[Constitution, Jefferson's Manual, and the Rules of the House of Representatives, 112th Congress]
[112nd Congress]
[House Document 111-157]
[Rules of the House of Representatives]
[Pages 623-657]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov]


[[Page 623]]

 

                                Rule XIII


Calendars
                     calendars and committee reports

828. Calendar for reports of committees. 1. (a) All business reported by committees shall be referred to one of the following three calendars:
(1) A Calendar of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, to which shall be referred public bills and public resolutions raising revenue, involving a tax or charge on the people, directly or indirectly making appropriations of money or property or requiring such appropriations to be made, authorizing payments out of appropriations already made, releasing any liability to the United States for money or property, or referring a claim to the Court of Claims. (2) A House Calendar, to which shall be referred all public bills and public resolutions not requiring referral to the Calendar of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union. (3) A Private Calendar as provided in clause 5 of rule XV, to which shall be referred all private bills and private resolutions. [[Page 624]] to a calendar is governed by the text of the bill as referred to committee, and amendments reported by committees are not considered (VIII, 2392). This provision was adopted in 1880 and amended in 1911 (VI, 742); but as early as 1820 a rule was adopted creating calendars for the Committees of the Whole. Clerical and stylistic changes were effected when the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47), including a change in subparagraph (3) from the ``Calendar of the Committee of the Whole House'' to the ``Private Calendar.'' Bills not requiring consideration in Committee of the Whole were considered when reported, but in 1880 the House Calendar was created to remedy the delays in making reports caused by such consideration (IV, 3115). Reference of a bill A motion to correct an error in referring a bill to the proper calendar presents a question of privilege (III, 2614, 2615); but a mere clerical error in the calendar does not give rise to such question (III, 2616). A bill improperly reported is not entitled to a place on the calendar (IV, 3117). A bill on the wrong calendar may be transferred to the proper calendar as of date of original reference by direction of the Speaker (VI, 744- 748; VII, 859, 2406; Dec. 7, 1950, p. 16307; Apr. 26, 1984, p. 10242; Sept. 10, 1990, p. 23677). But the Speaker has no authority to change calendar reference made by the House (VI, 749; VII, 859). Reports from the Court of Claims did not remain on the calendar from Congress to Congress, even when a law seemed so to provide (IV, 3298-3302). In determining whether a bill should be placed on the House or Union Calendar, clause 3 of rule XVIII should be consulted. The Speaker may correct the erroneous referral of a bill as private by referring it to the appropriate (Union) calendar as a public bill when reported (June 1, 1988, p. 13184). Although the Speaker has no general authority to remove a reported bill from the Union Calendar (other than to correct the erroneous reference of a reported bill between calendars), the Speaker may discharge a bill therefrom for reference to another committee when required (1) by section 401(b) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, permitting 15-day referral to the Committee on Appropriations of reported bills providing new entitlement authority in excess of that allocated to the reporting committee in connection with the most recently agreed-to concurrent resolution on the budget (Speaker O'Neill, Sept. 8, 1977, p. 28153), or (2) by clause 2 of rule XII (formerly clause 5 of rule X), authorizing and directing the Speaker to assure that each committee has responsibility to consider legislation within its jurisdiction by fashioning sequential referrals when appropriate (Speaker O'Neill, Apr. 27, 1978, p. 11742; June 19, 1986, p. 14741).
Sec. 830. Motion to discharge. (b) There is established a Calendar of Motions to Discharge Committees as provided in clause 2 of rule XV.
[[Page 625]] Filing and printing of reports From the 106th Congress through the 108th Congress, paragraph (b) was occupied by a cross reference to the Corrections Calendar. The provision was added when the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47) and was stricken when the Corrections Calendar was abolished in the 109th Congress (sec. 2(f), H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 2005, p. 43). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, the current paragraph (b) was found in former clause 5 of rule XIII (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47).
831. Reports filed with the Clerk. 2. (a)(1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2), all reports of committees (other than those filed from the floor) shall be delivered to the Clerk for printing and reference to the proper calendar under the direction of the Speaker in accordance with clause 1. The title or subject of each report shall be entered on the Journal and printed in the Congressional Record.
Sec. 832. Adverse reports. (2) A bill or resolution reported adversely (other than those filed as privileged) shall be laid on the table unless a committee to which the bill or resolution was referred requests at the time of the report its referral to an appropriate calendar under clause 1 or unless, within three days thereafter, a Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner makes such a request.
A technical amendment was effected by the 93d Congress (H. Res. 988, Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). Clerical and stylistic changes were effected when the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47), but the 111th Congress reversed an inadvertent change to paragraph (a)(2) to restore its application to nonprivileged reports only (sec. 2(m), H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 2009, p. _) (contrast the 1999 codification with its predecessor in form; VI, 411).
Sec. 833. Requirement that reports of committees be in writing and be printed. When the House codified its rules in the 106th Congress, it deleted the portion of clause 2 of rule XVIII that required the printing of reports. That provision was redundant because this provision carries the same requirement (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). Former clause 2 of rule XVIII was adopted in 1880 (V, 5647).
[[Page 626]] 4671; VIII, 2229; see clause 2(l)(5) of rule XI). Under this rule, the printing requirement is not a condition precedent to consideration of the matter reported (VIII, 2307-2309). However, for various availability and layover requirements in the rules, see clause 6 of rule X (Sec. 764, supra), clauses 4, 5, and 6 of rule XIII (Sec. Sec. 850-852, Sec. 853, Sec. 857, infra, respectively), and clause 8 of rule XXII (Sec. 1082, infra). See also clause 3(a)(2) of rule XIII (Sec. 838, infra), which excepts from the availability requirements of clause 4 supplemental reports to correct a technical error in the depiction of record votes in a committee report. The House insists on its requirement that all reports be in writing (IV, 4655) and does not receive verbal reports as to bills (IV, 4654). But the sufficiency of a report is passed on by the House and not by the Speaker (II, 1339; IV, 4653). A report is not necessarily signed by all those concurring (II, 1274) or even by any of those concurring, but minority, supplemental, and additional views are signed by those submitting them (IV, Unless filed with a report pursuant to clause 2(c) or rule XIII, minority, supplemental, or additional views may be presented only with the consent of the House (IV, 4600; VIII, 2231, 2248). It has been held that the fact that a report was not printed by the Public Printer as originally made to the House does not prevent the consideration of the matter reported (VIII, 2307). A committee may not file its report on a bill after the House has passed the bill (Sept. 30, 1985, p. 25270).
Sec. 834. Chair's duty. (b)(1) It shall be the duty of the chair of each committee to report or cause to be reported promptly to the House a measure or matter approved by the committee and to take or cause to be taken steps necessary to bring the measure or matter to a vote.
[[Page 627]] quiry addressed to the head of an executive department.
Sec. 835. Filing by majority of committee. (2) In any event, the report of a committee on a measure that has been approved by the committee shall be filed within seven calendar days (exclusive of days on which the House is not in session) after the day on which a written request for the filing of the report, signed by a majority of the members of the committee, has been filed with the clerk of the committee. The clerk of the committee shall immediately notify the chair of the filing of such a request. This subparagraph does not apply to a report of the Committee on Rules with respect to a rule, joint rule, or order of business of the House, or to the reporting of a resolution of in
Subparagraph (1) (formerly clause 2(l)(1)(A) of rule XI) is derived from section 133(c) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 812) and was made a part of the standing rules on January 3, 1953 (p. 24). It is sufficient authority for the chair to call up a bill on Calendar Wednesday (Speaker Rayburn, Feb. 22, 1950, p. 2162). Subparagraph (2) (formerly clause 2(l)(1)(B) of rule XI) is derived from section 105 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140) and was made part of the rules in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144). Former clause 2(l)(1)(C) of rule XI was added by the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470), to incorporate section 307 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (88 Stat. 313), requiring the Committee on Appropriations to strive to complete committee action on all regular appropriation bills before reporting any of them to the House, and to submit a report comparing specified spending levels, but was repealed by section 232(e) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-177). An obsolete reference in former subdivision (B) to the former subdivision (C) was deleted in the 104th Congress (sec. 223(f), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 469). Gender- based references were eliminated in the 111th Congress (sec. 2(l), H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 2009, p. _). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 2(l)(1) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). Absent a special order of the House, committee reports must be submitted while the House is in session, except as permitted under clause 2(c) of rule XIII with respect to the guaranteed time for composing separate views (see Sec. 836, infra) (Dec. 17, 1982, p. 31951). [[Page 628]] preclude the immediate filing or printing of a committee report in the absence of a timely request for the opportunity to file supplemental, minority, or additional views as provided in clause 2(l) of rule XI.
