[Senate Document 105-20]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]





                                     
                                     
                                     

 
                    MINUTES OF THE SENATE DEMOCRATIC

                               CONFERENCE

                                1903-1964


                                     
                    MINUTES OF THE SENATE DEMOCRATIC
                               CONFERENCE

          Fifty-eighth Congress through Eighty-eighth Congress

                                1903-1964


                                Edited by

                            Donald A. Ritchie
                      U.S. Senate Historical Office

       Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate

                     U.S. Government Printing Office
                               Washington
  105th Congress
  S. Doc. 105-20
  U.S. Government Printing Office
  Washington: 1998

  Cover illustration: The Senate Caucus Room, where the PDemocratic 
Conference often met early in the twentieth century. Senate Historical 
Office.

  Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

  Senate Democratic Conference (U.S.)
      Minutes of the Senate Democratic Conference : Fifty-eighth 
Congress through Eighty-eighth Congress, 1903-1964 / edited by Donald A. 
Ritchie ; prepared under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate.
          p.  cm.
      Includes bibliographical references and index.
      1. United States.    Congress.    Senate--History--20th century--
Sources.  2. Democratic Party (U.S.)--History--20th century--Sources.  
I. Ritchie, Donald A., 1945-  .  II. United States.    Congress.    
Senate.    Office of the Secretary.  III. Title.
  JK1161.S445  1999
  328.73'07657--dc21
                                                                98-42670
                                                                     CIP
                                CONTENTS
            Foreword..........................................      xiii
            Preface...........................................        xv
            Introduction......................................      xvii


58th Congress (1903-1905)

            March 16, 1903................................             1
            December 12, 1903.............................             2
            December 14, 1903.............................             3
            December 15, 1903.............................             3
            December 16, 1903.............................             5
            January 23, 1904..............................             6


59th Congress (1905-1907)

            December 8, 1905..............................             7
            February 3, 1906..............................             8
            June 9, 1906..................................             9
            June 21, 1906.................................            10


60th Congress (1907-1909)

            December 3, 1907..............................            11
            December 16, 1907.............................            12
            January 25, 1908..............................            18


61st Congress (1909-1911)

            March 5, 1909.................................            21
            March 22, 1909................................            23
            April 14, 1909................................            28
            April 16, 1909................................            29
            December 6, 1909..............................            30
            December 9, 1909..............................            30
            February 10, 1911.............................            36


62nd Congress (1911-1913)

            April 7, 1911.................................            39
            June 1, 1912..................................            41


63rd Congress (1913-1915)

            March 5, 1913.................................            43
            March 6, 1913.................................            45
            March 7, 1913.................................            48
            March 8, 1913.................................            50
            March 15, 1913................................            51
            March 17, 1913................................            72
            April 8, 1913.................................            74
            May 5, 1913...................................            76
            May 6, 1913...................................            76
            May 19, 1913..................................            77
            May 28, 1913..................................            78
            June 20, 1913.................................            79
            June 21, 1913.................................            80
            June 23, 1913.................................            80
            June 24, 1913.................................            82
            June 25, 1913.................................            83
            June 26, 1913.................................            88
            June 27, 1913.................................            88
            June 28, 1913.................................            92
            June 30, 1913.................................            96
            July 1, 1913..................................           103
            July 2, 1913..................................           111
            July 3, 1913..................................           115
            July 5, 1913..................................           120
            July 7, 1913..................................           122
            August 14, 1913...............................           127
            August 15, 1913...............................           129
            September 2, 1913.............................           130
            September 3, 1913.............................           132
            September 5, 1913.............................           135
            October 1, 1913...............................           143
            November 26, 1913.............................           147
            November 27, 1913.............................           150
            November 28, 1913.............................           153
            November 29, 1913.............................           155
            November 30, 1913.............................           156
            December 17, 1913.............................           161
            December 18, 1913.............................           164
            July 1, 1914..................................           167
            July 22, 1914.................................           169
            October 6, 1914...............................           172
            October 7, 1914...............................           174
            December 12, 1914.............................           179
            January 16, 1915..............................           181
            January 18, 1915..............................           183
            January 20, 1915..............................           185
            January 21, 1915..............................           186
            January 22, 1915..............................           188
            January 23, 1915..............................           189
            February 2, 1915..............................           194
            February 13, 1915.............................           196


64th Congress (1915-1917)

            November 29, 1915.............................           201
            December 1, 1915..............................           203
            December 2, 1915..............................           205
            December 3, 1915..............................           208
            December 4, 1915..............................           212
            March 16, 1916................................           214
            April 19, 1916................................           215
            July 5, 1916..................................           217
            July 7, 1916..................................           219
            July 8, 1916..................................           219
            July 15, 1916.................................           222
            July 25, 1916.................................           224
            July 31, 1916.................................           228
            August 10, 1916...............................           231
            August 11, 1916...............................           232
            August 12, 1916...............................           233
            August 13, 1916...............................           237
            August 14, 1916...............................           242
            December 13, 1916.............................           243
            January 8, 1917...............................           245
            January 25, 1917..............................           247
            February 9, 1917..............................           248
            February 10, 1917.............................           250
            February 11, 1917.............................           252


65th Congress (1917-1919)

            March 6, 1917.................................           257
            March 7, 1917.................................           260
            March 12, 1917................................           263
            February 13, 1919.............................           274


66th Congress (1919-1921)

            May 17, 1919..................................           277
            May 26, 1919..................................           280
            November 6, 1919..............................           288
            January 15, 1920..............................           290
            February 7, 1920..............................           296
            April 27, 1920................................           299
            May 21, 1920..................................           300


67th Congress (1921-1923)

            March 5, 1921.................................           303


68th Congress (1923-1925)

            December 3, 1923..............................           305
            April 26, 1924................................           307
            April 28, 1924................................           308


69th Congress (1925-1927)

            March 6, 1925.................................           311
            December 9, 1925..............................           314
            December 7, 1926..............................           315


70th Congress (1927-1929)

            March 5, 1927.................................           319
            January 19, 1928..............................           320
            January 21, 1928..............................           324
            January 9, 1929...............................           325


71st Congress (1929-1931)

            March 5, 1929.................................           327
            April 25, 1929................................           329


72nd Congress (1931-1933)

            December 4, 1931..............................           331
            July 8, 1932..................................           334
            July 9, 1932..................................           336
            December 23, 1932.............................           337


73rd Congress (1933-1935)

            March 6, 1933.................................           339
            March 14, 1933................................           343
            April 30, 1934................................           346


74th Congress (1935-1937)

            January 2, 1935...............................           349
            May 10, 1935..................................           350


75th Congress (1937-1939)

            July 22, 1937.................................           353
            December 31, 1938.............................           354


76th Congress (1939-1941)

            April 19, 1939................................           357


77th Congress (1941-1943)

            January 4, 1941...............................           359
            July 10, 1941.................................           361


78th Congress (1943-1945)

            January 7, 1943...............................           363
            January 19, 1943..............................           367
            February 24, 1944.............................           370


79th Congress (1945-1947)

            January 5, 1945...............................           375
            February 1, 1945..............................           379
            April 19, 1945................................           380
            July 27, 1945.................................           382
            October 11, 1945..............................           383


80th Congress (1947-1949)

            January 2, 1947...............................           387
            March 6, 1947.................................           396
            May 16, 1947..................................           400
            July 10, 1947.................................           403
            March 16, 1948................................           406
            August 7, 1948................................           408
            December 31, 1948.............................           410


81st Congress (1949-1951)

            February 1, 1949..............................           420
            February 6, 1949..............................           423
            February 23, 1949.............................           425
            April 11, 1949................................           427
            June 3, 1949..................................           431
            September 8, 1949.............................           434
            January 5, 1950...............................           437
            January 17, 1950..............................           444
            January 26, 1950..............................           448
            February 21, 1950.............................           452
            June 7, 1950..................................           455
            July 19, 1950.................................           459
            August 21, 1950...............................           460
            December 12, 1950.............................           466


82nd Congress (1951-1953)

            January 2, 1951...............................           471
            February 22, 1951.............................           477
            June 26, 1951.................................           479
            August 23, 1951...............................           480
            October 3, 1951...............................           480
            March 21, 1952................................           481
            May 15, 1952..................................           484


83rd Congress (1953-1955)

            January 2, 1953...............................           487


84th Congress (1955-1957)

            January 4, 1955...............................           495


85th Congress (1957-1959)

            January 3, 1957...............................           501
            January 7, 1958...............................           505


86th Congress (1959-1961)

            January 7, 1959...............................           509
            January 7, 1960...............................           515
            January 12, 1960..............................           524
            January 20, 1960..............................           544
            February 15, 1960.............................           557
            February 18, 1960.............................           572


87th Congress (1961-1963)

            January 3, 1961...............................           577
            January 4, 1961...............................           581
            January 5, 1961...............................           583
            January 10, 1961..............................           585
            February 27, 1961.............................           588
            February 7, 1962..............................           591
            March 13, 1962................................           593
            May 2, 1962...................................           598
            June 6, 1962..................................           599
            June 7, 1962..................................           603


88th Congress (1963-1965)

            January 9, 1963...............................           607
            February 7, 1963..............................           613
            March 28, 1963................................           619
            November 4, 1963..............................           622
            January 8, 1964...............................           625
            January 28, 1964..............................           629
            May 19, 1964..................................           634
            July 20, 1964.................................           638
            July 27, 1964.................................           642
            August 3,1964.................................           648
            August 10, 1964...............................           651
            August 17, 1964...............................           655

            Appendix A: Democratic Conference Officers, 1903-
              1964............................................       657

            Appendix B: Members of the Senate Democratic 
              Conference, 1903-1964...........................       659

            Index.............................................       669
                                     

                                FOREWORD

  In 1991 the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress unanimously 
recommended that these minutes, and their Republican counterparts, be 
edited for publication. The discussions they contain tell a great deal 
about the development of our party's organization during these formative 
decades from before World War I to the mid-1960s.
  I am delighted to have played a role in making these minutes available 
and hope they will prove a source of illumination to my colleagues, to 
scholars, and to the American people.

                                      Thomas A. Daschle
                                      Senate Democratic Leader and
                                      Chairman, Democratic Conference
                                 PREFACE

  These conference minutes add significantly to our knowledge of the 
Senate's institutional development during the first two-thirds of the 
twentieth century. Their publication, on the unanimous recommendation of 
the Advisory Committee on the Records of Congress, serves as a further 
demonstration of the Senate's desire to open its historical records in a 
timely and useful manner. As the Senate officer responsible for 
preserving and making publicly available this body's noncurrent records, 
I take particular pleasure in this volume's release. Over the past five 
years, the Senate Historical Office, operating under the Secretary of 
the Senate's supervision, has carefully transcribed, annotated, edited, 
and indexed the minutes of both party conferences. Special thanks go to 
my predecessors Walter J. Stewart and Kelly D. Johnston for coordinating 
this project with the Senate's party leaders, and to party secretaries 
Elizabeth B. Greene and Martin P. Paone for their generous cooperation. 
Within the Senate Historical Office, I wish to acknowledge Senate 
Historian Richard A. Baker, who has resolutely advocated this enterprise 
almost since his appointment in 1975, and to Associate Historian Donald 
A. Ritchie and Historical Editor Wendy Wolff, the two professional staff 
members who did the hard work of transcribing, editing, and annotating. 
Wendy Wolff also prepared the detailed index that greatly enhances this 
work's reference value.

                                      Gary Sisco
                                      Secretary of the Senate
                              INTRODUCTION
                The Development of Senate Party Caucuses

  The authors of the United States Constitution did not anticipate 
political parties and therefore made no provisions for political 
organizations within Congress. Yet party caucuses--meetings open only to 
members of the same party--emerged early in the histories of both the 
Senate and the House of Representatives and over time became the 
``fountainhead'' of political power in Congress. Caucuses, later called 
conferences, took responsibility for choosing party candidates for such 
officers of the Senate as the president pro tempore, the chaplain, the 
secretary of the Senate, and the sergeant at arms. They also selected 
the majority and minority leaders and whips, the policy committees, 
steering committees, and members of all the standing and special 
committees. Depending upon the particular time, the issues, the 
incumbent president, the inclinations of the leadership, and the party's 
numerical strength, caucuses have attempted to maintain party unity and 
promote the party's program. 1
  ``Caucus'' derived from an Algonquian Indian word for counselors. 
Before the American Revolution, secret caucuses within the colonial 
legislatures plotted opposition to British-appointed governors. By the 
time the First Congress met in 1789, the term ``caucusing'' had become a 
commonplace expression for any private conference of likeminded 
legislators. Between 1796 and 1836, formal congressional caucuses 
nominated candidates for president of the United States--until protests 
against ``King Caucus'' led to the convening of national party 
conventions. Less regularly during these early congresses, party 
caucuses met to plan strategy dealing with legislation, nominations, and 
treaties. When the Jeffersonian Republicans won control of Congress in 
1800, the Federalist minority accused the majority of trying to 
reconcile their differences in caucuses before debating anything in 
public, thereby treating the minority as ``nullities.'' When legislation 
dealing with the purchase of Louisiana reached the Senate, a Federalist 
senator complained that ``the democratic senators held a Caucus last 
evening in which they settled the principles of the bill--and agreed to 
the same in the Senate without any debate.'' 2
  Caucus innovations generally emerged from the majority party and were 
later adopted by the minority. Prior to the Civil War, when Democrats 
more often held the majority, the Democratic caucus originated the 
practice of submitting slates of names of its members for committee 
assignments (rather than have the Senate as a whole elect committee 
members as was the practice before 1846). Republicans gained the 
majority during the Civil War and held it for most of the remainder of 
the nineteenth century. During this era, Republican senators made their 
party caucus a vehicle for scheduling legislation on the floor, a 
function that they eventually assigned to a steering committee within 
the caucus. Republicans also established a committee on committees to 
make party assignments to the standing committees. Senate Democrats 
adopted similar committees during the two congresses in which they held 
the majority between the Civil War and the end of the century. By 
contrast, in the twentieth century Democrats held the majority more 
frequently than Republicans. During this time, the Democratic Conference 
invented such offices as the majority leader and whip, which in turn 
were adopted by the Republicans. 3
  Senators have also attempted to exert party discipline through their 
caucuses. In December 1858, the Democratic caucus voted to remove 
Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas as chairman of the Committee on 
Territories, because of his opposition to President James Buchanan's 
plans for the organization of the Kansas territory. Similarly, in 1871, 
the Senate Republican caucus deposed Massachusetts Senator Charles 
Sumner as chair of the Foreign Relations Committee, after he opposed 
President U.S. Grant's plans to annex Santo Domingo. Senator Sumner had 
also refused to acknowledge that his party caucus could limit the topics 
for consideration on the floor or tie senators' hands in advance. 
Nevertheless, by 1900 the two party caucuses controlled both committee 
assignments and calendars and imposed what one scholar has called 
``unprecedented discipline'' on roll-call votes. 4
  The progressive reform movement at the opening of the twentieth 
century had a significant impact on the congressional caucuses. 
Suspicious of any exercise of power in secret meetings, the progressives 
discredited the term ``caucus,'' which increasingly came to be replaced 
by ``conference.'' Republicans officially designated their meetings as 
conferences in January 1913, while the Democrats switched from caucus to 
conference more informally. Although the two terms continue to be used 
interchangeably, ``caucus'' came to refer to those attempts at binding 
the party's vote, while ``conference'' referred to the election of 
officers and the general discussions of legislative business. 
5 For instance, on April 19, 1916, while debating a tariff on 
sugar, Nevada Senator Francis G. Newlands asked whether the meeting was 
a conference or a caucus--that is, whether those participating in the 
meeting were to be bound by its actions. The chairman declared the 
meeting to be a conference and explained that it would not ``assume the 
character of a caucus'' unless two-thirds of the Democratic senators 
first voted to make the question ``a party question.'' At that point, 
Georgia Senator Thomas W. Hardwick rose to state that unless the caucus 
coerced him he would ``use every means in his power'' to prevent the 
Senate from adopting the House version of the bill. But Hardwick added 
that if bound by the caucus he would ``submit to such vote as a good 
party man.''
  A keen observer of the caucus' potential was the political scientist 
Woodrow Wilson. In his book, Congressional Government, published in 
1885, Wilson had argued that ``No one is the Senator. No one may speak 
for his party as well as for himself; no one exercises the special trust 
of acknowledged leadership.'' However, by 1908, in his study 
Constitutional Government in the United States, Wilson had identified 
the chairman of the majority caucus as the leader of the Senate: ``Each 
party in the Senate finds its real, its permanent, its effective 
organization in its caucus, and follows the leadership, in all important 
political battles, of the chairman of that caucus, its organization and 
leadership alike resting upon arrangements quite outside the 
Constitution, for which there is no better and no other sanction than 
human nature.'' 6
                  The Democratic Conference, 1903-1964

  Democrats held the majority from 1879 to 1881, and again from 1893 to 
1895. In 1894, Maryland Senator Arthur Pue Gorman, as chair of the 
Democratic caucus, concluded that without an effective caucus ``we 
should have passed through the session with divisions as wide upon this 
side as it is possible to conceive of within a party.'' Perhaps because 
of their long years in the minority, Democrats had concentrated their 
party leadership more than did the Republicans, allowing their caucus 
chairman to head both the Steering Committee and Committee on Committees 
(during their years in the minority these committees were merged). In 
1898, Gorman was defeated for reelection, but he returned to the Senate 
in March 1903, and once again was elected caucus chairman. Seeking 
further stability in their party organization, Democrats at that time 
adopted a ``binding'' rule by which members agreed to support any issue 
that received a two-thirds vote in the caucus. At the same time, Gorman 
began keeping regular minutes of the caucus proceedings. During the 
years that the Democrats remained in the minority, prior to 1913, Senate 
committee assignments and patronage issues initially predominated on the 
conference agenda.7
  In 1912, Wilson won election as the Democratic candidate for president 
of the United States, and Democrats won the majority in both the Senate 
and House. Putting his theories into practice, Wilson was determined to 
make his party ``a disciplined instrument'' to enact his New Freedom 
program. He worked closely with the Democratic caucus to forge his 
legislative agenda within his party, rather than seek coalitions with 
progressive Republicans. The Senate Democratic caucus elected the 
progressive-minded freshman Senator John Worth Kern as its chairman and 
its de facto majority leader--although he never held that title 
officially. Kern called regular meetings of the caucus, particularly to 
debate the tariff, long a defining issue for the Democratic party. The 
caucus played a similar role in shaping legislation creating the Federal 
Reserve System and the Federal Trade Commission, the pillars of Wilson's 
``New Freedom'' program.8
  Kern was defeated for reelection in 1916, and Senate Democratic 
leadership reverted to the senior party member, Thomas S. Martin, a 
conservative Virginia Democrat, and caucus meetings were held less 
frequently. The ``binding'' rule was revived in 1917, to promote party 
unity in enacting the Senate's first cloture rule to limit debate during 
filibusters. Wilson had been angered when a band of antiwar senators, 
whom he dubbed a ``little group of willful men,'' filibustered 
legislation to permit the arming of American merchant ships prior to 
U.S. entry into the First World War. The new rule permitted debate to be 
cut off by a two-thirds vote of the Senate. In subsequent decades, 
filibusters were most frequently employed to block the passage of civil 
rights legislation, and the Democratic caucuses would confront the 
difficult issue of further liberalizing the cloture rule.9
  After the frequent meetings called under Senator Kern's leadership, 
the Democratic Conference was convened far less often during the long 
and dynamic tenure of Arkansas Senator Joseph T. Robinson. Minority 
leader from 1923 to 1933, and majority leader from 1933 to his death in 
1937, Robinson called conferences only at the beginning of sessions to 
elect officers and conduct routine business. In 1928, however, he used a 
vote of the Conference to support his leadership against attack from 
Alabama's fiery Senator Thomas Heflin.
  On March 6, 1933, when the Democrats retook the majority after 
fourteen years in the minority, and with the administration of President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt ready to tackle the crisis of the Great 
Depression, Majority Leader Robinson attempted to restore the binding 
caucus rule that the Wilson administration had used so effectively a 
generation earlier:

    RESOLVED, That until further ordered the Chairman is 
      authorized to convene Democratic Senators in caucus for 
      the purpose of considering any measure recommended by 
      the President; and that all Democratic Senators shall be 
      bound by the vote of the majority of the caucus; 
      Provided that any Senator may be excused from voting for 
      any such measure upon his express statement to the 
      caucus that said measure is contrary to his 
      conscientious judgment or that said measure is in 
      violation of pledges made to his constituents as a 
      candidate.

  However, Louisiana's independent-minded Senator Huey Long immediately 
insisted that he would not be bound by any caucus. Other senators also 
asserted that they would vote their own consciences regardless of caucus 
rulings. Robinson retreated and thereafter used the Conference 
sparingly. Increasingly larger Democratic majorities in the Senate also 
relieved Robinson of the burden of maintaining party unity through the 
Conference. Robinson's successor as majority leader, Alben Barkley of 
Kentucky, similarly refrained from calling many party meetings. Although 
Barkley ostensibly led the largest majority in modern history, Senate 
Democratic ranks had divided sharply in response to President 
Roosevelt's plan to ``pack'' the Supreme Court in 1937, a division that 
took years to heal. Under those circumstances, Conference meetings 
offered Barkley anything but harmony. Ultimately, however, Barkley did 
draw strength from the caucus, which unanimously reelected him in 1944, 
following his resignation as majority leader over President Roosevelt's 
veto of a revenue bill that Barkley had endorsed.10
  When Barkley became vice president in 1949, Senate Democratic 
leadership passed to his whip, Illinois Senator Scott Lucas, who sought 
to revive the Conference with regular meetings on President Harry S. 
Truman's legislative program. Defeated for reelection in 1950, Lucas was 
succeeded by Arizona Senator Ernest McFarland, who similarly looked to 
the party conferences to strengthen his leadership. McFarland was 
defeated for reelection in 1952, and the following year Senate Democrats 
elected Texas Senator Lyndon B. Johnson as Conference chairman and floor 
leader. In the mode of Joe Robinson and Alben Barkley before him, 
Johnson rarely called conferences, except at the beginning of each 
session.
  Johnson's concentration of power in the leadership rather than the 
Democratic Conference worked best when the two parties were narrowly 
divided in the Senate. However, in 1959, shortly after Democrats won a 
landslide majority in the Senate, freshman Senator William Proxmire of 
Wisconsin took the floor to lament that ``the Democratic conference or 
caucus is dead.'' Noting that only two conferences had been called 
during his two years in the Senate, Proxmire offered as an epitaph:
  Here lies the Democratic caucus
  Conceived by senatorial responsibility
  And born with the Democratic Party--1800
  Assassinated at the hand of senatorial indifference--1953.
  ``She labored faithfully and well to make Senatorial 
    leadership responsible to all the people.''

  Senator Proxmire pointed out that ``there is one body and only one 
body to which all Democratic Senators and only Democratic Senators 
belong. That is the Democratic conference--in the past years called the 
Democratic caucus.'' He argued that ``During much of the history of the 
Senate the party conference or caucus has given all Democratic Senators 
their opportunity to exercise their right and fulfill their duty in 
determining our party's program and policies.'' By the late 1950s, 
Proxmire argued that due to the diminution of the party conferences, 
``the typical Democratic Senator has literally nothing to do with 
determining the legislative program and policies of this party in the 
Senate.'' Proxmire called for ``a greater degree of democracy in our 
party in the Senate,'' by calling regular meetings of the Conference 
``to permit all Senators to know where the leadership intends to take 
us, and to permit the membership, if it cares to do so, to indicate 
whether or not it wants to go there.'' 11
  Majority Leader Johnson publicly doubted that the Democratic 
Conference could be a productive tool, and privately worried that 
frequent party conferences might prove more divisive than unifying for 
the party. ``There may be some who attribute to me power and influence 
which I do not possess,'' Johnson argued, ``but I can say in good 
conscience, and give my word for whatever it may be worth, that if I had 
caucused all day and night, I doubt whether anything I might have said 
would have changed the viewpoint'' of other Democratic senators. 
However, Johnson responded to his critics by convening conferences to 
discuss specific issues. 12
  Johnson's election as vice president in 1960 brought a vastly 
different style of party leadership under Montana Senator Mike 
Mansfield, who chaired the Democratic Conference and served as majority 
leader from 1961 to 1977. Believing that responsibility for moving the 
legislative agenda should be shared by all senators and not simply the 
leadership, Mansfield saw the Conference as a means of building 
consensus within the party. The Democratic Conference determined that 
regional and philosophical balance should be established on all party 
committees, and that no senator, except the Conference chairman, should 
sit on both the Steering and the Policy committees.13
                             Editorial Method

  The minutes of the Democratic Conference from 1903 to 1964 cover sixty 
years and the activities of 316 Democratic senators. They span an era 
that opened with concern over the treatment of Civil War veterans still 
serving on the Senate staff, and conclude with a reference to the 
enactment of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. They offer insights into the 
senators who sponsored such monumental legislation as the Federal 
Reserve Act of 1913, the Social Security Act of 1935, and the Civil 
Rights Act of 1964.
  Rarely verbatim, the minutes are formal in nature. But they contain 
occasional flashes of levity, as on June 24, 1913, when Conference 
Secretary Willard Saulsbury noted why he had missed some of the debate 
over the tariff: ``Chairman here interfered with the duties of the 
Secretary by telling his laughing hyena story.'' On November 27, 1913, 
when the chair ruled against Senator Saulsbury's motion to adjourn for 
Thanksgiving, the Secretary took revenge by referring to the action in 
the minutes he was keeping as: ``the steamroller having been oiled up 
and brought in.'' One notes also that on January 25, 1917, the 
conference passed a resolution of appreciation to the Manitou Spring 
Water Company of Colorado for having furnished the Conference with a 
complimentary case of its ginger ale.
  The Democratic Conference minutes were reproduced from those held in 
custody by the party secretary for the use of the Conference. In 1993 
microform copies were deposited in the National Archives, where they 
will be opened for research. These minutes begin in 1903, when Senator 
Arthur Pue Gorman resumed the Conference chairmanship, and when the 
conference first established a ``binding'' rule, making record keeping 
more essential. Minutes of a few early meetings were not included in the 
official minutes but were found in Senator Gorman's personal papers. 
Over the years a succession of Conference secretaries recorded the 
minutes, adopting different styles and varying the amount of material 
included. The earliest minutes were handwritten; later minutes were 
typed with occasional handwritten addenda.
  The transcripts have sought to remain faithful to the original texts, 
with the exception of silently correcting small typographical errors, 
maintaining some consistency in capitalization and punctuation, and 
providing full words in place of abbreviations. Occasionally, an obvious 
typographical error (such as describing a Senate committee room as Ways 
and Means instead of Finance) has been corrected by inserting the 
correct word in brackets. In general, spelling has not been altered, so 
that a word like ``subcommittee'' may be spelled in a variety of ways 
over the sixty-year period of these minutes. To provide historical 
context for the documents, the editor has added introductory notes for 
each Congress, explanatory information in brackets (including 
identification for House members, Republican senators, and other 
noncaucus members mentioned only by last name), and occasional 
footnotes. Appendix B lists the full names, states, and dates of service 
of all Democratic senators during this period, including those who 
served only briefly and thus are not mentioned within the minutes.

                                      Donald A. Ritchie
                                      Senate Historical Office
                                  Notes

      1. Remarks by Senator William Proxmire, Congressional Record, 23 
        February 1959, 86th Congress, 1st sess., p. 2814.
      2. Robert Luce, Legislative Procedure: Parliamentary Practices and 
        the Course of Business in the Framing of Statutes (New York: Da 
        Capo Press, 1972 [1922]), pp. 506-10; Noble E. Cunningham, Jr., 
        The Process of Government Under Jefferson (Princeton: Princeton 
        University Press, 1978), pp. 280-82.
      3. U.S., Congress, Senate, The Senate, 1789-1989: Addresses on the 
        History of the United States Senate, by Robert C. Byrd, S. Doc. 
        100-20, 100th Congress, 1st sess., vol. 2, 1991, p. 219.
      4. David J. Rothman, Politics and Power: The United States Senate, 
        1868-1901 (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1966), pp. 4, 
        18-25.
      5. George H. Haynes, The Senate of the United States: Its History 
        and Practice (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1938), vol. 1, pp. 474-
        89.
      6. Woodrow Wilson, Congressional Government: A Study in American 
        Politics (Cleveland: World Publishing Company, 1956 [1885]), p. 
        147; Woodrow Wilson, Constitutional Government in the United 
        States (New York; Columbia University Press, 1908), p. 133.
      7. Rothman, pp. 61-63, 68; see also John R. Lambert, Arthur Pue 
        Gorman (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1953).
      8. Dewey W. Grantham, The Life & Death of the Solid South: A 
        Political History (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 
        1988), p. 66; Byrd, The Senate, 1789-1989, vol. 1, 1989, pp. 
        407-29.
      9. See Thomas W. Ryley, A Little Group of Willful Men: A Study of 
        Congressional-Presidential Authority (Port Washington, NY: 
        Kennikat Press, 1975).
      10. Donald A. Ritchie, ``Alben W. Barkley; The President's Man,'' 
        in Richard A. Baker and Roger H. Davidson, eds., First Among 
        Equals: Outstanding Senate Leaders of the Twentieth Century 
        (Washington: Congressional Quarterly, 1991), pp. 144-50.
      11. Congressional Record, 86th Congress, 1st sess., pp. 2814-20.
      12. Ibid., p. 9262.
      13. Ross K. Baker, ``Mike Mansfield and the Birth of the Modern 
        Senate,'' Baker and Davidson, eds., First Among Equals, pp. 264-
        94.
                    Fifty-eighth Congress (1903-1905)

  [Editor's Note: President Theodore Roosevelt called the Senate into 
special session on March 5, 1903 to consider the ratification of the 
Hay-Herran Treaty with the Republic of Colombia to construct an 
interoceanic canal across the Isthmus of Panama. On March 17, the Senate 
approved the treaty by a vote of 73 to 5, but Colombia refused to accept 
the treaty.
  During the Fifty-eighth Congress, Senate Democrats were in the 
minority by a margin of 33 to 57. On March 6, the Democratic Conference 
(alternately identified as the Democratic caucus) elected Senator Arthur 
Pue Gorman of Maryland as chairman. No minutes exist of that meeting, 
which was reported in the following day's Washington Post. Senator 
Gorman had previously chaired the caucus from 1889 to 1893, and again 
from 1893 until his defeat for reelection in 1899; he won another term 
in the Senate in 1902. Also on March 6, 1903, Senator Edward W. Carmack 
of Tennessee was elected Democratic Conference secretary; the Conference 
increased the Democratic Steering Committee from seven to nine members; 
and the Steering Committee was instructed to recommend Democratic 
appointments to Senate committees, subject to ratification by the 
Conference.]
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 16, 1903]

MARCH 16, 1903

                      Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate.1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

  \1\ From 1903 to 1911, the Minority Conference met in room 24 on the 
gallery floor of the Senate wing of the Capitol. This room was 
subsequently renumbered S-311 and renamed the ``Senate Wives' Lounge.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         March 16, 1903.

The Conference was called to order at 10:30 a.m., Senator Gorman 
presiding, with the following Senators present: Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, 
Bate, Berry, Blackburn, Carmack, Clark of Montana, Clay, Cockrell, 
Daniel, Foster of Louisiana, Gorman, Latimer, McCreary, McEnery, 
Mallory, Martin, Money, Newlands, Overman, Patterson, Pettus, Simmons, 
Stone, Taliaferro, Teller, and Tillman, 27 in all.
Senator Gorman stated the object of the meeting to be the discussion of 
the proposed amendments to the pending Panama Canal Treaty.

Mr. Money offered the following amendment, by way of a substitute for 
the Second Paragraph of Article 4:

  The United States, following their uniform established 
  policy in regard to their sister Republics in America, 
  freely acknowledge and recognize the sovereignty of the 
  Republic of Colombia, and disavow any intention to impair it 
  in any way whatever, or to increase their territory at the 
  expense of Colombia, but most earnestly desire her peace and 
  prosperity.

which was adopted.
Mr. Bacon offered the following amendment as a substitute for Article 23 
of the Treaty:

  The Government of the United States shall have and exercise 
  the exclusive right to provide and enforce such means and 
  measures as it may deem advisable and necessary for the 
  regulation and management of the canal and for the 
  protection and safety thereof, and of the ships that make 
  use of the same, and the railways and other works within 
  said Zone, including all persons and cargos and freights and 
  other property connected with the construction, maintenance 
  and operation of said canal and the use thereof, and for the 
  accomplishment of these ends, as well as for the protection 
  of the lives and persons of those employed upon the Canal, 
  railways or other works, or engaged in the use thereof. The 
  Government of the United States shall employ such force as 
  may by it be deemed necessary, and to this end shall have 
  the right at all times and in its discretion to use its 
  police and its land and naval forces for these purposes,

which was adopted.

There being no further business, the Conference adjourned.


__________________________________________

   [Editor's Note: The Senate reconvened for the first session of the 
Fifty-eighth Congress on November 9, six days after a revolution broke 
out in Panama to secure its independence from Colombia. A U.S. warship 
prevented the Colombians from landing troops in Panama, and the United 
States quickly recognized the new government. On November 18, the United 
States and Panama signed the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty, permitting the 
United States to build and operate, and protect a canal across Panama. 
Although he insisted that the United States had neither encouraged or 
assisted the rebellion, in later years, President Roosevelt asserted: 
``I took the Canal Zone and let Congress debate.'' Democratic Senators 
opposed to the new treaty sought to unite their party by proposing a 
rule that would bind all members of the Conference to any decision 
approved by a two-thirds vote of the Conference. This marked the first 
time that either party caucus sought to bind its members to the decision 
of the caucus. The Senate approved the Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty on 
February 23, 1904, by a vote of 66 to 14.
   No minutes were taken for the Democratic Conference meetings held on 
December 12 and 14, 1903, however Conference Chairman Gorman left the 
following account of these meetings in his own journal:
                                 Saturday
                              Dec. 12, 1903

  The Democratic Conference was held at 10:30 A.M. to consider 
  a resolution offered by Senator Berry, to amend the Cuban 
  bill; it was strongly urged [by] this Senator and Senator 
  Teller but was opposed by Bailey, Clay, Blackburn and 
  Gorman, who stated the only effect would be to divide the 
  party and accomplish no other result. He appealed to his 
  associates to unite [and] pass a resolution where \2/3\ of 
  the Caucus so voted it should be binding on all matters of 
  party interest. Blackburn offered such a resolution [and] a 
  spirited debate followed. Strong in favor of Blackburn's 
  proposition. The Conference declined to authorize any 
  amend[ment] to the Cuban bill; Senator Teller announced he 
  wold not allow another Caucus and would not be bound. We 
  adjourned until Mond[ay] 14 to Consider Blackburn's 
  resolution.
                           December 14th, 1903

  Caucus of Senators at 10, on Blackburn's resolution to bind 
  all Senators on \2/3\ vote in Congress. Long debate. Daniel, 
  Tillman, Blackburn, Carmack, Stone, Morgan, Foster 
  advocating resolution. Bacon, Cockrell, Berry, Mallory 
  opposing it; finally vote was taken on postponing until 
  tomorrow. Carried by vote of 16, 25 in Caucus. Senator 
  Newlands offered resolution to reorganize Steering 
  Committee: 5 South including Maryland, 4 North. There are 6 
  Senators from the North--not considered but will be 
  tomorrow.2]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ John R. Lambert, Jr., ``The Autobiographical Writings of Senator 
Arthur Pue Gorman,'' Maryland Historical Magazine 58 (June 1963), pp. 
105-6.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 15, 1903]

DECEMBER 15, 1903

                                   Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate

                                                       December 15, 1903

The Caucus met at 10 o'clock a.m. with the following Senators present:

  Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, Bate, Berry, Blackburn, Carmack, Clay, 
  Cockrell, Daniel, Dubois, Foster of La., Gibson, Gorman, Latimer, 
  McCreary, McEnery, McLaurin, Mallory, Martin, Morgan. Newlands, 
  Overman, Pettus, Simmons, Stone, Taliaferro, and Tillman. Total 27.

The following resolution offered by Mr. Blackburn was taken up for 
consideration:

  RESOLVED, That hereafter all members of the Senate 
  Democratic Caucus shall be bound to vote in accordance with 
  its decisions made by a two-thirds vote of all its members, 
  on all questions except those involving a construction of 
  the Constitution, or upon which a Senator has made pledges 
  to his constituents, or received instructions from the 
  Legislature of a State which he represents.

 Full discussion was had, and Senator Mallory offered the following 
amendment:

   Provided, this rule shall not apply to the action of 
  Senators on the pending Cuban Reciprocity Bill or the 
  pending Panama Canal Treaty,

which, after discussion was rejected by the following vote:

  Yeas: Messrs. Bacon, Bate, Berry, Clay, Cockrell, Foster of La., 
  McCreary, McEnery, Mallory, Simmons, Taliaferro, Total 11.
  Nays: Messrs. Bailey, Blackburn, Carmack, Daniel, Dubois, Gibson, 
  Gorman, Latimer, McLaurin, Martin, Morgan, Overman, Pettus, Stone, and 
  Tillman, Total 15.

The question recurring on the original resolution offered by Mr. 
Blackburn, same was adopted by the following vote:

  Yeas: Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, Bate, Berry, Blackburn, Carmack, Clay, 
  Daniel, Dubois, Foster of La., Gibson, Gorman, Latimer, McCreary, 
  McLaurin, Martin, Morgan, Overman, Patterson, Pettus, Simmons, Stone, 
  Tillman, Total 23.
  Nays: Messrs. Mallory and Taliaferro, Total 2.

 Mr. Newlands offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be reconstituted by 
  providing that it shall consist of nine members, five to be 
  selected by the Senators from the Southern States, including 
  Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, and four to be selected by 
  the Senators from the remaining States.

 After consideration, the Caucus, upon motion of Mr. Pettus, adjourned 
until 10 a.m. Wednesday, December 16.3
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ Chairman Gorman's journal recorded: ``The Democratic Caucus met at 
10. The Resolution of Senator Blackburn for \2/3\ rule was debated until 
12. M [noon]. The opposition resolved the case on an Amendment to 
exclude the Cuban Treaty and Panama Treaty; it was voted down 11 to 16. 
And the Blackburn resolution passed 23 to 2; Senator Cockrell not 
voting. The debate was spirited, Bailey, Morgan, Stone for it; Cockrell, 
Foster, Mallory, and his colleague [James P. Taliaferro], and others in 
opposition. A great deal of feeling was exhibited as it is the first 
time such a rule has been adopted. I hope it will be allayed and good 
feeling will prevail. Senator Newlands then offered his resolution to 
reorganize the Caucus Committee, which goes over until tomorrow, 
Wednesday, at that meeting a resolution will be offered to oppose [the] 
Cuban Treaty.'' Lambert, ``Autobiographical Writings of Senator Arthur 
Pue Gorman,'' p. 107.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 16, 1903]

DECEMBER 16, 1903

                                   Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate

                                                       December 16, 1903

 The Caucus convened at 10 o'clock a.m., with the following Senators 
present:

  Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, Bate, Berry, Blackburn, Carmack, Clay, 
  Cockrell, Culberson, Daniel, Dubois, Gibson, Gorman, Latimer, 
  McCreary, McLaurin, Mallory, Morgan, Newlands, Overman, Patterson, 
  Pettus, Stone, Taliaferro and Tillman, 25 in all.

Mr. Bailey offered the following resolution:

  Whereas, this Caucus has heretofore expressly left each 
  member of it to determine for himself his vote upon the 
  treaty with Cuba; and
  Whereas, Senators have, in accordance with such Caucus 
  action, committed themselves by votes and speeches in favor 
  of said treaty,
  Therefore, Be it Resolved, That it would be inexpedient and 
  unwise to adopt a rule requiring such Senators to vote 
  against the bill now pending in the Senate to approve said 
  treaty,

which was adopted.

Mr. Bailey offered the following resolution:

   That it is the sense of this Caucus that Democratic 
  Senators shall insist in Executive Session on making public 
  [the] Treaty with Panama and all documents,

which was adopted.4
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \4\ Senator Gorman recorded in his journal: ``The Democratic 
Conference met at 10 a.m. The resolution of Senator Newlands was 
considered for reorganization of Steering Committee, and sundry 
propositions were made to amend by increasing the committee to 11. I 
finally stated that the Caucus could do as they desired but I considered 
the whole move a reflection on my action and it would be so regarded 
generally that the motion must be modified as I would not select the new 
members the Caucus must do that, that I would gladly surrender the place 
as chairman but I could not submit to continue with any Senators 
thinking I had been unfair to any section. The Caucus declined to take 
any action after which several Senators, Stone, Blackburn, Carmack & 
others appealed to me to adjust it. I told them frankly, I could not 
recede. I would be glad to vacate, so the matter ended. The Caucus 
decided to permit the Cuban bill to go through without Amendment being 
offered and each Senator to vote as he desired. And then to unite on 
demand for Panamanian Treaty to be made public and to insist on Post 
Office Investigation.'' Lambert, ``Autobiographical Writings of Senator 
Arthur Pue Gorman,'' p. 108.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 23, 1904]

JANUARY 23, 1904

                                   Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate

                                                        January 23, 1904

At a meeting of the Caucus held this day, the following resolution was 
discussed:

   RESOLVED, That the Committee on Foreign Relations is hereby 
  instructed to investigate and ascertain whether Bunau-
  Varilla, and other persons residing in the United States and 
  subject to our laws, did aid or promote an insurrection in 
  Panama against the Republic of Colombia, and did give 
  assurance to citizens of Panama that they should have the 
  aid and assistance of our Navy in behalf of such 
  insurrection, and whether any official of any Department of 
  the Government did disclose or make known to said Bunau-
  Varilla or to any other person, the action which the 
  Government of the United States designed or proposed to take 
  in the event of an insurrection. Said committee shall have 
  authority to send for persons and papers, compel attendance 
  of witnesses, and shall make report at the earliest 
  practicable date.

and the matter referred to the following Sub Committee:

  Messrs. Bacon, Patterson, Martin, Newlands, and Bailey.5
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \5\ Senator Gorman recorded in his journal on January 22, 1904: ``The 
Caucus Committee--Culberson, Cockrell, and [my]self being present agreed 
to a resolution of inquiry and one for investigation as to aid given by 
[the U.S.] government [to the] revolution in Panama. Called Caucus for 
tomorrow.'' On January 23, Gorman wrote: ``The U.S. Senate [Democratic] 
Caucus met at 11 A.M. After a long discussion we agreed to two 
resolutions named in memoranda of yesterday and appoint[ed] committee of 
5 to take any other action.'' Lambert, ``The Autobiographical Writings 
of Senator Arthur Pue Gorman,'' p. 234.
                    Fifty-ninth Congress (1905-1907)

  [Editor's Note: Senate Democrats remained in the minority, 32 to 58 
1, during the Fifty-ninth Congress. A major issue facing the 
Senate in 1905 was a treaty with Santo Domingo (the Dominican Republic), 
designed to solve Santo Domingo's debt crisis and forestall European 
intervention. The treaty permitted the United States to operate Santo 
Domingo's customhouses and manage its debt payment. The Senate first 
took up the treaty in December 1905, recommitting it to the Foreign 
Relations Committee on December 13. A revised treaty was eventually 
approved by a vote of 43 to 19, on February 25, 1907.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ Source for party divisions in Senate and House of Representatives 
is Kenneth C. Mardis, The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the 
United States Congress, 1789-1989 (New York, 1989), pp. 157- 241.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Senator Thomas M. Patterson of Colorado broke ranks with his party to 
support President Roosevelt's Dominican policies. Appearing before the 
Democratic Caucus on February 3, 1906, Patterson defended his views, but 
the caucus adopted a resolution requiring all members to vote against 
the treaty. In the Senate on February 5, Patterson assailed the attempt 
to enforce party discipline as being ``in plain violation of the spirit 
and intent of the constitution of the United States.'' Senator Joseph W. 
Bailey of Texas responded that the caucus had adopted a rule ``defining 
a Senator's duty as a Democrat. The Senator is at perfect liberty, 
whenever the importance of the question or the force of his convictions, 
or both, shall render it impossible to obey the Caucus, to defy it, and 
to vote precisely as he would had no Caucus action had been taken. If he 
does defy it, he then settles with the Democratic people of his own 
State.'' 2]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ Clarence A. Berdahl, ``Some Notes on Party Membership in 
Congress,'' American Political Science Review 43 (August 1949): 721-23; 
U.S., Congress, Senate, Congressional Record, 59th Cong., 1st sess., pp. 
2053-54.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 8, 1905]

DECEMBER 8, 1905

                                  Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                       December 8, 1905.

 The Caucus was called to order by Mr. Blackburn, Vice-Chairman, in the 
absence of Mr. Gorman, and Mr. Martin was requested to act as Secretary 
in the absence of Mr. Carmack. There were present:

  Messrs. Blackburn, Teller, Bacon, Stone, Daniel, Mallory, McLaurin, 
  Overman, Latimer, Culberson, Rayner, McCreary, Bacon, Dubois, Simmons, 
  Foster, Bailey, Tillman, Clay, Money, Newlands, Frazier, and McEnery, 
  Total 23--A quorum.

On motion of Mr. Martin, Mr. Gorman was unanimously elected Chairman of 
the Caucus.
On motion of Mr. McLaurin, Mr. Blackburn was unanimously elected Vice-
Chairman.
On motion of Mr. Dubois, Mr. Carmack was unanimously elected Secretary. 
Mr. Teller was unanimously elected to fill the vacancy on the Steering 
Committee caused by the retirement of Senator Cockrell.
Upon motion adjournment was had.
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 3, 1906]

FEBRUARY 3, 1906

                                  Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                       February 3, 1906.

The Caucus convened at 10 o'clock a.m., Senator Blackburn presiding, 
with the following Senators present:

  Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, Clarke (Ark.), Clay, Culberson, Daniel, Dubois, 
  Foster, Frazier, Latimer, McCreary, Mallory, Martin, Money, Morgan, 
  Newlands, Overman, Patterson, Pettus, Rayner, Simmons, Teller, 
  Tillman, and Gearin (by telegram).

Mr. Bailey offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Senate ought not to advise and consent 
  to the Treaty between the United States and the Republic of 
  Santo Domingo now pending before the Senate, and be it 
  further resolved, that if two-thirds of this Caucus shall 
  vote in favor of the foregoing resolution, it shall be the 
  duty of every Democratic Senator to vote against the 
  ratification of said Treaty.

The question was divided, and the vote taken upon the first and second 
sections thereof separately, resulting in 24 yeas and 1 nay (Mr. Clarke 
of Arkansas) upon the first section, which was therefore adopted, and 20 
yeas and 4 nays (Messrs. Clarke of Arkansas, Daniel, Foster and Mallory) 
upon the second section, which was accordingly adopted.
 Upon motion the Chairman and Secretary were requested to give notice of 
the result of the meeting.
____________________________________________________

                                                          [June 9, 1906]

JUNE 9, 1906

                                  Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                           June 9, 1906.

 The Caucus convened, Mr. Blackburn, Vice-Chairman, presiding, with the 
following Senators present:

  Messrs: Bacon, Bailey, Blackburn, Clark (Mont.) Clay, Culberson, 
  Daniel, Dubois, Frazier, Gearin, McCreary, Mallory, Money, Morgan, 
  Overman, Patterson, Pettus, Rayner, Simmons, Taliaferro, Teller and 
  Tillman, Total 22--a quorum.

 Mr. Bacon offered the following resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted:

  The Democratic Senators at their first meeting in Conference 
  subsequent to the death of their former honored and loved 
  Chairman, the late Senator Gorman, obey their unaffected 
  impulse in the expression of their profound sorrow for his 
  loss to them as their personal friend, and their sagacious, 
  faithful political guide in their official relations.
  A faithful friend, zealous and wise party leader, 
  considerate and conciliatory and careful of the interests of 
  all, he greatly endeared himself to his party associates, by 
  whom his memory will ever be most fondly cherished 
  3
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ Senator Arthur Pue Gorman, chairman of the Democratic Conference, 
died on June 4, 1906.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mr. Blackburn was unanimously chosen as Chairman of the Caucus as the 
successor of the late Mr. Gorman.

 Mr. Bacon offered the following resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted:

   The Democratic Senators in electing as their Chairman of 
  the Conference Senator Blackburn of Kentucky, congratulate 
  themselves and their several constituencies upon the fact 
  that they have among their number one so well fitted by his 
  marked capacity, his great acquirements, and his large 
  experience in Congressional work, and especially by his 
  power as an orator and as a debater, to render to his party 
  associates the most signal and valuable services as their 
  chosen official leader in the great forum of the Senate of 
  the United States.

 Senator Overman of North Carolina was appointed by the Chairman to fill 
the vacancy on the Steering Committee, occasioned by the death of 
Senator Gorman.
The Steering Committee was authorized to consider vacancies on 
Committees, and to make recommendations to a subsequent Caucus.
 Upon motion, this Caucus adjourned.
                      Democratic Steering Committee
                              June 9, 1906.

                            Mr. Blackburn.
                            " Martin.
                            " Bacon.
                            " Money.
                            " Dubois.
                            " Bailey.
                            " Tillman.
                            " Teller.
                            " Overman.
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 21, 1906]

JUNE 21, 1906

                                  Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                          June 21, 1906.

 The Caucus convened, Mr. Blackburn presiding, with the following 
Senators either present or represented by proxies:

  Messrs. Blackburn, Bailey, Berry, Carmack, Clark (Mont.), Clay, 
  Culberson, Daniel, Foster, Frazier, McLaurin, Mallory, Martin, Money, 
  Overman, Rayner, Simmons, Stone, Taliaferro and Whyte.

The Steering Committee reported the following recommendations relative 
to appointments to Senate Committees:

  That Mr. Clay be excused from further service on the 
  Committee on Commerce.

That the following appointments be made to fill vacancies:

  Mr. Clay on Appropriations;
   "   Taliaferro on Finance;
   "   Simmons on Commerce.

 The recommendations of the Steering Committee were agreed to.
                      Sixtieth Congress (1907-1909)

   [Editor's Note: During the Sixtieth Congress, Senate Democrats 
remained in the minority by a margin of 31 to 61. The number of standing 
and select committees of the Senate had reached sixty-six, including a 
number of committees that had no legislative business but existed solely 
to provide their chairmen with a committee room and a clerk. Nine 
chairmanships of these sinecure committees were reserved for senior 
members of the minority party.]
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 3, 1907]

DECEMBER 3, 1907

                                  Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate,

                                                        December 3, 1907

 Upon motion of Mr. Newlands, Mr. Money was made Temporary Chairman, and 
Mr. Owen Temporary Secretary.
 Mr. Culberson was by Mr. Stone nominated for Chairman of the 
Conference, and upon motion of Mr. Whyte unanimously elected.
 Mr. McCreary was by Mr. Clarke nominated for Vice-Chairman, and upon 
motion unanimously elected.
Mr. Owen was by Mr. Clay nominated for Secretary, and upon motion of Mr. 
McLaurin, seconded by Mr. Bailey, unanimously elected.
Mr. Culberson invited the co-operation of the members of the Conference 
in united and aggressive action.
The vote of Mr. Bankhead, who was absent, was by request recorded for 
Mr. Culberson as Chairman.
Mr. Whyte suggested that in old times a Committee on Committees was 
appointed, and requested information as to the method of procedure. The 
Chairman replied that the custom was for the Chairman of the Conference 
to appoint a Steering Committee to assign members to Committees. After 
discussion, in which Mr. Bailey suggested that the Conference should 
select the Committee on Committees, it was decided that the Chairman 
should name the Committee, the motion to this effect, passing by the 
affirmative vote of all present, except Mr. Bailey, who requested that 
he be recorded as voting against it.
Mr. Tillman emphasized the importance of organization; suggested that 
the Chairman of the Conference should be the leader of the Steering 
Committee; and that Co-operation was needed.
Upon suggestion that rules should be prepared for the future procedure 
of the Conference. Upon motion of Mr. Clarke the Chairman was authorized 
to appoint a Committee of three to prepare such rules.
The Chairman announced that the Steering Committee to be named would be 
for the Sixtieth Congress.
The Conference thereupon adjourned.

                                                                Chairman
                                                 [signed] Robert L. Owen

                                                               Secretary

 On December 9, 1907, in conformity to resolutions adopted at the 
Conference meeting of December 3, '07, the Chairman announced the 
appointment of the following Committees:

  Committee on Committees: Messrs. Money, Stone, Bacon, Simmons, Martin, 
  Newlands, Tillman, Clarke, Culberson.
  Committee on Preparation of Rules of Procedure for Minority 
  Conference: Messrs. Clarke, Daniel, Taliaferro.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 16, 1907]

DECEMBER 16, 1907

                                  Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                      December 16, 1907.

 Conference convened, with the following Senators present and answering 
the roll call:

  Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, Culberson, Foster, Frazier, Johnston, McCreary, 
  Martin, Money, Newlands, Overman, Paynter, Simmons, Stone, Taylor, 
  Teller, Tillman, Gore, and Owen.

 The Committee on Committees submitted the following Report:

        Agriculture and Forestry

Hernando D. Money of Mississippi
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina
John H. Bankhead of Alabama

              Appropriations

Henry M. Teller of Colorado
Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
John W. Daniel of Virginia
Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana

   Audit and Control of the Contingent 
         Expenses of the Senate

Hernando D. Money of Mississippi
James P. Clarke of Arkansas

            Canadian Relations

Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
William P. Whyte of Maryland
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

                  Census

Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
James P. Taliaferro of Florida
Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina

      Civil Service and Retrenchment

Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
James P. Clarke of Arkansas
Isidor Rayner of Maryland
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

                  Claims

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina
James B. Frazier of Tennessee
Jeff Davis of Arkansas
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky

         Coast and Insular Survey

Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
Charles A. Culberson of Texas
Jeff Davis of Arkansas
John H. Bankhead of Alabama

              Coast Defenses

Charles A. Culberson of Texas
James P. Taliaferro of Florida
Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana

                 Commerce

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
Stephen R. Mallory of Florida
William J. Stone of Missouri
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
James P. Clarke of Arkansas

 Corporations Organized in the District 
               of Columbia

Stephen R. Mallory of Florida, Chairman
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina

             Cuban Relations

James P. Taliaferro of Florida
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
William J. Stone of Missouri

           District of Columbia

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
William P. Whyte of Maryland
Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama

           Education and Labor

John W. Daniel of Virginia
Isidor Rayner of Maryland
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky
John H. Bankhead of Alabama

             Engrossed Bills

Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia, Chairman

              Enrolled Bills

Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana

   Examine the Several Branches of the 
              Civil Service

Charles A. Culberson of Texas
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
James B. McCreary of Kentucky

                 Finance

John W. Daniel of Virginia
Henry M. Teller of Colorado
Hernando D. Money of Mississippi
Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
James P. Taliaferro of Florida

                Fisheries

Stephen R. Mallory of Florida
Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina

            Foreign Relations

Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia
Hernando D. Money of Mississippi
James B. McCreary of Kentucky
James B. Frazier of Tennessee
William P. Whyte of Maryland

 Forest Reservations and the Protection 
                 of Game

Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee

            Geological Survey

Hernando D. Money of Mississippi
Isidor Rayner of Maryland
Henry M. Teller of Colorado

               Immigration

Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina
Jeff Davis of Arkansas
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

              Indian Affairs

William J. Stone of Missouri
Jeff Davis of Arkansas
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

           Indian Depredations

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
Jeff Davis of Arkansas
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

           Interoceanic Canals

James P. Taliaferro of Florida
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
Charles A. Culberson of Texas
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama

           Interstate Commerce

Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana
Francis J. Newlands of Nevada
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee

                Irrigation

Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
Francis J. Newlands of Nevada
William P. Whyte of Maryland
Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

                Judiciary

Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia
Charles A. Culberson of Texas
James P. Clarke of Arkansas
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina
Isidor Rayner of Maryland

                 Library

John W. Daniel of Virginia
Francis G. Newlands of Nevada

               Manufactures

Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina
James B. Frazier of Tennessee

             Military Affairs

James P. Taliaferro of Florida
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina
James B. Frazier of Tennessee
James B. McCreary of Kentucky

             Mines and Mining

Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
Henry M. Teller of Colorado
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

  Mississippi River and its Tributaries

Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

              Naval Affairs

Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina
Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
Stephen B. Mallory of Florida

 Organization, Conduct and Expenditures 
      of the Executive Departments

Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
William J. Stone of Missouri
James B. Frazier of Tennessee
Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia

      Pacific Islands and Porto Rico

Stephen R. Mallory of Florida
Isidor Rayner of Maryland
James P. Clarke of Arkansas
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

            Pacific Railroads

James P. Taliaferro of Florida
James B. McCreary of Kentucky
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

                 Patents

Stephen R. Mallory of Florida
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina

                 Pensions

James P. Taliaferro of Florida
Henry M. Teller of Colorado
James P. McCreary of Kentucky
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

               Philippines

Charles A. Culberson of Texas
William J. Stone of Missouri
Henry M. Teller of Colorado
Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama

       Post Offices and Post Roads

Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
James P. Taliaferro of Florida
F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
John H. Bankhead of Alabama
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

                 Printing

William P. Whyte of Maryland

           Private Land Claims

Henry M. Teller of Colorado, Chairman
Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana

         Privileges and Elections

Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
James B. Frazier of Tennessee
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky
John H. Bankhead of Alabama
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

       Public Buildings and Grounds

Charles A. Culberson of Texas
Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
William J. Stone of Missouri
Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina

  Public Health and National Quarantine

John W. Daniel of Virginia, Chairman
Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
Stephen R. Mallory of Florida
Charles A. Culberson of Texas

               Public Lands

Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
Anselm J. McLaurin of Mississippi
Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
Jeff Davis of Arkansas
John H. Bankhead of Alabama
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

                Railroads

Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia
Hernando Money of Mississippi
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee
John H. Bankhead of Alabama

           Revision of the Laws

John W. Daniel of Virginia
Stephen R. Mallory of Florida
Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky

           Revolutionary Claims

James P. Taliaferro of Florida, Chairman
James B. Frazier of Tennessee

                  Rules

Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia
Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
William P. Whyte of Maryland

               Territories

James P. Clarke of Arkansas
Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
James B. Frazier of Tennessee
Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma

  Transportation Routes to the Seaboard

John W. Daniel of Virginia
Isidor Rayner of Maryland
John H. Bankhead of Alabama
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

     University of the United States

Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee

    Additional Accommodations for the 
           Library of Congress

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia, Chairman
William J. Stone of Missouri

  Disposition of Useless Papers in the 
          Executive Departments

Hernando D. Money of Mississippi, 
  Chairman
James B. Taylor of Tennessee

 Expenditures in the Treasury Department

William P. Whyte of Maryland
James P. Clarke of Arkansas

     Five Civilized Tribes of Indians

Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina, 
  Chairman
Henry M. Teller of Colorado

          Industrial Expositions

John W. Daniel of Virginia
James B. McCreary of Kentucky
Isidor Rayner of Maryland
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina
Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee
John H. Bankhead of Alabama

    Investigate the Condition of the 
    Potomac River Front at Washington

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia
William P. Whyte of Maryland

 Investigate Trespassers on Indian Lands

Thomas H. Paynter of Kentucky

              National Banks

Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama

     Standards, Weights and Measures

James B. McCreary of Kentucky
Augustus O. Bacon of Georgia

     Transportation and Sale of Meat 
                Products

Samuel D. McEnery of Louisiana, Chairman
William J. Stone of Missouri

    Expenditures in the War Department

Hernando D. Money of Mississippi
Murphy J. Foster of Louisiana

              Woman Suffrage

Alexander S. Clay of Georgia, Chairman
Joseph F. Johnston of Alabama

    Expenditures in the Department of 
                 Justice

Joseph W. Bailey of Texas
Isidor Rayner of Maryland

   Expenditures in the Navy Department

Thomas S. Martin of Virginia
Benjamin R. Tillman of South Carolina

 Expenditures in the Interior Department

James B. McCreary of Kentucky
Jeff Davis of Arkansas

    Expenditures in the Department of 
               Agriculture

F.M. Simmons of North Carolina
Thomas P. Gore of Oklahoma

Upon motion of Mr. Teller, the report of the Committee was adopted by 
the Conference. The assignments of Mr. Bankhead left vacant, a special 
report to be submitted when he is sworn in, the Chairman stating that he 
would nominate Mr. Bankhead to the vacancies then.

 On motion of Mr. Bailey, the Chairman was authorized to fill the four 
vacancies on the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which was 
done, the members of the Committee for 1908 being:

   Messrs:
  James P. Taliaferro of Florida
  William J. Stone of Missouri
  Alexander S. Clay of Georgia
  Francis G. Newlands of Nevada
  Robert L. Owen of Oklahoma
  Robert L. Taylor of Tennessee
  Asbury C. Latimer of South Carolina
  C.A. Culberson of Texas
  Thomas S. Martin of Virginia

 Mr. Johnston suggested that a resolution, defining the duty of 
Democratic Senators as to legislation on the financial situation, and 
declaring that they would acquiesce in and not obstruct any just 
remedial legislation proposed should be adopted.
Mr. Newlands moved that the Steering Committee be authorized to receive 
suggestions as to such legislation and to call meetings of the 
Conference to consider them, but accepted an amendment to the effect 
that the Committee on Rules be substituted.
The Chairman read a proposed resolution, directing the Committee on 
Finance to forthwith investigate the financial situation, and make early 
report, with recommendations as to relief, suggesting that the 
Democratic members of the Finance Committee should take the initiative 
in developing the facts and formulating a proper plan for Democratic 
action.
Messrs. Money and Teller suggested that they did not feel that they 
could be bound to the Conference on questions relating to finance.
 With Mr. Newlands' motion pending, the Conference adjourned.

                                                                Chairman
                                                 [signed] Robert L. Owen

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 25, 1908]

JANUARY 25, 1908

                                   Minority Conference Room, U.S. Senate

                                                       January 25, 1908.

 Conference convened at 10:30 a.m., with the following Senators present:

  Messrs. Bailey, Bankhead, Bryan, Clarke, Clay, Culberson, Daniel, 
  Davis, Frazier, Gore, Johns[t]on, Latimer, McCreary, McLaurin, 
  Newlands, Overman, Owen, Paynter, Rayner, Simmons, Stone, Taliaferro, 
  Taylor, Teller, Tillman and Whyte.

The minutes were read to date. Mr. Bailey suggested that he would prefer 
to have his reasons for voting to have the Conference name its own 
Committee on Committees inserted in the minutes, which was agreed to, 
and the minutes are to be corrected in this respect.
 The Chairman read a letter from the Oklahoma Delegation, expressing its 
thanks at the selection of Mr. Owen as Secretary of the Conference. Upon 
motion of Senator Daniel, it was ordered that the letter be spread upon 
the minutes, and it reads as follows:
                             Dec. 5th, 1907

    Senator Chas. A. Culberson
    Washington, D.C.

    My dear Sir:

       I beg to hand you a copy of resolutions unanimously 
    adopted by the Oklahoma Democratic delegation. We are all 
    duly sensible of the high honor conferred upon our State 
    by the selection of my distinguished and deserving 
    colleague as Secretary of the Democratic Caucus. You will 
    kindly convey expressions of our gratitude and 
    gratification to the Democratic minority in caucus 
    assembled.

                                      Believe me,
                                       Very truly
                                      [Signed] T.P. Gore
                                Resolution

   RESOLVED, by the Democratic delegation of the State of 
  Oklahoma in caucus assembled, that we heartily endorse the 
  selection of Senator Robert L. Owen, as Secretary of the 
  Democratic Senate Caucus, not only as a fitting recognition 
  of his high character and intrinsic worth, but as a 
  significant and gracious compliment to the State of 
  Oklahoma, the youngest daughter of the Republic.

                                       [signed] T.P. Gore, Chairman
                                       J.S. Davenport, Secy.

 An extended discussion of the financial question, participated in by 
various members, ensued, lasting until recess at 1 o'clock.
 The Conference reconvened at 2 p.m., and discussion continued until 
4:30. The sense of the Conference appeared to be that the question 
should be discussed as thoroughly as possible, with a view to as great a 
degree of co-operation as possible among the members. It was further 
suggested that the members of the Minority on the Finance Committee 
should prepare a measure, and that suggestions should be made by the 
various members of the Minority in regard to the subject, with a view of 
securing such coherence of action as was possible, but no definite 
action was taken in regard to the matter.
The discussion was participated in by Senators McLaurin, Owen, Bailey, 
Culberson, Newlands, Clarke, Teller, Taylor, Daniel, and others.
 There being no further business, the meeting adjourned.

                                                                Chairman
  Secretary


__________________________________________

                                          Conference Room, April 15, 08.

 Senator J. H. Bankhead of Alabama was selected as a member of the 
Congressional Campaign Committee, vice Senator A.[C.] Latimer, deceased.
                    Sixty-first Congress (1909-1911)

  [Editor's Note: After the election of 1908, Senate Democrats remained 
in the minority with 32 Democrats to 60 Republicans. President William 
Howard Taft called the Senate into special session, from March 4 to 6, 
to confirm his cabinet nominees. Taft called both houses of Congress 
back into session, from March 15 to August 5, 1909, to enact new tariff 
legislation. Although the president and reformers in both parties aimed 
to lower tariff rates, the resulting Payne-Aldrich Tariff considerably 
raised tariff duties.]
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 5, 1909]

MARCH 5, 1909

                                           Conference Room, U.S. Senate,

                                                          March 5, 1909.

 Conference met at 10 a.m. The following Senators were present. Messrs: 
Bankhead, Chamberlain, Clarke, Clay, Culberson, Frazier, Gore, Hughes, 
Johnston, McLaurin, Money, Newlands, Overman, Owen, Shively, Simmons, 
Smith (Md.), Smith (S.C.), Stone and Tillman. Absent: Messrs. Bacon, 
Bailey, Daniel, Davis, Fletcher, Foster, McEnery, Martin, Paynter, 
Rayner, Taliaferro and Taylor.
Upon the convening of the Conference, the Chairman stated that the usual 
practice had been that no Senator was taken off a Committee without his 
consent, and that seniority governed in nominating for Committee 
vacancies, except that when such senior Senator was already upon an 
important committee or committees, this seniority privilege of 
nomination was not necessarily accorded, unless the senior Senator 
desiring the nomination agreed as a condition to such nomination to 
vacate a committee place already held by him. This suggestion of the 
Chairman was not questioned.
Upon the nomination of Senator Stone, Senator Culberson was unanimously 
elected Chairman of the Conference for the 61st PCongress.
Upon nomination of Senator Clarke, Senator Money was unanimously elected 
Vice-Chairman of the Conference for the 61st PCongress.
Upon nomination of Senator Frazier, Senator Owen was unanimously elected 
Secretary of the Conference for the 61st Congress.
Upon motion of Senator Clarke the Chairman was authorized to Pappoint a 
Committee on Committees of nine members, including Pthe Chairman of the 
Conference as ex-officio Chairman of the PCommittee.
Senator Clarke reported reasons why the Committee to formulate rules for 
the government of the Conference had not prepared such rules, and moved 
that the Chairman appoint a new Committee of three for this purpose, 
which was adopted.
Thereupon, the Chairman announced the appointment on this Committee of 
Senators: Clarke, Daniel, Taliaferro.
The Chairman announced the appointment of the following Senators on the 
Committee on Committees: Money, Bacon, Martin, Tillman, Stone, Simmons, 
Newlands, Clarke, Culberson (Ex-officio Chairman).
Upon motion, Conference adjourned, subject to call of Chairman.

                                                                Chairman
  Secretary
                               [typescript]

          Meeting of the Democratic Conference, March 5th, 1909. 10 a.m.

                                                         Quorum present.

 Chairman Culberson called the meeting to order and made a short 
explanation of the purpose of the Conference, explaining the necessity 
for the reorganization of the Conference and the establishment of a 
Committee on Committees, and he stated that the usual practice of the 
Democratic Conference in the past was that no Senator was ever taken off 
a Committee without his consent, and that when vacancies occurred, the 
rule of seniority prevails in regard to application for preferment to 
such vacancies with the exception, that where a Senator is elected to 
act on a Committee, he may be required to relinquish something, before 
being advanced to the more important vacancy.
Upon motion of Senator Stone, Senator Culberson was re-elected 
unanimously as Chairman of the Conference for the Sixty-first Congress.
Senator Money, on the nomination of Senator Clarke, was unanimously 
elected Vice-Chairman of the Democratic Conference. Senator Owen, on the 
nomination of Senator Frazier, was unanimously re-elected Secretary of 
the Conference.
Senator Clarke moved the Chairman appoint a Committee of nine, as a 
Steering Committee, of which the Chairman of the Conference should be ex 
officio Chairman. Senator Clarke named Senators Money, Bacon, Martin, 
Tillman, Stone, Simmons, Newlands, and Clarke as members of the 
Committee on Committees or Steering Committee.
Senator Clarke reported for the Committee on Rules, that his Committee, 
consisting of Senators Daniel and Taliaferro had not had opportunity to 
prepare rules, and that he moved a new Committee of three be appointed 
to draw up permanent rules of procedure. Chairman Culberson appointed 
Senators Clarke, Daniel, and Taliaferro to perform this duty.
 General discussion ensued, with regard to the policy of the Minority, 
in which Senators Tillman, Money, Newlands, Clay, Simmons, Clarke and 
others participated.
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 22, 1909]

MARCH 22, 1909

                                           Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                         March 22, 1909.

