42 U.S.C.
United States Code, 2008 Edition
Title 42 - THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE
CHAPTER 154 - COMBATING CHILD EXPLOITATION
From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov

CHAPTER 154—COMBATING CHILD EXPLOITATION

Sec.
17601.
Definitions.

        

SUBCHAPTER I—NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CHILD EXPLOITATION PREVENTION AND INTERDICTION

17611.
Establishment of National Strategy for Child Exploitation Prevention and Interdiction.
17612.
Establishment of National ICAC Task Force Program.
17613.
Purpose of ICAC task forces.
17614.
Duties and functions of task forces.
17615.
National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System.
17616.
ICAC grant program.
17617.
Authorization of appropriations.

        

SUBCHAPTER II—ADDITIONAL MEASURES TO COMBAT CHILD EXPLOITATION

17631.
Additional regional computer forensic labs.

        

§17601. Definitions

In this chapter, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) Child exploitation

The term “child exploitation” means any conduct, attempted conduct, or conspiracy to engage in conduct involving a minor that violates section 1591, chapter 109A, chapter 110, and chapter 117 of title 18 or any sexual activity involving a minor for which any person can be charged with a criminal offense.

(2) Child obscenity

The term “child obscenity” means any visual depiction proscribed by section 1466A of title 18.

(3) Minor

The term “minor” means any person under the age of 18 years.

(4) Sexually explicit conduct

The term “sexually explicit conduct” has the meaning given such term in section 2256 of title 18.

(Pub. L. 110–401, §2, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4229.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “this Act”, meaning Pub. L. 110–401, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4229, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out below and Tables.

Short Title

Pub. L. 110–401, §1(a), Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4229, provided that: “This Act [enacting this chapter and sections 2258A to 2258E of Title 18, Crimes and Criminal Procedure, amending sections 2251, 2252A, 2256, 2260, and 2702 of Title 18, repealing section 13032 of this title, and enacting provisions set out as a note under section 2251 of Title 18] may be cited as the ‘Providing Resources, Officers, and Technology To Eradicate Cyber Threats to Our Children Act of 2008’ or the ‘PROTECT Our Children Act of 2008’.”

SUBCHAPTER I—NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR CHILD EXPLOITATION PREVENTION AND INTERDICTION

§17611. Establishment of National Strategy for Child Exploitation Prevention and Interdiction

(a) In general

The Attorney General of the United States shall create and implement a National Strategy for Child Exploitation Prevention and Interdiction.

(b) Timing

Not later than 1 year after October 13, 2008, and on February 1 of every second year thereafter, the Attorney General shall submit to Congress the National Strategy established under subsection (a).

(c) Required contents of National Strategy

The National Strategy established under subsection (a) shall include the following:

(1) Comprehensive long-range,1 goals for reducing child exploitation.

(2) Annual measurable objectives and specific targets to accomplish long-term, quantifiable goals that the Attorney General determines may be achieved during each year beginning on the date when the National Strategy is submitted.

(3) Annual budget priorities and Federal efforts dedicated to combating child exploitation, including resources dedicated to Internet Crimes Against Children task forces, Project Safe Childhood, FBI Innocent Images Initiative, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, regional forensic computer labs, Internet Safety 2 programs, and all other entities whose goal or mission is to combat the exploitation of children that receive Federal support.

(4) A 5-year projection for program and budget goals and priorities.

(5) A review of the policies and work of the Department of Justice related to the prevention and investigation of child exploitation crimes, including efforts at the Office of Justice Programs, the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice, the Executive Office of United States Attorneys, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Office of the Attorney General, the Office of the Deputy Attorney General, the Office of Legal Policy, and any other agency or bureau of the Department of Justice whose activities relate to child exploitation.

(6) A description of the Department's efforts to coordinate with international, State, local, tribal law enforcement, and private sector entities on child exploitation prevention and interdiction efforts.

(7) Plans for interagency coordination regarding the prevention, investigation, and apprehension of individuals exploiting children, including cooperation and collaboration with—

(A) Immigration and Customs Enforcement;

(B) the United States Postal Inspection Service;

(C) the Department of State;

(D) the Department of Commerce;

(E) the Department of Education;

(F) the Department of Health and Human Services; and

(G) other appropriate Federal agencies.


