21 U.S.C.
United States Code, 2010 Edition
Title 21 - FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER 7 - PRACTICE OF PHARMACY AND SALE OF POISONS IN CONSULAR DISTRICTS IN CHINA
From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov

CHAPTER 7—PRACTICE OF PHARMACY AND SALE OF POISONS IN CONSULAR DISTRICTS IN CHINA

Sec.
201.
Doing business without a license unlawful; employment of Chinese subjects.
202.
Certain classes of persons and corporations excepted; insecticides.
203.
Application for license; requirements; qualifications for license.
204.
Issuance of license.
205.
Display of license in pharmacy.
206.
Revocation of license.
207.
Restrictions on sales; written orders or prescriptions.
208.
Certain preparations and sales excepted.
209.
Poisons; book entry of sale; labels.
210.
Pharmacist; unauthorized use of title.
211.
Preservation of originals of prescriptions compounded and copies thereof; inspection of prescriptions by consular officers; marking containers of drugs.
212.
Offenses; punishment; duty to enforce provisions.
213.
Fraudulent representations to evade or defeat restrictions.
214.
Previous laws unaffected.
215.
“Consul” defined.

        

§201. Doing business without a license unlawful; employment of Chinese subjects

It shall be unlawful in the consular districts of the United States in China for any person whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States not licensed as a pharmacist within the meaning of this chapter to conduct or manage any pharmacy, drug or chemical store, apothecary shop, or other place of business for the retailing, compounding, or dispensing of any drugs, chemicals, or poisons, or for the compounding of physicians’ prescriptions, or to keep exposed for sale at retail, any drugs, chemicals, or poisons, except as hereinafter provided, or, except as hereinafter provided, for any person whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States not licensed as a pharmacist within the meaning of this chapter to compound, dispense, or sell, at retail, any drug, chemical, poison, or pharmaceutical preparation upon the prescription of a physician, or otherwise, or to compound physicians’ prescriptions, except as an aid to and under the proper supervision of a pharmacist licensed under this chapter. And it shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation owing permanent allegiance to the United States owning partly or wholly or managing a pharmacy, drug store, or other place of business to cause or permit any person other than a licensed pharmacist to compound, dispense, or sell at retail any drug, medicine, or poison, except as an aid to and under the proper supervision of a licensed pharmacist. Where it is necessary for a person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States and owning partly or wholly or managing a pharmacy, drug store, or other place of business to employ Chinese subjects to compound, dispense, or sell at retail any drug, medicine, or poison, such person, firm, or corporation, owner, part owner, or manager of a pharmacy, drug store, or other place of business may employ such Chinese subjects when their character, ability, and age of twenty-one years or over have been certified to by at least two recognized and reputable practitioners of medicine, or two pharmacists licensed under this chapter whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §1, 38 Stat. 817.)

Codification

Section is comprised of part of section 1 of act Mar. 3, 1915. Remainder of such section 1 is classified to section 202 of this title.

§202. Certain classes of persons and corporations excepted; insecticides

Nothing in section 201 of this title shall be construed to interfere with any recognized and reputable practitioner of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary surgery in the compounding of his own prescriptions, or to prevent him from supplying to his patients such medicines as he may deem proper, except as hereinafter provided; nor with the exclusively wholesale business of any person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States dealing and licensed as pharmacists, or having in their employ at least one person who is so licensed, except as hereinafter provided; nor with the sale by persons, firms, or corporations whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States other than pharmacists of poisonous substances sold exclusively for use in the arts, or as insecticides, when such substances are sold in unbroken packages bearing labels having plainly printed upon them the name of the contents, the word “Poison”, when practicable the name of at least one suitable antidote, and the name and address of the vender.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §1, 38 Stat. 818.)

Codification

Section is comprised of part of section 1 of act Mar. 3, 1915. Remainder of such section 1 is classified to section 201 of this title.

§203. Application for license; requirements; qualifications for license

Every person whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States desiring to practice as a pharmacist in the consular districts in China shall file with the consul an application, duly verified under oath, setting forth the name and age of the applicant, the place or places at which he pursued and the time spent in the study of pharmacy, the experience which the applicant has had in compounding physicians’ prescriptions under the direction of a licensed pharmacist, and the name and location of the school or college of pharmacy, if any, of which he is a graduate, and shall submit evidence sufficient to show to the satisfaction of said consul that he is of good moral character and not addicted to the use of alcoholic liquors or narcotic drugs so as to render him unfit to practice pharmacy. Applicants shall be not less than twenty-one years of age and shall have had at least four years’ experience in the practice of pharmacy or shall have served three years under the instruction of a regularly licensed pharmacist, and any applicant who has been graduated from a school or college of pharmacy recognized by the proper board of his State, Territory, District of Columbia, or other possession of the United States as in good standing shall be entitled to practice upon presentation of his diploma.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §2, 38 Stat. 818.)

Codification

The words “now practicing as a pharmacist or,” which preceded “desiring to practice” in the original text of this section, were omitted as obsolete.

