients.(8) 
What follows is a sampling of recent recipients of the award.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 8. For a full list of recipients, see http://clerk.house.gov/
art--history/house--history/goldMedal.html (last visited May 3, 
        2010).                          -------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 24.1 The House, by unanimous consent, considered

[[Page 312]]

    and adopted an unreported concurrent resolution (discharged from 
    the Committee on House Administration) authorizing the use of the 
    Rotunda for the posthumous presentation of a Congressional Gold 
    Medal to Jackie Robinson.

    On Mar. 1, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 3072, 3073, 109th Cong. 1st Sess. See also 149 Cong. 
        Rec. 24229-33, 108th Cong. 1st Sess., Oct. 7, 2003 (H.R. 1900, 
        to award a posthumous Congressional Gold Medal to Jackie 
        Robinson in recognition of his many contributions to the 
        Nation).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

            PERMITTING USE OF CAPITOL ROTUNDA FOR CEREMONY TO AWARD 
                  CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL TO JACKIE ROBINSON

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the Committee on House Administration be discharged 
    from further consideration of the concurrent resolution (H. Con. 
    Res. 79) permitting the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a 
    ceremony to award a Congressional gold medal to Jackie Robinson 
    (posthumously), in recognition of his many contributions to the 
    Nation, and ask for its immediate consideration in the House.
        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 79

        Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
    concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to be 
    used on March 2, 2005, for a ceremony to award a Congressional gold 
    medal to Jackie Robinson (posthumously), in recognition of his many 
    contributions to the Nation. Physical preparations for the ceremony 
    shall be carried out in accordance with such conditions as the 
    Architect of the Capitol may prescribe.
        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 24.2 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and adopted an 
    unreported concurrent resolution (discharged from the Committee on 
    House Administration) authorizing the use of the Rotunda for the 
    presentation of a Congressional Gold Medal to General Henry H. 
    Shelton.

    On Sept. 17, 2002,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 148 Cong. Rec. 16912, 107th Cong. 2d. Sess. See also 147 Cong. Rec. 
        27125-28, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., Dec. 19, 2001 (H.R. 2751, 
        authorizing the President to award a gold medal on behalf of 
        the Congress to General Henry H. Shelton and to provide for the 
        production of bronze duplicates of such medal for sale to the 
        public).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Vernon] EHLERS [of Michigan]. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent that the Committee on House Administration be discharged 
    from further consideration of the concurrent resolution

[[Page 313]]

    (H. Con. Res. 469) authorizing the Rotunda of the Capitol to be 
    used on September 19, 2002, for a ceremony to present the 
    Congressional Gold Medal to General Henry H. Shelton (USA, Ret.), 
    and ask for its immediate consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Duncan).(2) Is there 
    objection to the request of the gentleman from Michigan?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John J. Duncan, Jr. (TN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 469

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the Rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on September 19, 2002, for a ceremony to present the 
        Congressional Gold Medal to General Henry H. Shelton (USA, 
        Ret.). Physical preparations for the ceremony shall be carried 
        out in accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the 
        Capitol may prescribe.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 24.3 The House suspended the rules and agreed to a concurrent 
    resolution (discharged from the Committee on House Administration) 
    authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony to present a 
    Congressional Gold Medal to former President Ronald Reagan and his 
    wife, Nancy Reagan.

    On Mar. 5, 2002,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 148 Cong. Rec. 2393-95, 2398, 107th Cong. 2d. Sess. See also 146 
        Cong. Rec. 4255-61, 107th Cong. 2d Sess., Apr. 3, 2000 (H.R. 
        3591, to provide for the award of a gold medal on behalf of the 
        Congress to former President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy 
        Reagan in recognition of their service to the Nation).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [John] LINDER [of Georgia]. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend 
    the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 305) 
    permitting the use of the Rotunda of the Capitol for a ceremony to 
    present a gold medal on behalf of Congress to former President 
    Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy Reagan, as amended.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 305

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the Rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on May 16, 2002, for a ceremony to present a gold medal 
        on behalf of Congress to former President Ronald Reagan and his 
        wife Nancy Reagan. Physical preparations for the ceremony shall 
        be carried out in accordance with such conditions as the 
        Architect of the Capitol may prescribe.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Linder) and the gentleman from 
    Maryland (Mr. Hoyer) will each control 20 minutes. The Chair 
    recognizes the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Linder). . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. John Culberson (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were 
    suspended and

[[Page 314]]

    the concurrent resolution, as amended, was agreed to.
        The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 24.4 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and adopted an 
    unreported concurrent resolution (discharged from the committee on 
    House Administration) authorizing the use of the Rotunda for the 
    posthumous presentation of a Congressional Gold Medal to Charles M. 
    Schulz, the creator of the Peanuts comic strip.

    On June 5, 2001,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 147 Cong. Rec. 9891, 9892, 107th Cong. 1st Sess. See also 146 Cong. 
        Rec. 9587, 9588, 106th Cong. 2d Sess., June 6, 2000 (H.R. 3642, 
        to authorize the President to award a gold medal on behalf of 
        the Congress to Charles M. Schulz in recognition of his lasting 
        artistic contributions to the Nation and to the world).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

             PERMITTING USE OF ROTUNDA OF CAPITOL FOR PRESENTATION 
         POSTHUMOUSLY OF CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL TO CHARLES M. SCHULZ

        Mr. [Vernon] EHLERS [of Michigan]. Madam Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the Committee on House Administration be 
    discharged from further consideration of the concurrent resolution 
    (H. Con. Res. 149) permitting the use of the Rotunda of the Capitol 
    for a ceremony to present posthumously a gold medal on behalf of 
    Congress to Charles M. Schulz, and ask for its immediate 
    consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Michigan? . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Judith Biggert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                H. Con. Res. 149

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the Rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on June 7, 2001, for a ceremony to present posthumously 
        a gold medal on behalf of Congress to Charles M. Schulz. 
        Physical preparations for the ceremony shall be carried out in 
        accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol 
        may prescribe.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 24.5 The House suspended the rules and agreed to an unreported 
    concurrent resolution (discharged from the Committee on House 
    Administration) authorizing use of the Rotunda to present a 
    Congressional Gold Medal to Father Theodore Hesburgh.

[[Page 315]]

    On June 27, 2000,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 146 Cong. Rec. 12520-22, 106th Cong. 2d Sess. See also 145 Cong. 
        Rec. 24976-82, 106th Cong. 1st Sess., Oct. 12, 1999 (H.R. 1932, 
        to authorize the President to award a gold medal on behalf of 
        the Congress to Father Theodore M. Hesburgh, in recognition of 
        his outstanding and enduring contributions to civil rights, 
        higher education, the Catholic Church, the Nation, and the 
        global community).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        PERMITTING USE OF ROTUNDA OF CAPITOL FOR PRESENTATION CEREMONY 
            OF CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL TO FATHER THEODORE HESBURGH

        Mr. [Bill] THOMAS [of California]. Mr. Speaker, I move to 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. 
    Res. 344) permitting the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for a 
    ceremony to present the Congressional Gold Medal to Father Theodore 
    Hesburgh, as amended.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                              H. Con. Res. 344

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on July 13, 2000, for a ceremony to present the 
        Congressional Gold Medal to Father Theodore Hesburgh. Physical 
        preparations for the ceremony shall be carried out in 
        accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol 
        may prescribe.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from California (Mr. Thomas) and the gentleman from 
    Maryland (Mr. Hoyer) each will control 20 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ray LaHood (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California (Mr. 
    Thomas).
        Mr. THOMAS. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
    consume. . . .
        Mr. THOMAS. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. LaHood). The question is on the 
    motion offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Thomas) that 
    the House suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution, 
    H. Con. Res. 344, as amended.
        The question was taken; and (two-thirds having voted in favor 
    thereof) the rules were suspended and the concurrent resolution, as 
    amended, was agreed.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 24.6 The House suspended the rules and agreed to a concurrent 
    resolution authorizing the use of the Rotunda for a ceremony to 
    present the Congressional Gold Medal to President and Mrs. Gerald 
    R. Ford.

    On Oct. 18, 1999,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 145 Cong. Rec. 25679, 25680, 25695, 106th Cong. 1st Sess. See also 
        144 Cong. Rec. 17828, 105th Cong. 2d Sess., July 29, 1998 (H.R. 
        3506, to award a congressional gold medal to Gerald R. and 
        Betty Ford in recognition of their dedicated public service and 
        outstanding humanitarian contributions to the people of the 
        United States).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 316]]

        Mr. [Bill] THOMAS [of California]. Madam Speaker, I move to 
    suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent resolution (H. Con. 
    Res. 196) permitting the use of the rotunda of the Capitol for the 
    presentation of the Congressional Gold Medal to President and Mrs. 
    Gerald R. Ford.
        The Clerk read as follows:

                              H. Con. Res. 196

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring), That the rotunda of the Capitol is authorized to 
        be used on October 27, 1999, for the presentation of the 
        Congressional Gold Medal to President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford. 
        Physical preparations for the ceremony shall be carried out in 
        accordance with such conditions as the Architect of the Capitol 
        may prescribe.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to the rule, 
    the gentleman from California (Mr. Thomas) and the gentleman from 
    Michigan (Mr. Kildee) each will control 20 minutes. . . .
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Judith Biggert (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules were 
    suspended and the concurrent resolution was agreed to.


                        

[Page 316-338]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 25. Presidential Inaugurations

    Inaugural ceremonies have evolved since George Washington gave his 
first inaugural address on Apr. 30, 1789, and his second on Mar. 4, 
1793.
    After Washington's first inauguration, the Mar. 4 date was used for 
subsequent Presidential inaugurations until 1933.(1) The 
ratification of the 20th Amendment in 1933 mandated that the 
Presidential term begin at noon on Jan. 20.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. The ratification of the 12th Amendment in 1804 mandated that the 
        Presidential term expire on Mar. 4. U.S. Const. amend. XII.
 2. U.S. Const. amend. XX. See also House Rules and Manual Sec. 150 
        (2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    From the 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson through the 1977 
inauguration of Jimmy Carter, the primary Inauguration Day ceremony 
took place on the Capitol's East Portico.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. The fourth inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1945 was a 
        notable exception. Because World War II was at its height, 
        Roosevelt had a simple inauguration ceremony at the White House 
        with no fanfare or formal celebration. See 91 Cong. Rec. 364, 
        365, 79th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 22, 1945.
            Ronald Reagan's second inaugural in 1985 was the coldest on 
        record, with an estimated noon temperature of seven degrees 
        Fahrenheit and wind chills well below zero. Because Jan. 20, 
        1985, fell on a Sunday, President Reagan was sworn in privately 
        on that date at the White House and had scheduled his public 
        inauguration ceremony for Monday, Jan. 21. The cold weather 
        forced the ceremony to be moved indoors to the Capitol Rotunda, 
        and limited space dictated that it be a semi-private ceremony. 
        See 131 Cong. Rec. 630-633, 99th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 21, 
        1985. See also House Rules and Manual Sec. 159 (2007).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 317]]

    Since the 1981 inauguration of Ronald Reagan, the ceremony has been 
held on a terrace on the Capitol's West Front.(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 4. See 127 Cong. Rec. 540-543, 97th Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In preparation for the ceremonies, a joint committee is created 
months in advance of the event.(5) The committee is 
established by concurrent resolution in the preceding Congress and the 
authority continues in the following Congress by a continuing 
resolution.(6)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. See Sec. 25.1, infra.
 6. See Sec. 25.4, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On inauguration morning, the House proceeds to participate in the 
ceremonies and stands adjourned at the conclusion of the ceremony 
pursuant to an adjournment resolution.(7)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 7. See Sec. 25.7, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    At the designated hour of the morning, the Senate and House leave 
their respective Halls each to attend the ceremonies.
    The House procession is traditionally headed by the Sergeant at 
Arms bearing the mace and led by the Speaker pro tempore (who is 
oftentimes the Dean of the House), followed by the House leadership, 
committee chairmen, ranking minority members, and other Members in 
order of seniority.(8) The officers of the House have 
participated in the procession as well.(9)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 8. See, e.g., Sec. 25.8, infra.
 9. Ibid.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Vice Presidential oath of office has been administered 
variously by the outgoing Vice President,(10) by a Senator 
from the Vice President's home state,(11) by the Senate 
Minority Leader,(12) by the Speaker of the 
House,(13) and by a Justice of the U.S. Supreme 
Court.(14)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
10. 91 Cong. Rec. 364, 365, 79th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 22, 1945 
        (retiring Vice President Henry A. Wallace); 87 Cong. Rec. 188-
        190, 77th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 29, 1941 (retiring Vice 
        President John N. Garner).
11. 103 Cong. Rec. 804-806, 85th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 21, 1957 (U.S. 
        Senator William F. Knowland); 99 Cong. Rec. 450-452, 83d Cong. 
        1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1953 (U.S. Senator William F. Knowland).
12. 115 Cong. Rec. 1288-92, 91st Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1969 (Senate 
        Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen).
13. See 151 Cong. Rec. 295-298, 109th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 2005 
        (Speaker Hastert); 123 Cong. Rec. 1861-63, 95th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 20, 1977 (Speaker O'Neill); and 111 Cong. Rec. 984-
        986, 89th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1965 (Speaker McCormack).
14. See, e.g., 147 Cong. Rec. 547-549, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 22, 
        2001 (Chief Justice Rehnquist); 143 Cong. Rec. 470-473, 105th 
        Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1997 (Associate Justice Ginsburg); 
        and 119 Cong. Rec. 1658-61, 93d Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1973 
        (Chief Justice Burger).

