48 U.S.C.
United States Code, 2011 Edition
Title 48 - TERRITORIES AND INSULAR POSSESSIONS
CHAPTER 4 - PUERTO RICO
From the U.S. Government Printing Office, www.gpo.gov

CHAPTER 4—PUERTO RICO

SUBCHAPTER I—GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec.
731.
Territory included under name Puerto Rico.
731a.
Change of name; Puerto Rico.
731b.
Organization of a government pursuant to a constitution.
731c.
Submission of sections 731b to 731e of this title to people of Puerto Rico for referendum; convening of constitutional convention; requisites of constitution.
731d.
Ratification of constitution by Congress.
731e.
Chapter continued in force and effect.
732.
Repealed.
733.
Citizens; former Spanish subjects and children; body politic; name.
733a.
Citizens; residence in island of citizens of United States.
733a–1, 733b. Repealed or Omitted.
734.
United States laws extended to Puerto Rico; internal revenue receipts covered into treasury.
734a.
Extension of industrial alcohol and internal revenue laws to Puerto Rico.
735.
Repealed.
736.
Puerto Rican law modified.
737.
Privileges and immunities.
738.
Free interchange of merchandise with United States.
739.
Duties on foreign imports; books and pamphlets in English language.
740.
Duties and taxes to constitute fund for benefit of Puerto Rico; ports of entry.
741.
Export duties, taxes, etc.; bonds to anticipate revenues.
741a.
Internal-revenue taxes; levy and collection; discrimination.
742.
Acknowledgment of deeds.
743.
Repealed.
744.
Coasting trade laws.
745.
Tax exempt bonds.
745a.
Public improvement bonds sold to United States or agency thereof excluded from public indebtedness.
745b.
Refunding bonds excluded temporarily in computing indebtedness.
746.
Public lands and buildings; reservations; rights prior to July 1, 1902.
747.
Public property transferred; “control” defined.
748.
Conveyance by President to people of lands, buildings, etc.
749.
Harbors and navigable waters transferred; definitions.
750.
Repealed.
751.
Interstate commerce and certain other laws inapplicable to Puerto Rico.
752.
Corporate real estate holdings.
753 to 755. Repealed or Omitted.

        

SUBCHAPTER II—THE EXECUTIVE AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS

771 to 793b. Repealed.
794.
Official reports.
795.
Government expenses payable out of revenues.
796 to 799. Repealed.

        

SUBCHAPTER III—THE LEGISLATURE

811 to 820. Repealed.
821.
Legislative power.
822 to 844. Repealed or Omitted.
845.
Income tax laws; modification or repeal by legislature.

        

SUBCHAPTER IV—THE JUDICIARY

861 to 863. Repealed or Omitted.
864.
Appeals, certiorari, removal of causes, etc.; use of English language.
865 to 867. Repealed or Omitted.
868.
Fees part of United States revenues.
869.
Fees payable by United States out of revenue of Puerto Rico.
870, 871.
Repealed or Omitted.
872.
Habeas corpus; mandamus; suit to restrain assessment or collection of taxes.
873, 873a. Repealed.
874.
Judicial process; officials to be citizens of United States; oath.
875, 876.
Repealed.

        

SUBCHAPTER V—RESIDENT COMMISSIONER

891.
Resident Commissioner; election.
892.
Qualifications of Commissioner; appointment to fill vacancy.
893.
Salary of Commissioner; allowances; franking privilege.
894.
Salary and traveling expenses; payment.

        

SUBCHAPTER VI—SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN REDEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

910.
Slum clearance and urban redevelopment and renewal projects; powers of government.
910a.
Authorization of loans, conveyances, etc., by government and municipalities.
910b.
Ratification of prior acts.

        

SUBCHAPTER VII—LOW RENT HOUSING PROJECTS AND ELIMINATION OF SUB-STANDARD HOUSING

911.
Legislative authorization to create authorities.
912.
Authority to appoint commissioners; powers of authorities.
913.
Authorization of loans, conveyances, etc., by municipalities.
914.
Issuance of bonds and obligations.
915.
Bonds as public debt.
916.
Ratification of previous legislation.

        

SUBCHAPTER I—GENERAL PROVISIONS

§731. Territory included under name Puerto Rico

The provisions of this chapter shall apply to the island of Puerto Rico and to the adjacent islands belonging to the United States and waters of those islands; and the name Puerto Rico, as used in this chapter, shall be held to include not only the island of that name, but all the adjacent islands as aforesaid.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §1, 39 Stat. 951; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “this Act”, meaning act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951, as amended, known as the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and also popularly known as the Jones Act, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out below and Tables.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, 31 Stat. 77, which is popularly known as the “Foraker Act” and also as the “Puerto Rico Civil Code”.

Section 1 of act Apr. 12, 1900, was similar to this section, except that it described the adjacent islands and waters of those islands as those lying east of the seventy-fourth meridian of longitude west of Greenwich, which were ceded to the United States by the Government of Spain by the treaty of Dec. 10, 1898, 30 Stat. 1754.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Short Title

Act July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §4, 64 Stat. 319, provided, in part, that the act of Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951 [enacting this chapter, section 1019 of this title, section 46 of Title 2, The Congress, and section 358 of Title 8, Aliens and Nationality, and amending sections 325, 327, and 328 of former Title 39, Postal Service], may be cited as the “Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act”. The act of Mar. 2, 1917, is also popularly known as the “Jones Act”.

United States-Puerto Rico Commission on the Status of Puerto Rico

Pub. L. 88–271, Feb. 20, 1964, 78 Stat. 17, as amended by Pub. L. 89–84, July 24, 1965, 79 Stat. 261, established a United States-Puerto Rico Commission on the Status of Puerto Rico to study all factors, including but not limited to applicable laws, treaties, constitutions, and agreements having a bearing on the relationship between the United States and Puerto Rico. The Commission was required to render its report to the President of the United States, the Congress of the United States, the Governor of Puerto Rico, and the Legislative Assembly of Puerto Rico not later than Sept. 30, 1966.

Administration of Government

The administration of the Government of Puerto Rico was transferred from the Bureau of Insular Affairs to the Office of Territories (formerly the Division of Territories and Island Possessions and now the Office of Territorial Affairs), in the Department of the Interior by Executive Order No. 6726, eff. May 29, 1934, eff. Mar. 2, 1935. For present government of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, see section 731d of this title.

Ex. Ord. No. 13183. Establishment of the President's Task Force on Puerto Rico's Status

Ex. Ord. No. 13183, Dec. 23, 2000, 65 F.R. 82889, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 13209, Apr. 30, 2001, 66 F.R. 22105; Ex. Ord. No. 13319, Dec. 3, 2003, 68 F.R. 68233; Ex. Ord. No. 13517, §1, Oct. 30, 2009, 74 F.R. 57239, provided:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of the executive branch of the Government of the United States of America to help answer the questions that the people of Puerto Rico have asked for years regarding the options for the islands’ future status and the process for realizing an option. Further, it is our policy to consider and develop positions on proposals, without preference among the options, for the Commonwealth's future status; to discuss such proposals with representatives of the people of Puerto Rico and the Congress; to work with leaders of the Commonwealth and the Congress to clarify the options to enable Puerto Ricans to determine their preference among options for the islands’ future status that are not incompatible with the Constitution and basic laws and policies of the United States; and to implement such an option if chosen by a majority, including helping Puerto Ricans obtain a governing arrangement under which they would vote for national government officials, if they choose such a status. It is also the policy of the executive branch to improve the treatment of Puerto Rico in Federal programs and to promote job creation, education, health care, clean energy, and economic development on the islands.

Sec. 2. The President's Task Force on Puerto Rico's Status. There is established a task force to be known as “The President's Task Force on Puerto Rico's Status” (Task Force). It shall be composed of designees of each member of the President's Cabinet and the Deputy Assistant to the President and Director for Intergovernmental Affairs. The Task Force shall be co-chaired by the Attorney General's designee and the Deputy Assistant to the President and Director for Intergovernmental Affairs.

Sec. 3. Functions. The Task Force shall seek to implement the policy set forth in section 1 of this order. The Task Force shall ensure official attention to and facilitate action on matters related to proposals for Puerto Rico's status and provide advice and recommendations on such matters to the President and the Congress. The Task Force shall also identify and promote existing Federal initiatives that benefit Puerto Rico; provide advice and recommendations to the President and the Congress on the treatment of Puerto Rico in Federal programs; and provide advice and recommendations to the President and the Congress on policies and initiatives that promote job creation, education, health care, clean energy, and economic development on the islands.

Sec. 4. Report. The Task Force shall submit to the President a report on the actions it has taken to perform the functions set forth in section 3 no later than 1 year from the date of this order. The Task Force shall also report to the President, as appropriate, on other matters relating to the Task Force's responsibilities under this order.

§731a. Change of name; Puerto Rico

From and after May 17, 1932, the island designated “Porto Rico” in the Act entitled “An Act to provide a civil government for Porto Rico, and for other purposes,” approved March 2, 1917, as amended, shall be known and designated as “Puerto Rico.” All laws, regulations, and public documents and records of the United States in which such island is designated or referred to under the name of “Porto Rico” shall be held to refer to such island under and by the name of “Puerto Rico.”

(May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

References in Text

Act approved March 2, 1917, as amended, referred to in text, is act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951, as amended, known as the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and also popularly known as the Jones Act, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 731 of this title and Tables.

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§731b. Organization of a government pursuant to a constitution

Fully recognizing the principle of government by consent, sections 731b to 731e of this title are now adopted in the nature of a compact so that the people of Puerto Rico may organize a government pursuant to a constitution of their own adoption.

(July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §1, 64 Stat. 319.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Repeals

Section 6 of act July 3, 1950 provided that: “All laws or parts of laws inconsistent with this Act [enacting sections 731b to 731e of this title] are hereby repealed.”

§731c. Submission of sections 731b to 731e of this title to people of Puerto Rico for referendum; convening of constitutional convention; requisites of constitution

Sections 731b to 731e of this title shall be submitted to the qualified voters of Puerto Rico for acceptance or rejection through an island-wide referendum to be held in accordance with the laws of Puerto Rico. Upon the approval of said sections, by a majority of the voters participating in such referendum, the Legislature of Puerto Rico is authorized to call a constitutional convention to draft a constitution for the said island of Puerto Rico. The said constitution shall provide a republican form of government and shall include a bill of rights.