(8) A review of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program, including—

(A) the number of ICAC task forces and location of each ICAC task force;

(B) the number of trained personnel at each ICAC task force;

(C) the amount of Federal grants awarded to each ICAC task force;

(D) an assessment of the Federal, State, and local cooperation in each task force, including—

(i) the number of arrests made by each task force;

(ii) the number of criminal referrals to United States attorneys for prosecution;

(iii) the number of prosecutions and convictions from the referrals made under clause (ii);

(iv) the number, if available, of local prosecutions and convictions based on ICAC task force investigations; and

(v) any other information demonstrating the level of Federal, State, and local coordination and cooperation, as such information is to be determined by the Attorney General;


(E) an assessment of the training opportunities and technical assistance available to support ICAC task force grantees; and

(F) an assessment of the success of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program at leveraging State and local resources and matching funds.


(9) An assessment of the technical assistance and support available for Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies, in the prevention, investigation, and prosecution of child exploitation crimes.

(10) A review of the backlog of forensic analysis for child exploitation cases at each FBI Regional Forensic lab and an estimate of the backlog at State and local labs.

(11) Plans for reducing the forensic backlog described in paragraph (10), if any, at Federal, State and local forensic labs.

(12) A review of the Federal programs related to child exploitation prevention and education, including those related to Internet safety, including efforts by the private sector and nonprofit entities, or any other initiatives, that have proven successful in promoting child safety and Internet safety.

(13) An assessment of the future trends, challenges, and opportunities, including new technologies, that will impact Federal, State, local, and tribal efforts to combat child exploitation.

(14) Plans for liaisons with the judicial branches of the Federal and State governments on matters relating to child exploitation.

(15) An assessment of Federal investigative and prosecution activity relating to reported incidents of child exploitation crimes, which shall include a number of factors, including—

(A) the number of high-priority suspects (identified because of the volume of suspected criminal activity or because of the danger to the community or a potential victim) who were investigated and prosecuted;

(B) the number of investigations, arrests, prosecutions and convictions for a crime of child exploitation; and

(C) the average sentence imposed and statutory maximum for each crime of child exploitation.


(16) A review of all available statistical data indicating the overall magnitude of child pornography trafficking in the United States and internationally, including—

(A) the number of computers or computer users, foreign and domestic, observed engaging in, or suspected by law enforcement agencies and other sources of engaging in, peer-to-peer file sharing of child pornography;

(B) the number of computers or computer users, foreign and domestic, observed engaging in, or suspected by law enforcement agencies and other reporting sources of engaging in, buying and selling, or other commercial activity related to child pornography;

(C) the number of computers or computer users, foreign and domestic, observed engaging in, or suspected by law enforcement agencies and other sources of engaging in, all other forms of activity related to child pornography;

(D) the number of tips or other statistical data from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children's CyberTipline and other data indicating the magnitude of child pornography trafficking; and

(E) any other statistical data indicating the type, nature, and extent of child exploitation crime in the United States and abroad.


(17) Copies of recent relevant research and studies related to child exploitation, including—

(A) studies related to the link between possession or trafficking of child pornography and actual abuse of a child;

(B) studies related to establishing a link between the types of files being viewed or shared and the type of illegal activity; and

(C) any other research, studies, and available information related to child exploitation.


(18) A review of the extent of cooperation, coordination, and mutual support between private sector and other entities and organizations and Federal agencies, including the involvement of States, local and tribal government agencies to the extent Federal programs are involved.

(19) The results of the Project Safe Childhood Conference or other conferences or meetings convened by the Department of Justice related to combating child exploitation.

(d) Appointment of high-level official

(1) In general

The Attorney General shall designate a senior official at the Department of Justice to be responsible for coordinating the development of the National Strategy established under subsection (a).

(2) Duties

The duties of the official designated under paragraph (1) shall include—

(A) acting as a liaison with all Federal agencies regarding the development of the National Strategy;

(B) working to ensure that there is proper coordination among agencies in developing the National Strategy;

(C) being knowledgeable about budget priorities and familiar with all efforts within the Department of Justice and the FBI related to child exploitation prevention and interdiction; and

(D) communicating the National Strategy to Congress and being available to answer questions related to the strategy at congressional hearings, if requested by committees of appropriate jurisdictions, on the contents of the National Strategy and progress of the Department of Justice in implementing the National Strategy.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §101, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4230.)

1 So in original. The comma probably should not appear.

2 So in original. Probably should not be capitalized.

§17612. Establishment of National ICAC Task Force Program

(a) Establishment

(1) In general

There is established within the Department of Justice, under the general authority of the Attorney General, a National Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program (hereinafter in this subchapter referred to as the “ICAC Task Force Program”), which shall consist of a national program of State and local law enforcement task forces dedicated to developing effective responses to online enticement of children by sexual predators, child exploitation, and child obscenity and pornography cases.