§204. Issuance of license

If the applicant for license as a pharmacist has complied with the requirements of section 203 of this title, the consul shall issue to him a license which shall entitle him to practice pharmacy in the consular districts of the United States in China, subject to the provisions of this chapter.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §3, 38 Stat. 819.)

§205. Display of license in pharmacy

Every license to practice pharmacy shall be conspicuously displayed by the person to whom the same has been issued in the pharmacy, drug store, or place of business, if any, of which the said person is the owner or part owner or manager.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §5, 38 Stat. 819.)

§206. Revocation of license

The license of any person whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States to practice pharmacy in the consular districts of the United States in China may be revoked by the consul if such person be found to have obtained such license by fraud, or be addicted to the use of any narcotic or stimulant, or to be suffering from physical or mental disease, in such manner and to such extent as to render it expedient that in the interests of the public his license be canceled; or to be of an immoral character; or if such person be convicted in any court of competent jurisdiction of any offense involving moral turpitude. It shall be the duty of the consul to investigate any case in which it is discovered by him or made to appear to his satisfaction that any license issued under the provisions of this chapter is revocable and shall, after full hearing, if in his judgment the facts warrant it, revoke such license.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §4, 38 Stat. 819.)

§207. Restrictions on sales; written orders or prescriptions

It shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States, either personally or by servant or agent or as the servant or agent of any other person or of any firm or corporation, to sell, furnish, or give away any cocaine, salts of cocaine, or preparation containing cocaine or salts of cocaine, or morphine or preparation containing morphine or salts of morphine, or any opium or preparation containing opium, or any chloral hydrate or preparation containing chloral hydrate, except upon the original written order or prescription of a recognized and reputable practitioner of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine, which order or prescription shall be dated and shall contain the name of the person for whom prescribed, or, if ordered by a practitioner of veterinary medicine, shall state the kind of animal for which ordered and shall be signed by the person giving the order or prescription. Such order or prescription shall be, for a period of three years, retained on file by the person, firm, or corporation who compounds or dispenses the article ordered or prescribed, and it shall not be compounded or dispensed after the first time except upon the written order of the original prescriber.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §6, 38 Stat. 819.)

Codification

Section is comprised of part of section 6 of act Mar. 3, 1915. Remainder of such section 6 is classified to section 208 of this title.

§208. Certain preparations and sales excepted

The provisions of section 207 of this title shall not apply to preparations containing not more than two grains of opium or not more than one-quarter grain of morphine, or not more than one-quarter grain of cocaine, or not more than two grains of chloral hydrate in the fluid ounce, or, of a solid preparation, in one avoirdupois ounce, nor shall they apply to preparations sold in good faith for diarrhea and cholera, each bottle or package of which is accompanied by specific directions for use and caution against habitual use, nor to liniments or ointments sold in good faith as such when plainly labeled “for external use only”, nor to powder of ipecac and opium, commonly known as Dover's powder, when sold in quantities not exceeding twenty grains. The provisions of this section or section 207 of this title shall not be construed to permit the selling, furnishing, giving away, or prescribing for the use of any habitual users of the same any cocaine, salts of cocaine, or preparation containing cocaine or salts of cocaine, or morphine or salts of morphine, or preparations containing morphine or salts of morphine, or any opium or preparation containing opium, or any chloral hydrate or preparation containing chloral hydrate. But the preceding sentence shall not be construed to prevent any recognized or reputable practitioner of medicine whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States from furnishing in good faith for the use of any habitual user of narcotic drugs who is under his professional care such substances as he may deem necessary for their treatment, when such prescriptions are not given or substances furnished for the purpose of evading the provisions of this section. But the provisions of this section or section 207 of this title shall not apply to sales at wholesale between jobbers, manufacturers, and retail druggists, hospitals, and scientific or public institutions.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §6, 38 Stat. 819.)

Codification

Section is comprised of section 6 of act Mar. 3, 1915. Remainder of such section 6 is classified to section 207 of this title.

§209. Poisons; book entry of sale; labels

It shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States to sell or deliver to any other person any of the following-described substances, or any poisonous compound, combination, or preparation thereof, to wit: The compounds of and salts of antimony, arsenic, barium, chromium, copper, gold, lead, mercury, silver, and zinc, the caustic hydrates of sodium and potassium, solution or water of ammonia, methyl alcohol, paregoric, the concentrated mineral acids, oxalic and hydrocyanic acids and their salts, yellow phosphorus, Paris green, carbolic acid, the essential oils of almonds, pennyroyal, tansy, rue, and savin; croton oil, creosote, chloroform, cantharides, or aconite, belladonna, bitter almonds, colchicum, cotton root, cocculus indicus, conium, cannabis indica, digitalis, ergot, hyoscyamus, ignatia, lobelia, nux vomica, physostigma, phytolacca, strophanthus, stramonium, veratrum viride, or any of the poisonous alkaloids or alkaloidal salts derived from the foregoing, or any other poisonous alkaloids or their salts, or any other virulent poison, except in the manner following, and, moreover, if the applicant be less than eighteen years of age, except upon the written order of a person known or believed to be an adult.