(July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §2, 64 Stat. 319.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Constitutional Convention

A constitutional convention to draft a constitution for the island of Puerto Rico convened in San Juan on Sept. 17, 1951, and concluded its deliberations on Feb. 6, 1952.

Referendum

Act July 3, 1950, which enacted sections 731b to 731e of this title, was submitted to the qualified voters of Puerto Rico through an island-wide referendum held on June 4, 1951, and approved.

§731d. Ratification of constitution by Congress

Upon adoption of the constitution by the people of Puerto Rico, the President of the United States is authorized to transmit such constitution to the Congress of the United States if he finds that such constitution conforms with the applicable provisions of sections 731b to 731e of this title and of the Constitution of the United States.

Upon approval by the Congress the constitution shall become effective in accordance with its terms.

(July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §3, 64 Stat. 319.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

Constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico was approved by the Constitutional Convention of Puerto Rico on Feb. 6, 1952; ratified by the people of Puerto Rico on Mar. 3, 1952; amended and approved by Congress by Joint Res. July 3, 1952, ch. 567, 66 Stat. 327; proclaimed by the Governor of Puerto Rico to be in force and effect on July 25, 1952.

§731e. Chapter continued in force and effect

This chapter is continued in force and effect.

(July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §4, 64 Stat. 319.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “the Act entitled ‘An Act to provide a civil government for Porto Rico, and for other purposes,’ approved March 2, 1917, as amended”, meaning act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951, as amended, known as the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and also popularly known as the Jones Act, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 731 of this title and Tables.

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§732. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §4, 39 Stat. 953; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, designated San Juan as the capital of Puerto Rico. Section 6 of act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, 31 Stat. 79, formerly cited as a credit to this section, was not repealed by act July 3, 1950.

Effective Date of Repeal

Section 5 of act July 3, 1950, provided that the repeal of this section and sections 735, 750, 753, 754, 771–793, 793b, 796–799, 811–820, 822, 823, 824–844, 861, and 873 of this title and the amendment of sections 737 and 752 of this title were to be effective at such time as the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico became effective. Under section 731d of this title, that Constitution, upon approval by the Congress of the United States, “shall become effective in accordance with its terms”. Congress, by act July 3, 1952, ch. 567, 66 Stat. 327, approved, with certain conditions, that Constitution; the approving act further provided that the Constitution, as so approved, “shall become effective when the Constitutional Convention of Puerto Rico shall have declared in a formal resolution its acceptance in the name of Puerto Rico of the conditions of approval herein contained, and when the Governor of Puerto Rico, being duly notified by the proper officials of the Constitutional Convention of Puerto Rico that such resolution of acceptance has been formally adopted, shall issue a proclamation to that effect”. The Constitution was proclaimed by the Governor of Puerto Rico on July 25, 1952, and became effective on that date.

§733. Citizens; former Spanish subjects and children; body politic; name

All inhabitants continuing to reside in Puerto Rico who were Spanish subjects on the 11th day of April 1899, and then resided in Puerto Rico, and their children born subsequent thereto, shall be deemed and held to be citizens of Puerto Rico, and as such entitled to the protection of the United States, except such as shall have elected to preserve their allegiance to the Crown of Spain on or before the 11th day of April 1900, in accordance with the provisions of the treaty of peace between the United States and Spain entered into on the 11th day of April 1899; and they, together with such citizens of the United States as may reside in Puerto Rico, shall constitute a body politic under the name of the People of Puerto Rico, with governmental powers as hereinafter conferred, and with power to sue and be sued as such.

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §7, 31 Stat. 79; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§733a. Citizens; residence in island of citizens of United States

All citizens of the United States who have resided or who shall after March 4, 1927, reside in the island for one year shall be citizens of Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §5a, as added Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §2, 44 Stat. 1418; amended May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Section was formerly classified to section 5a of Title 8, Aliens and Nationality.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§733a–1. Repealed. June 27, 1952, ch. 477, title IV, §403(a)(14), 66 Stat. 279

Section, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §5b, as added June 25, 1948, ch. 649, 62 Stat. 1015, related to nonapplication of section 804(c) of Title 8, Aliens and Nationality.

§733b. Omitted

Codification

Prior to the enactment of the Nationality Act of 1940, act Oct. 14, 1940, ch. 876, 54 Stat. 1137, this section, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §5b, as added June 27, 1934, ch. 845, 48 Stat. 1245, provided as follows: “All persons born in Puerto Rico on or after April 11, 1899 (whether before or after June 27, 1934) and not citizens, subjects, or nationals of any foreign power, are hereby declared to be citizens of the United States: Provided, That this section shall not be construed as depriving any person, native of Puerto Rico, of his or her American citizenship heretofore otherwise lawfully acquired by such person; or to extend such citizenship to persons who shall have renounced or lost it under the treaties and/or laws of the United States or who are now residing permanently abroad and are citizens or subjects of a foreign country: And provided further, That any woman, native of Puerto Rico and permanently residing therein, who, prior to March 2, 1917, had lost her American nationality by reason of her marriage to an alien eligible to citizenship, or by reason of the loss of the United States citizenship by her husband, may be naturalized under the provisions of section 369 of title 8.”

The second proviso thereof was repealed by section 504 of the Nationality Act of 1940. Provisions relating to citizenship of persons born in Puerto Rico, are contained in section 1402 of Title 8, Aliens and Nationality.

§734. United States laws extended to Puerto Rico; internal revenue receipts covered into treasury

The statutory laws of the United States not locally inapplicable, except as hereinbefore or hereinafter otherwise provided, shall have the same force and effect in Puerto Rico as in the United States, except the internal revenue laws other than those contained in the Philippine Trade Act of 1946 [22 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.] or the Philippine Trade Agreement Revision Act of 1955 [22 U.S.C. 1371 et seq.]: Provided, however, That after May 1, 1946, all taxes collected under the internal revenue laws of the United States on articles produced in Puerto Rico and transported to the United States, or consumed in the island shall be covered into the treasury of Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §9, 39 Stat. 954; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, §513, 60 Stat. 158; Aug. 1, 1955, ch. 438, title III, §308, 69 Stat. 427.)

References in Text

The Philippine Trade Act of 1946, referred to in text, is act Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, 60 Stat. 141, as amended, which is classified principally to subchapters I to IV (§1251 et seq.) of chapter 15 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1354 of Title 22 and Tables.

The Philippine Trade Agreement Revision Act of 1955, referred to in text, is act Aug. 1, 1955, ch. 438, 69 Stat. 413, which is classified generally to subchapter IV–A (§1371 et seq.) of chapter 15 of Title 22. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1373 of Title 22 and Tables.

The internal revenue laws of the United States, referred to in text, are classified generally to Title 26, Internal Revenue Code.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §14, 31 Stat. 80, except that the words “which, in view of the provisions of section three, shall not have force and effect in Porto Rico” were contained in lieu of the proviso. As to section 3 of act Apr. 12, 1900, see section 738 of this title and notes thereunder.

Amendments

1955—Act Aug. 1, 1955, inserted “or the Philippine Trade Agreement Revision Act of 1955”.

1946—Act Apr. 30, 1946, inserted “other than those contained in the Philippine Trade Act of 1946”.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Effective Date of 1955 Amendment

Amendment by act Aug. 1, 1955, effective Jan. 1, 1956, see section 301(b) of act Aug. 1, 1955, set out as an Effective Date note under section 1373 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse.

Effective Date of 1946 Amendment

Amendment by act Apr. 30, 1946, effective on day after date of its enactment, Apr. 30, 1946, see section 512 of act Apr. 30, 1946, set out as an Effective Date note under section 1354 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse.

Ex. Ord. No. 9909. Exempting District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico and the Department of Justice From Making Reports Required by This Section

Ex. Ord. No. 9909, eff. Dec. 9, 1947, 12 F.R. 8291, provided:

By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 49b(2) of the Organic Act of Puerto Rico, as amended by section 6 of the Act of August 5, 1947, Public Law 362, 80th Congress [section 793b of this title], it is hereby ordered that the District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico and the Department of Justice shall be exempt from making the reports to the Coordinator of Federal Agencies in Puerto Rico which are provided for in such section.

Harry S Truman.      

Ex. Ord. No. 10005. Establishment of President's Advisory Commission on Relation of Federal Laws to Puerto Rico

Ex. Ord. No. 10005, eff. Oct. 5, 1948, 13 F.R. 5854, provided:

WHEREAS section 9 of the Organic Act of Puerto Rico, 39 Stat. 954 [this section], provides that “the statutory laws of the United States not locally inapplicable, except as hereinbefore or hereinafter otherwise provided, shall have the same force and effect in Puerto Rico as in the United States”; and

WHEREAS section 49b(3) of the said Act, which was added by section 6 of the act of August 5, 1947, 61 Stat. 772 [section 793b of this title], provides that “the President of the United States may, from time to time, after hearing, promulgate Executive orders expressly excepting Puerto Rico from the application of any Federal law, not expressly declared by Congress to be applicable to Puerto Rico, which is contemplated by section 9 of this act [this section] is inapplicable by reason of local conditions”:

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the said Organic Act of Puerto Rico, and as President of the United States, it is ordered as follows:

1. There is hereby created a commission to be known as the President's Advisory Commission on the Relation of Federal Laws to Puerto Rico, which shall be composed of nine members to be designated by the President and to serve without compensation.

2. The Commission shall from time to time make recommendations to the President concerning the exercise of his power under section 49b(3) of the Organic Act of Puerto Rico [section 793b of this title] to exempt Puerto Rico from the application of Federal laws. To that end, the Commission is authorized to examine into, and to hold hearings on, the inapplicability of Federal laws to Puerto Rico by reason of local conditions.

3. All executive departments and agencies of the Federal Government are authorized and directed to cooperate with the Commission in its work and to furnish the Commission such information as the Commission may require in the performance of its duties.

4. The Commission shall continue to exist until the President terminates its existence by Executive order.

Harry S Truman.      

Administrative Treatment of Puerto Rico as a State

Memorandum of President of the United States, Nov. 30, 1992, 57 F.R. 57093, provided:

Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies

Puerto Rico is a self-governing territory of the United States whose residents have been United States citizens since 1917 and have fought valorously in five wars in the defense of our Nation and the liberty of others.

On July 25, 1952, as a consequence of steps taken by both the United States Government and the people of Puerto Rico voting in a referendum, a new constitution was promulgated establishing the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The Commonwealth structure provides for self-government in respect of internal affairs and administration, subject to relevant portions of the Constitution and the laws of the United States. As long as Puerto Rico is a territory, however, the will of its people regarding their political status should be ascertained periodically by means of a general right of referendum or specific referenda sponsored either by the United States Government or the Legislature of Puerto Rico.