(2) Intent of Congress

It is the purpose and intent of Congress that the ICAC Task Force Program established under paragraph (1) is intended to continue the ICAC Task Force Program authorized under title I of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998, and funded under title IV of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 [42 U.S.C. 5771 et seq.].

(b) National program

(1) State representation

The ICAC Task Force Program established under subsection (a) shall include at least 1 ICAC task force in each State.

(2) Capacity and continuity of investigations

In order to maintain established capacity and continuity of investigations and prosecutions of child exploitation cases, the Attorney General, shall, in establishing the ICAC Task Force Program under subsection (a) consult with and consider all 59 task forces in existence on October 13, 2008. The Attorney General shall include all existing ICAC task forces in the ICAC Task Force Program, unless the Attorney General makes a determination that an existing ICAC 1 does not have a proven track record of success.

(3) Ongoing review

The Attorney General shall—

(A) conduct periodic reviews of the effectiveness of each ICAC task force established under this section; and

(B) have the discretion to establish a new task force if the Attorney General determines that such decision will enhance the effectiveness of combating child exploitation provided that the Attorney General notifies Congress in advance of any such decision and that each state 2 maintains at least 1 ICAC task force at all times.

(4) Training

(A) In general

The Attorney General may establish national training programs to support the mission of the ICAC task forces, including the effective use of the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System.

(B) Limitation

In establishing training courses under this paragraph, the Attorney General may not award any one entity other than a law enforcement agency more than $2,000,000 annually to establish and conduct training courses for ICAC task force members and other law enforcement officials.

(C) Review

The Attorney General shall—

(i) conduct periodic reviews of the effectiveness of each training session authorized by this paragraph; and

(ii) consider outside reports related to the effective use of Federal funding in making future grant awards for training.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §102, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4233.)

References in Text

Title I of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998, referred to in subsec. (a)(2), is title I of Pub. L. 105–119, Nov. 26, 1997, 111 Stat. 2440. For complete classification of title I to the Code, see Tables.

The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, referred to in subsec. (a)(2), is Pub. L. 93–415, Sept. 7, 1974, 88 Stat. 1109. Title IV of the Act is classified generally to subchapter IV (§5771 et seq.) of chapter 72 of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 5601 of this title and Tables.

1 So in original. Probably should be “ICAC task force”.

2 So in original. Probably should be capitalized.

§17613. Purpose of ICAC task forces

The ICAC Task Force Program, and each State or local ICAC task force that is part of the national program of task forces, shall be dedicated toward—

(1) increasing the investigative capabilities of State and local law enforcement officers in the detection, investigation, and apprehension of Internet crimes against children offenses or offenders, including technology-facilitated child exploitation offenses;

(2) conducting proactive and reactive Internet crimes against children investigations;

(3) providing training and technical assistance to ICAC task forces and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in the areas of investigations, forensics, prosecution, community outreach, and capacity-building, using recognized experts to assist in the development and delivery of training programs;

(4) increasing the number of Internet crimes against children offenses being investigated and prosecuted in both Federal and State courts;

(5) creating a multiagency task force response to Internet crimes against children offenses within each State;

(6) participating in the Department of Justice's Project Safe Childhood initiative, the purpose of which is to combat technology-facilitated sexual exploitation crimes against children;

(7) enhancing nationwide responses to Internet crimes against children offenses, including assisting other ICAC task forces, as well as other Federal, State, and local agencies with Internet crimes against children investigations and prosecutions;

(8) developing and delivering Internet crimes against children public awareness and prevention programs; and

(9) participating in such other activities, both proactive and reactive, that will enhance investigations and prosecutions of Internet crimes against children.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §103, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4234.)