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 318]]

    The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has administered the oath to 
the President at every regularly scheduled inauguration since Chief 
Justice Oliver Ellsworth swore in President John Adams in 1797.
    Following the swearing-in, the President makes an inaugural 
address.
    In the closing, a well-known American musical group or person may 
perform a patriotic musical or poetic selection.
    A benediction is pronounced and the ceremony comes to an 
end.                          -------------------

Joint Committee for Inaugural Ceremonies

Sec. 25.1 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and agreed to a 
    Senate concurrent resolution establishing a Joint Congressional 
    Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies.

    On Mar. 16, 2004,(1) the following proceedings occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 150 Cong. Rec. 4380, 108th Cong. 2d Sess.
            For other examples, see 146 Cong. Rec. 2720, 2721, 106th 
        Cong. 2d Sess., Mar. 14, 2000 (S. Con. Res. 89); 142 Cong. Rec. 
        21405, 104th Cong. 2d Sess., Aug. 2, 1996 (S. Con. Res. 47); 
        138 Cong. Rec. 16712, 102d Cong. 2d Sess., June 29, 1992 (S. 
        Con. Res. 103).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

            ESTABLISHING JOINT CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE ON INAUGURAL 
                                   CEREMONIES

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Ohio]. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous 
    consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate concurrent 
    resolution (S. Con. Res. 94) establishing the Joint Congressional 
    Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, and ask for its immediate 
    consideration in the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Chris Chocola (IN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                 S. Con Res. 94

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring),

     SECTION 1. ESTABLISHMENT OF JOINT COMMITTEE.

       There is established a Joint Congressional Committee on 
     Inaugural Ceremonies (in this resolution referred to as the 
     ``joint committee''), consisting of 3 Senators and 3 Members 
     of the House of Representatives appointed by the President of 
     the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, 
     respectively. The joint committee is authorized to make the 
     necessary arrangements for the inauguration of the President-
     elect and the Vice President-elect of the United States.

     SEC. 2. SUPPORT OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE.

           The joint committee--
       (1) is authorized to utilize appropriate equipment and the 
     services of appropriate

[[Page 319]]

     personnel of departments and agencies of the Federal 
     Government, under arrangements between the joint committee 
     and the heads of the departments and agencies, in connection 
     with the inaugural proceedings and ceremonies; and
       (2) may accept gifts and donations of goods and services to 
     carry out its responsibilities. . . .

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.(3)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: The concurrent resolution has no effect 
        beyond a Congress in which it is agreed to. A new concurrent 
        resolution continuing the joint committee at the beginning of 
        the Congress must be adopted at the beginning of the next 
        Congress. See Sec. 25.4, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Appointments to Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies

Sec. 25.2 The Chair announced the Speaker's appointment of members to 
    the Joint Committee on Inaugural Arrangements.

    On Mar. 16, 2004,(1) the Chair announced the Speaker's 
appointments to the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural 
Ceremonies:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 150 Cong. Rec. 4381, 108th Cong. 2d Sess.
            For other examples, see 146 Cong. Rec. 7055, 106th Cong. 2d 
        Sess., May 8, 2000; and 142 Cong. Rec. 22372, 104th Cong. 2d 
        Sess., Sept. 10, 1996.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS TO JOINT CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE ON 
                              INAUGURAL CEREMONIES

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Pursuant to Senate 
    Concurrent Resolution 94, 108th Congress, and the order of the 
    House of December 8, 2003, the Chair announces the Speaker's 
    appointment of the following Members of the House to the Joint 
    Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Chris Chocola (IN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. Hastert, Illinois;
        Mr. DeLay, Texas;
        Ms. Pelosi, California.

    On Jan. 4, 2005,(3) the Members of the Joint Committee 
were reappointed, as follows:(4)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 151 Cong. Rec. 68, 69, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
 4. For another example, see 139 Cong. Rec. 104, 103d Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Jan. 5, 1993.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         REAPPOINTMENT AS MEMBERS OF JOINT COMMITTEE TO MAKE NECESSARY 
              ARRANGEMENT FOR THE INAUGURATION ON JANUARY 20, 2005

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(5) Pursuant to Senate 
    Concurrent Resolution 2, 109th Congress, the Chair announces the 
    Speaker's reappointment as members of the joint committee to make 
    the necessary arrangements for the inauguration of the President-
    elect and the Vice President-elect of the United States on the 20th 
    day of January, 2005, the following Members of the House:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 5. Ray LaHood (IL).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. Hastert of Illinois,

[[Page 320]]

        Mr. DeLay of Texas,
        Ms. Pelosi of California.

Use of the Rotunda by the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural 
    Ceremonies

Sec. 25.3 The House, by unanimous consent, considered and agreed to a 
    Senate concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Capitol 
    Rotunda and other Federal resources in connection with Presidential 
    inaugural ceremonies on Jan. 20, 2005.

    Several months before the inauguration, the House considered and 
agreed to a concurrent resolution authorizing the use of the Capitol 
Rotunda in connection with the Presidential inaugural ceremonies as a 
predicate on which to plan and to prepare for logistics and security.
    On Mar. 16, 2004,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 150 Cong. Rec. 4380, 108th Cong. 2d Sess. See Sec. 25.4, infra, for 
        the continuing resolution related to this concurrent 
        resolution.
            For other examples, see 146 Cong. Rec. 2721, 106th Cong. 2d 
        Sess., Mar. 14, 2000 (S. Con. Res. 90); 142 Cong. Rec. 21405, 
        104th Cong. 2d. Sess., Aug. 2, 1996 (S. Con. Res. 48; 138 Cong. 
        Rec. 16712, 102d Cong. 2d Sess., June 29, 1992 (S. Con. Res. 
        103).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

           AUTHORIZING USE OF CAPITOL ROTUNDA BY JOINT CONGRESSIONAL 
                       COMMITTEE ON INAUGURAL CEREMONIES

        Mr. [Robert W.] NEY [of Indiana]. Madam Speaker, I ask 
    unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the Senate 
    concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 93) authorizing the use of the 
    rotunda of the Capitol by the Joint Congressional Committee on 
    Inaugural Ceremonies, and ask for its immediate consideration in 
    the House.
        The Clerk read the title of the Senate concurrent resolution.
        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(2) Is there objection to 
    the request of the gentleman from Ohio?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Chris Chocola (IN).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        There was no objection.
        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                S. Con. Res. 93

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring),

     SECTION 1. USE OF THE ROTUNDA OF THE CAPITOL BY THE JOINT 
                   CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE ON INAUGURAL 
                   CEREMONIES.

       The rotunda of the United States Capitol is authorized to 
     be used on January 20, 2005, by the Joint Congressional 
     Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies in connection with the 
     proceedings and ceremonies conducted for the inauguration of 
     the President-elect and the Vice President-elect of the 
     United States.

  Mr. [John B.] LARSON of Connecticut. Madam Speaker, I support S. Con. 
Res. 93, which authorizes planning for the use of the Capitol Rotunda 
on January 20, 2005, for the proceedings and ceremonies conducted for 
the inauguration of the President and Vice President of the United 
States. We traditionally pass this measure to begin the period of 
security planning and rehearsal for the inaugural, since the Rotunda is 
routinely used for ceremonial purposes during the inauguration and 
could host the event itself, depending on the weather at that time.

[[Page 321]]

  The 108th Congress does not formally authorize use of the Rotunda 
through this measure, since it will expire on January 3, 2005, like all 
concurrent resolutions which are not made part of permanent law and 
must be renewed in the 109th Congress. However, it initiates the period 
of pre-event planning necessary to bring one of our democracy's most 
memorable and historic ceremonies to fruition smoothly and safely. I 
urge its adoption.

        The Senate concurrent resolution was concurred in.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 25.4 The House considered and agreed to a privileged Senate 
    concurrent resolution continuing the authority of the Joint 
    Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies and the authority to use the 
    Capitol Rotunda for such ceremonies.

    On Jan. 4, 2005,(1) the following proceedings took 
place:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 7, 109th Cong. 1st Sess. See also Sec. Sec. 25.1, 
        25.3, supra.
            For other examples of similar continuing resolutions, see 
        147 Cong. Rec. 37, 38, 107th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 3, 2001 (S. 
        Con. Res. 2); 143 Cong. Rec. 143, 105th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 
        7, 1997 (S. Con. Res. 2); 139 Cong. Rec. 100, 103d Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 5, 1993 (S. Con. Res. 2); 135 Cong. Rec. 84, 101st 
        Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 3, 1989 (S. Con. Res. 2).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

        A message from the Senate by Mr. Monahan, one of its clerks, 
    announced that the Senate has passed bills of the following titles 
    in which the concurrence of the House is requested: . . .

            S. Con. Res. 2. Concurrent resolution to extend the life of 
        the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies and 
        the provisions of S. Con. Res. 93 and S. Con. Res. 94 of the 
        One Hundred Eighth Congress . . 
        .                          -------------------

             PROVIDING FOR CONTINUATION OF JOINT COMMITTEE TO MAKE 
                           INAUGURATION ARRANGEMENTS

        The SPEAKER pro tempore(2) laid before the House the 
    following privileged(3) Senate concurrent resolution (S. 
    Con. Res. 2) to extend the life of the Joint Congressional 
    Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies and the provision of S. Con. Res. 
    93 and S. Con. Res. 94 of the One Hundred Eighth Congress.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Ray LaHood (IL).
 3. Parliamentarian's Note: The concurrent resolution for the 
        continuation of the joint committee is privileged as essential 
        to the role of Congress in the inauguration.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Clerk read the Senate concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                 S. Con. Res. 2

            Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
        concurring), That effective from January 3, 2005, the joint 
        committee created by Senate Concurrent Resolution 94 (108th 
        Congress), to make the necessary arrangements for the 
        inauguration, is hereby continued with the same power and 
        authority provided for in that resolution.
            Sec. 2. Effective from January 4, 2005, the provisions of 
        Senate Concurrent Resolution 93 (108th Congress), to authorize 
        the rotunda of the United States Capitol to be used in 
        connection with the proceedings

[[Page 322]]

        and ceremonies for the inauguration of the President-elect and 
        the Vice President-elect of the United States, are continued 
        with the same power and authority provided for in that 
        resolution.