Because Puerto Rico's degree of constitutional self-government, population, and size set it apart from other areas also subject to Federal jurisdiction under Article IV, section 3, clause 2 of the Constitution, I hereby direct all Federal departments, agencies, and officials, to the extent consistent with the Constitution and the laws of the United States, henceforward to treat Puerto Rico administratively as if it were a State, except insofar as doing so with respect to an existing Federal program or activity would increase or decrease Federal receipts or expenditures, or would seriously disrupt the operation of such program or activity. With respect to a Federal program or activity for which no fiscal baseline has been established, this memorandum shall not be construed to require that such program or activity be conducted in a way that increases or decreases Federal receipts or expenditures relative to the level that would obtain if Puerto Rico were treated other than as a State.

If any matters arise involving the fundamentals of Puerto Rico's status, they shall be referred to the Office of the President.

This guidance shall remain in effect until Federal legislation is enacted altering the current status of Puerto Rico in accordance with the freely expressed wishes of the people of Puerto Rico.

The memorandum for the heads of executive departments and agencies on this subject, issued July 25, 1961 [26 F.R. 6695], is hereby rescinded.

This memorandum shall be published in the Federal Register.

George Bush.      

§734a. Extension of industrial alcohol and internal revenue laws to Puerto Rico

Title III of the National Prohibition Act, as amended, and all provisions of the internal revenue laws relating to the enforcement thereof, are extended to and made applicable to Puerto Rico from and after August 27, 1935. The Insular Government shall advance to the Treasury of the United States such funds as may be required from time to time by the Secretary of the Treasury for the purpose of defraying all expenses incurred by the Treasury Department in connection with the enforcement in Puerto Rico of the said Title III and regulations promulgated thereunder. The funds so advanced shall be deposited in a separate trust fund in the Treasury of the United States and shall be available to the Treasury Department for the purposes of this section.

(June 26, 1936, ch. 830, title III, §329(c), 49 Stat. 1957.)

References in Text

The National Prohibition Act, as amended, referred to in text, is act Oct. 28, 1919, ch. 85, 41 Stat. 305, as amended. Title III of such Act was classified principally to chapter 3 (§71 et seq.) of Title 27, Intoxicating Liquors, and was omitted from the Code in view of the incorporation of such provisions in the Internal Revenue Code of 1939, and subsequently into the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

Codification

Provisions similar to those comprising this section relating to the Virgin Islands are classified to section 1402 of this title.

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§735. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §57, 39 Stat. 968; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, continued certain Puerto Rican Laws in force and authorized the legislative authority to modify or repeal laws. Section 15 of act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, 31 Stat. 80, formerly cited as a credit to this section, was not repealed by act July 3, 1950.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective July 25, 1952, see Effective Date of Repeal note set out under section 732 of this title.

§736. Puerto Rican law modified

So much of the law which was in force at the time of cession, April 11th, 1899, forbidding the marriage of priests, ministers, or followers of any faith because of vows they may have taken, being paragraph 4, article 83, chapter 3, civil code, and which was continued by the order of the secretary of justice of Puerto Rico, dated March 17, 1899, and promulgated by Major General Guy V. Henry, United States Volunteers, is repealed and annulled, and all persons lawfully married in Puerto Rico shall have all the rights and remedies conferred by law upon parties to either civil or religious marriages. Paragraph 1, article 105, section 4, divorce, civil code, and paragraph 2, section 19, of the order of the minister of justice of Puerto Rico, dated March 17, 1899, and promulgated by Major General Guy V. Henry, United States Volunteers, are so amended as to read: “Adultery on the part of either the husband or the wife.”

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §8, 31 Stat. 79; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§737. Privileges and immunities

The rights, privileges, and immunities of citizens of the United States shall be respected in Puerto Rico to the same extent as though Puerto Rico were a State of the Union and subject to the provisions of paragraph 1 of section 2 of article IV of the Constitution of the United States.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §2, 39 Stat. 951; Feb. 3, 1921, ch. 34, §1, 41 Stat. 1096; Mar. 2, 1934, ch. 37, §1, 48 Stat. 361; Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §7, 61 Stat. 772; July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(1), 64 Stat. 320.)

Amendments

1950—Act July 3, 1950, repealed all of section relating to bill of rights and restrictions except last paragraph.

1947—Act Aug. 5, 1947, inserted privileges and immunities provisions.

1934—Act Mar. 2, 1934, repealed so much of former provisions of twentieth paragraph of this section making it unlawful to import, manufacture, sell or give away, or to expose for sale or gift any intoxicating liquors. The penalty formerly contained in such paragraph, related only to violation of such provisions.

Effective Date of 1950 Amendment

Amendment by act July 3, 1950, effective July 25, 1952, the date the Constitution of Puerto Rico became effective, see Effective Date of Repeal note set out under section 732 of this title.

§738. Free interchange of merchandise with United States

All merchandise and articles coming into the United States from Puerto Rico and coming into Puerto Rico from the United States shall be entered at the several ports of entry free of duty and in no event shall any tariff duties be collected on said merchandise or articles.

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §3, 31 Stat. 77; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Act Apr. 12, 1900, §3, as originally enacted, imposed tariff duties, amounting to 15 per centum of the duties on like articles imported from foreign countries, on all articles of merchandise coming into the United States from Porto Rico and vice versa. Merchandise and articles except coffee, not dutiable under United States’ tariff laws, and merchandise or articles entered in Porto Rico free of duty under orders theretofore made by the Secretary of War, were to be admitted from the United States free of duty, all laws or parts of laws to the contrary, notwithstanding. However, all of the aforesaid tariff duties were to cease, and the provisions in the text were to become operative, whenever the local legislative assembly should put into operation a system of local taxation, and the President should make proclamation thereof. In no event were those duties to be collected after March 1, 1902. In accordance with the aforesaid provision President McKinley issued his proclamation July 25, 1901, 32 Stat. 1983.

Section 3 also contained provisions relating to a tax on merchandise of Porto Rican manufacture equal to the internal-revenue tax imposed in the United States, and on merchandise of United States manufacture coming into Porto Rico, a tax equal to the internal-revenue tax imposed in Porto Rico upon like articles of Porto Rican manufacture which are contained in sections 7652 and 7653 of Title 26, Internal Revenue Code.

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§739. Duties on foreign imports; books and pamphlets in English language

The same tariffs, customs, and duties shall be levied, collected, and paid upon all articles imported into Puerto Rico from ports other than those of the United States which are required by law to be collected upon articles imported into the United States from foreign countries. All books and pamphlets printed in the English language shall be admitted into Puerto Rico free of duty when imported from the United States.

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §2, 31 Stat. 77; Aug. 5, 1909, ch. 6, §1, 36 Stat. 71, 74; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Amendments

1909—Act Aug. 5, 1909, placed coffee in the bean or ground, imported into Puerto Rico, formerly subject to a duty of 5 cents, on the duty free list.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§740. Duties and taxes to constitute fund for benefit of Puerto Rico; ports of entry

The duties and taxes collected in Puerto Rico in pursuance of the provisions of this Act, less the cost of collecting the same, and the gross amount of all collections of duties and taxes in the United States upon articles of merchandise coming from Puerto Rico, shall be paid into the treasury of Puerto Rico to be expended as required by law for the government and benefit thereof, and the Secretary of the Treasury shall designate the several ports and subports of entry in Puerto Rico and shall make such rules and regulations and appoint such agents as may be necessary to collect the duties and taxes authorized to be levied, collected, and paid in Puerto Rico by the provisions of this Act, and he shall fix the compensation and provide for the payment thereof of all such officers, agents, and assistants as he may find it necessary to employ to carry out the provisions of law.

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §4, 31 Stat. 78; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

References in Text

This Act, referred to in text, means act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, 31 Stat. 77, as amended, popularly known as the Foraker Act, which, insofar as is classified to the Code, enacted sections 733, 736, 738 to 740, 743, 744, 755, 864, and 866 of this title and amended sections 1 and 11 of former Title 11, Bankruptcy. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Tables.

Codification

Additional provisions of act Apr. 12, 1900, §4, directing the payment of duties and taxes into a separate fund in the Treasury of the United States until the organization of a local civil government, have been omitted.

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Transfer of Functions

All offices of collector of customs, comptroller of customs, surveyor of customs, and appraiser of merchandise of Bureau of Customs of Department of the Treasury to which appointments were required to be made by President with advice and consent of Senate ordered abolished, with such offices to be terminated not later than December 31, 1966, by Reorg. Plan No. 1, of 1965, eff. May 25, 1965, 30 F.R. 7035, 79 Stat. 1317, set out in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees. All functions of offices eliminated were already vested in Secretary of the Treasury by Reorg. Plan No. 26 of 1950, eff. July 31, 1950, 15 F.R. 4935, 64 Stat. 1280, set out in the Appendix to Title 5.

Expenditures for Governmental and Public Purposes

The amount of customs revenue received by the United States on importations from Puerto Rico since its evacuation by the Spanish forces together with all that should thereafter be collected under the existing law were placed at the disposal of the President to be used for governmental and public purposes in Puerto Rico, by act Mar. 24, 1900, ch. 91, 31 Stat. 51.

§741. Export duties, taxes, etc.; bonds to anticipate revenues

No export duties shall be levied or collected on exports from Puerto Rico, but taxes and assessments on property, income taxes, internal revenue, and license fees, and royalties for franchises, privileges, and concessions may be imposed for the purposes of the insular and municipal governments, respectively, as may be provided and defined by the Legislature of Puerto Rico; and when necessary to anticipate taxes and revenues, bonds and other obligations may be issued by Puerto Rico or any municipal government therein as may be provided by law, and to protect the public credit.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §3, 39 Stat. 953; Feb. 3, 1921, ch. 34, §2, 41 Stat. 1096; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §1, 44 Stat. 1418; Aug. 26, 1937, ch. 831, 50 Stat. 843.)

Codification

Section is comprised of first part of section 3 of act Mar. 2, 1917, down to the proviso clause. The remainder of section 3 is classified to sections 741a and 745 of this title.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §38, 31 Stat. 86.

Amendments

1937—Act Aug. 26, 1937, reenacted section without substantive change.

1927—Act Mar. 4, 1927, inserted imposition of income taxes.