§17614. Duties and functions of task forces

Each State or local ICAC task force that is part of the national program of task forces shall—

(1) consist of State and local investigators, prosecutors, forensic specialists, and education specialists who are dedicated to addressing the goals of such task force;

(2) work consistently toward achieving the purposes described in section 17613 of this title;

(3) engage in proactive investigations, forensic examinations, and effective prosecutions of Internet crimes against children;

(4) provide forensic, preventive, and investigative assistance to parents, educators, prosecutors, law enforcement, and others concerned with Internet crimes against children;

(5) develop multijurisdictional, multiagency responses and partnerships to Internet crimes against children offenses through ongoing informational, administrative, and technological support to other State and local law enforcement agencies, as a means for such agencies to acquire the necessary knowledge, personnel, and specialized equipment to investigate and prosecute such offenses;

(6) participate in nationally coordinated investigations in any case in which the Attorney General determines such participation to be necessary, as permitted by the available resources of such task force;

(7) establish or adopt investigative and prosecution standards, consistent with established norms, to which such task force shall comply;

(8) investigate, and seek prosecution on, tips related to Internet crimes against children, including tips from Operation Fairplay, the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System established in section 17615 of this title, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children's CyberTipline, ICAC task forces, and other Federal, State, and local agencies, with priority being given to investigative leads that indicate the possibility of identifying or rescuing child victims, including investigative leads that indicate a likelihood of seriousness of offense or dangerousness to the community;

(9) develop procedures for handling seized evidence;

(10) maintain—

(A) such reports and records as are required under this subchapter; and

(B) such other reports and records as determined by the Attorney General; and


(11) seek to comply with national standards regarding the investigation and prosecution of Internet crimes against children, as set forth by the Attorney General, to the extent such standards are consistent with the law of the State where the task force is located.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §104, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4235.)

§17615. National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System

(a) In general

The Attorney General shall establish, consistent with all existing Federal laws relating to the protection of privacy, a National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System. The system shall not be used to search for or obtain any information that does not involve the use of the Internet to facilitate child exploitation.

(b) Intent of Congress

It is the purpose and intent of Congress that the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System established in subsection (a) is intended to continue and build upon Operation Fairplay developed by the Wyoming Attorney General's office, which has established a secure, dynamic undercover infrastructure that has facilitated online law enforcement investigations of child exploitation, information sharing, and the capacity to collect and aggregate data on the extent of the problems of child exploitation.

(c) Purpose of system

The National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System established under subsection (a) shall be dedicated to assisting and supporting credentialed law enforcement agencies authorized to investigate child exploitation in accordance with Federal, State, local, and tribal laws, including by providing assistance and support to—

(1) Federal agencies investigating and prosecuting child exploitation;

(2) the ICAC Task Force Program established under section 17612 of this title;

(3) State, local, and tribal agencies investigating and prosecuting child exploitation; and

(4) foreign or international law enforcement agencies, subject to approval by the Attorney General.

(d) Cyber safe deconfliction and information sharing

The National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System established under subsection (a)—

(1) shall be housed and maintained within the Department of Justice or a credentialed law enforcement agency;

(2) shall be made available for a nominal charge to support credentialed law enforcement agencies in accordance with subsection (c); and

(3) shall—

(A) allow Federal, State, local, and tribal agencies and ICAC task forces investigating and prosecuting child exploitation to contribute and access data for use in resolving case conflicts;

(B) provide, directly or in partnership with a credentialed law enforcement agency, a dynamic undercover infrastructure to facilitate online law enforcement investigations of child exploitation;

(C) facilitate the development of essential software and network capability for law enforcement participants; and

(D) provide software or direct hosting and support for online investigations of child exploitation activities, or, in the alternative, provide users with a secure connection to an alternative system that provides such capabilities, provided that the system is hosted within a governmental agency or a credentialed law enforcement agency.

(e) Collection and reporting of data

(1) In general

The National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System established under subsection (a) shall ensure the following:

(A) Real-time reporting

All child exploitation cases involving local child victims that are reasonably detectable using available software and data are, immediately upon their detection, made available to participating law enforcement agencies.

(B) High-priority suspects

Every 30 days, at minimum, the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System shall—

(i) identify high-priority suspects, as such suspects are determined by the volume of suspected criminal activity or other indicators of seriousness of offense or dangerousness to the community or a potential local victim; and

(ii) report all such identified high-priority suspects to participating law enforcement agencies.

(C) Annual reports

Any statistical data indicating the overall magnitude of child pornography trafficking and child exploitation in the United States and internationally is made available and included in the National Strategy, as is required under section 17611(c)(16) of this title.

(2) Rule of construction

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to limit the ability of participating law enforcement agencies to disseminate investigative leads or statistical information in accordance with State and local laws.