        The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the Senate 
    concurrent resolution is concurred in.
        There was no objection.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Vice Presidential Inauguration Included

Sec. 25.5 Ceremonies for the inauguration of both the President and the 
    Vice President are now held on the steps of the 
    Capitol.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. The Vice President was inaugurated in the Senate Chamber until Jan. 
        20, 1937.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Feb. 3, 1956,(2) the concurrent resolution providing 
for the joint inaugural planning committee was amended in the Senate to 
provide for the inclusion of the Vice President-elect:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 102 Cong. Rec. 1958, 84th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         JOINT COMMITTEE TO ARRANGE FOR INAUGURATION OF THE PRESIDENT-
                                     ELECT

        The concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 64) providing for a 
    joint committee to arrange for the inauguration of the President-
    elect of the United States, January 20, 1957, was announced as next 
    in order. . . .
        Mr. [William H.] KNOWLAND [of California]. Mr. President, I 
    should like to offer an amendment on line 6, after the word 
    ``President-elect'', to add the words ``and Vice President-elect.''
        Originally, the Vice President of the United States was 
    inaugurated in the Senate Chamber, but in recent years the 
    inaugural ceremonies for both the President-elect and the Vice 
    President-elect have been held on the steps of the Capitol 
    building. . . .
        Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I conferred with the ranking 
    Republican member of the Committee on Rules and Administration.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER.(3) The clerk will state the 
    amendment offered by the Senator from California.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Frederick G. Payne (ME).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The Legislative Clerk. It is proposed to insert in line 6, 
    after the word ``President-elect'', the words ``and Vice President-
    elect.''
        The amendment was agreed to.
        The concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 64), as amended, was 
    agreed to, as follows:

            Resolved, etc., That a joint committee consisting of 3 
        Senators and 3 Representatives, to be appointed by the 
        President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives, respectively, is authorized to make the 
        necessary arrangements for the inauguration of the President-
        elect and the Vice President-elect of the United States on the 
        25th day of January 1957.

Sunday Inauguration Date

Sec. 25.6 Debate occurred in the Senate concerning Inauguration Day 
    1957 falling on a

[[Page 323]]

    Sunday for the fifth time in history.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See House Rules and Manual Sec. 150 (2007). See also 3 Hinds' 
        Precedents Sec. 1996; and 6 Cannon's Precedents Sec. 449.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Feb. 16, 1956,(2) Senate Concurrent Resolution 64 was 
called up by unanimous consent, and the Presiding Officer laid before 
the Senate the House amendment thereto. The proceedings were as 
follows:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 102 Cong. Rec. 2668, 2669, 84th Cong. 2d Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

         JOINT COMMITTEE TO ARRANGE FOR INAUGURATION OF THE PRESIDENT-
                                     ELECT

        Mr. [Theodore F.] GREEN [of Rhode Island]. Mr. President, I 
    desire to have Senate Concurrent Resolution 64 called up.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Bible(3) in the chair). 
    The unfinished business is Senate Resolution 168, Calendar 1408.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Alan H. Bible (NV).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mr. [Earle C.] CLEMENTS [of Kentucky]. Mr. President, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the unfinished business be temporarily laid 
    aside, so that Senate Concurrent Resolution 64 may be considered, 
    in accordance with the wish of the Senator from Rhode Island.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER laid before the Senate the amendment of 
    the House of Representatives to the concurrent resolution (S. Con. 
    Res. 64) providing for a joint committee to arrange for the 
    inauguration of the President-elect of the United States, January 
    20, 1957, which was in line 7, to strike out ``twentieth'' and 
    insert ``twenty-first''.
        Mr. GREEN. Mr. President, let me say that Senate Concurrent 
    Resolution 64 has been agreed to by both the Senate and the House 
    of Representatives, and amendments to the concurrent resolution 
    have been adopted by both bodies.
        The concurrent resolution as submitted by me, and passed as 
    agreed to by the Senate on February 3, 1956, provided for a joint 
    committee to arrange for the inauguration of the President-elect of 
    the United States, on January 20, 1957. On that day I was absent 
    from the Senate, having been excused in order to attend the 
    inauguration of the new President of Brazil. In my absence, Senate 
    Concurrent Resolution 64 was amended to include the Vice-President-
    elect.
        Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, as amended by the Senate, was 
    agreed to by the House of Representatives on February 7, 1956, 
    after it was further amended by the House to change the date in the 
    text of the resolution from ``January 20, 1957'' to ``January 21, 
    1957.'' The concurrent resolution is now back before the Senate for 
    consideration of the House amendment.
        I have no objection to either the Senate amendment, which added 
    the Vice-President-elect, or to the House amendment, which changed 
    the date from January 20, 1957, to January 21, 1957. I believe, 
    however, that a statement in clarification of my position and of 
    proposed further amendments, which I am about to offer, is in 
    order.
        As my colleagues in the Congress well know, under the 
    Constitution, as

[[Page 324]]

    amended, the terms of the President and the Vice President end at 
    noon on the 20th day of January 1957, and the terms of the 
    President-elect and the Vice-President-elect begin at the same 
    instant--Constitution of the United States, amendment XX, effective 
    October 15, 1933; 62d United States Statutes at Large, page 672; 
    title 3, United States Code, section 101. Accordingly, although I 
    was well aware when I submitted Senate Concurrent Resolution 64 
    that the 20th day of January, in the year 1957, would fall on a 
    Sunday. I employed that date in my resolution because it was fixed 
    by the established law.
        In 1957, for the first time since the ratification of the 20th 
    amendment, January 20 will fall on a Sunday in an inaugural year. 
    Under the old law, when Presidents of the United States were 
    inaugurated on March 4, there wee four occasions on which March 4 
    fell on a Sunday in an inaugural year. The former occasions were: 
    In 1971, Woodrow Wilson's second term; in 1877, Rutherford B. 
    Hayes' first term; in 1849, Zachary Taylor's first term; and in 
    1821, the beginning of James Monroe's second term.
        In 1916, a Senate concurrent resolution was adopted by the 
    Congress providing for a committee to arrange for the inauguration 
    of the President elect, which carried in its text the date ``March 
    5, 1917.'' I refer to Senate Concurrent Resolution 27 of the 64th 
    Congress. President Wilson actually took his oath of office as 
    President, however, at the Capitol, on Sunday morning, March 4, 
    1917. Present at the occasion were his Cabinet and a few friends. 
    On the next day, Monday, March 5, 1917, the inaugural ceremony was 
    repeated in public for the benefit of the crowd which assembled at 
    the east front of the Capitol.
        On the three prior occasions in our history when March 4 fell 
    on a Sunday in an inaugural year, there were no similar concurrent 
    resolutions. In 1877, President Hayes took the oath of office on 
    Saturday, March 3. Chief Justice Waite administered the oath in the 
    red room of the White House. On the following Monday, March 5, the 
    Chief Justice again swore President Hayes in at the formal ceremony 
    on the occasion of the President's Inaugural Address.
        In 1849, President Taylor did not take his oath of office until 
    Monday, March 5, at 12 noon. It took place at the public 
    inauguration ceremonies in front of the great portico. This 
    occasion gave rise to a claim, apparently never completely 
    resolved, that Senator David R. Atchison, President pro tempore of 
    the Senate, was, under the Succession Act of 1792, actually 
    President of the United States for 1 day, beginning at noon on 
    March 4, 1849.
        In 1821, President Monroe took the oath of office on March 5.
        Today, the ending and beginning of a Presidential and Vice 
    Presidential term is clearly defined in the 20th amendment to the 
    Constitution which provides:

            The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at 
        noon on the 20th day of January * * * and the terms of their 
        successors shall then begin.

        In my humble opinion, if the President-elect of the United 
    States does not take his oath of office until noon on Monday, 
    January 21, 1957, then, pursuant to the provisions of Public Law

[[Page 325]]

    199 of the 80th Congress, the Speaker of the House of 
    Representatives will actually be the President of the United States 
    from noon on January 20, 1957, until noon on the following day. Of 
    course, I have no objection to having the Honorable Sam Rayburn 
    occupy the White House and only regret that his term of office, 
    under those circumstances, would be so short lived. To those who 
    are opposed to Sam Rayburn's elevation to this high office, I can 
    only say that they will have to use irresistible persuasion on the 
    next President-elect to make him take his oath of office at noon on 
    Sunday, January 20, 1957.
        Because the people of the State of Rhode Island, the smallest 
    State in the Union, have no aversion to a citizen of the largest 
    State taking possession of the White House, and because I feel that 
    Senate Concurrent Resolution 64 provides for a committee to make 
    arrangements for the public ceremonies attendant upon the 
    assumption of office by a new President, I now suggest that the 
    Senate agree to the amendment adopted by the House. In order to 
    avoid any misunderstanding or any possible interpretation of Senate 
    Concurrent Resolution 64 which would affect the law on Presidential 
    succession, however, I offer an amendment to the resolution, as 
    follows: On page 1, line 6, before the word ``inauguration'', 
    insert the word ``public.''
        In addition, I offer a further amendment, as follows: In the 
    title of Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, before the word 
    ``inauguration'' insert the word ``public''; after the words 
    ``President-elect'', insert the words ``and Vice President-elect''; 
    and, after the word ``January'', strike the date ``20'', and insert 
    instead the date ``21.''
        I ask unanimous consent that my amendments to Senate Concurrent 
    Resolution 64 be now considered and approved; and that Senate 
    Concurrent Resolution 64, as amended, be agreed to, by the Senate.
        Mr. [William F.] KNOWLAND [of California]. Mr. President, will 
    the Senator yield?
        Mr. GREEN. I yield.
        Mr. KNOWLAND. I was wondering if the Senator would care to 
    amplify the reasons for inserting the word ``public,'' rather than, 
    in the original language, merely referring to the ``inauguration.'' 
    As the Senator will recall, at the fourth inaugural of President 
    Franklin D. Roosevelt, he determined to have the ceremony at the 
    White House, since it was a case of reelection to the office. No 
    one knows who the next President of the United States may be. He 
    may be a reelected President or a new President.
        Mr. GREEN. The idea is that with these four amendments--two of 
    which have already been adopted, and the two I now offer--it will 
    be possible to distinguish between the public inauguration and 
    privately taking the oath in the White House or anywhere else the 
    President-elect might choose. Of course, we would not want to do 
    away with the public inauguration. Otherwise, as I have tried to 
    make clear, this ambiguity might make it possible for the claim to 
    be made that someone else than the elected President was President 
    during that one day.
        Mr. KNOWLAND. All I wish to do is clarify the legislative 
    history. Let us assume, for the moment, that President Eisenhower 
    were reelected, and that he might choose, as President

[[Page 326]]