1921—Act Feb. 3, 1921, reenacted section without change.

§741a. Internal-revenue taxes; levy and collection; discrimination

The internal-revenue taxes levied by the Legislature of Puerto Rico in pursuance of the authority granted by this chapter on articles, goods, wares, or merchandise may be levied and collected as such legislature may direct, on the articles subject to said tax, as soon as the same are manufactured, sold, used, or brought into the island: Provided, That no discrimination be made between the articles imported from the United States or foreign countries and similar articles produced or manufactured in Puerto Rico. The officials of the Customs and Postal Services of the United States are directed to assist the appropriate officials of the Puerto Rican government in the collection of these taxes.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §3, 39 Stat. 953; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §1, 44 Stat. 1418; Aug. 26, 1937, ch. 831, 50 Stat. 844.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “this Act”, meaning act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951, as amended, known as the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and also popularly known as the Jones Act, which is classified principally to the chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 731 of this title and Tables.

Codification

Section is comprised of last part of section 3 of act Mar. 2, 1917, as added by act Mar. 4, 1927. The first two parts are classified to sections 741 and 745 of this title.

Amendments

1937—Act Aug. 26, 1937, reenacted section without substantive change.

§742. Acknowledgment of deeds

Deeds and other instruments affecting land situate in the District of Columbia, or any other territory or possession of the United States, may be acknowledged in Puerto Rico before any notary public appointed therein by proper authority, or any officer therein who has ex officio the powers of a notary public. The certificate by such notary shall be accompanied by the certificate of the executive secretary of Puerto Rico to the effect that the notary taking such acknowledgment is in fact such notarial officer.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §54, 39 Stat. 968; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Mar. 22, 1902, ch. 273, 32 Stat. 88, except that that act required the certificate of the attorney general of Puerto Rico, rather than of the executive secretary of Puerto Rico as required by this section.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§743. Repealed. July 1, 1944, ch. 373, title XI, §1113, 58 Stat. 714

Section, acts Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §10, 31 Stat. 80; Aug. 14, 1912, ch. 288, 37 Stat. 309; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, provided for quarantine stations in Puerto Rico. See section 267 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare.

Renumbering of Repealing Act

Section 611 of act July 1, 1944, which repealed this section, was renumbered §711 by act Aug. 13, 1946, ch. 958, §5, 60 Stat. 1049, §713 by act Feb. 28, 1948, ch. 83, §9(b), 62 Stat. 47, §813 by act July 30, 1956, ch. 779, §3(b), 70 Stat. 720, §913 by Pub. L. 88–581, §4(b), Sept. 4, 1964, 78 Stat. 919, §1013 by Pub. L. 89–239, §3(b), Oct. 6, 1965, 79 Stat. 931, and §1113 by Pub. L. 91–572, §6(b), Dec. 24, 1970, 84 Stat. 1506.

§744. Coasting trade laws

The coasting trade between Puerto Rico and the United States shall be regulated in accordance with the provisions of law applicable to such trade between any two great coasting districts of the United States.

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §9, 31 Stat. 79; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Additional provisions of section 9 of act Apr. 12, 1900, authorizing the making of regulations for the nationalization of all vessels owned by inhabitants of Puerto Rico on April 11, 1889, and which continued to be so owned up to the date of that nationalization and for the admission of the same to all the benefits of the coasting trade of the United States, have been omitted.

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§745. Tax exempt bonds

All bonds issued by the Government of Puerto Rico, or by its authority, shall be exempt from taxation by the Government of the United States, or by the Government of Puerto Rico or of any political or municipal subdivision thereof, or by any State, Territory, or possession, or by any county, municipality, or other municipal subdivision of any State, Territory, or possession of the United States, or by the District of Columbia.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §3, 39 Stat. 953; Feb. 3, 1921, ch. 34, §2, 41 Stat. 1096; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §1, 44 Stat. 1418; Aug. 26, 1937, ch. 831, 50 Stat. 844; Aug. 17, 1950, ch. 731, 64 Stat. 458; Pub. L. 87–121, §1, Aug. 3, 1961, 75 Stat. 245.)

Codification

Section is comprised of second part of section 3 of act Mar. 2, 1917, commencing with proviso clause. The first and last parts of section 3 are classified to sections 741 and 741a, respectively, of this title.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §38, 31 Stat. 86.

Amendments

1961—Pub. L. 87–121 struck out “no public indebtedness of Puerto Rico and the municipalities of San Juan, Ponce, Arecibo, Rio Pledras, and Mayaguez shall be allowed in excess of 10 per centum of the aggregate tax valuation of its property, and no public indebtedness of any other subdivision or municipality of Puerto Rico shall hereafter be allowed in excess of 5 per centum of the aggregate tax valuation of the property in any such subdivision or municipality,” before “All bonds issued” and also struck out “In computing the indebtedness of the people of Puerto Rico, municipal bonds for the payment of interest and principal of which the good faith of the people of Puerto Rico has heretofore been pledged and bonds issued by the people of Puerto Rico secured by bonds to an equivalent amount of bonds of municipal corporations or school boards of Puerto Rico shall not be counted but all bonds hereafter issued by any municipality or subdivision within the 5 per centum hereby authorized for which the good faith of the people of Puerto Rico is pledged shall be counted” after “District of Columbia”.

1950—Act Aug. 17, 1950, made section applicable to municipalities of Arecibo and Rio Piedras.

1937—Act Aug. 26, 1937, made section applicable to municipality of Mayaguez and substituted “August 26, 1937” for “March 4, 1927” wherever appearing.

1927—Act Mar. 4, 1927, made section applicable to municipalities of San Juan and Ponce, limited public indebtedness of other subdivisions or municipalities of Puerto Rico to 5 per centum, and inserted in last sentence two clauses, the first relating to the non-inclusion of municipal bonds for the payment of interest and principal, and the second reading “but all bonds after August 26, 1937, issued by any municipality or subdivision within the 5 per centum authorized for which the good faith of the people of Porto Rico is pledged shall be counted.”

1921—Act Feb. 3, 1921, increased allowable public indebtedness from 7 to 10 per centum of aggregate tax valuation of property.

Effective Date of 1961 Amendment

Section 2 of Pub. L. 87–121 provided that: “Section 1 of this Act [amending this section] shall take effect upon a majority of the qualified electors of Puerto Rico having voted in a referendum pursuant to section 1 of article VII of the constitution of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, to include provisions in the Commonwealth constitution, in lieu of the provisions of section 3 of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act [this section] specified herein, limiting the debt-incurring capacity of the Commonwealth and of its municipalities (as proposed in the concurrent resolution of the legislative assembly of the Commonwealth).”

[Referendum held Dec. 10, 1961, and debt limitation amendment to Article VI, §2, of Constitution of Commonwealth of Puerto Rico ratified by a majority of voters.]

§745a. Public improvement bonds sold to United States or agency thereof excluded from public indebtedness

Bonds or other obligations of Puerto Rico or any municipal government therein, payable solely from revenues derived from any public improvement or undertaking (which revenues may include transfers by agreement or otherwise from the regular funds of the issuer in respect of the use by it of the facilities afforded by such improvement or undertaking), and issued and sold to the United States of America or any agency or instrumentality thereof, shall not be considered public indebtedness of the issuer within the meaning of section 745 of this title.

(Aug. 13, 1935, ch. 516, 49 Stat. 611.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§745b. Refunding bonds excluded temporarily in computing indebtedness

Any bonds or other obligations of Puerto Rico issued after August 3, 1935, for the purpose of retiring previously outstanding bonds or obligations shall not be included in computing the public indebtedness of Puerto Rico under section 745 of this title, until six months after their issue.

(Aug. 3, 1935, ch. 435, 49 Stat. 516.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§746. Public lands and buildings; reservations; rights prior to July 1, 1902

All public lands and buildings, not including harbor areas and navigable streams and bodies of water and the submerged lands underlying the same, owned by the United States in the island of Puerto Rico and not reserved by the President of the United States prior to July 1, 1903, pursuant to authority vested in him by law, are granted to the government of Puerto Rico, to be held or disposed of for the use and benefit of the people of said island. Said grant is upon the express condition that the government of Puerto Rico, by proper authority, release to the United States any interest or claim it may have in or upon the lands or buildings reserved by the President as mentioned herein. Nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to affect any legal or equitable rights acquired by the government of Puerto Rico or by any other party, under any contract, lease, or license made by the United States authorities prior to the 1st day of May 1900.

(July 1, 1902, ch. 1383, §1, 32 Stat. 731; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Law Library

Section 2 of act July 1, 1902, made an appropriation for the purchase of a law library for the use of the United States District Court for Puerto Rico.

Expenses and Term of Resident Commissioner

Section 3 of act July 1, 1902, related to allowance of traveling expenses in addition to salary to the resident commissioner from Puerto Rico, and to the commencement of his term.

§747. Public property transferred; “control” defined

All property which may have been acquired in Puerto Rico by the United States under the cession of Spain in the treaty of peace entered into on the 10th day of December 1898, in any public bridges, road houses, water powers, highways, unnavigable streams and the beds thereof, subterranean waters, mines or minerals under the surface of private lands, all property which at the time of the cession belonged, under the laws of Spain then in force, to the various harbor works boards of Puerto Rico, all the harbor shores, docks, slips, reclaimed lands, and all public lands and buildings not reserved by the United States for public purposes prior to March 2, 1917, is placed under the control of the government of Puerto Rico, to be administered for the benefit of the people of Puerto Rico; and the Legislature of Puerto Rico shall have authority, subject to the limitations imposed upon all its acts, to legislate with respect to all matters, as it may deem advisable. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, as used in this section “control” includes all right, title, and interest in and to and jurisdiction and authority over the aforesaid property and includes proprietary rights of ownership, and the rights of management, administration, leasing, use, and development of such property.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §7, 39 Stat. 954; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Pub. L. 96–205, title VI, §606(b), Mar. 12, 1980, 94 Stat. 91.)

Codification

Section is comprised of that part of section 7 of act Mar. 2, 1917, preceding the proviso clause. The remainder of section 7 is classified to section 748 of this title.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §13, 31 Stat. 80.

Amendments

1980—Pub. L. 96–205 inserted provisions defining “control”.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§748. Conveyance by President to people of lands, buildings, etc.