(f) Mandatory requirements of network

The National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System established under subsection (a) shall develop, deploy, and maintain an integrated technology and training program that provides—

(1) a secure, online system for Federal law enforcement agencies, ICAC task forces, and other State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies for use in resolving case conflicts, as provided in subsection (d);

(2) a secure system enabling online communication and collaboration by Federal law enforcement agencies, ICAC task forces, and other State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies regarding ongoing investigations, investigatory techniques, best practices, and any other relevant news and professional information;

(3) a secure online data storage and analysis system for use by Federal law enforcement agencies, ICAC task forces, and other State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies;

(4) secure connections or interaction with State and local law enforcement computer networks, consistent with reasonable and established security protocols and guidelines;

(5) guidelines for use of the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System by Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies and ICAC task forces; and

(6) training and technical assistance on the use of the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System by Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies and ICAC task forces.

(g) National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System Steering Committee

The Attorney General shall establish a National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System Steering Committee to provide guidance to the Network relating to the program under subsection (f), and to assist in the development of strategic plans for the System. The Steering Committee shall consist of 10 members with expertise in child exploitation prevention and interdiction prosecution, investigation, or prevention, including—

(1) 3 representatives elected by the local directors of the ICAC task forces, such representatives shall represent different geographic regions of the country;

(2) 1 representative of the Department of Justice Office of Information Services;

(3) 1 representative from Operation Fairplay, currently hosted at the Wyoming Office of the Attorney General;

(4) 1 representative from the law enforcement agency having primary responsibility for hosting and maintaining the National Internet Crimes Against Children Data System;

(5) 1 representative of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Innocent Images National Initiative or Regional Computer Forensic Lab program;

(6) 1 representative of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Cyber Crimes Center;

(7) 1 representative of the United States Postal Inspection Service; and

(8) 1 representative of the Department of Justice.

(h) Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated for each of the fiscal years 2009 through 2016, $2,000,000 to carry out the provisions of this section.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §105, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4236.)

§17616. ICAC grant program

(a) Establishment

(1) In general

The Attorney General is authorized to award grants to State and local ICAC task forces to assist in carrying out the duties and functions described under section 17614 of this title.

(2) Formula grants

(A) Development of formula

At least 75 percent of the total funds appropriated to carry out this section shall be available to award or otherwise distribute grants pursuant to a funding formula established by the Attorney General in accordance with the requirements in subparagraph (B).

(B) Formula requirements

Any formula established by the Attorney General under subparagraph (A) shall—

(i) ensure that each State or local ICAC task force shall, at a minimum, receive an amount equal to 0.5 percent of the funds available to award or otherwise distribute grants under subparagraph (A); and

(ii) take into consideration the following factors:

(I) The population of each State, as determined by the most recent decennial census performed by the Bureau of the Census.

(II) The number of investigative leads within the applicant's jurisdiction generated by Operation Fairplay, the ICAC Data Network, the CyberTipline, and other sources.

(III) The number of criminal cases related to Internet crimes against children referred to a task force for Federal, State, or local prosecution.

(IV) The number of successful prosecutions of child exploitation cases by a task force.

(V) The amount of training, technical assistance, and public education or outreach by a task force related to the prevention, investigation, or prosecution of child exploitation offenses.

(VI) Such other criteria as the Attorney General determines demonstrate the level of need for additional resources by a task force.

(3) Distribution of remaining funds based on need

(A) In general

Any funds remaining from the total funds appropriated to carry out this section after funds have been made available to award or otherwise distribute formula grants under paragraph (2)(A) shall be distributed to State and local ICAC task forces based upon need, as set forth by criteria established by the Attorney General. Such criteria shall include the factors under paragraph (2)(B)(ii).

(B) Matching requirement

A State or local ICAC task force shall contribute matching non-Federal funds in an amount equal to not less than 25 percent of the amount of funds received by the State or local ICAC task force under subparagraph (A). A State or local ICAC task force that is not able or willing to contribute matching funds in accordance with this subparagraph shall not be eligible for funds under subparagraph (A).

(C) Waiver

The Attorney General may waive, in whole or in part, the matching requirement under subparagraph (B) if the State or local ICAC task force demonstrates good cause or financial hardship.

(b) Application

(1) In general

Each State or local ICAC task force seeking a grant under this section shall submit an application to the Attorney General at such time, in such manner, and accompanied by such information as the Attorney General may reasonably require.

(2) Contents

Each application submitted pursuant to paragraph (1) shall—

(A) describe the activities for which assistance under this section is sought; and

(B) provide such additional assurances as the Attorney General determines to be essential to ensure compliance with the requirements of this subchapter.