    Franklin D. Roosevelt did, to have an inaugural ceremony at the 
    White House instead of at the Capitol. Would the language suggested 
    by the Senator foreclose the joint committee from such 
    arrangements?
        Mr. GREEN. No. As I understand, he could take the oath 
    privately in the White House on Sunday, January 20, and later a 
    public inauguration could be held, the next day. We might 
    distinguish between the two ceremonies, and call one the 
    inauguration and the other the affirmation, or celebration of the 
    inauguration.
        Mr. KNOWLAND. I understand that. However, because of the fact 
    that January 20 falls on Sunday, the President-elect might 
    privately take the oath of office on Sunday, and have the public or 
    formal ceremonies the following day.
        Mr. GREEN. We might call that the installation.
        Mr. KNOWLAND. But suppose the present President should be 
    reelected, as occurred during the Franklin D. Roosevelt 
    administration, and that he should choose to have the ceremony at 
    the White House. Would that be foreclosed under the language 
    suggested by the Senator?
        Mr. GREEN. No; it would not be foreclosed. He might forego the 
    public inauguration if he so desired.
        Mr. [Leverett] SALTONSTALL [of Massachusetts]. Mr. President, 
    will the Senator yield?
        Mr. GREEN. I yield.
        Mr. SALTONSTALL. I think the Senator from Rhode Island has made 
    it clear, but in order to make the Record still clearer, let me ask 
    one or two questions.
        The President would take his oath on Sunday and become the 
    President of the United States, whether he were a reelected 
    President or a new President.
        Mr. GREEN. That is correct.
        Mr. SALTONSTALL. In connection with the public inauguration on 
    Monday, is it the Senator's idea that the President-elect should 
    again take the oath, or would the ceremonies on Monday be 
    ceremonies of celebration, when he should make his speech and go 
    through with all the other ceremonies?
        Mr. GREEN. I think the public would like to see him take the 
    oath over again. However, I do not think it is necessary legally.
        Mr. [Herbert H.] LEHMAN [of New York]. Mr. President, will the 
    Senator yield?
        Mr. GREEN. I yield.
        Mr. LEHMAN. We have had some experience with matters of this 
    kind in the State of New York.
        The Constitution of the State of New York provides that the 
    term of a governor shall end at midnight on December 31. However, 
    he is not inaugurated until noon of the following day. Invariably 
    the Governor, whether he be a new governor or a governor who has 
    held office previously, has taken his oath of office at the 
    executive mansion at 1 minute after 12 o'clock midnight December 
    31, and has been publicly inaugurated the following day.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The first amendment offered by the 
    Senator from Rhode Island will be stated.
        The Legislative Clerk. On page 1, line 6 before the word 
    ``inauguration'' it is proposed to insert the word ``public.''
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The amendment is not in order, because

[[Page 327]]

    the Senate cannot amend its own concurrent resolution after it has 
    been agreed to by the House.
        Mr. GREEN. Mr. President, may I ask unanimous consent that the 
    amendment be held to be in order, if a point of order is raised?
        Mr. CLEMENTS. Will the Chair state the parliamentary situation?
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Chair has held that the amendment 
    offered by the Senator from Rhode Island [Green] adding the word 
    ``public'' is not in order.
        Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, a parliamentary inquiry.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator will state it.
        Mr. KNOWLAND. If the Senate does not concur in the House 
    amendment and requests a conference with the House, would it be 
    possible for the conferees to make the change?
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Chair is advised that the conferees 
    would not have any authority to take into consideration any 
    amendments which were not in disagreement.
        Mr. CLEMENTS. Mr. President, will the Chair state the procedure 
    that should be followed in connection with this matter?
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Chair is advised that all that the 
    Senate may consider is the amendment of the House of 
    Representatives, which is before it.
        Mr. GREEN. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that I may 
    withdraw my amendment, and merely move that the Senate concur in 
    the House amendment.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection? The Chair hears 
    none, and it is so ordered.
        Mr. GREEN. I believe the understanding is perfectly clear on 
    the Record without the use of the word ``public.'' I move that the 
    Senate concur in the amendment of the House of Representatives.
        The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the 
    motion of the Senator from Rhode Island.
        The motion was agreed to.

Inaugural Procedures Reviewed

Sec. 25.7 The House considered and adopted a privileged resolution 
    providing that at a designated time on Inauguration Day the House 
    shall proceed to the West Front of the Capitol to attend the 
    ceremony, and that at the conclusion of the ceremony the House 
    shall stand adjourned until a day and time certain pursuant to an 
    adjournment resolution.

    On Jan. 4, 2005,(1) the House considered and adopted a 
privileged resolution providing that at a designated time on 
Inauguration Day the House shall proceed to the West Front of the 
Capitol to attend the ceremony, and that at the conclusion of the 
ceremony the House shall stand adjourned until

[[Page 328]]

a day and time certain pursuant to an adjournment 
resolution:(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 69, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
 2. Parliamentarian's Note: In an improvement over prior years' 
        resolutions, this one acknowledged the role of a concurrent 
        resolution of adjournment in providing for the House to stand 
        adjourned for more than three constitutional days (as opposed 
        to appearing itself to grant such permission). For 
        illustrations of the previous practice, see 147 Cong. Rec. 38, 
        107th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 3, 2001 (H. Res. 10, providing that 
        the House shall stand adjourned to a day certain ``or pursuant 
        to such other concurrent resolution of adjournment as may then 
        apply''); 143 Cong. Rec. 143, 105th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 7, 
        1997 (H. Res. 8, providing for adjournment until a date and 
        time certain without reference to an adjournment resolution); 
        139 Cong. Rec. 104, 103d Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 5, 1993 (H. Res. 
        10, providing for procession to the West Front for the 
        inauguration but not adjournment); 135 Cong. Rec. 244, 101st 
        Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 19, 1989 (H. Res. 40, providing for 
        adjournment until a date and time certain without reference to 
        an adjournment resolution); and 131 Cong. Rec. 418, 99th Cong. 
        1st Sess., Jan. 3, 1985 (H. Res. 10, providing for adjournment 
        until a date and time certain without reference to an 
        adjournment resolution).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        PROVIDING FOR ATTENDANCE AT INAUGURAL CEREMONIES ON JANUARY 20, 
                                      2005

        Mr. [Tom] DeLAY [of Texas]. Mr. Speaker, I offer a privileged 
    resolution (H. Res. 9) and ask for its immediate consideration.
        The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                                   H. Res. 9

            Resolved, That at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, January 20, 2005, 
        the House shall proceed to the West Front of the Capitol for 
        the purpose of attending the inaugural ceremonies of the 
        President and Vice President of the United States; and that 
        upon the conclusion of the ceremonies the House stands 
        adjourned until 2 p.m. on Tuesday, January 25, 2005, pursuant 
        to such concurrent resolution of adjournment as may so permit.

        The resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

    On that same day,(3) the House adopted a privileged 
concurrent resolution providing for the adjournment of the House for 
more than three days until Inauguration Day, and then from Inauguration 
Day to a date certain more than three days hence:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. 151 Cong. Rec. 69, 109th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 4, 2005.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

            PROVIDING FOR AN ADJOURNMENT OR RECESS OF THE TWO HOUSES

        Mr. DeLAY. Mr. Speaker, I offer a privileged concurrent 
    resolution (H. Con. Res. 2) and ask for its immediate 
    consideration.
        The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                                 H. Con. Res. 2

            Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
        concurring),

[[Page 329]]

        That when the House adjourns on the legislative day of 
        Thursday, January 6, 2005, on a motion offered pursuant to this 
        concurrent resolution by its Majority Leader or his designee, 
        it stand adjourned until 10 a.m. on Thursday, January 20, 2005, 
        or until the time of any reassembly pursuant to section 2 of 
        this concurrent resolution, whichever occurs first; that when 
        the House adjourns on the legislative day of Thursday, January 
        20, 2005, it stand adjourned until 2 p.m. on Tuesday, January 
        25, 2005, or until the time of any reassembly pursuant to 
        section 2 of this concurrent resolution, whichever occurs 
        first; and that when the Senate recesses or adjourns on 
        Thursday, January 6, 2005, or Friday, January 7, 2005, on a 
        motion offered pursuant to this concurrent resolution by its 
        Majority Leader or his designee, it stand recessed or adjourned 
        until noon on Thursday, January 20, 2005, or at such other time 
        on that day as may be specified by its Majority Leader or his 
        designee in the motion to recess or adjourn, or until the time 
        of any reassembly pursuant to section 2 of this concurrent 
        resolution, whichever occurs first.
            Sec. 2. The Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of 
        the Senate, or their respective designees, acting jointly after 
        consultation with the Minority Leader of the House and the 
        Minority Leader of the Senate, shall notify the Members of the 
        House and the Senate, respectively, to reassemble at such place 
        and time as they may designate whenever, in their opinion, the 
        public interest shall warrant it.

        The concurrent resolution was agreed to.
        A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

Sec. 25.8 The Chair announced the policy for the seating of Members 
    (and former Members) for the inaugural ceremonies.

    On Jan. 20, 2005,(1) the Chair made an announcement 
regarding the assembling and attendance of the House at the inaugural 
ceremonies on the East Front of the Capitol.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 151 Cong. Rec. 267, 109th Cong. 1st Sess.
 2. For other illustrations, see 147 Cong. Rec. 163, 107th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 20, 2001; 143 Cong. Rec. 381, 105th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 20, 1997; 139 Cong. Rec. 381, 103d Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Jan. 20, 1993; 135 Cong. Rec. 324, 325, 101st Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Jan. 20, 1989; and 131 Cong. Rec. 690, 99th Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Jan. 21, 1985.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER pro tempore.(3) The Chair announces that 
    sitting Members are being delivered their official pins in order to 
    be seated on the platform. There are no extra seats available, so 
    former Members cannot join the procession. The same holds true for 
    children. They can neither go with the procession nor be seated on 
    the platform.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. Michael K. Simpson (ID).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The area where Members of the House are to be seated is not 
    covered. Members should keep this fact in mind in deciding whether 
    to wear overcoats and hats.
        The Sergeant-at-Arms will precede the procession bearing the 
    mace. The Clerk will escort the Members to the west front of the 
    Capitol. The procession will be led by the dean of the

[[Page 330]]

    House, followed by the House leadership, committee chairmen, 
    ranking minority members, and then other Members in order of 
    seniority.
        The House leadership, committee chairmen, and ranking minority 
    members shall retire to the holding room upon leaving the Chamber.
        The Chair would encourage Members, as they gather in order of 
    seniority, to congregate by ``classes'' in the well.
        Pursuant to House Resolution 9, the Members of the House will 
    now proceed to the west front to attend the inaugural ceremonies 
    for the President and the Vice President of the United States.
        Upon completion of the ceremony, pursuant to House Resolution 
    9, 109th Congress, the House will stand adjourned.
        Pursuant to House Concurrent Resolution 2, 109th Congress, that 
    adjournment will be until 2 p.m. on Tuesday, January 25, 2005.
        Thereupon, at 10 o'clock and 22 minutes a.m., the Members of 
    the House, preceded by the Sergeant-at-Arms and the Speaker, 
    proceeded to the west front of the Capitol.

Appointment of Speaker Pro Tempore

Sec. 25.9 The Speaker has designated the Dean of the House as Speaker 
    pro tempore to lead the House procession to the inauguration of the 
    President and the Vice President.

    On Jan. 19, 1989,(1) the Speaker designated the Dean of 
the House to act as Speaker pro tempore when the House convened just 
prior to the inaugural ceremonies, as follows:(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 135 Cong. Rec. 244, 101st Cong. 1st Sess.
 2. For other examples, see 131 Cong. Rec. 420, 99th Cong. 1st Sess., 
        Jan. 3, 1985 (designating Jamie L. Whitten [MS] as Speaker pro 
        tempore on Inauguration Day); 127 Cong. Rec. 405, 97th Cong. 
        1st Sess., Jan. 19, 1981 (designating Jamie L. Whitten [MS] as 
        Speaker pro tempore on Inauguration Day); 119 Cong. Rec. 1555, 
        93d Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 18, 1973 (designating Wright Patman 
        [TX] as Speaker pro tempore on Inauguration Day); and 115 Cong. 
        Rec. 1184, 91st Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 17, 1969 (designating 
        Emanuel Celler [NY] as Speaker pro tempore on Inauguration 
        Day).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        DESIGNATION OF SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE TO LEAD HOUSE ``PROCESSION'' 
                            IN INAUGURATION CEREMONY

        The SPEAKER.(3) The Chair designates the Honorable 
    Jamie L. Whitten, of Mississippi, dean of the House, to act as 
    Speaker pro tempore on Friday, January 20, 1989, to lead the House 
    procession to the Inauguration of the President of the United 
    States.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 3. James C. Wright, Jr. (TX).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clerk Authorized to Receive Messages

Sec. 25.10 The Clerk is authorized to receive messages from the

[[Page 331]]

    President and the Senate, notwithstanding adjournment of the House, 
    prior to Inauguration Day.