 The Conference was called to order by the Chairman at 10:20 a.m. In the 
absence of Senator Owen, Senator Martin acted as Secretary. The 
following Senators were present: Messrs. Bankhead, Chamberlain, Clay, 
Culberson, Fletcher, Frazier, Gore, Hughes, Johnston, Martin, Money, 
Newlands, Paynter, Rayner, Shively, Simmons, Smith of Maryland, Stone 
and Taylor. Senator Foster, though detained, was by request counted as 
present.

 The Committee on Committees submitted the following report of Senators 
selected for the several committees:

  On Additional Accommodations for the 
           Library of Congress

 Money (Chairman)
Stone

        Agriculture and Forestry

Money
Bankhead
Gore
Chamberlain
Smith (S.C.)

             Appropriations

Tillman
Daniel
Clay
Foster
Culberson

Audit and Control Contingent Expenses of 
               the Senate

Money
Clarke of Ark.

           Canadian Relations

Tillman
Foster
Gore
Smith (Md.)

                 Census

McEnery
Taliaferro
Bailey
Shively

     Civil Service and Retrenchment

McLaurin
Clarke of Ark.
Rayner
Owen

                 Claims

Martin
Overman
Frazier
Davis
Paynter

        Coast and Insular Survey

Clay
Culberson
Davis
Bankhead

             Coast Defenses

Taliaferro
Clay
Simmons
Foster
Smith (Md.)

                Commerce

Martin
Stone
Simmons
McLaurin
Clarke (Ark.)
Newlands

   Conservation of National Resources

Newlands
Overman
Davis
Bankhead
Smith (S.C.)

 Corporations Organized in the District 
               of Columbia

Taliaferro (Chairman)
Shively

             Cuban Relations

 Taliaferro
Simmons
Newlands
Stone

  Disposition of Useless Papers in the 
          Executive Departments

 Simmons (Chairman)
Frazier

           District of Columbia

 Martin
Paynter
Johnston (Ala.)
Smith (Md.)
Fletcher

           Education and Labor

 Daniel
 Rayner
Bankhead
Shively

             Engrossed Bills

 Bacon (Chairman)

             Enrolled Bills

 Foster

 To Examine the Several Branches of the 
              Civil Service

 Culberson
Simmons
Smith (S.C.)

     Expenditures in Department of 
               Agriculture

 Simmons
Gore

 Expenditures in the Interior Department

 Davis
Chamberlain

   Expenditures in the Department of 
                 Justice

 Bailey
Rayner

   Expenditures in the Navy Department

 Martin
Tillman

    Expenditures in the Post Office 
               Department

 Bacon
 Frazier

 Expenditures in the Department of State

 McLaurin
 Stone

 Expenditures in the Treasury Department

 Clarke (Ark.)
Smith (Md.)

   Expenditures in the War Department

 Money
 Foster

                 Finance

 Daniel
Money
Taliaferro
Simmons

                Fisheries

 McEnery
Bailey
Overman
 Fletcher

  The Five Civilized Tribes of Indians

 Tillman (Chairman)
Fletcher

            Foreign Relations

 Bacon
Money
Frazier
Stone
Shively

 Forest Reservations and the Protection 
                 of Game

 Tillman
Overman
Taylor

            Geological Survey

 Money
Rayner
Smith (S.C.)

               Immigration

 McLaurin
Davis
Gore
Hughes
Smith (S.C.)

             Indian Affairs

 Stone
 Davis
Paynter
Owen
Bankhead
Hughes

           Indian Depredations

 Martin
 McLaurin
 Davis
 Johnston
 Owen

         Industrial Expositions

 Daniel
 Rayner
 Overman
 Taylor
 Bankhead
 Paynter

           Interoceanic Canals

 Taliaferro
 Simmons
 Johnston (Ala)
Smith (Md.)
Hughes

           Interstate Commerce

 Tillman
McLaurin
Foster
Newlands
Taylor

 To Investigate Trespassers upon Indian 
                  Lands

 Paynter

Irrigation and Reclamation of Arid Lands

 Bailey
Newlands
Gore
Smith (Md.)
Chamberlain

 Joint Committee on the Revision of the 
        Laws of the United States

 McLaurin
Clarke (Ark.)

                Judiciary

 Bacon
Culberson
Clarke (Ark.)
Overman
Rayner
Paynter

               The Library

 Daniel
 Newlands
 Shively

              Manufactures

 Clay
 Frazier
Smith (S.C.)

            Military Affairs

 Taliaferro
 Foster
 Overman
 Frazier
 Johnston (Ala.)

            Mines and Mining

 Tillman
 Johnston (Ala.)
 Gore
 Hughes

     The Mississippi River and its 
               Tributaries

 McEnery
 McLaurin
 Owen

              Naval Affairs

 Tillman
 Martin
 McEnery
 Smith (Md.)

     Pacific Islands and Porto Rico

 Rayner
 Clarke (Ark.)
 Owen
 Fletcher

            Pacific Railroads

 Taliaferro
 Gore
 Chamberlain
 Shively

                 Patents

 Foster
 Shively
 Smith (S.C.)

                Pensions

Taliaferro
 Taylor
Gore
Hughes
Shively

             The Philippines

 Johnston (Ala.)
Paynter
Chamberlain
Fletcher
Hughes

       Post-Offices and Post-Roads

 Clay
 Taliaferro
 Owen
 Bankhead
 Taylor

                Printing

 Smith (Md.)
 Chamberlain
 Fletcher

           Private Land Claims

Daniel (Chairman)
McEnery
Davis

        Privileges and Elections

Bailey
Frazier
Paynter
Johnston (Ala.)
Fletcher

      Public Buildings and Grounds

Culberson
Clay
Stone
Overman
Taylor
Gore

           Public Expenditures

McLaurin
Newlands
Owen
Fletcher
Hughes

  Public Health and National Quarantine

Martin (Chairman)
McEnery
Culberson
Fletcher

              Public Lands

McEnery
Newlands
Davis
Owen
Bankhead
Chamberlain

                Railroads

Bacon
Money
Taylor
Bankhead

          Revolutionary Claims

Bailey (Chairman)

                  Rules

Bacon
Bailey
Clarke (Ark.)

     Standards, Weights and Measures

Bacon
Hughes

               Territories

Clarke (Ark.)
Frazier
Owen
Hughes

  Transportation Routes to the Seaboard

Daniel
Rayner
Gore
Bankhead


     Transportation and Sale of Meat 
                Products

McEnery (Chairman)
Stone

   The University of the United States

Clay
Foster
Overman
Taylor

             Woman Suffrage

Clay (Chairman)
Johnston (Ala.)

 The recommendations of the Committee on Committees were agreed to.
Thereupon the Conference adjourned.
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 14, 1909]

APRIL 14, 1909

                                           Conference Room, U.S. Senate,

                                                         April 14, 1909.

Conference met at 2 p.m. The following Senators were present: Messrs. 
Bacon, Bailey, Chamberlain, Clay, Culberson, Daniel, Fletcher, Foster, 
Frazier, Gore, Hughes, Johnston, McEnery, McLaurin, Martin, Money, 
Overman, Owen, Rayner, Shively, Simmons, Smith of Md., Smith of S.C., 
Stone, Taliaferro, Taylor. Senator Davis was announced absent because of 
the death of his wife.
Chairman Culberson explained that the Conference was called to consider 
the will of the Conference on the Tariff Bill.
Senator Daniel urged a tax on the gross income of corporations. Senator 
Money advocated putting the entire responsibility on the Republicans, 
because the Minority were denied all rights in Committee, not being 
consulted on this Tariff Bill, or permitted to protest.
General discussion followed and an agreement favorable to the Income Tax 
seemed to prevail. Senator Culberson suggested a graduated income tax, 
and to gradually reduce the protected articles.
Senators Bailey, Taliaferro, Daniel, Culberson, Bacon, Johnston, 
McLaurin, Chamberlain, Simmons, Foster, Smith and others participated in 
the discussion.

Senator Bacon submitted the following motion:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that an 
  income tax provision should be engrafted upon the Tariff 
  Bill now pending in the Senate for the purpose of supplying 
  revenue for the support of the Government, and that the 
  Tariff Schedules in the said pending bill should be reduced 
  in proportion to the revenue to be derived from said income 
  tax, and that in said reductions, so far as practicable, the 
  burden of taxation should be removed from the necessities of 
  life.

Senator Culberson was authorized to explain to the Press so far as he 
thought judicious the action of the Conference.
Upon motion of Senator Johnston, adjournment was had.

                                                                Chairman
  Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 16, 1909]

APRIL 16, 1909

                                           Conference Room, U.S. Senate.

                                                         April 16, 1909.

 Conference met, pursuant to call at 2 p.m. The following Senators were 
present:

  Messrs. Bankhead, Chamberlain, Clay, Culberson, Daniel, Fletcher, 
  Foster, Frazier, Gore, Hughes, Johnston, McLaurin, Money, Newlands, 
  Overman, Owen, Paynter, Shively, Simmons, Smith (Md.), Stone and 
  Taylor.

Mr. Daniel suggested dividing the work and giving each member a special 
subject. Mr. Simmons suggested being ready to proceed with the debate 
and to have a record made of those ready to take the floor. Senators 
Daniel, Stone and Money expressed themselves ready to speak.
 Mr. Culberson explained to the Conference that he had asked no favors 
of Senator Aldrich 4 in the way of delays.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \4\ Nelson W. Aldrich (Republican of Rhode Island), chaired the Senate 
Finance Committee and was the principal Senate sponsor of the Payne-
Aldrich Tariff.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 The Income Tax was discussed. Reference was made to Senator George's 
5 Report of 1892-93, when Chairman of the Committee on 
Agriculture, and the decisions of the Supreme Court in Knowlton v. 
Moore, 178 U.S. 52, and Pollock v. Farmers Loan and Trust Co., 157 U.S. 
601, and the fact that in the Pollock Case, Sections 27-37 of the Act of 
1894 had been held void. Senator Bankhead suggested that the decision be 
printed as a public document. Senator Rayner explained that the Court's 
decision recognized as valid taxes on offices, privileges, employments 
and vocation, but as to income on real estate and personal property the 
Court held that it was a direct tax, and was not apportioned as 
required.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \5\ James Z. George (Democrat of Mississippi), 1881-1897.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Senator Daniel urged the taxing of franchises and corporations. Senator 
Gore suggested the income tax passed during the War by the Republicans, 
and sustained by the Supreme Court, as having tactical advantage. 
Senator Clay moved the appointment of a Committee of three to 
investigate the New York Tax Law on future contracts and report to the 
Conference. The motion was carried.
 The Chairman appointed upon the Committee Messrs. Clay, Paynter, and 
Hughes.
Senator Paynter suggested a rebate of 6 cents a pound on twisted loose-
leaf tobacco, so far as the farmers' personal sales were concerned (the 
item has passed the House three times). Senator Newlands suggested a 
special conference on the Philippines. Adjourned.
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 6, 1909]

DECEMBER 6, 1909

                                           Conference Room, U.S. Senate,

                                                       December 6, 1909.

 Conference called to order at 2 p.m. by Hon. H. D. Money, Vice 
Chairman. On motion of Senator Clay, Senator Shively was elected 
Temporary Secretary.
A communication from Senator Culberson to Senator Money, expressing his 
desire and proposal to retire from the Chairmanship of the Caucus, on 
account of the condition of his health, was made. After remarks by 
Senators, the Conference decided to postpone consideration.
Upon motion the Conference decided to proceed to election of Assistant 
Sergeant at Arms.
Senator Tillman nominated Mr. Thomas W. Keller, Senator Davis seconding 
the nomination.
Senator Bailey nominated C.W. Jurney.
Senator Overman nominated Mr. T. J. Peirce.
On the first ballot the vote was: For Mr. Keller 14, for Mr. Jurney 4, 
for Mr. Peirce 7; and Mr. Keller was accordingly declared elected.
 On motion of Senator Tillman, the Caucus adjourned, subject to call of 
the Chairman. Adjourned.
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 9, 1909]

DECEMBER 9, 1909

                                            Conference Room, U.S. Senate

Meeting of Democratic Conference on Thursday, December 9th at 10 o'clock 
a.m.

Senator Money directed roll call, which was as follows:

  Present: Bacon, Bankhead, Chamberlain, Clarke, Clay, Daniel, Davis, 
  Fletcher, Foster, Frazier, Hughes, Johnston, Money, Newlands, Overman, 
  Owen, Paynter, Rayner, Shively, Simmons, Smith of S.C., Stone, 
  Taliaferro, Taylor, Thompson of N.D., Tillman. Absent: Bailey, 
  Culberson, Gore, McEnery, McLaurin, Martin, Smith of Md.

Senator Stone moved that Chas. A. Culberson's resignation be adopted and 
his letter spread on minutes.
Motion carried nem con.

The letter follows:
                           Atlantic City, N.J.
                              Dec. 5 1909.

   To the Democratic Caucus:

    I hereby tender my resignation as Chairman of our Caucus 
  to take effect at once.
    Enclosed is a copy of my letter to Senator Money giving 
  my reasons for this course which I ask may be spread on 
  the minutes of the proceedings. With renewed assurances of 
  my profound appreciation of the honor done me by election 
  to this high party station,

                                       Very truly yours,
                                       [Signed] C.A. Culberson
                   Atlantic City, N.J., Dec. 3, 1909.

   Hon. H.D. Money
  Vice Chairman, Democratic Caucus
  Washington, D.C.

  Dear Senator:

     As you and all my Democratic associates know, I have 
  not been at all well for nearly a year. Last March I had a 
  severe attack of the grippe. Without taking the necessary 
  rest from such an attack, I remained in Washington in 
  attendance upon the Senate throughout the recent extra 
  session. The result was that I continued all during all 
  the session, and at its close, I was much reduced in 
  strength and vitality. From this I have not recovered in 
  the comparatively short vacation which I have been able to 
  take.
    The approaching session of the Congress promises to be a 
  long, exacting and arduous one, and, in my present 
  condition, I do not feel that I should undertake the extra 
  duties which will devolve upon the Chairman of our Caucus. 
  It would probably retard or prevent my early and full 
  restoration to health.
    While I am deeply sensible to the high honor done me by 
  my colleagues in my unanimous election to this 
  chairmanship for the last two Congresses, especially as it 
  came wholly without my seeking, and while under different 
  circumstances, I would, of course, fulfill as best I might 
  the requirements of the position, yet for the reasons 
  stated, I am compelled to ask to be relieved of its 
  duties. Accordingly at the first Conference to be held by 
  the Minority in the coming session, I will submit my 
  resignation as chairman.
    It remains only for me to repeat that the esteem and 
  confidence and partiality of my party associates in the 
  Senate are ever more keenly appreciated than I can 
  express, and that I will ever bear them in grateful 
  recollection.

                                      Your friend,
                                      [signed] C.A. Culberson

 Senator Daniel moved that the Secretary advise Senator Culberson of the 
profound appreciation of the Conference of his uniform courtesy, 
fairness and fidelity.
Motion unanimously carried.
                            Washington, D.C.
                             Dec. 10th 1909.

   Hon. Charles A. Culberson
  Washington, D.C.

  My very dear friend:

     On behalf of the Democratic Conference of the United 
  States Senate over which you have so kindly and graciously 
  presided, I am instructed by a formal resolution of the 
  Conference to express to you the profound appreciation of 
  your Democratic Colleagues for the faithful, able, 
  impartial and very honorable manner in which you have 
  discharged the duties of the trust reposed in you by them.
    Nothing but an earnest desire to promote the restoration 
  of your health would have induced your associates to 
  accept your resignation.
    Had you been able to overhear the sentiments expressed 
  at the Conference when your determination to withdraw was 
  discussed you would more fully realize the very cordial 
  admiration and affection felt for you by all of your 
  colleagues on whose behalf and in whose name I am directed 
  to thank you for the fidelity and distinguished ability 
  with which you have so satisfactorily served them as 
  chairman.

                                      Faithfully your friend,
                                      [Signed] Robert L. Owen
                                      Secretary of the
                                      Conference of Democratic Senators

 Senator Daniel moved Senator Money be elected Chairman of the 
Conference for this Congress. He was elected by acclamation.
Senator Money made an address to the Conference, pledging his best 
efforts to preserve concord, promote unity and serve the PCountry.
Senator Newlands nominated for Vice-Chairman by Senator Chamberlain. 
Senator Stone suggested Senator Shively on account of the importance of 
Indiana.
Senator Newlands withdrew his name and Senator Shively was elected nem 
con.
Senator Tillman nominated Captain R. S. Anderson as door-keeper. 
Carried.
 Adjourned.


__________________________________________

                                                        Washington, D.C.
                                                          Dec. 16, 1909.

 Committee service.
Mr. Money asked to be excused from Committee on Additional 
Accommodations for the Library of Congress, also Committee on Railroads.
Mr. Paynter ask[ed] to be excused from further service on Committee on 
Indian Affairs.
Mr. Rayner ask[ed] to be excused from further service on Committee on 
Pacific Islands and Porto Rico.
Mr. Stone ask[ed] to be excused from further service on Committee on 
Transportation and Sale of Meat Products.
Mr. Davis ask[ed] to be excused from further service on Committee on 
Conservation of Natural Resources.
On motion Mr. Money.
Mr. McLaurin was excused from further service on Committee on the 
Mississippi River and its Tributaries.
On motion Mr. Money.
Mr. Bankhead was excused from further service as a member of Committee 
[on] Industrial Expositions.
 Mr. Newlands at his own request was excused from further service as a 
member of the Committee on Cuban Relations.
Mr. Culberson, of Tex., appointed to fill the chairmanship of the 
Committee on Additional Accommodations for the Library of Congress.
Mr. Thompson--North Dakota, appointed on the following vacancies of 
committees:

  The Mississippi River and its Tributaries
  Conservation of Natural Resources
  Industrial Expositions
  Railroads
  Transportation and Sale of Meat Products
  Cuban Relations
  Indian Affairs
  Pacific Islands & Porto Rico.


__________________________________________

                                                          Dec. 20, 1909.

Mr. Simmons appointed by the Vice President as part of the Senate Select 
Committee on Disposition of Useless Papers in the Executive Departments.


__________________________________________

                                        Washington, D.C., Jan. 19, 1910.

 Mr. Gordon of Miss. be assigned to following Committees:

  Civil Service & Retrenchment
  Expenditures in Department of State
  Immigration
  Indian Depredations
  Joint Committee on Revisions of the Laws of the United States.
  Public Expenditures

Mr. Bankhead of Ala. assigned to Committee on Commerce.
Mr. Hughes of Colo. be assigned to the following committee: Committee on 
Interstate Commerce.


__________________________________________

                                         Washington, D.C., Jan. 28, 1910

 Mr. Hughes of Colo. be appointed to fill a vacancy on the Committee on 
Public Lands.


__________________________________________

                                                          Feby. 2, 1910.

Mr. Purcell of N.D. to fill the following vacancies of each of the 
following committees:

  Conservation of National Resources
  Cuban Relations
  Indian Affairs
  Industrial Expositions
  Mississippi River and its Tributaries
  Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
  Railroads
  Transportation and Sale of Meat Products


__________________________________________

                                   Wash[ington], D.C., M[ar]ch 16, 1910.

 Mr. Percy of Miss. be assigned to the following committees:

  Expenditures in Department of State
  Immigration
  Indian Affairs
  Joint Committee on Revision of the Laws of the United States
  Public Expenditures


__________________________________________

                                        Washington, D.C., March 31, 1910

 Mr. Hughes of Colo. at his own request was excused as a member of the 
Committee on Interoceanic Canals.
Mr. Percy, of Miss., be assigned as a member on the Committee on 
Interoceanic Canals.


__________________________________________

                                         Washington, D.C., Dec. 8, 1910.

 Mr. Money submitted the following Resolution which was agreed to.
Resolved, That Mr. Terrell be appointed to fill the following vacancies 
on Committees:

  Coast and Insular Survey
  Coast Defenses
  Manufactures
  Post Office[s] & Post Roads
  University of the United States

That Mr. Swanson be appointed to fill the vacancy on each of the 
following Committees:

  Education and Labor
  Industrial Expositions
  Library
  Public Buildings and Grounds
  Transportation Routes to the Seaboard

That Mr. Martin be appointed to fill the vacancy on the Committee on 
Appropriations.
That Mr. Stone be appointed to fill the vacancy on the Committee on 
Finance.
That Mr. Overman be appointed to fill the vacancy on the Committee on 
Appropriations.


__________________________________________

                                                        Washington, D.C.
                                                          Dec. 12, 1910.

 By Mr. Money Resolved:
That Mr. Thornton of La. be appointed to fill the vacancies on each of 
the following Committees:

  The Census
  Fisheries
  Mississippi River and its Tributaries
  Naval Affairs
  Private Land Claims
  Public Health and National Quarantine
  Public Lands

 Mr. Money. Resolved that the following Senators to be respectively 
relieved from further service as a member and chairman of the following 
Committees:

  Mr. Bacon as chairman and member of the Committee on 
  Engrossed Bills.
  Mr. Bailey as chairman and member of the Committee on 
  Revolutionary Claims.
  Mr. Simmons as chairman and member of the Committee on 
  Disposition of Useless Papers in the Executive Departments.

Resolved further: That existing vacancies in the committees of the 
Senate be, and the same are hereby, filled by the appointment of the 
following named Senators to the respective vacancies as follows:

  Mr. Bacon as a member of the Committee on Private Land 
  Claims and to be chairman thereof.
  Mr. Bailey as a member of the Committee on Woman Suffrage 
  and to be chairman thereof.
  Mr. Simmons as a member of the Committee on Transportation 
  and Sale of Meat Products and to be chairman thereof.
  Mr. Overman as a member of the Committee on Revolutionary 
  Claims and to be chairman thereof.
  Mr. Clarke as a member of the Committee on Disposition of 
  Useless Papers in the Executive Departments and to be 
  chairman thereof.


__________________________________________

                                      Wash[ington], D.C., Feby. 3 [1911]

 Mr. Money Resolved: Mr. Watson be assigned to service as a member of 
the following Committees:

  Conservation of National Resources
  Cuban Relations
  Indian Affairs
  Mississippi River and its Tributaries
  Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
  Railroads
  Transportation and Sale of Meat Products

Mr. Clarke of Arkansas be assigned to service as a member of the 
Committee on Interstate Commerce.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 10, 1911]

FEBRUARY 10, 1911

                                        Washington, D.C., Feb. 10, 1911.

Democratic Conference

On roll call following members present:

  Mr. Bailey, Mr. Chamberlain, Mr. Clarke, Mr. Culberson, Mr. Foster, 
  Mr. Frazier, Mr. Gore, Mr. Martin, Mr. Money (Chairman), Mr. Newlands, 
  Mr. Overman, Mr. Owen (Secretary), Mr. Percy, Mr. Rayner, Mr. Shively, 
  Mr. Simmons, Mr. Smith of Md., Mr. Smith of S.C., Mr. Stone, Mr. 
  Swanson, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Thornton, Mr. Tillman and Mr. Watson.

Questions of policy on Reciprocity and Tariff Board discussed.
Speeches confined to 5 minutes on motion of Sen[ator] Newlands.
Sen[ator]s Newlands, Stone, Money, Bacon, Rayner, Bailey, and Stone 
spoke.
On motion of Sen[ator] Martin, Democratic members of Committee on Rules 
instructed to obtain a suitable committee room in the Senate Office 
Building.6 Adjourned to meet 10 a.m. Tuesday next.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \6\ The first Senate Office Building, now designated as the Richard B. 
Russell Building, was opened for occupancy in March 1909.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                               [signed] R.L. Owen, Sect.
                    Sixty-second Congress (1911-1913)

   [Editor's Note: The election of 1910 saw significant gains for 
Congressional Democrats, who took the majority of the House of 
Representatives, by a margin of 230 to 162, and narrowed the margin in 
the Senate to 44 to 52. However, the expanded Conference also showed 
signs of division between the newly elected progressives and the more 
conservative senior members. Three-time Democratic presidential 
candidate William Jennings Bryan came to the Capitol to oppose the 
election of the conservative Senator Thomas S. Martin of Virginia as 
Conference chairman. Bryan argued that Martin had voted far too often 
with the Republicans in favor of higher tariff rates set by the Payne-
Aldrich Tariff. However, Martin easily defeated his progressive 
challenger, Senator Benjamin Shively of Indiana, for chairman. Senator 
Augustus Bacon noted that this marked the first roll-call vote taken for 
chairman in sixteen years.1]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ Wythe W. Holt, Jr. ``The Senator from Virginia and the Democratic 
Floor Leadership: Thomas S. Martin and Conservatism in the Progressive 
Era,'' Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 83 (January 1975): 5-
7; Walter J. Oleszek, ``John Worth Kern: Portrait of a FloorLeader,'' in 
Richard A. Baker and Roger O. Davidson, eds., First Among Equals: 
Outstanding Senate Leaders of the Twentieth Century (Washington, D.C.: 
Congressional Quarterly, 1991), p. 15.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                         [April 7, 1911]

APRIL 7, 1911

                                           Conference Room, U.S. Senate,

                                                         April 7th, 1911

 A meeting of the Democratic members of the United States Senate was 
held in the Conference room of the Minority in the Capitol on Friday, 
April 7th, 1911, at 2:30 p.m.
Senator Shively, the Vice Chairman, not being present, the meeting was 
called to order by Senator Owen, and upon his suggestion a temporary 
chairman was selected.
Senator Culberson was elected temporary chairman by acclamation. The 
first business was the selection of a Chairman of the Conference 
Committee.
Nominations being in order, Senator Clarke nominated Senator Martin, and 
Senator Kern nominated Senator Shively.

The roll was called and the following senators voted for Senator Martin:

  Messrs. Bacon, Bailey, Bankhead, Bryan, Chilton, Clarke, Culberson, 
  Fletcher, Foster, Johnston, Overman, Paynter, Percy, Rayner, Simmons, 
  Smith of Maryland, Swanson, Taylor, Watson and Williams (21).

The following Senators voted for Senator Shively:

  Messrs. Chamberlain, Davis, Gore, Hitchcock, Johnson of Maine, Kern, 
  Lea, Martin, Myers, Newlands, O'Gorman, Owen, Pomerene, Reed, Smith of 
  South Carolina, and Stone (16).

Thereupon, Senator Martin was declared duly elected and took the chair 
and thereupon Senator Shively was unanimously reelected Vice-Chairman of 
the Caucus.
The next business in order was the election of a Secretary. Senator 
Owen, not desiring reelection and stating to the Caucus that he would 
decline if elected, Senator Chilton was, upon motion of Senator Bailey, 
unanimously elected Secretary.
Senator Clarke moved that the Committee on Committees shall consist of 
nine members of which the Chairman shall be one, and that the other 
eight of the said committee shall be appointed by the Chairman.

Senator Owen moved as a substitute for the motion of Senator Clarke the 
following:

   RESOLVED, That the Committee on Committees shall be 
  selected by vote of the Conference, at a stated meeting 
  called for that purpose, on the basis of three members from 
  the first fourteen senior Democrats; three members from the 
  second fourteen senior Democrats; and three members from the 
  third fourteen senior Democrats.
   Be it further RESOLVED, That we heartily approve of the 
  Democratic House program and pledge our earnest support 
  thereto.

 The original motion and resolution were discussed by Senators Owen, 
Williams, Stone, Bailey, Thornton, Newlands, Bankhead, Percy, Hitchcock, 
Johnston, Clarke, Culberson, Bacon, Kern, Fletcher and Gore.
Thereupon, Senator Owen withdrew his said substitute, and the original 
motion made by Senator Clarke was adopted unanimously.
Thereupon, Senator Newlands gave notice that at a subsequent meeting of 
the Caucus he would move the adoption of resolutions in writing which he 
presented to the Caucus, which said resolution is as follows:

   RESOLVED, That a committee selected to prepare a plan of 
  legislation looking to the preparation of bills complying 
  with the Democratic National Platform as to interstate trade 
  or the trusts, interstate transportation or the railroads, 
  interstate exchange or banking, conservation of natural 
  resources or the waterways, and the naturalization of the 
  Philippines, for consideration at the commencement of the 
  regular session.

 Senator Bacon as the senior Democratic member of the Committee on 
Rules, reported that the Democratic members of that Committee had 
secured as the new Caucus room, the large room on the third floor of the 
Senate Office Building, near the southwest corner.2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ Known as the ``Senate Caucus Room.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Senator Gore moved that the report of the Rules Committee be received 
and that the Caucus return thanks to the Committee on Rules for the 
successful work in this behalf, which motion was unanimously adopted.
Senator Gore further moved that the Democratic members of the Committee 
on Rules be instructed to use their best efforts to secure for the use 
of the Democratic members the present quarters occupied by the 
Democratic Conference Committee in the Capitol, so that the Democratic 
members can have a conference room near the Senate Chamber for emergency 
conference.
 Upon motion the Caucus adjourned.
____________________________________________________

                                                          [June 1, 1912]

JUNE 1, 1912

                                                       June first, 1912.

 The Democratic Conference met in the Conference Room on this first day 
of June, 1912, in pursuance of the call of the chairman.
There were present the following named Senators: Ashurst, Bacon, 
Bankhead, Bryan, Chamberlain, Chilton, Fletcher, Foster, Gardner, Gore, 
Hitchcock, Johnson, Johnston, Kern, Lea, Martin, Martine, Myers, 
Newlands, Overman, Pomerene, Reed, Shively, Simmons, Smith of Ariz., 
Smith of Ga., Stone, Swanson, Thornton and PWilliams.
Senator Overman moved that the Chemical Schedule Bill be temporarily 
laid aside, and in the meantime we take up the appropriation bills and 
the Lorimer case.3 After some discussion the motion was 
withdrawn.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ On July 13, 1912, the Senate declared the election of William 
Lorimer (Republican of Illinois) to be invalid.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Senator Newlands moved that the conference proceed to the consideration 
of the Sugar Schedule. Thereupon Senator Stone moved as a substitute 
that it is the sense of this Caucus that upon the conclusion of the vote 
upon the Chemical Schedule Bill the Democrats unite to secure 
consideration of the Wool Schedule Bill and to make it the unfinished 
business and press it to a final conclusion.

After some discussion Senator Williams moved the adoption of the 
following resolution:

   RESOLVED that the Democrats of the Senate hereby agree to 
  abide by the results of the votes taken in Caucus, and that 
  they request the minority members of the Finance Committee 
  to take up the various tariff bills which have been or may 
  be passed by the House of Representatives, and before 
  adjournment secure action by the Senate upon all of the said 
  bills.

 At this point it was announced by the Chairman that so many Senators 
had left that a quorum was not present, and thereupon the Conference 
adjourned to meet again at a time and place to be fixed by the Chairman.
                    Sixty-third Congress (1913-1915)

  [Editor's Note: Democrats gained the majority in the Senate during the 
Sixty-third Congress, for the first time in twenty years. Fifty-one 
Democrats faced 44 Republicans and one independent. The House similarly 
had a Democratic majority, and a Democrat, Woodrow Wilson, occupied the 
White House. In the Senate, progressive Democrats were determined to 
exert leadership and enact President Wilson's ``New Freedom'' 
legislative program. In February 1913, progressive Democrats met at the 
Washington home of Senator Luke Lea and agreed to support Senator John 
Worth Kern for chairman of the caucus. With thirty votes committed to 
Kern, assuring him the election, the incumbent chairman, Senator Thomas 
Martin, withdrew from the race. The caucus retained Martin on the 
Steering Committee and rewarded him with the chairmanship of the Senate 
Appropriations PCommittee.
  The Senate met in special session from March 4 to March 17, 1913, to 
advise and consent on the president's nominations. Wilson then called 
Congress into session on April 7, 1913, and both the Senate and House 
remained in session without recess until December 1. The second session 
of the Sixty-third Congress extended from December 1, 1913 to October 
24, 1914, with only a twenty-day recess over the Christmas holidays. A 
third session ran from December 7, 1914 to March 3, 1915. During these 
unusually long sessions, Congress enacted major legislation for tariff 
revision, banking and currency reform, and trade and antitrust 
regulation. Wilson's program owed its success in large part to the 
willingness of Democratic senators to bind themselves to the caucus 
decision on key issues.1]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ Wythe W. Holt, Jr., ``The Senator from Virginia and the Democratic 
Floor Leadership,'' The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 83 
(January 1975): 8-18; Walter J. Oleszek, ``John Worth Kern: Portrait of 
a Floor Leader,'' in First Among Equals: Outstanding Senate Leaders of 
the Twentieth Century, eds. Richard A. Baker and Roger H. Davidson 
(Washington: Congressional Quarterly, Inc., 1991), pp. 28-30.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 5, 1913]

MARCH 5, 1913

The Democratic Members of the Senate assembled in Caucus Wednesday, 
March 5, 1913, at 10:30 o'clock, a.m., pursuant to call.
Senator Martin called the Caucus to order and stated the object of the 
meeting and as he was not a candidate for Chairman, asked for nomination 
for that office.
The calling of the roll showed 47 Senators present. Senators Reed and 
Robinson only being absent.
Senator Shively nominated Senator Kern, of Indiana, for Chairman of the 
Caucus, which was seconded by Senator Clarke, and Senator Kern, 
receiving the unanimous vote of the Caucus, accepted and assumed his 
duties.
Senator O'Gorman presented the following resolution, and moved its 
adoption.

  RESOLVED, That the Democratic Caucus expresses its high 
  appreciation of the great ability, the untiring efforts and 
  efficient service of Senator Martin as Democratic leader 
  during the 62nd Congress. His influence was a large factor 
  in the harmony and effectiveness of the Democratic minority 
  in the session which has just closed. He retires from the 
  Caucus leadership with the respect and best wishes of all 
  his colleagues.

Senators Martine, Owen and Bacon seconded the above resolution and it 
was unanimously adopted by a rising vote.
Senator Martin expressed appreciation of the terms of the resolution.
Senator Newlands was elected Vice Chairman on motion of Senator Pittman.
Senator O'Gorman then nominated Senator Saulsbury, of Delaware, for 
Secretary of the Caucus, which was duly seconded and Mr. Saulsbury 
elected, and assumed his duties as Secretary of the Caucus.
Senator Bryan moved the Chairman appoint a Committee of Five to report 
to the Caucus on order of business, and this being seconded by Senator 
Smith of Georgia, was declared carried, and Senators Bryan, Stone, 
Culberson, O'Gorman, and Walsh were named as such Committee.
Senator Clarke moved that the Chairman appoint a Committee of Nine 
members, as a Steering Committee, the Chairman to be one, and report the 
Caucus for its approval. This motion was carried after Senator Ashurst 
had moved that such Committee be elected by the Caucus, which amendment 
was lost by a vote of 13 ayes to 26 noes.
Senator Stone moved that a Committee of Five be appointed by the Chair 
in re the Illinois matter, which was duly carried, and Senators Stone, 
Williams, Fletcher, Smith (Ga.) and Pomerene were thereupon appointed by 
the Chairman as such Committee.
On motion of Senator Swanson, the Caucus adjourned to meet at eleven 
o'clock a.m., March sixth, A.D. 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 6, 1913]

MARCH 6, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met at 11 o'clock a.m., Thursday, 
March 6th, 1913.
The meeting was called to order by the Chairman, Senator Kern.
The calling of the roll disclosed all Senators present with the 
exception of Senator Robinson.
Senator Chamberlain moved that speeches be limited to five minutes. 
Carried.

The Chairman announced the appointment of the following Steering 
Committee:

  Senators Kern, Martin, Clarke, Chamberlain, Owen, O'Gorman, 
  Smith (Ga.), Lea and Thomas, which was approved by the 
  Caucus after motion to add Vice-Chairman and Secretary to 
  the Committee was laid on the table.

The report of the Committee on Order of Business was then presented, as 
follows:
              To the Caucus of the Democratic Members of the
                          United States Senate

 Your Committee on Order of Business, appointed at the session held on 
Wednesday, the fifth day of March, 1913, submits the following report:

  Your Committee recommends the following order of business, 
  viz.:

    1. Selection of the following officers of the Senate

      (a) A President pro tempore
      (b) Chaplain
      (c) Secretary
      (d) Sergeant at Arms

    2. Consideration of appointment of minor officers under the 
  Secretary of the Senate and the Sergeant at Arms.
    3. Selection of a Committee on Committees.
    4. Consideration of the continuance, creation and abolition of 
  committees, the number of members on each and the apportionment of 
  members under the political parties.
    5. Consideration of rank on committees and appointment of conferees.
    6. Consideration of the question of whether the choice of a senator 
  for president pro tempore or for chairman of the Caucus shall be 
  deemed the equivalent of appointment to a chairmanship of a first-
  class committee.2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ This consideration was prompted by the expressed desire of Senator 
Augustus Bacon to become both president pro tempore and chairman of the 
Foreign Relations Committee.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    7. Any other business that may properly come before the Caucus.

                                                           Respectfully,
                                                      [signed] T.J.Walsh
                                                     [signed] N.P. Bryan

Senator O'Gorman moved the adoption of the report, subject to the action 
of the Caucus in modification, after Paragraph 3, (Committee on 
Committees) had, on motion, been struck out by unanimous Pconsent.
It was then moved by Senator Smith (S.C.) that Paragraph 6 of Order be 
now considered, which motion prevailed.
Senator Stone moved that the selection of Senators as President pro tem. 
and as Chairman of the Caucus shall not be held equivalent to 
Chairmanship of 1st Class Committee, be referred to the Steering 
Committee. Seconded and carried.
Senator Lea moved that Paragraph 1 (Selection of Officers of the Senate) 
be deferred to Saturday next, March 8th at ten o'clock, a.m.
Substitute offered by Senator Myers, fixing time for selection of 
officers at ten a.m., Friday, March 7th, 1913, was carried.
The Report by Senator Clarke on Conference with Republican Committee was 
referred to the Steering Committee.

Senator Chamberlain offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That ranking members of Committees entitled to 
  Chairmanships under the present practice of the Senate be 
  permitted to announce their choice for Chairmanships and 
  that after such choice they shall not be entitled to place 
  on other Committees until all the other members of the 
  Senate have a chance to express their choice for committee 
  place.

Senator Swanson moved that the above resolution and Paragraph 5 be 
referred to the Steering Committee, which shall report back as to Place 
on Committees to Conferees. Carried.

The following resolution was offered by Senator Bryan:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Caucus that the 
  inactive committees be abolished and that the minority party 
  be allowed the extra clerical help that the continuance of 
  said committees would provide for.

Senator Newlands presented the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That all obsolete committees maintained simply in 
  order to given Senators additional employees be abolished 
  and that all Senators without Chairmanships shall have three 
  employees: A Secretary at $2500. per annum; a Stenographer 
  at $1500. per annum; and a Messenger at $1200. per annum.

Senator O'Gorman moved that the resolutions of Senators Bryan and 
Newlands above recited be referred to the Steering Committee, which 
motion prevailed.

On motion of Senator O'Gorman, the following resolution was unanimously 
adopted:

   RESOLVED, Unless otherwise ordered, That information 
  respecting proceedings in Conference shall not be disclosed 
  by any Senator, except the Chairman of the Caucus.

Senator Overman offered the following resolution.

  RESOLVED, That the patronage shall be divided equally in 
  value among the Democratic Senators and the minority shall 
  be accorded the same patronage which they have heretofore 
  extended to the Democratic Minority. Also,
  RESOLVED, That a Committee of Five (5) be appointed by the 
  Chair to consider the question of how many offices, if any, 
  may be dispensed with without injury to the efficiency of 
  the work of the Senate, and the amount to which each Senator 
  is entitled, and report fully to the Caucus their 
  recommendations as to whether the permanent roll should be 
  continued and who shall be kept on this list. Adoption 
  seconded and carried.

In accordance with Senator Overman's resolution, the Chair appointed the 
following Committee:

  Senators Overman, Williams, Shively, Hitchcock and Johnson.

Senator Reed moved that the Steering Committee shall report a plan of 
equalization of Salaries of Senate Clerks, &c., which motion was duly 
seconded and carried.

Senator Hitchcock moved the adoption of the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That a Committee on Banking and Currency be 
  created and that subject be withdrawn from the Finance 
  Committee.

Senator Stone presented the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Merchant Marine shall be withdrawn from 
  the Committee on Commerce and a Committee to be known as 
  Merchant Marine and Fisheries be created.

The resolutions of Senators Hitchcock and Stone, just presented, were 
referred to the Steering Committee.
Senator Bacon moved that the question, ``Shall the Committee on Cuban 
Relations be Continued?'' be referred to the Committee on Committees. 
Seconded and carried.

Senator Newlands moved the adoption of the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the subject of the Regulation and 
  Development of Rivers and Inland Waterways be transferred 
  from the Committee on Commerce to the Committee on 
  Interstate Commerce.

The motion was referred to the Steering Committee.
Senator Williams moved, as the sense of the Caucus, that each Senator 
have not more than 3 rooms.
Senator O'Gorman moved to refer resolution of Senator Williams to the 
Democratic members of the Committee on Rules, which was declared 
carried.

Senator Newlands then presented the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That hereafter, rooms and seats be assigned 
  according to seniority and where two or more are of the same 
  period of service, by lot.

Senator Swanson moved that this Resolution be laid on the table, and 
this motion prevailed.
On motion, the meeting then adjourned to meet at ten o'clock a.m., 
Friday, March 7th, 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 7, 1913]

MARCH 7, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met at 10 o'clock a.m., Friday, 
March 7th, 1913.
Meeting called to order by the Chairman.
The calling of the roll disclosed 46 Senators present. Senators Lane, 
Robinson and Shields being absent.
The Committee on Patronage reported partially through Senator Overman, 
and was continued.
The meeting then proceeded to the election of President pro tem.
Senator O'Gorman nominated Senator Clarke of Arkansas.
Senator Smith of Georgia nominated Senator Bacon.
Senator Clarke receiving 27 votes to 14 for Mr. Bacon, was declared 
elected President pro tem.

The election of a Chaplain to the Senate was then proceeded with:

Senator Smith (Maryland) nominated Rev. F. J. Prettyman and nomination 
seconded by Senators Overman, Smith (South Carolina), Swanson and Owen.
Senator Martine nominated Rev. A.W. Spooner. Mr. Spooner's nomination 
seconded by Senator Myers.
Senator Pomerene nominated Rev. Thomas Gordon and nomination seconded by 
Senator Shafroth.
Senator Ransdell nominated Rev. Hugh T. Stephens, and this nomination 
seconded by Senators Johnston and O'Gorman.
Senator Williams nominated Rev. James H. Taylor, and seconded by Senator 
James.
Senator Fletcher nominated Rev. U.G. B. Pierce.
After two ballots, without election, Senator O'Gorman moved to postpone 
the election of a Chaplain until a day in May to be designated by 
Chairman.
This motion laid on table.
On the 3rd ballot for Chaplain, Rev. F. J. Prettyman, receiving 25 
votes, sufficient to elect, was declared elected and his election was, 
on motion, made unanimous.
It was then moved that the meeting proceed to the election of a 
Secretary of the Senate.
Senator Hughes moved that nominating speeches be limited to three 
minutes. Carried.
Senator Williams nominated Robert M. Gates.
Senator Tillman nominated James M. Baker. Mr. Baker's nomination 
seconded by Senators Pomerene, Clarke, Swanson and Johnston.
Senator Martine nominated Joseph C. Spriggs.
Senator Johnston nominated Thomas B. Stallings.
Senator Lea nominated Joseph R. Wilson and nomination seconded by 
Senator Pittman.
Senator O'Gorman nominated Thomas W. Keller.
It was moved by Senator Lea that the election of a Secretary of the 
Senate be postponed until Saturday morning, March 8th, 1913, at ten 
o'clock, and that a committee of five be appointed to examine evidence 
in the Baker matter.3
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ James M. Baker of South Carolina had served in the Senate since 
1893, when he was appointed assistant librarian of the Senate Library, 
and ``Democratic caucus representative.'' Before his election as 
secretary of the Senate, a special committee examined his financial 
relationship with Sully & Company. He held the office of secretary until 
1919.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

On motion the Caucus took a recess until four o'clock, p.m., March 7th, 
at which time it was agreed that the election of a Sergeant-at-Arms 
should be taken up.


__________________________________________

The Democratic Senatorial Caucus re-assembled at four o'clock, Friday 
afternoon, March 7th, 1913.
The meeting proceeded to the election of a Sergeant-at-Arms.
Senator Ashurst nominated Lee Crandall; nomination seconded by Senator 
Smith of Arizona.
Senator Stone nominated Charles P. Higgins and this nomination seconded 
by Senator Reed. Senator Swanson placed the name of Mr. Willis of 
Virginia in nomination.
Senator Gore nominated John M. Young.
On the third ballot, receiving the vote of 27 against 19 for Young, 
Charles P. Higgins was declared elected Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate.
Senator Thomas [moved] that the Caucus take a recess until Saturday 
morning, March 8th, 1913, at 11 o'clock, which motion prevailed.
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 8, 1913]

MARCH 8, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met at 11 o'clock a.m., Saturday, 
March 8th, 1913.
The meeting was called to order by the Chairman.
The calling of the roll disclosed 47 Senators present, Senators Lane and 
Robinson being absent.
The first business to come before the Caucus was the election of a 
Secretary of the Senate.
By consent, James M. Baker, one of the nominees for that office, was 
admitted to explain the Sully & Company matter, and made his statement, 
reading letters, affidavits, &c., after debate.
At 12:30 o'clock, p.m., by order of the Caucus, the five-minute rule was 
applied.
At 1:20 o'clock, p.m., debate ordered closed at 1:25 p.m. and a vote to 
be ordered.
On the 2nd ballot, James M. Baker was nominated, receiving 25 votes 
therefor, and his nomination was then made unanimous by acclamation.
The Caucus authorized the Chairman to deny the report as to Senator 
Vardaman.
Senator Chilton then nominated Thomas Keller for the post of Assistant 
Door Keeper, who was elected by acclamation.
The Caucus then adjourned, subject to the call of the Chair.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 15, 1913]

MARCH 15, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, March 
15th, 1913.
The meeting was called to order by the Chairman.
The calling of the roll disclosed 47 Senators present.
On motion, the reading of minutes of last preceding meeting was 
dispensed with.
The Report of the Committee on Patronage was presented by Senator 
Overman.
Senator Stone moved that the Chairman of the Committee on Patronage be 
directed to have copies of the report of that Committee made and 
distributed among all the Democratic Senators and that consideration of 
said report be postponed until Monday, March 17th, 1913, at 10 o'clock, 
a.m., which motion prevailed. [printed report follows:]
                               Confidential
      REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PATRONAGE TO THE DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS

 Your committee, after three prolonged sessions, extending over many 
hours each, have carefully considered your instructions to as the 
division of patronage equally among the Democratic Senators and the 
allowance to be made to the Republican minority, and have endeavored to 
conform strictly to them.
In response to the second division of your instructions an exhaustive 
examination in detail of the personnel of the employees of the Senate 
has been made, and the questions of ``how many offices may be dispensed 
with without injury to the efficiency of the work of the Senate, and the 
amount to which each Senator is entitled. . . and whether the permanent 
roll shall be continued and who shall be kept on the list'' have been 
met as fully as time would allow.
 The committee have come to the following conclusions and present the 
following recommendations to the Caucus in obedience to its 
instructions:
In the first place, they find that there is wisdom in the custom which 
has grown up of retaining in the service of the Senate those employees 
who by efficient experience, capacity, and diligence, expedite business 
to the credit of the Senate and the comfort and advantage of the 
individual Senators. They, therefore, recommend that the following 
offices, 20 in number, in the office of the Secretary of the Senate, 
aggregating total annual salary list of $39,960, be filled by their 
present occupants during good behavior, subject to removal only for good 
cause and by direction of the appointing officers and the committee on 
patronage:

------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Officers retained, Secretary's Office
Position:                                                      Salary
  Chief Clerk..............................................    $3,250
  Financial Clerk..........................................     4,250
  Enrolling Clerk..........................................     3,000
  Principal Clerk (O.S.) 4.................................     3,000
4 ``O.S.'' was the abbreviation for ``Old Soldier.'' During
 the late nineteenth century, many patronage posts on
 Capitol Hill went to Civil War veterans, often one-armed,
 or one-legged men. They were predominantly Union Army
 veterans appointed by Republican members. In 1911, after
 the Democrats won the majority in the House of
 Representatives and narrowed the Republican margin in the
 Senate, Idaho Republican Senator Weldon B. Heyburn
 introduced a resolution permitting all Union veterans
 still on the Senate payroll to hold their positions until
 they voluntarily retired. One of the last senators to
 ``wave the bloody shirt,'' Senator Heyburn had won
 national notoriety for opposing the placing of a statue of
 General Robert E. Lee in the Capitol, or the spending of
 federal funds for Confederate monuments. Heyburn died in
 1912, the same year that Democrats captured the majority
 in the Senate. Nevertheless, the Democrats honored the
 Heyburn Resolution and retained the Union veterans on the
 Senate patronage.
  Assistant financial clerk................................     2,750
  Chief bookkeeper.........................................     2,500
  Printing clerk...........................................     2,500
  Clerk compiling history of revenue bills (O.S.)..........     2,500
  Clerk....................................................     2,220
  Assistant in document room...............................     2,250
  Clerk in document room (O.S.)............................     1,440
  Librarian................................................     2,500
  Keeper of stationery (O.S.)..............................     2,400
  Laborer in stationery room (colored).....................       720
  3 laborers (colored) at $840.............................     2,520
  3 laborers (colored) at $720.............................     2,160
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    39,960
  Deducting 4 positions held by old soldiers (indicated         9,340
   above by ``O.S.'')......................................
                                                            ------------
    Leaves a total of......................................    30,620

 By this arrangement the following offices in the office of the
 Secretary of the Senate would be filled by Republicans retained:
  Financial clerk..........................................    $4,250
  Enrolling clerk..........................................     3,000
  Chief bookkeeper.........................................     2,500
  Printing clerk...........................................     2,500
  Clerk....................................................     2,220
  Librarian................................................     2,500
  Compiler history of revenue bills (O.S.).................     2,500
  Clerk in document room (O.S.)............................     1,440
  Keeper of stationery (O.S.)..............................     2,400
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    23,310
  Deducting 3 positions held by old soldiers...............     6,340
                                                            ------------
    Leaves a total of......................................    16,970

 The following offices in the office of the Secretary of the Senate are
 now filled by Democrats retained by the Republicans:
  Chief clerk..............................................    $3,250
  Principal clerk (O.S.)...................................     3,000
  Assistant financial clerk................................     2,750
  Assistant in document room...............................     2,250
  Clerk....................................................     2,220
  Assistant librarian......................................     2,400
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    15,870
  Deducting the one position held by an old soldier........     3,000
                                                            ------------
    Leaves a total of......................................    12,870

 Thus it is seen that the Republicans are conceded $4,100 more in
 patronage than they have heretofore allowed the Democrats.

The committee from their inquiry into the several positions named and
 provided for in the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation
 act, in the office of the Secretary of the Senate, find that the
 following positions need not be occupied because they are
 supernumerary:
  Compiler of the Navy Yearbook, etc.......................    $2,220
  Indexer Senate public documents..........................     2,220
  A clerk..................................................     2,100
  A messenger..............................................     1,400
  A clerk in stationery room...............................     1,440
  Assistant librarian......................................     1,600
  Assistant in stationery room.............................     2,000
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    13,020

 It is believed that this may be done without lessening the efficiency
 of the clerical and other forces, and it is of opinion that this course
 ought to be followed.

There can be had by this means a saving of a good deal of money, and
 while it lessens the amount of patronage which each Senator might have
 allotted to him, the difference would not be very great and the policy
 of it would be in true line with the declared promises of the party to
 administer the affairs of every branch of the Government with as much
 efficiency and with a greater regard to economy than has been done in
 the past.

Eliminating these two classes of exemptions from patronage, the
 following positions are subject to the appointment of the Secretary of
 the Senate on the nomination of Senators:
  Minute and journal clerk.................................    $3,000
  Reading clerk............................................     3,000
  Executive clerk..........................................     2,750
  File clerk...............................................     2,500
  Assistant journal clerk..................................     2,500
  Clerks, two at $2,500....................................     5,000
  Clerk....................................................     2,220
  Clerk....................................................     2,100
  Clerk....................................................     1,800
  Clerk....................................................     1,600
  Assistant messenger......................................     1,200
  Assistant in document room...............................     2,250
  Assistant in document room...............................     1,440
  First assistant librarian................................     2,400
  Assistant librarian......................................     1,800
  Skilled laborers, 2 at $1,200............................     2,400
  Assistant in stationery room.............................     1,200
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    39,160

                   RECAPITULATION, SECRETARY'S OFFICE.

 In the office of the Secretary of the Senate there are 49 positions,
 the salaries of which amount to $107,060.
  Secretary, elected by Senate (including horse hire)......    $6,920
  Assistant Secretary (H.M. Rose), $5,000 and                   8,000
   superintendent of document room (G.H. Boyd), $3,000,
   both offices in appropriation act by name...............
  9 officers and 7 colored laborers retained on account of     30,520
   efficient experience....................................
  4 officers, old soldiers, retained on account of Senate       9,340
   resolution 72, of July 14, 1911.........................
  7 supernumerary positions proposed to be abolished.......    13,020
  19 positions subject to the appointment of the Secretary     39,180
   on nominations by Senators..............................
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................   107,060

                      OFFICE OF THE SERGEANT AT ARMS

 The committee recommend that the following employees on account of
 efficient experience be retained during good behavior, subject to
 removal only for good cause and by direction of the appointing officer
 and the committee on patronage:
  Doherty, E.W., messenger acting as assistant doorkeeper..    $1,800
  Edwards, J.F., messenger acting as assistant doorkeeper..     1,800
  Anderson, R.S., messenger................................     1,440
  McGrain, J.J., storekeeper...............................     2,220
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................     7,260

 The committee recommend that the following positions, 66 in number, the
 salaries which aggregate $47,660, on account of the character of
 service rendered, be exempted from patronage:
  Clerk on Journal work for Congressional Record...........    $2,000
  Superintendent of Press Gallery..........................     1,800
  Assistant superintendent of Press Gallery................     1,400
  Messenger for service to press correspondents............       900
  Upholsterer and locksmith................................     1,440
  Cabinetmaker.............................................     1,200
  3 carpenters at $1,080...................................     3,240
  Chief telephone operator.................................     1,200
  Telephone operator.......................................       900
  Telephone page...........................................       720
  4 skilled laborers at $1000..............................     4,000
  Skilled laborer..........................................       900
  Laborer in charge of private passage.....................       840
  3 attendants in ladies' room, Capitol, at $720...........     2,160
  2 attendants in ladies' room, Senate Office Building, at      1,440
   $720....................................................
  21 laborers at $720 (janitor force)......................    15,120
  Elevator conductor.......................................     1,200
  16 pages at $300 ($2.50 per day).........................     4,800
  5 hostlers, Senate stable, at $480.......................     2,400
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    47,660

 According to the custom of the Senate heretofore, it is recommended
 that 10 messengers, at $1,440 each, be detailed from the Sergeant at
 Arms' office for service to the minority, $14,400.

Respecting Senate resolution of July 14, 1911, creating an old soldiers'
 roll, it is found that 26 employees of the Sergeant at Arms, whose
 salaries aggregate now $34,512.50, come under its protection. The
 committee have considered each case and recommend that these employees
 be given positions whose salaries aggregate $27,975, a total reduction
 of $6,537.50.

Proposed salaries for employees on soldiers' roll, total $27,975.

Under the arrangement proposed by your committee the following offices
 in the office of the Sergeant at Arms would be filled by Republicans
 retained:
  Messenger acting as assistant doorkeeper.................    $1,800
  10 messengers detailed to minority Senators, at $1,440...    14,400
  5 messengers, old soldiers, at $1,440....................     7,200
  Foreman, folding room, old soldier.......................     1,400
  Mail carrier, old soldier................................     1,200
  Elevator conductor, old soldier..........................     1,200
  3 folders, old soldiers, at $1,000.......................     3,000
  2 riding pages, old soldiers, at $912.50.................     1,825
  5 laborers, old soldiers, at $720........................     3,600
  Laborer..................................................       720
  7 privates, Capitol police, old soldiers, at $1,050......     7,350
                                                            ------------
    37 positions, total salaries...........................    43,695

The following offices in the office of the Sergeant at Arms are now
 filled by Democrats retained by Republicans:
  Messenger acting as Assistant Doorkeeper.................    $1,800
  10 messengers detailed to minority Senators, at $1,440       14,400
   each....................................................
  Messenger................................................     1,440
  Storekeeper..............................................     2,220
  3 elevator conductors, at $1,200 each....................     3,600
  Elevator conductor, old soldier..........................     1,200
  Stenographer in charge furniture accounts, Senate Office      1,200
   Building................................................
  Private, Capitol police..................................     1,050
  Laborers (2) at $720.....................................     1,440
                                                            ------------
    21 positions, total salaries...........................    28,350

 The committee, from their inquiry into the several positions named and
 provided for in the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriations
 act, in the office of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate, find that the
 following positions need not be occupied, because they are
 supernumerary:
  Assistant Sergeant at Arms...............................    $2,500
  Messenger................................................     1,440
  Messenger, Senate Office Building........................     1,440
  Folder...................................................     1,000
  Attendant in charge bathroom, Senate Office Building.....     1,800
  Two attendants in bathroom, Senate Office Building, at        1,440
   $720 each...............................................
  Janitor, bathroom, Senate Office Building................       720
  Attendant, women's toilet room, Senate Office Building...       720
  17 employees carried on ``Maltby Building roll'' 5.......    17,200
5 In 1891 the Senate purchased an apartment house on
 Capitol Hill, known as the Maltby Building, to provide
 extra office space, primarily for members of the minority
 party and junior members of the majority party. In 1909
 when the first Senate Office Building opened, the Maltby
 Building was vacated. It stood empty until demolished in
 1930.
  17 privates, Capitol police--reduction made by               17,850
   legislative appropriation act-- at $1,050...............
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    46,190

 Subtracting the above classes of exceptions and the positions
 recommended to be abolished, the following positions are subject to the
 appointment of the Sergeant at Arms on the nomination of Senators:
   2 messengers on the floor of the Senate, at $2,000......    $4,000
  2 messengers, acting assistant doorkeepers, at $1,800....     3,600
  21 messengers, at $1,440.................................    30,240
  Messenger at card door...................................     1,600
  Postmaster...............................................     2,250
  Chief clerk, post office.................................     1,800
  6 mail carriers, at $1,200...............................     7,200
  2 messengers, acting as mail carriers, at $1,200.........     2,400
  Riding page..............................................       912.50
  Assistant in folding room................................     1,400
  Clerk, folding room......................................     1,200
  2 folders, at $1,000.....................................     2,000
  8 folders, at $840.......................................     6,720
  Stenographer in charge of furniture accounts, Senate          1,200
   Office Building.........................................
  Janitor..................................................     1,200
  Laborer..................................................       840
  Laborer..................................................       720
  Telephone operator.......................................       900
  Night telephone operator.................................       720
  8 conductors of elevators, Capitol, at $1,200 each.......     9,600
  13 conductors of elevators, Senate Office Building, at       15,600
   $1,200 each.............................................
  Captain of police........................................     1,800
  Lieutenant of police.....................................     1,200
  Special police officer, Capitol..........................     1,200
  9 privates, Capitol police, at $1,050....................     9,450
  Special police officer, Senate Office Building...........     1,200
  16 privates, police, Senate Office Building, at $1,050...    16,800
  Foreman, Senate stable...................................       900
                                                            ------------
    106 positions, total salaries..........................   128,652.50

                RECAPITULATION, SERGEANT AT ARMS' OFFICE.

 In the office of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate there are 258
 positions, the salaries of which amount to $284,241.50
   Sergeant at Arms, elected by Senate, salary and horse       $6,920
   hire....................................................
  Assistant Doorkeeper and Acting Assistant Doorkeeper,         5,104
   elected by Senate, at $2,592............................
  4 employees, retained on account of efficient experience.     7,260
  24 employees, 16 pages, 21 laborers, and 5 hostlers,         47,660
   exempted from patronage on account of character of
   service rendered........................................
  10 messengers, detailed to minority Senators.............    14,400
  25 employees, old soldiers, retained on account of Senate    27,975
   resolution of July 14, 1911.............................
  45 supernumerary positions, proposed to be abolished.....    46,190
  106 positions, subject to the appointment of the Sergeant   128,852.50
   at Arms on nomination by Senators.......................
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................   284,241.50
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     OLD SOLDIERS' ROLL OF THE SENATE

 The committee find themselves confronted by the following resolution 
(S. Res. 72), which was introduced by the late Senator Heyburn, of 
Idaho, and adopted on July 14, 1911:

   Resolved, That the Secretary of the Senate and the Sergeant 
  at Arms of the Senate are hereby directed to retain in the 
  employ of the Senate those persons who served in the Union 
  Army during the late Civil War and whose service in the 
  Senate is necessary and satisfactory and who are not 
  otherwise provided for, and to continue such persons in 
  their positions until cause of their removal shall have been 
  reported to and approved of by the Senate and their removal 
  directed.

 The names and positions of those entitled at that date to the 
protection of this provision and who have qualified by exhibiting 
honorable discharges from the service or pension certificates are given 
below, together with the salaries and the total amount thereof:

------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Old soldier's roll of the Senate

         [Under (Heyburn) Senate resolution 72, July 14, 1911.]

Office of the Secretary of the Senate:
  A.C. Parkinson, principal clerk (D.).....................    $3,000
  J.C. Donaldson, assistant librarian......................     1,800
  C.N. Richards, keeper of stationery......................     2,400
  R.R. Dutton, clerk.......................................     1,440
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................     8,640
Office of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate:
  J.A. Abbott, messenger, acting as assistant doorkeeper...     1,800
  Wm. M. Palmer, messenger.................................     1,440
  Geo. H. Bond, messenger..................................     1,440
  James McArthur, messenger................................     1,440
  A.D. Gaston, messenger...................................     1,440
  A.J. Maxham, messenger...................................     1,440
  O.M. Osbon, messenger....................................     1,440
  E.P. Getchell, messenger.................................     1,440
  D.S. Corser, messenger...................................     1,440
  W.G. Gallager, messenger.................................     1,440
  D.M. Earle, messenger....................................     1,440
Senate Post Office:
  J.A. Crystal, postmaster.................................     2,250
  G.M. Turner, mail carrier................................     1,200
  E.W. Foster, riding page.................................       912.50
Senate folding room:
  H.H. Brewer, foreman.....................................     1,500
  M.T. Coates, folder......................................     1,000
  J.W. Curran, folder......................................     1,000
Senate Office Building:
  J. Russell Williams (D.), elevator conductor.............     1,200
  Peter Reily, elevator conductor..........................     1,200
  H. Baer, special officer.................................     1,200
Maltby:
  C.C. Burr, elevator conductor............................       800
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................    28,362.50
Capitol police:
  J.P. Megrew, captain.....................................    $1,800
  John Hammond, lieutenant.................................     1,200
  George Butler, private...................................     1,050
  J.A. Burrows, private....................................     1,050
  H.A. Kasson, private.....................................     1,050
                                                            ------------
    Total..................................................     6,150
                                                            ------------
    Grand total............................................    43,152.50
------------------------------------------------------------------------

To attempt to repeal this class legislation (few Senators were 
acquainted with the true import of the resolution) might, it is 
apprehended, lead to a long debate and through misconception of the true 
intent of the party arouse a hostile excitement which would not be 
justified by the results. It has therefore been thought a safer plan to 
suggest to the appointing officers the method of gradually putting these 
men when found inefficient and incompetent into places carrying less 
salary and of less weighty and important duties, and to fill the 
vacancies thus created with men adapted to the work, capable of doing it 
well, and worth the money. If the service were not handicapped by this 
necessity, it can be seen without demonstration that a considerable 
saving in positions could be had, and consequently of salaries.
The committee find in many instances that positions are filled by men 
whose duties are entirely apart from the places they occupy. It is 
suggested that this is one of those causes of offense which invites 
criticism and should cease to exist. The manner and method of doing 
this, it is believed, can be safely intrusted to the appointing officers 
of the Senate, if this suggestion meets with the approval of the Caucus.
                                 MALTBY.

 The committee recommend that what is known as the Maltby roll 
(miscellaneous items on account of Maltby Building in the contingent 
allowance of the Senate), carrying $17,280, be immediately abolished. 
The last appropriation act does this after July 1, 1913, and transfers 
some of the employees to the regular roll of the Senate, where they will 
be placed if their services are found to be necessary.
                    BATHROOMS, SENATE OFFICE BUILDING.

 It is recommended that the bathrooms 6 of the Senate Office 
Building be abolished. In doing this it would dispense with the services 
of a masseur at $1,800 and three assistants at $720 each.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \6\ ``Bathrooms'' referred to the area set aside when the Senate 
Office Building opened in 1909 for a swimming pool, showers and steam 
rooms, attended by masseurs. This was an extension of the marble bath 
tubs that had been set up in the Capitol basement during the nineteenth 
century, when members of Congress lived in Washington boardinghouses 
that lacked bathing facilities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 On June 13, 1911, it is understood from accurate sources, the net 
amount of patronage to be divided among the 51 Republican Senators 
amounted to $206,835, which gave each about $4,200.
By deducting the amount of the old soldiers' roll of the Senate, 
$43,152.50, which was subject to patronage in June, 1911, before the 
passage of the Heyburn resolution in July, it will be seen that the 
total residue of patronage was $163,682.50, or about $3,273 to each 
Republican Senator.
Assuming that the recommendations of this committee will be accepted by 
the Caucus, each Democratic Senator will be entitled to recommend 
appointments to positions the salaries of which will amount in the 
aggregate to $3,360.
The committee recommend that the Secretary of the Senate, the Sergeant 
at Arms of the Senate, and the Superintendent of the Capitol, by and 
with the approval of the committee on patronage, readjust the 
distribution of those offices to which appointments are to be made on 
recommendation, so that each Democratic Senator shall receive as nearly 
as practicable the amount of patronage due him under this plan.
The Republicans allowed the Democrats in the Secretary's office 6 
positions with salaries totaling $15,870, and in the Sergeant at Arms' 
office 21 positions totaling $28,350, a grand total of $44,220. The 
Democrats under this proposed arrangement allow the Republicans 9 
positions in the Secretary's office, $23,310, and 37 in the Sergeant at 
Arms' office, $43,695, a grand total of $67,005. This makes a difference 
in favor of Republicans of $22,785, which is largely accounted for by 
the old soldiers' roll now exempted from patronage.

                        Patronage to be available

Sergeant at Arms' office
  Total appropriation for salaries......................     $284,241.50
  Total amount of exemptions for all causes.............      155,399.00
                                                         ---------------
    Balance.............................................      128,842.50
Secretary's office:
  Total appropriation for salaries......................     $107,060.00
  Total amount of exemptions for all causes.............       67,900.00
                                                         ---------------
    Balance.............................................       39,160.00
  Total amount of patronage, both offices...............      168,002.50
Divided by 50 Democratic Senators.......................        3,360.00
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Chairman of the Steering Committee, Senator Kern, then presented the 
Report of that Committee, as follows:

  Gentlemen of the Conference:

  As chairman of your Steering Committee, I have the honor to 
  present to you a report of the action of that Committee, 
  indulging in the hope that it may meet your approval.
  Your Committee addressed itself to the work assigned to it, 
  with a full sense of the responsibility attaching to such 
  work--responsibility to this majority, to the Senate and to 
  the country. It was the earnest desire of every member of 
  that Committee, in the formation of Senate Committees, to 
  respect the desires of their fellow Democrats as to 
  assignments.
  In many instances, where many Senators preferred requests 
  for the same places, it was of course impossible to 
  accommodate all, and in such case we have done the best we 
  could, keeping in mind all the time the welfare of party and 
  country, and the necessity for party harmony.
  If there are Senators here who are disappointed in their 
  assignments, I feel sure that, recognizing the difficulties 
  under which the committee labored, they will not hesitate to 
  accept the places to which they have been assigned and 
  proceed to the discharge of their duties in a spirit of 
  concession and forbearance which will aid in bringing about 
  that unity of action so necessary to the success of the 
  measures for the enactment of which we hold a commission 
  from the American people.
  Your committee proposes certain reforms, not only the 
  processes of procedure in the Senate, but in the political 
  methods of our party in its organization.
  We propose that this great body shall be democratic, not 
  only in name, but in practical reality, and that the charge 
  so often made that it is controlled by a few men through 
  committee organization and otherwise, shall no longer have 
  any basis in fact.
  We therefore submit to the Conference two resolutions for 
  its consideration, which if adopted will as we believe, 
  enable the Senate to become a more powerful agency for the 
  registration of the public will and more quickly respond to 
  the desires and demands of the people as expressed at the 
  polls.