It shall first be learned, by due inquiry, that the person to whom delivery is about to be made is aware of the poisonous character of the substance and that it is desired for a lawful purpose, and the box, bottle, or other package shall be plainly labeled with the name of the substance, the word “Poison”, the name of at least one suitable antidote, when practicable, and the name and address of the person, firm, or corporation dispensing the substance. And before delivery be made of any of the foregoing substances, excepting solution or water of ammonia and sulphate of copper, there shall be recorded in a book kept for that purpose the name of the article, the quantity delivered, the purpose for which it is to be used, the date of delivery, the name and address of the person for whom it is procured, and the name of the individual personally dispensing the same; and said book shall be preserved by the owner thereof for at least three years after the date of the last entry therein. The foregoing provisions shall not apply to articles dispensed upon the order of persons believed by the dispenser to be recognized and reputable practitioners of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary surgery. When a physician writes upon his prescription a request that it be marked or labeled “Poison” the pharmacist shall, in the case of liquids, place the same in a colored glass, roughened bottle, of the kind commonly known in trade as a “poison bottle”, and, in the case of dry substances, he shall place a poison label upon the container. The record of sale and delivery above mentioned shall not be required of manufacturers and wholesalers who shall sell any of the foregoing substances at wholesale to licensed pharmacists, but the box, bottle, or other package containing such substance, when sold at wholesale, shall be properly labeled with the name of the substance, the word “poison”, and the name and address of the manufacturer or wholesaler. It shall not be necessary, in sales either at wholesale or at retail, to place a poison label upon, nor to record the delivery of, the sulphide of antimony, or the oxide or carbonate of zinc, or of colors ground in oil and intended for use as paints, or calomel; nor in the case of preparations containing any of the substances named in this section, when a single box, bottle, or other package, or when the bulk of one-half fluid ounce or the weight of one-half avoirdupois ounce does not contain more than an adult medicinal dose of such substance; nor in the case of liniments or ointments sold in good faith as such, when plainly labeled “For external use only”; nor, in the case of preparations put up and sold in the form of pills, tablets, or lozenges, containing any of the substances enumerated in this section and intended for internal use, when the dose recommended does not contain more than one-fourth of an adult medicinal dose of such substance.

For the purpose of this and of every other section of this chapter no box, bottle, or other package shall be regarded as having been labeled “Poison” unless the word “Poison” appears conspicuously thereon, printed in plain, uncondensed gothic letters in red ink.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §7, 38 Stat. 820.)

§210. Pharmacist; unauthorized use of title

It shall be unlawful for any person whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States, not legally licensed as a pharmacist, to take, use, or exhibit the title of pharmacist, or licensed or registered pharmacist, or the title of druggist or apothecary, or any other title or description of like import.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §10, 38 Stat. 821.)

§211. Preservation of originals of prescriptions compounded and copies thereof; inspection of prescriptions by consular officers; marking containers of drugs

Every person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States owning, partly owning, or managing a drug store or pharmacy shall keep in his place of business a suitable book or file, in which shall be preserved for a period of not less than three years the original of every prescription compounded or dispensed at such store or pharmacy, or a copy of such prescription, except when the preservation of the original is required by section 207 or 208 of this title. Upon request the owner, part owner, or manager of such store shall furnish to the prescribing physician, or to the person for whom such prescription was compounded or dispensed, a true and correct copy thereof. Any prescription required by section 207 or 208 of this title, and any prescription for, or register of sales of, substances mentioned in such sections shall at all times be open to inspection by duly authorized consular officers in the consular districts of the United States in China. No person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States shall, in a consular district, compound or dispense any drug or drugs or deliver the same to any other person without marking on the container thereof the name of the drug or drugs contained therein and directions for using the same.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §9, 38 Stat. 821.)

§212. Offenses; punishment; duty to enforce provisions

Any person, firm, or corporation, whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States, violating any of the provisions of this chapter shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not less than $50 and not more than $100 or by imprisonment for not less than one month and not more than sixty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court, and if the offense be continuing in its character, each week or part of a week during which it continues shall constitute a separate and distinct offense. And it shall be the duty of the consular and judicial officers of the United States in China to enforce the provisions of this chapter.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §11, 38 Stat. 821.)

§213. Fraudulent representations to evade or defeat restrictions

No person, firm, or corporation whose permanent allegiance is due to the United States seeking to procure in the consular districts of the United States in China any substance the sale of which is regulated by the provisions of this chapter shall make any fraudulent representations so as to evade or defeat the restrictions herein imposed.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §8, 38 Stat. 821.)

§214. Previous laws unaffected

Nothing in this chapter shall be construed as modifying or revoking any of the provisions of sections 191 to 193 1 of this title.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §13, 38 Stat. 822.)

References in Text

Sections 191 to 193 of this title, referred to in text, were repealed by Pub. L. 91–513, title III, §1101(a)(1), Oct. 27, 1970, 84 Stat. 1291. See section 801 et seq. of this title.

1 See References in Text note below.

§215. “Consul” defined

The word “consul” as used in this chapter shall mean the consular officer in charge of the district concerned.

(Mar. 3, 1915, ch. 74, §12, 38 Stat. 822.)