(c) Allowable uses

Grants awarded under this section may be used to—

(1) hire personnel, investigators, prosecutors, education specialists, and forensic specialists;

(2) establish and support forensic laboratories utilized in Internet crimes against children investigations;

(3) support investigations and prosecutions of Internet crimes against children;

(4) conduct and assist with education programs to help children and parents protect themselves from Internet predators;

(5) conduct and attend training sessions related to successful investigations and prosecutions of Internet crimes against children; and

(6) fund any other activities directly related to preventing, investigating, or prosecuting Internet crimes against children.

(d) Reporting requirements

(1) ICAC reports

To measure the results of the activities funded by grants under this section, and to assist the Attorney General in complying with the Government Performance and Results Act (Public Law 103–62; 107 Stat. 285), each State or local ICAC task force receiving a grant under this section shall, on an annual basis, submit a report to the Attorney General that sets forth the following:

(A) Staffing levels of the task force, including the number of investigators, prosecutors, education specialists, and forensic specialists dedicated to investigating and prosecuting Internet crimes against children.

(B) Investigation and prosecution performance measures of the task force, including—

(i) the number of investigations initiated related to Internet crimes against children;

(ii) the number of arrests related to Internet crimes against children; and

(iii) the number of prosecutions for Internet crimes against children, including—

(I) whether the prosecution resulted in a conviction for such crime; and

(II) the sentence and the statutory maximum for such crime under State law.


(C) The number of referrals made by the task force to the United States Attorneys office, including whether the referral was accepted by the United States Attorney.

(D) Statistics that account for the disposition of investigations that do not result in arrests or prosecutions, such as referrals to other law enforcement.

(E) The number of investigative technical assistance sessions that the task force provided to nonmember law enforcement agencies.

(F) The number of computer forensic examinations that the task force completed.

(G) The number of law enforcement agencies participating in Internet crimes against children program standards established by the task force.

(2) Report to Congress

Not later than 1 year after October 13, 2008, the Attorney General shall submit a report to Congress on—

(A) the progress of the development of the ICAC Task Force Program established under section 17612 of this title; and

(B) the number of Federal and State investigations, prosecutions, and convictions in the prior 12-month period related to child exploitation.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §106, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4238.)

References in Text

The Government Performance and Results Act, referred to in subsec. (d)(1), probably means the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, Pub. L. 103–62, Aug. 3, 1993, 107 Stat. 285, which enacted section 306 of Title 5, Government Organization and Employees, sections 1115 to 1119, 9703, and 9704 of Title 31, Money and Finance, and sections 2801 to 2805 of Title 39, Postal Service, amended section 1105 of Title 31, and enacted provisions set out as notes under sections 1101 and 1115 of Title 31. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title of 1993 Amendment note set out under section 1101 of Title 31 and Tables.

§17617. Authorization of appropriations

(a) In general

There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this subchapter—

(1) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;

(2) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;

(3) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2011;

(4) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2012; and

(5) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2013.

(b) Availability

Funds appropriated under subsection (a) shall remain available until expended.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title I, §107, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4241.)

SUBCHAPTER II—ADDITIONAL MEASURES TO COMBAT CHILD EXPLOITATION

§17631. Additional regional computer forensic labs

(a) Additional resources

The Attorney General shall establish additional computer forensic capacity to address the current backlog for computer forensics, including for child exploitation investigations. The Attorney General may utilize funds under this subchapter to increase capacity at existing regional forensic laboratories or to add laboratories under the Regional Computer Forensic Laboratories Program operated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

(b) Purpose of new resources

The additional forensic capacity established by resources provided under this section shall be dedicated to assist Federal agencies, State and local Internet Crimes Against Children task forces, and other Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in preventing, investigating, and prosecuting Internet crimes against children.

(c) New computer forensic labs

If the Attorney General determines that new regional computer forensic laboratories are required under subsection (a) to best address existing backlogs, such new laboratories shall be established pursuant to subsection (d).

(d) Location of new labs

The location of any new regional computer forensic laboratories under this section shall be determined by the Attorney General, in consultation with the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Regional Computer Forensic Laboratory National Steering Committee, and other relevant stakeholders.

(e) Report

Not later than 1 year after October 13, 2008, and every year thereafter, the Attorney General shall submit a report to the Congress on how the funds appropriated under this section were utilized.

(f) Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years 2009 through 2013, $2,000,000 to carry out the provisions of this section.

(Pub. L. 110–401, title II, §201, Oct. 13, 2008, 122 Stat. 4241.)