The first of these resolutions addressed to the subject of Committee 
work, is as follows:

   Resolved, That a majority of the Democratic members of any 
  committee may call a meeting of such committee, and shall 
  select, by a recorded vote of such members, all Democratic 
  members of conference committees and of all subcommittees 
  representing the committee.

The second, which undertakes to regulate and govern in the future, the 
procedure of our party in the work of Senate organization, is as 
follows:

   Resolved: 1. That hereafter the members of the steering 
  committee shall be elected by the Conference.
   2. That hereafter the majority members of committees shall 
  elect their own chairmen.
   3. That all vacancies on committees in the future shall be 
  nominated by the Steering Committee, subject to the approval 
  of the Conference.

Speaking for the entire committee, I hope these resolutions may be 
adopted, to the end that the country may know in advance that the Senate 
of the United States, under Democratic control, is an active, efficient, 
and sympathetic branch of this great popular government, which, freed 
from some of the shackles of custom and precedent and able to respond 
quickly to the will of the people, will without surrendering any of its 
constitutional prerogatives, or losing sight of the position which the 
fathers of the Republic intended it to occupy, take its proper place, 
and do its full share of work in the great progressive movement of the 
twentieth century, in which are centered the hopes and aspirations of a 
hundred million free people.

                    COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENT OF SENATORS
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Sixty-Third Congress

                             March 15, 1913.

Mr. ASHURST.............................   Industrial Expositions,
                                           chairman
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Pensions
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Woman Suffrage

Mr. BACON...............................  Foreign Relations, chairman
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department
                                          Judiciary
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Railroads
                                          Rules
                                          Standards, Weights, and
                                           Measures

Mr. BANKHEAD............................  Post Offices and Post Roads,
                                           chairman
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Commerce
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Standards, Weights, and
                                           Measures
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

Mr. BRYAN...............................  Claims, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Investigate Trespassers on
                                           Indian Lands
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pensions
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads

Mr. CHAMBERLAIN.........................  Public Lands, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Appropriations
                                          Commerce
                                          Military Affairs
                                          National Banks
                                          Territories

Mr. CHILTON.............................  Census, chairman
                                          Expenditures in the
                                           Departments of Commerce and
                                           Labor
                                          Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Judiciary
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Printing
                                          Revolutionary Claims

Mr. CLARKE of Arkansas..................  Commerce, chairman
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Railroads
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

Mr. CULBERSON...........................  Judiciary, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine

Mr. FLETCHER............................  Printing, chairman
                                          Commerce
                                          Fisheries
                                          Judiciary
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine

Mr. GORE................................  Agriculture and Forestry,
                                           chairman
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Finance
                                          Immigration
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Patents
                                          Pensions

Mr. HITCHCOCK...........................  Philippines, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Printing
                                          Territories

Mr. HOLLIS..............................  Enrolled Bills, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department
                                          Immigration
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products
                                          University of the United
                                           States
                                          Woman Suffrage

Mr. HUGHES..............................  Expenditures in the Navy
                                           Department, chairman
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          Finance
                                          Pensions
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Public Lands
                                          Standards, Weights, and
                                           Measures
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

Mr. JAMES...............................  Patents, chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Enrolled Bills
                                          Finance
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico

Mr. JOHNSON.............................  National Banks, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Coast Defense
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Finance
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pensions
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Territories

Mr. JOHNSTON............................  Military Affairs, chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Revision of the Laws of the
                                           United States
                                          University of the United
                                           States

Mr. KERN................................  Privileges and Elections,
                                           chairman
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Immigration
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Printing
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Rules

Mr. LANE................................  Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Fisheries
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Irrigation
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

Mr. LEA.................................  Library, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Disposition of Useless Papers
                                           in the Executive Departments
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Privileges and Elections

Mr. MARTIN..............................  Appropriations, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Commerce
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the
                                           Departments of Commerce and
                                           Labor
                                          Expenditures in the Navy
                                           Department
                                          Fisheries

Mr. MARTINE.............................  Coast Defenses, chairman
                                          Census
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          National Banks
                                          Philippines
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

Mr. MYERS...............................  Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands, chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Public Lands
                                          Revolutionary Claims

Mr. NEWLANDS............................  Interstate Commerce, chairman
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Disposition of Useless Papers
                                           in Executive Departments
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Library
                                          Revolutionary Claims

Mr. O'GORMAN............................  Interoceanic Canals, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Immigration
                                          Judiciary
                                          Manufactures
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Rules

Mr. OVERMAN.............................  Rules, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Claims
                                          Forest Reservations and
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Judiciary
                                          University of the United
                                           States

Mr. OWEN................................  Banking and Currency, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Library
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Territories
                                          Woman Suffrage

Mr. PITTMAN.............................  Territories, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Pacific Railroads

Mr. POMERENE............................  Civil Service and
                                           Retrenchment, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Census
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures
                                          Privileges and Elections

Mr. RANSDELL............................  Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine, chairman
                                          Agriculture
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Commerce
                                          Expenditures in the State
                                           Department
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Lands
                                          Woman Suffrage

Mr. REED................................  Manufactures, chairman
                                          Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Judiciary
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Philippines
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Railroads

Mr. ROBINSON............................  Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Claims
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Immigration
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Revision of the Laws of the
                                           United States (joint)
                                          Public Lands

Mr. SAULSBURY...........................  Coast and Insular Survey,
                                           chairman
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Engrossed Bills
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          University of the United
                                           States

Mr. SHAFROTH............................  Pacific Islands and Porto
                                           Rico, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Appropriations
                                          Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Philippines
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products

Mr. SHEPPARD............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Census
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Commerce
                                          Immigration
                                          Irrigation
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

Mr. SHIELDS.............................  Canadian Relations, chairman
                                          Commerce
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries

Mr. SHIVELY.............................  Pensions, chairman
                                          Census
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Finance
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Library
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Patents
                                          Territories

Mr. SIMMONS.............................  Finance, chairman
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Commerce
                                          Engrossed Bills
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products

Mr. SMITH of Arizona....................  Conservation of National
                                           Resources, chairman
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Printing
                                          Public Lands
                                          Railroads

Mr. SMITH of Georgia....................  Education and Labor, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Finance
                                          Library
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads

Mr. SMITH of Maryland...................  District of Columbia, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department
                                          Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands
                                          Naval Affairs

Mr. SMITH of South Carolina.............  Immigration, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures
                                          Patents
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Railroads

Mr. STONE...............................  Indian Affairs, chairman
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of State
                                          Finance
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Mississippi River and
                                           Tributaries
                                          Pacific Railroads

Mr. SWANSON.............................  Public Buildings and Grounds,
                                           chairman
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads

Mr. THOMAS..............................  Woman Suffrage, chairman
                                          Finance
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Library
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Public Lands

Mr. THOMPSON............................  Expenditures in the
                                           Departments of Commerce and
                                           Labor, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Census
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Public Lands

Mr. THORNTON............................  Fisheries, chairman
                                          Census
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Manufactures
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          Naval Affairs

Mr. TILLMAN.............................  Naval Affairs, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Expenditures in the Navy
                                           Department
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Private Land Claims

Mr. VARDAMAN............................  Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department, chairman
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          Commerce
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

Mr. WALSH...............................  Mines and Mining, chairman
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Judiciary
                                          Pensions
                                          Philippines
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Territories

Mr. WILLIAMS............................  Audit and Control of the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate, chairman
                                          Finance
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Railroads
                                          Rules
                                          University of the United
                                           States
------------------------------------------------------------------------

On motion, action of the Resolutions proposed in the Report of the 
Steering Committee, was deferred.

Senator Tillman moved the adoption of the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the report of the Steering Committee just 
  presented be disapproved; that the Report be referred back 
  to said Committee with instructions to substitute Tillman's 
  name for Martin's as Chairman of the Committee on 
  Appropriations.7
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \7\ In 1908 and 1910 Senator Tillman suffered a paralytic stroke and a 
cerebral hemorrhage, which left him a permanent invalid and caused his 
frequent absences from the Senate. Under the caucus's seniority 
practice, Tillman was entitled to choose between chairing the committees 
on Appropriations, Interstate Commerce, and Naval Affairs. Tillman 
informed the caucus that he preferred the Appropriations Committee. 
However, the caucus determined that Tillman's ill health would prevent 
him from functioning effectively as chairman of the powerful 
Appropriations Committee, and assigned him--over his protests--the less 
arduous task of chairing the Naval Affairs Committee. See Francis Butler 
Simkins, Pitchfork Ben Tillman: South Carolinian (Baton Rouge: Louisiana 
State University Press, 1944), pp. 508-10.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

At the request of Senator Tillman, a roll call on said resolution 
resulted as follows:

  Yeas 4
  Nays 33

The motion was therefore lost.
Senator Sheppard then moved the adoption of the report of the Steering 
Committee on assignment of the Committees of the Senate, and this motion 
prevailed.
Senator Bankhead moved to postpone the adoption of the resolutions 
contained in the Report of the Steering Committee until the first 
Conference of the Extra Session. Carried.
On motion, the Caucus then adjourned to meet Monday morning, March 17th, 
1913, at ten o'clock, a.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 17, 1913]

MARCH 17, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met on Monday morning, March 17th, 
1913, at ten o'clock.
The meeting was called to order by the Chairman.
The calling of the roll disclosed 30 Senators present and 20 absent.
By a vote of the Caucus, the speech of Senator Tillman at the last 
meeting of the Caucus was released for the newspapers.
Senator Sheppard moved that a resolution be adopted by the Caucus 
providing an additional employe[e] for each Democratic Chairman having 
only two employe[e]s of his Committee, and that a resolution be prepared 
to that effect and presented to the Senate, such employe[e] to be paid 
out of the contingent fund. Unanimously adopted.
The Chairman appointed as a Committee to draft such a resolution 
Senators Sheppard, Thompson and Saulsbury.
Senator James moved that the matter of assignment of rooms be referred 
to the Committee on Rules. Declared carried, after amendment offered by 
Senator Gore that [the] Committee on Rules report back their action to 
the Caucus was lost.
The Caucus then adjourned until three o'clock Monday afternoon.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate reconvened at 3:20 o'clock, Monday 
afternoon, March 17, 1913.
The motion to give and provide for assignment to each Democratic 
Chairman of a Committee two Clerks and one Messenger was unanimously 
adopted and the Committees of the Senate were directed to carry out the 
true intent of this motion.

Senator Swanson offered the following resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted:

  RESOLVED, That the Report of the Committee on Patronage be 
  received and that the Committee be directed to proceed to 
  arrange with Democratic Senators for a distribution of 
  patronage, including all employe[e]s, as nearly as possible 
  equally among Democratic Senators. That in doing so the 
  substance of the Committee's Report be approved except as 
  the Committee may find it possible to enlarge the quota of 
  each Senator on further consideration by modifying the 
  exemptions and abolition of offices. That as to the 
  permanent roll, the Committee on Division of Patronage, 
  hereinafter provided for, shall substitute a Democrat for a 
  Republican where the same may be done without substantial 
  detriment to the efficient service of the Senate and their 
  obligation to the Republican minority.

On motion of Senator Martine, the following resolution was adopted:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Democratic Members of 
  the United States Senate, in Caucus assembled, that the 
  Supervisor of the Senate Building is hereby authorized and 
  instructed to remove all Bath Rooms and appliances thereto, 
  as now existing in the Senate Office Building and Further 
  that all attendants in said Bath Rooms are herewith 
  discharged.

The request of Senator [Joseph L.] Bristow [Republican, Kansas] was 
referred to the Steering Committee.
The Caucus then adjourned, subject to the call of the Chair.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

  [Editor's Note: On April 8, 1913, President Wilson broke with 
tradition to address a joint session of Congress about the need to lower 
tariff duties, which he declared had become ``a set of privileges and 
exemptions from competition behind which it was easy by any, even the 
crudest, forms of competition to organize monopoly.'' The following day, 
Wilson went to the President's Room, outside the Senate chamber, to meet 
personally with members of the Senate Finance Committee. The Democratic 
majority in the House acted swiftly. Led by House Ways and Means 
Committee chairman Oscar W. Underwood (Democrat, Alabama), the House 
enacted the tariff bill on May 8, by a vote of 281 to 139. However, the 
Wilson administration was aware that previous efforts to reduce the 
tariff had passed the House only to be reversed in the Senate.
   In the Senate the tariff bill was managed by Finance Committee 
chairman Furnifold Simmons (Democrat, North Carolina), who had 
previously supported the high-rate Payne-Aldrich Tariff of 1909, in 
return for protectionist rates for cotton textiles, lumber and other 
interests in his state. Although Simmons pledged his support for 
Wilson's tariff proposals, Democrats chose to debate the tariff rates 
more in the caucus rather than the Finance Committee. This strategy 
risked alienating progressive Republicans, who were excluded from the 
caucus proceedings. Given that the two Louisiana Democratic senators 
opposed the tariff because it lowered rates for sugar imports, any 
additional defections would have denied the Democrats enough votes to 
pass the tariff without significant compromise. In addition to his 
personal lobbying, Wilson pressured the Senate through public opinion. 
At his press conference on May 26, President Wilson denounced the 
``extraordinary lobbying'' efforts against the tariff bill. ``This town 
is swarming with lobbyists,'' the president asserted, calling it ``as 
concerted an effort, I dare say, as has ever been made to influence 
governmental legislation by the pressure of public interests.'' 
8 A subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee, chaired by Lee 
S. Overman (Democrat, North Carolina) investigated Wilson's charges, 
uncovering evidence of extensive lobbying and of senators who had 
personal financial interest in businesses that were affected by tariff 
duties.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \8\ Arthur S. Link, et al., eds., The Papers of Woodrow Wilson 
(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978), 27: 471-72.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

   These revelations helped the Democratic Conference maintain a united 
position on tariff reductions. On July 7, the caucus voted to make the 
tariff bill ``a party measure,'' and to call for the Democratic senators 
to unite in support of the bill as amended in the caucus. The Underwood-
Simmons bill went to the Senate on July 11, and was approved by a vote 
of 44 to 37 on August 9, with all Democrats voting for or paired in 
favor of the bill, except for the two senators from 
Louisiana.9]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \9\ See Arthur S. Link, Wilson: the New Freedom (Princeton: Princeton 
University Press, 1956), pp. 177-97. A compendium of the votes on the 
tariff, showing the extraordinary unity among Democratic senators, was 
published as Senate Document 556, 63rd Congress, 2nd Session, Underwood-
Simmons Tariff Bill; Yea and Nay Votes in the United States Senate 
(Washington: Government Printing Office, 1914).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                         [April 8, 1913]

APRIL 8, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met at 1:30 p.m., Tuesday afternoon, 
April 8th, 1913.
The roll call disclosed 39 Senators present.
The Chairman stated to the meeting unfinished business to be the reason 
for the call of the caucus.
Senator Tillman submitted to the caucus the matter of Door Keeper 
Anderson taken from the permanent roll and assigned to him as patronage, 
and this was referred to the Committee on Patronage.

The following resolution, heretofore submitted to the caucus in the 
report of the Steering Committee, was then read to the meeting:

  RESOLVED, That a majority of the Democratic members of any 
  committee may call a meeting of such committee, and shall 
  select, by a recorded vote of such members, all Democratic 
  members of conference committees and of all sub-committees 
  representing the Committee.

Senator O'Gorman moved that the word ``may'' be substituted for the word 
``shall'' where it appears in said resolution, and this amendment was 
adopted by unanimous consent.

Senator Williams then offered the following as a substitute:

  RESOLVED, That hereafter the Chairman in selecting conferees 
  and subcommittees shall not be guided solely by the rule of 
  the committee rank but by such consideration of efficiency 
  as may seem good to them and their respective committee, 
  which was lost, and the Resolution, as amended and adopted 
  by the caucus, now reads as follows:
  RESOLVED, That a majority of the Democratic Members of any 
  Committee may call a meeting of such committee, and may 
  select, by a recorded vote of such members, all Democratic 
  members of conference committee and of all subcommittees 
  representing the committee.

The consideration of the following resolutions, heretofore submitted, 
was then taken up:

  RESOLVED:

    1. That hereafter the members of the Steering Committee 
    shall be elected by the conference.
    2. That hereafter the majority members of committees 
    shall elect their own Chairman.
    3. That all vacancies on Committees in the future shall 
    be nominated by the Steering Committee subject to the 
    approval of the conference.

The consideration of said resolutions was postponed until a later 
caucus.
Senator Newlands moved that it is the sense of the caucus that the duty 
on sugar and wool be reduced forty per cent.
The Caucus then adjourned (with this motion not acted on) subject to the 
Call of the Chairman.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                           [May 5, 1913]

MAY 5, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met at 11 o'clock, a.m., Monday, May 
5th, A.D. 1913.
The calling of the roll disclosed 38 Senators present.
The Chairman stated the reason of the call for the meeting to be the 
humiliation caused by the failure of Democrats to muster a majority in 
the session of the Senate on Thursday last (May 1st) and asked that this 
condition be remedied.

Senator Swanson then offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Caucus that no member 
  shall absent himself from any session of the Senate without 
  first reporting to and getting the consent of the Chairman 
  of the Caucus for his absence.

The above resolution was unanimously adopted.
On motion of Senator Williams, the caucus adjourned to meet at 11 
o'clock, a.m., Tuesday, May 6th, 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                           [May 6, 1913]

MAY 6, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met on Tuesday morning, May 6th, 
1913, at eleven o'clock, 37 Senators being present.
Senator Williams introduced the matter of the Report of the Committee 
[to] Audit and [Control the] Contingent Expenses of the Senate against 
giving Republicans three employees, calling attention to the previous 
action of the Caucus, deciding to give Republicans only what the 
Republicans had given to the Democrats, and moving that the previous 
action of the Caucus, (giving to the Republicans only what they had 
allowed the Democrats) be strictly adhered to and that participants in 
the Caucus be bound thereby.

This motion of Senator Williams was unanimously adopted after Senator 
Newlands had offered the following substitute:

  RESOLVED, That each Senator of the Minority other than 
  Chairmen of Committees be allowed an additional stenographer 
  at a salary of twelve hundred dollars per annum,--which 
  motion as offered by Senator Newlands was subsequently 
  withdrawn and the motion of Senator Williams adopted 
  unanimously by the Caucus, as stated.

Senator Newlands then offered the following Resolution:

  RESOLVED, That the duties fixed by the pending Bill shall 
  take full effect on the first day of January, A.D. 1916, and 
  that the difference between the existing duties and those 
  fixed by such bill shall be gradually reduced between the 
  first day of January, A.D. 1914, and the first day of 
  January, A.D. 1916, as follows: One-third thereof on the 
  first day of January, A.D. 1914; one-third thereof on the 
  first day of January, A.D. 1915; and one-third thereof on 
  the first day of January, A.D. 1916.

Pending discussion of the Resolution offered by Senator Newlands, the 
Caucus adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 19, 1913]

MAY 19, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met on Monday morning, May 19th, 
1913, at eleven o'clock, the calling of the roll showing 36 Senators 
present.
The Chairman stated that the matter of ``Senators Pairs'' was the reason 
for the calling of the Caucus.
Senator Owen moved that all pairs be canceled, after reasonable notice, 
so far as they apply to Executive Sessions. That notice be given of the 
cancellation of all pairs, to take effect with regard to Republican 
Senators now present in Washington on Wednesday at the meeting of the 
Senate, and as to Republican Senators absent from the City, to take 
effect six days from this date. That there be no cancellation with 
regard to Republicans who are sick and physically unable to attend the 
Senate.

Senator Owen then offered the following Resolution:

   RESOLVED, That each Democratic Senator shall advise his 
  Republican Pair that he will reserve the right to vote in 
  Executive Session, to take effect as to Senators in 
  Washington immediately after actual notice, and giving time 
  to any absent Senator sufficient to be present but not to 
  include a Senator now sick and confined to the house.

Senator Swanson then moved the adoption of the following Resolution as a 
substitute for the Resolution offered by Senator Owen:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Caucus that 
  Democratic Senators shall as soon as possible arrange their 
  pairs so as to reserve the privilege of voting in Executive 
  Session, when necessary to make a quorum, or for the entire 
  Executive Session.

On motion, the resolution of Senator Swanson was adopted unanimously by 
the Caucus.

The following resolution was then proposed by Senator Hollis:

   RESOLVED, That the Chair appoint a Committee of Five, to 
  confer with the Democratic Congressional Committee from the 
  House of Representatives and a similar Committee from the 
  National Committee, to formulate and report upon a permanent 
  plan for the conduct of Senatorial and Congressional 
  elections.

The Caucus adjourned during discussion of this resolution.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Chair appointed the following Senators on the committee authorized by 
above resolution adopted on [May 28, 1913].

  Chamberlain
  Shively
  Newlands
  Smith of Ariz.
  Thomas
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 28, 1913]

MAY 28, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate met on Wednesday morning, May 28th, 
1913, at 10:30 o'clock, the calling of the roll disclosing thirty-three 
Senators present.
The object of this meeting of the Caucus, as stated by the Chairman, was 
to consider the proposed absence of several Democratic Senators.
Senator Simmons offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that in 
  view of important matters likely to come before the Senate 
  at any time, and of complications likely to arise both in 
  legislative and executive sessions, Senators are requested 
  to be in attendance throughout the present session, unless 
  absent for important reasons. Adopted unanimously.

Senator Stone advocated the selection of a Democratic ``whip'' so-called 
and moved that Senator Lewis 10 be appointed to assist the 
Chairman in securing the attendance of Senators on all necessary 
occasions.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \10\ James Hamilton Lewis, Illinois, 1913-1919, 1931-1939, served as 
Democratic whip throughout his service in the Senate. He was the first 
senator of either party to hold that title.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The resolution of Senator Hollis, at last meeting, proposing to appoint 
Senators to co-operate with the Democratic Congressional Committee and 
the Democratic National Committee, was then unanimously 
adopted.11
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \11\ On May 29, 1913, the Washington Post identified the senators 
named to meet with the Democratic National Committee as Senators Gore, 
Chamberlain, Shively, Newlands, and Thomas.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator James moved that the Committee on Naval Affairs be increased by 
one member, which was adopted.
Senator Vardaman moved that the Chairmen of the Senate Committees be 
requested to adjourn their committee meetings in sufficient time to meet 
in Caucus at the time for which Caucus may be called.
Certain committee changes were then agreed to by the Caucus by the 
surrender of places by certain senators and the appointment of Senator 
Lewis in their stead.12
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \12\ To provide Senator Lewis with committee assignments, Senator Kern 
relinquished his seat on Interstate Commerce, Senator Hitchcock the 
Printing Committee, Senator Thornton the Pacific Islands and Porto Rico 
Committee, Senator Saulsbury the Committee on Manufactures, Senator 
Clarke the Railroads Committee, and Senator Chamberlain the National 
Banks Committee. Lewis was also made chairman of the Committee on 
Expenditures in the State Department. See Washington Post, May 29, 1913.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The meeting thereupon adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 20, 1913]

JUNE 20, 1913

The Democratic Caucus was called to order by the Chairman, Friday, June 
20th, 1913, at ten o'clock, a.m.
34 Senators were present.
Senator Simmons, Chairman of the Finance Committee, made statement to 
the Caucus concerning the action of the Caucus comparing changes in the 
proposed bill with the House Bill, during which there was considerable 
discussion and at one o'clock, Senator Swanson moved that the Finance 
Committee be authorized to give out to the representatives of the Press 
desiring it the draft of H.[R.] 3321 submitted by the Finance Committee 
with proposed amendments, together with a statement by the Chairman of 
the Finance Committee, showing the actual conditions as to the 
reductions proposed by the Senate Committee and that all of the members 
of the Caucus shall refrain from making statements to the press.
This motion unanimously prevailed and the Caucus then adjourned to meet 
on Saturday, June 21st, 1913, at ten o'clock, a.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 21, 1913]

JUNE 21, 1913

Democratic Caucus of the Senate met on Saturday, June 21st, 1913, at 
10:30 o'clock a.m. 39 Senators present.
Senator Simmons continued his statements regarding the tariff bill. On 
motion it was agreed that the amendments made by the Committee be read 
and afterwards the advisability of changes should be taken up.
Schedule A (Chemicals) was then taken up and the Caucus at 11:55 took a 
recess until thirty minutes after the Senate adjourns this day.
Caucus re-convened at 2:30 p.m., June 21st.
Schedule A was finished and approved by the Caucus without change.
Schedule B (Earths, &c.) was taken up for consideration. When paragraphs 
95-96, page 27, were reached, they were referred back to the Committee, 
it being understood that Stained Glass, paragraph 97, be considered by 
the Committee, also the provision ``or without,'' paragraph 97, in 
connection with paragraph 86.
Subject to this reference and understanding, Schedule B was approved 
without change.
Schedule C (Metals) was then taken up. Paragraph 121 was referred back 
to the Committee with instructions to reduce duty on low priced 
machines.
Paragraphs 127 [and] 128 were referred back to the Committee.
The Caucus then adjourned to 10 o'clock a.m., June 23rd.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 23, 1913]

JUNE 23, 1913

Democratic Caucus met Monday, June 23rd, 1913, 26 Members appeared at 
10:30 a.m.
38 Members altogether attended the Caucus during its session.
Consideration of the metal schedule was continued.
Senator Thomas moved that Paragraphs 123-144 be referred back to the 
Committee, which motion was adopted.
Senator Reed moved referring back to the committee of paragraph 133, 
relating to files. Carried.
Senator Simmons moved to refer back to the committee paragraphs 141-144. 
Carried.
Recess until 2 o'clock, p.m.
Afternoon session. Monday, June 23rd, 1913.
Senator Overman moved that Paragraph 145 be referred back to the 
Committee, which motion was laid on the table.
Senator O'Gorman moved to put articles in Paragraph 145 on the Free 
List.
Substitute moved by Senator Williams to approve the action of the 
Finance Committee as to Paragraph 145 was adopted.
Paragraphs 149-116 referred on motion of Senator Clarke back to the 
Finance Committee.
Senator Swanson moved to retain House rate of \1/2\ cents instead of \3/
4\ cents in paragraph 154. Motion lost by vote of Ayes 8, Noes 27.
Schedule C, with the exception of the paragraphs above mentioned, was 
then approved.
Schedule D (Wood &c.) then taken up.
Senator Martine moved to put articles in paragraph 172 on the free list. 
Lost. Ayes, 14; Noes, 22.
The schedule was then adopted without change.
Schedule E (Sugar) was then taken up. Senator Shafroth moved to amend 
paragraph 179 by striking out the words ``Free of duty'' at the end 
thereof and inserting in lieu thereof, the words ``at a rate equal to 
one-half the above duties,'' and addressed the Caucus in favor of his 
motion.
Senator Walsh followed and before concluding his speech, by consent, 
Senator Chamberlain reported from the Committee appointed to confer with 
the House Committee and Democratic Congressional Committee and National 
Democratic Committee that the Committee of Senators had met with the 
members of the House and said Committees, and resolved as follows:

  RESOLVED, That the Democrats of the Senate shall be 
  represented on the Democratic Congressional Committee by one 
  member of such Committee from each state having Democratic 
  representation in the Senate, and in which a Senatorial term 
  expires in 1915; that in the case where both Senators are 
  Democrats, the Senator whose term expires in 1915 shall be 
  the member of the Committee from his State, and that in the 
  case where the term of the Republican Senator expires in 
  1915, the Democratic Senator from such State shall be the 
  member of the PCommittee.

On his motion the action of the Democratic Senators' Committee was 
approved.
The Caucus then adjourned until ten o'clock, a.m., Tuesday, June 24th, 
1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 24, 1913]

JUNE 24, 1913

Senate [Democratic] Caucus reconvened Tuesday, June 24th, 1913, at 10:30 
o'clock, a.m.
26 Members present.
Number afterwards increased to 40.
No roll call, as Caucus had directed consideration of the tariff bill to 
proceed at time for assembling of the Caucus without regard to quorum 
being present, therefore consideration of the tariff bill proceeded.
Schedule F was taken up and on motion of Senator Simmons was approved 
without change.
Schedule G was then taken up, Senator Williams reading.
Chairman here interfered with the duties of the Secretary by telling his 
laughing hyena story.
After discussion of paragraph 196, it was allowed to remain as written.
Paragraph 142 on motion of Senator Thomas was referred back to the 
Committee.
At this point Senator Walsh resumed and concluded his argument on the 
Sugar Schedule.
At the conclusion of his remarks, Caucus recessed until 2:30 p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Caucus reassembled at 2:40 o'clock, p.m., June 24, 1913.
Senator Myers addressed the Caucus.
Senator Thornton of Louisiana moved as a substitute of Senator 
Shafroth's that all in lines 15 to 17, beginning with the word 
``Provided'' and ending with the words ``Free of Duty'' be stricken out 
on page 52.
Senator Thornton addressed the Caucus.
Senator Ransdell addressed the Caucus.
Unanimous consent was then given to take a vote on free sugar and free 
wool not later than four o'clock p.m. on Wednesday, June 25th.
At the conclusion of Senator Ransdell's remarks, the Caucus adjourned to 
ten o'clock, a.m., June 25th, 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 25, 1913]

JUNE 25, 1913

Caucus met June 25th, 1913, at 10:30 a.m., pursuant to adjournment.

The following gentlemen addressed the Caucus:

  Senators Ransdell, Thomas, Williams, James, Newlands, 
  Shafroth, Pomerene, Thornton, Walsh, Simmons, Johnson, 
  Clarke, Lane, Martine, Smith (S.C.) and Thompson.

The vote agreed to be taken by unanimous consent on free wool and free 
sugar was taken at the close of the discussion at 4:06 p.m., as follows:

  Senator Thornton's amendment was lost: Ayes 2; Noes 
  43.13 [See tally sheet A]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \13\ The numbers given for each vote, and the tally sheets with their 
totals, are reproduced here as they appear in the minutes. No attempt 
has been made to reconcile the discrepancies that exist in some cases 
between the vote as reported in the minutes, the number of marks on the 
tally sheet, and the total written at the bottom of a sheet. The minutes 
books also do not necessarily contain a tally sheet for every roll-call 
vote.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Senator Shafroth's motion was lost: Ayes 10; Noes 35. [See 
  tally sheet B]

Senator Thompson moved to amend as follows:

  Amend the paragraph in question, by striking out the words 
  ``free of duty'' in line 17 and by adding the following 
  words: ``at one-half of the above duty; and that such duty 
  as so reduced shall thereafter be reduced twenty-five per 
  cent each year until said articles shall be admitted free of 
  duty''

  Making the section read as follows:

    Provided, That on and after the first day of May, 
    nineteen hundred and sixteen, the articles hereinbefore 
    enumerated in this paragraph shall be admitted at one-
    half of the above duty; and that such duty as so reduced 
    shall thereafter be reduced 25% each year until said 
    articles shall be admitted free of duty.

Which amendment was lost: Ayes 8; Noes 38. [See tally sheet C]
Senator Ransdell moved that the existing schedule remain in effect until 
February first, so that the present crop of cane may be harvested and 
then the law apply as provided in the bill. This motion after discussion 
showing the Committee had the matter under discussion as to when the Act 
should take effect, was withdrawn.
Senator Simmons then moved to approve the action of the Committee 
respecting Schedule E, which motion prevailed: Ayes 38; Noes 6. [See 
tally sheet E]

Senator Walsh then offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That Schedule K be reported back to the Committee 
  on Finance, with instructions to remodel the same so as that 
  Classes 1 and 2 of wool, as defined in the existing tariff 
  act, shall bear a duty of 15% and Class 3 as so defined 
  shall be admitted free.

Which motion was lost: Ayes 7; Noes 36. [See tally sheet F]
Senator Simmons moved that the Caucus approve paragraphs 652-653. 
Declared Carried.
The vote for Free Wool stood: Ayes 40; Noes 6. [See tally sheet D]
Senator Smith (Ariz.) moved to amend so that Angora Wool be left at the 
House rate, which motion was lost.
Senator Simmons moved that the balance of the paragraph be adopted, 
which motion prevailed by a vive voce vote.
Senator Johnston of Alabama moved to adjourn; which motion was lost.
The Caucus resumed consideration.
Schedule G, at paragraph 197--discussion proceeded in connection with 
paragraph 646.
Senator O'Gorman moved to strike out all the provisions in paragraph 
646.
During the discussion on this motion, and without voting, the caucus on 
motion adjourned until ten o'clock a.m., Thursday, June 26, 1913.
The roll calls on the various amendments affecting sugar and wool will 
be found to follow these minutes.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

1. For Thornton Amendment
[Free Sugar]
[Tally sheet A]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon    
            Bankhead 
            Bryan    
            Chamberla
            Chilton  
            Clarke   
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore     
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
            Kern     
            Lane     
            Lea      
            Lewis
            Martin   
            Martine  
            Myers    
            Newlands 
            O'Gorman 
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman  
            Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed     
            Robinson 
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
            Sheppard 
            Shields  
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
     Thornton
            Tillman  
            Vardaman 
            Walsh    
            Williams 
       2               45

2. For Shafroth Amendment
[Sugar paragraph]
[Tally sheet B]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon    
            Bankhead 
            Bryan    
     Chamberlain
            Chilton  
            Clarke   
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
            Kern     
     Lane
            Lea      
            Lewis
            Martin   
            Martine  
            Myers    
     Newlands
            O'Gorman 
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman  
            Pomerene 
     Ransdell
            Reed     
            Robinson 
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields  
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
     Thompson
     Thornton
     Tillman
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
            Williams 
      10               36

3. For Thompson Amendment
[Sugar paragraph]
[Tally sheet C]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon    
            Bankhead 
            Bryan    
     Chamberlain
            Chilton  
            Clarke   
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
            Kern     
            Lane     
            Lea      
            Lewis
            Martin   
            Martine  
            Myers    
     Newlands
            O'Gorman 
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman  
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell 
            Reed     
            Robinson 
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields  
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
     Thompson
            Thornton 
     Tillman
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
            Williams 
       8               29

4. Free Wool
[For 652-32.155]
[Tally sheet D]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberla
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands 
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton 
            Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
     Williams
      40                6

5. Adoption of Schedule K as reported by 
Committee
[Tally sheet E]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands 
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton 
     Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
     Williams
      38                6

6. For Walsh as to classes 1 & 2 & 3 of 
wools
[Tally sheet F]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon    
            Bankhead
            Bryan    
     Chamberlain
            Chilton  
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore     
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
            Kern     
            Lane     
            Lea      
            Lewis
            Martin   
            Martine  
            Myers    
     Newlands
            O'Gorman 
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman  
            Pomerene 
     Ransdell
            Reed     
            Robinson 
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields  
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
            Williams 
       7               38
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 26, 1913]

JUNE 26, 1913

Democratic Caucus convened June 26th, 1913, at ten o'clock a.m., 
pursuant to adjournment.
Senator Reed asked unanimous consent that the consideration of the wheat 
item be temporarily postponed until 11:30 o'clock. So ordered.
Senator Clarke moved that no more meeting of Senate Committees except 
Committee to Audit and Control Contingent Expenses be held unless with 
the approval of the Caucus.
Senator Martine moved to put butter and butter substitutes paragraph 
200, on free list.
Senator Martine's motion lost: 10 Ayes; 16 Noes.
Senator Reed moved that Paragraph 200, butter section, be referred back 
to the Committee.
During discussion of this motion, recess was taken until 15 minutes 
after adjournment of the Senate.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reconvened at 5:50 p.m., June 26th, 1913.
Senator Simmons moved that debate on each amendment hereafter be limited 
to thirty minutes and each Senator be limited to five minutes and no 
Senator be allowed to speak more than once.
Carried unanimously.
Senator Simmons also moved that Caucus hold morning, afternoon and night 
sessions when not interfered with by Senate sessions, namely, from 10 
o'clock, a.m. to one o'clock p.m., from two o'clock, p.m. to six 
o'clock, p.m., and from eight o'clock p.m., until adjournment.
Carried.
On motion Caucus adjourned until ten o'clock, Friday morning, June 27th, 
1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 27, 1913]

JUNE 27, 1913

Caucus reconvened Friday, June 27th, 1913, at 10:20 a.m.
In the absence of Senator Kern, Senator Chilton was made Chairman pro 
tempore.
Senator Reed's motion to refer paragraph 200 back to the Committee was 
carried viva voce.
Senator Martine moved to put articles in Paragraph 201 on the Free List.
Senator Thomas moved as amendment that Paragraphs 201 to 209, inclusive, 
be put on the Free List. Point of order by Senator Vardaman that 
separate vote[s] should be taken.
Separate vote[s] ordered.
Senator Martine's motion lost by viva voce vote, so paragraph 201 was 
approved as reported by Committee.
Senator Martine moved paragraph 202 be put on the Free List. Lost.
Senator O'Gorman moved to change 25%, in line 11, paragraph 221, back to 
20%. 5 Ayes, 14 Noes.
Paragraph 225 passed until Senator Bryan returned to Caucus.
Paragraphs 227-233 referred back to the Committee.
Senator Bryan appeared and Paragraph 225, Citrus Fruits, was taken up.
Senator Newlands moved to reduce the duty on Lemons only 50% from 
present rate of 1\1/2\ cents per pound, or from 1\1/2\ cents per pound 
to \3/4\ cents per pound. This motion was subsequently withdrawn.
On motion of Senator Bryan, paragraph 225 was referred back to the 
Committee.
Senator O'Gorman moved to strike out proviso for countervailing duty in 
paragraph 646, which motion was lost, Ayes 8, Noes 26. Vote is shown by 
roll call. [See tally sheet G]
Senator O'Gorman moved that President may direct by Executive Order in 
substance as provided by countervailing duty, as provided for in lines 7 
to 14. Subsequently withdrawn.
Senator Reed moved to insert after the word ``that'' in line 7, 
paragraph 646, the words ``after January 1st, 1914.'' Lost by viva voce 
vote.
Senator Simmons moved adoption of Schedule G, as amended by the 
Committee, except as to paragraphs referred back to the Committee, which 
motion prevailed.
Senator Newlands moved that the Committee on Finance be instructed to 
reduce the duties on all food products contained in Schedule G by a 
sliding scale of ten per cent. per annum, extending over a period of ten 
years, to the free list. This motion was lost.
Schedule H, paragraph 254, with Committee amendments, approved on motion 
of Senator Simmons.
On his motion also paragraph 254\1/2\ referred back to Committee on 
Finance.
At 1:05 p.m. recessed until 15 minutes after the adjournment of the 
Senate.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Democratic Caucus reconvened June 27th, 1913, at 5:35 p.m., after 
adjournment of the Senate.
Senator Ransdell was elected temporary Chairman.
On motion, Caucus adjourned until eight o'clock, p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reconvened Friday, June 27th, 1913, at 8 o'clock, p.m.
Senator Vardaman moved to increase all rates under Schedule H 30%. Laid 
on the table by a viva voce vote.
Schedule G taken up.
Paragraphs 255 and 256, page 70, approved.
Senator Saulsbury moved to recommit paragraph 256 to the Committee, with 
instructions to put sewing cotton on the Free List. Carried 15 Ayes, 14 
Noes.
After Committee had leave to strike out in Paragraph 257 all of lines 
25, page 73, line 4, page 74, and the words ``plain woven,'' in line 21, 
page 72, Paragraph 257 was approved.
Paragraph 258 was adopted with lines 16 and 17 out.
Paragraph 259 and Paragraphs 260 and 261 were approved, permission being 
given to slightly change verbiage.
Paragraph 262 was approved.
Senator Hollis moved to amend Paragraph 263, page 76, line 15, by adding 
after the word ``goods,'' the words ``and woven-figures bed spreads.'' 
Lost by viva voce vote, after which Paragraph 263 was Papproved.
Paragraph 265, Senator Sheppard moved to reduce ``50%'' in line 5, page 
77, to 40%. Lost.
Senator Reed moved to restore House Rate of 35% in line 7, page 77. 
Lost.
Motion to adjourn. Lost.
Paragraph 266 approved.
Paragraph 267 referred back to the Committee.
Senator Hollis offered two amendments and moved to refer same back to 
the Committee.

These amendments are as follows:

  In paragraph 255, page 70, lines 15, 16 and 17, strike out 
  the words ``Not combed, bleached, dyed, mercerized, or 
  colored, except spool thread of cotton, crochet, darning and 
  embroidery cottons, hereinafter provided for,'' and insert 
  in place thereof the words ``not hereinafter specially 
  provided for.''

In line 8, page 71, of same paragraph, insert after the word ``colored'' 
the words ``or if specially manufactured for crochet, knitting, darning 
or embroidery purposes.''
In paragraph 256, page 72, strike out the words ``crochet, darning and 
embroidery cottons.''

Tariff Bill as reported to the Caucus be amended by adding the following 
paragraph to the Cloth Schedule:

   Cotton cloth woven with colored yarns shall pay a duty of 
  1\6/10\ times the duty on cloth of the same construction 
  woven from grey yarns.

On motion adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

[Free Wheat]
[Tally sheet G]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon
            Bankhead 
            Bryan
            Chamberla
            Chilton  
            Clarke   
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
            Kern     
            Lane
     Lea
            Lewis
            Martin   
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands 
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman
            Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Stone    
            Swanson
            Thomas   
            Thompson
            Thornton 
            Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
       8               26
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 28, 1913]

JUNE 28, 1913

Senate Caucus reconvened 10:25 a.m., Saturday, June 28th, 1913.
At the request of Senator Williams, who was absent, Schedule I was 
passed for a time.
Schedule K was taken up.
Senator Walsh moved to recommit Paragraph 295, with instructions to 
consider whether tops, &c., should not go on the Free List. Agreed to.
Paragraph 297 was amended by striking out lines 6 to 11, beginning with 
the word ``plushes'' and ending with the word ``ad valorem.''
Senator Ashurst moved that all articles in lines 1, 2, 3 and 4, in 
paragraph 297, and in the same paragraph beginning with the word 
``Stockings'' and paragraphs 298, 299 and 300, be put on the Free List, 
which motion was lost.
Senator Johnston moved that the time for the discussion of this motion 
be extended 30 minutes. Carried by a vote of 17 to 4.
The matter of Press Cloth, page 85, lines 22, referred to committee at 
request of committee.
At one o'clock, p.m., on motion of Senator Simmons, time extended for 
session until 1:15, when Caucus adjourned to meet 15 minutes after 
adjournment of the Senate.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reconvened Saturday afternoon, June 28th, 1913, at 2:35 o'clock.
Senator Reed moved to put blankets on the Free List--paragraph 298. 
Lost, Ayes 11, Noes 19. [See tally sheet H]
Senator Johnston moved to free list blankets valued under 40 cents per 
pound. Amendment accepted, and then on motion referred to the committee: 
Also flannels, and all in paragraph 298.
Paragraph 315 referred to Committee, after which Schedule K was 
approved, except as amended, and as to paragraphs referred to the 
Committee.
Schedule J was then taken up, Senator Williams having returned.
Senator Saulsbury then moved to place on the free list articles named in 
paragraph 280--gill nets, seines, &c. Motion was lost, after which 
paragraph was approved.
Paragraph 290 was referred back to the Committee on Senator Walsh's 
suggestion that articles therein go to the free list.
Schedule J and Paragraph 416 then approved, except as to the matters 
referred to the Committee.
Senator Thomas moved, at paragraph 89, line 3, to insert after 
``surface'' the words ``and woven figured upholstery goods.''
Schedule L, paragraph 319, approved.
All to paragraph 323 approved, ``per number'' line 24, page 89, first 
struck out.
Schedule L approved, after ``35%,'' line 6, page 94, changed to 30%.
Schedule M, page 99, line 24, permission given to insert certain 
specifications.
Senator Vardaman moved to admit free, all books under three dollars in 
value. Lost.
At line 18, page 102, permission given to insert after ``cards'' the 
words ``not including American Views.''
Schedule M, and paragraph 572, were approved.
Recess was then taken until 8 o'clock, p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus called to order 8:17 p.m., Saturday, June 28, 1913.
In absence of Senator Saulsbury, Senator Sheppard was chosen Secretary 
pro tem.
Senator Smith (S.C.) moved to put blasting caps on the free list. 
Senator Hughes moved to table the motion. Withdrawn.
On motion of Senator Smith, 6 ayes, 13 noes. Lost.
Senator Pomerene moved to strike out Senate Finance Committee amendment 
in lines 10, 11, and 12. Senator Reed moved to amend by striking out all 
of paragraph 357 after word ``valorem'' in line 4, page 108. 11 ayes, 12 
noes.
Senator Reed moved to amend by striking out all of paragraph 357 after 
word ``Provided'' in line 4, page 108.
Senator Simmons asked unanimous consent that paragraph 357 be referred 
back to Finance Committee. So ordered.
Paragraph 358 referred back to committee.
Senator Martine moved to make duty on finished diamond 15 instead of 20 
per cent. Motion withdrawn.
Committee's substitute for paragraph 368 adopted.
Senators Overman and Smith (S.C.) moved that raw ivory be placed on the 
free list. Motion lost.
Senator Reed moved to substitute 25 for 15 per centum, line 11, page 
117, paragraph 386 (increasing duty on paintings and sculpture for 
private use). Carried: 14 ayes, 11 noes, on roll called. [See tally 
sheet I]
Articles in paragraph 354, on motion of Senator Pittman, and in 353, on 
motion of Senator Thomas, put on free list.
Motion by Senator Sheppard to reduce duty of 35% on dolls, toys, &c., in 
paragraph 350, to 30 per cent. Lost: ayes 8, noes 11.
Paragraph 169 on motion of Senator Reed referred back to the Pcommittee.
Senator Sheppard moved that free list be adopted, provided any senator 
at next meeting might direct attention to any particular item. 
Withdrawn, to be offered at next meeting.
Senator Johnson, of Maine, moved to amend paragraph 452 by striking out 
after word ``catgut,'' line 18, the words ``whip gut or worm gut'' and 
by adding after words ``for surgical use,'' line 19, the words ``and 
whip gut or catgut unmanufactured.'' Carried.

Senator Chilton moved as follows and said he would call motion up later: 
Page 131, line 9, Paragraph 459, after the word ``form'' insert the 
following:

   Provided, that bituminous coal shall be subject to a duty 
  of 30 cents per ton, and shale and slack 15 cents per ton, 
  and coke shall be subject to a duty of 20 per centum ad 
  valorem, when imported directly or indirectly from a 
  country, dependency, or other subdivision of government 
  which imposes a duty upon such articles when imported from 
  the United States.

Senator Williams moved to strike out the language of paragraph 438. 
Carried.
Senator Vardaman moved to authorize the Finance Committee to correct any 
clerical or verbal inaccuracies. Carried.
Senator Thomas moved to adjourn until ten o'clock, Monday morning, June 
30th, 1913. Carried.
Caucus adjourned.

                                                [signed] Morris Sheppard

                                                          secy. pro tem.

Free List Blankets
Reed's Motion
[Tally sheet H]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead 
            Bryan    
     Chamberlain
            Chilton  
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore     
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
            Kern     
     Lane
            Lea
            Lewis
            Martin
            Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman  
            Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton 
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
      11               19

Roll Call on motion of Senator Reed to 
increase duty on paintings and sculpture 
for private use from 15 to 25 per cent.
[Tally sheet I]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James
            Johnson  
     Johnston
     Kern
     Lane
            Lea
            Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
      14               11
____________________________________________________

                                                         [June 30, 1913]

JUNE 30, 1913

Senate Caucus reconvened Monday morning, June 30th, 1913, at 10:20 a.m.
Senator Smith (S.C.) introduced a resolution and then withdrew same 
temporarily.
Senator Sheppard renewed his motion to approve free list. Motion 
withdrawn.

Senator Pomerene offered the following amendment to paragraph 401:

   Provided that any of the foregoing specified articles shall 
  be subject to a duty of eight per centum ad valorem when 
  imported directly or indirectly from a country, dependency 
  or other subdivision of Government which imposes a duty in 
  excess of eight per cent. on such articles imported from the 
  United States.

Lost, by viva voce vote.
Paragraph 403, at the request of Senator Bryan, was passed.
In paragraph 404, Senator Walsh moved to insert ``Per chlorate of'' 
after words ``sulphate of,'' line 3, page 122. Accepted.
Paragraph 403\1/2\ approved.
Paragraph 434 referred to Committee for possible insertion for printing 
machines for books, &c. for blind.
Paragraph 450, referred back to committee, without objection.
Amendment to paragraph 459, by Senator Chilton, referred to committee 
for consideration.
Paragraph 475, passed, by request of Senator Thornton.
Paragraph 534, page 137, line 24, amended by Committee, by consent, to 
read: ``Skins for morocco, rough leather tanned but not Pfinished.''

Paragraph 548, amendment offered by Committee: Add at end:

   Provided, That meat and meat products brought to the United 
  States shall be subject to the same inspection by the Bureau 
  of Animal Industry of the Department of Agriculture as 
  prescribed by the Act of June 30th, 1906, for domestic 
  cattle and meats, unless the Secretary of Agriculture shall 
  be satisfied that the government of the country whence the 
  meat or meat products are exported maintains and enforces a 
  system of inspection equal to our own, or satisfactory to 
  him, as being competent to protect the public health, in 
  which case the certificates of such government that such 
  inspection has been made shall be Psufficient.

Adopted.
Paragraph 532 amended by adding ``and Lard Substitutes.''
Paragraph 580\1/2\ amended by adding ``and moving pictures.''
Paragraph 650 amended by inserting the words ``Spanish Cedar.''
Paragraph 654 was referred to the Committee, with instruction to 
harmonize with other section, by vote of 11 ayes to 10 noes.
Paragraph 626, by consent, referred to committee for consideration.
On motion of Senator Pomerene, it was moved to refer paragraph 657 back 
to the Committee. Lost.
Caucus then took a recess until 2:15 p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reconvened, Monday afternoon, June 30th, 1913, at 2:30 o'clock.
Senator Thornton moved to amend paragraph 475, page 132, by striking out 
the paragraph, and insert in proper place: ``All cotton not further 
advanced than by being ginned, 25% ad valorem.''
Senator Newlands moved that Tahiti (Vanilla) Beans be put on the Free 
List. Lost.
Senator Bryan's motion to refer alcohol paragraphs back to committee for 
consideration, carried.
Senator Bryan's motion was to add (after 403) ``Provided that 
importations of all kinds of alcohol shall be freed from bond upon the 
terms and conditions pertaining to domestic alcohol.''
The proposal of Senator Hughes that the words ``not cut'' in paragraph 
481\1/2\, line 18, page 132, be changed to ``uncut'' was referred to the 
committee with the consent of Caucus that same be made.

Senator Newlands offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED: That it is the sense of the Democratic Caucus:

  First. That the reductions in tariff duties called for by the pending 
  bill should be distributed over a period of three years;
  Second. That at the end of three years further reductions should be 
  made upon all articles the imports of which have not equalled five per 
  cent. of similar articles produced in the United States at the rate of 
  five per cent. per annum, until such importations shall equal five per 
  cent. of similar articles produced in the United States;
  That all articles now on the free list, not including the necessaries 
  of life, shall be placed on the dutiable list at the rate of one per 
  cent. on the value thereof for the first year, and increasing 
  thereafter annually at the rate of one per cent. per annum, until the 
  duty thereon shall equal five per cent.

Ordered to lie on the table, subject to being called up at some future 
time.
Senator Chamberlain moved that a countervailing duty be placed on logs, 
&c., paragraph 649. Lost, by a viva voce vote.
Senator Simmons moved that the Free List, except as referred to the 
Committee, or reserved, be adopted. Carried.
Section II was taken up, on motion of Senator Simmons.
Senator Clarke started discussion on Sub Division A.
Senator Williams continued discussion, time limit being removed by 
unanimous consent.
Subdivision 1 adopted without objection.
Subdivision 2 referred back to Committee to phrase lines 20 and 21, page 
162.
In Line 4, page 166, the word ``from'' changed to ``for.''
Senator Walsh moved that the words ``and dependent upon him,'' in line 
21, ``and dependent upon her'' in line 24, be struck out. Carried.
Senator Johnston moved to insert ``grandchild'' at end of line 4, on 
page 168. Lost.
Senator Pomerene then moved as a substitute to strike out all in 
Subdivision C relative to exemption. Lost.
On motion, the Caucus then adjourned, to reconvene at eight o'clock, 
Monday evening, June 30th, 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reconvened at 8:30 p.m., Monday evening, June 30, 1913.
The Secretary stated Senator Newlands' request that his resolution be 
given to the Press representatives.
Ordered, that Secretary give out the resolution of Senator Newlands, as 
requested.
Senator Pomerene's substitute for Senator Johnston's motion taken up.
Unanimous consent was given to have Senator Williams' report to Caucus 
correct draft of Committee's amendment.
Senator Pomerene's motion is to the effect that all exemptions as to 
children be stricken out. Lost.
Senator Johnston's motion as to grandchildren. Lost.
Senator Chilton moved to disagree with Senate amendments and return to 
House Bill as to Children. Ayes 7, Noes 13.
Sub-division D.
Senate reports amendment in lieu of printed Bill (Caucus print).
Senator Clarke moved to put the income tax into effect as of July the 
first (to-morrow) and not be retroactive. Lost.
Senator Saulsbury moved that the Committee provide that obligors under 
provisions in bonds, referred to on Page 176, lines 6 to 17, shall pay 
tax, and that same shall not be charged to holders thereof. Lost.
Senator Pomerene moved to strike out Senate amendment as to Mutual Life 
Insurance Companies. Carried, 13 Ayes, 11 Noes.
Senator O'Gorman moved to strike out Senate amendment as to Mutual 
Marine Insurance Companies. Lost.
Motion to adjourn. Lost, 10 Ayes, 13 Noes.
It was moved that Committee strike out lines 11 to 14, on Page 187, and 
insert amendments, March 1 to December 31, \5/6\ths of its income.

It was then proposed that a new Section O be inserted at the bottom of 
page 202, as follows:

   O. That for the purpose of carrying into effect the 
  provisions of Section II of this Act, and to pay the 
  expenses of assessing and collecting the income tax therein 
  imposed, there is hereby appropriated out of any money in 
  the Treasury not otherwise appropriated for the fiscal year 
  ending June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and fourteen (June 
  30, 1914) the sum of one million two hundred thousand 
  dollars ($1,200,000.00), and the Commissioner of Internal 
  Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
  is authorized to appoint and pay from this appropriation all 
  necessary officers, agents, inspectors, deputy collectors, 
  clerks, messengers and janitors, and to rent such quarters, 
  purchase such supplies, equipment, mechanical devices and 
  other articles as may be necessary for employment or use in 
  the District of Columbia or any collection district in the 
  United States, or any of the territories thereof, provided 
  that no agent paid from this appropriation will receive 
  compensation at a rate higher than that now received by 
  traveling agents on accounts in the Internal Revenue 
  Service, and no inspector shall receive a compensation 
  higher than $5.00 a day and $3.00 additional in lieu of 
  subsistence, and no deputy collector, clerk, messenger or 
  other employee shall be paid at a rate of compensation 
  higher than the rate now being paid for the same or similar 
  work in the Internal Revenue Service.
   For the administration in the Internal Revenue Bureau at 
  Washington, D.C., of this act in the collection of tax 
  aforesaid, there shall be appointed one additional Deputy 
  Commissioner at a salary of $4,000. per annum, two Heads of 
  Divisions whose compensation shall not exceed two thousand 
  five hundred dollars ($2,500.00) per annum, and such other 
  clerks, messengers, and employees, and to rent such quarters 
  and to purchase such supplies as may be necessary; Provided, 
  That for a period of two years from and after the passage of 
  this act, the force of agents, deputy collectors and 
  inspectors authorized by this section of this act shall be 
  appointed by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, with the 
  approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, and without 
  compliance with the conditions prescribed by the Act 
  entitled ``An Act to regulate and improve the Civil 
  Service,'' approved January sixteenth, eighteen hundred and 
  eighty-three, and amendments thereto, and with such 
  compensation as the Commissioner of Internal Revenue may 
  fix, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
  within the limitations therein prescribed; Provided further, 
  That no person now in the classified service who shall be 
  appointed an agent or inspector shall lose his civil service 
  status because of such appointment.

Senator Chilton moved to strike out the last four lines, beginning with 
the word ``Provided.'' Motion lost.

The following is the amendment proposed by Mr. Clarke: Add as new 
sections after the end of line 6, on Page 168, at end of Sec. 2 the 
following:

   That upon each sale, agreement of sale, or agreement to 
  sell, or upon each purchase, agreement of purchase, or 
  agreement to purchase, of any cotton for future delivery, at 
  or on any cotton exchange or board of trade, or other 
  similar place, or by any person acting in substantial 
  conformity to the rules and regulations for market 
  quotations of any such cotton exchange, board of trade, or 
  other similar place, there is hereby levied a tax equal to 
  one-tenth of 1 cent per pound on the quantity of cotton 
  mentioned and described in any such contract: Provided, That 
  in all cases where the quantity and kind of cotton mentioned 
  and described in such contract is actually delivered, in 
  compliance in good faith therewith, by the seller to the 
  buyer therein respectively named, the tax levied by this 
  section shall be refunded to the party paying the same in 
  such manner and under such regulations as the Secretary of 
  the Treasury shall prescribe. Any sale, agreement of sale, 
  or agreement to sell, any cotton for future delivery, at or 
  on any cotton exchange, Board of Trade, or other similar 
  place, or by any person acting in conformity to the rules 
  and regulations of any such cotton exchange, Board of Trade, 
  or other similar place, in any foreign country, where the 
  order for such sale or purchase has been transmitted from 
  the United States to such foreign countries and either the 
  buyer or the seller described in such contract of sale or 
  purchase is at the time of the execution thereof a resident 
  of the United States, shall be deemed and considered in all 
  respects a sale, agreement of sale, or agreement to sell, 
  for future delivery, of the cotton described therein within 
  the meaning of this section. A corporation organized under 
  the laws of any State or Country shall be deemed for all 
  purposes a person within the meaning of this section. All 
  contracts for the sale or purchase as aforesaid of cotton 
  for future delivery at the places and by the persons 
  hereinafter mentioned shall be in writing, plainly stating 
  the terms of such contract and indicating the parties 
  thereto and signed by the party to be charged, by himself or 
  his agent. The said tax shall be paid by means of stamps 
  affixed to such written contract.
   That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized and 
  empowered to make, prescribe, and publish all rules and 
  regulations necessary to the enforcement of the foregoing 
  section and to the collection of the tax thereby imposed. To 
  further effect this purpose, he is hereby authorized to 
  require all persons coming within its provisions to keep 
  such record and system of accounting as will fully and 
  correctly disclose the transaction in connection with which 
  the said tax is authorized; and he may appoint such agent as 
  he may deem necessary to conduct the inspection necessary to 
  collect the tax herein authorized and otherwise to enforce 
  this statute and all rules and regulations lawfully made in 
  pursuance thereof, as in his judgment may be required, and 
  to fix the compensation of such agents.
   That any cotton exchange, board of trade, or other similar 
  place, or person acting in conformity with the rules and 
  regulations of any such cotton exchange, Board of Trade, or 
  other similar place where contracts for the sale of cotton 
  for future delivery are made, and every person who shall be 
  a party to such contracts of sale, as mentioned and 
  described in section--, who shall fail to pay, or shall 
  evade, or attempt to evade the payment of the tax levied in 
  section--, or shall otherwise violate this statute, or any 
  rule or regulation lawfully made in pursuance thereof, shall 
  be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof 
  shall pay a fine in any sum not less than $100 nor more than 
  $20,000; and in case of natural persons or unincorporated 
  associations of persons violating this Act an additional 
  punishment by imprisonment for not less than one year nor 
  more than three years may be imposed, at the discretion of 
  the Court.
  That no person whose evidence is deemed material by the 
  officer prosecuting on behalf of the United States shall 
  withhold his testimony because of guilty participation by 
  him in any violation of this statute, but any such persons 
  so required to give evidence as a witness shall be exempt 
  from prosecution in any Court of the United States for the 
  particular offense in the prosecution whereof such testimony 
  was given. In addition to the foregoing punishment, there is 
  hereby imposed a penalty of $2,000 on each separate sale 
  made in violation of this statute to be recovered in an 
  action founded on this statute in the name of the United 
  States as plaintiff, and when so recovered one-half of said 
  amount shall be paid over to the person giving the 
  information upon which such recovery is based.
  That the payment of the tax levied under authority of Sec. . 
  . . . shall not exempt any person from any penalty or 
  punishment now or hereafter provided by the laws of any 
  State for entering into contracts for the future delivery of 
  cotton; nor shall the payment of taxes imposed by said 
  section--be held to prohibit any State or municipality from 
  imposing a tax on the same transaction.

 Senator Hitchcock offered the following amendment: Amendment intended 
to be proposed by Mr. Hitchcock to the Bill (H.R. 3321), viz: After the 
first paragraph in sub-section C, Section 2, insert the following:

   Provided also, that whenever a corporation, joint-stock 
  company, or association, having a capital stock of not less 
  than $100,000,000 shall produce or control annually over 
  one-quarter of the annual production in any line of 
  manufacture or production in the United States, the rate of 
  tax to be levied, assessed, and paid annually upon the 
  entire net income arising or accruing from all sources 
  during the previous calendar year shall be five per centum; 
  and whenever such corporation, joint-stock company, or 
  association shall produce or control annually over one-third 
  of the annual production in any line of manufacture or 
  production in the United States, the rate of tax to be 
  levied, assessed, and paid annually upon the entire net 
  income arising or accruing from all sources during the 
  previous calendar year shall be fifteen per centum; and 
  whenever such corporation, joint-stock company, or 
  association shall produce or control annually over one-half 
  of the annual production in any line of manufacture or 
  production in the United States, the rate of tax to be 
  levied, assessed, and paid annually upon the entire net 
  income arising or accruing from all sources during the 
  previous calendar year shall be twenty-five per centum.

Adjourned, 11:20 p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 1, 1913]

JULY 1, 1913

Caucus reconvened on Tuesday, July 1st, 1913, at 10:23 o'clock, a.m.
Senator Swanson moved to proceed to consideration of Section III--
Administrative Clauses. Agreed to.
Page 203, Sec. III.
Section III adopted without change.
Section IV.
Subdivision A approved.
``I'' passed at the request of Senator Simmons, pending the return of 
Senator Ransdell.
Paragraph J, Subsection 6, amended by the Committee by inserting at the 
end of line 5, page 252, ``or other vessels used by.''
Senator Ashurst moved amendment as to J. Subsection 7, practically as in 
House Bill--5% differential in American bottoms. Vote on this: Ayes 9; 
Noes 20. (See Roll Call.) [See tally sheet J]

Senator Simmons, for the Committee, proposed an amendment at page 264, 
line 1, before the word ``but'' as follows:

   And provided further, that an excise tax upon the doing of 
  business, equivalent to one per centum upon their entire net 
  income, shall be levied, assessed and collected upon 
  corporations, joint stock companies or associations, and 
  insurance companies, of the character described in Section 
  38 of the Act of August 5th, 1909, for the period from 
  January 1st to February 28th, 1913, both dates inclusive, 
  which said tax shall be computed upon one-sixth of the 
  entire net income of said corporations, joint stock 
  companies or associations, and ins[urance] companies, for 
  said year, said net income to be ascertained in accordance 
  with the provisions of subsection G of Section 2 of this 
  Act: Provided, further, that the provisions of said Section 
  38 of the Act of August 5th, 1909, relative to the 
  collection of the tax therein imposed, shall remain in force 
  for the collection of the excise tax herein provided, but 
  for the year nineteen hundred and thirteen it shall not be 
  necessary to make more than one return and assessment for 
  all the taxes imposed herein upon said corporations, joint 
  stock companies or associations, and insurance companies, 
  either by way of income or excise, which return and 
  assessment shall be made at the times and in the manner 
  provided in this Act.

Page 248, Section I.
Senator O'Gorman moved to strike out all reference to child labor in the 
Section.
Senator Pittman offered a substitute, to make Section read as follows: 
``Principally by children under 14 years of age in countries where there 
are no laws regulating child labor,'' to be inserted at Line 15, page 
248. Also, after word ``convicts,'' in line 22, ``is not prohibited by 
law, or of children is not regulated by law,'' line 23, striking out 
``under 14 years of age.''
Senator O'Gorman moved that provision as to convict labor in House Bill 
be adopted.

The whole subject, paragraph and amendments, was on motion of Senator 
Pittman, recommitted to the Committee, with the proposed amendment as 
follows:

   I. That no goods, wares, articles, and merchandise--except 
  immediate products of agriculture, forests, and fisheries--
  manufactured wholly or in part in any foreign country by 
  convict labor, or principally by children under fourteen 
  years of age, in countries where there are no laws 
  regulating child labor, shall be entitled to entry at any of 
  the ports of the United States, and the importation thereof 
  is hereby prohibited. Any shipment consigned for entry at 
  any of the ports of the United States of goods, wares, 
  articles, and merchandise--except immediate products of 
  agriculture, forests, and fisheries--manufactured in any 
  foreign country, province or dependency, where the 
  industrial employment of convicts is not restricted by law, 
  or of children is not regulated by law, shall be accompanied 
  by an affidavit of the shipper of such merchandise, or his 
  legal agent, to the effect that the merchandise covered by 
  the invoice has not been manufactured wholly or in part by 
  convict labor or principally by children under fourteen 
  years of age, the form of the affidavit to be prescribed by 
  the Secretary of the Treasury, who is also authorized and 
  directed to issue such further regulations and to collect 
  all information pertinent thereto through cooperation with 
  the Consular Service of the United States, as may be 
  necessary for the enforcement of this provision.

Senator Clarke moved that the amendment as to tax or cotton sales be 
taken up at three p.m.
Senator Lewis moved to reconsider the vote by which Mutual Life 
Insurance Companies were excluded from exemption from tax.
Recess.

Roll Call on Sen. Ashurst Amendment
[Tally sheet J]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
            Bryan    
            Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke   
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James
            Johnson
            Johnston 
     Kern
            Lane     
            Lea
     Lewis
            Martin   
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands 
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
            Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields  
            Shively
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson
            Thomas   
            Thompson 
            Thornton 
            Tillman
            Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
       9               20

Caucus reconvened at 2:20 p.m., Tuesday, July 1st, 1913.
Vote on reconsideration of Mutual Insurance Companies exemption set for 
2:45.
The vote by which Senator Pomerene's motion was adopted was 
reconsidered--carried by a vote of 16 ayes to 8 noes.
Senator Pomerene's motion to strike out all of Senate amendment 
exempting Mutual Life Insurance Companies from Income Tax was then put, 
and lost, 10 ayes; 18 noes.

Senator Hitchcock then spoke and submitted his resolution as follows:

   RESOLVED, That the Democratic Caucus is in sympathy with 
  any effective legislation to cure the flagrant evils of the 
  Tobacco Trust, and without passing upon the plan of 
  graduated taxation proposed by Mr. Hitchcock, approves his 
  purpose to submit it as a tariff bill amendment in the 
  Senate and leaves each Democratic Senator entirely free to 
  vote upon it in accordance with his individual judgment.

The consideration of Senator Hitchcock's resolution was suspended until 
amendment of Senator Clarke, fixed for three o'clock this day, shall be 
disposed of.