    Prior to the existence of such authority in the standing 
rules,(1) the Clerk was routinely authorized to receive 
message by unanimous consent. For example, on Jan. 17, 
1969,(2) the Speaker(3) recognized Mr. Carl 
Albert, of Oklahoma, who asked unanimous consent that the Clerk be 
authorized to receive certain messages:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Rule II clause 2(h), House Rules and Manual Sec. 652 (2007).
 2. 115 Cong. Rec. 1184, 91st Cong. 1st Sess.
 3. John W. McCormack (MA).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        MR. ALBERT. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that 
    notwithstanding the adjournment of the House until Monday, January 
    20, 1969, the Clerk be authorized to receive messages from the 
    President and the Senate.
        THE SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Oklahoma?
        There was no objection.

 Inaugural Ceremonies

Sec. 25.11 Ceremonies for the inauguration of the President and Vice 
    President.(1)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. For other examples of inauguration programs, see 151 Cong. Rec. 
        295-298, 109th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 2005 (second inaugural 
        of President Bush); 143 Cong. Rec. 470-473, 105th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 21, 1997 (second inaugural of President Clinton); 
        139 Cong. Rec. 383-386, 103d Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1993 
        (first inaugural of President Clinton); 135 Cong. Rec. 303-306, 
        101st Cong., 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1989 (inaugural of President 
        George H.W. Bush); 131 Cong. Rec. 630-633, 99th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 21, 1985 (second inaugural of President Reagan); 
        127 Cong. Rec. 540-543, 97th Cong, 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1981 
        (first inaugural of President Reagan); 123 Cong. Rec. 1861-63, 
        95th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1977 (inaugural of President 
        Carter); 119 Cong. Rec. 1658-61, 93d Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 
        1973 (second inaugural of President Nixon); 115 Cong. Rec. 
        1289-92, 91st Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1969 (first inaugural 
        of President Nixon); 111 Cong. Rec. 984-986, 89th Cong. 1st 
        Sess., Jan. 20, 1965 (inaugural of President Johnson); and 107 
        Cong. Rec. 1010-1013, 87th Cong. 1st Sess., Jan. 20, 1961 
        (inaugural of President Kennedy).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    On Jan. 22, 2001,(2) the following proceedings took 
place in the Senate:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. 147 Cong. Rec. 547-549, 107th Cong. 1st Sess.
            Parliamentarian's Note: The Senate portion of the 
        Congressional Record carried the inaugural proceedings even 
        though the Senate was not in session during those proceedings. 
        The House customarily has not printed the proceedings, even 
        though it customarily remains in session for their duration.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

[[Page 332]]

                               INAUGURAL CEREMONY

        Mrs. [Kay Bailey] HUTCHISON [of Texas]. Mr. President, I ask 
    unanimous consent that the proceedings of Saturday's Inaugural 
    Ceremony be printed in today's Record.
        There being no objection, the proceedings of the Inaugural 
    Ceremony were ordered to be printed in the Record, as 
    follows:                          -------------------

         Inauguration Ceremony, Saturday, January 20, 2001, 11:47 a.m.

            Members of the House of Representatives, Members of the 
        Senate, Justices of the Supreme Court, nominees to the Cabinet, 
        the Governors of the States, and the Mayor of the District of 
        Columbia, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other distinguished 
        guests assembled on the West Front.
            Mr. Martin Paone, Senate Secretary for the Majority, 
        escorted Senator Clinton and Mrs. Gore, accompanied by Mrs. 
        Clegg Dodd, Mrs. Gephardt, and Mrs. Daschle, to the President's 
        platform.
            Mrs. Elizabeth Letchworth, Senate Secretary for the 
        Minority, escorted Mrs. Bush and Mrs. Cheney, accompanied by 
        Mrs. McConnell (Elaine Chao), Mrs. Lott, Mrs. Hastert, and Mrs. 
        Armey, to the President's platform.
            Mr. Jay Eagen, House CAO, Mr. Gary Sisco, Secretary of the 
        Senate, and Mr. Jeff Trandahl, Clerk of the House, escorted 
        President Clinton and Vice President Gore, accompanied by 
        Senator Dodd, Representative Gephardt, and Senator Daschle, to 
        the President's platform.
            Ms. Lani Gerst, Executive Director, JCCIC, Mrs. Loretta 
        Symms, Senate Deputy Sergeant at Arms, and Ms. Kerri Hanley, 
        House Deputy Sergeant at Arms, escorted Vice President-elect 
        Cheney, accompanied by Senator Lott and Representative Armey, 
        to the President's platform.
            Ms. Tamara Somerville, Chief of Staff, JCCIC, Mr. Jim 
        Ziglar, Senate Sergeant at Arms, and Mr. Bill Livingood, House 
        Sergeant at Arms, escorted President-elect Bush, accompanied by 
        Senator McConnell, Senator Dodd, Speaker Hastert, and Senator 
        Lott, to the President's platform.
            Mr. [Mitch] McCONNELL [of Kentucky]. Everyone, please be 
        seated so we can begin.
            Welcome to the 54th inauguration of the President and the 
        Vice President of the United States of America. Today we honor 
        the past in commemorating two centuries of inaugurations in 
        Washington, DC. As well, we embrace the future, this day 
        marking the first inauguration of the 21st century and the new 
        millennium.
            America has now spanned four centuries, her promise still 
        shining bright--beginning and present--linked by timeless 
        ideals and faith. The enduring strength of our Constitution, 
        which brings us to the West Front of the Capitol today, attests 
        to the wisdom of America's founders and the heroism of 
        generations of Americans who fought wars and toiled in peace to 
        preserve this legacy of liberty. In becoming the 43rd President 
        of the United States, George W. Bush will assume the sacred 
        trust as guardian of our Constitution. Dick Cheney will be 
        sworn in as our new Vice President. Witnessed by the Congress, 
        Supreme Court, Governors, and Presidents past, the current 
        President will stand by as the new President peacefully takes 
        office. This is a triumph of our democratic Republic, a 
        ceremony befitting a great nation.
            In his father's stead, the Rev. Franklin Graham is with us 
        today to lead the Nation in prayer. Please stand for the 
        invocation.
            Reverend Graham.

[[Page 333]]

            Reverend GRAHAM. Let us pray:
            Blessed are You, O Lord our God. Yours, O God, is the 
        greatness and the power and the glory and the majesty and the 
        splendor, for everything in heaven and Earth is Yours. Yours, O 
        Lord, is the kingdom. You are exalted as head over all. Wealth 
        and honor come from You. You are the ruler of all things. In 
        Your hands are strength and power to exalt and to give strength 
        to all.
            As President Lincoln once said, we have been the recipients 
        of the choicest bounties of heaven. We have been preserved 
        these many years in peace and prosperity. We have grown in 
        numbers, wealth, and power, as no other nation has ever grown, 
        but we have forgotten God. It behooves us then to humble 
        ourselves before the offended powers, to confess our national 
        sins, and to pray for clemency and forgiveness.
            O Lord, as we come together on this historic and solemn 
        occasion to inaugurate once again a President and Vice 
        President, teach us afresh that power, wisdom, and salvation 
        come only from Your hand.
            We pray, O Lord, for President-elect George W. Bush and 
        Vice President-elect Richard B. Cheney to whom You have 
        entrusted leadership of this Nation at this moment in history. 
        We pray that You will help them bring our country together so 
        that we may rise above partisan politics and seek the larger 
        vision of Your will for our Nation. Use them to bring 
        reconciliation between the races, healing to political wounds, 
        that we may truly become one nation under God.
            Give our new President, and all who advise him, calmness in 
        the face of storms, encouragement in the face of frustration, 
        and humility in the face of success. Give them the wisdom to 
        know and to do what is right and the courage to say no to all 
        that is contrary to Your statutes and holy law.
            Lord, we pray for their families, and especially their 
        wives, Laura Bush and Lynne Cheney, that they may sense Your 
        presence and know Your love.
            Today we entrust to You President and Senator Clinton and 
        Vice President and Mrs. Gore. Lead them as they journey through 
        new doors of opportunity to serve others.
            Now, O Lord, we dedicate this Presidential inaugural 
        ceremony to You. May this be the beginning of a new dawn for 
        America as we humble ourselves before You and acknowledge You 
        alone as our Lord, our Saviour, and our Redeemer.
            We pray this in the name of the Father and of the Son, the 
        Lord Jesus Christ, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.
            Mr. McCONNELL. Thank you, Reverend Graham.
            It is my distinct pleasure to introduce the Dupont Manual 
        Choir of Louisville, KY.
            (Performance by the Dupont Manual Choir of Louisville, KY.)
            Mr. McCONNELL. I now call on Senator Christopher J. Dodd of 
        Connecticut to introduce the Chief Justice of the United 
        States.
            Mr. DODD. Thank you, Senator McConnell.
            President and Senator Clinton, Vice President and Mrs. 
        Gore, President-elect and Mrs. Bush, and fellow citizens, the 
        Vice President-elect will now take the oath of office. His 
        wife, Lynne, and their daughters, Elizabeth Cheney Perry and 
        Mary Cheney, will hold the family Bible. I have the honor and 
        privilege to now present the Chief Justice of the United States 
        Supreme Court, the Hon. William Hobbs Rehnquist, to administer 
        the oath of office to the Vice President-elect, Richard Bruce 
        Cheney.
            (Applause.)

[[Page 334]]

            Mr. Chief Justice REHNQUIST. Mr. Cheney, are you ready to 
        take the oath? -
            Vice President-elect CHENEY. I am.
            Mr. Chief Justice Rehnquist. Please raise your right hand 
        and repeat after me.
            The Chief Justice of the United States, William Hobbs 
        Rehnquist, administered to the Vice President-elect the oath of 
        office prescribed by the Constitution, which he repeated, as 
        follows:
            ``I, Richard Bruce Cheney, do solemnly swear that I will 
        support and defend the Constitution of the United States 
        against all enemies foreign and domestic; that I will bear true 
        faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation 
        freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, 
        and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the 
        office of which I am about to enter. So help me God.''
            Mr. Chief Justice REHNQUIST. Congratulations.
            (The Marine Band performed ``Hail Columbia.'')
            (Applause.)
            Mr. McCONNELL. Ladies and gentlemen, Staff Sergeant Alec T. 
        Maly of the United States Army Band will now perform an 
        American medley.
            (Staff Sergeant Alec T. Maly sang a medley of American 
        music.)
            Mr. McCONNELL. It is now my high honor to again present the 
        Chief Justice of the United States who will administer the 
        Presidential oath of office. Everyone, please stand.
            (Applause.)
            Mr. Chief Justice REHNQUIST. Governor Bush, are you ready 
        to take the oath?
            President-elect BUSH. Yes, sir.
            Mr. Chief Justice REHNQUIST. Please raise your right hand 
        and repeat after me.
            The Chief Justice of the United States, William Hobbs 
        Rehnquist, administered to the President-elect the oath of 
        office prescribed by the Constitution, which he repeated, as 
        follows:
            ``I, George Walker Bush, do solemnly swear that I will 
        faithfully execute the office of President of the United States 
        and will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and 
        defend the Constitution of the United States. So help me God.''
            Mr. Chief Justice Rehnquist. Congratulations.
            (Applause.)
            Mr. McCONNELL. Ladies and gentlemen, the President of the 
        United States, George W. Bush.
            (Applause.)
            (Herald Trumpets play ``Ruffles and Flourishes'' and ``Hail 
        to the Chief,'' and 21-gun salute.)
            President BUSH. Thank you all.
            Chief Justice Rehnquist, President Carter, President Bush--
        --
            (Laughter, applause.)
            President Clinton, distinguished guests, and my fellow 
        citizens:
            This peaceful transfer of authority is rare in history, yet 
        common in our country. With a simple oath, we affirm old 
        traditions and make new beginnings.
            As I begin, I thank President Clinton for his service to 
        our Nation. -
            (Applause.)
            And I thank Vice President Gore for a contest conducted 
        with spirit and ended with grace.
            (Applause.)
            I am honored and humbled to stand here, where so many of 
        America's leaders have come before me and so many will follow.
            We have a place, all of us, in a long story; a story we 
        continue, but whose end we will not see. It is the story of a 
        new world that became a friend and liberator of the old, the 
        story of a slave-holding society that became a servant of 
        freedom, the