Sec. 836. Filing with minority views. (c) All supplemental, minority, or additional views filed under clause 2(l) of rule XI by one or more members of a committee shall be included in, and shall be a part of, the report filed by the committee with respect to a measure or matter. When time guaranteed by clause 2(l) of rule XI has expired (or, if sooner, when all separate views have been received), the committee may arrange to file its report with the Clerk not later than one hour after the expiration of such time. This clause and provisions of clause 2(l) of rule XI do not
Content of reports The first sentence of this paragraph was originally included in section 107 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140) and was made a part of the rules in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144). The remainder of the paragraph (establishing standing authority for committees to file reports with the Clerk after honoring the guarantee of the rule) was adopted in the 105th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 1997, p. 121). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 2(l)(5) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47).
837. Single volume. 3. (a)(1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2), the report of a committee on a measure or matter shall be printed in a single volume that--
(A) shall include all supplemental, minority, or additional views that have been submitted by the time of the filing of the report; and (B) shall bear on its cover a recital that any such supplemental, minority, or additional views (and any material submitted under paragraph (c)(3)) are included as part of the report. [[Page 629]] quirement in clause 4 or clause 6 concerning the availability of reports.
Sec. 838. Technical error. (2) A committee may file a supplemental report for the correction of a technical error in its previous report on a measure or matter. A supplemental report only correcting errors in the depiction of record votes under paragraph (b) may be filed under this subparagraph and shall not be subject to the re
Clause 3 (formerly clause 2(l)(5) of rule XI) was originally included in section 107 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140) and was incorporated into the rules in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 2(l)(5) of rule XI, and the former companion provision of clause 2(l)(5) of rule XI entitling members to supplemental, minority, or additional views was transferred to new clause 2(l) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). The last sentence of subparagraph (2) was added in the 107th Congress (sec. 2(k), H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 2001, p. 25). A technical correction to subparagraph (1)(B) was effected in the 108th Congress (sec. 2(u), H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 2003, p. 7). Except as provided in subparagraph (2), a supplemental report is subject to three-day availability under clause 4 of this rule (Deschler, ch. 17, Sec. 64.1). A committee may file a supplemental report pursuant to subparagraph (2) to correct a technical error in the depiction of a bill number in the portion of the report regarding congressional earmarks, targeted tax benefits, and targeted tariff benefits under clause 9 of rule XXI (July 30, 2010, p. _).
Sec. 839. Vote on reporting. (b) With respect to each record vote on a motion to report a measure or matter of a public nature, and on any amendment offered to the measure or matter, the total number of votes cast for and against, and the names of members voting for and against, shall be included in the committee report. The preceding sentence does not apply to votes taken in executive session by the Committee on Ethics.
[[Page 630]] on Rules in the 110th and 111th Congresses (sec. 503, H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 2007, p. 19 (adopted Jan. 5, 2007); sec. 2(c)(10), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). This paragraph was amended in the 112th Congress to reflect a change in committee name (sec. 2(e)(8), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 2(l)(2)(B) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). If the accompanying report erroneously reflects information required by this paragraph, a bill would be subject to a point of order against its consideration, unless corrected pursuant to clause 3(a)(2) by a supplemental report; however, a point of order would not lie if the error was introduced by the Government Printing Office (Jan. 19, 1995, p. 1613). A question alleging that a committee report contained descriptions of recorded votes (as required by this clause) that deliberately mischaracterized certain amendments and directing the chair of the committee to file a supplemental report to change those descriptions was held to constitute a question of the privileges of the House (May 3, 2005, pp. 8417, 8418). The requirement of subparagraph (b) (formerly clause 2(l)(2)(B) of rule XI) was contained in section 104(b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140), was incorporated into the rules in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144), and was expanded in the 104th Congress to require that reports also reflect the total number of votes cast for and against any public measure or matter and any amendment thereto and the names of those voting for and against (sec. 209, H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 468). An exception for the Committee on Standards of Official Conduct (now Ethics) was adopted in the 105th Congress (sec. 8, H. Res. 168, Sept. 18, 1997, p. 19318) and expanded to include the Committee
Sec. 840. Content of reports. (c) The report of a committee on a measure that has been approved by the committee shall include, separately set out and clearly identified, the following:
(1) Oversight findings and recommendations under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X. (2) The statement required by section 308(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, except that an estimate of new budget authority shall include, when practicable, a comparison of the total estimated funding level for the relevant programs to the appropriate levels under current law. (3) An estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 if timely submitted to the committee before the filing of the report. [[Page 631]] goals and objectives, for which the measure authorizes funding. (4) A statement of general performance goals and objectives, including outcome-related This provision (formerly clause 2(l)(3) of rule XI) became effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). It was amended in the 95th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 1977, pp. 53-70), to correct a cross-reference, and in the 103d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 1993, p. 49) to correct the typographical transposition of a phrase. Subparagraphs (2) and (3) (formerly clauses 2(l)(3)(B) and 2(l)(3)(C) of rule XI) are requirements of sections 308(a) and 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (88 Stat. 297). Subparagraph (2) (formerly clause 2(l)(3)(B) of rule XI) was amended in the 99th Congress by section 232(f) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-177) to include new entitlement and credit authority in conformity with section 308(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended by that law. It was again amended in the 104th Congress to require estimates of new budget authority, when practicable, to compare the total estimated funding for the program to the appropriate level under current law (sec. 102(a), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 462). In the 104th and 106th Congresses, it was amended to conform references to a renamed committee (sec. 202(b), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 467; H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). This provision was amended in the 105th Congress to reflect the repeal of the collective definition of ``new spending authority'' and the revision of various remaining parts and to effect a technical and conforming change (Budget Enforcement Act of 1997 (sec. 10116, P.L. 105-33)). Subparagraph (4) was amended to replace a requirement that committees include in their reports oversight findings and recommendations by the Committee on Government Reform with a requirement that they include a statement of performance goals and objectives (sec. 2(l), H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 2001, p. 25).
Sec. 841. Estimate of cost. (d) Each report of a committee on a public bill or public joint resolution shall contain the following:
[[Page 632]] (1)(A) An estimate by the committee of the costs that would be incurred in carrying out the bill or joint resolution in the fiscal year in which it is reported and in each of the five fiscal years following that fiscal year (or for the authorized duration of any program authorized by the bill or joint resolution if less than five years); (B) a comparison of the estimate of costs described in subdivision (A) made by the committee with any estimate of such costs made by a Government agency and submitted to such committee; and (C) when practicable, a comparison of the total estimated funding level for the relevant programs with the appropriate levels under current law. (2)(A) In subparagraph (1) the term ``Government agency'' includes any department, agency, establishment, wholly owned Government corporation, or instrumentality of the Federal Government or the government of the District of Columbia. (B) Subparagraph (1) does not apply to the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on House Administration, the Committee on Rules, or the Committee on Ethics, and does not apply when a cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been included in the report under paragraph (c)(3). [[Page 633]] to the appropriate level under current law (sec. 102(b), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 462). In the 104th and 106th Congresses subparagraph (2)(B) (formerly clause 7(d)) was amended to reflect a change in committee name (sec. 202(b), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 467; H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). In the 105th Congress it was amended to effect a technical change (Budget Enforcement Act of 1997 (sec. 10116, P.L. 105-33)). In the 112th Congress subparagraphs (2) and (3) were redesignated when a former subparagraph (1) was repealed (sec. 2(a)(2), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _) and subparagraph (2)(B) was amended to reflect a change in committee name (sec. 2(e)(8), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 7 of this rule (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). This provision was adopted in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144) as part of the implementation of section 252(b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140) and was amended in the 95th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 1977, pp. 53-70) to remove references to the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. Subparagraph (2)(B) (formerly clause 7(d)) was amended in the 97th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 1981, pp. 98-113) to render committee cost estimates optional if an estimate by the Congressional Budget Office is included in the report. It was amended by the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 900 note) to require five-year estimates of revenue changes in legislative reports. In the 104th Congress it was amended to require estimates of new budget authority, when practicable, to compare the total estimated funding for the program A committee cost estimate identifying certain spending authority as recurring annually and indefinitely was held necessarily to address the five-year period required by section 308 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Nov. 20, 1993, p. 31354).