Senator Clarke's Amendment read as reported from the Committee:
                    IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
                                AMENDMENT

Intended to be proposed by Mr. Clarke of Arkansas to the bill (H.R. 
3321) to reduce tariff duties and to provide revenue for the Government, 
and for other purposes, viz: Add as new section after the end of line 6, 
on page 168, at end of section 2, the following:

  Sec.--. That upon each sale, agreement of sale, or agreement 
  to sell, any cotton for future delivery at or on any cotton 
  exchange, or board of trade, or other similar place, or by 
  any person acting in substantial conformity to the rules and 
  regulations or market quotations of any such cotton 
  exchange, board of trade, or other similar place, there is 
  hereby levied a tax equal to one-tenth of 1 cent per pound 
  on the quantity of cotton mentioned and described in any 
  such contract: Provided, That in all cases where the 
  quantity and kind of cotton mentioned and described in such 
  contract is actually delivered, in compliance in good faith 
  therewith, by the seller to the buyer therein respectively 
  named, the tax levied by this section shall be refunded to 
  the party paying the same in such manner and under such 
  regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury shall 
  prescribe. Any sale, agreement of sale, or agreement to 
  sell, any cotton for future delivery, at or on any cotton 
  exchange, board of trade, or other similar place, or by any 
  person acting in conformity to the rules and regulations of 
  any such cotton exchange, board of trade, or other similar 
  place, in any foreign country, where the order for such sale 
  has been transmitted from the United States to such foreign 
  country and either the buyer or the seller described in such 
  contract of sale is at the time of the execution thereof a 
  resident of the United States, shall be deemed and 
  considered in all respects a sale, agreement of sale, or 
  agreement to sell, for future delivery, of the cotton 
  described therein within the meaning of this section. A 
  corporation organized under the laws of any State or country 
  shall be deemed for all purposes a person within the meaning 
  of this section. All contracts for the sale as aforesaid of 
  cotton for future delivery at the places and by the persons 
  herein mentioned shall be in writing, plainly stating the 
  terms of such contract and indicating the parties thereto 
  and signed by the party to be charged, by himself or his 
  agent. The said tax shall be paid by means of stamps affixed 
  to such written contract and shall be paid by the party 
  named as buyer therein.
   That the Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized and 
  empowered to make, prescribe, and publish all rules and 
  regulations necessary to the enforcement of the foregoing 
  section and to the collection of the tax thereby imposed. To 
  further effect this purpose, he is hereby authorized to 
  require all persons coming within its provisions to keep 
  such records and systems of accounting as will fully and 
  correctly disclose the transactions in connection with which 
  the said tax is authorized; and he may appoint such agents 
  as he may deem necessary to conduct the inspection necessary 
  to collect the tax herein authorized and otherwise to 
  enforce this statute and all rules and regulations lawfully 
  made in pursuance thereof, as in his judgment may be 
  required, and to fix the compensation of such agents.
   That any cotton exchange, board of trade, or other similar 
  place, or person acting in conformity with the rules and 
  regulations or market quotations of any such cotton 
  exchange, board of trade, or other similar place where 
  contracts for the sale of cotton for future delivery are 
  made in violation of this statute, and every person who is 
  made liable for the tax thereby imposed, who shall fail to 
  pay, or shall evade, or attempt to evade, the payment of the 
  tax levied in this section, or shall otherwise violate this 
  statute, or any rule or regulation lawfully made by the 
  Secretary of the Treasury in pursuance thereof, shall be 
  guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall 
  pay a fine in any sum not less than $100 nor more than 
  $20,000; and in case of natural persons or unincorporated 
  associations of persons violating this Act an additional 
  punishment by imprisonment for not less than one year nor 
  more than three years may be imposed, at the discretion of 
  the court.
  In addition to the foregoing punishment, there is hereby 
  imposed a penalty of $2,000 on each separate sale made in 
  violation of this statute, to be recovered in an action 
  founded on this statute in the name of the United States as 
  plaintiff, and when so recovered one-half of said amount 
  shall be paid over to the person giving the information upon 
  which said recovery is based.
  That no person whose evidence is deemed material by the 
  officer prosecuting on behalf of the United States shall 
  withhold his testimony because of complicity by him in any 
  violation of this statute, but any such person so required 
  to give evidence as a witness shall be exempt from 
  prosecution in any court of the United States for the 
  particular offense in connection with the prosecution 
  whereof such testimony was given.
  That the payment of the tax levied under authority of this 
  section shall not exempt any person from any penalty or 
  punishment now or hereafter provided by the laws of any 
  State for entering into contracts for the future delivery of 
  cotton; nor shall the payment of taxes imposed by this 
  section be held to prohibit any State or municipality from 
  imposing a tax on the same transaction.

Senator Overman moved to amend by making the tax 25 cents per bale. 
Lost.
Senator Clarke's amendment was then adopted.

 Senator Ashurst moved as substitute the adoption of Senator Hitchcock's 
amendment to the Tariff Bill:
                                AMENDMENT

Intended to be proposed by Mr. Hitchcock to the bill (H.R. 3321) to 
reduce tariff duties and to provide revenue for the Government, and for 
other purposes, viz: After section 4 add an additional section, to be 
known as section 5, as follows:

   Sec. 5. That manufacturers of tobacco, cigars, cigarettes, 
  and snuff shall, after the thirty-first day of December, 
  nineteen hundred and thirteen, be subject to pay a special 
  quarterly excise tax in addition to all other taxes provided 
  by law, which special additional excise tax shall be payable 
  quarterly and be graduated and levied as follows:

    A. On all tobacco, whether smoking tobacco, plug tobacco, 
    twist, or fine cut, manufactured during the quarter over 
    and in excess of twenty million pounds, 1 cent a pound for 
    the first million pounds excess or part thereof, 2 cents a 
    pound for the second million pounds excess or part 
    thereof, 3 cents a pound for the third million pounds 
    excess or part thereof, 4 cents a pound for the fourth 
    million pound excess or part thereof, 5 cents a pound for 
    the fifth million pounds excess or part thereof, 6 cents a 
    pound for all above the fifth million pounds excess.
    B. On all cigarettes weighing not more than three pounds 
    per thousand manufactured during the quarter over and in 
    excess of four hundred million cigarettes, 25 cents per 
    thousand on the first fifty million cigarettes excess or 
    part thereof, 60 cents per thousand on the second fifty 
    million cigarettes excess or part thereof, $1 per thousand 
    on the third fifty million cigarettes excess or part 
    thereof, $1.50 per thousand on the fourth fifty million 
    cigarettes excess or part thereof, $2 per thousand on the 
    fifth fifty million cigarettes excess or part thereof, 
    $2.60 per thousand on the sixth fifty million cigarettes 
    excess or part thereof, $3.25 per thousand on all above 
    the sixty fifth million cigarettes excess.
    C. On all cigarettes weighing more than three pounds per 
    thousand manufactured during the quarter over and in 
    excess of one million cigarettes, $1 per thousand on the 
    first half million excess per quarter or part thereof, $2 
    per thousand on the second half million cigarettes excess 
    per quarter or part thereof, $3 per thousand on all above 
    the second half million cigarettes excess.
    D. On all cigars weighing more than three pounds per 
    thousand manufactured during the quarter over and in 
    excess of four hundred million cigars, $1 per thousand on 
    the first one hundred million cigars excess or part 
    thereof, $2 per thousand on the second one hundred million 
    cigars excess or part thereof, $3 per thousand on all 
    above the second one hundred million cigars excess.
    E. On all cigars weighing not more than three pounds per 
    thousand manufactured during the quarter over and in 
    excess of fifty million cigars, 20 cents per thousand on 
    the first ten million cigars excess or part thereof, 45 
    cents per thousand on the second ten million cigars excess 
    or part thereof, 70 cents per thousand on the third ten 
    million cigars excess or part thereof, $1 on all above the 
    third ten million cigars excess.
    F. On all snuff manufactured during the quarter over and 
    in excess of one million pounds, 1 cent a pound for the 
    first million pounds or part thereof in excess, 3 cents a 
    pound for the second million pounds or part thereof in 
    excess, 5 cents a pound for the third million pounds or 
    part thereof in excess, 10 cents a pound for all above the 
    third million pounds excess.
    G. In computing the product of any manufacturer there 
    shall be included the products, as above specified, made 
    directly by said manufacturer and by any company 
    controlled by said manufacturer in whole or in part 
    through stock ownership, contract, lease, or otherwise; 
    and any company having directors or stockholders in common 
    to the extent of twenty-five per centum of the stock, or 
    one-third of the directors, shall be considered and held 
    to be a part of the same manufacturing organization, and 
    the rate of tax shall be based on their combined output, 
    each company to pay upon its proper proportion thereof.
    H. It shall be the duty of every manufacturer of tobacco, 
    cigars, cigarettes, or snuff, on demand of any officer of 
    internal revenue, to render such officer a true and 
    correct statement under oath of the quantity and amount of 
    all tobacco, cigars, cigarettes, or snuff manufactured by 
    him during the quarter, and this statement shall be made 
    on or before the tenth day of the month following the 
    close of the quarter. it shall also be the duty of every 
    manufacturer on demand of any officer of internal revenue 
    to render to such officer a true and correct statement 
    under oath, showing in detail the ownership,management, 
    and organization of the business; who the officers and 
    directors or trustees of the same are; what, if any, 
    contract, lease, or other arrangement exists with another 
    manufacturer of tobacco, cigars, cigarettes, or snuff.
    I. In case of refusal or neglect to render any such 
    statement as herein provided, or if there is cause to 
    believe such statement to be incorrect or fraudulent, the 
    collector shall make an examination of persons, books, and 
    papers in manner provided by law in relation to frauds and 
    evasions of internal-revenue taxes.
    J. The special additional quarterly excise tax on tobacco, 
    cigars, cigarettes, and snuff shall be paid on or before 
    the tenth of April, July, October, and January for the 
    previous calendar quarter, and in enforcing this Act and 
    in the collection of this tax all existing provisions of 
    law relating to the collection of internal revenue are 
    hereby made applicable, and the commissioner is hereby 
    authorized to make and enforce proper regulations to carry 
    these provisions into effect.

 Senator Walsh then offered the following amendment to Senator Ashurst's 
motion:

   That the amendment to the Bill under consideration be 
  referred to the Committee, with directions to report a 
  substitute embodying the principle of the amendment and 
  making it applicable to any corporation or combination which 
  having been adjudged unlawful as in restraint of trade, 
  controls, or any constituent of which controls more than 25% 
  of the total output of produce in which it deals.

 Senator Walsh's amendment subsequently withdrawn.

 Senator O'Gorman offered the following:

   RESOLVED, That we favor the insertion in the Tariff Bill of 
  a graduated production tax on oil and tobacco, along the 
  lines proposed by Senator Hitchcock.

 Roll Call demanded on Senator O'Gorman's motion and it was lost by a 
vote of 16 to 16. See Roll Call. [See tally sheet K]
The question of the adoption of Senator Ashurst's motion to adopt the 
Hitchcock amendment was then taken up and a roll call demanded, which 
was suspended, [see tally sheet L] and the Caucus thereupon determined 
to vote upon Senator Ashurst's motion at 11 o'clock, Wednesday morning, 
July 2nd, after which
The Caucus then adjourned until ten o'clock, a.m., Wednesday, July 2nd, 
A.D. 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Vote on Senator O'Gorman's Motion
[Tally sheet K]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
             Bankhead
            Bryan    
            Chamberlain
            Chilton  
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea
            Lewis
            Martin   
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen
             Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson
            Thomas   
            Thompson
            Thornton 
            Tillman
            Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
      16               16

Vote on Hitchcock Tobacco Amendment
Roll Call Suspended
[Tally sheet L]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
             Bankhead
            Bryan    
            Chamberlain
            Chilton  
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea
            Lewis
            Martin   
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively
            Simmons
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone
            Swanson
            Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
            Walsh
            Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 2, 1913]

JULY 2, 1913

 Caucus convened at 10:35 a.m., Wednesday, July 2nd, 1913.
 Senator O'Gorman brought up the matter of Mutual Life Insurance 
Companies exemption and after some discussion, the matter was suspended 
until disposition of the Hitchcock amendment.
Discussion of the Hitchcock amendment began in anticipation of a vote 
thereon at 11 o'clock, and proceeded.
Senator Ashurst's motion to adopt Hitchcock amendment lost by a vote of 
18 ayes, 23 noes. See Roll Call. [See tally sheet M]
Senator Hitchcock here read a statement, of which he left a copy with 
the Secretary.
                               July 2, 1913

    Hon. John W. Kern,
    Chairman, Democratic Caucus.

    Dear Sir:

       I desire hereby to announce my retirement from the 
    Democratic Caucus. I find that I can no longer participate 
    in its deliberations without permitting myself to be 
    deprived of the privilege of offering certain amendments 
    to the bill upon the floor of the Senate.
       The amendments I propose to offer impose a graduated 
    tax on trusts. I was denied the opportunity to present 
    these amendments to the Finance Committee. One of them was 
    presented to the Caucus yesterday by Senator Ashurst. A 
    roll call was ordered and had it been finished the vote 
    would have stood as follows:

        For the Amendment               Against
        BacoMartin
        ClarSimmons
        Newl Overman
        FletStone
        ThorGore
        KernShively
        MartBryan
        MyerChilton
        PomeJohnson
        O'GoWilliams
        AshuSmith (Hoke)
        ShepThomas
        RansHughes
        RobiJames
        WalsJohnston
        Hollis
        Hitchcock
        Saulsbury

       The roll call was not finished but contrary to all 
    proprieties was interrupted in its midst and an 
    adjournment taken until today. I did not offer my 
    amendment in the Caucus. I purposely refrained from doing 
    so because I do not seek to bind any member of the Caucus 
    to vote for my amendment in the Senate against his 
    judgment. I do, however, maintain my own right to offer my 
    amendment for the taxation of trusts and I had hoped to 
    secure the consent of the Caucus for any of its members to 
    vote in the open Senate upon my amendment upon its merits. 
    I therefore introduced the following resolution:
       RESOLVED, That the Democratic Caucus, [indistinct] with 
    any effective legislation to cure the flagrant evils of 
    the Tobacco Trust, and without passing upon the plan of 
    graduated taxation proposed by Mr. Hitchcock, approves his 
    purpose to submit it as a tariff bill amendment in the 
    Senate and leaves each Democratic Senator entirely free to 
    vote upon it in accordance with his individual judgment.
       From what has transpired, I foresee the probability 
    that if I remain in the Caucus I may be deprived of this 
    privilege and I therefore withdraw from its further 
    deliberations as above stated.

                                      Yours truly,
                        G.M. HITCHCOCK 14
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \14\ When the Caucus adjourned, Senator Simmons, chairman of the 
Finance Committee, issued this statement, as reported in the Washington 
Post, July 3, 1913:
The caucus declined to adopt the so-called Hitchcock amendment 
to the tariff bill principally because it did not consider it 
wise to attempt in a tariff measure to deal with the trust 
evil. It was felt that the trust question should be dealt with 
as a separate one, as soon as it could be reached, and only 
after such thorough and mature consideration as the great 
importance of the subject required. Moreover, such 
consideration could not now be given to it by the finance 
committee, the caucus and the Congress without unduly delaying 
final action on the tariff bill and disappointing the public 
desire for its early settlement.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Senator Myers offered an amendment to the bill, as follows: 
[handwritten notation] Senator Myers took away only copy. Motion will be 
inserted here.
 Recess until 15 minutes after Senate adjourns.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reconvened at 4:10 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, July 2nd, 1913.
The Secretary stated to the meeting that the Reporters were asking for 
the ``tobacco'' vote. During the course of the discussion provoked 
thereby, Senator O'Gorman offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That in giving out the vote on the proposal to 
  tax oil and tobacco production, the Secretary is authorized 
  to state to the Press that the Senators voting in the 
  negative based their opposition on the grounds that the 
  incorporation of anti-trust legislation in a tariff bill was 
  not proper and that such a course might impede the passage 
  and impair the efficiency of the tariff bill.

 Some objection being made thereto, Senator O'Gorman withdrew his motion 
to adopt the resolution.
Chairman Kern and Vice-Chairman Newlands stated that they would be 
absent to-morrow (Thursday) and with the consent of the Caucus, the 
chairman designated Senator O'Gorman to preside over the Caucus on 
Thursday, July 3rd, 1913.
Senator Myers resumed discussion of his amendment without limit of time.
Senator Myers' motion was lost.
Senator O'Gorman called the attention of the Caucus and the Finance 
Committee to the exemption of Mutual Life Insurance Companies and handed 
his amendments to the Finance Committee.

Senator Hollis offered some amendments, for consideration of the 
Committee on Finance, as follows:

  Amend Paragraph 263, Section 1, by inserting after the word 
  ``goods,'' in line 15, page 76, the words: ``and woven-
  figured table damask and bed spreads containing yarns number 
  60 or finer.''

 Also by Senator Hollis: ``That manufactures of which wool is the 
component of chief value shall be exempt from the provisions of this Act 
until January 1st, 1914.''

Senator Smith (Ga.) moved the adoption of the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That in view of the importance to the entire 
  country that the Tariff Bill should be passed at the 
  earliest time possible, the Democratic Members of the 
  Finance Committee of the Senate are requested to interpose 
  objection to the consumption of the time of the Senate by 
  speeches or in any other way not absolutely necessary in 
  connection with the Tariff Bill until the same is disposed 
  of.

 Adopted.
Chairman ordered Secretary to give press note on Hitchcock amendment.
 Adjourned until 15 minutes after Senate adjourns to-morrow, Thursday, 
July 3rd, 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Vote to Adopt Hitchcock Amendment
[Tally sheet M]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
             Bankhead
            Bryan    
            Chamberla
            Chilton  
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
     Kern
            Lane     
     Lea
            Lewis    
            Martin   
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman
            Owen     
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
            Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone    
            Swanson
            Thomas   
            Thompson
            Thornton 
            Tillman  
     Vardaman
            Walsh
            Williams 
      18                23
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 3, 1913]

JULY 3, 1913

 The Senate Caucus met at 2:45 p.m., Thursday, July 3rd, 1913.
Senator O'Gorman was made Chairman of the meeting in the absence of 
Chairman Kern.
Par. 86 and 97, House provisions restored.
 See typewritten report of Committee--following pages.

 Action of the Committee on matters referred to it by the Caucus.
Page 24, paragraph 86, line 1. Referred back to consider whether or not 
the words ``and all blown glass ware'' covers ``Incandescent electric 
light bulbs and lamps without filaments'' on line 17, paragraph 97, page 
27. The Committee is of the opinion that the facts do not warrant any 
change in these paragraphs.
Page 27, paragraph 95, line 9, paragraph 96, line 11. These paragraphs 
were referred back to consider rearrangements so as to include 
``surveying instruments'' in paragraph 96. The Committee has amended 
these paragraphs by inserting after the word ``same'' in line 9 the 
words ``all the foregoing not specially provided for in this section'' 
and by reducing the rate from 45% to 35%. Paragraph 96 was amended by 
inserting at the beginning of line 1 the words ``surveying 
instruments.''
Page 33, paragraph 116. Referred back in connection with paragraph 149, 
page 44 to consider placing copper wire on the free list. The Committee 
decided that it is not desirable to make any change in those paragraphs.
Page 36, paragraph 121. Referred back to consider reducing the duty on 
automobiles valued at less than $1,000. The Committee amended this 
paragraph as follows; after ``$1,500'' on line 3 insert ``and more than 
1,000''; before the word ``automobile'' on line 4 insert ``finished 
automobile valued at $1,000 or less 15 per centum ad valorem.'' 
[handwritten note: Motion lost to reduce to 10% instead of 15%]
Page 36, paragraph 123. Referred back to consider harmonizing ``axles'' 
with wheels with axles ``fitted in them.''
Page 42, paragraph 144, lines 10-14. The Committee finds that axles and 
wheels except those for railway purposes are taxed in paragraph 123 at 
10% and that wheels for railway purposes only are taxed at 25% in 
paragraph 144. The Committee recommends a reduction of the duty in 
paragraph 144, from 25% to 15%.
 Page 37, paragraph 127, line 9. Referred back to consider lowering the 
duty on cast iron pipe and probably transfer it to the free list. The 
Committee transfers iron pipe to the free list.
Page 37, paragraph 128. Referred back to specifically place trace chains 
on the free list and to consider placing some other chains on the free 
list. The Committee finds that under the ruling of the Treasury 
Department trace chains are on the free list, page 138, paragraph 334, 
lines 2-3. Log chains can not be separate from other chains. It is not 
deemed advisable to make any change.
Page 39, paragraph 133. Referred back to consider reducing duty on 
``machine out'' files. The Committee recommends a reduction of the duty 
from 25% to 20%.
Page 41, paragraph 141. Referred back to consider placing ``saws used by 
carpenters'' on the free list. It is the judgment of the Committee that 
the rate on saws should not be changed.
Page 41, paragraph 142. Referred back for readjustment. The Committee 
recommends the restoration of the House provision.
Page 49, paragraph 169. Referred back to consider reducing duty on 
carding machines. The Committee recommends that the rate on line 13 be 
reduced from 25% to 20%. This clause included carding machines and other 
textile machinery.
Page 52, paragraph 179. Referred back to consider date when this 
paragraph shall become effective. The Committee recommends that this 
paragraph be amended by inserting at the end of line 14 the following: 
``provided further, that the duties imposed in this paragraph shall be 
effective on and after the first day of March, 1914.''
Page 60, paragraph 205. Referred back to Committee to consider restoring 
language of the House Bill. The Committee recommends that the language 
of the House Bill stand.
Page 61, paragraph 227, line 3. Referred back by request of the [Caucus] 
to perfect. The Committee recommends that on line 3 insert ``count'' 
before the word ``bunch'' and after the bunch insert ``of nine hands.''
Page 61, paragraph 233. Referred back to consider reducing or removing 
duties. The Committee recommends that the duty on ``extract of meat 
n.s.p.f.'' be reduced from 15 cts to 10 cts., and that on ``fluid 
extract of meat'' be reduced from 7 cents to 5 cents.
Page 72, paragraph 256. Referred back to consider such a revision of 
language as will place spool thread or spools containing not more than 
200 yards on the free list. The Committee reports that they do not 
clearly understand what the Caucus desires.
Page 69, paragraph 254\1/2\. Referred back by request to consider the 
date when the paragraph shall become effective. The Committee recommends 
that at the end of the paragraph there be added the words ``Provided, 
however, That this paragraph shall not go into effect until the first 
day of January nineteen hundred and fourteen.''
Page 83, paragraph 290. Referred back to consider reducing the duty on 
bags. The Committee recommends that the duty be reduced from 15% to 10%.
Page 84, paragraph 295. Referred back to consider reducing duty on wool 
tops or placing them on the free list or of placing nails on the 
dutiable list. The Committee recommends that the duty on tops be reduced 
from 15% to 5%, and in harmony with this the duty on yarns be reduced 
from 20% to 15%.
Page 85, paragraph 297, line 23. Referred back to consider reducing the 
duty on press cloth. The Committee recommends that the duty be reduced 
from 15% to 10%.
Page 85, paragraph 298. Referred back to consider reducing the duty on 
blankets valued at less than 40 cents per pound. The Committee does not 
consider it advisable to make any change.
Page 88, paragraph 315. Referred back to consider reducing the duty on 
tops made from the hair of the angora goat. The Committee recommends 
that the duty be reduced from 15% to 5%. [T]o preserve harmony the 
Committee recommends that the duty on yarns be reduced from 20% to 15%.
Page 106, paragraph 353. Referred back to consider transferring 
fulminates to the free list. The Committee recommends that the articles 
in this paragraph go to the free list.
Page 106, paragraph 354. Referred back to consider placing gun powder 
and all explosives on the free list. The Committee recommends that gun 
powder, and all explosive substances not specially provided for, be 
transferred to the free list, and that gun powder used for sporting 
purposes remain in paragraph 354 with the duty therein provided.
Page 107, paragraph 357. Referred back to revise the provisoes beginning 
on line 4, page 108. The Committee recommends that all the words 
beginning with the word ``and'' on line 5, page 108, beginning and 
including line 12, be stricken out.
Page 108, paragraph 358. Referred back to consider placing undressed 
skins on the free list and reduce duties on dressed skins. The Committee 
recommends that the furs and fur skins mentioned on lines 13-15 be 
transferred to the free list, and that the following language then be 
substituted for the paragraph.
Page 128, paragraph 434. Referred back to consider placing printing and 
other apparatus serving to teach the blind on the free list. The 
Committee recommends the insertion of the following words at the end of 
paragraph 434: Braille tablets, cubarithmes, special apparatus and 
objects serving to teach the blind, including printing apparatus, 
machines, presses, and types for the use and benefit of the blind 
exclusively.
Page 135, paragraph 504. Referred back. The Committee is uncertain as to 
why this paragraph was referred and asks for information.
Page 149, paragraph 626. Referred back to consider placing extract of 
sumac on the free list if it is a tanning material. The Committee finds 
that extract of sumac is not used as a tanning material except perhaps 
in tanning glove leather.
Page 156, paragraph 654. Referred back to consider striking out ``50 
years etc.'' in lines 14-15. The Committee recommends that no change be 
made in this paragraph.
Page 158, paragraph 657. Referred back to consider including pictorial 
paintings on glass for presentation to institutions and religious 
societies on the free list. The Committee recommends the following 
substitute for this paragraph: [text of report ends here]

Par. 236. Chocolate and cocoa. At 20 cents instead of 15.
Senator Pomerene submitted two amendments to Caucus.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

 At 4:45 p.m. Senator Sheppard took charge as temporary Secretary.
 4:45 p.m.--Thursday, July 3d, 1913.

 Senator Bryan moved as follows:

 403\1/4\--Alcohol, ethel of a proof strength of not less than one 
hundred and eighty degrees and containing denaturing materials of such 
character and quantity as to render it unfit as a beverage of for liquid 
medicinal purposes. Provided, that the proper denaturation of such 
alcohol (including denatured alcohol brought to the United States from 
Porto Rico) shall be determined in such manner as the Secretary of the 
Treasury may by regulations prescribe; and all such alcohol admitted 
free of duty or tax shall not be subject to any internal revenue tax.
 Carried.
Senator Williams moved that paragraph 504 be adopted as recommended by 
the Committee, the Committee to be authorized to act differently if 
Senator Walsh should prevail on them to make change.
Senator Fletcher moved to take skins of hares, rabbits, goats and dogs 
from the free list and put a tax of ten per cent. on them. Motion lost.
Senator Smith (Ga.) moved that Section one be approved. Carried.
Senator Williams moved to adopt Section Two. Carried.
Senator Bryan moved to adopt Section Three. Carried.
Senator Williams moved to adopt the Pittman amendment regarding child 
labor. Carried, Senator Stone reserving the right to submit certain 
changes to the Caucus.

Pittman amendment follows:

  I. That no goods, wares, articles, and merchandise--except 
  immediate products of agriculture, forests, and fisheries--
  manufactured wholly or in part in any foreign country by 
  convict labor, or principally by children under fourteen 
  years of age in countries where there are no laws regulating 
  child labor, shall not be entitled to entry at any of the 
  ports of the United States, and the importation thereof is 
  hereby prohibited. Any shipment consigned for entry at any 
  of the ports of the United States of goods, wares, articles, 
  and merchandise--except immediate products of agriculture, 
  forests, and fisheries--manufactured in any foreign country, 
  province, or dependency, where the industrial employment of 
  convicts is not restricted by law, or of children not 
  regulated by law, shall be accompanied by an affidavit of 
  the shipper of such merchandise, or his legal agent, to the 
  effect that the merchandise covered by the invoice has not 
  been manufactured wholly or in part by convict labor or 
  principally by children under fourteen years of age, the 
  form of the affidavit to be presented by the Secretary of 
  the Treasury, who is also authorized and directed to issue 
  such further regulations and to collect all information 
  pertinent thereto through co-operation with the Consular 
  Service of the United States, as may be necessary for the 
  enforcement of the provision.

 Senator Sheppard moved that Section Four be adopted, except as to 
reservation by Senator Stone regarding Pittman child labor amendment.

Senator Stone gave notice that at the next meeting of the Caucus, he 
would offer the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the tariff bill agreed to by this Conference 
  in its amended form is declared to be a party measure, and 
  it is declared to be the duty of each Democratic Senator to 
  support it in the Senate and to vote against all amendments 
  or motions to recommit; Provided, however, that the 
  Conference or the Finance Committee are authorized after 
  reference or otherwise to propose amendments to the bill 
  that shall not be considered as included in the foregoing 
  inhibition.

 Assistant Doorkeeper Keller was then instructed to state in the notice 
of the next meeting that a resolution binding the members to the action 
of the Caucus would be presented for discussion.
Senator Hollis moved to place bed spreads woven-figured carrying yarn 
No. 60 or finer, in paragraph 263. Lost.
Moved that the Caucus adjourn until 11 o'clock, Saturday morning, July 
5th. Carried.
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 5, 1913]

JULY 5, 1913

Senate Caucus called to order 11:25 o'clock, Saturday morning, July 5th, 
1913. Senator O'Gorman presiding in absence of Senator Kern and Senator 
Sheppard acting as a temporary secretary.
The Finance Committee's amendment regarding method of computing income 
tax deductions for depletion in value of ores adopted on motion of 
Senator Williams.
Senator Ashurst moved that it is the sense of the Caucus that 
immediately after the passage of the Tariff Bill through the Senate that 
the pure fabric bill of Senator Myers be passed through the Senate.
Senator Ashurst then withdrew this motion and moved that it be the sense 
of the Caucus that the Myers Pure Fabric Bill receive the consideration 
of the Senate before this session closed, if practicable. This motion 
also withdrawn.

 Senator Newlands suggested:

  (1) Reductions in tariff bill to be distributed equally over 
  three years.
  (2) That at the end of three years further reductions should 
  be made upon all articles the imports of which have not 
  equalled ten per cent. of similar articles produced in the 
  United States at the rate of five per cent. per annum, until 
  such importations shall equal ten per cent. of similar 
  articles produced in the United States;
  (3) Commission, Secy. of War, Interior and Agriculture to 
  report before end of tariff debate on effect of free listing 
  of sugar on our dependencies, on arid and semi-arid states, 
  and to report effect of free listing wool,

and addressed the Caucus on these suggestions, but made no motion.
Senator Simmons moved that with the exception of the wool schedule, 
sugar schedule, the income tax and revenue tax on brandies for 
fortifying wines, the Tariff Bill become effective on its passage. 
Carried.
Senator Thornton desired to register his protest against Caucus action 
on paragraph dealing with importation of feathers for millinery trade 
and against action of Caucus on bananas.

 The following telegram was read from Senator Lewis:

                                                    CHICAGO, JULY 4TH 13

         HON. JNO W KERN, U.S. SENATE CHAMBERS, WASHINGTON, D.C.

  AM DETAINED DELIVERING FOURTH JULY DEMOCRATIC SPEECHES AND 
  OTHER THINGS TO THE MULTITUDES ASSEMBLED ON SHORES LAKE 
  MICHIGAN AS DID THAT OTHER DEMOCRAT DISTRIBUTE LOAVES AND 
  FISHES ON SHORES OF GALILEE. VOTE ME IN CAUCUS SAME WAY YOU 
  CAST YOUR VOTE. BACK IN A FEW DAYS TO TAKE SOME TOIL OFF 
  YOUR HANDS TWENTY FOUR HOURS A DAY UNTIL END OF SESSION.

                                      J. HAMILTON LEWIS.

Senator Hughes stated that Senator James has received a telegram from 
Senator Chilton, asking that he be counted for resolution binding 
Caucus, and Senator Hughes asked unanimous consent that Senator 
Chilton's vote be so recorded.
Objection by Senator Walsh.

The following letter was read from Senator Saulsbury

                                                        July 4, 1913    

    Hon. John W. Kern
    Chairman, Democratic Senatorial Caucus

    Dear Senator:

      As I may not be able to return to Washington to-morrow, 
    Saturday, July 5th for final binding Caucus action I 
    request that my vote be recorded in favor of such 
    resolution as may be offered, if offered, and on all 
    motions or resolutions to that effect, intended to produce 
    absolute unity among Democrats on all votes on the Tariff 
    bill & amendments thereto and on all other votes 
    calculated to advance final action on the bill.
      I consider it a test of party loyalty to support in 
    every way the action of the Caucus on this measure in all 
    particulars as well as generally.

                                      Yours very truly,
                                      Willard Saulsbury

 Please insert this letter or spread it on the minutes.
Senator Simmons asked unanimous consent that Senator James, who was 
absent in New York, be allowed to have his vote recorded for motion 
binding Caucus. Objection by Senator Walsh.

 A Roll Call to determine the number of those present showed 31 Senators 
present. Roll call as follows:
ABSENT               PRESENT
             Ashurst 
            Bacon    
     Bankhead
            Bryan    
            Chamberla
     Chilton
            Clarke   
     Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes   
     James
            Johnson  
            Johnston 
     Kern
            Lane     
     Lea
     Lewis
            Martin   
            Martine  
            Myers    
            Newlands 
            O'Gorman 
     Overman
     Owen
            Pittman  
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell 
            Reed     
            Robinson 
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
            Sheppard 
            Shields  
            Shively  
            Simmons  
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
     Thompson
            Thornton 
            Tillman  
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
33 present

Senator Swanson moved that two-thirds of the members present, a quorum 
being present, should bind the Democratic members of the Senate.
Senator Simmons moved that the Caucus adjourn until four o'clock, Monday 
afternoon, July 7th, 1913. Carried.

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 7, 1913]

JULY 7, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate convened on Monday 
afternoon, July 7th, 1913, at 4:10 o'clock.
The calling of the roll showed that 43 Senators were present and 
subsequently others appeared, bringing the total number of Senators 
present up to 49.
The following Senators addressed the Caucus: Senators O'Gorman, 
Chamberlain, Lane, Myers, Williams, Thomas and Lewis.
Senator Thornton explained his intended vote, and
Senator Ransdell explained his intended vote.
Senator O'Gorman moved that the pending tariff bill be declared to be a 
party measure.
Senator Reed offered a motion as a substitute, which was accepted by 
Senator O'Gorman.

 Senator Reed's motion was as follows:

   RESOLVED, That House Bill No. 3321 as agreed upon in the 
  Democratic Conference is, subject to such further formal 
  changes as may be hereafter recommended by the Finance 
  Committee, or such changes as may be agreed to by the 
  Conference, hereby declared to be a party measure.
  RESOLVED, That the Tariff Bill agreed to by this Conference 
  in its amended form is declared to be a party measure and we 
  urge its undivided support as a duty by Democratic Senators 
  without amendment.
   Provided, however, that the Conference or the Finance 
  Committee may after reference or otherwise propose 
  amendments to the Bill.

 ADOPTED--only one vote against it. 47 Senators declared their intention 
to vote for the Bill. Senators Culberson and Hitchcock only being 
absent. [See tally sheet N]

Senator Thornton, by consent of the Caucus, filed with the Secretary, 
the following:

                                      Washington, D.C., 2nd [July] 1913.

  Hon. J.E. Ransdell
  Washington, D.C.

  My dear Senator:

    As I am leaving for Gettysburg in the morning and the 
  Senate Democratic Conference may adjourn finally before my 
  return, I wish to acquaint you with my position in the 
  matter of the pending tariff bill.
    If future developments will permit me to vote for the 
  bill without personal dishonor through violation of 
  pledges made to the Legislature of Louisiana before and 
  after my election on the sugar question, I will of course 
  vote for it on final passage.
    I, however, reserve the right to offer any amendments on 
  the floor of the Senate imposing duties on agricultural 
  products where none are now imposed by the bill, or to 
  increase duties already imposed by the bill, or to support 
  amendments on this line offered by others.
    I also reserve the right to speak against the sugar 
  section of the bill and against the Clarke amendment, as I 
  wish my position on that subject understood by the public.
    But I would not refuse to vote for the bill after all 
  amendments favored by me, except sugar, had been defeated, 
  as I consider myself only bound to vote against the free 
  sugar provision, while on all other questions I would 
  defer to the wish of the party after having made my 
  protests on the floor of the Senate.

                                      Very truly yours,
                                      [signed] J.R. Thornton

 Extract from Speech of J. R. Thornton before the General Assembly of 
the State of Louisiana on his Candidacy, before his Election, to the 
United States Senate:

   ``The statement published in a New Orleans paper that on last 
Thursday night, at a conference of my friends, I had recanted my 
statement of Wednesday and said I would yield in my tariff views on 
sugar, rice, and lumber, if necessary, to be in line with the action of 
a Democratic Caucus, is false. Those gentlemen from every part of the 
State who attended that large conference, know how false is the 
statement that I had recanted. They know that my answer to the question 
as to whether I was a Democrat and would abide by the action of a 
Democratic Caucus on these matters, was, that while I was a Democrat, I 
would never abide by the action of any caucus that might force me to 
strike a blow at any of the great industries of my State. That has been 
my unwavering position from the beginning.
  ``I do not think this is or ought to be made a test of fealty to the 
national Democratic Party. I hope and I believe that I will never be 
placed in the position where my duty to my National Party will come in 
conflict with my duty to my people. But, if ever the time does come, 
those who have placed their faith in my plighted word will find that 
their faith was not misplaced.
   ``If my mother must be stabbed, some other hand than mine must be 
found to wield the knife."

 Extract from Address of Senator Thornton before the General Assembly of 
Louisiana, December 7, 1910, accepting his election to the United States 
Senate:

   ``But tariff duties must be levied. Agriculture is the great basic 
foundation of the prosperity of Louisiana, and it will continue to be 
so. Because the agriculturalists of the United States generally raise 
more than our own people consume, we are exporters of such products and 
thus they do not receive the benefit of a protective tariff, while 
bearing so many of its unjust burdens. So, if a tariff can be levied 
that will help, or protect, if you please, those who follow agriculture 
as a livelihood, I think it should be done. In Louisiana, at least two 
of our great soil productions can be helped or protected by a tariff 
duty; those two are sugar and rice.
  ``And so I can certainly justify myself in doing what I can in the 
Congress of the United States to help these great agricultural products 
of Louisiana. This accords with my sense of right to those producers, 
with my sense of duty to my State, and with my individual sentiments as 
well, for I am descended from a long line of agriculturalists, am a son 
of the soil and racy of it.
  ``I don't see why party fealty should prevent me from standing by 
these great industries of Louisiana, but, as I have said, if it does, 
national fealty must yield to State fealty, as it did in the time of the 
Civil War.''

July 7--
Senator Lewis addressed the Caucus.
Senator Smith (Ga.) [addressed the Caucus.]
Senator Simmons stated--as to tariff bill--Raw wool to take effect 
October 1st; manufactured wool December 1st.
Senator Walsh, Senator Hollis, addressed.
Senator Simmons moved that wool duties go into effect December 1st, 
1913.
Senator Gore moved as a substitute that wool duties go into effect on 
the passage of the Act. Subsequently Senator Gore withdrew his motion.
Senator Hollis moved that the duty on Raw Wool go into effect on 
December 1st, 1913, and on Manufactures of Wool to go into effect on 
January 1st, 1914. Carried, by vote of 11 Yeas, 4 Noes.
Senator Newlands and Senator Johnson addressed the Caucus.
On motion, the thanks of the Caucus was extended to the Finance 
Committee.
ADJOURNED.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Informal expression
Will vote for bill
[Tally sheet N]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton 
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams

Roll Call
Monday, July 7, 1913
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams

Roll Call on Williams' Resolution
[Tally sheet O] 15
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \15\ This tally sheet has not been matched to a vote in the minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands 
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth (declared himself 
              bound)
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
1 No
3 not voting
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 14, 1913]

AUGUST 14, 1913

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate convened on Thursday morning, August 
14th, 1913, at ten o'clock.
The roll call disclosed 31 Senators present.
The reading of the minutes of the previous meeting was on motion 
dispensed with.
Senator Vardaman moved that the Caucus meetings be open and that the 
press and public be admitted so far as possible to hear discussions.
This on motion was laid aside temporarily.
The Chairman of the Steering Committee reported: Senator Chamberlain to 
become Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs, vice Senator 
Johnston, deceased. Senator Myers to become Chairman of the Committee on 
Public Lands. Senator Smith (Arizona) to become Chairman of the 
Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation of Arid Lands. Senator Vardaman 
to become Chairman of the Committee on Conservation of National 
Resources.
The Report of the Chairman as above approved.
It was then proposed that the vacancies caused by the death of Senator 
Johnston remain open.
Senator Martine stated his desire to withdraw from the Philippines 
Committee, in favor of Senator Shafroth, and this was likewise 
Papproved.
Senator James then moved to lay the motion of Senator Vardaman, which 
had been laid aside temporarily, on the table, and the motion of Senator 
James was carried by a vote of 31 Yeas to 8 Nays. See Roll Call. [See 
tally sheet P]
A communication was received from the Republican Caucus through Senator 
Overman for additional employee of Sergeant at Arms, which was on motion 
referred to the Committee on Patronage, with power to act.
Senator Swanson moved that the Steering Committee be authorized to fix 
the hours of Sessions.
On motion, the Caucus adjourned until eight o'clock, Thursday evening, 
August 14th, 1913.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Caucus August 14, 1913
Roll Call
[PRESENT]           [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes
     James
            Johnson
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
            Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams

To lay Vardaman motion on table
[Tally sheet P]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes
     James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane     
     Lea
            Lewis    
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen     
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
     Williams

      31                8
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 15, 1913]

AUGUST 15, 1913

Pursuant to morning adjournment, the Democratic Caucus of the Senate met 
on Thursday evening, August 15th, 1913, at eight o'clock, and fifteen 
minutes.
In the absence of the Secretary, Senator Sheppard was appointed 
temporary Secretary.
The roll call showed 26 Senators present.
A resolution was then proposed by Senator Owen.
At this point (8:20 p.m.) Senator Saulsbury arrived and assumed his 
duties as Secretary of the Caucus.

 The resolution offered by Senator Owen is as follows:

   RESOLVED, That it is the judgment of this Conference that a 
  Banking and Currency Bill shall be considered and passed at 
  this session before recess or adjournment.16
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \16\ With the first session of the Sixty-third Congress having 
continued through a hot summer in Washington, senators talked of an 
adjournment that would postpone debate on the administration's banking 
legislation until November. President Wilson dispatched his personal 
secretary Joseph Tumulty to Capitol Hill on August 13 and 14, to advise 
senators of the president's desire that the Senate remain in session. 
See Washington Post, August 15, 1913.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Senator Lewis then offered the following amendment to the motion of 
Senator Owen:

  That the Banking and Currency Bill be taken up immediately 
  after a recess.
  Senator Hitchcock offered an amendment, which was lost.

Senator Robinson moved as a substitution for Senator Owen's resolution 
(accepted by Senator Owen) a resolution as follows:

   RESOLVED by the Conference that the Congress should proceed 
  to consider and determine legislation concerning Currency 
  and Banking immediately following the passage of the pending 
  Tariff Bill.

Senator O'Gorman then offered an amendment, which was lost.
Senator Hitchcock moved that the press be informed that any member of 
the Caucus has not endorsed any particular bill.
Senator Hughes moved to lay on table Senator Hitchcock's motion. 
Carried.
The Caucus then adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, Thursday Evening, 8:15 p.m.
[PRESENT]           [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
            James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
     Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
            Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
26 present
____________________________________________________

                                                     [September 2, 1913]

SEPTEMBER 2, 1913

Senate Democratic Caucus was called to order by the Chairman at 7:25 
p.m., September 2, 1913. Forty-two Senators were present.
It was moved by Senator Sheppard that all speeches be limited to ten 
minutes, and no Senator speak more than once. An amendment offered by 
Senator Clarke that each Senator should have ten minutes for his opening 
speech and five minutes for closing, if desired, was unanimously 
adopted.
The Finance Committee reported a change in Paragraph 67, relating to 
soaps, reducing the duty from 40% to 30% and from 30% to 20%, which 
change was approved after much discussion.
Paragraph 106 taken up. Committee reported in favor of striking out 
``sashes'' and ``frames,'' line 5, page 30. Senator Fletcher's motion to 
approve the amendment was lost.
Senator Reed's motion to reduce the duty to 5% on common soap was lost.
Senator Smith of Arizona, moved to readopt the paragraph as it stands in 
the Bill, which motion prevailed.
Committee proposed amendment to Paragraph 116, which was adopted.
Paragraph 163 was settled without any motion by general consent.
Discussion arose as to Aluminum. Without formal motion, the matter was 
laid aside.
Amendment proposed by Committee to Paragraph 258 was adopted.
With respect to paragraphs 263 and 268 and all suggestions in regard to 
the Cotton Schedule, referred back to Committee with full power to act.
Paragraph 322 summarized as Zipp on Plushes was referred back with full 
power to act.
Senator Martin of Virginia moved that all matters of detail in Schedules 
be referred back to the Finance Committee with full power to act, except 
only where a vote is asked by a Caucus Member, unanimously adopted.
Paragraph 357, where Finance Committee had a tie vote, was taken up. 
Senator O'Gorman moved to restore the House provision in the Bill. 
Senator Reed moved to approve the previous action of the Caucus. Senator 
Reed's motion approved, ayes 22, noes 18.
Paragraph 657. Senator O'Gorman moved that painted and stain-glass 
windows for religious houses and Churches be restored to the Free List, 
which was adopted, after Senator Hughes' motion was lost to allow it to 
stand as printed.
Senator Myers moved to reconsider vote on Bird Plumage (Paragraph 357), 
but afterward withdrew his motion, which was renewed by Senator Ashurst 
and carried.
Senator Williams moved that former Caucus action be considered as 
binding regarding this provision (par. 357), but afterward withdrew his 
motion. Senator Hughes moved to concur in House action as to paragraph 
357, which after a long discussion was adopted.
Caucus adjourned to meet at 8:00 p.m., Wednesday, September 3.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

   [Editor's Note: In 1913 the states ratified the Sixteenth Amendment 
to the Constitution, permitting Congress to levy an income tax. Having 
reduced federal revenues produced by the tariff, the Underwood-Simmons 
bill proposed to raise revenue through the first income tax. Originally, 
the bill called for a rate of three percent for incomes over $100,000 . 
On August 27, a group of progressive Republican senators advocated 
increasing the top rate to 10 percent. Although Democrats voted against 
this proposal, Democratic progressives called for a caucus meeting to 
raise the tax rates on higher incomes. Newspaper accounts indicate that 
the Democratic caucus met on August 29--but no minutes for any such 
meeting were recorded. President Wilson urged a compromise of a 7-
percent rate, which the caucus adopted on September 5. On September 9 
the Senate passed the Underwood-Simmons Tariff by a vote of 44 to 37. 
Among Democrats, only the two senators from Louisiana, protesting cuts 
in the sugar rates, voted against the tariff.]
____________________________________________________

                                                     [September 3, 1913]

SEPTEMBER 3, 1913

Caucus met September 3, 1913, at 8:15 p.m., with forty-two Senators 
present, with the Vice President.17
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \17\ Thomas R. Marshall (Democrat, Indiana), vice president, 1913-
1921.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Bryan brought up the matter of denatured alcohol. Senator Lane 
moved to reconsider former action of Caucus placing denatured alcohol on 
Free List. Senator Vardaman moved to lay motion on table, which motion 
was declared carried.
Senator Myers moved that action of Caucus be reconsidered regarding 
Paragraph 337, which motion was declared lost.
Senator Myers moved to reconsider Caucus action as to Paragraph 311.
Senator O'Gorman proposed and moved adoption of following amendment to 
clause at page 182, beginning with line 3, which was ordered to go over 
until Friday night:

  On page 182 of ``Caucus Print,'' after line 3, add a new 
  paragraph to read as follows:
  That whenever and as often as the imposition and collection 
  of any tax upon incomes under the provisions of this act 
  result in a financial loss to or the imposition of a 
  financial burden upon any State or Territory, political 
  subdivision thereof, or municipal corporation therein, by 
  reason of any provision or provisions in any agreement, 
  contract, right, or franchise, granted or executed by or for 
  such State, Territory, political subdivision, or 
  municipality and which financial loss or burden would not 
  have been suffered or borne if the income tax herein 
  provided for were not imposed and collected, there shall be 
  paid from the Treasury of the United States to such State, 
  Territory, political subdivision, or municipality, as the 
  case may be, after such tax so affecting such State, 
  Territory, political subdivision, or municipality, shall 
  have been collected as in this act provided, a sum 
  equivalent to the financial loss so suffered or burden so 
  sustained by such State, Territory, political subdivision, 
  or municipality. Provided, however, that such agreement, 
  contract, right, or franchise was entered into or granted by 
  or in behalf of such State, Territory, political 
  subdivision, or municipality, in the exercise or in the 
  furtherance of a State, Territorial, municipal or other 
  public function or purpose. Provided, further, that this 
  provision shall not be construed to exempt any person, 
  copartnership, or corporation with whom such agreement or 
  contract shall have been made or to whom such right or 
  franchise shall have been granted, from the payment of the 
  tax upon income herein provided for, nor shall the payment 
  from the treasury of the United States herein provided for, 
  to any State, Territory, political subdivision, or 
  municipality be deemed a refund to or a credit in favor of 
  the person, copartnership, or corporation paying the tax, 
  because of which the payment is made to such State, 
  Territory, political subdivision, or municipality.

The Income Tax section was then taken up.

 Senator Williams made the following report. Finance Committee to make 
surtax as follows: (See page 165, line 13.)


                                                                   Total

   1 on excess over $20,000 up to $50,000.......................       2
   2 on excess over $50,000 up to $100,000......................       3
   3 on excess over $100,000 up to $250,000.....................       4
   4 on excess of $250,000 up to not exceeding $500,000.........      5%
   5 on excess of $500,000 up to not exceeding $1,000,000.......      6%
   6 on amount by which same exceeds $1,000,000.................       7


 Senator Williams moved that the Committee amendment as above be 
adopted. His amendment is as follows: ``Strike out line 3, page 166, 
after $100,000, and amend balance of that sentence so as to read as 
follows:

  and does not exceed $250,000; four per cent per annum upon 
  the amount by which the total net income exceeds $250,000, 
  and does not exceed $500,000, and five per cent per annum 
  upon the amount by which the total net income exceeds 
  $500,000, and does not exceed $1,000,000, and six per cent 
  per annum upon the amount by which the total net income 
  exceeds $1,000,000.

 Senator Reed then offered the following amendment:

   Strike out all after the word ``exceeds'' in line 19, page 
  165, all of lines 20 and 21, page 165, and down to and 
  including ``$100,000'' in line 3, page 166, and insert in 
  lieu thereof the following: ``$4,000 and does not exceed 
  $10,000; and 1 per centum per annum upon the amount by which 
  the total net income exceeds $10,000 and does not exceed 
  $20,000; and 1\1/2\ per centum per annum upon the amount by 
  which the total net income exceeds $20,000 but does not 
  exceed $30,000; and 2 per centum per annum upon the amount 
  by which the total net income exceeds $30,000 but does not 
  exceed $40,000; and 2\1/2\ per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which the total net income exceeds $40,000 but 
  does not exceed $50,000; and 3 per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which the total net income exceeds $50,000 but 
  does not exceed $60,000; and 4 per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which the total net income exceeds $60,000 but 
  does not exceed $70,000; and 5 per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which the total net income exceeds $70,000 but 
  does not exceed $80,000; and 6 per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which the total net income exceeds $80,000 but 
  does not exceed $90,000; and 7 per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which the total net income exceeds $90,000 but 
  does not exceed $100,000; and 8 per centum per annum upon 
  the amount by which the total net income exceeds $100,000.''

Senator O'Gorman offered amendment that tax begin at $1,000, and proceed 
as in the bill as reported.

Senator Vardaman introduced the following amendment:

  Strike out all after the word ``exceeds'' in line 19, page 
  165, down to and including ``$100,000'' in line 3, page 166, 
  and insert in lieu thereof the following:
  ``$10,000 and does not exceed $20,000, and 1\1/4\ per centum 
  per annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $20,000 and does not exceed $30,000, and 1\1/2\ per centum 
  per annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $30,000 and does not exceed $40,000, and 1\3/4\ per centum 
  per annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $40,000 and does not exceed $50,000, and 2 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $50,000 and does not exceed $60,000, and 2\1/2\ per centum 
  per annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $60,000 and does not exceed $70,000, and 3 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $80,000 but does not exceed $90,000, and 4 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $90,000 but does not exceed $100,000, and 5 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $100,000 but does not exceed $125,000, and 6 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $125,000 but does not exceed $150,000, and 7 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $150,000 but does not exceed $175,000, and 8 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $175,000 but does not exceed $200,000, and 9 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total income exceeds 
  $200,000.''

 The Caucus then adjourned to meet again Friday evening, September 5th, 
at 8:00 o'clock.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, September 3, 1913, 8 p.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
42 present +the Vice President
____________________________________________________

                                                     [September 5, 1913]

SEPTEMBER 5, 1913

Democratic Caucus called to order by the Chairman, Friday morning, 
September 5th, 1913, at 9:40 o'clock. 27 Senators present. 40 Senators 
appeared later.
Caucus ordered that all speeches be limited to five minutes and rule be 
strictly enforced. No Senator to be recognized more than twice.
On motion of Senator Clarke, one hour was allowed for debate on income 
tax, to be equally divided and the time of speakers to be stated by 
Senators Simmons and Reed.
Senator Reed moved that low limit of income taxation be fixed at $4,000, 
which motion was declared lost by a vote of 12 ayes and 23 noes. (See 
attached Roll.) [See tally sheet Q]
Senator O'Gorman moved to make the minimum amount of income taxation 
$1,000, which motion was declared lost.
Senator Pomerene moved to strike out exemption as to families, which 
motion was declared lost.
Senator Thompson offered amendment applicable to Senator Reed's 
amendment. Lost.
Senator Hoke Smith offered amendment as follows, which amendment was 
accepted by Senator Reed and declared adopted, by a vote of 29 yeas to 
11 noes. (See attached Roll.) [See tally sheet R]

   On page 116, line 1, after the word ``exceed,'' strike out 
  $100,000 and insert $75,000; after the comma in the same 
  line strike out the word ``and''; on line 3, after the word 
  ``exceed'' insert ``$75,000 and does not exceed;'' and also 
  on line 3, after $100,000'' insert ``4 per centum per annum 
  upon the amount by which the total net income exceeds 
  $100,000 and does not exceed $250,000, 5 per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total net income exceeds 
  $250,000 and does not exceed $500,000, and 6 per cent per 
  annum upon the amount by which the total net income exceeds 
  $500,000.''

 Senator O'Gorman's amendment was taken up, discussed and postponed 
until the Evening Caucus by general consent.
 Proposed amendment as to Meat Inspection was referred to the Sub-
Committee of the Committee on Finance, with full power to act.
On motion, debate on Cotton option will close at 1:30 p.m. One-half by 
Senator Clarke and one-half by Senator Hoke Smith of Ga.
Senator Hoke Smith offered an amendment to the amendment of Senator 
Clarke.
Senator Hoke Smith took the floor at 12:15 p.m. and consumed 23 minutes.
Senator Simmons took the floor at 12:38 p.m. and consumed five minutes.
Senator Smith of S.C. took the floor at 12:43 p.m.
Senator Ransdell took the floor at 12:55 p.m. Time extended by general 
consent to 1:03 p.m., and time for voting extended to 1:35 p.m.
Senator from North Carolina (Mr.            ) consumed three minutes by 
grant of time from Senator Clarke of Arkansas.
Senator Hoke Smith's amendment declared lost.
Caucus took recess until 8 p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Reed's Motion to increase minimum to 
$4,000
[Tally sheet Q]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon    
            Bankhead 
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes
            James
            Johnson  
            Kern     
            Lane     
            Lea      
            Lewis    
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman 
     Overman
            Owen     
            Pittman  
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell 
     Reed
     Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
            Sheppard 
     Shields
            Shively
            Simmons  
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of 
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
            Thomas   
            Thompson 
            Thornton 
            Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
      12               23

Vote on Reed's Amendment as amended by 
Sen. Hoke Smith and accepted.
[Tally sheet R]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes
            James    
            Johnson  
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman 
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
     Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
            Thomas   
     Thompson
            Thornton 
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
      29               11

Roll Call, 9:40 a.m. Friday, September 5
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
      40

 Caucus reconvened at 8:13 p.m., Friday, September 5, 1913, with twenty-
five Senators present, which number was later increased to thirty-nine.
Senator Reed (P. 208) moved to amend section of Administration clause to 
provide that all employees be appointed outside the Civil Service. 
Senator Kern offered an amendment to Senator Reed's amendment, accepted 
by Senator Reed, and declared adopted, which amendment is as follows:

   On page 208, line 25, before the word ``inspectors,'' 
  strike out the word ``and,'' and after the word 
  ``inspectors'' in the same line, insert a comma and the 
  words ``and other employees''; on page 209, line 2, 
  beginning with the word ``and'' strike out all of the 
  language down to and including the word ``thereto,'' on line 
  6, and insert the words ``under such rules and regulations 
  as may be fixed by the Secretary to insure faithful and 
  competent Pservice.''

 Senator O'Gorman submitted new proposed amendment as follows: (Insert 
on p. 186 at end of line 9.)

   Provided, that whenever any State, Territory, or the 
  District of Columbia, or a political subdivision of a State 
  or Territory shall have entered in good faith into a 
  contract with any person or corporation, the object and 
  purpose of which is to acquire, construct, operate or 
  maintain a public utility, no tax shall be levied under the 
  provisions of this act upon the income derived from the 
  operation of such public utility, so far as the payment 
  thereof will impose a loss or burden upon such State, 
  Territory, or the District of Columbia, or a political 
  subdivision of a State or Territory; but this provision is 
  not intended to confer upon such person or corporation any 
  financial gain or exemption or to relieve such person or 
  corporation from the payment of a tax as provided for in 
  this section upon the part or portion of said income to 
  which such person or corporation shall be entitled under 
  such contract.

 Senator O'Gorman's amendment adopted, yeas 24, noes 17 (See Roll 
attached.--No. 2) [See tally sheet S]
Senator Newlands addressed the Caucus and declared he had ``never for 
one moment contemplated an alliance with the opposition Party.''

 Senator Walsh offered amendment to Bill providing for Customs Board. 
This amendment is as follows:

    A commission is hereby created and established in the 
  Treasury Department, to be known as the ``customs 
  commission,'' to be composed of five commissioners to be 
  appointed by the President, by and with the advice and 
  consent of the Senate. The commissioners first appointed 
  under this act shall continue in office two, three, four, 
  five and six years, respectively, from the date of their 
  respective appointments, the term of each to be designated 
  by the president, but their successors shall be appointed 
  for terms of six years, except that any person chosen to 
  fill a vacancy shall be appointed only for the unexpired 
  term of the commissioner whom he shall succeed. Any 
  commissioner may be removed by the president for 
  inefficiency, neglect of duty, malfeasance in office, or 
  other sufficient cause. No more than three of the 
  commissioners shall be appointed from the same political 
  party. No person engaged in importing merchandise into the 
  United States and no person engaged in manufactures, or who 
  is in any manner peculiarly interested therein, shall hold 
  such office. No vacancy in the commission shall impair the 
  right of the remaining commissioners to exercise all the 
  powers of the commission. The salary of such commissioners 
  shall be at the rate of $7,500 per annum. They shall be 
  entitled, in addition, to compensation for actual traveling 
  and other necessary expenses in the discharge of their 
  duties. They shall choose one of their own number to be 
  president of the commission. They shall have power to employ 
  a clerk, a stenographer, and a messenger, and, with the 
  approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, such other 
  clerical assistants as shall be necessary to the performance 
  of their duties, and at such rates of compensation as they 
  may establish, with the approval of the Secretary of the 
  Treasury. Their salaries, expenses, and the compensation of 
  the clerk, stenographer, messenger, and such additional 
  clerical force as may be thus employed, shall be paid out of 
  any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated upon 
  the auditing of the same, according to the usual course in 
  the Treasury Department.
    That the commission shall establish its permanent office 
  at the city of Washington, where it shall be at all times, 
  in the usual course of business, ready to hear or receive 
  oral or written testimony upon all the specific subjects 
  mentioned in the preceding sections of this act, and 
  generally upon everything relating directly or indirectly to 
  custom duties and revenues.
    That it shall be the duty of the said commission to 
  examine into and ascertain the average price of commodities 
  imported into the United States, both at wholesale and 
  retail in the United States, and both in the United States 
  and in the foreign places of production, sale, or shipment 
  for the period of six months preceding and six months 
  following any change in the rate of customs duties imposed 
  upon such commodities, and this inquiry shall be carried 
  back for a period of twenty-five years, and more, if deemed 
  advisable by such commission, and shall extend to all facts 
  relating to demand and supply, domestic and foreign, which 
  tend to influence prices of such commodities, foreign and 
  domestic, and to aid in determining the true effect of the 
  import duty or of the change therein in the several cases, 
  upon domestic and foreign prices, and upon productions of 
  the same or of other commodities, upon revenue, upon 
  immigration, upon profits of capital, rates of wages, and 
  the general welfare. Second, to ascertain the amounts in 
  quantity and value of the importation of the principal 
  commodities during each of said periods of six months 
  preceding and succeeding any such change in customs duties. 
  Third, to ascertain, as far as practicable, the quantity and 
  value of the same or similar commodities produced in the 
  United States during the same respective periods. Fourth, to 
  ascertain whether in any and in what instances the 
  particular rates of customs duties have operated to increase 
  or diminish production in the United States. Fifth, to 
  ascertain in what particulars rates of customs duties, 
  existing from time to time, operate injuriously or favorably 
  to the development and increase of American manufactures and 
  productions, or operate injuriously or favorably to the 
  consumers of such manufactured articles and productions in 
  respect of causing or contributing to the payment of 
  unreasonable prices by consumers, or the removal or 
  reduction of the same. Sixth, to ascertain the effect of the 
  customs duties upon the price of agricultural productions of 
  the country and their sale in the United States markets and 
  their consumption in the United States. Seventh, to 
  ascertain the effect of such customs duties, both actual and 
  relative, in respect of the employment and the payment of 
  remunerative wages, both actual and relative, to labor in 
  the United States, and a comparison of the same with the 
  labor and wages in other countries. Eighth, to consider the 
  effect of customs duties, or the absence of them, upon the 
  agricultural, commercial, manufacturing, mining, and other 
  industrial interests, of the people of the United States. 
  Ninth, to ascertain and compare the actual cost of the 
  selling price, both at wholesale and retail, of similar 
  manufactured commodities reduced to American weights, 
  measures, and money in the United States and elsewhere. 
  Tenth, to ascertain the growth and the development of the 
  principal manufacturing industries affected by the tariff 
  schedules in England, France, Germany, Belgium, Japan, and 
  the United States for the last twenty-five years; and to 
  ascertain the relative cost of transportation in those 
  countries and the United States.
    That for the purpose of such inquiry and investigation the 
  commission may visit any part of the United States, and by 
  public notice or otherwise, invite testimony and information 
  from all persons interested. They may from time to time also 
  delegate one of their number to visit foreign countries to 
  make investigation respecting the labor and industries of 
  those countries whenever such investigation may be necessary 
  to promote the objects of the commission, and they may 
  require information concerning labor and industries of 
  foreign countries from consular or other agents of the 
  United States, in those countries, and such agents shall 
  furnish the information as required promptly and without 
  charge.
    That the commission shall report its proceedings in 
  respect of the matters hereinbefore in this act mentioned, 
  with the statistics and evidence upon which its report is 
  based together with recommendations for changes in customs 
  dues which they may deem advisable and necessary, and the 
  ground upon which its conclusions concerning such changes 
  have been reached, to Congress in the month of December in 
  each year. It shall cause the testimony and statistics taken 
  and obtained in respect of the matters in this act mentioned 
  to be printed from time to time and distributed to Members 
  of Congress by the Public Printer, and also shall cause to 
  be printed for the use of Congress 2000 copies of its annual 
  report, together with statistics and testimony hereinbefore 
  mentioned. It is hereby made the duty of the Public Printer 
  to execute the printing provided for in this act.

 Senator Walsh withdrew his amendment.
The resolutions proposed by Senator Newlands were lost on a viva voce 
vote.
The Caucus then adjourned sine die.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Caucus reassembled at 8:13 p.m. 
September 5, 1913
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
      25

Vote on O'Gorman's Amendment
[Tally sheet S]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes   
            James    
            Johnson  
     Kern
            Lane     
     Lea
     Lewis
            Martin   
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
     Owen
     Pittman
            Pomerene 
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of 
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
            Thompson 
            Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
      24               17
____________________________________________________

                                                  September 30, 1913    

    Honorable John W. Kern:

      The undersigned members of the Senate respectfully 
    request that a Conference be called in the Marble Room at 
    Ten-thirty o'clock a.m., October 1st, 1913, to consider 
    Tariff Bill as reported from Conference.

        J.A. Reed
        Robert L. Owen
        J. A. O'Gorman
        H.F. Hollis
        G.M. Hitchcock
        John F. Shafroth
        H. L. Myers
        Atlee Pomerene
        James E. Martine
        Willard Saulsbury
____________________________________________________

                                                       [October 1, 1913]

OCTOBER 1, 1913

 Pursuant to the foregoing request, the Democratic Caucus met on 
Wednesday, October 1st, 1913, at 11:20 o'clock, a.m.
 Senator Reed addressed the Caucus, saying he was largely instrumental 
in securing the meeting and explained why--referred to cast iron pipe, 
electric cables, &c.
Senator Pomerene moved that the Chairman of the Finance Committee be 
asked to move to postpone action on Conference Report until Thursday, 
October 2nd, 1913, at twelve o'clock noon and that the Caucus recess 
until three o'clock this afternoon to meet at the Finance Committee Room 
in the Senate Office Building. Carried.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, October 1, 1913
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
      39

 The Democratic Caucus reassembled at three o'clock, Wednesday 
afternoon, October 1st, 1913.
As shown by the roll call, thirty-seven Senators were present. PSenator 
Reed moved that it is the sense of the Caucus that the Senate do not 
concur in confirming report on paragraph 116 of bill, being Senate 
Amendment 87, and that the intent of this motion be carried out on the 
floor of the Senate.
Senators Lane and Martine spoke.
Unanimous request was granted that Senator Shively's vote be recorded in 
favor of Committee's report.
It was stated that Senator Tillman had left authority with Senator 
Thornton to cast his vote.
Senator Martin addressed the Caucus; also Senator Hughes and Senator 
James.
Senator Pomerene addressed the Caucus on wine spirits, &c.
It was stated by Senator Bacon that he would leave the right to cast his 
vote with Senator Hoke Smith in favor of the Conference Report and with 
Senator Smith on cotton futures. Unanimous consent granted to this.
Senator Hollis earnestly urged that rates on woolen hose be replaced at 
50% instead of 40%, to which it was reduced. A discussion as to the 
possibility of doing this in the state of the bill seemed to show the 
impossibility of doing this, in view of the parliamentary position of 
the bill.
Senators Reed, Smith (Arizona), Pittman and Shafroth then addressed the 
Caucus.
Senator Reed withdrew his original motion and moved that the Conferees 
be instructed to further insist on the Senate Amendments.
Senator Pomerene moved to amend by instructing Conferees to insist on 
Senate amendment, page 76, lines 5 to 24 inclusive, and on page 77.
Senator Simmons moved to sustain the Conference Report and this was duly 
adopted as shown by the roll call by a vote of 33 yeas, 6 nays. [See 
tally sheet T]
It was then agreed that the Senate recede from the Clarke amendment and 
disagree to House substitute thereto or therefor, so that no such 
provision be placed in the Tariff Bill.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, 3:10 p.m.,
afternoon of October 1, 1913
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
            Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
     Gore
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
      37

Simmons motion to approve action of 
Conference Committee
[Tally sheet T]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
     Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
     Newlands
            O'Gorman 
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell ex
            Reed     
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton   ex
            Tillman
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
     Williams
      33                6


__________________________________________

  [Editor's Note: On June 23, 1913, President Wilson made his second 
address to a joint session of Congress, calling for government control 
of the banking system. On June 26, Virginia Representative Carter Glass 
and Oklahoma Senator Robert L. Owen, respective chairmen of the House 
and Senate Banking and Currency committees, introduced the Wilson 
administration's bill to establish a government-controlled Federal 
Reserve Board, to issue federal reserve notes, and to facilitate 
national monetary policy. On September 18, the House voted 287 to 85 in 
favor of the bill, with only three Democratic representatives in 
opposition. Banking and business interests lobbied against the bill, 
favoring a decentralized and privately controlled reserve banking 
system. After holding lengthy hearings, the Senate Banking and Currency 
Committee found itself evenly divided on the issue--with six Democratic 
senators voting in opposition to Democratic Senator Gilbert Hitchcock 
and five Republicans. In November the committee reported to the Senate 
two contradictory bills for public and private control. On December 19, 
1913, the Senate defeated the banker-sponsored bill by a vote of 44 to 
41, and adopted the Glass-Owen bill by 54 to 34, with all Senate 
Democrats voting for it.]
____________________________________________________

                                                     [November 26, 1913]

NOVEMBER 26, 1913

 The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate assembled on 
Wednesday morning, November 26th, 1913.
27 Senators answered the roll call and subsequently six others appeared, 
making 33 present.
The meeting was called to order by the Chairman at 11:15.