[[Page 335]]

        story of a power that went into the world to protect but not 
        possess, to defend but not to conquer. It is the American 
        story; a story of flawed and fallible people, united across the 
        generations by grand and enduring ideals.
            The grandest of these ideals is an unfolding American 
        promise: that everyone belongs, that everyone deserves a 
        chance, that no insignificant person was ever born.
            Americans are called to enact this promise in our lives and 
        in our laws. And though our Nation has sometimes halted, and 
        sometimes delayed, we must follow no other course.
            Through much of the last century, America's faith in 
        freedom and democracy was a rock in a raging sea. Now it is a 
        seed upon the wind, taking root in many nations.
            Our democratic faith is more than the creed of our country, 
        it is the inborn hope of our humanity; an ideal we carry but do 
        not own, a trust we bear and pass along. And even after nearly 
        225 years, we have a long way yet to travel.
            While many of our citizens prosper, others doubt the 
        promise--even the justice--of our own country. The ambitions of 
        some Americans are limited by failing schools, and hidden 
        prejudice, and the circumstances of their birth. And sometimes 
        our differences run so deep, it seems we share a continent, but 
        not a country.
            We do not accept this, and we will not allow it. Our unity, 
        our union, is the serious work of leaders and citizens in every 
        generation. And this is my solemn pledge: I will work to build 
        a single nation of justice and opportunity.
            (Applause.)
            I know this is within our reach, because we are guided by a 
        power larger than ourselves who creates us equal in His image.
            And we are confident in principles that unite and lead us 
        onward.
            America has never been united by blood or birth or soil. We 
        are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift 
        us above our interests, and teach us what it means to be 
        citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every 
        citizen must uphold them. And every immigrant, by embracing 
        these ideals, makes our country more, not less, American.
            (Applause.)
            Today we affirm a new commitment to live out our Nation's 
        promise through civility, courage, compassion, and character.
            America, at its best, matches a commitment to principle 
        with a concern for civility.
            A civil society demands from each of us good will and 
        respect, fair dealing and forgiveness.
            Some seem to believe that our politics can afford to be 
        petty because, in a time of peace, the stakes of our debates 
        appear small. But the stakes, for America, are never small. If 
        our country does not lead the cause of freedom, it will not be 
        led. If we do not turn the hearts of children toward knowledge 
        and character, we will lose their gifts and undermine their 
        idealism. If we permit our economy to drift and decline, the 
        vulnerable will suffer most.
            We must live up to the calling we share. Civility is not a 
        tactic or a sentiment. It is the determined choice of trust 
        over cynicism, of community over chaos. And this commitment, if 
        we keep it, is a way to shared accomplishment.
            America, at its best, is also courageous.
            Our national courage has been clear in times of depression 
        and war, when defeating common dangers defined our common good. 
        Now we must choose if the example of our fathers and mothers 
        will inspire us or condemn us. We must show courage in a time 
        of blessing by confronting

[[Page 336]]

        problems instead of passing them onto future generations.
            (Applause.)
            Together we will reclaim America's schools, before 
        ignorance and apathy claim more young lives. We will reform 
        Social Security and Medicare, sparing our children from 
        struggles we have the power to prevent. And we will reduce 
        taxes, to recover the momentum of our economy and reward the 
        efforts and enterprise of working Americans.
            (Applause.)
            We will build our defenses beyond challenge, lest weakness 
        invite challenge.
            (Applause.)
            We will confront weapons of mass destruction, so that a new 
        century is spared new horrors.
            The enemies of liberty and our country should make no 
        mistake, America remains engaged in the world, by history and 
        by choice, shaping a balance of power that favors freedom. We 
        will defend our allies and our interests. We will show purpose 
        without arrogance. We will meet aggression and bad faith with 
        resolve and strength. And to all nations, we will speak for the 
        values that gave our Nation birth.
            (Applause.)
            America, at its best, is compassionate.
            In the quiet of American conscience, we know that deep, 
        persistent poverty is unworthy of our Nation's promise. And 
        whatever our views of its cause, we can agree that children at 
        risk are not at fault. Abandonment and abuse are not acts of 
        God; they are failures of love.
            (Applause.)
            And the proliferation of prisons, however necessary, is no 
        substitute for hope and order in our souls.
            Where there is suffering, there is duty. Americans in need 
        are not strangers, they are citizens; not problems, but 
        priorities. And all of us are diminished when any are hopeless.
            (Applause.)
            Government has great responsibilities, for public safety 
        and public health, for civil rights and common schools. Yet 
        compassion is the work of a nation, not just a government. And 
        some needs and hurts are so deep, they will only respond to a 
        mentor's touch or a pastor's prayer. Church and charity, 
        synagogue and mosque lend our communities their humanity, and 
        they will have an honored place in our plans and in our laws.
            (Applause.)
            Many in our country do not know the pain of poverty. But we 
        can listen to those who do. And I can pledge our Nation to a 
        goal. When we see that wounded traveler on the road to Jericho, 
        we will not pass to the other side.
            (Applause.)
            America, at its best, is a place where personal 
        responsibility is valued and expected.
            Encouraging responsibility is not a search for scapegoats; 
        it is a call to conscience. And though it requires sacrifice, 
        it brings a deeper fulfillment. We find the fullness of life, 
        not only in options, but in commitments. And we find that 
        children and community are the commitments that set us free.
            Our public interest depends on private character; on civic 
        duty and family bonds and basic fairness; on uncounted, 
        unhonored acts of decency which give direction to our freedom. 
        Sometimes in life we are called to do great things. But as a 
        saint of our times has said, every day we are called to do 
        small things with great love. The most important tasks of a 
        democracy are done by everyone.
            I will live and lead by these principles: to advance my 
        convictions with civility; to pursue the public interest with 
        courage; to speak for

[[Page 337]]

        greater justice and compassion; to call for responsibility, and 
        try to live it as well. In all these ways, I will bring the 
        values of our history to the care of our times.
            What you do is as important as anything government does. I 
        ask you to seek a common good beyond your comfort; to defend 
        needed reforms against easy attacks; to serve your Nation, 
        beginning with your neighbor. I ask you to be citizens--
        citizens, not spectators; citizens, not subjects; responsible 
        citizens building communities of service and a nation of 
        character.
            (Applause.)
            Americans are generous and strong and decent, not because 
        we believe in ourselves, but because we hold beliefs beyond 
        ourselves. When this spirit of citizenship is missing, no 
        government program can replace it. When this spirit is present, 
        no wrong can stand against it.
            (Applause.)
            After the Declaration of Independence was signed, Virginia 
        statesman John Page wrote to Thomas Jefferson:
            We know the race is not to the swift nor the Battle to the 
        Strong. Do you not think an Angel rides in the Whirlwind and 
        directs this Storm?
            Much time has passed since Jefferson arrived for his 
        inauguration. The years and changes accumulate, but the themes 
        of this day he would know: our Nation's grand story of courage 
        and its simple dream of dignity. We are not the story's author, 
        who fills time and eternity with His purpose. Yet His purpose 
        is achieved in our duty; and our duty is fulfilled in service 
        to one another.
            Never tiring, never yielding, never finishing, we renew 
        that purpose today: to make our country more just and generous; 
        to affirm the dignity of our lives and every life.
            This work continues. This story goes on. And an angel still 
        rides in the whirlwind and directs this storm.
            God bless you all, and God bless America.
            (Applause.)
            Mr. McCONNELL. Please stand now as Pastor Kribyjon H. 
        Caldwell will now deliver the benediction, and afterward, 
        please remain standing for the singing of our National Anthem, 
        after which the ceremony will be concluded. I call upon Senator 
        Dodd to organize the Presidential party after the ceremony has 
        ended to depart the platform.
            Pastor Caldwell.
            Pastor CALDWELL. Thank you, Senator McConnell.
            Let us pray, please:
            Almighty God, the supply and supplier of peace, prudent 
        policy, and nonpartisanship, we bless Your holy and righteous 
        name. Thank You, O God, for blessing us with forgiveness, with 
        faith, and with favor. Forgive us for choosing pride over 
        purpose. Forgive us for choosing popularity over principles. 
        And forgive us for choosing materialism over morals. Deliver us 
        from these and all other evils, and cast our sins into Your sea 
        of forgetfulness to be remembered no more. And Lord, not only 
        do we thank You for our forgiveness, we thank You for faith, 
        faith to believe that every child can learn and no child will 
        be left behind and no youth will be left out.
            Thank You for blessing us with the faith to believe that 
        all of Your leaders can sit down and reason with one another so 
        that each American is blessed.
            Thank You for blessing us with the faith to believe that 
        the walls of inequity can be torn down and the gaps between the 
        rich and the poor, the haves and the have-nots, the uneducated 
        and the educated, can and will be closed.

[[Page 338]]

            And, Lord, lastly, we thank You for favor. We thank You for 
        Your divine favor. Let Your favor be upon President Clinton and 
        the outgoing administration. May they go forth in spiritual 
        grace and civic greatness. And, of course, O Lord, let Your 
        divine favor be upon President George W. Bush and First Lady 
        Laura Welch Bush and their family. We decree and declare that 
        no weapon formed against them shall prosper. Let Your divine 
        favor be upon the Bush team and all Americans with the rising 
        of the Sun and the going down of the same. May we grow in our 
        willingness and ability to bless You and bless one another.
            We respectfully submit this humble prayer in the name that 
        is above all other names, Jesus the Christ. Let all who agree 
        say ``Amen.''
            (Staff Sergeant Maly performed the National Anthem with 
        accompaniment.)
            (Applause.)
            The inaugural ceremonies were concluded at 12:24 p.m.


                         

[Page 338-341]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec. 26. Vice Presidential Swearing-in Ceremonies

    On Dec. 6, 1973, a joint meeting occurred in the House for the 
swearing-in of Gerald R. Ford as Vice President of the United 
States.(1) Ford was nominated pursuant to Sec. 2 of the 25th 
Amendment of the Constitution of the United States. Similarly, on Dec. 
19, 1974, the House was invited to the Senate Chamber for the swearing-
in of Nelson Rockefeller as Vice President of the United 
States.(2)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. See Sec. 26.2, infra.
 2. See Sec. 26.3, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    For a discussion on the process for Presidential nominations for 
Vice President, see Ch. 10, Sec. 4, 
supra.                          -------------------

Sec. 26.1 The Speaker announced that during the joint meeting for the 
    swearing-in of Gerald R. Ford as Vice President on the following 
    day, only certain doors would be open and only persons with floor 
    privileges would be permitted in the Chamber.

    On Dec. 5, 1973,(1) the following occurred:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 119 Cong. Rec. 39677, 93d Cong. 1st Sess.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER.(2) The Chair desires to make an 
    announcement.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. Carl Albert (OK).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        After communication with the majority and minority leaders, and 
    with their consent and approval, the Chair announces that on 
    tomorrow, December 6, during the joint meeting to be held in 
    connection with the swearing in of the Vice President, only the 
    doors immediately opposite the Speaker and those on his left and 
    right will be open.
        No one will be allowed on the floor of the House except those 
    persons having the privilege of the floor of the House.

[[Page 339]]

Sec. 26.2 Proceedings had during joint meeting for administration of 
    oath of office to Gerald R. Ford as Vice President of the United 
    States.