Sec. 842. Application of laws to legislative branch. Under the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, each report accompanying a bill or joint resolution relating to terms and conditions of employment or access to public services or accommodations must describe the manner in which the provisions apply to the legislative branch or a statement of the reasons the provisions do not apply; and any Member may raise a point of order against the consideration of a bill or joint resolution not complying with this requirement, which may be waived in the House by majority vote (sec. 102(b)(3), P.L. 104-1; 109 Stat. 6).
Sec. 843. Unfunded mandates. The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-4; 109 Stat. 48) added a new part B to title IV of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 658-658g) that imposes several requirements on committees with respect to measures effecting ``Federal mandates'' (secs. 423-424; 2 U.S.C. 658b-c) and establishes points of order to permit separate votes on whether to enforce those requirements (sec. 425; 2 U.S.C. 658d). See Sec. 1127, infra.
[[Page 634]]
Sec. 844. Former constitutional authority requirement and inflationary impact requirement. Former clause 2(l)(4) of rule XI, which became a part of the rules under the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470), required an analytical statement of inflationary impact. It was converted in the 105th Congress to require a statement of constitutional authority (H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 1997, p. 121) and was repealed in the 112th Congress in conjunction with the establishment of clause 7(c) of rule XII (sec. 2(a)(2), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). If a point of order were sustained under this subparagraph, the measure would be ``recommitted'' to await possible return to the Calendar by the filing of a supplemental report pursuant to clause 3(a)(2) correcting the technical error (Feb. 13, 1995, p. 4591).
Sec. 846. ``Ramseyer Rule.'' (e)(1) Whenever a committee reports a bill or joint resolution proposing to repeal or amend a statute or part thereof, it shall include in its report or in an accompanying document--
(A) the text of a statute or part thereof that is proposed to be repealed; and (B) a comparative print of any part of the bill or joint resolution proposing to amend the statute and of the statute or part thereof proposed to be amended, showing by appropriate typographical devices the omissions and insertions proposed. (2) If a committee reports a bill or joint resolution proposing to repeal or amend a statute or part thereof with a recommendation that the bill or joint resolution be amended, the comparative print required by subparagraph (1) shall reflect the changes in existing law proposed to be made by the bill or joint resolution as proposed to be amended. The first part of this paragraph (formerly clause 3) was adopted January 28, 1929 (VIII, 2234), was redesignated January 3, 1953 (p. 24), and subparagraph (2) (formerly a proviso in clause 3(2)) was added September 22, 1961 (p. 20823). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 3 of this rule (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). [[Page 635]] considered again and reported by the committee as if no previous report had been made (VIII, 2249). Technical failure of a committee report to comply with the ``Ramseyer'' rule may be remedied by a supplemental report (VIII, 2247). Although the filing of such a corrective report formerly required the consent of the House (VIII, 2248), it may now be filed with the Clerk pursuant to clause 3(a)(2). Reports held to violate the rule because they are not susceptible to correction by the filing of a supplemental report under clause 3(a)(2), as in the case of a substantial violation, are automatically recommitted to the respective committees reporting them (VIII, 2237, 2245, 2250). When a bill is so recommitted, further proceedings are de novo and the bill is Although a bill proposes but one minor and obvious change in existing law, the failure of the report to indicate the change is in violation of the rule (VIII, 2236). The statute proposed to be amended must be quoted in the report and it is not sufficient that it is incorporated in the bill (VIII, 2238). Under the rule the committee report on a bill amending existing law by the addition of a proviso should quote in full the section immediately preceding the proposed amendment (VIII, 2237). The rule applies to appropriation bills if such bills include legislative provisions (VIII, 2241) and reports on appropriation bills are also subject to the requirements of clause 3(f) of rule XIII, requiring a concise statement of the effect of any direct or indirect changes in the application of existing law. In order to fall within the purview of the rule the bill must seek to repeal or amend specifically an existing law (VIII, 2235, 2239, 2240). Special orders providing for consideration of bills, unless specifically waiving points of order, do not preclude the point of order that reports on such bills fail to indicate proposed changes in existing law (VIII, 2245). The point of order that a report fails to comply with the rule is properly made when the bill is called up in the House and comes too late after the House has resolved into the Committee of the Whole for its consideration (VIII, 2243-2245). Where the comparative print contained certain errors in punctuation and capitalization and utilized abbreviations not appearing in existing provisions of law, the Speaker held that the committee report was in substantial compliance with the rule and overruled a point of order against the report (Deschler, ch. 17, Sec. Sec. 60.13, 60.14).
Sec. 847. Content of reports on appropriation bills. (f)(1) A report of the Committee on Appropriations on a general appropriation bill shall include--
(A) a concise statement describing the effect of any provision of the accompanying bill that directly or indirectly changes the application of existing law; and [[Page 636]] penditures were authorized, the level of expenditures authorized for that year, the actual level of expenditures for that year, and the level of appropriations in the bill for such expenditures. (B) a list of all appropriations contained in the bill for expenditures not currently authorized by law for the period concerned (excepting classified intelligence or national security programs, projects, or activities), along with a statement of the last year for which such ex This provision (formerly clause 3 of rule XXI) became a part of the rules under the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). This provision was amended on January 14, 1975 (H. Res. 5, 94th Cong., p. 32) to confine its applicability to general appropriation bills, and again in the 104th Congress to add subparagraph (1)(B) concerning unauthorized items (sec. 215(d), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 468). Subparagraph (1)(B) was amended in the 107th Congress to require more detail on the status of unauthorized appropriations (sec. 2(m), H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 2001, p. 25). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 3 of rule XXI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). (2) Whenever the Committee on Appropriations reports a bill or joint resolution including matter specified in clause 1(b)(2) or (3) of rule X, it shall include-- (A) in the bill or joint resolution, separate headings for ``Rescissions'' and ``Transfers of Unexpended Balances''; and (B) in the report of the committee, a separate section listing such rescissions and transfers. This provision (formerly clause 1(b) of rule X) was added by the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 1(b) of rule X (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). [[Page 637]]
Sec. 848. Comparative print. (g) Whenever the Committee on Rules reports a resolution proposing to repeal or amend a standing rule of the House, it shall include in its report or in an accompanying document--
(1) the text of any rule or part thereof that is proposed to be repealed; and (2) a comparative print of any part of the resolution proposing to amend the rule and of the rule or part thereof proposed to be amended, showing by appropriate typographical devices the omissions and insertions proposed. This provision (formerly clause 4(d) of rule XI) was added to the rules under the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470), and is similar to the ``Ramseyer Rule'' requirements of paragraph (e) relating to bills and joint resolutions repealing or amending existing law. Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 4(d) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). This clause is applicable to resolutions reported from the Committee on Rules that propose direct permanent repeal or amendment of a rule of the House, but does not apply to resolutions providing temporary waivers of rules during the consideration of particular legislative business (Speaker Albert, Mar. 20, 1975, p. 7676; Mar. 24, 1975, p. 8418), or to a special order of business resolution providing for the consideration of a bill with textual modifications that would effect certain changes in House rules on enactment of the bill into law, but not itself repealing or amending any rule (May 27, 1993, p. 11597).