The following resolution, proposed by Mr. O'Gorman and as amended by Mr. 
Williams, was unanimously carried:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that 
  beginning on the 1st day of December, 1913, the Senate 
  should meet at 10 o'clock, a.m., and should sit until 6 
  p.m.; recess until 8 p.m. and sit until 11 p.m., each day 
  until the Currency Bill be voted upon. And that no Christmas 
  recess be taken except for Christmas Day, unless the 
  Currency bill be passed prior thereto. The adjournment being 
  from the 24th until the 26th day of December.

 The following resolution was then offered by Senator Lewis and was on 
his motion referred to the Steering Committee for consideration:

   Whereas, the Senate Committee on Banking and Currency have 
  for three months given full hearing to such sources as were 
  interested in the matter of banking and currency 
  legislation; and
  Whereas, there is now no necessity for debate on the measure 
  beyond such times as shall only be necessary to put forth 
  views on the contested portions of the bill:
  Now, therefore, to the end that immediate action may be had 
  as assurance to the people of certainty and quickness of 
  conduct:
  RESOLVED, By the Democratic Caucus, that debate on the 
  measure shall not exceed twenty days in open session, the 
  time to be divided as shall be arranged by the leaders of 
  each side of the Senate.

 Senator O'Gorman offered this resolution:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that the 
  Alaska bill when reached be laid aside until the currency 
  bill is passed.
   Said resolution duly adopted.

 Senator O'Gorman offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the program of speeches be arranged by the 
  Chairman of the Caucus and the Chairman of the Banking and 
  Currency Committee.

 Which motion was subsequently withdrawn.
Senator Stone then moved that when the Senate adjourns to-day, this 
Caucus reassemble.
Senator Reed offered a substitute, which Senator Stone accepted, and 
which was duly passed.

The resolution of Senator Reed is as follows:

   RESOLVED, That the Conference reconvene immediately after 
  the adjournment of the Senate to-day and continue during the 
  rest of this week, unless its consideration of the Banking 
  and Currency Bill is sooner terminated.

 Duly adopted.
 Senator Lewis requested that he be directed to proceed in accordance 
with his duty in securing the attendance of Senators, and this was 
accordingly adopted.

The following resolution was then offered by Senator Williams:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Banking and Currency 
  Committee shall report to the Conference a list of the 
  questions in dispute and submit them to the Conference for 
  consideration and action, in their order as appearing in the 
  bill. This shall not preclude any Senator from offering any 
  amendment to any part of the Bill.

 The above motion was subsequently withdrawn by Senator Williams. 
Senator Reed offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be requested 
  to endeavor to secure a unanimous consent agreement to vote 
  on the Banking and Currency Bill at the earliest possible 
  date.

? [Question mark suggests that the secretary was unsure of what action 
was taken on this resolution.]
Senator Pomerene moved to recess until after the close of the session of 
the Senate this afternoon. Carried. Adjournment.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, November 26, 1913
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
      36


__________________________________________

 Caucus reassembled at 5 o'clock, p.m., Wednesday, November 26th, 1913.
Senator Williams moved to adjourn at 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and then adjourn 
to 10 a.m. tomorrow, Thursday, November 27th.

 The following resolution was proposed by Senator Reed:

   RESOLVED, That the Owen Bill shall be read section by 
  section and that when any section has been read, it shall be 
  taken as approved, unless amendment is offered. But this 
  shall not preclude the offering of amendments to any part of 
  the bill at any time in the Conference.

 Adopted.
 Senator Owen began reading H.R. 7837.
Hitchcock proposal was accepted by Conference in lieu of Owen proposal, 
lines 5 to 11, page 1, and lines 1 and 2, page 3, inserting words ``Bank 
or.''
Insert in line 20, page 4, after word ``Board'' the words ``hereinafter 
provided for to be assigned by the President.'' Agreed to.
Strike out lines 9 and 10, page 5, and in lines 13 and 14 the words 
``the'' and ``thus constituted'' and change ``the'' to ``such.''
Discussion of many subjects followed and the hour of six p.m. having 
arrived, the Caucus recessed until 8 o'clock, p.m.


__________________________________________

Caucus reassembled at 8 o'clock, Wednesday evening, November 26th, 1913, 
22 Senators present.
Senator Hoke Smith moved to postpone Section 2 for the present, so far 
as it relates to the number of regional banks. Carried.
Moved by Senator Shafroth that the Chairman be instructed to call 
Senators to order. Adopted.
Three words ``and so forth,'' line 11, page 7, struck out. Word ``A'' 
substituted for ``such,'' 25th line, page 8. Word ``the'' substituted 
for ``such,'' 5th line, page 8.
Senator Sheppard moved to amend lines 11 and 12, page 9, to make 
payments ``one-half in gold or gold certificates and one-half in other 
lawful money'' at the option of the members bank. Lost.
Senator Sheppard moved to strike out ``said payments to be in gold or 
gold certificates.'' ?
On motion word ``circuit'' struck out in line 9, page 10.
Senator Reed moved lines 8 to 18 on page 10 with suggested amendments be 
referred back to the Committee. Carried.
Also suggestion of Senator Walsh as to lines 24, page 43 to and 
including line 22, page 44, referred back to committee. Adopted.
Senator Newlands moved to strike out everything in the bill providing 
for raising capital for regional reserve bank.
The hour of 11 o'clock having arrived, the Chairman declared the Caucus 
adjourned until 10 o'clock, a.m., Thursday.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                       November 27, 1913

NOVEMBER 27, 1913

 The Democratic Caucus of the United States was called to order 
Thursday, November 27th, 1913, at 9:20 o'clock, a.m., pursuant to 
adjournment. 9 Senators were present and subsequently this was at 9:30 
increased to 15.
 Senator Sheppard moved that the Caucus and all future meetings be held 
with open doors. This motion was subsequently withdrawn due to the 
absence of many Senators.

Senator Saulsbury rose to a question of privilege and stating same, read 
from the Thanksgiving Proclamation of the President, as Pfollows:

   Now, therefore, I, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United 
  States of America, do hereby designate Thursday, the 27th of 
  November, next, as a day of thanksgiving and prayer, and 
  invite the people throughout the land to cease from their 
  wonted occupations and in their several homes and places of 
  worship render thanks to Almighty God.

 And suggested that in accordance therewith, the Democratic Caucus 
should adjourn until Friday, November 28th, and its members go home and 
to places of worship and generally to comply with the direction of the 
President--Senator O'Gorman interrupting was compelled by Chairman to be 
seated.
The question of privilege was overruled. An appeal from the decision of 
the Chair was promptly overruled by the Chair, the steamroller having 
been oiled up and brought in.
Amendments on pages 21 and 22 were agreed to as to verbiage.
Senator Sheppard moved to strike out paragraph ``Eighth'' on page 23. 
This motion subsequently withdrawn.
Discussion then proceeded, during which Senator Overman, who had been 
called to the Chair, confided to the Secretary the charming story told 
by Senator Stone, &c.
Senator O'Gorman moved that Paragraph Eighth be postponed.
Senator Sheppard moved to postpone the consideration of Paragraph Eighth 
until Section 19 is reached. Carried.
Senator Thomas then read certain amendments he will offer when Section 
19 and Paragraph Eighth are considered.
At 11:40 o'clock, 25 Senators had appeared and were present.
Senator O'Gorman moved to strike out ``amendments,'' line 14 on page 24.
Senator Sheppard moved to amend lines 14 and 15, page 24, to read 
``discounts, advancements and accommodations.''
Senator O'Gorman moved to insert the words ``or employee'' after the 
word ``director'' in line 4, on page 25.
Senator Williams moved to amend lines 3 and 4, page 25: ``No director of 
Class B shall be an officer, employee, or director of any member bank, 
or of Class C shall be an officer, employee, director or stockholder of 
a member bank.''
Senator Thomas then moved to adjourn until 2 o'clock.
The Caucus then took a recess to 3 o'clock, p.m.


__________________________________________

 3 p.m.
Senator Williams moved to strike out lines 1 and 2 on page 25 and 
insert: ``No director of Class B shall be an officer, director or 
employee of any bank and no director of Class C shall be an officer, 
director, employee or stockholder of any bank.'' Lost.
Senator Reed moved to amend line 2 to read: ``No director of Class B or 
Class C shall be an officer, director, employee or stockholder of any 
bank.'' Carried.

Senator Swanson proposed the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That no Senator shall speak over ten minutes or 
  more than once upon any motion pending before the 
  Conference. Carried.

 Senator Williams proposed the following amendment: Beginning on page 
36, line 25, restore the language in the House amendment with amendments 
so that it shall read as follows:

   One-half of the net earnings, after the aforesaid divided 
  claims have been fully met, shall be paid into a surplus 
  fund until such fund shall amount to forty per centum of the 
  paid-in capital stock of such bank, and of the remaining 
  one-half thirty-three and one-third per centum shall be paid 
  to the United States as a franchise tax and thirty-three and 
  one-third per centum to the member banks in the ratio of 
  their average balances with the Federal reserve bank for the 
  proceeding year, and thirty-three and one-third per centum 
  shall be paid to the United States as a trustee for the 
  benefit of depositors in failed national banks, the money to 
  be kept in and losses from failures to be paid from it as a 
  Depositor's Insurance Fund under a division of the Treasury 
  to be constituted and managed under such regulations as may 
  be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury.

 The following amendment was then proposed by Senator Williams:

  At page 24, line 24, following the word ``district'' in line 
  24, insert the following: ``And who shall be actively 
  engaged at the time of their appointment in commerce, 
  industrial pursuits, or agriculture respectively.''

As a substitute therefor, Senator Thomas submitted the following:

  Strike out all after ``of,'' line 24, page 27, and insert 
  ``and actively engaged in the commercial, agricultural or 
  industrial interests of their respective districts.''

A further substitute therefor offered by Senator Walsh, and which was 
accepted is as follows: [no text provided]
On motion of Senator Williams, lines 5 and 6, at page 27, were referred 
back to the Committee.
Lines 24, 25 and 26 were on motion (at page 27) referred back to the 
Committee.
Senator Williams then made the following motion: At page 29, line 3, 
after the letter ``C,'' insert the following: ``Who shall be a person of 
tested banking experience.'' Carried.
Senator Reed moved that recess be had at 5:30, till 10 a.m., Friday.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [November 28, 1913]

NOVEMBER 28, 1913

 The Senate Caucus met Friday, November 28th, 1913, at 11:40 o'clock.

On motion the following amendments were adopted:

In line 15, page 47, substitute ``its'' for ``the.''
In lines 16 and 17, beginning with the word ``of,'' strike out to and 
including the word ``board.''
In line 17, page 47, substitute the word ``its'' for the word ``the'' 
where it appears before the word ``active.''
Senator Walsh was requested to hand his proposed amendment to Chairman 
Owen. Senator Bacon was likewise requested to hand his proposed 
amendment to Senator Owen. Both of said amendments to be inserted at 
page 49.
On motion the words ``or oftener'' were inserted after the word ``week'' 
in line 4, page 52.
Senator Swanson's motion to give the banks power to arrange reserve 
cities, was lost.
Senator Williams moved to strike out ``or remove.'' Senator Saulsbury 
moved to insert after the word ``suspend,'' line 12, page 53, the words 
``until hearing and after hearing to'' and to strike out the word ``or'' 
in line 12, page 53. This was accepted by Senator Williams but was 
subsequently lost.
Senator Shafroth moved to insert ``under such regulations as the board 
may prescribe'' after the word ``reserve,'' line 13, page 53.
Senator Williams moved to strike out ``federal reserve notes or'' at 
line 6, page 54.
Senator Thomas moved to adjourn at one o'clock to 2:30 p.m. Carried. 
Senator Saulsbury moved to substitute for line 5, page 54, the 
following: ``To authorize, for fixed periods and from time to time, the 
use, as reserves of member banks.'' Lost.

  Recess until 2:30 p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Caucus reassembled at 2:40 p.m., Friday afternoon, November 28th, 1913. 
Saulsbury motion lost, yeas 5, noes about 12.
Williams motion lost, about same vote.
Senator Newlands moved to insert the word ``state'' in line 5, page 54, 
between the words ``member'' and ``bank.'' Lost, yeas 5, noes 12.
Senator Saulsbury moved to insert after the word ``executor'' in line 9, 
page 54, the words ``administrator or registrar of bonds.'' Carried.
Senator Newlands moved to strike out paragraph (1), page 54. Yeas 6, 
noes 12.
Senator Overman moved to insert after the word ``powers'' in line 10, 
page 54, ``when authorized by the states or any county or the District 
of Columbia so to act.''
Senator Thomas proposed amendment to strike out all in paragraph (1) 
after the words ``registrar of bonds.''
Senator Swanson moved to refer the section to Committee for phraseology 
of section (1).
Amendment of Committee for insert between lines 1 and 2 ``with a waiver 
of demand, notice and protest,'' page 56. Agreed to.
Senator Swanson's amendment to change ``three'' to ``six,'' line 17, 
page 57, lost.
Senator Williams moved to amend line 5, page 58, by striking out period, 
insert comma, and add: ``Growing out of commercial, mercantile, or 
agricultural transactions.'' Referred to Committee.
On motion the words ``pay up'' in line 20, page 57, inserted. Senator 
Reed moved to strike out ``of such member banks'' in lines 14 and 15, 
page 57.
This on motion of Senator Smith of Georgia was referred back to the 
Committee.
On motion the Caucus took a recess until 8 p.m., Friday evening.

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

The Democratic Caucus of the Senate reassembled at 8:12 o'clock, Friday 
evening, November 28, 1913.
On motion of Senator Williams, the House provision at pages 58 and 59 
were restored down to lines 6 and 7, page 59, which shall read: ``Fifth, 
Liabilities incurred under the provisions of this Act.''
Senator Sheppard offered the following amendment: On page 56, after the 
word ``act'' in line 10, strike out the remainder of line 10, all of 
line 12, 13, and the words ``eligible for such discount'' in line 14, 
and insert in lieu thereof:

   Nothing in this act shall be construed to prohibit notes 
  having a maturity of net more than six months, secured by a 
  lien upon agricultural products or by warehouse or elevator 
  receipts representing agricultural products owned by the 
  producer thereof or by the landlord receiving the same in 
  payment of rent or for advances made in connection with the 
  production thereof.

 Lost.
Senator Williams moved to insert the word ``market'' after the word 
``actual'' at line 12, page 59. Withdrawn.
On motion the words ``whether or not indorsed by a member bank'' 
inserted line 14, page 60.
Line 6, page 61, amended by inserting the words ``political 
subdivision'' and after ``municipality'' insert ``in the Continental,'' 
striking out the words ``of the.'' Adopted.
Senator Saulsbury offered the following amendment to be added at the end 
of Section 16, which on his motion was referred to the Committee for 
consideration:

   No receipts or funds of common carriers engaged in 
  interstate commerce shall be deposited in any bank or Trust 
  Company not belonging to the system established by this Act.

 Senator Thomas moved to restore House provision of Section 17, page 64. 
The vote on this was ayes 8, noes 15.
Senator Shively moved to strike out the words ``except customs'' in 
lines 8 and 9, page 64, and restore the word ``customs'' in line 8. Ayes 
13, noes 12.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [November 29, 1913]

NOVEMBER 29, 1913

 Caucus reassembled at 10:30 a.m., Saturday morning, November 29th, 
1913.
Senator Williams moved an amendment which was lost.
Senator Saulsbury questioned the correctness of the provisions of lines 
10 to 14, page 67, and an extended discussion followed.
Senator Saulsbury moved to strike out ``if fit for circulation,'' lines 
12 and 13, page 67. Referred to Committee.
Senator Reed moved as a substitute for lines 3, 4 and 5 at page 69: ``A 
Federal Reserve Bank shall as said collateral matures pay or cause to be 
paid to the Federal Reserve Agent Federal Reserve Notes or lawful 
money.''
Recess.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.


__________________________________________

Caucus reassembled at 4:30 p.m.
Several motions were made and withdrawn.
Matters on page 68, recently discussed, were referred back to the 
Committee.
Several slight verbal changes were made at page 69, in lines 5, 6, 8, 
15, 20, 21. It was then agreed that the Committee should perfect page 
69, lines 3 to 21.
Senator Swanson then moved that all on page 70 (line 5) to line 6, page 
72, be approved.
Senator Thomas moved to strike out ``$1, $2,'' in line 11, page 70.
The substitute for Sec. 19 (prepared by Treasury Department) was read by 
Chairman Owen.
It was then moved to refer same with Sec. 19 reported by the Committee 
to the Committee to perfect. Carried.
Recess until 8 p.m.18
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \18\ Apparently, no minutes were made for any reassembly of the caucus 
at 8 p.m.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [November 30, 1913]

NOVEMBER 30, 1913

Caucus met at 3:20 o'clock, Sunday afternoon, November 30, 1913.
Senator Williams moved an amendment, as follows:

  Beginning at page 36, line 25, down to and including the 
  word ``Treasury'' in line 1, page 38, restore the language 
  of the House amendment with amendment so that it shall read 
  as follows:
  ``One half of the net earnings, after the aforesaid dividend 
  claims have been fully met, shall be paid into a surplus 
  fund until such fund shall amount to forty per centum of the 
  paid-in capital stock of such bank*, and of the remaining 
  one-half 50% shall be paid to the United States as a 
  franchise tax, and 50% shall be paid to the United States as 
  a trustee for the benefit of depositors in failed national 
  banks, the money to be kept in and losses from failures to 
  be paid from it as a depositors' insurance fund under a 
  division of the Treasury to be constituted and managed under 
  such regulations as may be prescribed by the Secretary of 
  the Treasury.''
   *If adopted, Committee to rearrange balance of the bill to 
  accord herewith
  Adopted 18 to 17.

The following was proposed by Senator Thomas, as a substitute for the 
Senator Williams amendment, but was lost:

  Beginning on page 36, line 25, down to and including the 
  word ``Treasury'' on line 1, page 38, restore the language 
  in the House amendment with amendment so that it shall read 
  as follows:
  ``One-half of the net earnings, after the aforesaid dividend 
  claims have been fully met, shall be paid into a surplus 
  fund until such fund shall amount to forty per centum of the 
  paid-in capital stock of such bank; and of the remaining 
  one-half, thirty-three and one-third per centum shall be 
  paid to the United States as a franchise tax, and thirty-
  three and one-third per centum to the member banks in the 
  ratio of their average balances with the Federal reserve 
  bank for the preceding year, and thirty-three and one-third 
  per centum shall be paid to the United States as a trustee 
  for the benefit of depositors in failed national banks, the 
  money to be known as a depositors' insurance fund, and shall 
  be used for the payment of depositors of insolvent member 
  banks under rules and regulations made by the board. The 
  reserve banks shall have a lien upon the assets of every 
  insolvent member bank for the reimbursement of such 
  insurance fund to the extent to which such fund may be 
  depleted by payments therefrom, to the depositors of such 
  insolvent member banks. When in the judgment of the board 
  there has been accumulated in such depositors' insurance 
  fund a sufficient sum fully to insure the payment of the 
  depositors of insolvent member banks, the board shall have 
  power to suspend the accumulation thereof; and thereafter 
  the percentage of said earnings so herein provided for, 
  shall be paid to the United States; Provided, nevertheless, 
  That in the event said depositors' insurance fund should 
  become depleted by the payment of depositors of insolvent 
  member banks, and shall not have been reimbursed from the 
  assets of such banks as herein provided, then such fund 
  shall be replenished by again setting aside such thirty-
  three and one-third per centum of the earnings or so much 
  thereof as in the judgment of the board may be necessary. 
  The remaining net earnings shall be paid to the United 
  States, and shall be applied to the purchase at par, with 
  accrued interest of the two per centum bonds of the United 
  States, said bonds then to be retired; or if such bonds can 
  not be so purchased, said amount shall be applied to the 
  purchase of other interest-bearing obligations of the United 
  States, which obligations shall thereupon be retired.''

 The Chairman reported agreement that not less than 8 or more than 12 
reserve banks be provided for. Corresponding changes have been made 
throughout the bill.
Language reported by the Chairman as to Class B directors: Mr. Williams 
moved amendment to make representation in and one of them shall be 
actually engaged in Commerce. One of them shall be actually engaged in 
Agriculture. One of them shall be actually engaged in some other 
industrial pursuit.
Senator Walsh's amendment adopted and handed to Chairman as to Class B 
directors.
Senator Saulsbury suggested method of guarantee of deposits provided for 
by Williams amendment and same was referred to the Committee.
The suggestion was as follows: ``(k) To authorize, for fixed periods and 
from time to time, member banks to use as reserve Federal reserve notes, 
or notes based on United States Bonds, to the extent that said board may 
find necessary.''
Now Senator Bacon's amendment using constitutional language.
The motion of Senator Reed to reconsider vote by which Saulsbury motion 
to make line 1, paragraph (k) to read as follows: ``To authorize for 
fixed periods and from time to time,'' &c. was laid on the table by a 
vote of 17 yeas against 11 noes. See roll call. [See tally sheet U]
Sundry verbal changes made on several pages by the committee approved 
and passed.
The Committee reported language to stand as in italics on page 65 and 
lines from 3 to 9, page 84, be struck out.
On page 67, lines 12 and 13, ``if fit for circulation'' struck out.
Insert made on page 69, line 9: ``Federal reserve notes so deposited 
shall not be reissued except upon compliance with the conditions of an 
original issue.'' Carried.
Senator Williams moved an amendment to the above, which Senator Shafroth 
moved to lay on table. Lost 18 to 6. [See tally sheet V]

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call on Saulsbury Amendment to 
Paragraph K, Line 54
[Tally sheet U]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
            Bryan    
            Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore     
            Hitchcock
            Hollis
            Hughes   
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands 
            O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen     
            Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed     
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
            Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
      17               11

Williams Amendment to Amend
[Tally sheet V]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman
     Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed     
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
            Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
            Thomas   
            Thompson
            Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
      18                6


__________________________________________

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate reassembled at 8:15 
o'clock, Sunday evening, November 30, 1913.
The words ``in blank'' on page 70, line 11, were on motion struck out.
Sec. 19, page 75, amended by accepting the Treasury proposal as 
substitute as amended by Senator Owen, Chairman, and further amended by 
Senator Williams to strike out limit of $25,000,000 per annum and the 3% 
bond substitute. Carried.
(Senator Sheppard requested that his vote be recorded against the 
Treasury proposal and for eliminating all reference to three per cent. 
bonds in the bill.)
The portion as to the three per cent. bond substitute of last motion 
reconsidered.
The motion of Senator Williams to strike out the 3% bond substitute from 
Treasury proposal as amended by Senator Owen, Chairman, was then 
adopted.

Senator Owen moved to amend as follows:

Line 1, page 70, strike out ``approved by'' and insert ``with the 
approval of.'' Carried.
Senator Reed moved to insert after the word ``of'' in line 18, page 64, 
the following: ``The bank's written agreement to return a like amount of 
said notes or lawful money to the Federal Reserve Agent within 90 days 
and''
Senator Hollis raised point of order that Sec. had been passed and 
matter was closed, sustained acrimonious discussion followed. Point of 
order withdrawn with general consent. Senator Reed's motion was renewed 
by Senator Walsh, but motion was lost.
The Committee recommended the Hitchcock language of the amendment at 
page 80, lines 15 to 19, in lieu of the Owen amendment, lines 15 to 18.
Some changes of phraseology on page 81 were made by substituting 
Hitchcock for Owen amendment.
Also at page 83, line 16, an amendment (relating outside Continental 
U.S.) offered by Senator Reed through Chairman Owen and amended by 
Senator Williams. Accepted.
Senator Lewis offered amendment, page 4, offering subscriptions to bank 
stock to all the public. Lost.
Also to change title of bill to read as he stated. Lost.

Senator Martine then offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Banking and Currency 
  Committee be instructed to press in every reasonable and 
  proper way to final passage through the Senate, the Bill 
  H.R. 7837 with the amendments as approved by the action of 
  this Conference.

 On motion unanimously adopted.
Senator Gore moved to insert ``banks having a capital of $35,000 or 
less'' at page 8, line 23;
And further, after word ``hereof''--``banks having a capital of $35,000 
or less may become members of the system with the consent of the Federal 
Reserve Board.'' Both lost.
Senator Clarke given permission was permitted to submit his proposed 
amendment to the Conference.
The Caucus then adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 17, 1913]

DECEMBER 17, 1913

 The Democratic Caucus met at 6 o'clock, p.m., Wednesday, December 17th, 
1913. Quorum present.
The Treasury suggestion as to organization adopted in such form as 
Committee may report.
The amendment of Senator Smith of Georgia as to temporary currency 
referred to committee with power to act.
At page 16, line 20, after word situated (insert suggestion) adopted in 
such form as Committee report. Referred to Committee with power to act.
Page 26, line 8, same action by Caucus.
Page 27, line 18, same action by Caucus.
Page 32, line 23 (Sec. 10) $12,000 salary in lieu of $10,000. Adopted.
Page 39, line 24 (Sec. 10) referred to Committee with power to act.
Page 40, line 13, Advisory Board to meet anywhere. Same action.
Page 49, line 1, proposal that amount of panic notes be limited to five 
hundred millions. Moved that Chairman's suggestion of automatic check of 
1\1/2\% on each 2\1/2\% reduction of gold reserve decreased below legal 
requirements.
Automatic tax in lieu of fixed limit adopted and referred to committee 
with power to act.
Senator O'Gorman moved to fix limit at 40% instead of 33\1/3\% where 
gold reserve automatic tax takes effect.
Moved to lay on table. Yeas 14, noes 20. Lost. [See tally sheet Y]
Senator Swanson moved substitute that gold reserve be 35%.
Senator O'Gorman moved to lay on table. Carried.
Senator O'Gorman then moved that the gold reserve for notes be 40% 
instead of 33\1/3\%.
Senator Owen moved that the tax on reduced reserve be not more than 1% 
until reduced to 32\1/2\% then not less than 1\1/2\% on each 2\1/2\% 
below. Carried.
The 40% reserve fixed by vote of 21 yeas, 17 noes. (A) [See tally sheet 
W]
Sub Sec. K (Sec. 11-12 as reprinted) amendment offered by Mr. Williams 
as follows: Striking out the words ``Federal notes'' in (K) Section 10 
and insert after word ``bonds'' in subheading (K) Section 10, line 18, 
page 30, of bill of Nov. 22--insert the words: ``or for the period of 3 
years after the passage of this Act Federal Reserve notes.'' (See vote) 
[See tally sheet X]
Senator Newlands moved as a substitution for Senator Williams' motion 
the following: Strike out K and substitute: ``To fix and extend the time 
within which any member state bank which at the time of obtaining 
membership is below the reserve requirements of this Act to comply with 
such requirements.'' Lost.
Senator Smith of South Carolina offered verbal amendment respecting 
agricultural notes as collateral for reserve notes increasing from 90 
days to 6 months.
Adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Williams Motion Lost
[Tally sheet X]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberla
            Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes
            James
     Johnson
            Kern     
            Lane
     Lea
            Lewis    
            Martin
            Martine  
            Myers    
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman
            Owen     
     Pittman
            Pomerene 
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson 
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone
            Swanson
            Thomas
            Thompson 
            Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman 
            Walsh    
     Williams
      13               18

Vote on 40% Gold Reserve
[Tally sheet W]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes
            James
     Johnson
            Kern     
            Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
            Martine  
            Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen     
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone
            Swanson  
            Thomas
            Thompson 
            Thornton
            Tillman  
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
            Williams 
      21               17

Lay on Table Motion to Amend
[Tally sheet Y]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberla
            Chilton
            Clarke   
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            James
     Johnson
            Kern     
            Lane
     Lea
            Lewis    
     Martin
            Martine  
            Myers    
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen     
            Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson 
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone
            Swanson  
            Thomas   
            Thompson 
            Thornton
            Tillman  
            Vardaman 
            Walsh
     Williams
      15               22
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 18, 1913]

DECEMBER 18, 1913

 Democratic Caucus met Monday evening, December 18, 1913, at 6 o'clock, 
the roll call showing a quorum--38 present.
Chairman Owen offered an amendment to Natl. Bank Act regarding reduction 
of capital of member banks. Adopted.
A further amendment as to information to be given out by Examiner. 
Adopted.
Further amendment, prohibiting non-member bank from getting discounts 
from reserve bank. Adopted.
It was stated that Senator Kern's votes on all questions in his absence 
[would be cast] by Senator Owen.
Page 48, line 22, 18th struck out and substituted. Page 5, lines 6 and 
7, Forfeiture Clause, struck out words ``within the discretion of 
reserve board.''
Amendment giving ``Permissive authority for D.C. Banks to come in.'' 
Adopted.
Page 47, line 17, matter of time deposits defined.
Page 47, bank notes issued by Federal Banks ``and redeemed'' inserted.
Subject agricultural notes 6 months. Amendment adopted.
Page 29, paragraph c, 40% gold reserve discussed.
Senator Thomas desired that he be recorded.
Senator Chamberlain moved to reconsider motion fixing 40% gold reserve 
at last meeting.
Motion to lay on table lost; 15 ayes, 22 noes. [See tally sheet Z]
Senator Newlands made a motion which was withheld.
Senator Owen asked for vote on member banks or national banks--member 
banks included.
It was moved to support the Owen amendment as offered. Carried.
Senator Newlands moved same as yesterday--ruled out on point of order.
All matters then referred to the Committee with power to act. Adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, December 18, 1913, 6 p.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
     Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
            Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Shively
            Simmons
     Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
     Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams

Motion to Reconsider 40% Gold Reserve
[Tally sheet Z]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead 
            Bryan    
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke   
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes   
            James
            Johnson  
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea      
            Lewis    
            Martin   
     Martine
     Myers
            Newlands 
            O'Gorman 
            Overman  
     Owen
            Pittman
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell 
            Reed     
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields
     Shively
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh
            Williams 
      15               22

Lay on Table
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bacon
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke   
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
     Hughes
            James    
            Johnson  
            Kern     
            Lane
            Lea      
            Lewis    
            Martin
            Martine  
            Myers
            Newlands 
            O'Gorman 
            Overman
            Owen     
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
            Reed     
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
            Stone
            Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson 
            Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
            Williams 
       8               23

[This tally sheet appears with the 
others from Dec. 18 but bears no 
indication of the subject of vote.]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
            Bacon
            Bankhead
            Bryan    
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
     Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
     Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea
     Lewis
     Martin
            Martine  
            Myers
            Newlands 
            O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed     
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively  
     Simmons
            Smith of 
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone
            Swanson
            Thomas   
     Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman
     Vardaman
            Walsh
            Williams 
      22               11
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 1, 1914]

JULY 1, 1914

 The Democratic Majority of the Senate of the United States met in 
Caucus duly called on Wednesday afternoon, July 1st, 1914, at four 
o'clock.
The calling of the roll (see roll-call herewith) disclosed forty 
Senators present.

Senator Stone offered the following resolutions:

   1. RESOLVED, That this Conference of Democratic Senators, 
  after due consideration, hereby declares that the present 
  session of Congress should not adjourn until at least the 
  following bills now pending in the Senate have been finally 
  disposed of, to wit:

  1. H.R. 15613, known as the Interstate Trade Commission Bill.
  2. H.R. 15657, known as the Clayton Anti-Trust Bill, and now before 
  the Senate Judiciary Committee.
  3. H.R. 16586, to amend Section 20 of an Act to regulate Commerce, to 
  prevent over issues of securities by carriers, etc.

   2. RESOLVED, That in adopting the foregoing resolution, it 
  is not thereby intended to make any of the bills mentioned a 
  party measure, or to interfere with the freedom of any 
  Senator with respect to amending or voting on the passage of 
  any of said bills; but said resolution is intended merely to 
  express the judgment and purpose of those representing the 
  Majority Party with respect to adjournment.
   3. RESOLVED, That as the duty rests primarily on Democratic 
  Senators to maintain a quorum, it is hereby declared that 
  hereafter Democratic Senators should remain in attendance on 
  the Senate, and that Senators who hereafter absent 
  themselves and thereby make it difficult to dispatch the 
  business of the Senate are guilty of such conduct as to 
  merit condemnation, unless such absence is on the business 
  of the Senate, or is otherwise necessary and unavoidable; 
  and the Chairman of this Conference is hereby directed to 
  have a copy of these Resolutions mailed forthwith to each 
  Democratic Senator and to invoke the constant aid of the 
  Senate Whip and other assistants.

 The following Senators spoke on the resolutions: Stone, Newlands, 
Thomas, Williams, Culberson, Clarke, Simmons, Martine, Swanson, Sheppard 
and Reed.
Senator Reed moved to strike out ``finally disposed of'' and in lieu 
thereof substitute ``passed or defeated,'' which motion was lost.
The 1st resolution was then declared carried.
The 2nd resolution was carried by a vote of 17 yeas to 15 nays.
Senator Hughes then moved to lay the 3rd resolution on the table, which 
was accordingly done.
Senator Simmons moved that the Senate Whip be instructed to have 
Senators present at sessions of the Senate, and this motion was 
Pcarried.
Senator Smith (Georgia) then moved that the motion of Senator Simmons be 
reconsidered, whereupon Senator Simmons withdrew his motion.
After sundry other motions had been made and withdrawn, the Caucus 
adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bankhead
     Bryan
     Camden
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
     Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore     
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
            James    
            Johnson  
     Kern
            Lane     
     Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
     Lewis
            Martin   
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen     
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
            Smith of 
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
            Smith of 
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman  
            Vardaman 
     Walsh
            West
     White
     Williams
      42               11


__________________________________________

                          United States Senate
                            Washington, D.C.

                                                          July 21, 1914.

     There will be a meeting of the Democratic Senators in 
  the Finance Committee Room--No. 312 Senate Office 
  Building--on Wednesday, July 22, 1914, at 8:00 p.m., to 
  take steps for maintaining a quorum, speeding trust 
  legislation and general consultation.

                                      [signed] Thomas W. Keller
                                      Assistant Doorkeeper
                                      U.S.S.
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 22, 1914]

JULY 22, 1914

 A meeting of the Democratic members of the United States Senate was 
held on Wednesday evening, July 22nd, at 8 o'clock.
The roll call (herewith attached) showed that 27 Senators were present 
but additional members arriving during the meeting made the total 
attendance at the Caucus 37 Senators.
Chairman Kern addressed the Caucus.
Senator Ashurst made the motion that in debate, each Senator should 
speak but once, and then only for a period of five minutes. This motion 
was declared carried.
Senator Lewis then addressed the Caucus on matters pertaining to the 
Jones nomination (Federal Reserve Board). 19
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \19\ President Woodrow Wilson had nominated Thomas D. Jones, a former 
trustee of Princeton University and a director of the International 
Harvester Company, to be one of the first members of the Federal Reserve 
Board. While supported in general by the banking and business community, 
Jones' nomination came under attack from progressive senators. President 
Wilson assured the Senate Banking Committee that Jones had gone on the 
board of the International Harvester Company only to reform it. But in 
testimony before the Committee, Jones denied any such intention, and 
admitted that he had approved of all the company's actions. When the 
Banking Committee refused to confirm Jones, Wilson withdrew the 
nomination. See Arthur S. Link, Woodrow Wilson and the Progressive Era, 
1910-1917 (New York: Harper & Row, 1954), pp. 76-77.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Senator Chamberlain then moved as follows:

   1. That appropriations bills have the right of way, 
  whenever they are ready to be presented to the Senate.
   2. That the Rivers and Harbors Bill be made the unfinished 
  business.
  3. That after the Rivers and Harbors Bill has been disposed 
  of, the Trade Commission bill be made the unfinished 
  business.
  4. That trust legislation be taken up and disposed of.
  5. That from and after the 23rd inst., the Senate convene at 
  ten o'clock, a.m., and continue in session until ten 
  o'clock, p.m., daily.

The following Senators then addressed the Caucus: Senators Vardaman, 
Martine, Ransdell, and a number of others.

 Senator James moved to amend:

   That the Trust legislation be made the unfinished business 
  in the Senate and so continued until passed.

Points of order then made and a general discussion ensued.
Senator Shafroth then moved that it is the sense of the Democratic 
Conference: That no Democratic Senator speak more than one hour, except 
members of the committee, who may speak 2 hours.
This motion was lost: 14 ayes; 18 noes.
Senator Sheppard moved that no Committees except the Coal Investigation 
Committee and Conference Committees shall sit during the session of the 
Senate. Declared carried.

 Senator Chamberlain then withdrew his resolution and moved the adoption 
of the following:

   1. That appropriation bills and conference reports shall 
  have the right of way whenever presented. This No. 1 was on 
  motion duly carried.
  2. That the trade commission bill shall continue the 
  unfinished business of the Senate, and shall be pressed 
  continuously until disposed of. No. 2 was likewise on motion 
  declared carried.
  3. That the Trust and Securities bills now pending be next 
  made the unfinished business, in that order, and pressed 
  continuously until disposed of. No. 3 was likewise carried.
  4. That the Rivers and Harbors Bill be thereupon made the 
  unfinished business and disposed of before the adjournment 
  of Congress. This No. 4 was also declared carried.
  5. That the Senate convene at 10 a.m. and remain in session 
  each day until 6 o'clock, p.m., after the 23rd inst., 
  recessing each day until the next. And further,
  That the Chairman of the Caucus only is authorized to move 
  for Executive Sessions; also calls for quorums by the 
  Chairman only; but the Senator in charge of the bill under 
  discussion, or some designated by the Chairman, may also so 
  act.

Senator Myers moved to amend that the hour of meeting in the morning be 
made 12 o'clock, noon, instead of ten o'clock, a.m.
As a substitute, Senator Lewis moved that the Trade Commission bill be 
pressed as unfinished business for one week and at the expiration of 
that period, another Caucus be held. This was lost.
Senator Overman moved as a new No. 5, That the Immigration bill be made 
the unfinished business and pressed for passage. This was subsequently 
withdrawn.
Senator Lee moved that all matters not enumerated in the resolution of 
Senator Chamberlain be remitted for consideration to further Caucus.
Senator Swanson then moved that the Senate meet at eleven o'clock, a.m., 
daily. This motion was carried.
Senator Pomerene moved that the Chairman only be authorized to state to 
reporters the proceedings of and what had occurred at the Caucus 
meeting, which motion was duly adopted.
The meeting thereupon adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll call, July 22, 1914
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
      31    Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
     Chamberlain
      28    Chilton
            Clarke
     Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
      33    Hughes
      34    James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea, of Tenn.
     Lee, of Md.
      30    Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
            O'Gorman
      32    Overman
            Owen
      36    Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
      29    Shields
            Shively
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
      35    Vardaman
      37    Walsh
     West
     White
            Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                       [October 6, 1914]

OCTOBER 6, 1914

The Democratic Conference of the United States Senate convened on 
Tuesday, October 6, 1914.
The Conference was called to order at 12:00 o'clock noon by Senator Kern 
who stated the Conference had been called at the request of the Finance 
Committee to consider the War Revenue Bill.
Senator Sheppard was designated Acting Secretary of the Caucus in the 
absence of Senator Saulsbury, who was detained on account of illness.
Thirty-four senators answered present on roll-calls as follows: 
Bankhead, Bryan, Camden, Chamberlain, Chilton, Culberson, Gore, Hollis, 
Hughes, James, Kern, Lea of Tenn., Lee of Md., Lewis, Martin, Martine, 
Myers, O'Gorman. Overman, Owen, Pomerene, Reed, Sheppard, Simmons, Smith 
of Ariz., Stone, Swanson, Thompson, Thornton, Vardaman, Walsh, West, 
White and Williams.
Senator Bankhead on motion was excused from attending the Caucus; he 
authorized Senator Simmons to cast his vote.
Senator Simmons made a general explanation of the Revenue Bill. Senator 
Williams made the following motion:

  On page 1, line 4, strike out $1.50 and insert in lieu 
  thereof $1.75. On page 2, line 1, after the semi-colon 
  succeeding the word ``accordingly,'' insert the following: 
  ``Provided that a discount of five per centum shall be 
  allowed upon all sales by collectors to brewers of the 
  stamps provided for the payment of said tax.''

Senator Hollis moved to substitute for $1.75 in the Williams amendment 
$2.00 and for five per centum, seven and a half per centum.
Senator Swanson then moved for a recess until 2:30 o'clock. Lost.
Senator Martin asked that his colleague, Senator Swanson, be allowed to 
cast his vote during his absence for 2 hours. Granted.
Recess taken until 3:30 o'clock.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

October 6, 1914. The Democratic Caucus reconvened at 3:30 o'clock, p.m.
Senator Simmons moved to limit speeches on each subject to ten minutes. 
This motion was carried.
The roll-call on the Hollis substitute disclosed: ayes 16, noes 20.
Senator Thomas moved to adjourn at 6:30 o'clock until 8:00 p.m. Carried.
The roll-call on the Williams amendment showed 21 ayes, 14 noes.
Senator Williams moved the following amendment: On page 1, line 11, 
strike out the period following the word ``law,'' and insert a comma and 
the following: And there be levied, collected and paid in addition to 
the tax now imposed by law a tax of five cents per gallon upon each 
gallon of rectified whiskey or other similar rectified distilled liquor, 
distilled or manufactured and sold or stored, or rectified in warehouse, 
or removed for consumption or sale within the United States. Adopted.
Senator Williams moved to strike out paragraph in section 4 relating to 
bankers. Withheld temporarily.
Senator Williams moved to strike out section 3a.
Senator White moved as a substitute to strike out section 3.
Recesses at 6:30.


__________________________________________

October 6, 1914. The Democratic Caucus reassembled at 8:00 p.m. and was 
called to order at 8:20 p.m. 28 Senators answered present on roll-call 
as follows: Ashurst, Bankhead, Bryan, Chilton, Fletcher, Gore, Hollis, 
Hughes, Johnson, Kern, Lea of Tenn., Lee of Md., Martin, Overman, 
Pomerene, Sheppard, Shively, Simmons, Smith of Ariz., Stone, Swanson, 
Thomas, Thompson, Thornton, Vardaman, West, White and Williams.
Senator Bryan moved to amend Sec. 3 by providing that producers of not 
more than 300 barrels of gasoline per day, \1/4\ of 1 cents per gallon 
of 300 to 600 barrels, \1/3\ of 1 cents per gallon; 600 to 1000 barrels, 
\1/2\ of 1 cents per gallon; 1000 to 2000 barrels, \3/4\ of 1 cents per 
gallon; over 2000 barrels, 1 cents per gallon. Lost.
Roll call on the White substitute disclosed ayes 20, noes 17.
Senator Williams moved to strike out that part of Sec. 3a, from lines 12 
to 21 inclusive, and to substitute the following: ``On each passenger 
automobile a yearly license tax of 25 cents per horse-power.''
Senator Williams withdrew this motion and moved to strike out Sec. 3a.
Senator Lea of Tenn. objected and the Chair sustained the objection. 
Senator Lea of Tenn. then withdrew objection.
Senator Williams moved to strike out Sec. 3a. Carried.
Senator West moved to reduce the tax on bankers from $2.00 to $1.00. 
Senator Williams moved to amend by striking out entire tax on bankers 
and Senator West accepted the amendment.
The amendment to strike out the tax defeated. Senator West then renewed 
his motion to reduce the tax from $2.00 to $1.00 and the roll-call on 
the West motion was ayes 26, noes 11.
Senator Lewis moved to substitute 1 cents for 2 cents in line 11, page 
36, in paragraph taxing seats and berths in palace or parlor cars.
Senator Williams moved as a substitute that 5 cents be substituted for 
2 cents where ticket carries the passenger longer than 24 hours, where 
less than 24 hours, tax of 2 cents to remain. Substitute defeated.

The roll-call on Senator Lewis' motion was ayes 16, noes, 18. Senator 
Pomerene moved to add the following provision to Sec. 2:

   254\1/2\. Every producer of pure sweet wines, other than 
  those actually exported, is hereby required to pay to the 
  Government as a revenue tax the sum of $1.10 per proof 
  gallon for the wine spirits or grape brandy or pure neutral 
  spirits used by him in the fortification of said wine, the 
  same to be paid upon the removal thereof from the distillery 
  or from any special bonded warehouse; Provided, however, 
  That the time of the payment of said tax upon such wine 
  spirits or grape brandy or pure neutral spirits used in 
  fortifying pure sweet wines may be extended not exceeding 
  two years upon the producer of such pure sweet wine giving 
  bond in a penal sum of not less than double the amount of 
  said tax with sureties to the satisfaction of the collector 
  of internal revenue of the district and the Commissioner of 
  Internal Revenue conditioned upon the payment of said tax 
  within said two years.
  That so much of the act entitled ``An act to reduce the 
  revenue and equalize duties on imports, and for other 
  purposes,'' approved October 1, 1890, as relates to the use, 
  free of tax, of wine spirits or grape brandy in the 
  fortifying of pure sweet wine, and all acts amendatory 
  thereof, so far as they relate to the fortification of such 
  wines and the charge thereof, which may be inconsistent with 
  this paragraph are hereby to that extent repealed.

A motion to adjourn by Senator Swanson until 10 o'clock Wednesday 
morning was defeated.
The roll-call on the Pomerene amendment was 14 ayes and 15 noes.
On motion of Senator Williams, the Conference adjourned until 10 o'clock 
Wednesday morning, October 7.

                                                       Acting Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                       [October 7, 1914]

OCTOBER 7, 1914

The Democratic Caucus of the U.S. Senate met on Wednesday morning, 
October 7, at 10:40 o'clock.
On motion the roll-call was dispensed with.
Senator Simmons moved that the Bill as reported be approved, except as 
to those provisions to which objections are made or amendments offered.
Senator Pomerene objected to the wine provision of the measure and made 
a statement relating thereto.
Senator O'Gorman moved to refer the wine tax provision to the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, and Senator Pomerene.
Senator O'Gorman suggested the insertion of ``store, shop or other'' 
after word ``each,'' line 2, page 11. This was accepted unanimously.
Also on page 31, lines 13 to 22, insert after the word ``value,'' line 
18, ``of the interest conveyed.''
Also at page 12, line 12, amount of cigarettes to regulate amount of 
license. Not determined.

 Senator Williams moved to insert as Sec. 4a, the following:

   Sec. 4a. That from and after November 1, 1914, the 
  following special tax on liquor dealers shall be and are 
  imposed annually, the amount of such special annual taxes to 
  be computed in all cases on the basis of the annual sales 
  for the preceding fiscal years, and shall be levied as 
  follows: Any retail dealer in liquor whose sales for the 
  year preceding did not exceed $5000, shall pay $25; any such 
  dealer whose sales for the preceding year exceeded $5000, 
  and did not exceed $10,000, shall pay $50; any such dealer 
  whose sales for the preceding year exceeded $10,000 and did 
  not exceed $25,000 shall pay $100; any whose sales for the 
  preceding year exceeded $25,000 and did not exceed $50,000 
  shall pay $200; and any whose sales for the preceding year 
  exceeded $50,000 shall pay $300.
  So much of section eighteen of the Act entitled ``An Act to 
  amend existing customs and internal-revenue laws, and for 
  other purposes,'' approved February eight, eighteen hundred 
  and seventy-five, as amended by section four of the Act of 
  March first, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine, as is in 
  conflict herewith is hereby repealed or modified.

It was then ordered that the Chairman of the Caucus be directed to 
adjourn until 11:00 a.m. tomorrow, and that Caucus recess now until 1:00 
p.m. today.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.


__________________________________________

The Democratic Caucus, Wednesday, 2:00 p.m., October 7, 1914.
After recess Caucus reassembled.
Senator Williams withdrew his proposed amendment.
Senator White proposed an amendment as to dealers in tobacco, page 11, 
which was withdrawn after discussion.
Senator West inquired as to manufacturers of cigarettes.
Senator Thompson offered amendment taxing liquor dealers $100 per annum. 
Lost. No roll-call.
Senator Williams offered amendment, page 10, to be inserted between 
lines 9 and 10, to tax the salaries of U.S. employees and officers 
receiving salaries over $1200. Lost.
Senator Thomas offered to amend making the amount $6,000. Lost.
Senator Williams offered amendment for bank check stamp tax, &c. at 
2 cents (including bills of exchange, &c.).
Senator Stone offered an amendment to Senator Williams' amendment--
1 cents instead of 2 cents--i.e. 50% all through.
Both amendments laid on table on motion of Senator Stone.
Senator Thomas moved to strike out brokers tax, page 7, lines 5 to 11. 
Ayes 19, noes 10.
On motion, Senator Chamberlain was excused and Senator Kern authorized 
to cast his vote.
Senator Chilton addressed the Caucus on sleeping-car ticket tax.
Senator Lee of Md. moved to reconsider the vote fixing the tax on 
sleeping-car tickets.
Senator Lewis moved to amend line 11, page 36, by changing 2 cents on 
Pullman tickets to 1 cents. Yeas 26, noes 8.
Senator Overman moved to refer to Finance Committee the matter of a 
graduated tax on dealers in tobacco.
Senator Lee of Maryland offered substitute by moving to strike out lines 
1 to 3 inclusive, page 11, and insert as follows: [no language follows]
Senator Stone on motion excused and Senator Swanson authorized to cast 
his vote.
Senators Hughes and Lea of Tenn. were likewise excused and Chairman 
authorized to cast their votes.
Senator Thomas moved to lay motion of Senator Lea on table. Carried. 
Ayes 20, noes 9.
Senator Overman offered amendment taxing only dealers who sell over $100 
worth.
Insert after tobacco, line 1, page 11, the words ``whose annual sales 
exceed $100.''
Senator Williams moved to lay on the table, ayes 13, noes 16, therefore 
lost. Senator Overman's motion yeas 9, noes 20, lost.
Senator Lee of Md. moved to amend.
Senator Bankhead moved to lay on table--carried, yeas 18, noes 11.
Senator James-- Senator Lee of Md.

 Insert Sec. 4, page 6, at end of line.

    All manufacturers and operators of pipe-lines, whether 
  corporate or individual, having a capital stock of 
  $4,000,000, and not more than $10,000,000, shall pay a tax 
  of 25 cents for each $1,000 of capital stock used or 
  employed, and in estimating the capital the surplus and 
  undivided profits shall be included: Those having a capital 
  of more than $10,000,000 and not more than $20,000,000 shall 
  pay a tax of 40 cents for each $1,000 of capital used and 
  employed, estimated as aforesaid: those having more than 
  $20,000,000 of capital stock and not more than $100,000,000 
  of capital stock shall pay sixty cents for each $1,000 of 
  capital used or employed, estimated as aforesaid; those 
  having a capital of more than $100,000,000 and not more than 
  $200,000,000 shall pay a tax of 80 cents for each $1,000 
  used or employed, estimated as aforesaid; those having a 
  capital of more than $200,000,000 and upwards shall pay a 
  tax of $1.00 for each $1,000 of capital used or employed, 
  estimated as aforesaid; and where one or more corporations 
  or concerns are under the same control or management, their 
  capital shall be added together and taxed as of the class of 
  the sum total of such Paddition.

Senator Williams moved to amend on page 36 to require stamps on claims 
against U.S. Pensioners, et al.
Senator Overman moved to lay on table. Carried.
Senator Kern moved to strike out word ``carbonated'' line 19, page 36, 
and to insert after the word ``waters'' the words ``carbonated or 
fortified.'' Lost. Yeas 10, noes 12.
Senator Pomerene moved to insert ``within 30 days after the expiration 
of,'' after line 3, page 29. Carried.
Senator Lee of Md. moved to insert ``Armories'' after Halls line 19, 
page 8.
Senator Simmons offered the following amendment to section 18, p. 241 
line 15, after word ``appropriated'' (proposed by Treasury Dept.) 
carried:
          Amendment suggested by Secretary McAdoo 20
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \20\ William G. McAdoo, secretary of the treasury, 1913-1919.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Sec. 19--Add on line 12, page 31, after the word ``appropriated'' the 
following:

    $492,000 or so much thereof as may be required, out of any 
  money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to be 
  immediately available; $412,000 thereof to be added to and 
  made a part of the appropriation: ``Salaries and Expenses of 
  Collectors of Internal Revenue, 1915''; $30,000 to the 
  appropriation: ``Paper for Internal Revenue Stamps, 1915''; 
  $40,000 to be available to pay for personal services in the 
  office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, to be 
  designated as additional to the appropriation: ``Salaries 
  Office of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 1915''; and 
  $10,000 to the appropriation: ``Contingent Expenses, 
  Treasury Department Stationery, 1915''. Provided, that the 
  appropriation: ``Salaries and Expenses of Agents and 
  Subordinate Officers of Internal Revenue, 1915'', be and 
  hereby is made available to pay the salaries of stamp agents 
  and counters, whose employment may be necessary on account 
  of the imprinting of stamps, the same to be reimbursed by 
  the stamp contractors and added to the appropriation from 
  which originally paid.
   RESOLVED, That the Committee be requested to prepare a 
  suitable amendment providing for a tax on Coca Cola and 
  beverages of like character.

Senator Thomas moved to lay the motion on the table. Yeas 15, noes 14.
Senator Overman moved to reconsider ``fortified'' waters vote--adopted.
Kern amendment, page 36, lines 19 and 20, carried. Ayes 15, noes 9.
Senator Johnson moved to insert on page 24, between secs. 17 and 18: 
Committee to insert Administration features.
Senator Sheppard moved to strike out in Schedule B medicinal and 
proprietary articles. Withdrawn.
Senator Martine moved to tax Coca Cola.
Senator Chilton moved to lay Senator Martine's motion on table. Carried, 
yeas 14, noes 8.
Senator O'Gorman offered resolution.
Senator Williams moved Chairman be instructed to report Bill to the 
Senate as amended.
Senator Pomerene reported that sub-committee to whom was referred 
fortified wines would be likely able to reach agreement.
Senator Simmons moved that the Committee on Finance be instructed to 
report Bill to Senate. Yeas 27.
Senator Kern moved that Bill as reported to Senate be regarded as Party 
measure. Unanimous.
Adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 12, 1914]

DECEMBER 12, 1914

The Democratic Caucus met on December 12, 1914, at 3:00 o'clock, p.m. 
Twenty-nine Senators present. See Roll.
Chairman asked Senator Hoke Smith to state objects of the meeting.
Senators Thomas, Shields, Lee of Md., Gore, Robinson and Bankhead 
subsequently appeared.
Senators Chilton and Tillman desired to be counted as quorum and voted 
by Chairman Kern.

 Senator Hoke Smith read the following program proposed by Steering 
Committee:

  Having in view the purpose of avoiding if possible the 
  necessity for an extra session of Congress, we recommend:
    1. That the Christmas recess be limited and that Congress 
  adjourn Tuesday night, December 22nd, and meet again on 
  Monday, December 28th.
    2. That appropriation bills be given preferences when 
  ready for consideration.
    3. That night sessions be held when the Chairman of the 
  Conference deems it advisable for the consideration of any 
  pending measure, and not less than once each week to 
  consider the general calendar of business.
    4. That the Senate proceed to the consideration of 
  executive business upon the close of the morning business 
  until the Safety at Sea Convention be disposed of.

Senator Vardaman moved to amend and make recess one day.
Senator Owen moved to adopt suggestion No. 1. Adopted.
Also No. 3.--Adopted unanimously.
Also No. 2.--Adopted unanimously.
Senator Newlands addressed the Conference concerning the Securities 
Bill. No action.
Senator Walsh addressed Conference on conservation of public lands and 
power site measures.
Senator Newlands addressed Conference on general coordination of 
conservation, water power, Rivers & Harbors and swamp drainage bills.
Senator Stone again addressed Caucus.

 Senator O'Gorman offered the following:

   RESOLVED, That the Safety at Sea Convention be pressed to a 
  vote not later however than December 31, 1914. It is not 
  intended to commit the Conference to the support of the 
  Convention. Adopted unanimously.

Chairman of Conference was authorized to stop unnecessary waste of time 
during morning hour.
Chairman authorized to give out newspaper information.
Adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, Dec. 12, 1914
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
     Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
     Hardwick
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee o Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
            Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
            Thomas
            Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     White
            Williams
      29


__________________________________________

                       United States Senate Chamber
                            Washington, D.C.
                            January 15, 1915

  To Senator Kern:

     You are requested to call a Conference of Democratic 
  Senators for Saturday afternoon next.

                    [signed]

                                      Claude A. Swanson
                                      John Walter Smith
                                      Duncan U. Fletcher
                                      Morris Sheppard
                                      H.L. Myers
                                      Henry F. Ashurst
                                      W.E. Chilton
                                      Ollie M. James
                                      Wm. Hughes
                                      Henry F. Hollis
                                      J.R. Thornton
                                      C.A. Culberson
                                      Atlee Pomerene
                                      Charles F. Johnson
                                      B.R. Tillman


__________________________________________

                       United States Senate Chamber
                            Washington, D.C.

                                                Friday, January 15, 1915

     There will be a meeting of the Democratic Senators in 
  the Finance Committee Room, Senate Office Building, Room 
  No. 312, on Saturday, January 16, 1915, at 2:30 o'clock, 
  p.m.

                    [signed]

                                      Thomas W. Keller
                                      Assistant Doorkeeper
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 16, 1915]

JANUARY 16, 1915

 Pursuant to written request for a call of meeting of the Democratic 
Caucus, signed by Senators Swanson, Smith (Md.), Fletcher, Sheppard, 
Myers, Ashurst, Chilton, James, Hughes, Hollis, Thornton, Culberson, 
Pomerene, Johnson and Tillman, the copy of which is filed with these 
Minutes. Call being duly made, the Democratic Caucus of the United 
States Senate met at 4:00 o'clock, Saturday afternoon, January 16, 1915.
 As shown by the roll-call, 30 Senators appeared by 4:15 p.m.

Senator Fletcher addressed the Caucus and offered the following 
resolution:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that S. 
  6856, known as the Shipping Bill, be made the unfinished 
  business, and that it be kept before the Senate without 
  interference by other measures until its final disposition 
  is reached in the Senate.

 The Chairman of the Caucus was authorized to cast the vote of Senator 
Smith of Md. during his necessary absence. Senator Smith desiring to 
vote with Senator Fletcher for the resolution.
On motion of Senator Bryan of Florida, the time limit within which each 
member should speak, was made 5 minutes.
Many other Members then spoke.
Various suggestions as to the Resolution were accepted by Senator 
Fletcher.
Among others, one providing for revision of the shipping regulations 
which Senator Saulsbury at his request explained to the Caucus.
On motion the Caucus then recessed until Monday, January 18, 1915, at 
8:00 o'clock, p.m.

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Jan. 16, 1915
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
     Hardwick
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
     Martine (30)
     Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
     Walsh
            White
            Williams
      32
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 18, 1915]

JANUARY 18, 1915

At the expiration of the recess, the Democratic Caucus reassembled 
Monday evening, January 18, 1915.
On roll-call at 8:30 o'clock, 28 Senators appeared and answered to their 
names.

 The following resolution was offered by Senator Robinson:

   RESOLVED, That the Committee on Banking and Currency is 
  requested to report a bill providing for a system of rural 
  credits, and that it is the sense of the Caucus that said 
  bill be considered by the Senate at the earliest practicable 
  date.

Said resolution was unanimously adopted.
Senator Gore moved that it be the sense of the Caucus that no Senator 
should speak on the Shipping Bill in the Senate more than 15 minutes.
This was laid on the table on motion of Senator Swanson by a vote of 
yeas 27, noes 3.
Senator Fletcher proposed several amendments to Sec. 1, which were 
adopted.
On motion it was ordered that the Bill be read by the acting Chairman 
and that the Committee amendments and all amendments offered by Senators 
be referred to the Committee for consideration.
Various amendments were offered.
Senator Bankhead offered a substitute for Section 6, which was referred 
to the Committee.
Senator Williams proposed an amendment to Section 7, which was referred 
to the Committee.
On motion the Caucus adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Jan. 18, 1915
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
     Hardwick
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
            Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
     Walsh
     White
     Williams
      32

On Gore's Motion to limit speeches
to 15 minutes in Senate
     YEAS         NAYS
       1    Ashurst
       2    Bankhead
       3    Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
       4    Fletcher
            Gore        1
       5    Hardwick
            Hitchcock
       6    Hollis
            Hughes
            James
       7    Johnson
       8    Kern
            Lane
       9    Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.  2
            Lewis
            Martin
      10    Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      11    Overman
            Owen
      12    Pittman
      13    Pomerene
            Ransdell
      28    Reed
      14    Robinson
      15    Saulsbury
      16    Shafroth
            Sheppard    3
            Shields
            Shively
      17    Simmons
      18    Smith of Ariz
      19    Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
      20    Stone
      21    Swanson
      22    Thomas
      23    Thompson
      24    Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
      25    Walsh
      26    White
      27    Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 20, 1915]

JANUARY 20, 1915

An adjourned meeting of the Democratic Caucus, held Wednesday evening, 
January 20, 1915, at 8:00 o'clock, with Senator Kern in the Chair and 
Senator Pittman as Acting Secretary.
Upon the calling of the roll, 27 Senators were found to be present, 
whereupon the Chair announced a quorum was present.
By unanimous consent, the Chair was permitted to cast the vote of 
Senator Thornton, Senator Smith (Ariz.) the vote of Senator Ashurst, and 
Senator Hardwick the vote of Senator O'Gorman.
Senator Fletcher presented and read a proposed amendment, providing for 
the incorporation of the corporation under the laws of the United 
States.
Senator Williams moved that Senators Reed, Thomas and Walsh revise the 
amendment providing for the organization of the corporation referred to 
in the Bill and such revised amendment be reported for adoption by the 
Conference. This motion was carried unanimously.
Senator Hoke Smith moved that lessee under the Bill shall be citizens of 
the United States, and if corporation, a majority of the stockholders of 
such corporation shall be citizens of the United States: That the 
Committee shall prepare such amendments, and as so prepared, shall be 
considered adopted. This was likewise carried unanimously.
Senator Hoke Smith moved that it is the sense of the Conference that an 
amendment be made to the Bill requiring the leasing of vessels in 
certain cases and under certain conditions. Senator Pomerene moved that 
Senator Hoke Smith's amendment be referred back to the Committee, and 
this motion was carried.
Senator Williams then offered an amendment that the stock of the United 
States may be sold by the Shipping Board at or above par, but only to 
citizens of the United States.
After further discussion, on motion the meeting adjourned to meet 
Thursday evening, January 21, at 8:00 o'clock.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Jan. 20, 1915
            Ashurst     a
            Bankhead    p
            Bryan       p
            Camden      p
            Chamberlain p
            Chilton     a
            Clarke      a
            Culberson   a
            Fletcher    p
            Gore        p
            Hardwick    p
            Hitchcock   a
            Hollis      a
            Hughes      p
            James       a
            Johnson     a
            Kern        p
            Lane        p
            Lea of Tenn.a
            Lee of Md.  p
            Lewis       p
            Martin      a
            Martine     p
            Myers       a
            Newlands    a
            O'Gorman    a
            Overman     a
            Owen        p
            Pittman     p
            Pomerene    p
            Ransdell    p
            Reed        p
            Robinson    p
            Saulsbury   a
            Shafroth    a
            Sheppard    p
            Shields     a
            Shively     p
            Simmons     p
            Smith of Arip
            Smith of Ga p
            Smith of Md a
            Smith of S.Ca
            Stone       p
            Swanson     p
            Thomas      p
            Thompson    p
            Thornton    a
            Tillman     a
            Vardaman    a
            Walsh       p
            White       p
            Williams    a
      30
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 21, 1915]

JANUARY 21, 1915

The Democratic Caucus reconvened, Thursday evening, January 21, 1915, at 
8:00 o'clock.
The roll-call shows the Senators present at 8:30 p.m.
Senator Williams withdrew his amendment amid applause.
The Caucus then took up Senator Bankhead's amendment and Senator 
Fletcher addressed the Caucus.
Senator Pittman then moved to make the Secretary of the Interior a 
member of the Shipping Board, which motion was subsequently withdrawn.
Senator Lewis offered an amendment regarding the satisfying of the 
Shipping Board as to title of Ship.
Senator Fletcher moved that Shipping Board have a membership of five in 
number, the three Cabinet Officers named in the Bill, and two others to 
be nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate.
Senator Pittman moved to add the Secretary of the Interior to the Board 
and this motion was lost.
Senator Smith (Ariz.) moved that the Shipping Board consist of five 
members, to be the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Commerce 
and three others skilled and experienced, to be named by the President 
and confirmed by the Senate.
Senator Walsh moved to add the Secretary of the Navy to the Board and 
this motion was carried by a vote of 16 to 12.
The motion was then made by Senator Smith (Ariz.) to make the Shipping 
Board five members instead of as at present, but this motion was lost by 
a vote of 12 ayes to 15 noes.
Senator Fletcher moved that the Caucus reconsider this vote.
Senator James then moved to lay this motion on the table--11 ayes, 15 
noes.
The motion to reconsider was then carried by a vote of 19 ayes to 7 noes 
and the Caucus then adopted the motion of Senator Smith (Ariz.) by a 
decisive viva voce vote.
An amendment was then proposed limiting the increase of stock by ten 
millions of dollars, the United States always to hold 51% of the 
[w]hole, and this was adopted.
Senator Saulsbury then moved that no salaries be paid to the members of 
the Shipping Board as such.
Senator Lewis offered an amendment that the members of the Shipping 
Board be paid only their expenses while performing their duties. This 
was lost.
Senator Fletcher moved that the salaries of the members of the Shipping 
Board be fixed at $6,000, and this motion was carried by a vote of 14 
ayes to 7 noes.
Senator Williams then moved that the term of non-official members of the 
Board be fixed not to exceed 2, 3 and 4 years, unless the Board be 
sooner dissolved by Act of Congress--understanding that the term be four 
years. Carried.
Senator Reed, the Chairman of the sub-committee on incorporating, 
reported thereon his complete report being given to Chairman Fletcher 
for the Committee.
The motion was then made by Senator Fletcher that the Report of the 
special Committee just presented by Senator Reed be adopted, and this 
was carried unanimously.
On motion the Caucus recessed until Friday evening at 8:00 p.m.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Jan. 21, 1915, 8:30 p.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis
     Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md. (appeared at 
              10:40)
     Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
     Walsh
            White
     Williams
      30
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 22, 1915]

JANUARY 22, 1915

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate met on Friday evening, 
January 22. The roll-call at 8:30 p.m. disclosed 29 Senators present.

The Caucus agreed unanimously that the following Senators be counted 
present:

  Ashurst, voted by his colleague          Smith
  Reed, voted by his colleague             Stone
  Hollis, voted by his colleague            Saulsbury

On motion, it was unanimously agreed that the Caucus should meet at 
11:00 o'clock Saturday morning, January 23rd.
Senator Smith offered his amendment regarding the chartering and selling 
of vessels after the termination of the European War.
The Caucus authorized Senator Stone to cast the vote of Senator James, 
who was excused for the evening.
Same order as to Senator Owen, whose vote was to be cast by Senator 
Swanson.
Senator Ransdell was likewise authorized to cast the vote of Senator 
Thornton.
After various discussion, the Caucus on motion adjourned to meet as 
agreed upon, 11:00 o'clock Saturday morning.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Jan. 22, 1915, 8:30 p.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
             Ashurst by Smith
     Bankhead
            Bryan
             Camden
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
     Hollis by Saulsbury
            Hughes
     James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed by Stone
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
     Walsh
     White
     Williams
      31
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 23, 1915]

JANUARY 23, 1915

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate met at 11:00 o'clock 
a.m., Saturday, January 23, 1915, pursuant to agreement. 23 Senators as 
shown by the roll-call answered to their names.
Senator Smith of Ga. continued to address the Caucus on his amendment.
At 11:41 a.m. at the end of the ten minutes period, the Chairman stated 
that the rule on motion of Senator Martine should be extended 10 
minutes.
Senator Chamberlain was excused and Senator Fletcher was authorized to 
cast his vote.

 Senator Smith's amendment was drawn and submitted as follows:

     That such corporation, with the approval of the Shipping 
  Board, may make charters or leases of any vessel or vessels 
  owned by such corporation to any other corporation 
  incorporated under the laws of any State of the United 
  States, the majority of the stock of which is owned by 
  citizens of the United States, or to any firm, the members 
  of which are citizens of the United States, or to citizens 
  of the United States; subject to rules and regulations to be 
  prescribed by such shipping board; provided that in no case 
  shall such charters or leases to any one corporation, firm, 
  or individual be of vessels in excess of five millions of 
  dollars in value; and provided further, that each contract 
  of charter or lease shall contain provisions to prevent the 
  corporation, firm or individual obtaining such charters or 
  leases from handling the vessels so chartered or leased in a 
  way to restrict competition or to create monopoly in 
  transportation.
    That after normal conditions when peace has been restored 
  and concluded between the nations of Europe now at war, such 
  corporation in which the United States has a majority of 
  stock shall operate only such of its vessels as cannot be 
  chartered or leased, under rules and regulations as to 
  routes and rates, to be fixed by the shipping board, to 
  another corporation, firm or individual in accordance with 
  the provisions of this statute.