The President may, from time to time, in his discretion, convey to the people of Puerto Rico, such lands, buildings, or interests in lands, or other property now owned by the United States, and within the territorial limits of Puerto Rico as in his opinion are no longer needed for purposes of the United States. And he may from time to time accept by legislative grant from Puerto Rico any lands, buildings, or other interests or property which may be needed for public purposes by the United States.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §7, 39 Stat. 954; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Section is comprised of proviso clause of section 7 of act Mar. 2, 1917. The text preceding the proviso clause of section 7 is classified to section 747 of this title.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Delegation of Functions

For delegation to Secretary of the Interior of authority vested in President by this section, see Ex. Ord. No. 10250, eff. June 5, 1951, 16 F.R. 5385, set out under section 301 of Title 3, The President.

§749. Harbors and navigable waters transferred; definitions

The harbor areas and navigable streams and bodies of water and submerged lands underlying the same in and around the island of Puerto Rico and the adjacent islands and waters, owned by the United States on March 2, 1917, and not reserved by the United States for public purposes, are placed under the control of the government of Puerto Rico, to be administered in the same manner and subject to the same limitations as the property enumerated in sections 747 and 748 of this title. All laws of the United States for the protection and improvement of the navigable waters of the United States and the preservation of the interests of navigation and commerce, except so far as the same may be locally inapplicable, shall apply to said island and waters and to its adjacent islands and waters. Nothing in this chapter contained shall be construed so as to affect or impair in any manner the terms or conditions of any authorizations, permits, or other powers lawfully granted or exercised or in respect of said waters and submerged lands in and surrounding said island and its adjacent islands by the Secretary of the Army or other authorized officer or agent of the United States prior to March 2, 1917. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, as used in this section (1) “submerged lands underlying navigable bodies of water” include lands permanently or periodically covered by tidal waters up to but not above the line of mean high tide, all lands underlying the navigable bodies of water in and around the island of Puerto Rico and the adjacent islands, and all artificially made, filled in, or reclaimed lands which formerly were lands beneath navigable bodies of water; (2) “navigable bodies of water and submerged lands underlying the same in and around the island of Puerto Rico and the adjacent islands and waters” extend from the coastline of the island of Puerto Rico and the adjacent islands as heretofore or hereafter modified by accretion, erosion, or reliction, seaward to a distance of three marine leagues; (3) “control” includes all right, title, and interest in and to and jurisdiction and authority over the submerged lands underlying the harbor areas and navigable streams and bodies of water in and around the island of Puerto Rico and the adjacent islands and waters, and the natural resources underlying such submerged lands and waters, and includes proprietary rights of ownership, and the rights of management, administration, leasing, use, and development of such natural resources and submerged lands beneath such waters.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §8, 39 Stat. 954; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; July 26, 1947, ch. 343, title II, §205(a), 61 Stat. 501; Pub. L. 96–205, title VI, §606(a), Mar. 12, 1980, 94 Stat. 91.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “this Act”, meaning act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951, as amended, known as the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and also popularly known as the Jones Act, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 731 of this title and Tables.

Codification

A further provision of section 8 of act Mar. 2, 1917, repealing act June 11, 1906, ch. 3075, 34 Stat. 234, and all other laws or parts of laws in conflict herewith was omitted.

Amendments

1980—Pub. L. 96–205 inserted provisions defining terms used in this section.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Department of War designated Department of the Army and title of Secretary of War changed to Secretary of the Army by section 205(a) of act July 26, 1947, ch. 343, title II, 61 Stat. 501. Section 205(a) of act July 26, 1947, was repealed by section 53 of act Aug. 10, 1956, ch. 1041, 70A Stat. 641. Section 1 of act Aug. 10, 1956, enacted “Title 10, Armed Forces” which in sections 3010 to 3013 continued Department of the Army under administrative supervision of Secretary of the Army.

§750. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §38, 39 Stat. 964; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §6, 44 Stat. 1420; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §7, 62 Stat. 580, related to grants of franchises, public service commission, etc.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§751. Interstate commerce and certain other laws inapplicable to Puerto Rico

Subtitle IV of title 49, and the Safety Appliance Acts and the several amendments made or to be made thereto, shall not apply to Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §38, 39 Stat. 964; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §6, 44 Stat. 1421; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

References in Text

The Safety Appliance Acts, referred to in text, are acts Mar. 2, 1893, ch. 196, 27 Stat. 531; Mar. 2, 1903, ch. 976, 32 Stat. 943; and Apr. 14, 1910, ch. 160, 36 Stat. 298, which were classified to sections 1 to 16 of Title 45, Railroads, and were repealed and reenacted in sections 20102, 20301 to 20304, 21302, and 21304 of Title 49, Transportation, by Pub. L. 103–272, §§1(e), 7(b), July 5, 1994, 108 Stat. 863, 881, 892, 893, 1379, the first section of which enacted subtitles II, III, and V to X of Title 49. Section 6 of act Apr. 14, 1910, which was classified to section 15 of Title 45, was repealed and reenacted as section 501(b) of Title 49 by Pub. L. 97–449, Jan. 12, 1983, 96 Stat. 2413.

Codification

“Subtitle IV of title 49” substituted in text for “The Interstate Commerce Act and the several amendments made or to be made thereto [49 U.S.C. 1 et seq.]” and “the Act of Congress entitled ‘An Act to amend an Act entitled “An Act to regulate commerce,” approved February 4, 1887, and all Acts amendatory thereof, by providing for a valuation of the several classes of property of carriers subject thereto and securing information concerning their stocks, bonds, and other securities,’ approved March 1, 1913 [49 U.S.C. 19a]” on authority of Pub. L. 95–473, §3(b), Oct. 17, 1978, 92 Stat. 1466, the first section of which enacted subtitle IV (§10101 et seq.) of Title 49, Transportation.

Section is comprised of second paragraph of section 38 of act Mar. 2, 1917. The first and third paragraphs of section 38 were classified to sections 750 and 753, respectively, of this title.

Amendments

1927—Act Mar. 4, 1927, reenacted section without change.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§752. Corporate real estate holdings

No corporation shall be authorized to conduct the business of buying and selling real estate or be permitted to hold or own real estate except such as may be reasonably necessary to enable it to carry out the purposes for which it was created, and every corporation authorized after May 1, 1900, to engage in agriculture shall by its charter be restricted to the ownership and control of not to exceed five hundred acres of land; and this provision shall be held to prevent any member of a corporation engaged in agriculture from being in any wise interested in any other corporation engaged in agriculture. Corporations, however, may loan funds upon real estate security, and purchase real estate when necessary for the collection of loans, but they shall dispose of real estate so obtained within five years after receiving the title. Corporations not organized in Puerto Rico, and doing business therein, shall be bound by the provisions of this section so far as they are applicable.

(May 1, 1900, No. 23, §3, 31 Stat. 716; Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §39, 39 Stat. 964; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320.)

Codification

Section is comprised of section 3 (less first sentence) of act May 1, 1900. The first sentence of such section 3 was superseded by section 39 of act Mar. 2, 1917. Prior to repeal of such section 39 by act July 3, 1950, the sentence read: “That all franchises, privileges or concessions granted under section thirty-two of said Act [act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, 31 Stat. 83] shall provide that the same shall be subject to amendment, alteration, or repeal; shall forbid the issue of stock or bonds, except in exchange for actual cash, or property at a fair valuation, equal in amount to the par value of the stock or bonds issued; shall forbid the declaring of stock or bond dividends; and, in the case of public-service corporations, shall provide for the effective regulation of the charges thereof and for the purchase or taking by the public authorities of their property at a fair and reasonable valuation.”

Section was not enacted as a part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Repeals

Section 5(2) of act July 3, 1950, repealed section 39 of act Mar. 2, 1917, cited as a credit to this section, eff. July 25, 1952. See Effective Date of Repeal note set out below.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of section 39 of act Mar. 2, 1917, effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§§753, 754. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), (4), 64 Stat. 320

Section 753, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §38, 39 Stat. 964; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §6, 44 Stat. 1420; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, authorized Legislature to regulate rates, tariffs, etc., of public carriers and public service commission to enforce those laws.

Section 754, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §35, 39 Stat. 963; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, which had been transferred to section 814a of this title, related to qualifications of electors.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of sections 753 and 754 effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§755. Omitted

Codification

Section, act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §11, 31 Stat. 80, provided for redemption by Secretary of the Treasury of Puerto Rican silver coins known as the peso and all other Puerto Rican silver and coppers in circulation on Apr. 12, 1900, except those imported after Feb. 1, 1900, at rate of 60 cents per peso and for recoinage of such coins into United States coins, and made United States coins sole legal tender in payment of debts, except those owing prior to Apr. 12, 1900, which were payable in Puerto Rico coins or their exchanged equivalents.

SUBCHAPTER II—THE EXECUTIVE AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS

§§771 to 793. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section 771, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §12, 39 Stat. 950; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §1, 61 Stat. 770, related to election, tenure of office, and qualifications of governor.

Section 771a, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §12a, as added Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §2, 61 Stat. 771, related to impeachment of governor.

Section 772, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §24, 39 Stat. 958; Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §4, 61 Stat. 771, related to succession to office of governor.

Section 773, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §13, 39 Stat. 955; Feb. 18, 1931, ch. 218, §1, 46 Stat. 1168, related to executive departments.

Section 774, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §37, 39 Stat. 964, prohibited Legislature from creating new departments but authorized their consolidation or abolition.

Section 775, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §13, 39 Stat. 955; Feb. 18, 1931, ch. 218, §1, 46 Stat. 1168; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §3, 61 Stat. 771, related to appointment and tenure of office of heads of departments.

Section 776, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §13, 39 Stat. 956; Feb. 18, 1931, ch. 218, §1, 46 Stat. 1168; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to residence requirement for heads of departments.

Section 777, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §13, 39 Stat. 956; Feb. 18, 1931, ch. 218, §1, 46 Stat. 1168, related to executive council and its duties and compensation.

Section 778, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §14, 39 Stat. 956; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to duties of Attorney General.

Section 779, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §22, 39 Stat. 958; June 27, 1924, ch. 322, §2, 43 Stat. 631; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §6, 62 Stat. 580, related to powers and duties of executive secretary.

Section 780, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §15, 39 Stat. 956; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to powers and duties of Treasurer, including designation of depositaries.

Section 781, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §15, 39 Stat. 956; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, required Treasurer to give a bond not less than $125,000.

Section 782, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §16, 39 Stat. 956, related to duties of Commissioner of the Interior.

Section 783, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §17, 39 Stat. 956; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to duties of Commissioner of Education.

Section 784, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §18, 39 Stat. 957; Feb. 18, 1931, ch. 218, §2, 46 Stat. 1168; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to duties of Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce.