Sec. 849. Tax complexity analysis. (h)(1) It shall not be in order to consider a bill or joint resolution reported by the Committee on Ways and Means that proposes to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 unless--
(A) the report includes a tax complexity analysis prepared by the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation in accordance with section 4022(b) of the Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998; or [[Page 638]] fore consideration of the bill or joint resolution. (B) the chair of the Committee on Ways and Means causes such a tax complexity analysis to be printed in the Congressional Record be This provision was added by the Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 as a new clause 2(l)(8) of rule XI, effective January 1, 1999 (sec. 4022, P.L. 105-206). It was transferred to this paragraph when the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). A gender-based reference was eliminated in the 111th Congress (sec. 2(l), H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 2009, p. _). (2)(A) It shall not be in order to consider a bill or joint resolution reported by the Committee on Ways and Means that proposes to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 unless-- (i) the report includes a macroeconomic impact analysis; (ii) the report includes a statement from the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation explaining why a macroeconomic impact analysis is not calculable; or (iii) the chair of the Committee on Ways and Means causes a macroeconomic impact analysis to be printed in the Congressional Record before consideration of the bill or joint resolution. (B) In subdivision (A), the term ``macroeconomic impact analysis'' means-- (i) an estimate prepared by the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation of the changes in economic output, employment, capital stock, and tax revenues expected to result from enactment of the proposal; and [[Page 639]] (ii) a statement from the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation identifying the critical assumptions and the source of data underlying that estimate. Availability of reports- This requirement of a macroeconomic analysis of any tax proposal replaced a provision that authorized the chair of the Committee on Ways and Means to request the Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation to prepare a dynamic estimate of revenue changes proposed in a measure designated by the Majority Leader as major tax legislation (sec. 2(j), H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 2003, p. 7). The former provision was added in the 105th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 1997, p. 121); but, before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, it was found in former clause 7(e) of rule XIII (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). A gender- based reference was eliminated in the 111th Congress (sec. 2(l), H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 2009, p. _).
850. Threeday layover. 4. (a)(1) Except as specified in subparagraph (2), it shall not be in order to consider in the House a measure or matter reported by a committee until the third calendar day (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, or legal holidays except when the House is in session on such a day) on which each report of a committee on that measure or matter has been available to Members, Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner.
(2) Subparagraph (1) does not apply to-- (A) a resolution providing a rule, joint rule, or order of business reported by the Committee on Rules considered under clause 6; (B) a resolution providing amounts from the applicable accounts described in clause 1(k)(1) of rule X reported by the Committee on House Administration considered under clause 6 of rule X; [[Page 640]] (C) a resolution presenting a question of the privileges of the House reported by any committee; (D) a measure for the declaration of war, or the declaration of a national emergency, by Congress; and (E) a measure providing for the disapproval of a decision, determination, or action by a Government agency that would become, or continue to be, effective unless disapproved or otherwise invalidated by one or both Houses of Congress. In this subdivision the term ``Government agency'' includes any department, agency, establishment, wholly owned Government corporation, or instrumentality of the Federal Government or of the government of the District of Columbia. (b) A committee that reports a measure or matter shall make every reasonable effort to have its hearings thereon (if any) printed and available for distribution to Members, Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner before the consideration of the measure or matter in the House. [[Page 641]] tions were effected. The 106th Congress also recodified the rules, transferring this provision from former clause 2(l)(6) of rule XI, which consisted of this provision and current clause 6(a)(2) of this rule (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). Subparagraph (2)(C) was added in the 107th Congress (sec. 2(n), H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 2001, p. 25). In the 109th Congress a subdivision was deleted as obsolete upon the repeal of the Corrections Calendar and in that Congress and in the 112th conforming changes to subparagraph (2)(B) were effected (sec. 2(a), H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 2005, p. 42; sec. 2(e)(8), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). This provision (formerly clause 2(l)(6) of rule XI) was originally contained in section 108 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140) and was incorporated into the rules in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144). It was amended in the 94th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 14, 1975, p. 20), in the 95th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 1977, pp. 53-70), and in the 96th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 15, 1979, p. 8). In the 102d Congress it was amended to clarify the availability requirements for reported measures, including concurrent resolutions on the budget (H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 1991, p. 39). It was amended in the 104th Congress to count as a ``calendar day'' any day on which the House is in session (H. Res. 254, Nov. 30, 1995, p. 35077), and again in the 105th Congress to achieve like treatment in the case of a concurrent resolution on the budget (H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 1997, p. 121). The rule was later amended in the 105th Congress to conform to a change in the layover requirement for a concurrent resolution on the budget (Budget Enforcement Act of 1997 (sec. 10109, P.L. 105-33)). In the 106th Congress two technical and conforming correc This availability requirement is not applicable to privileged reports from the Committee on Rules or to bills before the House that have not been reported from committee (Speaker Albert, Aug. 10, 1976, p. 26793). The Committee on Rules has the authority under clause 5(a) of rule XIII (formerly clause 4(a) of rule XI) to report a special order making in order the text of an introduced bill as a substitute original text for a reported bill, and no point of order lies that such introduced text has not been available for three days under this rule, which only applies to the consideration of reported measures themselves (Oct. 9, 1986, p. 29973). The exceptions from the three-day layover requirement were expanded in the 97th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 1981, p. 98) to include resolutions called up pursuant to legislative veto provisions in laws having the effect of approving or invalidating the actions of any government agency (and not just agencies of the executive branch). That exception allows the consideration of a measure disapproving an executive branch decision pursuant to statute within three days of the expiration of the congressional review period, notwithstanding the three-day availability requirement (concurrent resolution disapproving a regulation of the Federal Trade Commission pursuant to the Federal Trade Commission Improvements Act, P.L. 96-252) (May 26, 1982, pp. 12027-30). A report from a committee raising a question of the privileges of the House, such as a report relating to the contemptuous conduct of a witness before the committee, may be considered notwithstanding the availability requirements of this clause (Speaker Albert, July 13, 1971, pp. 24720-23; see also VI, 48; Deschler, ch. 14, Sec. 7.4, fn. 10, and Oct. 8, 1998, p. 24680, with respect to impeachment reports; and Feb. 12, 1998, p. 1323, with respect to a resolution dismissing an election contest reported as privileged under clause 5(a)(3) of rule XIII). Clause 3(a)(2) of rule XIII was amended in the 107th Congress to except from the three-day layover requirement a supplemental report only correcting errors in the depiction of record votes under clause 3(b) (sec. 2(k), H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 2001, p. 25).- [[Page 642]] not constitute questions of the privileges of the House, are subject to this clause (Speaker Albert, Mar. 6, 1975, p. 5537).
Sec. 851. Oneday layover. A committee expense resolution reported by the Committee on House Administration pursuant to clause 5 of rule XIII need only be available for one day. However, other resolutions reported from that committee that are privileged (such as a resolution authorizing the printing of material as a House document), but that do
Sec. 852. Printed hearings on appropriation bills. (c) A general appropriation bill reported by the Committee on Appropriations may not be considered in the House until the third calendar day (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays except when the House is in session on such a day) on which printed hearings of the Committee on Appropriations thereon have been available to Members, Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner.
Privileged reports, generally This provision from section 139(a) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 was made a part of the standing rules January 3, 1953 (p. 24), and was amended (by the addition of the parenthetical clause) on January 22, 1971 (p. 144). In the 104th Congress it was amended to count as a ``calendar day'' any day on which the House is in session (H. Res. 254, Nov. 30, 1995, p. 35077). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 7 of rule XXI; and a requirement that the report also be available for three days was deleted as redundant because reports on general appropriation bills are covered under the availability requirements of paragraph (a) (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). In counting the ``three calendar days'' specified in the clause, either the date the bill is filed or the date on which it is to be called up for consideration are counted, but not both (May 26, 1969, p. 13720).