Senator Owen was then excused and Senator Reed was authorized to vote 
for him.
The time limit on speeches, imposed by the Caucus, was modified as not 
to apply to Senator Fletcher, in charge of the Bill.
Senator Culberson was authorized to cast the vote of Senator Sheppard 
during the latter's temporary absence.
Senator Smith's amendment was lost by a vote of 7 ayes to 31 noes, as 
shown by the roll-call. [See tally sheet B]
Senator Bryan moved to strike out page 1, line 7, the word ``foreign.'' 
This motion was lost by a vote of 16 yeas to 24 nays, as shown by the 
roll-call. Also to strike out page 5, line 8, beginning with the word 
``except'' including to the end of line 10 and ending with the word 
``Tutuila,'' decided by 15 yeas to 24 nays, as shown above. [See tally 
sheet A]
Senator Reed then moved, at page 3, line 8, after the words ``except 
such vessels'' to add the words ``as are not built in the United 
States.'' This motion was carried by a vote of 24 ayes to 13 noes, and 
the understanding was that the Committee would perfect this idea. [See 
tally sheet D]
Senator Fletcher was then authorized to cast the vote of Senator 
Williams during his absence.

 Senator Fletcher then offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED: That in the judgment of the Democratic 
  Conference, the Bill S. 6856, as amended and agreed upon by 
  this Conference, should be enacted;
  And that it is the judgment of the Conference that said Bill 
  should be continued as the unfinished business of the 
  Senate;
  And that it should be supported as a party measure.

Senator Fletcher's resolution being divided as above, paragraphs 1 and 2 
were adopted viva voce.
A roll-call being asked on number 3, it was carried and adopted by a 
vote of 35 ayes and 3 noes. Senator Thomas then changed his vote to aye, 
leaving but 2 noes. All agreed to support the measure. [See tally sheet 
C]
The Conference then adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Jan. 23, 1915
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
            Ashurst
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
     Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
     Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hardwick
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
            James
     Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
            Pittman
            Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
            Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
     Walsh
     White
     Williams
      23

On Senator Bryan's Motion
January 23, 1915
[Tally sheet A]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst     1
            Bankhead
       1    Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain 2
            Chilton
            Clarke
       2    Culberson
            Fletcher    3
       3    Gore
       4    Hardwick
       5    Hitchcock
            Hollis      4
       6    Hughes
            James       5
            Johnson     6
            Kern        7
            Lane
       7    Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.  8
            Lewis
            Martin      9
       8    Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
       9    Overman
            Owen       10
      10    Pittman
            Pomerene   11
            Ransdell   12
      11    Reed
      12    Robinson
            Saulsbury  13
            Shafroth   14
            Sheppard
            Shields    15
            Shively
            Simmons    16
            Smith of Ar17
      13    Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone       18
            Swanson    19
            Thomas     20
      14    Thompson
            Thornton   21
      15    Tillman
            Vardaman
            Walsh      22
            White      23
            Williams   24

Roll Call on Senator Smith's motion
January 23, 1915
[Tally sheet B]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst    23
            Bankhead
       1     Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain 1
              (Fletcher)
            Chilton
            Clarke
       2    Culberson
            Fletcher    2
            Gore        3
            Hardwick
       3    Hitchcock
            Hollis      4
            Hughes      5
            James       6
            Johnson     7
            Kern        8
            Lane
       4    Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.  9
            Lewis
            Martin      10
            Martine    11
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
       5    Overman
            Owen (Reed) 12
            Pittman    13
            Pomerene   13
            Ransdell   14
            Reed       15
            Robinson   16
            Saulsbury  17
            Shafroth   18
            Sheppard   19
              (Culberson)
            Shields     20
            Shively
            Simmons    21
            Smith of Ar 22
       6    Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone      24
            Swanson    25
            Thomas     26
            Thompson   27
            Thornton   28
            Tillman    29
            Vardaman
            Walsh      30
            White      31
       7    Williams

Fletcher Resolution
January 23, 1915
[Tally sheet C]
     YEAS        NAYS
       1    Ashurst (Smith of Ariz.)
            Bankhead
            Bryan       1
            Camden
       2    Chamberlain (Fletcher)
            Chilton
            Clarke
       3    Culberson
       4    Fletcher
       5    Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
       6    Hollis
       7    Hughes
       8    James
       9    Johnson
      10    Kern
            Lane
      11    Lea of Tenn.
      12    Lee of Md.
      13    Lewis
      14    Martin (Fletcher)
      15    Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      16    Overman
      17    Owen (Reed)
      18    Pittman
      19    Pomerene
      20    Ransdell
      21    Reed
      22    Robinson
      23    Saulsbury
            Shafroth
      24    Sheppard (Culberson)
      25    Shields (Tillman)
            Shively
      26    Simmons
      27    Smith of Ariz
            Smith of Ga 2
            Smith of Md
      36    Smith of S.C.(Tillman)
      28    Stone
      29    Swanson
      37    Thomas (Cha xed)
      30    Thompson
      31    Thornton
      32    Tillman
            Vardaman
      33    Walsh
      34    White
      35    Williams (Fletcher)

Sen. Reed's Motion
January 23, 1915
[Tally sheet D]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst     1
            Bankhead
       1    Bryan
            Camden
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Clarke
       2    Culberson
            Fletcher    2
       3    Gore
            Hardwick
       4    Hitchcock
       5    Hollis
       6    Hughes
            James       3
            Johnson     4
       7    Kern
            Lane
       8    Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.  5
            Lewis
            Martin      6
       9    Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      10    Overman
      11    Owen
      12    Pittman
            Pomerene    7
            Ransdell    8
      13    Reed
      14    Robinson
      15    Saulsbury
            Shafroth    9
            Sheppard   10
            Shields
            Shively
      16    Simmons
            Smith of Ar11
      17    Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
      18    Stone
            Swanson     12
      19    Thomas
      20    Thompson
            Thornton
      21    Tillman
            Vardaman
      22    Walsh
      23    White
      24    Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 2, 1915]

FEBRUARY 2, 1915

Pursuant to call, the Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate met 
Tuesday morning, February 2, 1915, at 12 o'clock.
Thirty-one Democratic Senators responded to the roll-call.
Chairman Kern proceeded to address the Caucus.
Senator Simmons then spoke of two suggested amendments that were being 
considered as possible means of obtaining the required votes.
Senator Gore moved that Chairman Kern, Senator Fletcher, Senator Simmons 
and Senator Martin be made a Special Committee to manage the Shipping 
Bill differences and to take under consideration means of securing 
sufficient support for the bill, and to report to the Caucus this 
evening when it meets at 8:00 o'clock.
This motion was seconded by Senator Stone and carried unanimously.
The meeting then adjourned to meet at 8:00 o'clock this (Tuesday) 
evening, February 2, 1915.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.


__________________________________________

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate met on Tuesday 
evening, February 2, 1915, at 8:00 o'clock, the roll call showing 29 
Senators present.
Senator Kern made a report to the Caucus on his effort with Senators 
Bankhead, Clarke and Hitchcock, but could not report definite progress.
Senator Simmons reported on his efforts with Senators [Robert M.] La 
Follette [Republican, Wisconsin], [William S.] Kenyon [Republican, 
Iowa], and [George W.] Norris [Republican, Nebraska] (Senator Kenyon 
acting for Senator Norris). Senators La Follette and Norris will vote to 
recommit with instructions.
A discussion was then had as to the parliamentary situation.
Senator Williams moved that the Committee of Four appointed this morning 
be instructed to prepare and offer an amendment to the motion to 
recommit to effect a forthwith report from the Committee on Commerce 
with the Norris-La Follette amendments. This was adopted unanimously.
In case a motion to recommit with instructions fails, the Committee to 
indicate to the Democratic Senators what their action shall be. Should 
Senators La Follette, Norris and Kenyon vote with us, the agreed 
amendments shall be made if it is possible to do so with Democratic 
votes.
The meeting then adjourned.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Democratic Caucus
Tuesday, February 2, 1915, 10 a.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
            Ashurst
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Clarke
     Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
            Hughes
     James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
            Myers      35
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
            Sheppard   32
     Shields
            Shively
            Simmons
            Smith of Ar33
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman    34
            Vardaman
     Walsh
     White
     Williams
      31

Roll Call, Democratic Caucus
Tuesday, February 2, 1915, 8 p.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
     Ashurst (by Smith of Ariz.)
            Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
     Chamberlain (by Kern)
      Chilton
            Clarke
     Culberson
     Fletcher
      31    Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
            Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
     Owen
            Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
            Sheppard
   30 Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
     Thornton
            Tillman
            Vardaman
            Walsh
            White
     Williams
      29
                               S. Res. 528
                   IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
                            February 2, 1915

Mr. Burton submitted the following resolution: which was ordered to lie 
                          over under the rule.

                                RESOLUTION

   Whereas the pending ship purchase bill, being S. 6856, contemplates 
by certain of its provisions the purchase of shipping tonnage already 
constructed and therefore suggests the possible acquisition of ships 
belonging to belligerents, some of which are interned in American and 
other ports as the result of the war; and
  Whereas the purchase of such vessels would raise questions of vital 
importance to the interests of the United States, a knowledge of which 
is of supreme importance in order that the Senate may reach an 
intelligent conclusion as to the advisability of enacting said bill and 
as to the propriety of incorporating in its provisions certain 
amendments: Therefore be it
  Resolved, That the Secretary of State be requested and is hereby 
directed to transmit at his earliest convenience to the Senate of the 
United States information responsive to the following inquiry: Has the 
Secretary of State through private or official channels received any 
information from any responsible foreign source as to the attitude the 
Governments of the belligerent nations or any of them might be expected 
to assume in relation to the transfer to the American flag and American 
register of merchant ships which have heretofore carried the flag of a 
belligerent State?
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 13, 1915]

FEBRUARY 13, 1915

The Democratic Caucus of the United States Senate, pursuant to call, met 
on Saturday morning, February 13, 1915, at 10:30 o'clock.
The roll-call disclosed 36 Senators present.
Chairman Kern proceeded to address the Caucus.
Senator Clarke (Ark.) then addressed the Caucus on the subject of 
cloture generally and also on the Shipping Bill.
On motion of Senator Thomas, all speeches were limited to a period of 
five minutes, and this was agreed to without discussion.
Senator Owen then addressed the Caucus on cloture and offered his 
amendment (S. Res. 283, as shown on the following page).

 Senator Reed then offered as a substitute his resolution, which is as 
follows:

   Whereas, on yesterday the Ship Purchase Bill was 
  temporarily laid aside for the purpose of passing an 
  amendment to the rules which if adopted makes it possible to 
  pass the said Bill at this Session:
  RESOLVED, that said action is hereby approved and ratified.
  RESOLVED, that the proposition made by Senator Reed to amend 
  the rules shall be passed.
  RESOLVED, further, that the members of the Caucus are at 
  liberty to support the Norris substitute with instructions 
  if adopted that we will support the same as an amendment to 
  the rules.
  The Committee appointed to manage the Bill shall have charge 
  of the contest over the amendment to the rules.

Senator Hardwick arose for the purpose of questioning Senator Reed but 
Senator Vardaman proceeded to address the Caucus.
Senator Newlands obtained the floor and advised the Caucus.
Senator Overman addressed the Caucus.
Senator Pittman addressed the Caucus.
Senator Bankhead likewise addressed the Caucus.
On motion, the Caucus then recessed until 8:00 o'clock this (Saturday) 
evening.

                                              [signed] Willard Saulsbury

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Feb. 13, 1915, 10:30 a.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
            Ashurst
     Bankhead
     Bryan
            Camden
     Chamberlain
     Chilton (42 at 11:10)
     Clarke
     Culberson (37)
     Fletcher
     Gore (38)
     Hardwick (40 at 11 am)
     Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes (45)
     James
            Johnson
     Kern
            Lane
     Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md. (41 at 11 am)
            Lewis
     Martin
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
     O'Gorman (43 at 11:25)
     Overman
     Owen
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard (36)
     Shields
     Shively
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz (39)
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Thompson
            Thornton
     Tillman (44 at 11:25)
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     White
            Williams (counted for 
              quorum)
                               S. RES. 283
                   IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
                              March 2, 1914

 Mr. Owen submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the 
                           Committee on Rules.

                                RESOLUTION

   Resolved, That Rule XIX of the standing rules of the Senate be 
amended by adding the following:
  Sec. 6. That the Senate may at any time upon motion of a Senator fix a 
day and hour for the final vote upon any matter pending in the Senate: 
Provided, That upon the motion of a Senator, sustained by one-fourth of 
the Members of the Senate, debate of not to exceed forty-eight hours 
shall be allowed within the time fixed for such final vote, one-half of 
the time for debate to be controlled by the proponents and one-half by 
the opponents of the pending question.


__________________________________________

                                                     [February 13, 1915]

FEBRUARY 13, 1915

 A Conference of the Democratic members of the Senate was duly called by 
the following request, due notice and adjournment thereunder:

   To the Hon. John W. Kern, Chairman,
     We, the undersigned, respectfully request you to call a 
  Caucus of the Democrats of the Senate to be held in the room 
  of the Committee on Finance, Senate Office Building, on 
  February 13th, 1915, at 10 o'clock a.m. for the purpose of 
  considering amendments to the standing rules of the Senate 
  with respect to cloture.

                                       Duncan U. Fletcher
                                      Wm. J. Stone
                                      T.J. Walsh
                                      Luke Lea
                                      Robt. L. Owen
                                      Morris Sheppard
                                      Blair Lee
                                      Henry F. Hollis
                                      J.R. Thornton
                                      Jas. A. Reed
                                      W.E. Chilton

The Conference, pursuant to adjournment, was called to order Saturday, 
February 13, 1915, at 8:30 p.m., with Mr. Kern in the Chair and Mr. Lee 
of Maryland, temporary Secretary.
On roll-call thirty-four senators were recorded present either in person 
or by proxy. The following named were present in person: Messrs. 
Chamberlain, Chilton, Fletcher, Gore, Hughes, James, Kern, Lea of Tenn., 
Lee of Md., Myers, Newlands, Owen, Pittman, Ransdell, Reed, Robinson, 
Shafroth, Sheppard, Shively, Simmons, Smith of Ariz., Smith of Ga., 
Stone, Thomas, Walsh, White and Williams; and the following by proxy: 
Messrs. Martin, Martine, Thompson, Pomerene, Saulsbury and Swanson.
It was ordered that the vote of Messrs. Martin, Martine, Thompson, 
Pomerene and Swanson be cast by Mr. Fletcher, these gentlemen having so 
requested.
Mr. Williams requested that Mr. Saulsbury's vote be cast as requested by 
his letter to Senator Kern, which was agreed to.

Mr. Fletcher moved, as a substitute to Mr. Reed's motion, the following:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that some 
  rule for a modified cloture, permitting fair and reasonable 
  debate, but enabling a majority to end a persistent 
  filibuster intended to prevent a vote, and, for the present, 
  at least, a rule which would terminate the filibuster on the 
  shipping bill, should be adopted, and the committee in 
  charge of the management of the said bill is authorized to 
  give direction to this action.

Mr. Chilton retired and asked permission for Mr. Fletcher to cast his 
vote, which was agreed to.
After discussion, Mr. Fletcher's motion was put and carried.
Mr. Simmons moved to add to the committee of management Messrs. Hollis 
and Lea of Tenn., which was agreed to.
Mr. Lea of Tenn. moved that an amendment be added to the proper 
appropriation bill striking out the name of Mr. [Henry M.] Rose 
[Assistant Secretary of the Senate], which was agreed to.
Mr. Myers moved that when the Legislative, Executive and Judicial Bill 
is before the Senate he be granted leave to move for one more clerk for 
the Committee on Public Lands. Mr. Williams objected, stating a point of 
order, which point of order was sustained.
At 10:25 p.m. the Conference adjourned.

                                                 Respectfully submitted,
                                                      [signed] Blair Lee

                                                    Temporary Secretary.
                    Sixty-fourth Congress (1915-1917)

  [Editor's Note: The Seventeenth Amendment to the Constitution, which 
replaced the election of U.S. senators by state legislatures with direct 
election, was ratified in 1913, and the following year senators 
campaigned for popular election for the first time. Although Democrats 
lost 61 seats in the House, voters increased the Democratic majority in 
the Senate by 5 to a margin of 56 to 40. War in Europe, which had begun 
in August 1914, increasingly dominated the concerns of Congress and the 
president, as the nation attempted to remain neutral between the 
belligerent powers.]
____________________________________________________

                                                     [November 29, 1915]

NOVEMBER 29, 1915

Regular call meeting of the Democratic Caucus held on the 29th day of 
November, 1915, at the hour of 11:30 a.m.
Upon roll call, forty-four Senators responded to their names.
Senator Pomerene moved the nomination of Senator Kern as Chairman of the 
Caucus.
Upon a rising vote Senator Kern was unanimously elected.
Senator Kern thereupon addressed the Caucus and expressed his 
appreciation of the honor conferred upon him.
Senator Simmons moved that the Caucus appoint a steering committee to be 
nominated by the Chairman, to consist of eight members, and that the 
Chairman be an ex-official member of such Pcommittee.
Senator Williams who was nominated as Vice-Chairman begged leave to 
withdraw in favor of Senator Newlands.
Senator Newlands expressed his appreciation and begged leave to withdraw 
his name as a candidate; thereupon Senator Hughes moved that the matter 
of the election of a Vice-Chairman go over until the next meeting.
Senator Clarke of Arkansas was nominated for President pro tempore of 
the Senate.
Upon the request of Senator Reed, concurred in by Senator Clarke, the 
election of the President pro tempore of the Senate was passed until the 
succeeding meeting.

Senator Williams offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, that Rule XXII of the standing rules of the Senate 
  be amended as follows: Insert after the words ``to lay on 
  the table'' in Rule XXII the following:
  ``Any Senator arising in his place and asserting that in his 
  opinion an attempt is being made on the floor of the Senate 
  to obstruct, hinder, or delay the right of the Senate to 
  proceed to a vote, the Chair shall, without permitting any 
  debate thereon, put the question to the Senate, `Is it the 
  sense of the Senate that an attempt is being made to 
  obstruct, hinder, or delay a vote?' And if that question 
  shall be decided in the affirmative, then it shall be in 
  order, to the exclusion of the consideration of all other 
  questions, for any Senator to move to fix a time for voting 
  on the pending bill or resolution and all amendments 
  thereto; and the said motion shall be decided without 
  debate: PROVIDED, HOWEVER, That the time fixed in said 
  motion for taking the vote on the pending bill or resolution 
  and all amendments thereto shall be at least two calendar 
  days after the day on which said motion is made.''

The names of members of the committee appointed by the Caucus to make 
suggestions with regard to changes in the Rules were requested; 
whereupon Senator Owen, Chairman of the Committee, gave the names as 
follows: Senator Owen, Senator Martin, Senator Walsh.
Senator Owen in the same connection stated that the Committee would 
probably be ready to report at the adjourn meeting.
Senator James moved that the meeting adjourn until 11 o'clock on the 
morning of Wednesday, the 1st day of December, 1915.
The motion was carried.

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call Dem. Caucus, Nov. 29, 1915, 
11:30 a.m.
[PRESENT]             [ABSENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
      Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan    
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
      Clarke
            Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore     
      Hardwick
      Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
      Husting
      James
      Johnson of Me.
      Johnson of S. Dak.
      Kern
            Lane     
            Lea of Te
      Lee of Md.
            Lewis    
      Martin
            Martine  
      Myers
      Newlands
      O'Gorman
      Overman
      Owen
      Phelan
            Pittman  
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury
      Shafroth
            Sheppard 
      Shields
            Shively  
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz.
      Smith of Ga.
      Smith of Md.
            Smith of 
      Stone
      Swanson
      Thomas
      Thompson
      Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
      Williams
      44               12
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 1, 1915]

DECEMBER 1, 1915

Adjourn meeting of the Democratic Caucus, held in the Rooms of the 
Financial Committee, on this the 1st day of December 1915.

  PRESENT:  LSenator Kern in the Chair.PSenator Pittman, Secretary, 
acting.

At a roll call the following Senators answered ``present.'' [See roll 
call that follows these minutes.]
The Chairman then announced the following Steering Committee: Senator 
Martin; Senator Chamberlain; Senator Owen; Senator O'Gorman; Senator 
Smith of Ga.; Senator Thomas; Senator Williams; Senator James.
Upon motion duly made and seconded the appointment of such steering 
committee was unanimously approved and confirmed.
Senator Hoke Smith nominated Senator Chilton for Vice-Chairman.
The nomination was seconded by Senator O'Gorman.
The election of Senator Chilton was made unanimous by a rising vote.
Senator Chilton was thereupon called upon and expressed his appreciation 
of the honor conferred upon him.
Senator Hoke Smith requested permission of the Caucus to withdraw his 
name as a member of the steering committee; and in making such request 
urged the appointment of Senator Reed of Missouri as his successor.
Senator Reed thanked Senator Smith for his generosity in the matter but 
stated that he could not accept the sacrifice.
After further remarks by Senators present, Senator Smith's resignation 
from the Committee was accepted and Senator Reed was unanimously elected 
to fill the vacancy.
Senator Stone placed Senator Lewis of Illinois in nomination for the 
position of whip.
Senator Lewis was unanimously elected to such position.
Upon the suggestion of Senator Owen the matter of the election of the 
President pro tempore went over until Thursday [lined out and ``Friday'' 
inserted] at the hour of 2 o'clock.
Senator Owen as Chairman of the Committee on Special Rules announced 
that the Committee would report at the following session of the Caucus.
Upon motion of Senator O'Gorman it was agreed that when the caucus 
adjourned it would adjourn to convene at 2 o'clock p.m. on Thursday, the 
2nd of December.
Senator Overman made the informal report concerning patronage. It was 
thereupon suggested that it was proper that the Assistant Librarian of 
the Senate should be a Democrat.
Senator Newlands moved that it was the sense of the Caucus that certain 
Republican employees who have long been retained in their offices by 
reason of their efficiency and as a justice to the minority party should 
not be disturbed.
There was considerable discussion as to whether or not the Senate is a 
continuing body and whether or not the elective officers should be 
elected at the beginning of each session. No official action was taken 
upon the matter.
The matter of appointive patronage was called to the attention of the 
Committee on Patronage with request that they take up the matter and 
deal with it.
Senator O'Gorman moved to adjourn until 2 p.m., Thursday, December 2nd, 
1915.
The motion carried.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Dec. 1, 1915


         [PRESENT]                   [PRESENT]              [ABSENT]

Ashurst                     Phelan                      Broussard
Bankhead                    Pittman                     Bryan
Beckham                     Pomerene                    Culberson
Chamberlain                 Ransdell                    Lea of Tenn.
Chilton                     Reed                        Martine
Clarke                      Robinson                    Shively
Fletcher                    Saulsbury
Gore                        Shafroth
Hardwick                    Sheppard
Hitchcock                   Shields
Hollis                      Simmons
Hughes                      Smith of Ariz
Husting                     Smith of Ga.
James                       Smith of Md.
Johnson of Me.              Smith of S.C.
Johnson of S.Dak.           Stone
Kern                        Swanson
Lane                        Thomas
Lee of Md.                  Thompson
Lewis                       Tillman
Martin                      Underwood
Myers                       Vardaman
Newlands                    Walsh
O'Gorman                    Williams
Overman                      46 present
Owen


  
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 2, 1915]

DECEMBER 2, 1915

Adjourn meeting of the Democratic Caucus, held in the Room of the 
Finance Committee, at the hour of 2 o'clock p.m., on the 2nd day of 
December, 1915; with Senator Kern in the Chair, and Senator Pittman 
acting as Secretary.
At the request of the Chairman, the Secretary called the roll, and the 
following Senators were found to be present: [See roll call at end of 
minutes.]
The Chairman had called to the attention of the Caucus the necessity for 
the old Senators having numerous committee appointments to surrender 
such appointments so that the newly elected Senators might be provided 
with appropriate committees.
The Senators were requested to communicate with the Chairman, giving a 
list of such committees as they were willing to withdraw from.
Senator Gore suggested that members of the Steering Committee by reason 
of the importance of such committee should hold no other committee 
appointments.
It was suggested by Senator Overman that the majority party might be 
entitled to larger representations upon some of the committees.
Senator Simmons stated that he had favored the enlargement of the 
Finance Committee by two additional members, so that the Committee might 
have the benefit of the appointment of Mr. Underwood to such committee.
Senator Williams stated that he favored the increasing of the Finance 
Committee by the appointment of two Democrats, as he felt frequently 
that the Democratic majority was too small on such committees.
After considerable discussion it was agreed that the Steering Committee 
should take such steps as were proper to obtain an increase in the 
number of Democratic Senators upon certain committees, also the decrease 
of the number of Republican Senators upon such Committees.

Senator Owen as Chairman of the Committee on Special Rules thereupon 
submitted the report of the committee. The Committee recommended the 
passage of the following rule:

  RESOLVED: That the rules of the Senate of the Sixty-third 
  Congress shall be the rules of the Senate of the Sixty-
  fourth Congress until otherwise ordered, except that Rule 22 
  shall be as follows:

      Rule 22. Precedence of Motions.

    When a question is pending, no motion shall be received, 
    except as hereinafter provided, but--
    To adjourn.
    To adjourn to a day certain, or that when the Senate 
    adjourn it shall be to a day certain.
    To take a recess.
    To proceed to the consideration of executive business.
    To lay on the table.
    To postpone indefinitely.
    To Commit.
    To amend.

  Which several motions shall have precedence as they stand 
  arranged; and the motions relating to adjournment, to take a 
  recess, to proceed to the consideration of executive 
  business, to lay on the table, shall be decided without 
  debate.
  PROVIDED, HOWEVER, That any Senator arising in his place and 
  asserting that in his opinion an attempt is being made on 
  the floor of the Senate to obstruct, hinder, or delay the 
  right of the Senate to proceed to a vote, the Chair shall, 
  without permitting any debate thereon, put the question to 
  the Senate--
  ``Is it the sense of the Senate that an attempt is being 
  made to obstruct, hinder, or delay a vote?''
  And if that question shall be decided in the affirmative, 
  then it shall be in order to the exclusion of all other 
  questions and business for any Senator to move to limit 
  debate on the pending bill or resolution and all amendments 
  thereto, and the said motion shall be decided without 
  debate. And thereafter, the motion being carried, each 
  Senator shall be entitled to speak not to exceed one hour in 
  all on the bill, the amendments thereto and any motion 
  affecting the same.

Senator Owen thereupon moved that the report of the Committee be 
adopted.
Senator Martin stated that he was compelled to leave the Caucus and 
asked unanimous consent that the Chairman cast his vote in favor of the 
report.
The same request was made by Senator Stone.
There being no objection to their requests, the same were unanimously 
granted.
Senator Smith of S.C. requested to know if the members of the Caucus 
would be bound upon the floor of the Senate by the action of the Caucus. 
He further stated that under no consideration would he permit himself to 
be bound to support on the floor of the Senate the report of the 
Committee or any cloture rule.
Senator Martin replied to Senator Smith, and stated that the rule of the 
Caucus to be that a Senator is not bound upon the floor of the Senate by 
Caucus action, unless they had by two-thirds vote determined the 
question to be a party matter. The other exceptions were also stated by 
Senator Martin.
Senator Myers and Senator Thompson asked unanimous consent that they be 
excused and that the Chairman cast their vote in favor of the adoption 
of the report by the Committee.
There being no objection, their requests were granted.
Senator Williams then spoke in favor of the adoption of the report.
Senator Swanson asked consent to be excused, and that the Chairman cast 
his vote in favor of the resolution. Senator Bryan objected, and 
therefore permission was not granted.
Senator Walsh of Montana then took the floor and supported most strongly 
the report of the Committee in a very exhaustive and able argument. He 
maintained that the Senate is not a continuing body and that a new 
Senate is without rules, except the ordinary rules of parliamentary 
practice.
Senator Smith of Ga. and Senator Smith of S.C. expressed opposition to 
the motion on the grounds that the adoption of such resolution would 
commit the Senate or those voting for the same to the theory that the 
Senate is not a continuing body.
Senator Walsh stated that he had no desire to so commit any Senator, but 
that the preamble to the motion was suggested by the desire to have 
rules of procedure in the event that the Senate is not a continuing 
body.
On motion, the Caucus adjourned until 10 o'clock, a.m., on Friday, the 
3rd day of December, 1915.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Dec. 2, 1915


         [PRESENT]                   [PRESENT]              [ABSENT]

Ashurst                     Pittman                     Broussard
Bankhead                    Pomerene                    Chamberlain
Beckham                     Reed                        Culberson
Bryan                       Saulsbury                   Hughes
Chilton                     Shafroth                    James
Clarke                      Sheppard                    Johnson of
                                                         S.Dak.
Fletcher                    Shields                     Lane
Gore                        Simmons                     Lea of Tenn.
Hardwick                    Smith of Ariz.              Martine
Hitchcock                   Smith of Ga.                Lewis
Hollis                      Smith of Md.                Myers
Husting                     Smith of S.C.               Phelan
Johnson of Me.              Stoneof                     Shively
Kern                        Swanson                     Tillman
Lee of M                    Thomasd.
Martin                      Thompson
Newlands                    Underwood
O'Gorman                    Vardaman
Overman                     Walsh
Owen                        Williams


  
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 3, 1915]

DECEMBER 3, 1915

Adjourn meeting of the Democratic Caucus, December 3, 1915, at 10 a.m., 
held in the Rooms of the Financial Committee.
 Mr. Kern in the Chair.
 Mr. Pittman, Secretary acting.
Upon roll call 42 Senators found to be present.
Chairman called Mr. Hughes to the Chair.

Mr. Shafroth was recognized and presented for the consideration of the 
Caucus an amendment to Rule XIX, as follows:

   Amend Paragraph 1 of Rule XIX, so it shall read as follows:
                                RULE XIX.
                                 DEBATE

    I. When a Senator desires to speak, he shall rise and 
  address the Presiding Officer, and shall not proceed until 
  he is recognized, and the Presiding Officer shall recognize 
  the Senator who shall first address him. No Senator shall 
  interrupt another Senator in debate without his consent, and 
  to obtain such consent he shall first address the Presiding 
  Officer. NO SENATOR SHALL SPEAK FOR MORE THAN TWO HOURS UPON 
  ANY ONE BILL, RESOLUTION OR MATTER IN DEBATE, AND ALL 
  MOTIONS AFFECTING THE SAME, NOR FOR MORE THAN ONE HOUR UPON 
  ALL AMENDMENTS THERETO WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE SENATE, 
  WHICH SHALL BE DETERMINED WITHOUT DEBATE.

No action was taken upon the proposed amendment.
Mr. Overman took the floor and presented an argument sustaining the rule 
that the Senate is a continuing body.
Mr. Underwood requested that he be excused and that the Chairman cast 
his vote during his absence. The request was unanimously granted.
Mr. Saulsbury made request that he be excused and that the Chairman cast 
his vote. Request granted.

Mr. Bankhead presented the following amendment [to] Rule XIX:

  RESOLVED, That the Rules of the Senate be amended by adding 
  thereto the following:
    1. There shall be a motion for the previous question, 
  which being ordered by two-thirds of Senators voting, if a 
  quorum be present, shall have the effect to cut off all 
  debate and bring the Senate to a direct vote upon the 
  immediate question or questions on which it has been asked 
  or ordered. The previous question may be asked and ordered 
  upon a single motion, a series of motions allowable under 
  the rules, or an amendment or amendments, or may be made to 
  embrace all authorized motions or amendments and include the 
  bill to its passage or rejection. It shall be in order, 
  pending the motion for, or after the previous question shall 
  have been ordered on its passage, for the Presidng Officer 
  to entertain and submit a motion to commit with or without 
  instructions, to a standing or select committee.
    2. All motions for the previous question shall, before 
  being submitted to the Senate, be seconded by a two-thirds 
  vote by tellers, if demanded.
    3. When a motion for the previous question has been 
  seconded it shall be in order, before final vote is taken 
  thereon, for each Senator to debate the proposition to be 
  voted upon for two hours.

Mr. Reed took the floor in support of the Committee's report on 
amendment to Rule XXII. He contended that the Senate is not a continuing 
body.
Mr. Tillman interrupted the speaker and requested that the Caucus rule 
binding the members of the Caucus to vote on the floor of the Senate in 
accordance with the determination of the Caucus be read; whereupon the 
Secretary read resolutions adopted at a minority Caucus of Democrats on 
December 15, 1903; it being the only rule of such character apparently 
in existence.
The Caucus took a recess until 2 o'clock p.m.


__________________________________________

The Caucus re-convened at 2 p.m.
The Chair announced nominations for President pro tempore of the Senate 
in order.
Mr. Tillman was recognized and read an address. Upon completion of his 
address he moved that Mr. Clarke be elected by acclamation.
Mr. Newlands then took the floor and strongly supported the nomination 
of Mr. Clarke.
Mr. Walsh placed in nomination Mr. Pomerene of Ohio.
Mr. Stone seconded the nomination of Mr. Pomerene.
During Mr. Stone's speech he propounded certain questions to each of the 
candidates, relative to positions held by them on various political 
questions.
Mr. Gore then obtained the floor and strongly supported the nomination 
of Mr. Clarke.
Mr. Shafroth seconded the nomination of Mr. Clarke.
Mr. Pittman seconded the nomination of Mr. Pomerene.

There being no further remarks upon the nominations of either candidate, 
Mr. Bankhead moved that the roll be called and a vote taken. The roll 
was called and the Chair announced the following vote:

  Those voting for Mr. Clarke:

    Messrs.
        BankPomerene
        BeckRansdell
        BrouRobinson
        BryaSaulsbury
        Cham Shafroth
        GoreShields
        Hard Simmons
        HitcSmith of Ga.
        HughSmith of S.C.
        JameTillman
        JohnUnderwood.
        LaneVardaman
        NewlWilliams
        O'Gorman
        Overman

  Those voting for Mr. Pomerene:

    Messrs.
        AshuPhelan
        ChilPittman
        ClarReed
        FletSheppard
        HollSmith of Ariz.
        HustSmith of Md.
        JohnSwansonS.D.
        Lee Thomas
        MartThompson
        MyerWalsh
        Owen

Mr. Stone voted for Mr. Walsh of Montana.
Upon the Chair announcing that Mr. Clarke had received 28 votes and Mr. 
Pomerene 23, Mr. Pomerene rose and obtained the floor and in a most 
cordial speech moved that the nomination of Mr. Clarke be made 
unanimous. The motion was seconded by Mr. Smith of Arizona. The motion 
was unanimously carried.
Mr. Clarke thereupon took the floor and thanked the Caucus for the honor 
conferred upon him. He outlined his views of the duties of a President 
pro tempore and emphatically stated that his course would always be in 
keeping with such views. He said that he was very hopeful that some 
means could be discovered whereby the Senate could be protected against 
filibusters.
Mr. Thompson moved that the Chairman appoint Mr. Pomerene President pro 
tempore for Monday, the 6th of December, and until the President pro 
tempore elect was sworn in. On motion of Mr. Clarke such resolution was 
referred to the Chairman of the Caucus with instructions to do what he 
might consider proper under the circumstances, and under the rules and 
precedents of the Senate.
Mr. Chilton and Mr. Smith of S.C. announced that they would be 
necessarily absent on Saturday and requested permission to pair. No 
objection was made.
Mr. Stone requested that a vote be taken on or before 5 o'clock tomorrow 
on the motion to adopt the report of the Special Committee on Rules, the 
amendments presented to such Committee and all other amendments and 
matters connected therewith.
There being no objection the same was unanimously agreed to.
Mr. O'Gorman moved that an adjournment be had until 10:30 o'clock a.m. 
on Saturday, December 4, 1915; whereupon the motion was carried and the 
adjournment had.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                              Secretary.

Roll Call, Dec. 3, 1915


         [PRESENT]                   [PRESENT]              [ABSENT]

Bankhead                    Overman                     Ashurst
Beckham                     Owen                        Chamberlain
Broussard                   Pittman                      Gore
Bryan                       Pomerene                    Hitchcock
Chilton                     Ransdell                    Lea of Tenn.
Clarke                      Robinson                    Lewis
Culberson                   Shafroth                     Martine
Fletcher                    Sheppard                    Myers
Hardwick                    Simmons                     Phelan
Hollis                      Smith of Ga.                Reed
Hughes                      Smith of S.C.               Saulsbury
Husting                     Stone                       Shields
James                       Swanson                     Shively
Johnson of Me.              Thomas                      Smith of Ariz.
Johnson of S. Dak.          Tillman                     Smith of Md.
Kern                        Underwood                   Thompson
Lane                        Vardaman
Lee of Md.                  Walsh
Martin                      Williams
Newlands
O'Gorman                    42 present


  
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 4, 1915]

DECEMBER 4, 1915

Adjourn meeting of Democratic Conference, held at Committee Room, Dec. 
4, 1915.
Mr. Kern in Chair.
Mr. Pittman, Secretary, acting.
Roll-call--35 Senators found present.
Mr. Clarke was recognized and spoke in opposition to any form of 
cloture, giving as his opinion that there could be no half-wayP measure.
Mr. Vardaman spoke in favor of a limited cloture that would permit ample 
debate.
Mr. Pomerene spoke in favor of a modified cloture.
Mr. Owen took the floor and suggested that it was apparent that there 
was a great difference in opinion upon the question of whether the 
Senate was a continuing body or not, and therefore suggested that the 
question be considered not as a party matter but that it be presented to 
the Senate in the regular order.

Mr. Walsh introduced the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That no vote taken on the pending motion or any 
  resolution in relation to cloture shall carry with it any 
  obligation moral or otherwise on any member to vote in the 
  Senate in accordance therewith.

Mr. Stone spoke in favor of the resolution. Mr. Stone expressed his 
regret that the Conference could not act as a caucus and treat the 
matter as a party question binding upon those present.
Mr. O'Gorman moved to adjourn. Messrs. Walsh, Fletcher, and others 
requested the motion be withdrawn. Mr. O'Gorman consented.
Upon the suggestion of Mr. Clarke a standing vote was had upon the 
question of whether or not the changing of rules should be considered as 
a party question. Upon a rising vote it was determined that the question 
should not be considered as a party question.
Upon motion of Mr. Owen the whole matter was referred back to the 
special committee on rules of which Mr. Owen is Chairman.
Mr. Walsh addressed the Conference upon the subject of the reference of 
bills affecting mines and mining to the Committee on Mines and Mining 
rather than the Committee on Public Lands.
No action was taken with regard to this matter.
The Conference adjourned subject to the call of the Chair.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

Roll call, December 4, 1915
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      31    Bankhead
      Beckham
       0    Broussard
       0    Bryan
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
      Clarke
       0    Culberson
      Fletcher
      Gore
      Hardwick
      Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
      James
      Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
      Kern
      Lane
       0    Lea of Tenn.
      Lee of Md.
      Lewis
      Martin
       0    Martine
      Myers
      Newlands
      O'Gorman
      Overman
      Owen
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury
      Shafroth
      Sheppard
      Shields
       0    Shively
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
      Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone
      Swanson
      Thomas
      Thompson
      Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
      Williams
      46
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 16, 1916]

MARCH 16, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus March 16, 1916, at the hour of 2 o'clock, 
p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, acting.
The Chair stated that the object of the meeting was to determine by a 
Caucus action whether the provisions of the House bill with regard to 
sugar, which provision repeals the act placing sugar upon the free list, 
or the provision of the Finance Committee of the Senate extending for 
four years the operation of the bill placing sugar on the free list, 
should be supported by the Democrats in the Senate.
Senator Simmons moved that the provision as reported by the Committee on 
Finance of the Senate be approved by the Caucus and that such provision 
be supported by the Democrats upon the floor of the Senate. After a full 
and free discussion a Yea and Nay vote was taken upon the motion with 
the following result:
Senators voting Yea were: Ashurst, Beckham, Chamberlain, Chilton, Gore, 
Hardwick, Hollis, Hughes, James, Johnson, Kern, Lee, Overman, Pittman, 
Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Smith of Ga., Smith of S.C., Stone, 
Taggart, Thomas, Williams.
Senators voting Nay were: Broussard, Culberson, Martine, Ransdell, 
Shafroth, Shields, Thompson.
 The Chair declared the motion carried.

Senator Smith of Georgia then presented the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Conference that the 
  standing rules of the Senate should be amended in a way that 
  a determined filibuster may be brought to an end and a vote 
  reached.
  RESOLVED, Further that the Committee on Rules be requested 
  to report such amendment.
  RESOLVED, Further that the pending resolution and report be 
  referred to the Committee on Rules.

Resolution carried.
There being no further business before the meeting, the sameP adjourned.

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 19, 1916]

APRIL 19, 1916

Meeting of the Democratic Conference, held at the Committee Room of the 
Finance Committee, in the Senate Office Building, on the 19th day of 
April, 1916.
Senator Kern in the Chair.
Senator Pittman, Secretary, acting.
Chairman requested Senator Simmons to state the object of the meeting.
Senator Simmons took the floor and stated that the conferees on behalf 
of the Senate on [the] Senate Bill, commonly known as the ``Sugar 
Bill,'' were unable to induce the conferees on behalf of the House to 
agree to the substitute bill of the Senate, which continued in force and 
effect the present duty upon sugar for the period of four years, as 
distinguished from the House provision which simply repealed the act 
placing sugar upon the free list. The Senator stated that the conferees 
on behalf of the House, and other Democratic leaders in the House, 
stated that it would be impossible to pass the bill as amended by the 
Senate; that as the Senate Bill was acted upon in Democratic Conference 
the conferees on behalf of the Senate did not consider that they were at 
liberty to recede from the Senate amendment without express authority of 
the Democratic Conference. For the sake of harmony and to insure the 
passage of the bill, which he contended was required by existing 
emergencies, he urged the Conference to authorize the conferees to 
recede from the Senate amendment and accept the House Bill.
Senator Thomas thereupon moved that it was the sense of the Conference 
that the said Senate conferees insist upon the amendment passed by the 
Senate and disagree to the House Bill.
Senator Myers moved as a substitute for Senator Thomas' motion that the 
conferees be instructed to recede from the Senate amendment and to 
accept the bill as passed by the House.
Senator Newlands asked for information as to whether or not the meeting 
was in the nature of a Conference or a Caucus; in other words, whether 
any of those participating in the Conference were to be bound by the 
action of the Conference.
The Chair held that the meeting was in the nature of a Conference, and 
that it would not assume the character of a Caucus unless two-thirds of 
the Democratic members of the Senate should first vote to make the 
question a party question.
Senator Hardwick addressed the meeting. He stated that unless coerced by 
Caucus action that he would use every means in his power to prevent the 
passage of any motion receding from the Senate amendment and adopting 
the House Bill. That he would, however, if bound by Caucus vote submit 
to such vote as a good party man.
Senator Thomas addressed the meeting in favor of his motion.
Senator Lewis explained his position; that the principal argument made 
by him in his campaign for the United States Senate in the State of 
Illinois was based upon the promise of the Democratic party in its 
national platform to place sugar upon the free list. That for him now to 
vote otherwise would be exceedingly humiliating, if not dangerous to the 
success of the Democratic party in his State. He stated, however, that 
he would consider himself bound by the majority vote of the Conference.
Senator Swanson favored the Myers' substitute.
Senator Owen spoke in behalf of Senator Thomas' motion.
Senator Kern addressed the Conference on behalf of party harmony and 
party solidarity.
Senator Stone explained his reasons for having the Conference called, 
which were similar to the reasons suggested by Senator Simmons. He 
stated that he would be bound by the instructions of the Conference; 
that if no instructions were given he would probably ask to be relieved 
as a member of the conferees.
Senator Smith spoke in favor of Senator Myers' substitute.
Senator Pittman stated that he preferred the House amendment because 
under the provisions of the House Bill sugar could again be placed upon 
the free list at any time within four years if the emergency ceased to 
exist, while under the Senate Bill the Senators would be morally bound 
to maintain the present rate of duty for the period of four years.
The question was put to a vote upon Senator Myers' substitute. Upon a 
roll call 24 voted in favor of the substitute, and 9 against.
On the final vote on the motion as amended, the same was declared 
carried by the Chair.
Senator Thomas desired to be recorded as voting against the motion.
Conferees were then instructed to take such steps as they might deem 
advisable to carry out the sense of the Conference.
Upon motion the Conference adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 5, 1916]

JULY 5, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, July 5, 1916, Senator Kern in the Chair 
and Senator Pittman Secretary acting.
Upon roll call 33 senators answered to their names and a quorum was 
declared to be present.
The Chairman then stated to the Caucus that Senator [Jacob H.] Gallinger 
[Republican, New Hampshire], representing the minority, had stated to 
him that an agreement might be had to set the shipping bill down for 
consideration upon a day certain in the succeeding short session of 
Congress; that if such agreement were not entered into a legitimate 
filibuster might be engaged in by the Republicans. He insisted upon a 
reply to his suggestion at an early date.
The Chairman further stated that the Steering Committee had voted to 
have the general leasing bill follow the appropriation bill, and the 
Child Labor bill to following the Leasing bill, subject,P however, to 
the condition that the Shipping bill, if reported toP the Senate, should 
have [precedence] over all bills except theP appropriations.
Senator Chilton moved that speeches be limited to ten minutes.
Senator Clarke stated that he believed the real object of the Conference 
was to obtain party support for the Shipping bill; that he would not 
support such a bill as now prepared or any bill that provided for 
government ownership and operation, nor would be support a bill that 
provided for purchase of old vessels; that he would take no part in the 
work of the Committee on Commerce while such bill was being considered 
by that committee.
Senator Stone urged that the Shipping bill was the most important 
measure to be passed at this session of Congress, and recommended that 
the bill be put up to the Senate as soon as possible.
Senator Hoke Smith insisted upon the passage of his cloture resolution.
Senator Thomas moved that it be the sense of the Caucus that the Senate 
convene at 10:30 a.m. and stay in session until 9 p.m. Motion tabled.
Senator Reed favored accepting the challenge of the other side and of 
debating the Shipping bill until the next session of Congress if 
necessary.
Senator Pomerene spoke in favor of the Shipping bill and the necessity 
for action [at] this session.
Senator Simmons said the Committee on Commerce had been as expeditious 
as possible, and that he hoped to have the bill on the calendar in a 
week. He then explained the changes made in the old bill with the 
present bill.
Senator Tillman asked to be excused and that Senator Swanson be 
permitted to cast his vote. The request was granted.

Senator Mark Smith then presented the following motion:

   It is the sense of this Conference that what is known as 
  the Shipping bill, when reported to the Senate, shall become 
  the unfinished business of the Senate, subject to be 
  displaced only by appropriation bills and conference 
  reports, and shall so remain the unfinished business of the 
  Senate until a final vote be had thereon.

Motion adopted.
Upon motion the Caucus adjourned until 9 p.m. on Friday night the 7th 
day of July, 1916.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

Roll call, July 5, 1916
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
      Beckham
      Broussard
      Bryan
             Chamberlain
      Chilton
      Clarke
      Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis
      Hughes
      Husting
            James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
      Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
      Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
      O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth
      Sheppard
      Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone
      Swanson
     Taggart
      Thomas
             Thompson
      Tillman
      Underwood
            Vardaman
            Walsh
            Williams
      33
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 7, 1916]

JULY 7, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, Friday night, July 7, 1916, at 8 p.m.; 
meeting adjourned.
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 8, 1916]

JULY 8, 1916

July 8th, 1916, at the hour of 2 p.m., Senator Chilton, Vice Chairman, 
in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary acting.
The roll was called and 37 senators answered to their names. The Chair 
declared a quorum present.
Ten minute rule was agreed to.
Senator Simmons, on behalf of Democratic members of Committee on 
Commerce, stated that it was impossible for the Democratic members to 
reach an agreement with the Republican members of the committee; that 
the Democratic members of the committee had come to an agreement upon 
the main provisions of the bill, which will later be submitted to the 
Caucus.
Senator Simmons then read an amendment to Section 5 of the bill, which 
had been agreed upon by the Democratic members of the committee; and 
also Section 11 of the bill, which had been agreed upon by the 
Democratic members of the committee. Such amendments are hereto attached 
to the minutes.
Senator Reed then construed the amendments and explained their purposes.
Senator Simmons made some remarks in explanation of the amendments.
Senator Fletcher then moved that the action of the Democratic members of 
the Committee on Commerce in agreeing upon said amendments to Sections 5 
and 11 be approved and that the Caucus agree to support such amendments.
Senator Williams then moved that the Caucus do not approve that portion 
of such amendments which limits the power of the Shipping Board under 
the bill to purchase ships of belligerents. The motion was lost.
Senator Williams then moved that the Caucus do not approve that portion 
of such amendments which provides that ships of citizens engaged in 
American trade and carrying the commerce of America shall not be 
purchased. The motion was lost.
The motion of Senator Fletcher was then put to a vote, all the Senators 
present except Senator Thomas of Colorado voting in the affirmative. 
Motion was declared carried.

Senator Underwood then moved:

   That the committee be requested to so reform and frame the 
  Ship Purchase bill that the vessels built, purchased, 
  leased, chartered or operated under such Act shall be 
  admitted to register and permitted to enter the deep-sea 
  trade, and also that they be granted enrollment and licensed 
  and be admitted to the coast wise trade; that such vessels 
  be admitted to either trade or both trades at the same time.

By a rising vote the motion was unanimously carried.
Senator Thomas moved that the Senate convene at 11 a.m. and continue in 
session until 8 p.m. every day except Sunday and holidays.
Senator Fletcher offered an amendment to strike out 8 p.m. and 
substitute 7 p.m.
Senator Smith of Arizona moved a substitute by referring the entire 
matter to the Steering Committee.
The last motion was agreed to.
The Caucus then adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

Add at the end of Section 5:

   Provided, however, that no vessel then making American 
  ports and engaged in serving the commerce of the United 
  States, unless about to be taken from such commerce, and no 
  vessel of foreign registry, the country of such registry 
  being then engaged in war, shall be purchased, leased or 
  chartered.
  Provided further, that no vessel shall by the board be 
  purchased, leased, or chartered which is not adapted or by 
  reasonable alterations and repairs can be adapted to the 
  purposes defined in Section V.
  Provided further, that no vessel of American registry, or 
  owned by citizens of the United States shall be transferred 
  to the registry of any foreign power, or sold to any person 
  not a citizen of the United States, unless such vessel shall 
  first be tendered to the board for the price in good faith 
  offered by others.
  No vessel shall be purchased, which, upon expert examination 
  made under the direction of the board, a written report of 
  such examination being filed as a public record, unless it 
  be, without repair or alteration, of less than seventy-five 
  per cent. of its original efficiency at the time of its 
  being originally entered into commission as a seaworthy 
  vessel.

Amend Section 11 by adding:

  Provided, that neither the board nor any corporation in 
  which the United States is a stockholder formed under the 
  authority of section 11, shall engage in the operation of 
  any vessels constructed, purchased, leased or chartered 
  under the authority of this act unless the board shall be 
  unable after a bona fide effort to contract with a citizen 
  of the United States for the purchase, lease or charter of 
  such vessel or vessels under such conditions as may be 
  prescribed by the board.
  The board shall give public notice of the fact that vessels 
  are offered and the terms upon which a contract will be 
  invited, and may invite competitive offerings. But in every 
  instance the board shall adopt such course as will best 
  promote the purposes of this act. In the event the board 
  shall after full compliance with the terms of this proviso 
  determine that it is unable to enter into a contract with 
  such private parties for the operation of such vessels, it 
  shall make a full report to the president, who shall examine 
  such report, and if he shall approve the same, he shall make 
  an order declaring that the conditions have been found to 
  exist, which justifies the board in undertaking the 
  operation of such vessel or vessels by the agencies of the 
  United States provided for in this act.

Roll call, July 8, 1916
[PRESENT]
     Ashurst
            Bankhead
     Beckham
     Broussard
     Bryan
             Chamberlain
     Chilton
     Clarke
     Culberson
     Fletcher
     Gore
     Hardwick
     Hitchcock
             Hollis
     Hughes
     Husting
            James
            Johnson of Me.
     Johnson of S. Dak.
            Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
     Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
            Myers
     Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Phelan
     Pittman
            Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed
            Robinson
     Saulsbury
     Shafroth
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz.
     Smith of Ga.
            Smith of Md.
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
     Swanson
     Taggart
            Thomas
     Thompson
     Tillman
     Underwood
     Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 15, 1916]

JULY 15, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, July 15, 1916, at 8 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman Secretary acting.
On roll call 33 senators responded to their names.
The Chairman announced that the principal object of the meeting was to 
agree upon the action to be taken upon the Immigration bill.
Senator Lewis moved that a legislative program be adopted by the Caucus 
and that the various pending measures be set in their order of emergency 
and that they be taken up by the Senate in such order. The motion was 
unanimously carried.

Senator Hitchcock offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Conference that the 
  following bills in addition to the appropriation bills be 
  considered before adjournment:
  1. Revenue.
  2. Ship Purchase
  3. Corrupt Practice
  4. Philippine.

  That the Steering Committee may change the order of 
  consideration of the foregoing bills.

Senator Pittman offered as a substitute for following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Democratic Conference 
  that in view of the near approach of the end of the session, 
  that pending measures be considered and disposed of in the 
  order of their emergency.
   That the Steering Committee be instructed to attempt to 
  obtain the cooperation of the minority for the expedition of 
  business to the end that an early adjournment be had and 
  that all pending measures may be acted upon before 
  adjournment.

  That bills be taken up and disposed of in the following order:
  1. Conference Reports
  2. Appropriation bills.
  3. Revenue bills.
  4. Shipping bill.
  5. Child labor bill.
  6. Federal Employees.
  7. Immigration bill.
  8. Corrupt practice act.
  9. Pension bill.

Senator Chilton moved as a substitute for the resolutions offered by 
Senators Hitchcock and Pittman the following:

  RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be instructed to 
  arrange a program under which as much of the important 
  pending legislation as possible may have consideration at 
  the current session. The appropriation bills, the shipping 
  bill, the revenue bill, the workman's compensation bill, the 
  corrupt practices bill, the Philippine bill, the Civil War 
  and Spanish American Soldiers' pension bill, and the bill to 
  enlarge the Interstate Commerce Commission, being the most 
  urgent, demand first consideration.
   The Conference favors the adjournment of Congress not later 
  than August 20th, and recommends that the program be 
  arranged so as to permit an adjournment by said date.
   In the event that the Child Labor bill and the Immigration 
  bill cannot, in the judgment of the Steering Committee, be 
  disposed of in season to permit an adjournment by August 
  20th, an agreement should be entered into, if it can be 
  secured, for consideration and a vote on such measures 
  during the month of December, next.
   The Steering Committee may change the order of 
  consideration of the bills given precedence in these 
  resolutions when for any reason such change becomes 
  necessary for the expedition of business.

Thereupon Senators Hitchcock and Pittman withdrew their resolutions.
The resolution of Senator Chilton as amended was put to a vote and 
declared unanimously carried.
Senator Newlands moved to add to the program the bill to increase the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. The motion was carried.

The Chairman then stated that the Steering Committee had adopted the 
following resolution on July 11, 1916, to wit:

  That the Leasing bill, H.R. 406, go over until next session 
  and that the same shall be taken up on the 2nd Monday in 
  December of such session and disposed of before the 
  holidays, subject to emergency measures that may be before 
  the Senate.

Upon motion the action of the Steering Committee was approved.
There being no further business before the Caucus, the sameP adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

Roll call, July 15, 1916
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
      Beckham
      Broussard
      Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
      Clarke
      Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
      Hitchcock
      Hollis
            Hughes
            Husting
            James
      Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
            Martine
            Myers
      Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
      Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
            Reed
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
            Stone
            Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas
      Thompson
            Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
      Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 25, 1916]

JULY 25, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, July 25, 1916, at 8 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary acting.
The Chairman stated that the object of the meeting was to consider the 
disposition of the Child Labor bill. He informed the Caucus that the 
President had called at the Capitol and in discussing such bill with a 
number of Senators had urged most earnestly that the bill be taken up as 
soon as possible and passed.
Senator Stone requested a yea and nay vote to determine the senators who 
would vote in favor and those who would vote against the Child Labor 
bill when the matter came up for passage in the Senate. [See also tally 
sheet A.]

 Upon a roll call the following senators voted Yea:
        AshuPomerene
        ChamRansdell
        ChilReed
        HustRobinson
        JameShafroth
        JohnSheppard. Dak.
        KernSmith of Ariz.
        MartStone
        MyerTaggart
        NewlThomas
        OwenThompson
        PittWalsh

 The following senators voted Nay:
        Bryan
        Fletcher
        Hardwick
        Overman
        Simmons
        Smith of S.C.

Senators Broussard and Saulsbury were excused from voting. Senator 
Hardwick was granted unanimous consent to depart from the Caucus and 
leave his vote with Senator Smith of S.C.

Senator Stone offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that the 
  Child Labor bill, so-called, (H.R. 8234) should be voted 
  upon and disposed of at the present session of the Congress.
  RESOLVED, second, that the Chairman of this Conference shall 
  propose to the Chairman of the Republican Conference that 
  the two sides of the Senate agree to vote on the passage of 
  the pending Immigration bill, with amendments thereto, on a 
  day certain to be named in December next, to be agreed upon 
  between the two Chairmen; and that if such an agreement can 
  not be made, that in that event the said Immigration bill 
  shall, immediately upon the meeting of the second session of 
  the present Congress in December next, be taken up, made the 
  unfinished business of the Senate and thereafter proceeded 
  with until the same has been voted upon and finally disposed 
  of.

Senator Owen offered as an amendment to the resolution offered by 
Senator Stone the following:

  After the first resolution add the words: ``And immediately 
  after the disposition of the District Appropriation bill, 
  and that the Chairman of the Democratic Conference announce 
  this program tomorrow morning.''

The amendment of Senator Owen was adopted.
After the adoption of the amendment of Senator Owen the Chair put the 
question upon the adoption of Senator Stone's resolution as amended. The 
resolution was adopted. [See tally sheet B.]

Senator Myers offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That the so-called Western Water Power bill be set 
  down for consideration and final action immediately 
  following the Leasing bill.

The resolution was adopted.
Motion was made and carried that at an early date the Senate hold night 
sessions for the purpose of acting upon bills upon the calendar.
There being no further business, the Caucus adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

Roll call, July 25, 1916
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
            Bankhead
      Beckham
      Broussard
      Bryan
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis
            Hughes
      Husting
            James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea
            Lee
            Lewis
            Martin
      Martine
      Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
      Owen
            Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
            Saulsbury
      Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone
            Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas
      Thompson
            Tillman
            Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
             Williams

Who Will Vote for Child Labor Bill
July 25, 1916
[Tally sheet A]
     YEAS        NAYS
      Ashurst
             Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard   Ex
            Bryan    
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hardwick 
            Hitchcock
             Hollis
            Hughes
      Husting
      James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
            Lewis
            Martin
      Martine
      Myers
      Newlands wants amend.
            O'Gorman
            Overman  
      Owen
            Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
            Saulsbury   Ex
      Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
            Simmons  
      Smith of Ariz
            Smith of GaEx
            Smith of Md
            Smith of 
      Stone
            Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas wants amend.
      Thompson
            Tillman
            Underwood
            Vardaman    ?
      Walsh
            Williams

Roll call on party program
July 25, 1916
[Tally sheet B]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst
      Bankhead
      Beckham
             Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
      Husting
      James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
      Kern
      Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
      Lee of Md.
      Lewis
      Martin
      Martine
            Myers
      Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman
      Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury
            Shafroth
      Sheppard
      Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
      Stone
      Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas
      Thompson
      Tillman
      Underwood
            Vardaman
      Walsh
            Williams
      38
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 31, 1916]

JULY 31, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, July 31, 1916, 8 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman secretary acting.
A roll call was had and 38 senators responded to their names, as shown 
by the attached roll call.
The Chairman announced that the object of the meeting was to consider 
action to be taken with regard to the Immigration bill. He stated that 
Senator [William] Borah [Republican, Idaho] had threatened to tack the 
Immigration bill on the Child Labor bill, and it was important to 
determine what action the Democrats should take in the matter.
The Caucus adopted the rule that no senator should speak more than once 
on the same subject and not to exceed ten minutes.

Senator Bankhead offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Democratic Caucus that 
  the Child Labor bill shall be disposed of as hereinbefore 
  determined, that is, immediately following the disposal of 
  the District of Columbia Appropriation bill; that the 
  Immigration bill be taken up and acted upon before the 
  adjournment of this session, and that the time for action 
  upon such bill be fixed by the Steering Committee.

Senator Fletcher thereupon offered a substitute to Senator Bankhead's 
amendment, which reads as follows:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that 
  every amendment offered to the Child Labor bill introducing 
  a new subject be laid on the table; that in the absence of 
  an agreement fixing a day in December for consideration of 
  the Immigration bill, notice be given that as early in 
  December as practicable motion will be made to proceed to 
  its consideration with the view to its passage at that time.

Senator Reed offered an amendment to Senator Fletcher's amendment.

Senator Fletcher accepted the amendment so that his amendment as amended 
reads as follows:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that 
  every amendment offered to the Child Labor bill introducing 
  another subject be laid on the table; that in the absence of 
  an agreement fixing a day in December for consideration of 
  the Immigration bill, said bill shall by special order be 
  made the business for the first day of the December session 
  and be kept the unfinished business until final action. If 
  such order cannot be passed, then this Conference pledges 
  itself to take up said bill on the first day of the December 
  session and keep it the unfinished business until final 
  action is had upon it.

The following senators asked to be excused and that their votes be cast 
by other senators as follows:
        Sena  by Senator KernC.
        Sena  by Senator Reed
          Maine
        Sena  by Senator Kern
        Sena  by Senator Kern
        Sena  by Senator Bankhead
        Sena  by Senator Hoke Smith

Senator Tillman stated that he favored the Immigration bill but opposed 
the Child Labor bill.
Senator Underwood stated his position to be the same.
Senator Fletcher's amendment as amended was then put to a vote. A roll 
call was had with the result that thirty-one senators voted in the 
affirmative and eight in the negative. The attached roll call indicates 
how each senator voted. The Chair declared the Fletcher amendment 
carried. [See tally sheet C.]
Senator Stone then moved that the action taken upon the Fletcher 
amendment be considered party action and binding upon the Democratic 
senators in accordance with the rule in such matters. A roll call was 
demanded upon such motion with the result that thirty-eight senators 
voted in the affirmative, as shown by the attached roll call. The motion 
having been carried by a vote of two-thirds of all the Democratic 
senators, the Chair declared that the Caucus had determined that the 
Fletcher measure be considered a party Pmeasure.
There being no further business the meeting adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

Roll call, July 31, 1916
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
      Clarke
            Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
      Husting
      James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
      Lee of Md.
      Lewis
      Martin
      Martine
      Myers
      Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone
      Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas
      Thompson
      Tillman
      Underwood
            Vardaman
      Walsh
            Williams

Roll Call on Fletcher Amendment
as Amended by Reed
July 31, 1916
[Tally sheet C]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bankhead 
            Beckham  
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick by Hoke Smith 
              1 
1 [Conference granted unanimous consent on August 10, 1916 
for Hardwick to change this to a nay vote.]
            Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
      Husting
      James
             Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD by Reed
      Kern
      Lane by Kern
            Lea of Tenn.
      Lee of Md.
      Lewis
            Martin by
              Bankhead
      Martine
            Myers
      Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman  
      Owen
      Phelan
            Pittman  
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury by Kern
            Shafroth
      Sheppard
      Shields
            Simmons  
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
      Stone
            Swanson  
      Taggart
      Thomas
      Thompson
      Tillman
            Underwood
            Vardaman
      Walsh
             Williams
      31                8
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 10, 1916]

AUGUST 10, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, August 10, 1916, 8 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, acting.
Senator Simmons, Chairman of the Finance Committee, stated that the 
object of the meeting was to consider a report of the subcommittee 
having charge of the Income and Inheritance tax schedules.
Senator Smith of Georgia stated that the at last meeting of the Caucus 
he had cast the vote of Senator Hardwick of Georgia in favor of the 
Fletcher resolution under the belief that Senator Hardwick would so vote 
if he were present; that he had since ascertained that he was in error 
in casting Senator Hardwick's vote in the affirmative and therefore 
desired such vote changed from the affirmative to the negative. Senator 
Hardwick concurred in the statement made by Senator Smith and stated 
that he favored the passage of the immigration bill but was opposed to 
taking up and passing the Child Labor bill. Unanimous consent was given 
that Mr. Hardwick's vote be changed as requested.
Mr. Williams, Chairman of the subcommittee, moved that the committee 
amendment found on page 3 be amended by inserting the word ``net'' after 
the word ``all'' in line 12 of page 3. The motion was carried.
Senator Myers moved that the committee amendment be amended by striking 
out the word ``thirteen'' in line 11 and inserting in lieu thereof the 
word ``fifteen.''

Senator Pittman offered as a substitute for the committee amendment and 
the amendment of Senator Myers, the following:

  Strike out all after the figures ``$500,000'' in line 6, 
  page 3, down to and including line 12 of said page and 
  insert ``and does not exceed $750,000, eleven per centum per 
  annum upon the amount by which such total net income exceeds 
  $750,000 and does not exceed $1,000,000, twelve per centum 
  per annum upon the amount by which such total net income 
  exceeds $1,000,000 and does not exceed $1,250,000, thirteen 
  per centum per annum upon the amount by which such total net 
  income exceeds $1,250,000 and does not exceed $1,500,000, 
  fourteen per centum per annum upon the amount by which such 
  total net income exceeds $1,500,000 and does not exceed 
  $1,750,000, fifteen per centum per annum upon the amount by 
  which such total net income exceeds $1,750,000 and does not 
  exceed $2,000,000, sixteen per centum per annum upon the 
  amount by which such total net income exceeds $2,000,000 and 
  does not exceed $2,250,000, and seventeen per centum per 
  annum upon all net income in excess of $2,250,000.

Senator Myers withdrew his amendment in favor of the amendment offered 
by Senator Pittman.

Senator Reed offered as a substitute for the committee amendment and the 
amendment presented by Senate Pittman the following:

  That commencing with $300,000 [corrected to $500,000] the 
  surtax be increased one per centum for each additional 
  increase of $300,000 [corrected to $100,000] in net income, 
  and that the sub-committee be instructed by the Caucus to so 
  frame the provision of the bill.

Senators Myers, Pittman and Ashurst, in discussing the increase of the 
income tax, argued the injustice of the tax upon the copper industry and 
announced their intention of opposing such tax when the matter came 
before the Caucus.
Senator Clarke of Arkansas stated that the information that had come to 
him justified the tax upon copper.
Senator Smith of Georgia suggested that it was impossible to 
intelligently discuss certain schedules of the bill without having the 
whole bill before the committee and the information that had been 
presented to the committee and used by the committee in the 
consideration of the bill.
Senator Simmons stated that the committee hoped to have the whole bill 
ready for consideration by the following night.
Senator Martin of Virginia urged expedition in presenting the bill to 
the Senate.
Senator Williams, Chairman of the sub-committee, stated that the 
committee had not finally determined to place a special tax upon the 
copper industry and that the matter was still under consideration.
The Caucus adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 11, 1916]

AUGUST 11, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, August 11, 1916, 8 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, acting.
Senator Tillman asked unanimous consent to be excused and that Senator 
Overman be permitted to cast his vote. Request granted.
Senator Simmons, Chairman of the Committee on Finance, made a general 
statement concerning the revenue required to be raised and the method of 
raising such revenue.
Senator Pittman withdrew his amendment with regard to the surtax 
provision presented on the preceding day in favor of the amendment 
offered by Senator Reed. Senator Reed's amendment was submitted to a 
vote and declared lost.
On motion of the committee, amendments on page 3 were adopted.
Senator Underwood moved to insert after the word ``profits'' in line 14, 
page 4, the following: ``accrued since March 1st, 1913.''
Senator Reed asked unanimous consent that he be excused and that his 
vote be cast by the Chairman. Request was granted.
Senator Underwood offered a substitute for (C), page 5. The substitute 
was not agreed to, and committee amendments on page 5 were adopted.
Senator Robinson asked to be excused and that Senator Smith of South 
Carolina be permitted to cast his vote. Request was granted.
Senator O'Gorman moved to strike out in paragraph 5 on page 8 the 
following: ``and to an amount not exceeding the profits arising 
therefrom.'' Motion lost.
Recess was taken until two o'clock p.m., Saturday, August 12, 1916.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 12, 1916]

AUGUST 12, 1916

Meeting of Democratic Caucus held Aug. 12, 1916, at two o'clock p.m. in 
pursuance of prior adjournment.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, acting.
Senator Vardaman moved to reconsider Senator Underwood's substitute for 
(C) page 5. Motion carried. [See tally sheet D.]
The question then recurred upon the substitute offered by Senator 
Underwood. The substitute was adopted.
Senator Thomas offered a motion limiting time and number of speeches. 
Motion carried.
Senator Thomas moved to strike out in line 29, page 8, the words ``other 
than coal mines,'' and on page 9 strike out lines 8, 9 and 10 and the 
first four words of line 11.
Senator Pittman offered a motion which provided a reasonable allowance 
for depletion of metalliferous mines as well as coal mines not to exceed 
the market value of the ore in the mine which has been mined and sold 
during the year for which said return is made.
Senator Shafroth offered a substitute as follows: On page 9, line 8, 
strike out the word ``coal,'' page 9, line 9, strike out the word 
``coal,'' also in line 9 at the end of the line strike out the word 
``coal,'' and insert the word ``material.'' Senator Pittman accepted the 
amendment and the amendment was carried.