     On Dec. 6, 1973,(1) Speaker Carl Albert of Oklahoma 
presided over the Joint Meeting of the House and Senate for the 
swearing-in of Gerald R. Ford as Vice President:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 119 Cong. Rec. 39925-27, 93d Cong. 1st Sess. For the Dec. 3, 1973, 
        resignation letter of Gerald R. Ford from the House, see Ch. 
        37, infra. Upon the conclusion of the Joint Meeting for the 
        swearing-in, Vice President Ford called the Senate to order as 
        President of the body, see 119 Cong. Rec. 40104-05, 93d Cong. 
        1st Sess., Dec. 6, 1973.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        The SPEAKER. Pursuant to a previous order of the House, the 
    Chair declares a recess until 5:45 p.m. today.
        Accordingly (at 4 o'clock and 44 minutes p.m.), the House stood 
    in recess until 5:45 
    p.m.                          -------------------

        JOINT MEETING OF THE HOUSE AND SENATE FOR SWEARING-IN OF GERALD 
           R. FORD OF MICHIGAN AS VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

        The Speaker of the House presided.
        The Doorkeeper (Honorable William M. Miller) announced the 
    President pro tempore and the Members of the U.S. Senate, who 
    entered the Hall of the House of Representatives, the President pro 
    tempore taking the chair at the left of the Speaker, and the 
    Members of the Senate the seats reserved for them.
        The SPEAKER. The Chair appoints on behalf of the House as 
    members of the committee to escort the President and Vice President 
    designate into the Chamber: the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. 
    [Thomas] O'Neill), the gentleman from California (Mr. [John] 
    McFall), the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. [Peter] Rodino), the 
    gentlewoman from Michigan (Mrs. [Martha] Griffiths), the gentleman 
    from Illinois (Mr. [Leslie] Arends), the gentleman from Arizona 
    (Mr. [John] Rhodes), and the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. [J. 
    Edward] Hutchinson).
        The PRESIDENT pro tempore.(2) On behalf of the 
    Senate, I appoint the following Senators to accompany the President 
    of the United States and the Vice President designate of the United 
    States into the Chamber: the Senator from Montana (Mr. [Michael] 
    Mansfield), the Senator from Pennsylvania (Mr. Hugh Scott), the 
    Senator from West Virginia (Mr. Robert C. Byrd), the Senator from 
    Michigan (Mr. [Robert] Griffin), the Senator from Nevada (Mr. 
    [Howard] Cannon), and the Senator from Kentucky (Mr. [Marlow] 
    Cook).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 2. James Eastland (MS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Mrs. Gerald R. Ford was brought into the Chamber through the 
    Speaker's Lobby, and took the seat provided for her in the well to 
    the right of the rostrum.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Ambassadors, Ministers, and 
    Charges d'Affaires of foreign governments.
        The Ambassadors, Ministers, and Charges d'Affaires of foreign 
    governments entered the Hall of the House of

[[Page 340]]

    Representatives and took the seats reserved for them.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Chief Justice of the United States 
    and the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court.
        The Chief Justice of the United States and the Associate 
    Justices of the Supreme Court entered the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives and the Chief Justice took the seat provided for 
    him in the well to the right of the rostrum, next to Mrs. Gerald R. 
    Ford.
        The Associate Justices took the seats reserved for them in 
    front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        The Doorkeeper announced the Cabinet of the President of the 
    United States.
        The members of the Cabinet of the President of the United 
    States entered the Hall of the House of Representatives and took 
    the seats reserved for them in front of the Speaker's rostrum.
        At 6 o'clock and 5 minutes p.m., the Doorkeeper announced the 
    President of the United States and the Vice President designate of 
    the United States. The President of the United States and the Vice 
    President designate of the United States, escorted by the committee 
    of Senators and Representatives, entered into the Hall of the House 
    of Representatives, and stood at the Clerk's desk.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        Mrs. Gerald R. Ford, followed by the Chief Justice, was 
    escorted to the Clerk's desk with the Chief Justice to the right of 
    Mrs. Ford.
        The SPEAKER. The Senate, by a vote of 92 yeas to 3 nays on 
    November 27, 1973, having confirmed the nomination of Gerald R. 
    Ford of the State of Michigan, to be Vice President of the United 
    States, and the House of Representatives by a vote of 387 yeas to 
    35 nays on today having confirmed the nomination of Gerald R. Ford, 
    of the State of Michigan, to be Vice President of the United 
    States, the proceedings required by section 2 of the 25th amendment 
    to the U.S. Constitution have been complied with.
        The gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Gerald R. Ford) has advised 
    the Chair that he has transmitted his letter of resignation as a 
    Representative of the Fifth District of the State of Michigan to 
    the Governor and the Secretary of State of Michigan as required by 
    the law of that State.
        The Chair now requests the Chief Justice of the United States 
    to administer the oath of office to the Vice President.
        The oath of office was administered by the Chief Justice of the 
    United States to the Vice President, Gerald R. Ford, his right hand 
    raised and his left hand on the Bible held by Mrs. Ford.
        [Applause, the Members rising.]
        The SPEAKER. Mr. President, Members of the Congress, and 
    distinguished guests, I have the high personal honor of presenting 
    to you a dear friend and former colleague whom we shall all miss, 
    but whom we all congratulate--the Vice President of the United 
    States.
        [Applause, the Members 
    rising.]                          -------------------

               ADDRESS OF THE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

        The VICE PRESIDENT. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Chief Justice, Mr. 
    President

[[Page 341]]

    pro tempore, distinguished guests, and friends:
        Together we have made history here today. For the first time we 
    have carried out the command of the 25th amendment. In exactly 8 
    weeks, we have demonstrated to the world that our great republic 
    stands solid, stands strong upon the bedrock of the Constitution.
        I am a Ford, not a Lincoln. My addresses will never be as 
    eloquent as Mr. Lincoln's. . . .
        At 6 o'clock and 21 minutes p.m., the President, accompanied by 
    the committee of escort, retired from the Hall of the House of 
    Representatives.
        The Doorkeeper--Hon. William D. Miller--escorted the invited 
    guests from the Chamber in the following order:
        The Members of the President's Cabinet.
        The Chief Justice of the United States and the Associate 
    Justices of the Supreme Court.
        The Ambassadors, Ministers, and Charges d'Affaires of foreign 
    governments.                          -------------------

                            JOINT MEETING DISSOLVED

        The SPEAKER. The Chair declares the joint meeting of the two 
    Houses now dissolved.
        Accordingly at 6 o'clock and 23 minutes p.m. the joint meeting 
    of the two Houses was dissolved.
        The Members of the Senate, together with the Vice President, 
    retired to their 
    Chamber.                          -------------------

                                  AFTER RECESS

        The recess having expired at 6 o'clock and 28 minutes p.m., the 
    House was called to order by the Speaker.

                   printing of proceedings had during recess

        Mr. O'NEILL. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that the 
    proceedings had during the recess of the House to be printed in the 
    Record.
        The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
    from Massachusetts?
        There was no objection.

Sec. 26.3 The Speaker announced that all Members had been invited to 
    attend the Senate session for the swearing-in of Vice President 
    Rockefeller in the Senate Chamber.

    On Dec. 19, 1974,(1) Speaker Carl Albert of Oklahoma 
announced the following:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1. 120 Cong. Rec. 41570, 93d Cong. 2d Sess. For the recess 
        declaration, see Ch. 39, Sec. 3.9, infra.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE CHAIR

        The SPEAKER. The Chair desires to announce that all Members of 
    the House have been invited to attend the swearing in of Vice 
    President designate Nelson A. Rockefeller, be held in the Senate 
    Chamber tonight.
                   DESCHLER-BROWN-JOHNSON PRECEDENTS
Ch. 36 

[[Page 343]]

                        

[Page 343-348]
 
                               CHAPTER 36
 
                         Ceremonies and Awards
 
Sec.                      INDEX TO PRECEDENTS

Birthday felicitations, Sec. 18
    Members' birthdays, Sec. 18.3
    Parliamentarian, birthday, Sec. 18.4
    Presidential birthdays, Sec. 18.1
    Speakers' birthdays, Sec. 18.2
Ceremonies for Visiting Dignitaries, Sec. 23
    joint meeting for Iraqi Prime Minister, Sec. Sec. 23.1, 23.2
        authorizing concurrent resolution to designate date for recess, 
            Sec. 23.1
        joint meeting proceedings, Sec. 23.2
    joint meeting to hear President of Ukraine, Sec. 23.3
    joint meeting to hear Prime Minister of Israel and King of Jordan, 
        Sec. 23.4
    joint meetings with non-national foreign leaders, Sec. Sec. 23.5-
        23.7
        joint meeting to hear deputy President of African National 
            Congress, Sec. 23.5
        joint meeting to hear Lech Walesa, Sec. 23.6
    Rotunda reception for King and Queen of Great Britain, Sec. 23.7
    Rotunda receptions for religious leaders, Sec. Sec. 23.8, 23.9
        Rotunda reception for Dalai Lama, Sec. 23.9
        Rotunda reception for Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, 
            Sec. 23.8
    Rotunda reception for Soviet Jewish emigration movement, Sec. 23.10
Ceremonies outside the seat of government,
    concurrent resolution authorizing ceremonies for bicentennial of 
        Constitution, Sec. 4.5
    concurrent resolution authorizing ceremonies for bicentennial of 
        first Congress, Sec. 4.1
    joint meeting commemorating first Congress, Sec. 4.2
Commemorative occasions, Sec. Sec. 2-9
    Federal holidays, see Federal Holidays
    non-date specific commemorations, Sec. 2.1
        Flag Day, see Flag Day
        National Day of Reconciliation, Sec. Sec. 6.1, 6.2
        National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 
            Sec. 2.1
    Pan American Day, see Pan American Day
    patriotic observances, see Patriotic observances
    patriotic observances of another country, see Patriotic observances 
        of another country
    Presidential commemorations, see Presidential commemorations
    prohibition of commemorative legislation, Sec. 2
        waiving prohibition against introduction of commemoration, 
            Sec. Sec. 3.1, 3.2
Congressional Gold Medals, Sec. 24
    to Charles M. Schulz, Sec. 24.4
    to Father Theodore Hesburgh, Sec. 24.5
    to former President and Mrs. Gerald R. Ford, Sec. 24.6
    to former President and Mrs. Ronald Reagan, Sec. 24.3
    to General Henry H. Shelton, Sec. 24.2
    to Jackie Robinson, Sec. 24.1
Dedication of buildings and structures, Sec. 22
    Capitol Police headquarters building, concurrent resolution 
        redesignating, Sec. 22.3
    Chestnut-Gibson Memorial Door, concurrent resolution authorizing, 
        Sec. 22.2
    dedication of Assembly Room in Independence Hall in Philadelphia, 
        Sec. 22.7