Section 784a, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §18a, as added Feb. 18, 1931, ch. 218, §3, 46 Stat. 1169, and amended May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to duties of Commissioner of Labor.

Section 785, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §19, 39 Stat. 957, related to duties of Commissioner of Health.

Section 786, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; June 7, 1924, ch. 322, §1, 43 Stat. 631; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1419; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §5, 62 Stat. 580, related to appointment, compensation and term of office of Auditor and his powers and duties, and provided for an assistant auditor and other necessary assistants and employees.

Section 787, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1419, related to jurisdiction of Auditor over accounts.

Section 788, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; June 10, 1921, ch. 18, §§301, 304, 42 Stat. 23 to 25; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1419, related to finality of decisions of Auditor and time for appeal therefrom, and vested such official with like authority as that conferred by law upon Comptroller General of the United States, with certain exceptions.

Section 789, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §21, 39 Stat. 958, related to appeals from decisions of Auditor to Governor.

Section 790, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1420, related to annual report of the fiscal concern of the government from Auditor to Governor and those other reports as may be required.

Section 791, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1419, authorized Auditor to summon witnesses, administer oaths, take evidence, etc.

Section 792, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1420, related to supervision of office of Auditor by Governor.

Section 793, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §20, 39 Stat. 957; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §3, 44 Stat. 1419; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to performance of powers and duties of Auditor in case of a vacancy in the office or in his absence by the assistant auditor, or in the absence of that assistant, by an assistant designated by Governor.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of sections 771 to 793 effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§793a. Repealed. June 30, 1954, ch. 428, §1, 68 Stat. 336

Section, act Mar. 2, 1934, ch. 37, §4, 48 Stat. 361, created a Model Housing Board, and provided for construction and sale of model houses and for creation of a revolving “model housing fund”.

Disposition of Moneys in Revolving Fund

Act June 30, 1954, ch. 428, §2, 68 Stat. 336, authorized transfer of any moneys remaining in revolving model housing fund under this section to treasury of Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

§793b. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §49b, as added Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §6, 61 Stat. 772, and amended June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §1, 62 Stat. 579, provided for a Coordinator of Federal Agencies in Puerto Rico, his appointment, compensation and duties, and required President to prescribe rules and regulations to carry out provisions of former section 793 of this title.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§794. Official reports

All reports required by law to be made by the governor or heads of departments to any official of the United States shall be made to an executive department of the Government of the United States to be designated by the President, and the President is authorized to place all matters pertaining to the government of Puerto Rico in the jurisdiction of such department.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §11, 39 Stat. 955; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act July 15, 1909, ch. 4, §2, 36 Stat. 11.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Ex. Ord. No. 9383. Coordination of Functions and Policies of Federal Civil Agencies in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

Ex. Ord. No. 9383, eff. Oct. 5, 1943, 8 F.R. 13781, provided:

1. Each Federal civil agency performing services in Puerto Rico or in the Virgin Islands shall make current reports to the Secretary of the Interior concerning the work of such agency in such manner and form and at such times as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior.

2. The Secretary of the Interior shall make such recommendations to the heads of Federal civil agencies so reporting as may in his judgment serve to correlate the work of such agencies in Puerto Rico and in the Virgin Islands, eliminate unessential Federal activities, assist insular agencies to assume increasing responsibility in civil administration, meet more efficiently the needs of the people of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands for essential Federal services, and implement the policies of the United States with respect to its island possessions.

3. The Secretary of the Interior shall from time to time report to the President and to the Congress concerning the actions taken pursuant to this order.

4. This order shall not be applicable to United States District Judges, United States Attorneys, and United States Marshals.

Franklin D. Roosevelt.      

§795. Government expenses payable out of revenues

All expenses that may be incurred on account of the government of Puerto Rico for salaries of officials and the conduct of their offices and departments, and all expenses and obligations contracted for the internal improvement or development of the island, not, however, including defenses, barracks, harbors, lighthouses, buoys, and other works undertaken by the United States, shall, except as otherwise specifically provided by the Congress, be paid by the treasurer of Puerto Rico out of the revenue in his custody.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §6, 39 Stat. 953; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §12, 31 Stat. 80, with the exception of the words “except as otherwise specifically provided by the Congress”.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§§796 to 799. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section 796, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §53, 39 Stat. 968; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to transfer of bureaus or offices.

Section 797, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §50, 39 Stat. 967; June 7, 1924, ch. 322, §3, 43 Stat. 631; May 29, 1928, ch. 904, §§1, 2, 45 Stat. 997; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Aug. 5, 1947, ch. 490, §5, 61 Stat. 771; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §2, 62 Stat. 579; Sept. 7, 1949, ch. 544, 63 Stat. 692, related to salaries and bonds of officials, and residence of governor.

Section 798, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §50, 39 Stat. 967; June 7, 1924, ch. 322, §3, 43 Stat. 631; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §2, 62 Stat. 579; Sept. 7, 1949, ch. 544, 63 Stat. 692, related to payment of salaries, office expenses and bond premiums.

Section 799, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §51, 39 Stat. 967, provided for payment of municipal expenses from municipal revenues.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of sections 796 to 799 effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

SUBCHAPTER III—THE LEGISLATURE

§§811 to 820. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section 811, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §25, 39 Stat. 958; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, vested all local legislative powers in Puerto Rico, with certain exceptions, in “Legislature of Puerto Rico”, consisting of a “senate” and a “house of representatives”.

Section 812, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §26, 39 Stat. 958; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to Senate of Puerto Rico, its members, election and powers.

Section 813, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §27, 39 Stat. 959; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to House of Representatives and its members and their election.

Section 814, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §28, 39 Stat. 959; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, provided for division of Puerto Rico into thirty-five representative and seven senatorial districts.

Section 814a, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §35, 39 Stat. 963; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to qualification of electors.

Section 815, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §29, 39 Stat. 959; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, provided for time of holding elections and revision of boundaries of senatorial and representative districts and municipalities.

Section 816, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §32, 39 Stat. 960, related to powers of senate and house of representatives, including determination of election and qualifications of members.

Section 817, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §33, 39 Stat. 960; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §5, 44 Stat. 1420, provided for holding of annual sessions of legislature and time for convening.

Section 818, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §33, 39 Stat. 960; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §5, 44 Stat. 1420, authorized governor to call special sessions of legislature or senate.

Section 819, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §30, 39 Stat. 959; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; June 1, 1938, ch. 308, 52 Stat. 595, related to term of office of senators and representatives, filling of vacancies, and limitations upon appointment to other offices of those legislative members.

Section 820, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §31, 39 Stat. 960; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §4, 44 Stat. 1420; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §4, 62 Stat. 580, related to compensation and mileage of members of senate and house of representatives.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of sections 811 to 820 effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§821. Legislative power

The legislative authority shall extend to all matters of a legislative character not locally inapplicable, including power to create, consolidate, and reorganize the municipalities so far as may be necessary, and to provide and repeal laws and ordinances therefor; also the power to alter, amend, modify, or repeal any or all laws and ordinances of every character in force in Puerto Rico or municipality or district thereof on March 2, 1917, insofar as such alteration, amendment, modification, or repeal may be consistent with the provisions of this chapter.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §37, 39 Stat. 964; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

References in Text

This chapter, referred to in text, was in the original “this Act”, meaning act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, 39 Stat. 951, as amended, known as the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act and also popularly known as the Jones Act, which is classified principally to this chapter. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 731 of this title and Tables.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§§822, 823. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section 822, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 960, related to origin of bills and resolutions.

Section 823, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 960; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to enacting clauses of bills and resolutions.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of sections 822 and 823 effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§823a. Omitted

Codification

Section, act June 16, 1938, ch. 460, 52 Stat. 708, related to Congressional ratification of all joint resolutions.

§§824 to 844. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section 824, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 961, related to passage of bills and their alterations or amendments.

Section 825, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 960, related to reference of bills to committees, signature by governor, and approval by President.

Section 826, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 961; May 29, 1928, ch. 901, §1(128), 45 Stat. 996; Feb. 28, 1929, ch. 364, §§1, 2, 45 Stat. 1348; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, required laws enacted by Legislature of Puerto Rico to be reported to Congress.

Section 827, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 961, related to time of taking effect of laws and to introduction of a bill.

Section 828, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 961, related to house journals.

Section 829, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 961, required sessions of each house and committees to be open.

Section 830, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 961, related to adjournment.

Section 831, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, required presiding officer to sign bills and resolutions.

Section 832, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, provided that bills, with the exception of appropriation bills, were to contain one subject.

Section 833, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, provided that revenue bills were to originate in house of representatives.

Section 834, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, related to appropriation bills for executive, legislative and judicial departments.

Section 835, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, related to revival or amendment of laws.

Section 836, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, required legislature to prescribe number, duties and compensation of officers and employees.

Section 837, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, prohibited bills giving extra compensation for services rendered.

Section 838, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962; June 24, 1948, ch. 610, §3, 62 Stat. 580 prohibited laws relating to extension of term of office of officials, double jobs and salary of senators or representatives during term of office.

Section 839, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, related to presentation of orders, resolutions, etc., to Governor.

Section 840, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 960, required Governor to submit a financial budget at opening of each regular session of the legislature.

Section 841, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, provided for order of payment of appropriations, where revenue insufficient to meet appropriations, and limited appropriations under certain conditions.

Section 842, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §23, 39 Stat. 958; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, required Governor to transmit copies of laws to executive department of United States.

Section 843, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to definition and punishment of the offense of corrupt solicitation.

Section 844, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §34, 39 Stat. 962, related to punishment for offense of influencing officials by bribery.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal of sections 824 to 844 effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§845. Income tax laws; modification or repeal by legislature

The Puerto Rican Legislature shall have power by due enactment to amend, alter, modify, or repeal the income tax laws in force in Puerto Rico.

(Feb. 26, 1926, ch. 27, §§261, 1200, 44 Stat. 52, 125; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

Similar provisions of act Feb. 26, 1926, which related to the Philippine Islands, were formerly classified to section 1055 of this title.