853. Privileged reports. 5. (a) The following committees shall have leave to report at any time on the following matters, respectively:
(1) The Committee on Appropriations, on general appropriation bills and on joint resolutions continuing appropriations for a fiscal year after September 15 in the preceding fiscal year. [[Page 643]] mittee under titles III and IV of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974. (2) The Committee on the Budget, on the matters required to be reported by such com (3) The Committee on House Administration, on enrolled bills, on contested elections, on matters referred to it concerning printing for the use of the House or the two Houses, on expenditure of the applicable accounts of the House described in clause 1(k)(1) of rule X, and on matters relating to preservation and availability of noncurrent records of the House under rule VII. (4) The Committee on Rules, on rules, joint rules, and the order of business. (5) The Committee on Ethics, on resolutions recommending action by the House with respect to a Member, Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, or employee of the House as a result of an investigation by the committee relating to the official conduct of such Member, Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, or employee. (b) A report filed from the floor as privileged under paragraph (a) may be called up as a privileged question by direction of the reporting committee, subject to any requirement concerning its availability to Members, Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner under clause 4 or concerning the timing of its consideration under clause 6. [[Page 644]] Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). On the latter date the privileges given to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs (now Natural Resources) on bills for the forfeiture of land grants to railroad and other corporations, preventing speculation in the public lands and reserving public lands for the benefit of actual and bona fide settlers, and for the admission of new States, to the Committee on Public Works (now Transportation and Infrastructure) on bills authorizing the improvement of rivers and harbors, to the Committee on Veterans' Affairs on general pension bills, and to the Committee on Ways and Means on bills raising revenue, were eliminated from the rule. In the 94th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 14, 1975, p. 20), the rule was further amended to reinsert ``contested elections'' under the authority of the Committee on House Administration, a matter inadvertently omitted by the 93d Congress (H. Res. 988, Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). The rule was amended in the 97th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 1981, pp. 98-113) to permit joint resolutions continuing appropriations to be privileged if reported after a certain date. In the 101st Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 1989, p. 72), the rule was amended to include under the authority of the Committee on House Administration all matters relating to preservation and availability of noncurrent House records. In the 104th, 106th, and 112th Congresses, it was amended to reflect a change in committee name (sec. 202(b), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 467; H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47; sec. 2(e)(8), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). In the 105th Congress it was amended to update an archaic reference to the ``contingent fund'' (H. Res. 5, Jan. 7, 1997, p. 121). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 4 of rule XI; as part of that recodification, former clause 9 of rule XVI (restating the privilege of general appropriation bills) was deleted as obsolete (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). Conforming changes to paragraph (a)(3) were effected in the 109th and 112th Congresses (sec. 2(a) H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 2005, p. 42; sec. 2(e)(8), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). The origins of this provision appear as early as 1812, but it was in 1886 that the various provisions were consolidated in one rule. The rule was amended by the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 812), again on February 2, 1951 (p. 883), and yet again by the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., [[Page 645]] to the two- thirds vote requirement of clause 6 of this rule), and Standards of Official Conduct (now Ethics) could call up a matter in the House for immediate consideration as soon as the report was filed. Now only reports from the Committee on Rules on rules, joint rules, and the order of business under clause 6 of this rule; reports from the Committee on House Administration on committee expense resolutions under clause 5(a) of this rule; reports constituting questions of privilege (see generally Deschler, ch. 14, Sec. 7.4, fn. 10, discussing ruling of Speaker Albert, July 13, 1971, on a reported contempt); and reports on the official conduct of a Member (e.g., H. Res. 31, Jan. 21, 1997, p. 393) are exempt from the requirements of former clause 2(l)(6) (current clause 4 of this rule) (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). Other committees enumerated in this clause may still utilize the privilege after the report on the bill or resolution has been available for at least three calendar days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays except when the House is in session on such a day). Once called up for consideration, the matter so reported remains privileged until disposed of (IV, 3145). The House proceeds to the consideration of privileged questions only on motion directed to be made by the several committees reporting such questions (VIII, 2310). Privileged questions reported adversely have the same status so far as their privilege is concerned as those reported favorably (VI, 413; VIII, 2310). At the time these privileges originated all reports were made on the floor, and often with great difficulty because of the pressure of business (IV, 4621), and by giving this privilege the most important matters of business were greatly expedited. In 1890 a rule was adopted providing that reports should be made by filing with the Clerk, but privileged reports must still be made from the floor (IV, 3146; VIII, 2230). A privileged report from the Committee on Rules may be filed at any time when the House is in session, including during special-order speeches (Oct. 14, 1986, p. 30861). Before the original adoption of the provisions contained in former clause 2(l)(6) of rule XI in the 92d Congress (current clause 4 of rule XIII) (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144), the right of reporting at any time was held to give the right of immediate consideration by the House (IV, 3131, 3132, 3142-3147; VIII, 2291, 2312). However, from that date until the effective date of the provision of former clause 2(l)(6) (current clause 4 of this rule) on January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470), only the Committees on House Administration, Rules (subject
Sec. 854. Privileged reports defined. The matters reported under the provisions of this clause are denominated ``privileged reports'' or ``privileged questions,'' and because the privilege relates merely to the order of business under the rules, they must be distinguished from ``questions of privilege'' that relate to the safety or dignity of the House itself defined in rule IX (III, 2718). Therefore, ``questions of privilege'' take precedence over these matters that are privileged under the rules (III, 2426-2530; V, 6454; VIII, 3465).
Privileged questions interrupt the regular order of business as established by former rule XXIV (current rule XIV), but when they are disposed of the regular order continues on from the point of interruption (IV, 3070, 3071). The Speaker has declined to allow a call of committees to be interrupted by a privileged report (IV, 3132). The presence of nonprivileged matter destroys the privileged character of a bill (IV, 4622, 4624, 4633, 4640, 4643; VIII, 2289; Speaker Rayburn, May 21, 1958, pp. 9212-16), or resolution (VIII, 2300), and when the text of a bill contains nonprivileged matter, privilege may not be created by a committee amendment in the nature of a substitute not containing the nonprivileged matter (IV, 4623). [[Page 646]] or classes of bills (V, 6774), or the consideration of a specified amendment to a bill and prescribing a mode of considering such amendment (VIII, 2258). A special rule providing for the consideration of a bill is not invalidated by the fact that at the time the rule was reported, the bill was not on the calendar (VIII, 2259; Speaker McCormack, Aug. 19, 1964, p. 20212). The authority to report special orders of business includes authority to recommend consideration of measures and amendments thereto the subject of which might be separately pending before a standing committee (Apr. 15, 1986, p. 7531); to make in order the consideration of the text of an introduced bill as original text in a reported bill (Oct. 9, 1986, p. 29973); to permit consideration of a previously unnumbered and unsponsored measure that comes into existence by virtue of adoption by the House of the special order (Speaker O'Neill, Apr. 16, 1986, p. 7610); to recommend a ``hereby'' resolution, for example, that a concurrent resolution correcting the enrollment of a bill be considered as adopted by the House upon the adoption of the special order (Speaker Wright, May 4, 1988, p. 9865), or that a Senate amendment pending at the Speaker's table and otherwise requiring consideration in Committee of the Whole under clause 3 of rule XXII (formerly clause 1 of rule XX) be ``hereby'' considered as adopted upon adoption of the special order (Deschler, ch. 21, Sec. 16.11; Feb. 4, 1993, p. 2500); to provide that an amendment containing an appropriation in violation of clause 4 of rule XXI (formerly clause 5(a)) be considered as adopted in the House when the reported bill is under consideration (Feb. 24, 1993, p. 3542); to provide that an amendment containing an appropriation in violation of clause 2 of rule XXI be considered as adopted in the House when the reported bill is under consideration (July 27, 1993, p. 17129); and to provide that a nongermane amendment otherwise in violation of clause 7 of rule XVI be considered as adopted in the House when the bill is under consideration (Feb. 24, 1993, p. 3542; July 27, 1993, p. 17129). The Committee on Rules also has reported as privileged a joint resolution repealing a statutory joint rule (mandatory July adjournment, sec. 132 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946) (July 27, 1990, p. 20178). The Committee on Rules has reported as privileged a special order of business nearly identical to one previously rejected by the House, but held not to constitute ``another of the same substance'' within the meaning of the provisions in Jefferson's Manual on reconsideration (Sec. 513, supra) because it provided a different scheme for general debate (July 27, 1993, p. 17115).