[[Page 344]]

    extension of East Front of Capitol, Sec. 22.8
    House Office Buildings, Sec. Sec. 22.4, 22.5
        O'Neill and Ford Buildings, Sec. 22.4
        Rayburn Building, Sec. 22.5
    prohibition on naming of public works after sitting Members, 
        Sec. 22.1
    rooms of the Capitol, Sec. 22.6
Federal holidays, Sec. 3
    Independence Day, reading of Declaration of Independence, Sec. 3.7
    United We Stand Day, Sec. Sec. 3.1, 3.2
    Veterans' Day, Sec. Sec. 3.3-3.5
        moment of silence honoring lives lost during World War II, 
            Sec. 3.5
        Speaker authorized by unanimous consent to send message to 
            General of Army, Sec. 3.4
        special order speeches commemorating, Sec. 3.3
    Washington's Birthday, reading of Washington's farewell address, 
        Sec. 3.6
Flag Day, Sec. 8
    Flag Day ceremonies printed in the Congressional Record, Sec. 8.4
    Flag Day on Saturday observing mid-week during recess, Sec. 8.3
    Pause for the Pledge commemoration, second Pledge of Allegiance, 
        Sec. 8.1
    recess to observe Flag Day, Sec. Sec. 8.2, 8.4
Former Members' Day, Sec. 17
    declaring recess to receive Members in Chamber, by unanimous 
        consent, Sec. Sec. 17.1, 17.2
Holocaust Days of Remembrance, Sec. 14
    ceremony in Capitol Rotunda, Senate concurrent resolution 
        authorizing, Sec. 14.1
Honoring slain Capitol Police officers, Sec. 15
    legislative day dedicated to memory of officers, order of 
        procedure, Sec. 15.2
    printing and distribution of eulogies, Senate concurrent resolution 
        authorizing, Sec. 15.1
Honoring victims of national tragedies, Sec. 16
    ceremonies in New York, printed in Congressional Record, Sec. 16.4
        prayer vigil in Rotunda, concurrent resolution authorizing, 
            Sec. 16.2
        special order considering unreferred joint resolution on 
            legislative day of September 11, Sec. 16.3
    National Peace Officers' Memorial Service, Sec. 16.1
    terrorist attacks of September 11, Sec. Sec. 16.2-16.4
House Administration, Committee on
    jurisdiction over statuary, pictures and works of art, Sec. 20
Joint meetings
    commemorating 100th anniversary of President Eisenhower's birth, 
        Sec. 9.1
    commemorating 100th anniversary of birth of Harry S Truman, 
        Sec. 9.3
    commemorating 100th anniversary of birth of Franklin Delano 
        Roosevelt, Sec. 9.4
    commemorating 50th anniversary of end of World War II, Sec. 19.10
    commemorating First Congress, Sec. 4.2
    for swearing-in of Vice President Ford, Sec. 26.2
        floor privileges during, Sec. 26.1
    to hear Deputy President of African National Congress, Sec. 23.5
    to hear General Douglas MacArthur, Sec. 19.7
    to hear General Matthew Ridgway, Sec. 19.6
    to hear General William Westmoreland, Sec. 19.5

[[Page 345]]

    to hear Iraqi Prime Minister, Sec. 23.2
    to hear Lech Walesa, Sec. 23.6
    to hear President of Ukraine, Sec. 23.3
    to hear Prime Minister of Israel and King of Jordan, Sec. 23.4
    Speaker pro tempore presiding over joint meeting, Sec. 23.3
Memorial services, Sec. 10
    for current and former Members of House and Senate, see Memorial 
        services for current and former Members of House and Senate
    for Supreme Court justices, see Memorial services for Supreme Court 
        justices
    Holocaust Days of Remembrance, see Holocaust Days of Remembrance
    honoring slain Capitol Police officers, see Honoring slain Capitol 
        Police officers
    honoring victims of national tragedies, see Honoring victims of 
        national tragedies
    moments of silence, see Moments of silence
Memorial services for current and former Members of House and Senate, 
    Sec. 12
    announcement of death, Sec. 12.1
    notification to Members of memorial service in Statuary Hall, 
        Sec. 12.2
        lying-in-state, former Member and Senator, concurrent 
            resolution authorizing, Sec. 12.3
Memorial services for Supreme Court justices, Sec. 11
    death of Chief Justice, Sec. 11.1
    memorial services for justice, concurrent resolution providing for 
        services, Sec. 11.2
    use of catafalque, concurrent resolution authorizing transfer, 
        Sec. 11.1
Military Awards
    commemoration of 50th anniversary of the Department of Veterans' 
        Affairs, Sec. 19.9
    conferral of honorary veteran status, Sec. 19.8
    Medal of Honor, Sec. 19.1
Moments of silence, Sec. 13
    for Coretta Scott King, Sec. 13.1
    for marking Iraqi War Losses, Sec. 13.2
    for Nazi occupied France, Sec. 13.8
    for Rosa Parks, Sec. 13.3
    for those lost in World War II, Sec. 3.5
    for victims of anthrax attacks, Sec. 13.6
    for victims of mining accident, Sec. 13.5
    for victims of Oklahoma City bombing, Sec. 13.7
    in honor of Memorial Day, Sec. 13.4
Oversight and Government Reform Committee,
    Federal holidays under the jurisdiction, Sec. 3
    unanimous consent to be discharged for further consideration, 
        Sec. 2.1
Pan American Day, Sec. 7
    1966 Pan American Day, Sec. Sec. 7.2, 7.3
    resolutions designating date, Sec. Sec. 7.1, 7.2
Patriotic observances, Sec. 4
    1976 Bicentennial Celebration
        resolution providing for joint committee on arrangements, 
            Sec. 4.7
    anniversary of Constitution, Sec. Sec. 4.5, 4.6
    anniversary of first Congress, Sec. Sec. 4.1-4.5
        concurrent resolution authorizing ceremony the west lawn of 
            Capitol, Sec. 4.6
        concurrent resolution authorizing special ceremony in 
            Philadelphia, PA for bicentennial, Sec. 4.5
        concurrent resolution providing for Congressional 
            participation, Sec. 4.1
        joint meeting commemorating 200th anniversary, Sec. 4.2

[[Page 346]]

        proceedings held for 168th anniversary of first Congress, 
            Sec. 4.3
        proceedings held for 150th anniversary of first Congress, 
            Sec. 4.4
Patriotic observances of another country, Sec. 5
    concurrent resolution commemorating liberation of Cuba, Sec. 5.3
    concurrent resolution extending best wishes on Norweigian 
        constitution anniversary, Sec. 5.1
    Magna Carta loan for bicentennial, Sec. Sec. 4.8-4.12
        concurrent resolution expressing appreciation of Congress, 
            Sec. 4.8
        proceedings printed in Congressional Record, Sec. 4.11
        program for receiving copy of Magna Carta, as announced by 
            Speaker, Sec. 4.10
        recess declared to attend ceremony in Rotunda for return of 
            copy to Great Britain, Sec. 4.12
        rejection of Senate concurrent resolution authorizing a joint 
            House-Senate delegation to the United Kingdom, Sec. 4.9
    observing Lithuanian independence anniversary, Sec. 5.2
Presidential commemorations
    anniversary of Thomas Jefferson's birth, Sec. Sec. 9.8, 9.9
        dedication of Jefferson Memorial, meeting of House at later 
            time so Members could attend, Sec. 9.9
        reading of inaugural address, Sec. 9.8
    commemorating 100th anniversary of President Eisenhower, Sec. 9.1
    commemorating Lincoln inaugural, Sec. Sec. 9.6, 9.7
        ceremony on East Front of Capitol, Sec. 9.6
        joint resolution commemorating 100th anniversary of inaugural, 
            Sec. 9.7
    concurrent resolution authorizing civic group to use Rotunda on 
        anniversary of President Kennedy's death, considered under 
        suspension of rules, Sec. 9.2
    joint meeting to commemorate 100th anniversary of birth of Franklin 
        Roosevelt, Sec. 9.4
    Speaker announcing designation of joint meeting to commemorate 
        100th anniversary of birth of Harry S Truman, pursuant to 
        concurrent resolution, Sec. 9.3
    unanimous consent to allow tributes to memory of Theodore 
        Roosevelt, Sec. 9.5
Presentation of gifts and awards, Sec. 20
    donation of flag, Sec. 20.4
    donation of marble bust, Sec. 20.3
    John W. McCormack Award of Excellence, Sec. 20.1
    presentation of gift to Speaker by Member, Sec. 20.6
    presentation of historic chairs, Sec. 20.2
    Taft Memorial Tower, ceremonies, Sec. 20.5
Presidential inaugurations. Sec. 25
    adjournment after inaugural ceremonies, Sec. 25.7
    adopting privileged resolution providing designated time House 
        should proceed to West Front for Inauguration Day, Sec. 25.7
    ceremonies moved from West Front to Rotunda due to cold weather, 
        Sec. 25.1
    Clerk authorized to receive messages, Sec. 25.10
    continuing resolution for authority of Joint Committee on Inaugural 
        Ceremonies, Sec. 25.4
    designating Speaker pro tempore to lead procession, Sec. 25.9

[[Page 347]]

    inaugural ceremonies, Sec. 25.11
    Joint Committee for Inaugural Ceremonies, appointment of Members, 
        Sec. 25.2
    Joint Committee for Inaugural Ceremonies, establishment, Sec. 25.1
    seating policy of Members, Sec. 25.8
    Sunday inauguration date, Sec. 25.6
    use of Rotunda for ceremonies, for 2005 ceremony, Sec. Sec. 25.3, 
        25.4
Prohibition of commemorative legislative, within House Rules, Sec. 2
Receptions for Astronauts, Sec. Sec. 19.2, 19.3
    in Caucus Room, Sec. 19.3
    in House Chamber, Sec. 19.2
Receptions for Generals, Sec. Sec. 19.4-19.7
    joint meeting to hear General Douglas MacArthur, Sec. 19.7
    joint meeting to hear General Matthew Ridgway, Sec. 19.6
    joint meeting to hear General William Westmoreland, Sec. 19.5
    recess to welcome General Norman Schwarzkopf, Sec. 19.4
Religious Observances, Sec. 6
    Easter service, Sec. 6.3
    National Day of Reconciliation, Sec. Sec. 6.1, 6.2
        concurrent resolution allowing for use of the House Chamber, 
            House agreeing to, Sec. 6.1
        Senate concurrent resolution allowing for Rotunda ceremony, 
            House agreeing to, Sec. 6.2
Rotunda receptions
    ceremony for anniversary of President Kennedy's death, Sec. 9.2
    for ceremonies to observe unveiling of POW/MIA flag, Sec. 19.13
    for Dalai Lama, Sec. 23.9
    for Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Sec. 23.8
    for Holocaust Days of Remembrance, Sec. 14.1
    for King and Queen of Great Britain, Sec. 23.7
    for prayer vigil in Rotunda, Sec. 16.2
    for religious leaders, Sec. Sec. 23.8, 23.9
    for return of copy of Magna Carta to Great Britain, Sec. 4.12
    for Soviet Jewish emigration movement, Sec. 23.10
    honoring military heroism, concurrent resolution, Sec. 19.12
    to honor unaccounted soldiers from Vietnam War, Sec. 19.11
    use for ceremonies in connection with 2005 inauguration, Sec. 25.3
    use for inaugural ceremonies due to inclement weather, Sec. 25.1
    use for National Day of Reconciliation Sec. 6.2
Statuary, Sec. 21
    honoring Rosa Parks, Sec. 21.1
    restoring Portrait Monument to Pioneers of Woman Suffrage Movement, 
        concurrent resolution directing, Sec. 21.8
        reauthorizing concurrent resolution in subsequent Congress, 
            Sec. 21.9
    dedication of Sam Rayburn statue, Sec. 21.10
    honoring President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Sec. 21.7
    portrait busts, Sec. Sec. 21.4, 21.5
        Dan Quayle, Sec. 21.5
        George Bush, Sec. 21.4
    state contributions, Sec. Sec. 21.2, 21.3
        honoring Po'Pay, Sec. 21.2
        honoring Sakakawea, Sec. 21.6
        honoring Sarah Winnemucca, Sec. 21.3
    ten year moratorium on placement of statues, Sec. 21.1

[[Page 348]]

    unveiling of repaired statue of Abraham Lincoln, Sec. 21.11
Vice Presidential Swearing-in Ceremonies, Sec. 26
Vice President Ford, Sec. Sec. 26.1, 26.2
Vice President Rockefeller, Sec. 26.3
War-related observances, Sec. Sec. 19.10-19.17
    announcement for informal procession of Members to witness arrival 
        of remains of unknown soldiers, Sec. 19.15
    ceremonies authorizing use of Capitol Rotunda to honor unaccounted 
        soldiers from Vietnam War, Sec. 19.11
    ceremony authorizing use of Rotunda for ceremonies to observe 
        unveiling of POW/MIA flag, Sec. 19.13
    ceremony in Rotunda honoring military heroism, concurrent 
        resolution, Sec. 19.12
    gathering of Members to hear unconditional surrender of World War 
        II, Sec. 19.17
    joint meeting to celebrate 50th anniversary of World War II, 
        Sec. 19.10
    laying of wreath to unknown soldiers lying in state, Sec. 19.14
    lowering flag to half-mast, concurrent resolution authorizing, 
        Sec. 19.16