Senator Pomerene and Senator Chilton offered the following amendment in 
lieu of the committee amendment with regard to oil and gas wells:

  In the case of oil and gas wells a reasonable allowance for 
  actual reduction in flow and production to be ascertained 
  not by the flush flow, but by the settled production or 
  regular flow under rules and regulations to be prescribed by 
  the Secretary of the Treasury.

Senator Simmons moved that the Income and Inheritance Tax title be 
approved with a reservation to Senator Shafroth to make one amendment. 
Motion carried.
Senator Williams asked unanimous consent to be excused and leave his 
vote with Senator Simmons. Request was granted.
The Caucus took up ``Special Taxes,'' Senator Smith of Georgia having 
the title in charge.
The meeting adjourned until 8 p.m.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Adjourned meeting of Democratic Caucus [reconvened at] 8 p.m., August 
12, 1916.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman Secretary, acting.

Senator Bankhead offered the following amendment which was adopted:

  Sc. 25. That all internal revenue agents and inspectors be 
  granted leave of absence with pay, which shall not be 
  cumulative, not to exceed thirty days in any calendar year, 
  under such regulations as the Commissioner of Internal 
  Revenue, with the approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, 
  may prescribe.

Senator Stone offered the following amendment:

  RESOLVED, That the so-called munitions tax provision of the 
  pending bill; the so-called dyestuffs and chemical 
  provisions of said bill; and that part of the said bill 
  relating to wines, cordials, etc.; the tariff commission 
  provision; be taken up at the meeting tomorrow, the 13th 
  inst., may then determine and that Mr. Keller be directed to 
  proceed immediately to notify Senators of this meeting and 
  its purposes.

After general debate a recess was taken until August 13th at 2 p.m.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

[handwritten resolution attached:]

   RESOLVED, That this Conference of Democratic members of the 
  Senate express its confidence in the leadership of Senator 
  Robinson and his service on the Special Committee named to 
  investigate the alleged secret Mexican documents.

Those present on August 12, [1916]
[PRESENT]
       1    Ashurst
       2    Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
       3    Bryan
       4    Chamberlain
       5    Chilton
            Clarke
       6    Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
       7    Hardwick
            Hitchcock
       8    Hollis
       9    Hughes
      10    Husting
            James
            Johnson of Me.
      11    Johnson of S. Dak.
      12    Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
      13    Lee of Md.
      14    Lewis
            Martin
      15    Martine
      16    Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      17    Overman
            Owen
      18    Phelan
      19    Pittman
      20    Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
      22    Robinson
      23    Saulsbury
      24    Shafroth
      25    Sheppard
            Shields
      26    Simmons
      27    Smith of Ariz.
      28    Smith of Ga.
      29    Smith of Md.
      30    Smith of S.C.
      39    Stone
      31    Swanson
      32    Taggart
      33    Thomas
      40    Thompson
      34    Tillman
      35    Underwood
      36    Vardaman
      37    Walsh
      38    Williams

August 12, 1916
Motion to reconsider action
on the Underwood substitute
[Tally sheet D]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
      Bryan
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
      Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            Husting  
            James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
            Kern     
            Lane
            Lea of Te
            Lee of Md
            Lewis
            Martin   
            Martine
      Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
            Pittman  
      Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
            Robinson
      Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
      Sheppard
            Shields
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of Ga (ex)
      Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Taggart (ex)
            Thomas   
      Thompson
      Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
             Walsh   
            Williams 
      20               16

Roll Call, Aug. 12, 8 p.m.
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
            Husting
            James
            Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
      Lewis
            Martin
      Martine
      Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
            Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
      Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone
            Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas
            Thompson
            Tillman
      Underwood
            Vardaman
      Walsh
            Williams
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 13, 1916]

AUGUST 13, 1916

Adjourned meeting of Democratic Caucus, August 13, 1916, 2 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman Secretary, acting.
A roll call was had and a quorum found present.
Unanimous consent was given that Senator Martin be excused and that his 
vote be cast by Senator Swanson, and that Senator Tillman be excused and 
his vote cast by Senator Overman.
Senator Husting moved to reconsider committee amendment (B), page 48, 
with regard to publicity of income and corporation taxes. Motion lost. 
Senator Husting stated he was pledged on the subject and could not be 
bound by the Caucus.
Senator Thomas in charge of the Munitions title then explained the 
provisions under such title.

Senator Lewis offered the following resolution:

  WHEREAS, The Secretary of the Treasury has under existing 
  law the privilege and right to issue bonds from the 
  authorization for issuing and selling Panama Canal bonds; 
  therefore be it
  RESOLVED, That Panama Canal bonds be sold sufficient to meet 
  any deficiency that may exist between this date and January, 
  1917, and that further consideration of the pending revenue 
  bill be postponed until the December session of Congress, 
  1916.

The Chair ruled that such resolution could not be acted upon until all 
the committee amendments were acted upon and that the resolution would 
lie upon the table until such time.
Senator Williams asked to be excused and that his vote be cast by 
Senator Thomas on all questions except Tariff Commission and Dye Stuff, 
and that on such provisions he be represented by Senator Underwood. 
Request granted.
Senator Underwood moved to strike out all of subdivision 2, section 201.

Senator Simmons offered the following amendment on behalf of the 
committee:

  Insert on page 97, after line 17, the following:

   First, Corporations shall pay 5 cents for each $1,000 of 
  capital, surplus and undivided profits used in any of the 
  activities or functions of their business, including such 
  sums as may be invested in or loaned upon stocks, bonds, 
  mortgages, real estate or other securities. The amount of 
  such annual tax shall in all cases be computed on the basis 
  of the capital, surplus, and undivided profits for the 
  preceding fiscal year. Every corporation, joint stock 
  company or association as defined and limited in Section 10, 
  Title 1, of this Act, shall be liable to this tax. Provided, 
  That for the purpose of this tax an exemption of $50,000 
  shall be allowed from the capital, surplus and undivided 
  profits of each corporation. And Provided further, That 
  corporations actually paying the tax imposed by Section 201 
  of Title III of this act shall be exempt from this tax. 
  Provided that every corporation taxed under subdivision (1) 
  Sec. 201, of this Act shall be exempt from the provisions of 
  this section.

Senator Kern offered an amendment that the figures ``$50,000'' be 
stricken out and that there be inserted in lieu thereof the figures 
``$99,000.'' Motion carried.
Senator Simmons' amendment as amended was then put to a vote and 
unanimously carried.
Senator Simmons then by unanimous consent offered an amendment to 
subdivision (2), section 201, by striking out the word ``ten'' in line 
22 and substituting the word ``five.'' Amendment adopted.
After the adoption of Senator Simmons' amendment, Senator Underwood's 
amendment to strike out subdivision (2) was submitted to a vote. A yea 
and nay vote was demanded with the result of 15 yeas and 20 nays. Those 
voting in the affirmative were as follows: [See also tally sheet E.]




     Ashurst                  Myers                 Smith of S.C.
     Bankhead                 Overman               Taggart
    Chilton                   Pittman               Tillman
    Culberson                 Robinson              Underwood
    Fletcher                  Sheppard
    Hardwick



 Those voting in the negative were as follows:




     Hollis                   Phelan                Swanson
     Hughes                   Pomerene              Thomas
     Husting                  Shafroth              Thompson
     Kern                     Simmons               Walsh
     Lee of Md.               Smith of Ariz.        Williams
     Lewis                    Smith of Ga.
     Martin                   Stone
     Martine


Senator Thomas then moved to amend subdivision (2), section 201, by 
inserting after the word ``selling'' in line 18 the word ``to'' and 
after the word ``manufacturer'' the words ``for any corporation 
described in subdivision (1).'' Amendment adopted.
Meeting adjourned until 8:30 p.m.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Meeting of the Democratic Caucus August 13, 1916, 8:30 p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman Secretary, acting.
Senator Myers moved to amend subdivision (2), section 201, by inserting 
after the word ``manufacturer'' in line 25 the words ``in the United 
States.'' Motion carried.
On motion of Senator Hollis the stamp tax upon telegraph and telephone 
messages was stricken out of the bill. [See tally sheet G.]

Senator Simmons offered the following amendment which was adopted:

  That section 322, Schedule M of the Tariff Act of October 3, 1913, be 
  amended as follows:

   By striking out 2\1/2\ between the words ``above'' and 
  ``cents'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``5,'' and again by 
  striking out the ``2\1/2\'' between the words ``above'' and 
  ``cents'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``5,'' so as to 
  read: ``Valued above 5 cents per pound'' in both instances.

Senator Hughes offered an amendment for the protection of fishermen on 
the Pacific Coast from unjust discrimination by the British government. 
Senator Simmons moved that such amendment be referred to the committee 
with power to adopt the same. Motion carried. Such amendment reads as 
follows:

  Sec. 403. That from and after ninety days after the passage 
  of this Act no fresh or frozen halibut or salmon from the 
  north Pacific Ocean or its tributary waters shall be 
  admitted into the United States through any foreign country, 
  except when the same shall be in bond from an American port.

Senator Simmons moved that the sweet wine schedule be taken up. Motion 
carried.
Senator Hughes moved the adoption of the committee amendment. Senator 
Phelan opposed the same and urged that the committee amendment be not 
adopted and that the House amendment stand.
Senator Vardaman interrupted to ask unanimous consent that his vote be 
recorded in favor of Senator Underwood's motion to strike out 
subdivision (2) of Section 201. Request was granted.
A vote was taken upon Senator Simmons motion. The Chair being in doubt 
called for a division. Seven senators were counted as voting in the 
affirmative and seven in the negative, some senators failing to vote.
Senator Simmons demanded a roll call.
Senator Phelan objected upon the grounds that Senator Smith of Arizona 
had left the Caucus since voting.
The meeting recessed without determination of the question.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

Roll call, Aug. 13, 1916
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
      Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
      Husting
            James
            Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
      Lewis
      Martin (Swanson)
      Martine
      Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury
      Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
            Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone
      Swanson
      Taggart
      Thomas
            Thompson
      Tillman
            Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
      Williams

Vote on taxes on telegrams
[Tally sheet G]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton  
            Clarke
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hardwick 
            Hitchcock
      Hollis
      Hughes
            Husting  
            James
            Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
            Kern (ex)
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md
            Lewis    
            Martin
            Martine  
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman  
            Owen
            Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
            Robinson
            Saulsbury
      Shafroth
            Sheppard 
            Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga (ex)
            Smith of Md
            Smith of 
      Stone
            Swanson
            Taggart  
      Thomas
            Thompson 
            Tillman  
      Underwood
            Vardaman
      Walsh
      Williams
      14               13

Aug. 13 vote on Underwood amendment
to Subdivision (2) S-201
[Tally sheet E]
     YEAS        NAYS
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
      Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            Husting  
            James
            Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
            Kern     
            Lane
            Lea
            Lee      
            Lewis    
            Martin   
            Martine  
      Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
            Phelan   
      Pittman
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell
            Reed
      Robinson
            Saulsbury (ex)
            Shafroth 
      Sheppard
            Shields
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson  
      Taggart
            Thomas   
            Thompson 
      Tillman
      Underwood
            Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
      15               20

Roll call on Underwood amendment
[Tally sheet ??]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
      Bryan
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Clarke
      Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            Husting  
            James
            Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
            Kern     
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md
            Lewis    
            Martin
            Martine  
      Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
            Pittman  
      Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury
            Shafroth 
            Sheppard 
            Shields
            Simmons  
            Smith of 
            Smith of Ga (ex)
      Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson  
            Taggart (ex)
            Thomas   
            Thompson 
      Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
      19               18
____________________________________________________

                                                       [August 14, 1916]

AUGUST 14, 1916

Democratic Caucus, August 14, 1916, 8:30 p.m. Recess from August 13, 
1916.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman secretary acting.
Senator Simmons moved that senators be limited to one speech on each 
question and no speech to exceed ten minutes in duration and that the 
Chair enforce the rule. Motion carried.
On the question of the adoption of the committee amendment on the wine 
schedule in the revenue bill the roll call disclosed 21 votes in the 
affirmative and 8 votes in the negative. The Chair declared the 
amendment adopted.

Senator Phelan offered the following amendment as a substitute to 
Section 301, page 82 of the bill:

  All wines or modified wines hereafter made shall be the 
  product resulting from a single fermentation of ripe grapes 
  or fresh unfermented grape juice, and, under the supervision 
  of a United States gauger, there may be added before 
  fermentation a sugar solution of pure, dry, crystallized 
  cane, or beet, or pure anhydrous sugar containing not less 
  than ninety-seven per centum pure sugar, or of pure grape 
  must, or of pure grape syrup, to said material: Provided, 
  That such addition shall not increase the volume more than 
  twenty-five per centum; so that the resultant product does 
  not contain less than six parts per mill of natural free 
  acid nor more than thirteen per centum of alcohol after 
  complete fermentation; and which resultant product, under 
  the supervision of a gauger or storekeeper in the capacity 
  of gauger, may be sweetened with pure, dry, crystallized 
  cane or beet sugar, or pure anhydrous sugar containing not 
  less than ninety-seven per centum pure sugar, or with grape 
  syrup, and fortified under the provisions of this Act; 
  Provided, That such sweetening shall not increase the volume 
  more than ten per centum; Provided, however, That the 
  fortification of wines authorized in this section shall be 
  permitted only on premises where said wines were made; And 
  provided further, That the said rates of tax shall also 
  apply to and shall be levied and collected on all fermented 
  beverages made in imitation of or sold as wine.

Senator Phelan's amendment was put to a vote and a roll call was 
demanded with the result of nine yeas and fifteen nays. The Chair 
declared the amendment lost.
Senator Pomerene moved an amendment by adding at the end of line 2, page 
96, the following: Provided, however, that nothing herein contained 
shall be construed as prohibiting the fortification of sweet wines by 
the use of grain or any Ethyl alcohol. Amendment adopted.
Senator Lewis moved that the provision with regard to dye stuff be 
referred back to the Finance Committee with instructions to refer it to 
the Tariff Board provided in the Act, with instructions to such Board to 
report thereon to the Senate in December. Motion lost. Committee 
provision concerning dye stuff adopted.
Senator Williams moved to strike out all that part of Title V on page 
105 concerning dye stuffs. Upon a roll call the result was announced as 
Yea 6, Nay 25. The Chair declared the motion lost.
Senator Pittman moved that Sec. 201 and Senate amendment on line 17, 
page 97, providing a tax on corporations, be referred back to Finance 
Committee with power to amend, change or redraft, and to report the same 
directly to the Senate. Motion carried.
Senator Shafroth moved to reconsider the salary of the Tariff 
Commissioner. Motion carried.
Senator Fletcher then moved that the Caucus disregard Senate amendment. 
Motion carried and House provision reinstated.
Senator Lewis' resolution with regard to the dye stuff provision was 
referred to the Finance Committee.
On motion of Senator Simmons the Revenue Bill as amended in Caucus was 
approved.

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 13, 1916]

DECEMBER 13, 1916

Meeting of the Democratic Conference, December 13, 1916.
In the absence of the Chairman and Vice Chairman, Senator Thomas was 
nominated to act as Chairman.
Senator Kern, Senator Hollis and Senator Tillman requested that their 
votes be cast in favor of Senator Saulsbury for President pro tempore. 
The request was unanimously granted.
Senator Ransdell requested that Senator Kern cast his vote in the same 
manner that he himself cast his own vote. The request was granted.
Senator Robinson nominated Senator Saulsbury for President pro tempore 
of the Senate. There being no other nominations, upon motion Senator 
Saulsbury unanimously elected President pro tempore of the Senate.
Senator Saulsbury then arose and expressed his appreciation of the honor 
that had been conferred upon him.
There being no further business, the Conference adjourned.

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, December 13, 1916]
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
      Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Culberson
            Fletcher
            Gore
            Hardwick
      Hitchcock
            Hollis
            Hughes
      Husting
      James
      Johnson of Me
      Johnson of SD
            Kern
      Kirby
            Lane
            Lea
      Lee
            Lewis
      Martin
      Martine
            Myers
      Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
            Ransdell
            Reed
      Robinson
      Saulsbury
            Shafroth
      Sheppard
            Shields
            Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
      Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
            Stone
      Swanson
      Thomas
            Thompson
            Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
            Williams


__________________________________________

                          United States Senate,
                            Washington, D.C.

                                                            Jan. 6, 1917

            Hon. John W. Kern,
            Chairman &c.

Dear Sir:

  We, the undersigned, request you to call a Conference of Democratic 
Senators for the purpose of considering the advisability of preparing a 
legislative program for this session.

                                                           Respectfully,




[signed]             W.J. Bryan                     Harry F. Hollis                W.F. Kirby
                     Wm. Hughes                     T. S. Walsh                    O.W. Underwood
                     F.M. Simmons                   James Reed
                     Key Pittman                    W. Saulsbury
                     Thomas S. Martin               G. Hitchcock


____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 8, 1917]

JANUARY 8, 1917

Minutes of meeting of Democratic Caucus, Jan. 8, 1917.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, acting.
Senator Bryan of Florida stated that he had urged the call of the 
Conference for the purpose of having the Democrats determine whether 
they would control the Senate or whether they would permit the minority 
to dictate legislation.

Senator Hoke Smith of Georgia then offered the following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that we 
  should support the action of the Appropriation and other 
  committees in their effort to prevent increase of 
  appropriations and to make reductions wherever practicable.

Senator Pittman stated that he would not vote upon the resolution or be 
bound by it because such act on his part would be in effect delegating 
legislative authority to the committees named. He stated that he was 
willing to be bound by Caucus rule with regard to any matter that was 
definitely submitted to the committee for action.
Senator Lee of Maryland then offered the following amendment to the 
resolution offered by Senator Smith of Georgia:

  That at the end of the resolution there be added ``Provided, 
  that the proposed increase or decrease does not [a]ffect any 
  constitutional policy to which the member is attached.''

The amendment was lost.
Senator Newlands offered the following amendment to the resolution 
offered by Senator Smith of Georgia:

  That there be added to such resolution the following: ``That 
  the Finance and Appropriations Committees be requested to 
  present, when they are prepared so to do, to the Conference 
  for discussion a statement in general terms of the action 
  which they deem desirable in matters relating to revenue and 
  appropriations.''

The amendment was carried.
The vote then recurred upon the resolution of Senator Smith of Georgia 
as amended. The resolution was declared by the Chair to have been 
adopted by a viva voce vote.
Discussion was then had with regard to a legislative program. It was the 
consensus of opinion that the action of the Democratic Conference at the 
last session giving priority consideration to the General Leasing Bill, 
Western Water Power Bill, and the Corrupt Practices Act, should be 
respected by the Democrats. A discussion took place with regard to the 
priority of these measures.
Senator Walsh thereupon moved: ``That it is the sense of this Caucus 
that the Myers Water Power bill should tomorrow be urged for 
consideration and that the effort to secure such be persisted in until 
it is disposed of.''
The resolution was carried.
The Conference adjourned.

                                                               Secretary

Jan. 8, 1917, Roll Call
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
      Beckham (Chairman cast 
              vote)
            Broussard
      Bryan
      Chamberlain
      Chilton
            Culberson
      Fletcher
            Gore
      Hardwick
      Hitchcock
            Hollis
            Hughes
            Husting
      James
      Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
      Kern
            Kirby
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
      Lee of Md.
      Lewis
            Martin
            Martine
      Myers
            Newlands
      O'Gorman
      Overman
      Owen
            Phelan
      Pittman
            Pomerene
            Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson
            Saulsbury
      Shafroth
      Sheppard (Chairman cast 
              vote)
      Shields
      Simmons
      Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
            Stone
      Swanson
      Thomas
            Thompson
            Tillman
      Underwood
            Vardaman
      Walsh
            Williams
      28
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 25, 1917]

JANUARY 25, 1917

Meeting of Democratic Caucus, January 25th, 1917.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, Acting.
Upon the roll call the chairman announced a quorum as present.
By unanimous consent the following Senators were excused and permitted 
to cast their votes through the Senators whose names are set after 
theirs, namely: Chamberlain by Walsh; Culberson by Sheppard; Kern by 
Reed; Myers by Walsh; Robinson by Overman; Stone by Reed; Thomas by 
Shafroth; Williams by Kern.

Senator Williams, on behalf of the Steering Committee, offered the 
following motion:

  That the bills be taken up in the following order: (1) 
  Corrupt Practice Bill. (2) Flood Prevention Bill. (3) 
  Railroad Bills. (4) Webb Bill. (5) Porto Rican Bill. (6) 
  Land Leasing Bill, provided an agreement is reached on the 
  bill by the Cabinet Officers. Provided, that any of the 
  above bills shall be temporarily laid aside for 
  Appropriation Revenue Bills and Conference Reports.

In reply to an inquiry by Senator Walsh, it was agreed that the program 
should not interfere with the unfinished business which is the Water 
Power Bill.
Senator Newlands moved that the Railroad Bill be placed first on the 
program. Other Senators urged that particular measures in which they 
were in charge of be given precedence on the program. After extended 
discussion none of the foregoing motions were acted upon and by 
unanimous consent a motion by Senator Simmons that the whole matter of a 
program be referred back to the Steering Committee, was adopted.
Senator Shafroth called attention to the fact that the Manitou Spring 
Water Company of Colorado had furnished the Caucus with a case of its 
ginger ale with the compliments of the company and moved that the 
appreciation of the Caucus be expressed to the company. The motion was 
carried.
There being no further business before the Caucus, on motion, 
adjournment was had sine die.

                                                               Secretary

Jan. 25th, 1917, Roll Call
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bankhead
      Beckham
      Broussard
      Bryan
      Chamberlain (Walsh)
            Chilton
      Culberson (by Sheppard)
      Fletcher
            Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis
            Hughes
      Husting
      James
            Johnson of Me
            Johnson of SD
      Kern (Reed)
            Kirby
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md.
      Lewis
            Martin
      Martine
      Myers (Walsh)
      Newlands
            O'Gorman
      Overman
            Owen
      Phelan
      Pittman
      Pomerene
      Ransdell
      Reed
      Robinson (Vardaman)
      Saulsbury
      Shafroth
      Sheppard
      Shields
            Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
      Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
      Smith of S.C.
      Stone (Reed)
            Swanson
      Thomas (by Shafroth)
            Thompson
            Tillman
      Underwood
      Vardaman
      Walsh
      Williams (Kern)
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 9, 1917]

FEBRUARY 9, 1917

Democratic Caucus, Friday, February 9th, 8:25 p.m.
Caucus called to order at 8:25 p.m.
Senator Sheppard was chosen to act as Temporary Secretary.
Senators Kern and Robinson were excused, and Senator Simmons was 
authorized to cast their votes.
Senator Husting was excused and Senator Walsh authorized to cast his 
vote.
The Chairman (Senator Chilton) ordered the roll to be called. During its 
progress a motion was made by Senator Martin to dispense with the roll 
call. Motion adopted.
Senator Simmons submitted and explained proposal of Finance Committee, 
as embodied in the bill, H.R. 20573, with amendments added by said 
Committee.
Senator Thomas submitted a substitute providing for an issue of 5 
hundred millions of non-interest bearing Treasury notes, payable in 
1935. The notes are made legal tender, and are to be paid out by the 
government in the discharge of its obligations.
Senator Reed was excused and Senator Smith of Georgia authorized to cast 
his vote.
Senator Pittman was excused and Senator Hollis of New Hampshire 
authorized to cast his vote.
Senator Thomas asked for the roll call on his substitute.
Roll call on the Thomas substitute resulted as follows:

   YEAS----3

Martine
Thomas
Vardaman


  

  NAYS----31

Chilton                       Fletcher                      Hardwick                      Hitchcock
Hollis                        Hughes                        Husting                       James
Johnson, Me.                  Kern                          Lea, Tenn.                    Lee, Md.
Lewis                         Martin                        Myers                         Overman
Phelan                        Pittman                       Pomerene                      Reed
Robinson                      Saulsbury                     Shafroth                      Sheppard
Shields                       Simmons                       Smith, Ga.                    Smith, S.C.
Stone                         Walsh                         Williams


  

   NOT VOTING----21




 Ashurst                      Bankhead                      Beckham                       Broussard
 Bryan                        Chamberlain                   Culberson                     Gore
 Johnson, S.D.                Kirby                         Lane                          Newlands
 O'Gorman                     Owen                          Ransdell                      Smith, Ariz.
 Smith, Md.                   Swanson                       Thompson                      Tillman
 Underwood


 The Chairman declared the substitute lost.
Senator Overman moved that the bill, H.R. 20573 be recommitted to the 
Finance Committee with instructions to report a bill providing a bond 
issue sufficient to cover all revenues contemplated by Committee in its 
report of the bill, H.R. 20573, and doing away with all additional taxes 
provided by said bill.
Senator James was excused and Senator Simmons authorized to cast his 
vote.
Senator Thomas moved that the Caucus adjourn until 8 o'clock Saturday 
evening, February 10th. Senator Thomas withdrew this motion, and moved 
that a recess be taken until 8 o'clock Saturday evening, February 10th. 
This he also withdrew.
Senator Simmons asked unanimous consent that Senator Overman's motion be 
disposed at not later than 10 p.m., February 10th.
Senator Shafroth moved to substitute 11 p.m., February 10th. Carried and 
Caucus adjourned until 8 o'clock, Saturday evening, February 10th.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 10, 1917]

FEBRUARY 10, 1917

Meeting of the Democratic Caucus, Feb. 10th, 1917.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, Acting.
Upon roll call a quorum was declared by the Chair to be present.
Senator Reed asked that Senator Stone cast his vote. Senator Tillman 
asked that Senator Thomas cast his vote. By unanimous consent such 
requests were granted.
Senator Overman offered an amendment providing for the raising of the 
necessary revenues by the issue of bonds as a substitute for the Excess 
Profit Tax. Upon a roll call on the Overman amendment the yeas were five 
and the nays thirty-two. The Chair declared the motion lost. Copy of 
roll call is attached to these minutes. [See tally sheet H.]
Senator Shields asked unanimous consent that the bill be deemed read 
except as to committee amendments and that such amendments be read and 
acted upon. The request was agreed to.
Senator Thomas offered the following amendment, in lieu of committee 
amendment at lines 15-18, page 3, by inserting after the word 
``organized,'' the following: ``Except income derived from the business 
of insurance companies issuing policies upon the mutual plan.''
Senator James offered as an amendment to the amendment of Senator Thomas 
by inserting before the word ``insurance'' the word ``life.'' On a viva 
voce vote the Chair declared the amendment of Senator James lost. The 
question then recurred upon Senator Thomas' amendment. Upon a viva voce 
vote the Chair declared the amendment lost.

Senator Hoke Smith offered the following amendment:

  At page 5, line 7, after the word sixteen, insert, 
  ``provided that in the case of insurance companies there 
  shall not be included in the income used as a basis, any 
  sums apportioned or accruing to policy holders.''

Upon a viva voce vote the Chair declared the amendment lost.

Senator Lea of Tennessee offered the following amendment:

  At page 5, line 4, after the title, insert, ``provided that 
  in the case of insurance companies there shall not be 
  included in the income used as a basis, any sums apportioned 
  and paid to policy holders.''

Upon a viva voce vote the motion was declared lost.
The Chair then announced that the question recurred upon the committee 
amendment. Upon a viva voce vote the amendment was declared agreed to.
Senator Simmons asked unanimous consent that Section 204 be referred 
back to the Finance Committee. The request was agreed to.
Senator Smith of South Carolina moved to take a recess until 10:30 
o'clock, a.m., Sunday. Motion lost.
Senator Chamberlain reserved the right to offer upon the floor of the 
Senate an amendment dealing with the fishery question in the North 
Pacific.
The Caucus agreed to all the committee amendments with the exception of 
Section 204 which was referred back to the Finance Committee and section 
500 of Title 5, known as the Oleomargarine Tax, said Section 500 dealing 
with such tax was, by unanimous agreement, permitted to remain in the 
bill, but with the understanding that it was without Caucus action and 
that no member of the Caucus, including members of the Finance 
Committee, be bound to support such amendment or be obligated in any way 
to refrain from taking any action with regard thereto.
Thereupon, the Caucus recessed until 3:00 o'clock, p.m., Sunday, 
February 11th, 1917.

Roll Call, Dem. Conference,
Feb. 10, 1917
[PRESENT]
     Ashurst
             Bankhead
     Beckham
            Broussard
     Bryan
     Chamberlain
     Chilton
            Culberson
     Fletcher
            Gore
     Hardwick (Overman)
            Hitchcock
     Hollis
     Hughes
     Husting
     James (Hughes)
     Johnson of Me
     Johnson of SD
     Kern (Walsh)
     Kirby
            Lane
     Lea of Tenn.
     Lee of Md.
     Lewis
            Martin
     Martine
     Myers
     Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
     Phelan
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed (Stone)
     Robinson (Simmons)
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
     Smith of S.C.
     Stone
            Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
     Tillman (Thomas)
            Underwood
            Vardaman
     Walsh
     Williams

Roll Call on Motion
[Tally sheet H]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
            Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan    
            Chamberla
     Chilton
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
     Hardwick (Overman)
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes   
            Husting  
            James    
            Johnson o
            Johnson o
            Kern     
            Kirby    
            Lane
     Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md
            Lewis    
            Martin   
            Martine  
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
     Overman
            Owen
            Phelan    
            Pittman   
            Pomerene  
            Ransdell  
            Reed (St  
            Robinson  )
            Saulsbury
            Shafroth  
            Sheppard  
            Shields   
            Simmons   
            Smith of Ariz
            Smith of  
            Smith of Md
     Smith of S.C.
            Stone     
            Swanson
            Thomas    
            Thompson
            Tillman   
            Underwood
            Vardaman
            Walsh     
            Williams  
       5                32
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 11, 1917]

FEBRUARY 11, 1917

Postponed meeting of Democratic Caucus, Feb. 11th, 1917, at 3:00 
o'clock, p.m.
Senator Kern in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, Acting.
Senator Simmons, on behalf of the Finance Committee, recommended that 
the Caucus authorize such committee to add an additional section to the 
bill limiting the operation of the provisions for a tax on excess 
profits to a period of four years. Upon such motion the recommendation 
of the Finance Committee was adopted and the committee authorized to 
prepare and add such additional section to the bill.
Senator Saulsbury urged that in view of the provision for an excess 
profit tax, the munitions tax of 12\1/2\% provided in the last Revenue 
Bill, should be repealed. That to maintain such tax was discriminatory 
and unjust to the people of the state of Delaware.
Senator Simmons, on behalf of the Finance Committee, recommended that 
such committee be authorized and directed to provide in the bill an 
amendment to the munitions tax, limiting the operation of such tax to a 
period of six months after peace shall have been declared in Europe. 
Upon motion such recommendation was adopted and the committee was 
authorized as suggested.

Senator Lewis offered the following amendment:

   RESOLVED, That the Finance Committee be authorized to 
  consider if it be appropriate and practicable to attach to 
  the Revenue Law--now to be submitted to the Senate by the 
  Interstate Commerce Commission--that bill lately passed the 
  House for encouragement of Export Trade--known as the ``Webb 
  Bill''-- and report their conclusion on this point to the 
  Senate.

Upon a vote being had the amendment was declared by the Chair to be 
lost.
Senator Shields offered an amendment as a substitute for the tax upon 
excess profits providing for an increased tax upon liquors, cigars and 
cigarettes. The following discussion was had upon the amendment:
Senator Shields presented statistics showing that his amendment would 
raise the necessary revenue and that such form of a tax would not be 
either as burdensome or as obnoxious to a majority of the people of the 
country as would be the excess profits tax.
Senator Simmons, on behalf of the Finance Committee, took issue with 
Senator Shields. Senator Simmons opposed the amendment upon two grounds. 
First, that the Commissioner of Internal Revenue had given it as his 
opinion that an increased tax upon such articles would be impracticable 
and that the amount of revenue actually collected under it would 
probably be only one-third of the estimate. Second, that the Finance 
Committee was satisfied that no such provision would be agreed to by the 
House of Representatives and that time was too short to experiment in 
the passage of such provision.
A yea and nay vote was demanded. Upon a roll call the yeas were seven 
and the nays twenty-three, as shown by the attached record of such roll 
call. The Chair declared the amendment lost. [See tally sheet I.]
Senator Thomas moved that the committee be directed to modify the tax 
upon excess profits so as to exempt purely holding companies. The motion 
was lost.

Senator Thomas offered an amendment in the form of an additional section 
known as Section 601, in words as follows:

   Sec. 601. If any clause, sentence, paragraph or part of 
  this Act shall for any reason be adjudged by any Court of 
  competent jurisdiction to be invalid such judgment shall not 
  affect, impair or invalidate the remainder of said Act, but 
  shall be confined in its operation to the clause, sentence, 
  paragraph or part thereof directly involved in the 
  controversy in which such judgment shall have been rendered.

The amendment was adopted.
Senator Simmons, on behalf of the Finance Committee, reported back to 
the Caucus, Section 204, amended by striking out all of the section 
after the word ``services'' in line 2, page 6. The section so amended 
was adopted.
Senator Underwood requested that the action of the Caucus on the 
preceding day with reference to the oleomargarine provision be restated, 
whereupon Senator Williams of the Finance Committee stated the action 
taken as follows:

  By unanimous consent it was agreed that the oleomargarine 
  provision be left in the bill but that there be no Caucus 
  action thereon and that each Senator be at liberty to act as 
  he sees fit with regard to such amendment.

Senator Simmons moved that the Caucus approve and endorse the bill as 
amended, subject to express reservations agreed to in the Caucus. The 
motion carried. Thereupon the Caucus adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, Feb. 11, 1917
on Shields' amendment
[Tally sheet I]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst
            Bankhead
            Beckham
            Broussard
            Bryan
            Chamberlain
            Chilton
            Culberson
            Fletcher 
            Gore
            Hardwick
            Hitchcock
            Hollis   
            Hughes (S
            Husting  
            James    
            Johnson o
            Johnson o
            Kern     
     Kirby
            Lane
            Lea of Tenn.
            Lee of Md
            Lewis    
            Martin   
     Martine
            Myers
            Newlands
            O'Gorman
            Overman
            Owen
            Phelan
            Pittman  
            Pomerene 
            Ransdell 
            Reed (Sto
            Robinson 
     Saulsbury
            Shafroth
            Sheppard 
     Shields
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz
            Smith of 
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
            Stone    
            Swanson
     Thomas
            Thompson
            Tillman
     Underwood
     Vardaman
            Walsh    
            Williams 
       7               23
                     Sixty-fifth Congress (1917-1919)

   [Editor's Note: In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson won a narrow 
reelection, while Senate Democrats lost two seats in the 1916 election, 
retaining their majority by a 54 to 42 margin, and House Democrats lost 
their majority by a single vote of 215 to 214, with six independents. 
Among those defeated in the election was the Senate Democratic 
Conference Chairman, John Worth Kern. To replace him, Democratic 
Senators elected Thomas S. Martin of Virginia, chairman of the 
Appropriations Committee, who had previously served as Conference chair 
from 1911 to 1913.
  In the closing days of the 64th Congress, in March 1917, a group of 
anti-war senators conducted a filibuster against a bill to arm the U.S. 
merchant marine. The Wilson administration sponsored the Armed Ship bill 
to defend America's neutral rights on the Atlantic while Europe was at 
war. Isolationist senators, led by such progressive Republicans as 
Robert La Follette and George Norris, but also including such Democrats 
as William Stone, James K. Vardaman, and James O'Gorman, saw the bill as 
a blank check permitting the executive to lead the nation into an 
undeclared war. When the filibuster prevented the bill from passing, an 
outraged President Wilson denounced the ``little group of wilful men'' 
who had ``rendered the great government of the United States helpless 
and contemptible.'' Wilson insisted that the only remedy would be for 
the Senate to adopt its first cloture rule to cut off debate. He also 
announced that the Senate would have to act on the cloture rule before 
he called the entire Congress into special session to deal with the war 
emergency.
  The Senate met in special session beginning on March 5, 1917, and a 
bipartisan committee drafted a new rule. It took just six hours for the 
Senate to debate the issue on March 8, before voting 76 to 3 for a 
cloture rule. Wilson then called Congress into session on April 2, 1917, 
the date on which he appeared before a joint session to urge Congress to 
declare war against Germany and its allies.]
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 6, 1917]

MARCH 6, 1917

Minutes of the Democratic Caucus held in the office of Senator Simmons 
([Finance] Committee) at Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, March 6, 1917, at 
10 o'clock, a.m.
Upon motion, Senator Saulsbury was elected chairman pro tem, and Senator 
Pittman was elected secretary pro tem.

A roll call of the Democratic Senators showed the following present:

  Ashurst                     Johnson of S.D.                Pittman                         Swanson
  Bankhead                    Jones of N.M.                   Pomerene                       Thomas
  Beckham                     Kendrick                       Reed of Missouri                Thompson
  Broussard                   King                           Ransdell                        Tillman
  Chamberlain                 Kirby                           Robinson                        Trammell
  Culberson                   Lewis                          [Saulsbury]                      Underwood
  Fletcher                    McKellar                       Shafroth                        Vardaman
  Gore                        Martin                         Shepherd                        Walsh
  Hitchcock                    Myers                          Shields                         Williams
  Hollis                      Newlands                       Smith of Ariz.                   Wolcott
  Hughes                      Overman                        Smith of Ga.
  Husting                     Owen                           Smith of Md.
  James                       Phelen                         Smith of S.C.


Senator Saulsbury stated that the object of the meeting was to effect an 
organization of the Democratic senators and to consider such matters as 
might properly come before the meeting.
Upon motion, the Conference proceeded to the election of a chairman of 
the Democratic Caucus. The names of Senators Martin and Walsh were 
presented and various speeches made in behalf of each. Senator Martin 
was elected as Democratic leader and Chairman of the Democratic Caucus.
Senator Saulsbury surrendered the chair to Senator Martin who expressed 
his thanks for the honor conferred upon him and promised to discharge 
the duties of leader and chairman of the Caucus to the best of his 
ability. He asked the support of all Senators and hoped that the 
Senators would work harmoniously together for the welfare of the 
country. He stated that important problems and questions were before the 
coming Congress and that it would need the greatest wisdom and the 
highest patriotism upon the part of all in order that the best interests 
of the country be subserved.
Upon motion of Senator Pittman, Senator King was unanimously chosen as 
Secretary of the Caucus. Senator King thereupon assumed the duties of 
Secretary.

  [Editor's Note.--The following additional minute for the March 6, 1917 
meeting was submitted by the outgoing caucus secretary, Key Pittman.]

Democratic Caucus, March 6, 1917.
Vice Chairman Senator Chilton in the Chair, Senator Pittman, Secretary, 
acting.
Senator Myers was unanimously elected Temporary Chairman.
Senator Hoke Smith nominated Senator Martin for Permanent Chairman. The 
nomination was seconded by Senators Tillman, Owen, Smith of South 
Carolina, and Simmons. There being no other nominations, Senator Martin, 
upon notice, was unanimously elected by acclamation.
Senator James moved that the Chairman appoint a Steering Committee of 
nine members. Motion carried.
Senator Pittman was nominated for Secretary but respectfully declined 
the nomination.
Senator Reed thereupon nominated Senator King of Utah for such office. 
There being no other nomination, upon motion of Senator Owen, Senator 
King was unanimously elected by acclamation.
There being no further business before the meeting, the same adjourned.

                                                    [signed] Key Pittman

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Continuation of minutes of Democratic Caucus held at the office of 
Senator Simmons in the Senate Office Building at 10:30 a.m., Senator 
Martin presiding.
Senator Robinson presented the name of Senator Saulsbury for President 
pro tempore for the Senate. Senator Walsh's name was presented for the 
same position by Senator Thomas. Pending action upon the nominations, 
the Caucus at 11:45 a.m. upon motion of Senator Reed recessed until 
after the adjournment of the Senate this p.m.
At 3:45 p.m. the Caucus convened, Senator Martin presiding. Senator Reed 
reported that Senator [Henry Cabot] Lodge [Republican, Massachusetts] 
had advised him that the Republican Senators had met in Caucus, and 
would name a committee to confer with a committee to be named by the 
Democratic Senators, for the purpose of considering the question of 
revising the rules of the Senate. Thereupon, Senator Reed offered the 
following resolution which upon motion was unanimously adopted:

  RESOLVED, That a committee of five be appointed on the 
  Senate Rules. Said committee shall confer with a similar 
  committee from the Republican Caucus, if one be by it 
  appointed. In any event the committee shall report to this 
  Conference at the earliest possible day.

The resolution was unanimously agreed to.
Senators Hardwick, Smith of Georgia, Williams and Shafroth each offered 
resolutions relating to Senate Rules, and on motion of each tendering 
Senator, each resolution was referred, without reading or debate, to the 
committee provided for in the resolution offered by Senator Reed.
The Chairman named Senator Reed to informally advise Senator Lodge and 
the Republican Senators in Caucus that the Democratic Caucus had 
authorized the Chairman to name a committee of five Senators to confer 
with a similar committee to be appointed by the Republican Caucus, to 
consider the question of revising the Rules of the Senate.
Senator Walsh asked that his name be withdrawn and not considered as a 
candidate for the position of President pro tempore of the Senate. Upon 
motion of Senator Shields, Senator Saulsbury was named by acclamation as 
President pro tempore of the Senate.
Upon motion of Senator Simmons, Senator Lewis was named by acclamation 
as Democratic Whip of the Senate.
The Chairman announced as the Democratic members of the committee on the 
revision of the Senate Rules, Senators Reed, Owen, Swanson, Smith of 
Georgia and James.
The question of naming a Vice Chairman of the Democratic Caucus was 
considered, and upon motion of Senator Williams the further 
consideration of the subject was postponed.
Senator Williams nominated Charles P. Higgins for the position of 
Sergeant at Arms of the Senate. Upon motion, Colonel Higgins was 
unanimously named. Upon motion of Senator Shafroth, J.M. Baker of S.C. 
was unanimously selected for the position of Secretary of the Senate. 
Thomas W. Keller of West Va., upon motion of Senator Smith of Maryland, 
was named, by acclamation, for the position of Head Doorkeeper. Rev. 
F.J. Prettyman was, by acclamation, named for the position of Chaplain 
of the Senate.
Senator Overman moved that a committee be appointed by the Chairman, to 
consider the question of patronage to be given to the Senators, and to 
allot the same. Senator Hardwick moved as an amendment to Senator 
Overman's motion that the members of the present Democratic Committee on 
patronage be authorized to act in the matter, and to determine the 
patronage to be given Senators, and to allot to each Senator his 
proportion of the same. The amendment was agreed to and the motion as 
amended was adopted.
On motion of Senator Thomas, a recess was taken until 10:30 a.m., March 
7, 1917.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                Wednesday, March 7, 1917

MARCH 7, 1917

Minutes of meeting of the Democratic Caucus held at the office of 
Senator Simmons in the Senate Office Building at 11 a.m., Wed., March 7, 
1917, [Chairman] Martin presiding. The Chairman announced the presence 
of a quorum with a roll-call.
Senator Hardwick moved that nothing concerning the proceedings of the 
Democratic Caucuses be given out to the Press or otherwise, except by 
the Chairman or such persons as he might designate, and except that the 
Secretary may give out any recorded vote, and any Senator may make 
public his position on any recorded vote. The motion was unanimously 
agreed to.
The Chairman stated that he had added Senator Walsh to the committee on 
Revision of the Senate Rules, though the resolution authorized the 
naming of but five Senators, and asked that the Caucus ratify and 
approve his act. Upon motion, the act of the Chairman was ratified and 
the committee thus constituted consisted of the following: Senators 
Reed, Swanson, Owen, James, Smith of Georgia and Walsh.
It was moved by Senator Overman that a steering committee consisting of 
nine Senators be appointed by the Chair, and that the Chairman (Senator 
Martin) be a member of such committee, and ex officio Chairman thereof. 
The motion was unanimously adopted.
Senator Reed read a letter from Senator Stone giving his views on a 
cloture rule, and requested that because of being unavoidably detained 
from the Caucus, that Senator Reed be permitted to cast his vote. Upon 
motion, the request was granted. Senator Husting was excused from 
further attendance upon the Caucus.
Senator Sheppard moved that the Steering Committee be authorized and 
directed to prepare a list of committees at the earliest convenient day 
and report the same back to the Caucus. The motion was unanimously 
agreed to.
Senator Reed reported progress by the Committee, appointed by the 
Democratic and Republican Senators, on Revision of the Rules.
The Chair announced as members of the Steering Committee, Senators 
Martin, James, Williams, Reed, Swanson, Smith of Georgia, Thomas, 
Chamberlain, Overman and Robinson. The Chair called attention to the 
fact that the Steering Committee as announced consisted of ten members, 
one more than was authorized by the Caucus, and requested that the 
Steering Committee be increased so as to include the number named by 
him. Thereupon, Senator Myers moved that the Steering Committee consist 
of ten members, and that the action of the Chairman in the matter be 
approved. The motion was unanimously agreed to.
Senator Hardwick moved that the Caucus proceed to the selection of a 
Vice Chairman of the Democratic Caucus. The motion was agreed to. 
Thereupon, Senator Hardwick moved that Senator Hitchcock be elected as 
Vice Chairman of the Democratic Caucus, and that as such Vice Chairman 
he be ex officio a member of the [Democratic] Steering Committee. The 
motion was unanimously agreed to.
Upon motion of Senator Thomas, the Caucus stood in recess until 3 p.m. 
this day.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary


__________________________________________

Democratic Conference convened pursuant to former action at 3 p.m. 
(Wednesday, March 7, 1917), Chairman Martin presiding.
Senator Smith of Georgia reported (orally) that the two committees, 
appointed by the Democratic and Republican caucuses, had met, and after 
full discussion had agreed to recommend to their respective caucuses 
that Senate Rule 22 be amended, by adding at the close of the same the 
following:

  Provided, however, That if at any time a motion, signed by 
  sixteen Senators, to bring to a close the debate upon any 
  pending measure, is presented to the Senate, the presiding 
  officer shall at once state the motion to the Senate, and 
  one hour after the Senate meets on the following calendar 
  day but one, he shall lay the motion before the Senate and 
  direct that the Secretary call the roll, and upon 
  ascertainment that a quorum is present, the presiding 
  officer shall, without debate, submit to the Senate by an 
  aye-and-nay vote the question: ``Is it the sense of the 
  Senate that the debate shall be brought to a close?''
  And if that question shall be decided in the affirmative by 
  a two-thirds vote of those voting, then said measure shall 
  be the unfinished business to the exclusion of all other 
  business until disposed of. Thereafter no Senator shall be 
  entitled to speak in all more than [one] hour on the pending 
  measure, the amendments thereto, and motions affecting the 
  same, and it shall be the duty of the presiding officer to 
  keep the time of each Senator who speaks. Except by 
  unanimous consent, no amendment shall be in order after the 
  vote to bring the debate to a close, unless the same has 
  been presented and read prior to that time. No dilatory 
  amendment, or amendment not germane, shall be in order. 
  Points of order, including question of relevancy, and 
  appeals from the decision of the presiding officer, shall be 
  decided without debate.

Senator Smith moved the adoption of the report, and that Senate Rule 22 
be amended as recommended by the Committee.

Pending debate, Senator Pomerene moved to amend the proposed amendment, 
submitted by the Committee to Rule 22, by adding thereto the following:

  Provided, however, that during the last twelve days of the 
  session, debate may be further limited or concluded as a 
  two-thirds vote of the Senate may determine, and that a 
  motion for said purpose be voted upon without debate.

The amendment was rejected.

Senator Hughes submitted the following proposed amendment to Rule 22 and 
moved its reference to the Joint Committee on amendments to the Rule:

  After a bill shall have been reported to the Senate from the 
  Committee of the Whole, there shall be permitted a motion 
  for the Previous Question, after which no Senator shall, 
  without unanimous [consent], speak for more than one hour on 
  the bill or more than ten minutes on any amendment, and that 
  all such debate shall be pertinent and relevant to the 
  question under discussion.

The motion was agreed to and the resolution was referred to the Joint 
Committee.
After further discussion, the motion of Senator Smith of Georgia was 
unanimously adopted.
During the progress of the meeting Senator Shields was excused, leaving 
his proxy with Senator McKellar, and Senator Kirby was excused, leaving 
his proxy with the Chairman.
Upon motion, the Conference was adjourned subject to the call of the 
Chairman.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                  Monday, March 12, 1917

MARCH 12, 1917

Minutes of a meeting of the Democratic Caucus, held in the office of 
Senator Simmons in the Senate Office Building, pursuant to the call of 
the Chairman at 10:30 a.m., March 12, 1917. Chairman Martin called the 
meeting to order and announced the presence of a quorum without calling 
a roll.
Chairman Martin reported on behalf of the Steering Committee that the 
Committee had met and had assigned the Senators to the various 
committees provided by the rules of the Senate, and that such committee 
assignments were as follows:

                             Tentative Print
                    COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENT OF SENATORS
                          SIXTY-FIFTH CONGRESS
                               ----------
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             March 12, 1917

 MR. ASHURST............................  Indian Affairs, chairman
                                           Census
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Cuban Relations
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. BANKHEAD............................  Post Offices and Post Roads,
                                           chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Commerce
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Standards, Weights and
                                           Measures
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

MR. BECKHAM.............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Labor, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands
                                          Library
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Philippines
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine

MR. BROUSSARD...........................  National Banks, chairman
                                          Census
                                          Claims
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Library
                                          Manufactures
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Rules

MR. CHAMBERLAIN.........................  Military Affairs, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Appropriations
                                          Commerce
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Public Lands
                                          Revision of the Laws of the
                                           United States (Joint)

MR. CULBERSON...........................  Judiciary, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine

MR. FLETCHER............................  Commerce, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Fisheries
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Judiciary
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Philippines
                                          Printing
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine

MR. GERRY...............................  Railroads, chairman
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Commerce
                                          Finance
                                          Immigration
                                          National Banks
                                          Naval Affairs

MR. GORE................................  Agriculture and Forestry,
                                           chairman
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture
                                          Finance
                                          Immigration
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Patents

MR. HARDWICK............................  Industrial Expositions,
                                           chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Census
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Labor
                                          Immigration
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. HITCHCOCK...........................  Philippines, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Territories

MR. HOLLIS..............................  Enrolled Bills, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Final Disposition of Documents
                                          Pensions
                                          Woman Suffrage

MR. HUGHES..............................  Pensions, chairman
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          Finance
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Standards, Weights, and
                                           Measures
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. HUSTING.............................  Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Cuban Relations
                                          Fisheries
                                          Immigration
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Public Lands
                                          Revision of the Laws of the
                                           United States

MR. JAMES...............................  Patents, chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Enrolled Bills
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Finance
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Rules

MR. JOHNSON of South Dakota.............  Revolutionary Claims, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Claims
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Immigration
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Pensions

MR. JONES of New Mexico.................  Woman Suffrage, chairman
                                          Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Finance
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Manufactures
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Public Lands

MR. KENDRICK............................  Canadian Relations, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Territories

MR. KING................................  Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department, chairman
                                          Census
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department
                                          Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands
                                          Judiciary
                                          Pensions
                                          Privileges and Elections

MR. KIRBY...............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture, chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Claims
                                          Commerce
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Final Disposition of Documents
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          Patents

MR. LANE................................  Fisheries, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Territories

MR. LEWIS...............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of State, chairman
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures
                                          National Banks
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Printing
                                          Railroads

MR. McKELLAR............................  Civil Service and
                                           Retrenchment, chairman
                                          Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate
                                          Census
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Library
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. MARTIN..............................  Appropriations, chairman
                                          Commerce
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the Naval
                                           Department
                                          Final Disposition of Documents
                                          Fisheries
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

MR. MYERS...............................  Public Lands, chairman
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Military Affairs

MR. NEWLANDS............................  Interstate Commerce, chairman
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Library
                                          Revolutionary Claims

MR. OVERMAN.............................  Rules, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Commerce
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Judiciary
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. OWEN................................  Banking and Currency, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Territories
                                          Rules
                                          Woman Suffrage

MR. PHELAN..............................  Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands, chairman
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pensions
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Lands
                                          Territories

MR. PITTMAN.............................  Territories, chairman
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Public Lands

MR. POMERENE............................  Privileges and Elections,
                                           chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures

MR. RANSDELL............................  Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Commerce
                                          Immigration
                                          Philippines
                                          Printing
                                          Public Lands
                                          Woman Suffrage

MR. REED................................  Manufactures, chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Commerce
                                          Judiciary
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Philippines
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Railroads

MR. ROBINSON............................  Claims, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Census
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Pacific Railroad
                                          Printing
                                          Revision of the Laws of the
                                           United States (Joint)

MR. SAULSBURY...........................  Coast and Insular Survey,
                                           chairman
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. SHAFROTH............................  Pacific Islands and Porto
                                           Rico, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of State
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Lands
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products

MR. SHEPPARD............................  Census, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Commerce
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Revolutionary Claims
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

MR. SHIELDS.............................  Interoceanic Canals, chairman
                                          Commerce
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Labor
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          Standards, Weights, and
                                           Measures
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. SIMMONS.............................  Finance, chairman
                                          Commerce
                                          Engrossed Bills
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products

MR. SMITH of Arizona....................  Printing, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Public Lands
                                          Railroads

MR. SMITH of Georgia....................  Education and Labor, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Finance
                                          Judiciary
                                          Rules

MR. SMITH of Maryland...................  District of Columbia, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department
                                          Naval Affairs

MR. SMITH of South Carolina.............  Immigration, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures
                                          Patents
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Railroads

MR. STONE...............................  Foreign Relations, chairman
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of State
                                          Finance
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          Pacific Railroads

MR. SWANSON.............................  Public Buildings and Grounds,
                                           chairman
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads

MR. THOMAS..............................  Coast Defenses, chairman
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Finance
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Private Land Claims

MR. THOMPSON............................  Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate, chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Pensions
                                          Philippines
                                          Privileges and Elections

MR. TILLMAN.............................  Naval Affairs, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Expenditures in the Navy
                                           Department
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products

MR. TRAMMELL............................  Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department, chairman
                                          Claims
                                          Engrossed Bills
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico

MR. UNDERWOOD...........................  Cuban Relations, chairman
                                          Appropriations
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Rules

MR. VARDAMAN............................  Conservation of National
                                           Resources, chairman
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Commerce
                                          Manufactures
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

MR. WALSH...............................  Mines and Mining, chairman
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Judiciary
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pensions
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Territories

MR. WILLIAMS............................  Library, chairman
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department
                                          Finance
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Railroads
                                          Rules
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. WOLCOTT.............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Commerce, chairman
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Claims
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Fisheries
                                          Judiciary
                                          Privileges and Elections
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Saulsbury moved that the report of the committee and the 
assignments made be approved as submitted to the Caucus. The motion was 
unanimously carried.
Upon motion of Senator Robinson, the Caucus adjourned subject to the 
call of the Chair.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 13, 1919]

FEBRUARY 13, 1919

Minutes of a meeting of the Democratic Senators, held in the Finance 
Committee Room on February 13, 1919, at 8 o'clock, p.m.
Senator Martin of Virginia (Democratic Leader) presiding.
The following named senators were present: Ashurst, Beckham, Fletcher, 
Gay, Hardwick, Henderson, Hitchcock, Jones of N. Mex., Kendrick, King, 
Kirby, Martin of Va., Myers, Nugent, Overman, Pittman, Pollock, 
Pomerene, Ransdell, Robinson, Saulsbury, Shafroth, Sheppard, Smith of 
Ga., Smith of S.C., Swanson, Thomas, Vardaman, Wolcott.
The Conference was called to order by Senator Martin who stated that the 
object of the Conference was to consider what, if any, steps should be 
taken to expedite the passage of pending appropriation bills and other 
important legislation. He stated that there were but few legislative 
days remaining and that unless vigorous action were taken the end of the 
session would be reached without the passage of all the appropriations 
bills.
The Chairman urged that every legitimate means be adopted in order to 
secure the passage of the legislation referred to and suggested that 
night sessions be held.
Senator Wolcott reported that Senator Bankhead was unable to be present, 
but desired to be counted for the purpose of making a quorum, and 
desired that Senator Wolcott be permitted to cast his vote.
Senator Pittman reported that Senators Gerry and Martin of Kentucky were 
unavoidably detained, and that they requested that they be counted for a 
quorum and desired that Senator Pittman cast the vote of each.
Senator Hoke Smith of Georgia reported that Senator Lewis of Illinois 
was unavoidably detained, and desired to be counted for a quorum and 
that he (Senator Smith) cast his vote.
Senator Robinson of Arkansas reported that Senator Smith of Arizona was 
absent on account of illness; that he desired to be counted for a quorum 
and requested Senator Robinson to cast his vote.
Senator Hoke Smith of Georgia supported the views expressed by the 
Chairman and called attention to the fact that if all of the 
appropriation bills were not passed, an extra session of Congress would 
be imperative. He pointed out the desirability of avoiding an extra 
session, at least until after the Peace Congress at Paris had concluded 
its labors and the Treaty of Peace was ready for submission to the 
Senate. He urged that night sessions be held and that every effort 
possible be made to secure the passage, not only of the appropriation 
bills, but other pending important legislation.
Senator Henderson moved that, commencing tomorrow, Friday evening, 
February 14th, night sessions of the Senate be held; that the sessions 
commence at 11 o'clock a.m., and continue during the day and until such 
hour at night as might be determined upon. The motion was agreed to; a 
few votes being in the negative.
Upon motion, the requests of the absent senators were granted.
On motion of Senator Robinson the Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
                     Sixty-sixth Congress (1919-1921)

   [Editor's Note: As the election of 1918 took place, the World War in 
Europe drew to a close. On October 24, 1918, President Wilson issued an 
appeal to the nation to elect a Democratic Congress to support him as he 
prepared to negotiate the peace treaty ending the war. ``The return of a 
Republican majority to either House of the Congress would, moreover, 
certainly be interpreted on the other side of the water as a repudiation 
of my leadership,'' Wilson wrote. ``It is well understood there as well 
as here that the Republican leaders desire not so much to support the 
President as to control him.'' This miscalculated appeal failed not only 
to sway voters but contributed to the further estrangement between the 
president and congressional Republicans. Voters gave the Republicans a 
slim majority of 49 to 47 in the Senate, and expanded the Republican 
margin in the House to 240 to 192. After six years in the majority, 
Senate Democrats returned to the minority.
  The Republican majority made Henry Cabot Lodge chairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee and set up a monumental confrontation between Wilson 
and Lodge over the Treaty of Versailles with its provisions for American 
participation in a League of Nations. The Senate divided into several 
groups: those supporting the treaty as Wilson had negotiated it; those 
supporting the treaty with mild reservations; those supporting only with 
strong reservation; and those irreconcilably opposed to the treaty in 
any form.
  Wilson appeared before the Senate on July 10, 1919, to argue the case 
for the Treaty of Versailles, calling for its ratification without 
amendments or reservations. The Senate was still debating the treaty in 
September, when Wilson launched a national speaking tour to stimulate 
public support for the treaty. The president collapsed after giving a 
speech in Pueblo, Colorado, and returned to Washington, where he 
suffered a paralytic stroke on October 2. In November, Senate Democrats 
were able to defeat all amendments to the treaty, but the Senate adopted 
Senator Lodge's fourteen reservations. On November 14, 1919, Senate 
Democratic leader Thomas S. Martin died. He was succeeded by the vice 
chairman of the Democratic Conference, Gilbert Hitchcock. Although 
Hitchcock argued that the treaty could pass only with some reservations, 
the gravely ill Wilson refused to sanction any compromise. On November 
19, 1919, the Senate defeated the treaty. A second attempt on March 19, 
1920 similarly failed to receive the necessary two-thirds vote.]
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 17, 1919]

MAY 17, 1919

Minutes of the Democratic Conference held in the Finance Committee Room, 
Senate Office Building, Friday, May 17, 1919, 11 o'clock, a.m.
The Conference was called to order by Senator Martin, the roll-call 
showing thirty-six present and eleven absent.
Senator Pittman presented a telegram from Senator Phelan, authorizing 
the former to cast his vote, and Senator Swanson presented a telegram 
from Senator Johnson of South Dakota, requesting that the former be 
permitted to cast his vote.
Upon motion, Senator King was selected Chairman of the meeting, and 
Senator Walsh of Massachusetts, Secretary. The Chairman stated that the 
Conference was called for the purposes of effecting an organization of 
the Democratic Senators and to transact such other business as might 
properly come before the meeting.
Senator Reed nominated Senator Martin for Chairman of the Democratic 
Conference, and leader of the Democratic Minority. The motion was 
carried by acclamation.
Upon motion by Senator Underwood, Senator King was nominated by 
acclamation, as Secretary of the Democratic Conference. Upon motion of 
Senator Smith of Georgia, Senator Hitchcock was unanimously selected as 
vice-Chairman of the Democratic organization. Senator Swanson named 
Senator Pittman as President, pro tem, of the Senate, and the Chairman 
of the Caucus was instructed to present his name to the Senate, as the 
choice of the Democratic Party.
Senator Swanson moved that a Democratic whip be elected.1 
This was opposed by Senator Reed and others, but the motion being put, 
was carried upon motion of Senator Swanson. Senator Gerry was 
unanimously selected for the position of Democratic whip.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ The first Senate Democratic whip, J. Hamilton Lewis of Illinois, 
had been defeated for reelection in 1918.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Chairman of the Caucus, was, upon motion, instructed to present the 
names of the following persons to the Senate as the choice of the 
Democrats for the positions set opposite their names:

   Charles T. Higgins............................................  Sergeant-at-Arms
   James M. Baker................................................  Secretary of the Senate
  Thomas W. Keller...............................................  Assistant Sec'y of the Senate


 Senator Robinson offered the following:

   RESOLVED, That it is the desire of this Conference that 
  Edwin A. Halsey be continued in his present position as 
  Assistant on the floor of the Senate, under the office of 
  the Sergeant-at-Arms. Carried unanimously.

Senator Pomerene moved that Thomas Dawson be continued as executive 
clerk. Carried.
Upon motion, the Democratic Leader, Senator Martin, was authorized to 
appoint a steering committee consisting of twelve Senators who should 
constitute the steering committee of the Minority and that he, the 
chairman, should be ex officio chairman of the same.
Senator Jones of New Mexico moved that it be the sense of the Democratic 
Senators that no further steps be taken towards organization of the 
Senate until it is ascertained what the position of the Republicans is 
to be with respect to the number of Democrats to be assigned to the 
various committees.

Senator Thomas offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Caucus be instructed to 
  notify the Chairman of the Republican Conference that the 
  members of this Caucus will oppose the reorganization of the 
  Senate until questions regarding the composition of 
  Committees and disposition of positions be settled to its 
  satisfaction.

Senator Smith of Georgia moved that, in the organization of the 
Committees, it was the sense of the Minority that they should have but 
one less upon the various committees than the Republicans.
After discussion had taken place upon the preceding motions and 
resolutions, Senator Hitchcock moved that the matter of organization be 
left with Senator Martin in connection with the Steering Committee, and 
that he be authorized to secure as large a representation as possible 
for the Minority, upon the various Committees of the Senate. Carried 
unanimously.
Upon motion of Senator Reed, the Conference adjourned, subject to the 
call of the Minority leader.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, May 17, 1919]
PRESENT            ABSENT
            Ashurst  
            Bankhead 
     Beckham
     Chamberlain
            Culberson
     Dial
     Fletcher
     Gay
            Gerry    
     Gore
            Harris   
     Harrison
     Henderson
     Hitchcock
            Johnson o
     Jones of N.M.
     Kendrick
     King
     Kirby
     McKellar
     Martin
            Myers    
            Nugent   
     Overman
     Owen
            Phelan   
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Simmons
            Smith of 
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
     Smith of S.C.
            Stanley  
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Trammell
     Underwood
     Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
     Williams
     Wolcott
      36               11
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 26, 1919]

MAY 26, 1919

Minutes of a meeting of the Democratic Senators held in the Finance 
Committee room of the Senate, Senate Office Building, May 26, 1919, at 5 
p.m., pursuant to the call of Chairman Martin.
Senator Martin not being present, vice-Chairman Hitchcock called the 
meeting to order. Thirty-nine Senators were present.
Senator Hitchcock stated that the object of the meeting was to hear the 
report of the Steering Committee and Senator Martin, with regard to 
committee assignments.
The Secretary announced that the Chairman and the Steering Committee had 
presented a tentative Minority list of committee assignments of 
Democratic Senators for the Sixty-Sixth Congress, which was as follows:

                         Tentative Minority List
               COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENT OF DEMOCRATIC SENATORS
                         (SIXTY-SIXTH CONGRESS)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
MR. ASHURST.............................  Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands, Chairman
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Census
                                          Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Privileges and Elections

MR. BANKHEAD............................  Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department, Chairman
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Commerce
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

MR. BECKHAM.............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Labor
                                          Claims
                                          Library
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Philippines
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. CHAMBERLAIN.........................  Expenditures in the War
                                           Department, Chairman
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Commerce
                                          Public Lands
                                          Philippines
                                          Territories

MR. CULBERSON...........................  Private Land Claims, Chairman
                                          Judiciary
                                          Appropriations
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
                                          Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. DIAL................................  Cuban Relations
                                          Enrolled Bills
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of State
                                          National Banks
                                          University of the United
                                           States
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads

MR. FLETCHER............................  Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard, Chairman
                                          Commerce
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Fisheries
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Philippines
                                          Printing
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine

MR. GAY.................................  Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Appropriations
                                          Expenditures in the Navy
                                           Department
                                          Fisheries
                                          Pensions
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. GERRY...............................  Railroads
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Finance
                                          Immigration
                                          National Banks
                                          Naval Affairs

MR. GORE................................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice, Chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture
                                          Finance
                                          Immigration
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Patents
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico

MR. HARRIS..............................  Industrial Expositions
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Immigration
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard
                                          Appropriations
                                          Canadian Relations

MR. HARRISON............................  Immigration
                                          Coast and Insular Survey
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Revolutionary Claims
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Rules
                                          Expenditures in the War
                                           Department

MR. HENDERSON...........................   Mines and Mining
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Claims
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads

MR. HITCHCOCK...........................  Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game, Chairman
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Philippines
                                          Private Land Claims

MR. JOHNSON of South Dakota.............  Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Claims
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Pensions
                                          Public Lands
                                          Woman Suffrage

MR. JONES of New Mexico.................  Woman Suffrage
                                          Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Finance
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Manufactures
                                          Public Lands

MR. KENDRICK............................  Canadian Relations
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Pacific Railroads
                                          Public Lands
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands

MR. KING................................  Expenditures in the Post
                                           Office Department
                                          Census
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Judiciary
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pensions
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Immigration

MR. KIRBY...............................  Patents
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Commerce
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries

MR. McKELLAR............................  Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Audit and Control the
                                           Contingent Expenses of the
                                           Senate
                                          Census
                                          Education and Labor
                                          Library
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. MARTIN..............................  Appropriations
                                          Commerce
                                          Disposition of Useless Papers
                                           in the Executive Departments
                                          Fisheries
                                          Expenditures in the Interior
                                           Department

MR. MYERS...............................  Indian Depredations, Chairman
                                          Public Lands
                                          Canadian Relations
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of State
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians

MR. NUGENT..............................  Finance
                                          Immigration
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Territories
                                          Investigate Trespassers upon
                                           Indian Lands

MR. OVERMAN.............................  Engrossed Bills, Chairman
                                          Rules
                                          Appropriations
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Judiciary
                                          University of the United
                                           States

MR. OWEN................................  Five Civilized Tribes of
                                           Indians, Chairman
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Appropriations
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Rules
                                          Territories
                                          Woman Suffrage

MR. PHELAN..............................  Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pensions
                                          Philippines
                                          Public Lands
                                          Territories

MR. PITTMAN.............................  Industrial Expositions,
                                           Chairman
                                          Territories
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Public Lands

MR. POMERENE............................  Corporations Organized in the
                                           District of Columbia,
                                           Chairman
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Manufactures

MR. RANSDELL............................  Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries, Chairman
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Commerce
                                          Printing
                                          Woman Suffrage
                                          Interoceanic Canals

MR. REED................................  Standards, Weights and
                                           Measures, Chairman
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds
                                          Commerce
                                          Judiciary
                                          Manufactures
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Railroads

MR. ROBINSON............................  Claims
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Justice
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Philippines
                                          Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service
    Note.--Add Foreign Relations, should additional member be
     authorized. Add Census, should Senator Robinson fail to secure
     membership on Foreign Relations, in which event Walsh of Mass.,
     would be eliminated from Census.