Sec. 855. The privilege of individual committees for reports. The privilege given by this clause to the Committee on Rules is confined to ``action touching rules, joint rules, and order of business'' and this committee may not report as privileged a concurrent resolution providing for a Senate investigating committee (VIII, 2255), or provide for the appointment of a clerk (VIII, 2256); but the privilege has been held to include the right to report special orders for the consideration of individual bills
A resolution consisting solely of privileged matter, albeit in two separate jurisdictions empowered to report at any time under clause 4(a), has been referred to a primary committee, reported therefrom as privileged, referred sequentially, and reported as privileged from the sequential committee as well (H. Res. 258, 102d Cong., Nov. 8, 1991, p. 30979; Nov. 19, 1991, p. 32903). [[Page 647]] 2282-2284) and does not include appropriations for specific purposes (VIII, 2285). Before privilege was extended to continuing appropriation bills (in 1981), the rule was construed not to apply to resolutions extending appropriations (VIII, 2282-2284). The right of the Committee on Appropriations to report at any time is confined strictly to general appropriation bills (IV, 4629-4632; VIII, Reports from the Committee on House Administration authorizing appropriations from the Treasury directly for compensation of employees (IV, 4645) or fixing the salaries of employees are not privileged (VIII, 2302).
Sec. 856. Privileged motion for consideration of revenue and appropriation bills. As early as 1835 the necessity of giving appropriation bills precedence became apparent, and in 1837 former clause 9 of rule XVI was adopted to establish that principle, but was deleted in recodification as redundant to this rule. Former clause 4(a) of rule XI was amended by the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470) to eliminate the authority of the Committee on Ways and Means to report as privileged bills raising revenue, and former clause 9 of rule XVI was amended in the 104th Congress (H. Res. 254, Nov. 30, 1995, p. 35077) to delete as obsolete the reference to bills raising revenue (see Sec. 853, supra). However, the privilege to call up general appropriation bills in both rules was retained. When both types of reports were privileged under the rule before the 94th Congress, motions to consider revenue bills and appropriation bills were of equal privilege (IV, 3075, 3076).
[[Page 648]] Privileged reports by the Committee on Rules The motion may designate the particular appropriation bill to be considered (IV, 3074). The motion is privileged at any time after the approval of the Journal (subject to relevant report and hearing availability requirements), but only if offered at the direction of the committee (July 23, 1993, p. 16820). The motion is in order on District Mondays (VI, 716-718; VII, 876, 1123) and takes precedence over the motion to resolve into Committee of the Whole House to consider the Private Calendar (IV, 3082-3085; VI, 719, 720). The motion could be made on a ``suspension day'' as on other days (IV, 3080); and on consent days the call of the former Consent Calendar (abolished in the 104th Congress) took precedence of the motion (VII, 986). It may not be amended (VI, 52, 723), debated (VI, 716), laid on the table, or indefinitely postponed (VI, 726), and the previous question may not be demanded on it (IV, 3077-3079). Although highly privileged, it may not take precedence over a motion to reconsider (IV, 3087), or a motion to change the reference of a bill (VII, 2124). The motion is less highly privileged than the motion to discharge a committee from further consideration of a bill under former clause 3 of rule XXVII (current clause 2 of rule XV) (VII, 1011, 1016).
857. Reports from Committee on Rules. 6. (a) A report by the Committee on Rules on a rule, joint rule, or the order of business may not be called up for consideration on the same day it is presented to the House except--
(1) when so determined by a vote of two-thirds of the Members voting, a quorum being present; (2) in the case of a resolution proposing only to waive a requirement of clause 4 or of clause 8 of rule XXII concerning the availability of reports; or (3) during the last three days of a session of Congress. (b) Pending the consideration of a report by the Committee on Rules on a rule, joint rule, or the order of business, the Speaker may entertain one motion that the House adjourn but may not entertain any other dilatory motion until the report shall have been disposed of. [[Page 649]] (c) The Committee on Rules may not report a rule or order that would prevent the motion to recommit a bill or joint resolution from being made as provided in clause 2(b) of rule XIX, including a motion to recommit with instructions to report back an amendment otherwise in order, if offered by the Minority Leader or a designee, except with respect to a Senate bill or joint resolution for which the text of a House-passed measure has been substituted. The Committee on Rules, ``by uniform practice of the House,'' exercised the privilege of reporting at any time as early as 1888. The right to report at any time is confined to privileged matters (VIII, 2255). This was probably the survival of a practice that existed as early as 1853 of giving the privilege of reporting at any time to this committee for a session (IV, 4650). In 1890 the committee was included among the committees whose reports were privileged by rule. The present rule (formerly clause 4(b) of rule XI) was adopted in 1892 (IV, 4621) and was amended on March 15, 1909. Clause 6(a)(1) (former matter found in parentheses in clause 4(b) of rule XI) was adopted January 18, 1924 (pp. 1139, 1141), and the rule was further amended by the Committee Reform Amendments of 1974, effective January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470), to limit its application to reports from the Committee on Rules on rules, joint rules, and orders of business. In the 94th Congress it was amended to permit the immediate consideration of a resolution reported from the Committee on Rules waiving the two- hour layover requirement (H. Res. 868, Feb. 26, 1976, p. 4625). In the 104th Congress the provision was amended to prohibit the Committee on Rules from recommending a rule or order that would prevent a motion by the Minority Leader or a designee to recommit a bill or joint resolution with instructions to report back an amendment otherwise in order except in the case of a Senate bill or resolution for which the text of a House-passed measure is being substituted (sec. 210, H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 468). In the 111th Congress paragraph (c) was amended to remove a restriction on the authority of the committee with regard to Calendar Wednesday business under clause 6 of rule XV (sec. 2(e), H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 2009, p. _). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 4(b) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). A conforming change to paragraph (c) was effected in the 109th Congress (sec. 2(f), H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 2005, p. 43), a technical change to paragraph (b) was effected in the 110th Congress (sec. 505(b), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 2007, p. 19 (adopted Jan. 5, 2007)), and a technical change to paragraph (c) was effected in the 112th Congress (sec. 2(f), H. Res. 5, Jan. 5, 2011, p. _). For rulings under the earlier form of the rule, see Sec. 859, infra. [[Page 650]] Oct. 29, 1987, p. 29937). This clause does not require that a privileged resolution, and the report thereon, from the Committee on Rules be printed before it is called up for consideration (Speaker O'Neill, Feb. 2, 1977, p. 3344). Pursuant to this clause, a privileged report from the Committee on Rules may be considered on the same legislative day only by a two-thirds vote, but a report properly filed by the committee at any time before the convening of the House on the next legislative day may be called up for immediate consideration without the two-thirds vote requirement (Speaker Albert, July 31, 1975, p. 26243), including a report filed during special-order speeches after legislative business on that prior legislative day (Oct. 14, 1986, p. 30861), and if the House continues in session into a second calendar day and then meets again that day, or convenes for two legislative days on the same calendar day, any report filed on the first legislative day may be called up on the second without the question of consideration being raised (Speaker O'Neill, Dec. 16, 1985, p. 36755; Speaker Wright, In the case of certain resolutions reported from the Committee on Rules, the two-thirds vote requirement for consideration on the same day reported does not apply. This clause provides for the immediate consideration of a resolution from the Rules Committee waiving the requirement that copies of reports and reported measures be available for three days before their consideration, and waiving the requirement that copies of conference reports or amendments reported from conference in disagreement be available for two hours before their consideration (see Aug. 10, 1984, p. 23978). Although highly privileged, a report from the Committee on Rules yields to questions of privilege (VIII, 3491; Mar. 11, 1987, p. 5403), and is not in order after the House has voted to go into Committee of the Whole (V, 6781). Also a conference report has precedence over it, even when the previous question and the yeas and nays have been ordered (V, 6449). Formerly if a report from the Committee on Rules contained substantive propositions, a separate vote could be had on each proposition (VIII, 2271, 2272, 2274, 3167); but these decisions were nullified by the adoption of clause 5(b)(2) of rule XVI (formerly clause 6). A report from the Committee on Rules takes precedence over a motion to consider a measure that is ``highly privileged'' pursuant to a statute enacted as an exercise in the rulemaking authority of the House, acknowledging the constitutional authority of the House to change its rules at any time (Speaker Wright, Mar. 11, 1987, p. 5403). Before the House adopts rules, the Speaker may recognize a Member to offer for immediate consideration a special order providing for the consideration of a resolution adopting the rules (H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 447; H. Res. 5, Jan. 4, 2007, p. _). [[Page 651]] what legislation could be considered or otherwise constitute a rule of the House) (June 10, 1982, p. 13353). The Committee on Rules may report and call up as privileged resolutions temporarily waiving or altering any rule of the House, including statutory provisions enacted as an exercise of the House's rulemaking authority that would otherwise prohibit the consideration of a bill being made in order by the resolution (Speaker Albert, Mar. 20, 1975, p. 7676; Mar. 24, 1975, p. 8418), or that would otherwise establish an exclusive procedure for consideration of a particular type of measure (Speaker O'Neill, Apr. 16, 1986, p. 7610; Speaker Wright, Mar. 11, 1987, p. 5403). No rule of the House precludes the Committee on Rules from reporting a special order making in order specified amendments that have not been preprinted as otherwise required by an announced policy of that committee (Oct. 23, 1991, p. 28097). No point of order lies against a resolution reported from the Committee on Rules that waives points of order against a measure or provides special procedures for its consideration, if no law constituting a rule of the House prohibits consideration of such a resolution (resolution providing for consideration of a budget resolution, where a statute (P.L. 96-389) reaffirmed congressional commitment to balanced Federal budgets but did not dictate For a discussion of the Speaker's announced policy with respect to entertaining unanimous-consent requests in the House to alter a special order previously adopted by the House, see Sec. 956, infra. For a discussion of the unanimous-consent requests that may not be entertained in the Committee of the Whole if their effect is to materially modify procedures required by a special order adopted by the House, see Sec. 993, infra. [[Page 652]] that a virtually consecutive invocation of former rule XXX (current clause 6 of rule XVII), resulting in a second pair of votes on use of a chart and on reconsideration thereof, was not dilatory under this clause (or former clause 10 of rule XVI (current clause 1 of rule XVI)) (July 31, 1996, p. 20693). In the 107th Congress clause 6 of rule XVII was amended to render the Chair's recognition for a motion on the use of charts completely discretionary (see Sec. 963, infra).