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act June 2, 1924, ch. 234, §261, 43 Stat. 294, prior to repeal by section 1200 of act Feb. 26, 1926, to take effect Jan. 1, 1925.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

SUBCHAPTER IV—THE JUDICIARY

§861. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §40, 39 Stat. 965; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, vested judicial power in courts established and in operation on Mar. 2, 1917, provided for appointment of chief justice and associate justices of the supreme court by President with advice and consent of United States Senate, and authorized Puerto Rican legislature to organize, modify or rearrange the courts and their jurisdiction and procedure, except United States District Court.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§862. Omitted

Codification

Section, act Sept. 21, 1922, ch. 365, 42 Stat. 993, conferred on the courts of Puerto Rico jurisdiction of offenses under act Oct. 28, 1919, ch. 85, 41 Stat. 305, the National Prohibition Act.

§863. Repealed. Pub. L. 91–272, §13, June 2, 1970, 84 Stat. 298

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §41, 39 Stat. 965; Feb. 25, 1919, ch. 29, §1, 40 Stat. 1156; Mar. 4, 1921, ch. 161, §1, 41 Stat. 1412; Mar. 4, 1923, ch. 295, 42 Stat. 1560; Dec. 13, 1926, ch. 6, §1, 44 Stat. 919; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Mar. 26, 1938, ch. 51, §2, 52 Stat. 118; July 31, 1946, ch. 704, 60 Stat. 716; June 25, 1948, ch. 646, §20, 62 Stat. 989, set out jurisdiction of United States District Court for District of Puerto Rico and provided for salaries of judge and officials of the court and for filling of vacancies. Section 34 of act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, 31 Stat. 84, formerly cited as a credit to this section, was not repealed by act June 2, 1970.

Savings Provision

Section 13 of Pub. L. 91–272, as amended by Pub. L. 91–450, Oct. 14, 1970, 84 Stat. 922, provided in part that nothing in the repeal of Act Mar. 2, 1917, as amended, by said section 13 would impair the jurisdiction of the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico to hear and determine any action or matter begun in the court on or before June 2, 1970.

§864. Appeals, certiorari, removal of causes, etc.; use of English language

The laws of the United States relating to appeals, certiorari, removal of causes, and other matters or proceedings as between the courts of the United States and the courts of the several States shall govern in such matters and proceedings as between the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico and the courts of Puerto Rico.

All pleadings and proceedings in the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico shall be conducted in the English language.

(Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §35, 31 Stat. 85; Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §42, 39 Stat. 966; Feb. 13, 1925, ch. 229, §13, 43 Stat. 942; Jan. 31, 1928, ch. 14, §1, 45 Stat. 54; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; June 25, 1948, ch. 646, §21, 62 Stat. 990.)

References in Text

The laws of the United States relating to appeals, certiorari, removal of causes, and other matters or proceedings, referred to in text, are classified to Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

Codification

“United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico” in view of section 132(a) of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure, which states that “There shall be in each judicial district a district court which shall be a court of record known as the United States District Court for the district” and section 119 of Title 28, which states that “Puerto Rico constitutes one judicial district.”

Prior Provisions

Act Mar. 3, 1911, ch. 231, §244, 36 Stat. 1157, related to direct appeals from The Supreme Court and the United District Court for Puerto Rico to the United States Supreme Court, prior to repeal by act Jan. 28, 1915, ch. 22, §3, 38 Stat. 804.

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §34, 31 Stat. 84.

Amendments

1948—Act June 25, 1948, amended section generally, and struck out provisions relating to the term of district court and appeals to the circuit court.

1928—Act Jan. 31, 1928, abolished writ of error in civil and criminal cases and made all relief formerly obtained by writ of error obtainable by appeal.

1925—Act Feb. 13, 1925, ch. 229, §13, repealed provisions of this section permitting a direct review by the Supreme Court of cases in the courts in Puerto Rico.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

Effective Date of 1948 Amendment

Amendment by act June 25, 1948, effective Sept. 1, 1948, see section 38 of that act, set out as an Effective Date note preceding section 1 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

Repeals

Section 39 of act June 25, 1948, repealed section 1 of act Feb. 13, 1925, ch. 229, 43 Stat. 936, formerly cited as a credit to this section, which authorized review in the Circuit Court of Appeals in the First Circuit.

§865. Repealed. June 25, 1948, ch. 646, §39, 62 Stat. 992

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §43, 39 Stat. 966; Feb. 13, 1925, ch. 229, §13, 43 Stat. 942; Jan. 31, 1928, ch. 14, §1, 45 Stat. 54, related to writs of error and appeals. See section 1294 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Sept. 1, 1948, see section 38 of act June 25, 1948, set out as an Effective Date note preceding section 1 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

§866. Omitted

Codification

Section, act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §35, 31 Stat. 85, provided that all proceedings in Supreme Court of United States to review decisions of Supreme Court of Puerto Rico and the District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico, should be conducted in the English language.

§867. Repealed. Pub. L. 90–274, §103(g), Mar. 27, 1968, 82 Stat. 63

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §44, 39 Stat. 966; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, set out qualifications for jurors in District Court of United States for Puerto Rico as different from those set by local law and directed that juries be selected, drawn, and subject to exemption in accordance with laws of Congress insofar as locally applicable.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective 270 days after Mar. 27, 1968, except as to cases in which an indictment is returned or petit jury is empaneled prior to such effective date, see section 104 of Pub. L. 90–274, set out as an Effective Date of 1968 Amendment note under section 1861 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

§868. Fees part of United States revenues

All fees, fines, costs, and forfeitures as would be deposited to the credit of the United States if collected and paid into a district court of the United States shall become revenues of the United States when collected and paid into the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico. The sum of $500 a year from such fees, fines, costs, and forfeitures shall be retained by the clerk and expended for law library purposes under the direction of the judge.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §45, 39 Stat. 966; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

“United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico” in view of section 132(a) of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure, which states that “There shall be in each judicial district a district court which shall be a court of record known as the United States District Court for the district” and section 119 of Title 28, which states that “Puerto Rico constitutes one judicial district”.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Mar. 2, 1901, ch. 812, §2, 31 Stat. 953.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§869. Fees payable by United States out of revenue of Puerto Rico

Such fees and expenses as are payable by the United States if earned or incurred in connection with a district court of the United States shall be paid from the revenue of Puerto Rico if earned or incurred in connection with the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1901, ch. 812, §2, 31 Stat. 953; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

“United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico” in view of section 132(a) of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure, which states that “There shall be in each judicial district a district court which shall be a court of record known as the United States District Court for the district” and section 119 of Title 28 which states that “Puerto Rico constitutes one judicial district”.

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

As originally enacted, so much of section 2 of act Mar. 2, 1901, as is pertinent here, was as follows: “Such fees and expenses as are payable by the United States, if earned or incurred in connection with a circuit or district court of the United States, shall be paid from the revenues of Porto Rico, if earned or incurred in connection with the district court of the United States for Porto Rico.”

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§870. Repealed. June 25, 1948, ch. 646, §39, 62 Stat. 992

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §46, 39 Stat. 966; Feb. 26, 1919, ch. 49, §§2, 4, 40 Stat. 1182; Aug. 7, 1939, ch. 501, §6, 53 Stat. 1226, related to salaries of district court officials. See section 604 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Sept. 1, 1948, see section 38 of act June 25, 1948, set out as an Effective Date note preceding section 1 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

§871. Omitted

Codification

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §47, 39 Stat. 967; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, which related to fees and mileage of jurors and witnesses, was superseded by sections 1821, 1825 and 1871 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

§872. Habeas corpus; mandamus; suit to restrain assessment or collection of taxes

The supreme and district courts of Puerto Rico and the respective judges thereof may grant writs of habeas corpus in all cases in which the same are grantable by the judges of the district courts of the United States, and the district courts may grant writs of mandamus in all proper cases.

No suit for the purpose of restraining the assessment or collection of any tax imposed by the laws of Puerto Rico shall be maintained in the United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1927, ch. 145, §48, 39 Stat. 967; Mar. 4, 1927, ch. 503, §7, 44 Stat. 1421; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Codification

“United States District Court for the District of Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico” in view of section 132(a) of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure, which states that “There shall be in each judicial district a district court which shall be a court of record known as the United States District Court for the district” and section 119 of Title 28 which states that “Puerto Rico constitutes one judicial district”.

Amendments

1927—Act Mar. 4, 1927, added second paragraph.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§873. Repealed. July 3, 1950, ch. 446, §5(2), 64 Stat. 320

Section, acts Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §49, 39 Stat. 967; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158, related to appointment of judges, marshals and secretaries.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective July 25, 1952, see note set out under section 732 of this title.

§873a. Repealed. June 25, 1948, ch. 646, §39, 62 Stat. 992

Section, act Feb. 12, 1940, ch. 25, §1, 54 Stat. 22, which related to rules governing civil cases. See section 2072 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Sept. 1, 1948, see section 38 of act June 25, 1948, set out as an Effective Date note preceding section 1 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

§874. Judicial process; officials to be citizens of United States; oath

All judicial process shall run in the name of “United States of America, ss, the President of the United States”, and all penal or criminal prosecutions in the local courts shall be conducted in the name and by the authority of “The People of Puerto Rico.” All officials shall be citizens of the United States, and, before entering upon the duties of their respective offices, shall take an oath to support the Constitution of the United States and the laws of Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §10, 39 Stat. 954; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158.)

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §16, 31 Stat. 81.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§§875, 876. Repealed. June 25, 1948, ch. 646, §39, 62 Stat. 992

Section 875, act Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §55, 39 Stat. 968, related to continuation of court's jurisdiction.

Section 876, act Jan. 7, 1913, ch. 6, 37 Stat. 648, related to temporary judge.

Effective Date of Repeal

Repeal effective Sept. 1, 1948, see section 38 of act June 25, 1948, set out as an Effective Date note preceding section 1 of Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure.

SUBCHAPTER V—RESIDENT COMMISSIONER

§891. Resident Commissioner; election

The qualified electors of Puerto Rico shall choose a Resident Commissioner to the United States at each general election, whose term of office shall be four years from the 3d of January following such general election, and who shall be entitled to receive official recognition as such commissioner by all of the departments of the Government of the United States, upon presentation, through the Department of State, of a certificate of election of the Governor of Puerto Rico.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §36, 39 Stat. 963; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; June 5, 1934, ch. 390, §5, 48 Stat. 879.)