Sec. 858. Dilatory motions not permitted. In the later practice it has been held that the question of consideration may not be raised against a report from the Committee on Rules (V, 4961-4963; VIII, 2440, 2441). The clause forbidding dilatory motions has been construed strictly (V, 5740-5742), and in the later practice the following have been excluded: (1) the motion to commit after the ordering of the previous question (V, 5593-5601; VIII, 2270, 2750; Feb. 22, 1984, p. 2965); (2) an appeal from the Chair's decision not to entertain the question of consideration or a motion to lay the pending resolution on the table (V, 5739); and (3) the motion to postpone to a day certain (Oct. 9, 1986, p. 29972). A motion to reconsider the vote on ordering the previous question has been held not dilatory (V, 5739). Before debate has begun on a report from the Committee on Rules, a question of the privileges of the House takes precedence (VIII, 3491; Mar. 11, 1987, p. 5403). In the event that the previous question is rejected on a privileged resolution from the Committee on Rules, the provisions of clause 6(b) prohibiting ``dilatory'' motions no longer strictly apply; the resolution is subject to proper amendment, further debate, or a motion to table or refer, and the Member who led the opposition to the previous question is accorded priority in recognition (Oct. 19, 1966, pp. 27713, 27725-29; May 29, 1980, pp. 12667-78), subject to being preempted by a preferential motion offered by another Member (Aug. 13, 1982, pp. 20969, 20975-78). The member of the Committee on Rules calling up a privileged resolution on behalf of the committee may offer an amendment thereto without specific authorization from the committee (Sept. 25, 1990, p. 25575). A motion to table such a pending amendment is dilatory and not in order under this provision, but the motion to reconsider the vote on ordering the previous question on the rule and amendment thereto is not (see V, 5739; Sept. 25, 1990, p. 25575), and may be laid on the table without carrying with it the resolution itself (Sept. 25, 1990, p. 25575). Only one motion to adjourn is admissible during the consideration of a report from the Committee on Rules (July 23, 1997, pp. 15366, 15374; Mar. 11, 2008, p. _) and may be offered immediately after the reading of the resolution (Mar. 20, 2002, pp. 3671, 3672) but may not be made when another Member has the floor (Sept. 27, 1993, p. 22608). If the House adjourns during the consideration of a report from the Committee on Rules, further consideration of the report becomes the unfinished business on the following day, and debate resumes from the point where interrupted (Sept. 27, 1993, p. 22609; Sept. 28, 1993, p. 22719). The Chair has held
A motion to recommit a special rule from the Committee on Rules is not in order (VIII, 2270, 2753).
Sec. 859. Restrictions on authority of Committee on Rules. From 1934 until the amendment to this provision in the 104th Congress (sec. 210, H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 468), it was consistently held that the Committee on Rules could recommend a special order that limited, but did not totally prohibit, a motion to recommit pending passage of a bill or joint resolution, as by precluding the motion from containing instructions relating to specified amendments (Speaker Rainey, Jan. 11, 1934, pp. 479-83 (sustained on appeal)); or by omitting to preserve the availability of amendatory instructions in the case that the bill is entirely rewritten by the adoption of a substitute made in order as original text (Speaker Foley, June 4, 1991, p. 13170; Speaker Foley, Nov. 25, 1991, p. 34460); or by expressly allowing only a simple (``straight'') motion to recommit (without instructions) (Oct. 16, 1990, p. 29657 (sustained by tabling of appeal); Feb. 26, 1992, p. 3441 (sustained by tabling of appeal); May 7, 1992, p. 10586 (sustained by tabling of appeal); June 16, 1992, p. 14973 (sustained by tabling of appeal); Nov. 21, 1993, p. 31544; Nov. 22, 1993, p. 31815). A special order providing for consideration of a bill under suspension of the rules does not prevent a motion to recommit from being made ``as provided in clause 4 of rule XVI,'' i.e., after the previous question is ordered on passage, a procedure not applicable to a motion to suspend the rules (VIII, 2267; Speaker Foley, June 21, 1990, p. 15229). See Deschler, ch. 21, Sec. 26.11; see generally Deschler, ch. 23, Sec. 25.
The caveat against including in a special order matter privileged to be reported by another committee (Deschler, ch. 21, Sec. 17.13) does not extend to a ``hereby'' resolution (e.g., a special order providing that a concurrent resolution correcting the enrollment of a bill within the jurisdiction of another committee be considered as adopted by the House upon the adoption of the special order), so long as not precluding the motion to recommit a bill or joint resolution (Speaker Wright, May 4, 1988, p. 9865). [[Page 653]] minority member of the Rules Committee regarding this practice, see January 24, 1996, pp. 1228, 1229. The Committee on Rules has reported special rules to dispose of Senate amendments that have ordered the previous question to adoption without intervening motion. At this stage the special order need not preserve (under clause 6(c) of rule XIII) the motion to recommit (as provided in clause 2(b) of rule XIX) because the bill is not at the stage of initial passage. For an illustrative list of such special rules, see House Practice, ch. 51, Sec. 11. For an exchange of correspondence between the chair and ranking A special order of business reported by the Committee on Rules directing the Clerk to refrain from certifying an enrollment pending the resolution of a given contingency does not violate clause 2(d)(2) (Apr. 13, 2011, p. _).
Sec. 860. Unfunded mandates; congressional earmarks. The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-4; 109 Stat. 48) added a new part B to title IV of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 658-658g) that imposes several requirements on committees with respect to ``Federal mandates'' (secs. 423, 424; 2 U.S.C. 658b, 658c), establishes points of order to permit separate votes on whether to enforce those requirements (sec. 425; 2 U.S.C. 658d), and permits a vote on the consideration of a rule or order waiving such points of order (sec. 426(a); 2 U.S.C. 658e(a)). See Sec. 1127, infra.
Clause 9 of rule XXI establishes a point of order against considerationof certain measures for failure to disclose (or disclaim the presence of)certain earmarks, tax benefits, and tariff benefits (paragraphs (a) and (b)),and permits a vote on the question of consideration of a rule or orderwaiving such points of order (paragraph (c)). See Sec. 1068d, infra.
Sec. 861. Filing reports. (d) The Committee on Rules shall present to the House reports concerning rules, joint rules, and the order of business, within three legislative days of the time when they are ordered. If such a report is not considered immediately, it shall be referred to the calendar. If such a report on the calendar is not called up by the member of the committee who filed the report within seven legislative days, any member of the committee may call it up as a privileged question on the day after the calendar day on which the member announces to the House intention to do so. The Speaker shall recognize a member of the committee who rises for that purpose.
[[Page 654]] or public joint resolution may be called up as a privileged question by a Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner on a day when it is in order to consider a motion to discharge committees under clause 2 of rule XV. (e) An adverse report by the Committee on Rules on a resolution proposing a special order of business for the consideration of a public bill Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in one paragraph, former paragraph (c) of clause 4 of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). What is now paragraph (d) was initially adopted January 18, 1924, and was amended on January 6, 1987 (H. Res. 5, p. 6) (requiring one calendar day's notice before calling up a special order eligible under the rule). A gender-based reference was eliminated in the 111th Congress (sec. 2(l), H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 2009, p. _). What is now paragraph (e) was amended December 8, 1931 (VIII, 2268), January 3, 1949 (p. 16) (establishing the so-called ``21-day rule''), January 3, 1951 (p. 18) (abolishing the ``21-day rule''), January 4, 1965 (p. 24) (reestablishing the ``21-day rule''), January 10, 1967 (H. Res. 7, p. 28) (abolishing the ``21-day rule''). Technical changes to this provision were effected on January 3, 1975 (H. Res. 988, Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). A special order reported from the Committee on Rules and not called up within seven legislative days may be called up by any member of that committee, including a minority member (Nov. 13, 1979, p. 32185; May 6, 1982, p. 8905).
Sec. 862. Privileged motion. (f) If the House has adopted a resolution making in order a motion to consider a bill or resolution, and such a motion has not been offered within seven calendar days thereafter, such a motion shall be privileged if offered by direction of all reporting committees having initial jurisdiction of the bill or resolution.
[[Page 655]] This provision was contained in section 109 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (84 Stat. 1140) and became part of the rules in the 92d Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 22, 1971, p. 144). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 2(l)(7) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). In modern practice, this subparagraph is normally inapplicable in light of clause 2(b) of rule XVIII, which provides for the House resolving into the Committee of the Whole by declaration of the Speaker pursuant to a special order of business rather than by adoption of a motion.
Sec. 863. Specifying waivers. (g) Whenever the Committee on Rules reports a resolution providing for the consideration of a measure, it shall (to the maximum extent possible) specify in the resolution the object of any waiver of a point of order against the measure or against its consideration.
Resolutions of inquiry This provision (formerly clause 4(e) of rule XI) was adopted in this form in the 104th Congress (sec. 211, H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 1995, p. 468). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 4(e) of rule XI (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47).
864. Resolution of inquiry. 7. A report on a resolution of inquiry addressed to the head of an executive department may be filed from the floor as privileged. If such a resolution is not reported to the House within 14 legislative days after its introduction, a motion to discharge a committee from its consideration shall be privileged.
The House has exercised the right, from its earliest days, to call on the President and heads of departments for information. The first rule on the subject was adopted in 1820 for the purpose of securing greater care and deliberation in the making of requests. The present form of rule, in its essential features, dates from 1879 (III, 1856), although the time period for a committee to report was extended from one week to 14 legislative days in the 98th Congress (H. Res. 5, Jan. 3, 1983, p. 34). Before the House recodified its rules in the 106th Congress, this provision was found in former clause 5 of rule XXII (H. Res. 5, Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47). [[Page 656]] with the public interest'' (II, 1547; III, 1896-1901; V, 5759; VI, 436). But in some instances the House has made its inquiries of the President without condition, and has even made the inquiry imperative (III, 1896-1901). Resolutions of inquiry are delivered under direction of the Clerk (III, 1879) and are answered by subordinate officers of the Government either directly or through the President (III, 1908-1910).
Sec. 865. Forms of resolutions of inquiry and delivery thereof. Resolutions of inquiry are usually simple rather than concurrent in form (III, 1875), and are never joint resolutions (III, 1860). A resolution authorizing a committee to request information has been treated as a resolution of inquiry (III, 1860). It has been considered proper to use the word ``request'' in asking for information from the President and ``direct'' in addressing the heads of departments (III, 1856, footnote, 1895). It is usual for the House in calling on the President for information, especially with relation to foreign affairs, to use the qualifying clause ``if not incompatible
Sec. 866. Privileged status of resolutions of inquiry. The practice of the House gives to resolutions of inquiry a privileged status. Thus, they are privileged for report and consideration at any time after their reference to a committee (III, 1870; VI, 413, 414), but not before (III, 1857), and are in order for consideration only on motion directed to be made by the committee reporting the same (VI, 413; VIII, 2310). They are privileged for consideration on ``Suspension days'' (except on Calendar Wednesday (VII, 896-898)) and took precedence of the former Consent Calendar (VI, 409) before its abolishment in the 104th Congress (H. Res. 168, June 20, 1995, p. 16574). Only resolutions addressed to the President and the heads of the executive departments have the privilege (III, 1861-1864; VI, 406). To enjoy the privilege a resolution should call for facts rather than opinions (III, 1872, 1873; VI, 413, 418-432; July 7, 1971, pp. 23810-11), should not require investigations (III, 1872-1874; VI, 422, 427, 429, 432), and should not present a preamble (III, 1877, 1878; VI, 422, 427); but if a resolution on its face calls for facts, the Chair will not investigate the probability of the existence of the facts called for (VI, 422). However, a resolution inquiring for such facts as would inevitably require the statement of an opinion to answer such inquiry is not privileged (Speaker Longworth, Feb. 11, 1926, p. 3805).
Questions of privilege (as distinguished from privileged questions) have sometimes arisen in cases wherein the head of a department has declined to respond to an inquiry and the House has desired to demand a further answer (III, 1891; VI, 435); but a demand for a more complete reply (III, 1892) or a proposition to investigate as to whether or not there has been a failure to respond may not be presented as involving the privileges of the House (III, 1893). [[Page 657]] if the motion is agreed to, the resolution is debatable under the hour rule unless the previous question is ordered (VI, 416, 417). If a committee reports a privileged resolution of inquiry (favorably or adversely), it may then be called up only by an authorized member of the reporting committee and not by another Member of the House (VI, 413; VIII, 2310). The Member calling up a privileged resolution of inquiry reported from committee is recognized to control one hour of debate and may move to lay the resolution on the table before or after that time (July 7, 1971, pp. 23807-10; Oct. 20, 1971, pp. 37055-57).
Sec. 867. Discharge of a committee from a resolution of inquiry. Committees are required to report resolutions of inquiry back to the House within a prescribed timeframe (formerly one week, now 14 legislative days) (VIII, 3368; Speaker Rayburn, Feb. 9, 1950, p. 1755) exclusive of the day of introduction and the day of discharge (III, 1858, 1859). If a committee refuses or neglects to report the resolution back, the House may reach the resolution only by a motion to discharge the committee (III, 1865). The ordinary motion to discharge a committee is not privileged (VIII, 2316); but the practice of the House has given privilege to the motion in cases of resolutions of inquiry (III, 1866- 1870). And this motion to discharge is privileged at the end of the time period, though the resolution may have been delayed in reaching the committee (III, 1871). The motion to discharge is not debatable (III, 1868; VI, 415). However,
Sec. 868. Resolutions of inquiry as related to the Executive. The President having failed to respond to a resolution of inquiry, the House respectfully reminded him of the fact (III, 1890). In 1796 the House declared that its constitutional requests of the Executive for information need not be accompanied by a statement of purposes (II, 1509). As to the kind of information that may be required, especially as to the papers that may be demanded, there has been much discussion (III, 1700, 1738, 1888, 1902, 1903; VI, 402, 435). There have been several conflicts with the Executive (II, 1534, 1561; III, 1884, 1885-1889, 1894) over demands for papers and information, especially when the resolutions have called for papers relating to foreign affairs (II, 1509-1513, 1518, 1519).