Codification

Section is comprised of second sentence of section 36 of act Mar. 2, 1917. The first sentence of section 36, providing for election of a Resident Commissioner to the United States at the next general election for a term commencing with date of issuance of certificate of election and terminating Mar. 4, 1921, was omitted. Parts of the third and fourth sentences of section 36 are classified to section 893 of this title. The other part of the third sentence of section 36, which fixed the salary of the commissioner at $7,500 per annum, was superseded by act Feb. 26, 1907, ch. 1635, §4, 34 Stat. 993, as amended by act Mar. 4, 1925, ch. 549, §4, 43 Stat. 1301. See Prior Provisions note under section 31 of Title 2, The Congress. The other part of the fourth sentence of section 36, which allowed the commissioner $500 as mileage, was classified to former section 46 of Title 2 and was omitted from the Code as superseded by former section 43b–1 of Title 2. The fifth and sixth sentences of section 36 are classified to section 892 of this title.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §39, 31 Stat. 86.

The salary allowed by section 39 of act Apr. 12, 1900, was increased by act Feb. 26, 1907, ch. 1635, §4, 34 Stat. 993.

The resident commissioner was allowed traveling expenses in addition to his salary, and the commencement of his term was fixed by act July 1, 1902, ch. 1383, §3, 32 Stat. 732.

The manner of paying the salary and traveling expenses of the resident commissioner was fixed by a provision of act June 22, 1906, ch. 3514, §1, 34 Stat. 417.

Amendments

1934—Act June 5, 1934, changed commencement of term of office from Mar. 4 to Jan. 3 following the general election.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

§892. Qualifications of Commissioner; appointment to fill vacancy

No person shall be eligible to election as Resident Commissioner who is not a bona fide citizen of the United States and who is not more than twenty-five years of age, and who does not read and write the English language. In case of a vacancy in the office of Resident Commissioner by death, resignation, or otherwise, the governor, by and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint a Resident Commissioner to fill the vacancy, who shall serve until the next general election and until his successor is elected and qualified.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §36, 39 Stat. 963.)

Codification

Section is comprised of fifth and sixth sentences of section 36 of act Mar. 2, 1917. For classification of the remainder of section 36, see Codification note set out under section 891 of this title.

Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, §39, 31 Stat. 86.

§893. Salary of Commissioner; allowances; franking privilege

The Resident Commissioner shall receive a salary payable monthly by the United States. He shall be allowed the same sum for stationery and for the pay of necessary clerk hire as is allowed Members of the House of Representatives of the United States. He shall be allowed the franking privilege granted Members of Congress.

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, §36, 39 Stat. 963; Mar. 4, 1925, ch. 549, §4, 43 Stat. 1301.)

Codification

Section is comprised of parts of third and fourth sentences of section 36 of act Mar. 2, 1917. For classification of the remainder of section 36, see Codification note set out under section 891 of this title.

§894. Salary and traveling expenses; payment

The salary and traveling expenses of the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico to the United States shall be paid by the Chief Administrative Officer of the House of Representatives in the same manner as the salaries of the members of the House of Representatives are paid.

(June 22, 1906, ch. 3514, §1, 34 Stat. 417; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Pub. L. 104–186, title II, §224(1), Aug. 20, 1996, 110 Stat. 1752.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Amendments

1996—Pub. L. 104–186 substituted “Chief Administrative Officer” for “Sergeant-at-Arms”.

Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.

SUBCHAPTER VI—SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN REDEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

§910. Slum clearance and urban redevelopment and renewal projects; powers of government

The government of Puerto Rico acting through its legislature, may create a public corporate authority or authorities and may authorize such authority or authorities or any other public corporate authority or any municipal corporation or political subdivision, acting directly or through any officer or agency thereof or through a public corporate authority, to undertake slum clearance and urban redevelopment projects and urban renewal projects and to do all things, exercise any and all powers, and to assume and fulfill any and all obligations, duties, responsibilities, and requirements, including but not limited to those relating to planning and zoning, necessary or desirable for receiving Federal assistance under title I of the Housing Act of 1949 (Public Law 171, Eighty-first Congress), as amended [42 U.S.C. 1450 et seq.], or any other law, except that public corporate authorities (as distinct from municipalities or political subdivisions) created or authorized to operate in accordance with this Act, as amended, shall not be given any power of taxation or any power to pledge the full faith and credit of the people of the Territory, or municipality, or political subdivision, as the case may be, for any loan whatever. The Legislature of Puerto Rico may, with respect to any public corporate authority or authorities empowered or which may be empowered to undertake slum clearance and urban redevelopment projects and urban renewal projects, provide for the appointment and terms of office of the members thereof, and for the powers of such authorities, including authority to accept whatever benefits the Federal Government may make available for slum clearance and urban redevelopment projects and urban renewal projects, and authority, notwithstanding any other Federal law, to borrow money and to issue notes, bonds, and other obligations of such character and maturity, with such security, and in such manner as the respective legislatures may provide. Such notes, bonds, and other obligations shall not be a debt of the United States, or of any Territory or municipal corporation or other political subdivision or agency thereof other than the public corporate authority which issued such notes, bonds, or obligations, nor constitute a debt, indebtedness, or the borrowing of money within the meaning of any limitation or restriction on the issuance of notes, bonds, or other obligations contained in any laws of the United States applicable to Puerto Rico, or to any municipal corporation or other political subdivision or agency thereof.

(July 18, 1950, ch. 466, title I, §101, 64 Stat. 344; Aug. 11, 1955, ch. 783, title I, §107(3), (7), (9), 69 Stat. 637, 638.)

References in Text

The Housing Act of 1949 (Public Law 171, Eighty-first Congress), as amended, referred to in text, is act July 15, 1949, ch. 338, 63 Stat. 413, as amended. Title I of the Housing Act of 1949 was classified generally to subchapter II (§1450 et seq.) of chapter 8A of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare, and was omitted from the Code pursuant to section 5316 of Title 42 which terminated the authority to make grants or loans under such title I after Jan. 1, 1975. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1441 of Title 42 and Tables.

This Act, referred to in text, means act July 18, 1950, ch. 466, 64 Stat. 344, as amended, known as the Territorial Enabling Act of 1950, which enacted sections 480 to 480b, 483a, 483b, 721 to 721b, 910 to 910b, 1408 to 1408e of this title, amended sections 481 to 483 and 722 of this title, and enacted provisions set out as notes under sections 480, 481, and 722 of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Tables.

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Section 101 of act July 18, 1950, cited as a credit to this section, as applicable to Alaska and Hawaii, was classified to sections 480 and 721 of this title.

Amendments

1955—Act Aug. 11, 1955, included urban renewal projects, and inserted “as amended” after “(Public Law 171, Eighty-first Congress)” and after “this Act”.

Urban Renewal Activities

Financial assistance available for urban renewal projects, see section 107(1), (2) of act Aug. 11, 1955.

§910a. Authorization of loans, conveyances, etc., by government and municipalities

The government of Puerto Rico may assist slum clearance and urban redevelopment projects and urban renewal projects through cash donations, loans, conveyances of real and personal property, facilities, and services, and otherwise, and may authorize municipalities or other political subdivisions to make cash donations, loans, conveyances of real and personal property to public corporate authorities and to take other action, including but not limited to the making available or the furnishing of facilities and services, in aid of slum clearance and urban redevelopment projects and urban renewal projects.

(July 18, 1950, ch. 466, title I, §102, 64 Stat. 344; Aug. 11, 1955, ch. 783, title I, §107(3), 69 Stat. 637.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Section 102 of act July 18, 1950, cited as a credit to this section, as applicable to Alaska and Hawaii, was classified to sections 480a and 721a of this title.

Amendments

1955—Act Aug. 11, 1955, included urban renewal projects.

§910b. Ratification of prior acts

All legislation heretofore enacted by the Legislature of the Territory of Puerto Rico dealing with the subject matter of this Act and not inconsistent herewith is ratified and confirmed.

(July 18, 1950, ch. 466, title I, §103, 64 Stat. 345.)

References in Text

This Act, referred to in text, means act July 18, 1950, ch. 466, 64 Stat. 344, as amended, known as the Territorial Enabling Act of 1950, which enacted sections 480 to 480b, 483a, 483b, 721 to 721b, 910 to 910b, 1408 to 1408e of this title, amended sections 481 to 483 and 722 of this title, and enacted provisions set out as notes under sections 480, 481, and 722 of this title. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Tables.

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

Section 103 of act July 18, 1950, cited as a credit to this section, as applicable to Alaska and Hawaii, was classified to sections 480b and 721b of this title.

SUBCHAPTER VII—LOW RENT HOUSING PROJECTS AND ELIMINATION OF SUB-STANDARD HOUSING

§911. Legislative authorization to create authorities

The Legislature of Puerto Rico may create public corporate authorities to undertake slum clearance and projects to provide dwelling accommodations for families of low income.

(June 25, 1938, ch. 703, §1, 52 Stat. 1203.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§912. Authority to appoint commissioners; powers of authorities

The Legislature of Puerto Rico may provide for the appointment and terms of the commissioners of such authorities, and for the powers of such authorities, except that such authorities shall be given no power of taxation, and may authorize the commissioners of such authorities to fix the salaries of employees.

(June 25, 1938, ch. 703, §2, 52 Stat. 1203.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§913. Authorization of loans, conveyances, etc., by municipalities

The legislature may appropriate funds for and may make and authorize any municipality of Puerto Rico to make loans, donations, and conveyances of money or property to such authorities; may make and authorize any municipality of Puerto Rico to make available its facilities and services to such authorities and take other action in aid of slum clearance or low-rent housing; and may, without regard to any Federal Acts restricting the disposition of public property or lands in Puerto Rico, provide for the use by or disposal to such authorities of any public lands or other property held or controlled by the people of Puerto Rico, its municipalities, or other subdivisions.

(June 25, 1938, ch. 703, §3, 52 Stat. 1203.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§914. Issuance of bonds and obligations

The legislature may authorize such authorities to issue bonds or other obligations with such security as the legislature may provide and may provide for the disposition of the proceeds of such bonds and all receipts and revenues of such authorities.

(June 25, 1938, ch. 703, §4, 52 Stat. 1203.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§915. Bonds as public debt

Such bonds shall not be a debt of Puerto Rico or any municipality, and shall not constitute a public indebtedness within the meaning of section 745 of this title.

(June 25, 1938, ch. 703, §5, 52 Stat. 1203.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.

§916. Ratification of previous legislation

All legislation heretofore enacted by the Legislature of Puerto Rico dealing with the subject matter of sections 911 to 916 of this title and not inconsistent herewith is ratified and confirmed.

(June 25, 1938, ch. 703, §6, 52 Stat. 1203.)

Codification

Section was not enacted as part of the Puerto Rican Federal Relations Act which comprises this chapter.