MR. SHEPPARD............................  Revolutionary Claims, Chairman
                                          Census
                                          Commerce
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Transportation Routes to the
                                           Seaboard

MR. SHIELDS.............................  Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products, Chairman
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Labor
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mississippi River and its
                                           Tributaries
                                          University of the United
                                           States
                                          Philippines

MR. SIMMONS.............................  Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress,
                                           Chairman
                                          Finance
                                          Commerce
                                          Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Agriculture
                                          Interoceanic Canals

MR. SMITH of Arizona....................  Geological Survey, Chairman
                                          Printing
                                          Appropriations
                                          Conservation of National
                                           Resources
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Public Lands
                                          Railroads

MR. SMITH of Georgia....................  Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department, Chairman
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Judiciary
                                          Rules
                                          Education and Labor
                                           [handwritten insert]

MR. SMITH of Maryland...................  Examine the Several Branches
                                           of the Civil Service,
                                           Chairman
                                          District of Columbia
                                          Appropriations
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Standards, Weights, and
                                           Measures

MR. SMITH of South Carolina.............  Conservation of National
                                           Resources, Chairman
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Agriculture and Forestry
                                          Geological Survey
                                          Manufactures
                                          Patents
                                          Railroads

MR. STANLEY.............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Commerce
                                          Industrial Expositions
                                          Additional Accommodations for
                                           the Library of Congress
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Pacific Railroads

MR. SWANSON.............................  Expenditures in the Navy
                                           Department, Chairman
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Indian Depredations
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. THOMAS..............................  Pacific Railroads, Chairman
                                          Finance
                                          Military Affairs
                                          Private Land Claims
                                          Forest Reservations and the
                                           Protection of Game

MR. TRAMMELL............................  Expenditures in the Treasury
                                           Department
                                          Claims
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Pacific Islands and Porto Rico
                                          Public Buildings and Grounds

MR. UNDERWOOD...........................  Cuban Relations
                                          Appropriations
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Public Health and National
                                           Quarantine
                                          Rules

MR. WALSH of Massachusetts..............  Canadian Relations
                                          Manufactures
                                          Pensions
                                          Transportation and Sale of
                                           Meat Products
                                          Banking and Currency
                                          Census (Eliminate Census if
                                           Robinson should fail to
                                           obtain membership on Foreign
                                           Relations)
                                          Post Offices and Post Roads
                                          Education and Labor
                                           [handwritten insert]

MR. WALSH of Montana....................  Disposition of Useless Papers
                                           in the Executive Departments,
                                           Chairman
                                          Pensions
                                          Indian Affairs
                                          Interoceanic Canals
                                          Irrigation and Reclamation of
                                           Arid Lands
                                          Judiciary
                                          Mines and Mining
                                          Naval Affairs
                                          Privileges and Elections

MR. WILLIAMS............................  University of the United
                                           States, Chairman
                                          Library
                                          Finance
                                          Foreign Relations
                                          Railroads

MR. WOLCOTT.............................  Expenditures in the Department
                                           of Commerce
                                          Civil Service and Retrenchment
                                          Claims
                                          Coast Defenses
                                          Fisheries
                                          Privileges and Elections
                                          Interstate Commerce
                                          Education and Labor
------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Upon motion the Report of the Committee was adopted.
Upon motion, the Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                              Secretary.
____________________________________________________

                                                      [November 6, 1919]

NOVEMBER 6, 1919

Minutes of a meeting of the Democratic Senators held at the office of 
the Minority Conference, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C., 
November 6, 1919.
In the absence of Chairman Martin, Vice Chairman Hitchcock called the 
Conference to order and stated that he felt the necessity of consulting 
with Senators in view of the situation with respect to the Versailles 
Treaty, and the approaching final vote upon the same. He stated that all 
amendments to the Treaty had been defeated, and the question to be 
determined was what attitude should be taken by the Minority upon the 
various reservations, before the Senate, and those that might hereafter 
be offered. He stated that the Conference was for the purpose of getting 
the views of the Democratic Senators, as they might be developed in a 
general discussion. He further stated that in his opinion the Treaty 
could be ratified with reservations.
Senator Nugent suggested that the Conference adjourn with the 
understanding that the Chairman be authorized to call a meeting of all 
Democrats and Republicans who were in favor of having the Treaty 
ratified, in order that the matter might be fully considered by such 
joint meeting.
Senator McKellar suggested that Senator Hitchcock be requested to confer 
with Republican Senators, and those who favor reservations, with a view 
to determining what would be agreeable to them, and that, upon such 
information being obtained, a Conference be called, to which such report 
be submitted.
Senator Ashurst suggested that the Chairman appoint a Committee to 
prepare such reservations as the Democrats would be willing to 
support.2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ In his diary entry for November 7, 1919, Senator Ashurst recorded: 
``Pro-League Democratic senators caucused last night. I was amazed that 
some of the Democratic senators still believed that the Treaty might be 
ratified without reservation. The Republican factions in the Senate are 
united on this issue.'' George F. Sparks, ed. A Many-Colored Toga: The 
Diary of Henry Fountain Ashurst (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 
1962), p. 113.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The various suggestions, as well as others, were discussed at length by 
the Conference, but no action was taken upon them.

Senator Underwood offered the following resolution, which was agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Conference that an 
  unconditional vote on the ratification of the Treaty of 
  Peace with Germany should be had before any resolutions, 
  amendments, or reservations changing the status of the 
  Treaty of Peace are agreed to, and that the amendments, or 
  reservations, looking to the changing of the Treaty of Peace 
  should be rejected until a vote on unconditional 
  ratification is obtained.

Upon motion, the Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the 
Chairman.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                               [no date]

Upon two or three occasions not herein recorded Conferences of a 
majority of the Democratic Senators were held in the Minority Room in 
the Capitol while the Versailles Treaty was before the 
Senate.3 The undersigned was not present and no record of the 
proceedings was furnished him. He was informed, however, by Senators who 
participated in the Conference that no motions or resolutions were 
adopted and that no vote was taken upon any matter; that the discussions 
were general in character and related principally to the reservations 
offered to the Treaty which was pending in the Senate.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ Senator Ashurst's diary noted that Senator Hitchcock called a 
meeting of the Democratic caucus on the morning of November 19, 1919. 
Ashurst noted: ``Every Democratic senator who favored the Treaty was 
present at the caucus except Senator Culberson of Texas, who for months 
has been ill. Senator Underwood moved that the Democratic senators vote 
against the Lodge Resolution of Ratification. Democratic Leader 
Hitchcock then drew from his breast pocket and read the following letter 
from President Wilson:
The White House
Washington, 18 November 1919
My dear Senator:
  You were good enough to bring me word that the Democratic 
Senators supporting the Treaty expected to hold a conference 
before the final vote on the Lodge Resolution of Ratification 
and that they would be glad to receive a word of counsel from 
me.
  I should hesitate to offer it in any detail, but I assume 
that the Senators only desire my judgment upon the all-
important question of the final vote on the resolution 
containing the many reservations by Senator Lodge. On that I 
can not hesitate, for in my opinion, the resolution in that 
form does not provide for ratification but, rather, for the 
nullification of the Treaty. I sincerely hope that the friends 
and supporters of the Treaty will vote against the Lodge 
Resolution of Ratification.
  I understand that the door will probably then be open for a 
genuine resolution of ratification.
  I trust that all true friends of the Treaty will refuse to 
support the Lodge Resolution.
Cordially and sincerely yours,
Woodrow Wilson
To Hon. G.M. Hitchcock
United States Senate
  Examining the letter I perceived that it was not signed by President 
Wilson but that the words `Woodrow Wilson' were affixed thereto by a 
rubber stamp facsimile in purple ink.'' Sparks, ed., A Many-Colored 
Toga, pp. 114-15.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 15, 1920]

JANUARY 15, 1920

Minutes of the Conference of the Democratic Senators held January 15, 
1920, at 10:30 a.m., at the office of the Minority Leader, Capitol, 
Washington, D.C.
The meeting was called to order by Senator Hitchcock, who read a letter 
addressed to Senator Underwood, in which attention was called to the 
fact that a Conference of the Democratic Senators had been called for a 
certain date and at the request of Senator Underwood, the meeting had 
been postponed until a subsequent date, and that the present meeting was 
called for the purpose of selecting a leader for the Democrats of the 
Senate. A roll was called showing the following named Senators present: 
Ashurst, Bankhead, Beckham, Chamberlain, Culberson, Dial, Fletcher, Gay, 
Gerry, Gore, Harris, Harrison, Henderson, Hitchcock, Jones of N. Mex., 
Kendrick, King, Kirby, McKellar, Myers, Nugent, Overman, Owen, Phelan, 
Pittman, Pomerene, Ransdell, Reed, Robinson, Sheppard, Shields, Simmons, 
Smith of Ga., Smith of Md., Smith of S.C., Stanley, Thomas, Trammell, 
Underwood, Walsh of Mass., Walsh of Mont., Williams and Wolcott.
Upon the request of Senator Hitchcock, Senator Robinson of Arkansas was 
called to the Chair.
Upon motion of Senator Ashurst, it was unanimously agreed that no 
Senator should speak for more than five minutes upon any one question 
coming before the Conference.
Senator Pittman asked that unanimous consent be given that Hon. Carter 
Glass, Senator-Elect from the State of Va., and the present Secretary of 
the Treasury, be invited to attend and participate in the deliberations 
and proceedings of the Conference. Several Senators made objection. 
Thereupon, Senator Pittman offered the following resolution and moved 
its adoption:

  WHEREAS, Hon. Carter Glass has been duly appointed and 
  commissioned a Senator of the United States from the State 
  of Virginia, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the 
  late Senator Martin; and,
  WHEREAS, Senator-elect Glass has been restrained from taking 
  his seat in the Senate because of the continuation of the 
  duties of Secretary of the Treasury at the request of the 
  President; and,
  WHEREAS, Senator Glass states that he will take his seat in 
  the Senate in a few days and that he will participate in 
  this Conference if invited; and
  WHEREAS, it is the policy of Democratic Conferences to 
  permit Senators-elect after being commissioned and before 
  being sworn in to participate in such Conferences;
  THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that Senator-elect Glass be and he 
  is hereby invited to participate in this Conference and in 
  all other Democratic Conferences which may be held, with all 
  the privileges of a Democratic Senator.

Senators Pittman, Walsh of Mont., Reed, Gerry, Overman, Bankhead, 
Simmons, Williams, and Jones addressed the Conference upon the 
resolution. The vote being taken upon the resolution, it was declared to 
be carried--the vote being as follows: AYES--Senators Bankhead, Dial, 
Fletcher, Gay, Gerry, Gore, Harris, Harrison, Jones of N. Mex., 
McKellar, Owen, Pittman, Ransdell, Reed, Shields, Smith of Md., Smith of 
S.C., Stanley, Walsh of Mass., and Williams. Total - 20. NAYS--Ashurst, 
Chamberlain, Culberson, Henderson, Kendrick, King, Kirby, Myers, Nugent, 
Overman, Phelan, Pomerene, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Thomas, 
Trammell, Walsh of Mont., and Wolcott. Total - 19. [See also tally sheet 
A.]
Senator Beckham was present and announced that he had paired with 
Senator Swanson of Va., and withheld his vote. Senator Smith of Ga., 
refrained from voting.
The Chair appointed Senator Pittman to inform Secretary Glass of the 
adoption by the Conference of the resolution. Senator Ashurst announced 
that owing to the fact that Mr. Glass was filling an executive position, 
to wit, Secretary of the Treasury, and that it was indefinite as to when 
he would become a Senator, he would protest his participating in the 
Conference.
Senator Ashurst moved that the Conference proceed to the selection of a 
Democratic leader. Senator Reed raised the point of order that the 
Conference could not proceed until word had been received from Senator-
elect Glass as to what steps he would take concerning the resolution 
adopted by the Conference. Pending the motion of Senator Ashurst, and 
the point of order submitted by Senator Reed, Senator Pittman announced 
that he communicated by telephone with Mr. Glass and read to him over 
the phone, the resolution adopted by the Conference, including the 
number of votes for and the number of votes against the resolution; that 
thereupon, Mr. Glass informed him that he would not participate in the 
Conference as it appeared that there was material objection to such 
course.
Senator Gore moved that the election of a Democratic leader be postponed 
until the first Monday in February, 1920, at 10 o'clock, a.m., and that 
in the meantime, Senator Hitchcock continue to act as Democratic leader.
Senator Wolcott stated that he would not object to Mr. Glass 
participating in the Democratic Conference, provided he should appear 
and request that privilege; and then moved that if Mr. Glass appear and 
request to take part in the proceedings and to vote upon the question of 
selecting a Democratic leader, that the privilege be so accorded to him.

Senator Pittman offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the vote of each and every Democratic 
  Senator who may be absent from any Democratic Conference, 
  shall be cast and counted in any election and upon questions 
  that may arise, if in writing or by telegram he designates 
  for what candidate he desires his vote cast, or how he 
  desires his vote cast upon any question.

Senator Reed moved to add to Senator Gore's motion and as an amendment 
thereto, the resolution submitted by Senator Pittman. Senator Simmons 
moved to amend the motion of Senator Reed, by adding thereto and after 
the word ``question'' before the last sentence, ``and who is absent and 
his position is known and not questioned.'' Thereupon general discussion 
followed upon the various motions pending, after which Senator Gore 
withdrew his motion and the motion, together with all amendments 
thereto, was withdrawn and the question then recurred upon the motion of 
Senator Ashurst that the Conference proceed to the selection of a 
Democratic leader. The motion carried--no Senator voting in opposition 
thereto.
Senator Pittman placed in nomination Senator Underwood as Democratic 
leader. Senator Simmons nominated Senator Hitchcock to the same 
position. A vote was taken and the following Senators voted for Senator 
Underwood: Bankhead, Dial, Fletcher, Gay, Gerry, Gore, Harris, 
[Harrison] 4, Jones of N. Mex., McKellar, Pittman, Ransdell, 
Reed, Shields, Smith of Md., Smith of S.C., Stanley, Walsh of Mass., and 
Williams. 19. The following Senators voted for Senator Hitchcock: 
Ashurst, Chamberlain, Culberson, Henderson, Kendrick, King, Kirby, 
Myers, Nugent, Overman, Phelan, Pomerene, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, 
Thomas, Trammell, Walsh of Mont., and Wolcott. 19. [See also tally sheet 
B.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \4\ The name of Senator Harrison was omitted from the list in the 
minutes of those voting for Senator Underwood on both votes, but his 
name is checked on the two tally sheets as voting for Underwood. 
Similarly, Senator Dial's name was omitted from the second vote but 
checked on the tally sheet as voting for Underwood. The votes of both 
senators are necessary to achieve the total of 19.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Beckham announced that he was paired with Senator Swanson 
(absent on account of illness of his wife); that Senator Swanson if 
present would vote for Senator Hitchcock, and that he (Senator Beckham) 
would vote for Senator Underwood. Senator Owen announced that he was 
paired with Senator Smith of Arizona; that if Senator Smith were 
present, Senator Smith would vote for Senator Underwood, and that he 
(Senator Owen) would vote for Senator Hitchcock. Senator Smith of Ga., 
was present, but did not vote. Senators Underwood and Hitchcock were 
present, but neither voted.
Senator Pittman moved that the Conference be postponed until the first 
Monday in February and again offered as a part of the motion the 
resolution set forth, providing for absent senators leaving their vote, 
etc. Pending the motion, the suggestion was made that another vote be 
taken. Thereupon, the Conference proceeded to vote with the following 
result. For Senator Underwood: Senators Bankhead, [Dial], Fletcher, Gay, 
Gerry, Gore, Harris, [Harrison], Jones of N. Mex., McKellar, Pittman, 
Ransdell, Reed, Shields, Smith of Md., Smith of S.C., Stanley, Walsh of 
Mass., and Williams. 19. For Senator Hitchcock: Senators Ashurst, 
Chamberlain, Culberson, Henderson, Kendrick, King, Kirby, Myers, Nugent, 
Overman, Phelan, Pomerene, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Thomas, 
Trammell, Walsh of Mont., and Wolcott. 19. [See also tally sheet C.]
Senators Beckham and Owen made the same announcements as to pairs 
heretofore noted. Senator Smith was present, but did not vote.
Senator Ransdell moved that pending the determination of the leadership 
question, Senator Hitchcock continue to act as leader of the minority. 
All pending motions were withdrawn and thereupon, Senator Pittman 
offered the following motion:

  That the Conference adjourn to a time to be agreed upon by 
  Senators Hitchcock and Underwood, and that upon such 
  agreement being reached, a Conference of Democratic Senators 
  be called for the purpose of selecting a Democratic leader, 
  and that at such Conference the vote of each and every 
  Democratic Senator who may be absent from any Democratic 
  Conference called for the selection of a leader, shall be 
  cast and counted in any election and upon questions that may 
  arise, if in writing or by telegraph, he designates the 
  candidate for whom his vote be cast and how he desires his 
  vote cast upon any question. This rule terminates upon the 
  election of a minority leader.

The motion was agreed to and the Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, January 15, 1920]
PRESENT
     Ashurst
     Bankhead
     Beckham
     Chamberlain
     Culberson
     Dial
     Fletcher
     Gay
     Gerry
            Glass
     Gore
     Harris
     Harrison
     Henderson
     Hitchcock
            Johnson of SD
     Jones of N. Mex
     Kendrick
     King
     Kirby
     McKellar
     Myers
     Nugent
     Overman
     Owen
     Phelan
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Sheppard
     Shields
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
     Smith of S.C.
     Stanley
            Swanson
     Thomas
     Trammell
     Underwood
     Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
     Williams
     Wolcott

Vote on Pittman Resolution
Concerning Carter Glass
[Tally sheet A]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst  
     Bankhead
            Beckham (paired)
            Chamberla
            Culberson
     Dial
     Fletcher
     Gay
     Gerry
            Glass
     Gore
     Harris
     Harrison
            Henderson
            Hitchcock
            Johnson of SD
     Jones of N. Mex
            Kendrick 
            King     
            Kirby    
     McKellar
            Myers    
            Nugent   
            Overman  
     Owen
            Phelan   
     Pittman
            Pomerene 
     Ransdell
     Reed
            Robinson 
            Sheppard 
     Shields
            Simmons  
            Smith of Ariz
            Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
     Smith of S.C.
     Stanley
            Swanson
            Thomas   
            Trammell 
            Underwood
     Walsh of Mass
            Walsh of 
     Williams
            Wolcott  

1st vote [for leader]
[Tally sheet B]
HITCHCOCK         UNDERWOOD
     Ashurst
            Bankhead 
            Beckham (paired)
     Chamberlain
     Culberson
            Dial     
            Fletcher 
            Gay      
            Gerry    
            Glass
            Gore     
            Harris   
            Harrison 
     Henderson
            Hitchcock
            Johnson of SD
            Jones of 
     Kendrick
     King
     Kirby
            McKellar 
     Myers
     Nugent
     Overman
            Owen (paired)
     Phelan
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
            Reed     
     Robinson
     Sheppard
            Shields  
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
            Smith of Ga
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Stanley  
            Swanson
     Thomas
     Trammell
            Underwood
            Walsh of 
     Walsh of Mont
            Williams 
     Wolcott

2nd vote [for leader]
[Tally sheet C]
HITCHCOCK         UNDERWOOD
     Ashurst
            Bankhead 
            Beckham (paired)
     Chamberlain
     Culberson
            Dial     
            Fletcher 
            Gay      
            Gerry    
            Glass
            Gore     
            Harris   
            Harrison 
     Henderson
            Hitchcock
            Johnson of SD
            Jones of 
     Kendrick
     King
     Kirby
            McKellar 
     Myers
     Nugent
     Overman
            Owen (paired)
     Phelan
            Pittman  
     Pomerene
            Ransdell 
            Reed     
     Robinson
     Sheppard
            Shields  
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
            Smith of Ga
            Smith of 
            Smith of 
            Stanley  
     abst.  Swanson (paired)
     Thomas
     Trammell
            Underwood
            Walsh of 
     Walsh of Mont
            Williams 
     Wolcott
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 7, 1920]

FEBRUARY 7, 1920

Minutes of a Conference of Democratic Senators held in the Minority 
Room, Senate Office Bldg., Feb. 7, 1920, 10:30 a.m.
The Conference was called to order by Senator Hitchcock, the following 
named Senators being present: Ashurst, Beckham, Chamberlain, Gerry, 
Glass, Harris, Harrison, Henderson, Hitchcock, Johnson of S. Dak., Jones 
of N. Mex., King, Kirby, McKellar, Nugent, Overman, Phelan, Pittman, 
Ransdell, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Smith of Ga., Smith of Md., 
Stanley, Underwood, Walsh of Mont., and Williams.
Senator Hitchcock stated that on Monday Feb. 9, 1920, the leader of the 
Majority in the Senate, Senator Lodge, would probably take some steps 
for the further consideration of the Treaty of Peace with Germany now 
pending in the Senate, and looking to the ratification of the same. In 
view of this situation, he said that an informal Conference of the 
Democratic Senators was necessary and for that reason he had called this 
Conference. Senator Hitchcock read to the Conference the following 
letter which he had received from the President of the United States:

  My Dear Senator Hitchcock: 5
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \5\ The letter contains boldface headings because it had been printed 
(perhaps in a newspaper) and the clipping then pasted into the minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I have greatly appreciated your thoughtful kindness in 
  keeping me informed concerning the Conference you and some 
  of your colleagues have had with spokesmen of the Republican 
  party concerning the possible ratification of the treaty of 
  peace, and send this line in special appreciative 
  acknowledgment of your letter of the 22d. I return the 
  clipping you were kind enough to enclose.
    To the substance of it, I of course adhere. I am bound to. 
  Like yourself, I am solemnly sworn to obey and maintain the 
  Constitution of the United States. But I think the form of 
  it very unfortunate. Any reservation or resolution stating 
  that ``the United States assumes no obligation under such 
  and such an article unless and except'' would, I am sure, 
  chill our relationship with the nations with which we expect 
  to be associated in the great enterprise of maintaining the 
  world's peace.
    That association must in any case, my dear senator, 
  involve very serious and far-reaching implications of honor 
  and duty which I am sure we shall never in fact be desirous 
  of ignoring. It is the more important not to create the 
  impression that we are trying to escape obligations.
                       Accepts Hitchcock's Changes

    But I realize that negative criticism is not all that is 
  called for in so serious a matter. I am happy to be able to 
  add, therefore, that I have once more gone over the 
  reservations proposed by yourself, the copy of which I 
  return herewith, and am glad to say I can accept them as 
  they stand.
    I have never seen the slightest reason to doubt the good 
  faith of our associates in the war, nor ever had the 
  slightest reason to fear that any nation would seek to 
  enlarge our obligations under the covenant of the league of 
  nations or seek to commit us to lines of action which, under 
  our Constitution, only the Congress of the United States can 
  in the last analysis decide.
    May I suggest that with regard to the possible withdrawal 
  of the United States, it would be wise to give the President 
  the right to act upon our resolution of Congress in the 
  matter of withdrawal? In other words, it would seem to be 
  permissible and advisable that any resolution giving notice 
  of withdrawal should be a joint, rather than a concurrent 
  resolution.
                        View on Joint Resolution

    I doubt whether the President can be deprived of his veto 
  power under the Constitution, even with his own consent. The 
  use of a joint resolution would permit the President who is, 
  of course, charged by the Constitution with the conduct of 
  foreign policy, to merely exercise a voice in saying whether 
  so important a step as withdrawal from the league of nations 
  should be accomplished by a majority or a two-thirds vote.
    The Constitution itself providing that the legislative 
  body was to be consulted in treaty making and having 
  prescribed a two-thirds vote in such cases, it seems to me 
  that there should be no unnecessary departure from the 
  method there indicated.
    I see no objection to a frank statement that the United 
  States can accept a mandate with regard to any territory 
  under Article XIII, part 1, or any other provision of the 
  treaty of peace, only by direct authority and action of the 
  Congress of the United States.
    I hope, my dear senator, that you will never hesitate to 
  call upon me for any assistance that I can render in this or 
  any other public matter.
    Cordially and sincerely yours,

                                      WOODROW WILSON

Senator Glass reported the views of the President as stated to him 
yesterday, with respect to the ratification of the Treaty, the so-called 
Lodge Reservations, and other current questions.6
Senator Williams moved that Senator Hitchcock take whatever steps he 
deemed proper to bring the Treaty before the Senate for consideration 
and action thereon. Motion was carried.
A general discussion ensued respecting the parliamentary situation of 
the Treaty and the reservations pending and their nature and effect.
Senator Williams moved and the motion carried, that Senator Hitchcock be 
authorized to communicate with the President, and that if the President 
desired his letter of the 26th ult., heretofore referred to, to be given 
to the press, such action be taken.
Thereupon the Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
[Roll Call, February 7, 1920]
[PRESENT]
     Ashurst
            Bankhead
     Beckham
     Chamberlain
            Culberson
            Dial
            Fletcher
            Gay
     Gerry
     Glass
            Gore
     Harris
     Harrison
     Henderson
     Hitchcock
     Johnson of SD
     Jones of N. Mex
            Kendrick
     King
     Kirby
     McKellar
            Myers
     Nugent
     Overman
            Owen
  
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \6\ Senator Ashurst recorded in his diary the following account of 
Conference discussions: ``Senator Glass, Virginia, who left the Wilson 
Cabinet one week ago, announced that W.W. would refuse to exchange 
ratifications with the signatory powers, if the Lodge Reservations were 
adopted. Senator Glass then went on to say that W.W. charged that Lord 
Gray while here had conspired with Senator Lodge; and that he, W.W. was 
going to make the Treaty the issue in the coming campaign. Senator Walsh 
of Montana inquired how W.W. would make the Treaty an issue. Senator 
Glass replied that the President possessed sufficient leadership to 
bring the question before the people. Senator Pomerene spoke next and 
said he was disappointed at the attitude assumed by W.W. Senator John 
Sharp Williams then lauded W.W.'s attitude and denounced the suggestion 
that we should enter the League upon different terms than the other 
signatories.'' Sparks, ed. A Many-Colored Toga, pp. 122-23.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
[PRESENT]
     Phelan
     Pittman
     Pomerene
     Ransdell
            Reed
     Robinson
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Simmons
            Smith of Ariz
     Smith of Ga
     Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stanley
            Swanson
            Thomas
            Trammell
     Underwood
            Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
     Williams
            Wolcott
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 27, 1920]

APRIL 27, 1920

Minutes of a Conference of the Democratic Senators held April 27, 1920, 
at 10:30 a.m., in the committee room of the Minority, Senate Office 
Building, Washington, D.C.
The meeting was called to order by Senator Hitchcock. Upon a roll call 
the following Senators answered present: Ashurst, Chamberlain, Comer, 
Dial, Gay, Gerry, Glass, Harris, Harrison, Henderson, Hitchcock, Jones 
of N. Mex., Kendrick, King, McKellar, Myers, Overman, Owen, Pittman, 
Ransdell, Reed, Sheppard, Shields, Simmons, Smith of Ariz., Smith of 
Md., Swanson, Thomas and Underwood.
Senator Pittman announced that he held proxies from the following named 
Senators: Fletcher, Gore, Smith of Ga., Smith of S.C., Walsh of Mass., 
and Wolcott of Delaware.
The Chairman submitted a letter from Senator Culberson, asking that his 
vote be cast for Senator Underwood ``for Chairman to succeed Senator 
Martin.''
The Chairman stated that this Conference of the Democratic Senators had 
been called for the purpose of electing a Democratic leader to succeed 
the late Senator Martin. He further stated that several days ago, he had 
withdrawn his name as a candidate for leadership and that the only 
candidate before the Conference was Senator Underwood of Alabama.
Senator Pittman presented the name of Senator Underwood and moved that 
he be elected Democratic leader by acclamation, and upon his motion 
Senator Underwood was so elected.
Upon assuming the Chair, Senator Underwood extended his thanks to the 
Senators for the honor conferred and expressed his views as to the 
attitude of the minority leader and general policies of the Party. He 
further made a number of suggestions as to the course which he regarded 
as wise for the Democrats in the Senate to follow.
A brief discussion ensued concerning the questions of adjournment, the 
peace treaty, and legislative matters pending in Congress, but no action 
was taken thereon.
Upon motion of Senator Harris a rising vote of thanks was tendered to 
Senator Hitchcock for his able, conscientious and faithful services as 
Democratic leader.
Upon motion of Senator Swanson the Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 21, 1920]

MAY 21, 1920

Minutes of the Conference of the Senators of the Democratic party held 
May 21, 1920, at 10:00 a.m. in the Committee Room of the Minority, 
Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.
The meeting was called to order by Senator Underwood, Minority Leader. 
The following named Senators were present: Chamberlain, Comer, Dial, 
Gay, Harrison, Henderson, Jones of New Mexico, Kendrick, King, McKellar, 
Myers, Nugent, Overman, Phelan, Ransdell, Reed, Robinson, Sheppard, 
Simmons, Smith of Arizona, Stanley, Thomas, Trammell, Underwood, Walsh 
of Massachusetts, Walsh of Montana, and Williams.
Senator Underwood stated that the Conference had been called for the 
purpose of considering whether or not a program should be adopted by the 
Democratic senators for the guidance of the minority during the 
remainder of the session, and also to consider what the attitude of the 
minority should be with respect to the time of adjournment. He stated 
that the Republicans contemplated adjournment of Congress on the 5th of 
June and purposed pressing such measures as they deemed proper prior to 
that time. Considerable discussion ensued participated in by Senators 
Reed, Thomas, Kendrick, Chamberlain, McKellar, Walsh of Massachusetts, 
Walsh of Montana, Simmons, Williams, Jones of New Mexico, and Overman.
Senator Kendrick and other senators urged that the bill known as the 
Kendrick-Kenyon bill relating to the regulation of the packing industry 
should be pressed for passage before adjournment. It was urged by some 
Senators that no adjournment be had until this measure and certain war 
legislation should be repealed.
Various motions were submitted, discussed and withdrawn. Senator 
McKellar moved that in view of pending important legislation, the 
Democratic Conference declines to take action with respect to 
adjournment. After a discussion, Senator Williams moved as a substitute 
for Senator McKellar's motion that the Chairman of the Conference be 
requested to inform the leader of the majority that in view of the 
pendency of important legislation, the Democratic Senators were not 
willing to enter into an arrangement or agreement as to time of 
adjournment. The motion of Senator Williams was adopted and the 
Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, May 21, 1920]
[PRESENT]
            Ashurst
            Beckham
     Chamberlain
     Comer
            Culberson
     Dial
            Fletcher
     Gay
            Gerry
            Glass
            Gore
     Harris
     Harrison
     Henderson
            Hitchcock
            Johnson of SD
     Jones of N. Mex
     Kendrick
     King
            Kirby
     McKellar
     Myers
     Nugent
     Overman
            Owen
     Phelan
            Pittman
            Pomerene
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Sheppard
            Shields
     Simmons
     Smith of Ariz
            Smith of Ga
            Smith of Md
            Smith of S.C.
     Stanley
            Swanson
     Thomas
     Trammell
     Underwood
     Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
     Williams
            Wolcott
                   Sixty-seventh Congress (1921-1923)

   [Editor's Note: Republicans swept the election of 1920, repudiating 
the policies of Woodrow Wilson and sending Ohio Senator Warren G. 
Harding to the White House. In the Senate Republicans increased their 
majority to 59 to 37, while in the House the Republicans held a 302 to 
131 majority.]
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 5, 1921]

MARCH 5, 1921

Minutes of a Democratic Caucus held in Minority Room, Senate Office 
Building, March 5, 1921.
Upon motion, Senator Hitchcock was elected temporary Chairman, Senator 
King, temporary Secretary.
The Chairman announced that the purpose of the Conference was to select 
the usual Democratic officers for the 67th Congress, including the 
Democratic Leader, and to consider such other matters as might be 
brought before the Conference.
Senator Underwood was unanimously selected as Minority Leader, and 
Chairman of the Democratic Caucus. Senator Underwood thereupon took the 
Chair and made a felicitous speech, expressing his thanks for the action 
of the Minority and pledging his best efforts to discharge with fidelity 
the responsibilities of the position to which he had been elected.
Senator Hitchcock was unanimously elected as Vice Chairman. Senator King 
was unanimously named as Secretary of the Caucus, and Senator Gerry as 
Democratic Whip. Senator Pittman was unanimously elected as President 
Pro Tem of the Senate.
George H. Dern of Utah was nominated for the position of Secretary of 
the Senate; Charles P. Higgins of Missouri, Sergeant at Arms of the 
Senate and Doorkeeper, and Senator Underwood, as Minority leader, was 
directed to present these names to the Senate, when the offices for 
which they were named by the Caucus, were being filled.
Thomas W. Keller of West Virginia was agreed upon by the Conference for 
the position of Acting Assistant Doorkeeper of the PSenate.
Senator Swanson moved that the Vice Chairman of the Caucus, and the 
Whip, shall be ex officio members of the Steering Committee, and that 
the Chairman of the Caucus be authorized to appoint, not exceeding ten 
Senators, who, together with the ex officio members, shall constitute 
the Steering Committee; that said Committee shall have authority to 
assign representatives on the several committees of the Senate from time 
[to] time, and make selections to fill vacancies that might occur. The 
motion was agreed to.
Upon motion, Senator Robinson, as Chairman, was authorized to name a 
Committee on Patronage, which would be authorized to distribute whatever 
patronage might be allowed the Minority under the practice of the 
Senate.
Upon motion, the Caucus adjourned, subject to the call of the PChairman.

                                                [signed] William H. King
                                         United States Senator from Utah

                                                               Secretary
                    Sixty-eighth Congress (1923-1925)

   [Editor's Note: A business recession, farm depression, and spate of 
stories about corruption in the Harding administration helped Democrats 
make gains in the 1922 election, although they remained the minority in 
the Senate by a 42-to-52 margin, with 2 Farmer-Laborites. In the House, 
Democrats narrowed the gap more substantially, with a Republican 
majority of 225 to 207. The narrowing of the Republican majority in the 
Senate also gave the balance of power to a group of midwestern and 
western Progressive Republicans, who combined their vote with Democrats 
to frustrate or defeat the majority.
  When Oscar W. Underwood stepped down as minority leader, North 
Carolina Senator Furnifold Simmons, former chairman of the Finance 
Committee, sought the post. However, Arkansas Senator Joseph T. Robinson 
campaigned vigorously for the leadership. Robinson vowed to shape Senate 
Democrats into a ``fighting force'' that would not simply oppose the 
Republican majority but would offer its own programs. He promised to 
keep Democratic senators fully informed on pending issues, to offer more 
consultation with them on shaping party policies. Robinson also pledged 
to hold ``frequent conferences'' as a means of fostering party unity and 
harmony. Simmons withdrew from the contest, and Robinson was elected 
Conference chairman and floor leader, a post he held until his death in 
1937.1]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ Donald C. Bacon, ``Joseph Taylor Robinson: The Good Soldier,'' in 
Richard A. Baker and Roger H. Davidson, eds., First Among Equals: 
Outstanding Senate Leaders of the Twentieth Century (Washington: 
Congressional Quarterly, 1991), pp. 69-72.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 3, 1923]

DECEMBER 3, 1923

Minutes of Democratic Caucus, Minority Room, December 3, 1923.
Senator Underwood, Caucus Chairman, called the meeting to order and 
requested Senator Pittman to act as Secretary of the meeting.

The Chairman then directed the roll to be called. A roll call was had 
and the following Senators answered to their names:

  Adams                     George                            Mayfield                    Simmons
  Bayard                    Gerry                             Neely                       Smith
  Broussard                  Glass                            Overman                     Stanley
  Bruce                     Harris                            Owen                        Stephens
  Copeland                  Harrison                          Pittman                      Swanson
  Dial                      Heflin                            Ralston                     Trammell
  Dill                      Jones of N. Mex.                  Reed                         Underwood
  Edwards                   Kendrick                          Robinson                    Walsh of Mass.
  Ferris                    King                              Sheppard                    Walsh of Mont.
  Fletcher                  McKellar                          Shields                      Wheeler


A majority of the Democratic Senators being present, the Chair declared 
the meeting organized for business.
Senator Underwood then arose and expressed his deep appreciation for the 
unselfish and able support he had received from his fellow Democrats in 
the performance of his duty as Chairman of the Caucus and minority 
leader.
The Chair then announced that the election of a Chairman of the 
Democratic Caucus and minority leader for the ensuing Congress was in 
order.
Senator Simmons nominated Senator Robinson. There being no other 
nominations, on motion of Senator Simmons Senator Robinson was 
unanimously elected by acclamation.
Senator Robinson, upon taking the Chair, made a short address expressing 
his appreciation of the honor, promising his undivided attention to the 
duties of the office, and inviting the cooperation of his colleagues.
Senator Gerry nominated Senator T.J. Walsh of Montana as Vice Chairman. 
There being no other nominations, upon motion of Senator Gerry, Senator 
Walsh was unanimously elected by acclamation. Senator Walsh addressed 
the Caucus and expressed his appreciation of the honor conferred upon 
him.
Senator Harrison nominated Senator King of Utah for Secretary of the 
Caucus. There being no other nominations, Senator Harrison moved that 
the nomination be made unanimous. Senator King was unanimously elected.
Senator Underwood nominated Senator Gerry of Rhode Island for the office 
of Whip. There being no other nominations, upon motion of Senator 
Underwood, Senator Gerry was unanimously elected by acclamation.
Senator Swanson of Virginia nominated Senator Pittman of Nevada as a 
candidate of the Democratic Caucus for the office of President pro 
tempore of the Senate. There being no other nominations, upon motion of 
Senator Swanson, Senator Pittman was unanimously selected as the 
candidate of the Party for such office.
Senator Harrison nominated Colonel Halsey as a candidate of the Caucus 
for the office of Secretary of the Senate. There being no other 
nominations, on motion of Senator Harrison, Colonel Halsey was 
unanimously chosen as the candidate of the Caucus for such office.
Senator Underwood nominated Mr. Thomas Keller as the candidate of the 
Caucus for Assistant Doorkeeper of the Senate. There being no other 
nominations, upon motion of Senator Underwood, Mr. Keller was 
unanimously selected as the candidate of the Caucus for such office.
The Chair appointed Senators Swanson, Smith and Walsh of Montana a 
committee to select a candidate on behalf of the Caucus for Sergeant at 
Arms and to report the name to the Chairman. Such selection was 
authorized by the Caucus to be included among the candidates to be 
presented to the Senate for election.

Senator Stanley of Kentucky presented the following resolution and moved 
its adoption, namely:

  RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Caucus, the Vice-Chairman 
  and the Whip shall be ex-officio members of the Steering 
  Committee; that the Chairman of the Caucus may appoint not 
  exceeding nine Senators, who together with the ex-officio 
  members shall constitute the Steering Committee, which said 
  committee shall assign representation on the several 
  committees of the Senate and from time to time make 
  selections to fill vacancies as they arise.

Upon the question being put to a vote, the Chair declared the resolution 
unanimously adopted.
Upon motion duly seconded and carried the Chair was authorized to 
appoint a committee of three on Patronage.
At this point the newly elected Secretary of the Caucus, Senator King of 
Utah, appeared and assumed the office of Secretary.
The Chairman announced that a number of new Senators were present, and 
upon invitation, Senators Adams, Bayard, Bruce, Copeland, Edwards, 
Ferris, George, Mayfield, Neely, Ralston, briefly addressed the 
Conference.
There being no further business for the Caucus, upon motion, the meeting 
adjourned, subject to the call of the Chair.

                                                [signed] William H. King
                                         United States Senator from Utah

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 26, 1924]

APRIL 26, 1924

Minutes of a Democratic Caucus held in Minority Room of the Senate 
Office Building, April 26, 1924.
In the absence of Senator Robinson, leader of the Minority Conference, 
the meeting was called to order by Senator Walsh of Montana, Vice 
Chairman.
The following Senators were present: Adams, Bayard, Dial, Dill, Edwards, 
Ferris, George, Gerry, Glass, Harris, Heflin, Jones of New Mexico, 
Kendrick, King, McKellar, Mayfield, Neely, Pittman, Ralston, Ransdell, 
Sheppard, Shields, Simmons, Smith of S.C., Underwood, Walsh of Mass., 
and Walsh of Montana.
The Acting Chairman stated that the purpose of the meeting was to 
consider the pending Revenue Bill and to determine what steps, if any, 
should be taken with respect to the various schedules and provisions of 
the same.
It was agreed that each Senator should be limited to five minutes, 
except that Senator Simmons, in explaining the normal and surtax 
provisions, and Senator Jones, in explaining the corporate tax 
provision, and Senator Harris, in explaining his amendments with respect 
to exemptions, should not be within the rule.
Senator Simmons submitted the Amendment agreed upon by the Minority 
members of the Finance Committee of the Senate, to be offered in the 
nature of a substitute to the pending bill, for the provisions dealing 
with the income and surtax provisions agreed upon by the Majority. He 
explained the differences between the proposed substitute and the Mellon 
Plan, and the bill as it passed the House.
Senator Jones explained at length the amendment agreed upon by the 
Minority Members of the Finance Committee, providing for a graduated tax 
on corporations.
Senator Harris explained his proposed amendment, providing for larger 
exemptions.
A general discussion followed, in which Senators Underwood, Glass, 
Adams, Ralston, Pittman, King, Walsh of Mass., and Heflin participated. 
Various propositions were submitted with respect to the maximum surtax 
and a number of motions fixing the maximum at various figures between 35 
and 40, were offered and defeated.
Senator McKellar moved that the plan of the Minority Members of the 
Finance Committee, submitted by Senator Simmons, dealing with the normal 
and surtax provisions of the bill, be approved. The motion carried.
The Conference then adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                                [signed] William H. King
                                                  U.S. Senator from Utah

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 28, 1924]

APRIL 28, 1924

Minutes of a Democratic Caucus held in the Minority Room, Senate Office 
Bldg., April 28, 1924.
Senator Robinson being absent, the Vice Chairman, Senator Walsh of 
Montana, presided.
The Senators present were as follows: Adams, Ashurst, Bayard, Dial, 
Fletcher, George, Gerry, Harris, Jones of New Mexico, Kendrick, King, 
McKellar, Glass, Pittman, Ralston, Ransdell, Reed, Sheppard, Shields, 
Simmons, Stanley, Heflin, Walsh of Montana, and Walsh of Massachusetts.
Senator Harris presented an amendment which he intended to offer to the 
pending Revenue Measure, increasing the exemptions allowed tax payers. 
Discussion followed and the amendment was not agreed to. Senator Harris 
stated that if there was no objection, he would offer the amendment in 
the Senate, notwithstanding the action of the Caucus. The Chair informed 
him that his view was concurred in by the Senators and that there would 
be no objection to such course.
Considerable discussion occurred with respect to various provisions of 
the pending bill. Senator Jones explained in detail the provisions of 
the Amendment dealing with the plan offered by the Minority, providing 
for a graduated corporation tax.
Upon motion of Senator McKellar, the Conference agreed to support the 
Amendment, as explained by Senator Jones.
A number of Senators explained amendments which they intended to offer 
to the pending revenue measure.
Upon motion, the Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the 
Chairman.

                                                [signed] William H. King
                                                  U.S. Senator from Utah

                                                               Secretary
                     Sixty-ninth Congress (1925-1927)

   [Editor's Note: As the Senate investigated the leasing of Naval oil 
reserves at Teapot Dome, and news of other scandals in the Harding 
administration began to surface, President Warren G. Harding died in 
August 1923, and was succeeded by his vice president, Calvin Coolidge. 
In a three-way race in 1924, President Coolidge, the Republican 
candidate, won a landslide election over Democrat John W. Davis and the 
Progressive party candidate, Senator Robert M. La Follette, Sr. of 
Wisconsin. In the Senate Democrats remained in the minority by a 41-to-
54 margin, while in the House the Republican majority was 247 to 183.]
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 6, 1925]

MARCH 6, 1925

Minutes of a Conference of Democratic Senators held in the Office of 
Senator Joseph T. Robinson, at 10 o'clock a.m., March 6, 1925.
The meeting was called to order by Senator Robinson. Upon a call of the 
roll by the Secretary, Senator King, the following Senators answered 
present: Ashurst, Bayard, Blease, Bratton, Broussard, Bruce, Caraway, 
Dill, Edwards, Ferris, Fletcher, George, Gerry, Glass, Harris, Heflin, 
Jones of New Mexico, Kendrick, King, McKellar, Mayfield, Neely, Overman, 
Pittman, Ralston, Ransdell, Reed, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Smith, 
Stephens, Swanson, Trammell, Tyson, Underwood and Walsh. The absentees 
were Copeland, Harrison and Wheeler.
The Chairman announced that the first matter of business was the 
election of a Democratic leader to serve for the next two years. Senator 
Fletcher took the Chair. Senator Ashurst nominated Senator Robinson for 
the position of Minority Leader and Chairman of the Democratic 
Conference, and he was unanimously elected.
Senator Walsh of Montana, upon motion of Senator Swanson, was 
unanimously elected Vice-Chairman.
Senator King was elected Secretary, and Senator Gerry was elected whip.
Senator Pittman was named and unanimously supported for the position of 
President pro tem of the Senate.
Thomas Keller was selected as [the] choice of the Democrats as acting 
Assistant Doorkeeper of the Senate.

Senator Swanson offered the following Resolution, which was unanimously 
adopted:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Caucus, the Vice-
  Chairman and the Whip shall be ex-officio members of the 
  Steering Committee; that the Chairman of the Caucus may 
  appoint not exceeding ten Senators, who together with the 
  ex-officio members shall constitute the Steering Committee, 
  which said committee shall assign representation on the 
  several committees of the Senate and from time to time make 
  selections to fill vacancies as they arise.

The Chairman presented to the Conference the newly-elected Senators: 
Bratton of New Mexico, Blease of South Carolina, and Tyson of Tennessee.
The Chairman stated that in the organization of the Committees the 
Republican Leaders had agreed that the Democrats should have upon the 
various committees of the Senate the same number as the rules now 
provided, but in order to properly provide places for the enlarged 
Republican membership, they proposed to enlarge the following named 
committees; by adding one to the present number of such Committees: 
namely, Commerce, Education and Labor, Indian Affairs, Interstate 
Commerce, Manufactures, and Military Affairs.
Senator Harris moved that the Committee on Rules be directed to make 
assignments of rooms for offices according to seniority of service and 
to see that the rights of the Democratic Senators were protected in such 
assignments. He stated that there seemed to be discrimination in the 
assignment of offices to the Senators and that he and other Democratic 
Senators were having difficulty in obtaining suitable rooms and that 
there was a disposition upon the part of the majority, in the 
distribution of rooms, to give preference to Republicans, and such 
preference extended even to those who but recently had been elected to 
the Senate. The motion of Senator Harris was carried, and the Democratic 
members of the Rules Committee, upon further motion of Senator Harris, 
were instructed to present the matter to the Rules Committee and to 
insist that Democratic Senators receive just and fair treatment in the 
assignment of rooms.
Senator Robinson addressed the Conference stating what he believed would 
be the measures that would come before the Senate in the present extra 
session. He referred particularly to the Isle of Pines Treaty, the 
Lausanne Treaty and the World Court. He also suggested that the 
Democratic Senators should, so far as it was proper, and in harmony with 
their wishes, cooperate together for the good of the country and for the 
carrying out of Democratic principles and policies.
A number of Senators, Underwood, Swanson and Heflin, briefly spoke upon 
the work of the special session.
Senator King, Senator Swanson, and Senator Underwood suggested that in 
view of the opposition to the Lausanne Treaty, and the chaotic condition 
in Turkey, and the uncertainty of the present Kemalistic government 
remaining in power, it would be wise to postpone action upon the 
Lausanne Treaty until the Senate met in PDecember.
Senator Walsh of Montana called attention to the fact that Charles B. 
Warren had been nominated by the President for Attorney General, and 
referred to the record showing Mr. Warren's connection with the sugar 
trust, and its subsidiary companies. Senator Reed also discussed the 
Warren nomination. Senators Ferris, Broussard and Ransdell briefly 
referred to the Warren nomination.
Senator Overman stated that he had voted in the Committee to confirm 
Warren upon the theory that the President should have great latitude in 
selecting his own official family.1
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ On March 10, 1925, the Senate voted 40 to 40 on the nomination of 
Charles B. Warren as attorney general. While Vice President Charles G. 
Dawes raced to the Capitol to break the tie, Senator Overman, the only 
Democrat to vote for Warren, switched his vote against him. The 
nomination was defeated, 39 to 41, with several Progressive Republicans 
voting with the Democrats. A second attempt to confirm Warren was 
defeated on March 16, 1925, by a vote of 39 to 46.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Dill suggested that steps ought to be taken to keep the 
Democratic organizations in the various states in vigorous condition, 
because in a little more than year from now, there would be another 
election for members of the Senate and the House, as well as for state 
offices. He referred to the meeting held the preceding night in honor of 
Senator Walsh of Massachusetts and to the evident purpose of his friends 
to see that all proper steps were taken to present his claims to the 
people of Massachusetts at the coming election.
Senator Robinson stated that the matter had received attention and that 
undoubtedly the Chairman of the Senate campaign committee would take all 
necessary steps to put the party in proper shape for the coming 
election.
Senator Jones of New Mexico referred to the testimony taken by the sub-
Committee to investigate the Internal Revenue Bureau, which showed Mr. 
Mellon's connection with big business and to the further fact that he 
was connected with various corporations which, under the law, 
disqualified him from holding the position of Secretary of the Treasury.
Upon motion Senator Robinson was authorized to name a committee on 
patronage that would be empowered to distribute the limited patronage 
allowed the minority under the procedure of the Senate.
Upon motion, the Conference adjourned subject to the call of the Chair.

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, March 6, 1925]
[PRESENT]
     Ashurst
     Bayard
     Blease
     Bratton
     Broussard
     Bruce
     Caraway
            Copeland
     Dill
     Edwards
     Ferris
     Fletcher
     George
     Gerry
     Glass
     Harris
            Harrison
     Heflin
     Jones of N. Mex
     Kendrick
     King
     McKellar
     Mayfield
     Neely
     Overman
     Pittman
     Ralston
     Ransdell
     Reed
     Robinson
     Sheppard
     Simmons
     Smith
     Stephens
     Swanson
     Trammell
     Tyson
     Underwood
     Walsh
            Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 9, 1925]

DECEMBER 9, 1925

Minutes of a Conference of the Democratic Senators held in the Minority 
Rooms at the Capitol, December 9, 1925, 10:30 o'clock, a.m.
The Conference was called to order by Senator Joe T. Robinson, Chairman.
The roll-call by the Secretary showed the following Senators present: 
Ashurst, Bayard, Bratton, Broussard, Bruce, [Caraway], Copeland, Dill, 
Edwards, Ferris, Fletcher, George, Gerry, Glass, Harris, Harrison, 
Heflin, Kendrick, McKellar, Mayfield, Neely, Overman, Pittman, Ransdell, 
Robinson, Simmons, Smith, Stephens, Swanson, Trammell, Tyson, Underwood 
and Walsh of Montana.
The Chairman announced that during the recess, Thomas W. Keller, who for 
many years had served as doorkeeper of the Senate, and after the 
Republicans obtained control of the Senate, as Assistant Doorkeeper, 
died, and that it was necessary to appoint a successor, and that under 
the practice, the Minority named the Acting Assistant Doorkeeper.
Senator Swanson nominated Edwin A. Halsey of Virginia to fill the 
vacancy as Acting Assistant Doorkeeper, caused by the death of Thomas W. 
Keller.
Upon motion of Senator Simmons, Mr. Halsey was chosen by acclamation.
The Chairman stated that Mr. Halsey held the position of floor Assistant 
upon the Democratic side, and that his selection to fill Mr. Keller's 
place, created a vacancy in the position which he had held.
Senator Harrison moved that the Chairman be authorized to name Leslie L. 
Biffle for the position of Floor Assistant.
Senator Swanson stated that under the practice, the Chairman was given 
the right to name a person for this position. Senator Underwood said 
that that was the rule and that he would vote for Senator Harrison's 
motion for the reason that Mr. Biffle, coming from Arkansas, [the 
Chairman] might be embarrassed in making the selection, and he suggested 
as an amendment to Senator Harrison's motion, that the action 
contemplated by the motion should not be regarded as a precedent. The 
suggestion was treated as an amendment, and the motion as amended was 
carried.
The Chairman then announced the selection of Mr. Leslie L. Biffle for 
the position of Floor Assistant.
The Chair was authorized to present, when the Senate met, a candidate 
for Secretary of the Senate, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of 
Secretary Sanderson.
Before the meeting adjourned, the Chair announced that he would present 
the name of John Burns of Monticello, N.Y.
There being no further business for the Caucus, upon motion, the meeting 
adjourned, subject to the call of the Chair.
The Chairman announced that a number of new Sena . . . [rest left blank]

                                                [signed] William H. King

                                                  U.S. Senator from Utah
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 7, 1926]

DECEMBER 7, 1926

Minutes of a meeting of the Democratic Conference held at the rooms of 
the Minority, Capitol Building, December 7, 1926, at 10:30 a.m.
The Conference was called to order by the Minority Leader, Senator Joe 
T. Robinson.

The Secretary called the roll and the following Senators answered 
``Present'':

  Bayard                   Edwards                          King                             Robinson
  Bratton                  Ferris                           McKellar                         Stephens
  Broussard                George                           Mayfield                         Swanson
  Bruce                    Harris                           Neely                            Trammell
  Copeland                 Harrison                          Overman                         Tyson
  Dill                     Heflin                           Pittman                          Hawes
                           Kendrick                         Ransdell


Senator Robinson stated that the Conference was called for the purpose 
of meeting and greeting the newly-elected Senators, namely Senator Walsh 
of Massachusetts and Senator Hawes of Missouri and to take such steps as 
were necessary to provide Committee assignments for the two new 
Senators. Senator Walsh was not present, but Senator Hawes was in 
attendance.
Senator Robinson further stated that there were no Minority vacancies 
upon any of the Committees and in order to provide assignments for the 
two Senators, some of the Minority Senators would have to surrender 
their positions upon Committees, or an increase would have to be made in 
the membership of some of the PCommittees.
Senator Swanson suggested that in view of the fact that the number of 
Democratic Senators had been increased, he regarded it as just that 
there should be an increase of one in the membership of the Committee on 
Finance and that the Committee on Interstate Commerce should also be 
enlarged, the two increases being given to the Minority.
Upon motion of Senator Swanson, the leader of the Minority was 
authorized to confer with the Majority with a view to increasing the 
membership of the Committee on Finance and the Committee on Interstate 
Commerce, with the view to giving to Senator Walsh of Massachusetts 
membership upon the Finance Committee and to Senator Hawes a place upon 
the Interstate Commerce Committee, and also that if he was unsuccessful 
in this matter, that he be authorized to confer with the Democratic 
Senators, with a view to having more of them relinquish their positions 
upon Committees in order that places might be found upon Committees for 
Senators Walsh and Hawes.
The question as to the policy the Minority will pursue on the question 
of taxation was briefly discussed, but no definite action taken. The 
Chairman stated that immediately after the holidays another Conference 
would be held, at which time the program of the Minority, to be adopted 
for the remainder of the session, would be Pconsidered.
Upon motion, the Conference adjourned.

                                                [signed] William H. King
                                         United States Senator from Utah

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call, Democratic Caucus
December 7, 1926
[PRESENT]
            Ashurst
     Bayard
            Blease
     Bratton
     Broussard
     Bruce
            Caraway
     Copeland
     Dill
     Edwards
     Ferris
            Fletcher
     George
            Gerry
            Glass
     Harris
     Harrison
     Hawes
     Heflin
            Jones of N. Mex
     Kendrick
     King
     McKellar
     Mayfield
     Neely
     Overman
     Pittman
     Ransdell
            Reed
     Robinson
            Sheppard
            Simmons
            Smith
            Steck
     Stephens
     Swanson
     Trammell
     Tyson
            Underwood
            Walsh of Mass
            Walsh of Mont
            Wheeler
                     Seventieth Congress (1927-1929)

   [Editor's Note: The 1926 election narrowed the Republican majority in 
the Senate to 48 to 47, with one Farmer-Laborite. In the House, 
Republicans held a 238-to-194 majority.
  On January 8, 1928, Alabama Senator Thomas Heflin delivered a lengthy 
address in the Senate chamber in which he accused the Catholic Church 
and the Knights of Columbus of conspiring to defame him with forged 
documents, and repeatedly assailed New York Governor Al Smith, a 
Catholic who was the leading contender for the Democratic presidential 
nomination. Joseph Robinson, a member of the special committee to 
investigate the forged documents, rose to rebut Heflin by denying that 
the committee had uncovered any evidence of a Catholic conspiracy. 
Senator Heflin objected that: ``The Senator from Arkansas can not remain 
leader of the Democrats and fight the Roman Catholics' battle every time 
the issue is raised in this body without some expression from a 
constitutional Democrat.'' Robinson replied: ``Mr. President, whenever 
the Senator from Alabama can determine who shall be the leader of the 
Democratic Party in the Senate of the United States, that party can get 
somebody else than myself to lead it here.'' Senator Robinson then 
announced that he planned to call a Democratic Conference the following 
day and challenged the Senator from Alabama to come before the 
Conference and move the election of a new Democratic leader. The 
Democratic Conference overwhelmingly voted its confidence in Robinson, 
who later that year was nominated to run for vice president on the 
Democratic ticket headed by Governor Smith.1]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ Congressional Record, 70th Cong., 1st sess., pp. 1660-61.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 5, 1927]

MARCH 5, 1927

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Minority, March 5, 1927.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m., Saturday, March 5th, 
1927, in the Democratic Minority Conference Room in the Capitol, 
Washington, D.C.
The assembly was called to order by the Chairman, Senator Robinson.
Senator Sheppard was appointed Temporary Secretary in the absence of 
Secretary Senator King.
The roll was called and the following were present: Ashurst, Barkley, 
Bayard, Black, Bratton, Broussard, Bruce, Caraway, Dill, Edwards, 
Fletcher, George, Gerry, Glass, Hayden, Harris, Harrison, Hawes, Jones 
of N. Mex., Kendrick, Mayfield, Overman, Pittman, Robinson, Sheppard, 
Smith, Steck, Stephens, Swanson, Thomas, Tydings, Tyson, Wagner, Walsh 
of Mass., Walsh of Mont. (35).
Chairman, Senator Robinson, introduced the new members, after which he 
addressed the Conference, announcing in conclusion that he would call 
Senator Bayard to the Chair.
Senator Bayard then took the Chair.
Senator Swanson moved that the Conference proceed to the election of 
officers.
Senator Robinson was elected Chairman unanimously, and resumed the 
Chair.
Senator Walsh of Montana was unanimously elected Vice-Chairman.
Senator Black was unanimously elected Secretary.
Senator Gerry was unanimously elected Minority Whip.
A vote of thanks was unanimously tendered the Democratic Senatorial 
Campaign Committee for its work in the past.
Senator Pittman was nominated unanimously as President of Senate pro 
tem.
Senator Harrison made a motion, that in addition to the Chairman, 
Senator Robinson, the Vice-Chairman, Senator Walsh, and the Whip, 
Senator Gerry, ten others be named by the Chairman, to serve on the 
Steering Committee, which motion was carriedP unanimously.
Colonel Halsey was unanimously nominated for the Secretary of the 
Senate.
Charles L. Hartman of Montana was nominated by Senator Walsh of Montana, 
for Sergeant at Arms, which nomination was unanimously accepted.
Senator Harrison made a motion that the Chairman name a Committee of 
three on Patronage, which motion was carried, unanimously.
Upon motion, Conference adjourned.

                                                     [signed] Hugo Black

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 19, 1928]

JANUARY 19, 1928

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Minority, Jan. 19, 1928.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on January 19, 1928, in 
the Democratic Minority Conference Room in the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
The assembly was called to order by the Chairman, Senator PRobinson.
The roll was then called by the Secretary, and the following were 
present: Barkley, Bayard, Black, Bratton, Broussard, Bruce, Caraway, 
Copeland, Ferris, Fletcher, George, Gerry, Glass, Harris, Harrison, 
Hawes, Kendrick, King, McKellar, Mayfield, Overman, Robinson, Sheppard, 
Simmons, Steck, Stephens, Swanson, Thomas, Trammell, Tydings, Tyson, 
Wagner, Walsh of Mass., Walsh of Mont., Wheeler.
The Chairman, Senator Robinson, addressed the Conference, stating that 
he had called this Conference on account of Senator Heflin's challenge 
of his leadership of the Democratic Minority. Senator Robinson stated 
that he had written a letter to Senator Heflin, notifying him of this 
meeting and notifying him further of the purpose to consider Senator 
Heflin's challenge to his leadership. Senator Robinson then requested 
Senator Bayard to preside at the meeting. Senator Robinson then 
surrendered the chair to Senator Bayard. Senator Glass then offered the 
following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That this Conference of Democratic members of the 
  Senate express its confidence in the leadership of Senator 
  Robinson and in his service on the Special Committee named 
  to investigate the alleged secret Mexican documents.

The original penciled Resolution is hereto attached, marked Exhibit 
``A.''
Senator Glass then made some remarks, in which he stated that he 
conceded the right of any Senator to express himself on the floor on any 
subject within the rules, but he did not consider it the privilege of 
any Senator to attempt to involve any other Senator in his position.
Senator Trammell addressed the Conference, and stated in substance that 
he looked upon the matter raised by Senators Heflin and Robinson as a 
personal controversy between these two Senators, and that he (Senator 
Trammell) did not care to take sides on the issue between these two 
Senators. Senator Trammell further stated that he thought both Senators 
Robinson and Heflin had a right to express themselves on the Senate 
floor and that he was therefore opposed to Senator Glass' resolution.
Senator Harris addressed the Conference and indicated a reluctance to 
support the Resolution of Senator Glass, not because of any opposition 
to Senator Robinson's leadership, but because the passage of the 
resolution might be injurious to Senator Heflin, if it should be 
considered as a condemnation of Senator Heflin.
Senator Harrison made some remarks favoring the Resolution.
Senator Simmons addressed the Conference. He said that he was not 
opposed to the Resolution, and would be very glad to endorse the 
leadership of Senator Robinson. He stated, however, that he would go no 
further than this. He was afraid that the country would construe going 
any further to be a settlement of the disputed question between Senators 
Robinson and Heflin. He opposed a resolution, which would go that far. 
He said that if the Conference attempted to pass a resolution that 
smacked of an endorsement, it would look to the country as though it 
were passing upon the Pdispute.
Senator Bratton expressed himself as being favorable to a motion to 
express confidence in the leadership of the Democrats of Senator 
Robinson, and as to his impartiality on the Special Committee.
Senator Caraway said that it was absolutely necessary that Senator 
Robinson should be endorsed after the challenge had been made. He 
further said that he agreed that Senator Robinson should have said what 
he did say. He also said that he thought the Party should take the 
position that a man should belong to any church he saw fit.
Senator Bruce addressed the Conference, and said that if the Conference 
did not take action, he (Senator Bruce) would take up the question on 
the Senate floor. He said that if Robinson had not talked, others would. 
He said that from sixty to seventy-five percent of citizens would 
approve the course. He stated further that the know-nothings brought in 
the same kind of ruffians that are now attempting to control the party. 
He said that most of the people of his state were Catholics, and that 
there was no difference between Protestants and Catholics. He stated 
further that if the Democratic Party did not stand out for them, he 
would not remain in the Party. He said that if Senator Simmons was 
intolerant, he (Senator Bruce) would not be. He said further that he 
would say what he wanted to say on the floor.
Senator Copeland approved the Resolution.
Senator Robinson moved that Senator Black not vote on the question, and 
the motion was carried.
On the roll being called, all the Senators voted for the resolution 
except Senator Black, who did not vote, and Senator Trammell, who voted 
against the resolution.
Senators Reed and Hayden, being absent, asked that their votes be 
counted for the resolution.
There being no further business, the Conference adjourned.

                                                               Secretary
                              Exhibit ``A''

    Resolved, That this Conference of Democratic members of the Senate 
express its confidence in the leadership of Senator Robinson and in his 
service on the Special Committee named to investigate the alleged secret 
Mexican documents.

[Roll Call January 19, 1928]
[PRESENT]
            Ashurst     a
     Barkley
     Bayard
     Black
            Blease      a
     Bratton
     Broussard
     Bruce
     Caraway
     Copeland
            Dill        a
            Edwards     a
     Ferris
     Fletcher
     George
     Gerry
     Glass
     Harris
     Harrison
     Hawes
            Hayden      a
            Heflin      a
     Kendrick
     King
     McKellar
     Mayfield
            Neely       a
     Overman
     Pittman
            Ransdell    a
            Reed        a
     Robinson
     Sheppard
     Simmons
            Smith       a
     Steck
     Stephens
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Trammell
     Tydings
     Tyson
     Wagner
     Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
     Wheeler

Jan 19, 1928
[Vote on Senator Glass' Resolution]
[Tally sheet D]
     YEAS        NAYS
     Ashurst
     Barkley
     Bayard
            Black
            Blease      a
     Bratton
     Broussard
     Bruce
     Caraway
            Copeland    a
            Dill        a
            Edwards     a
     Ferris
     Fletcher
     George
     Gerry
     Glass
     Harris
     Harrison
     Hawes
            Hayden      a
            Heflin      a
     Kendrick
     King
     McKellar
     Mayfield
            Neely       a
     Overman
            Pittman   [a?]
            Ransdell    a
            Reed        a
     Robinson
     Sheppard
     Simmons
            Smith       a
     Steck
     Stephens
     Swanson
     Thomas
            Trammell 
     Tydings
     Tyson
     Wagner
     Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
     Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 21, 1928]

JANUARY 21, 1928

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Minority, Jan. 21, 1928.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on January 21, 1928, in 
the Democratic Minority Conference Room in the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
The assembly was called to order by the Chairman, Senator PRobinson.
The roll was then called by the Secretary, and the following were 
present: Barkley, Bayard, Black, Bratton, Broussard, Bruce, Caraway, 
Copeland, Ferris, Fletcher, George, Gerry, Glass, Harris, Harrison, 
Hawes, Kendrick, King, McKellar, Mayfield, Overman, Robinson, Sheppard, 
Simmons, Steck, Stephens, Swanson, Thomas, Trammell, Tydings, Tyson, 
Wagner, Walsh of Mass., Walsh of Mont., Wheeler.
Senator Robinson announced that the meeting was called for considering 
the Merchant Marine Bill.
Senator Fletcher discussed the Merchant Marine Bill.
Senator Copeland then presented his plan and an amendment he would 
propose to the Merchant Marine Bill.
Senator Robinson stated that it was not intended that any definite 
action should be taken, but that a discussion should be presented for 
the benefit of the Conference. In the discussion it developed that most 
of those present favored the Jones Bill. After discussion, upon motion 
the Conference adjourned.

                                                               Secretary
January 21 [1928]
[PRESENT]
      29    Ashurst
       1    Barkley
       2    Bayard
       3    Black
            Blease
      29    Bratton
       4    Broussard
       5    Bruce
      26    Caraway
       6    Copeland
            Dill
            Edwards
       7    Ferris
       8    Fletcher
       9    George
      10    Gerry
      11    Glass
      12    Harris
      13    Harrison
            Hawes
            Hayden
            Heflin
            Kendrick
      30    King
      27    McKellar
            Mayfield
      14    Neely
      15    Overman
            Pittman
            Ransdell
            Reed
      16    Robinson
      17    Sheppard
      18    Simmons
      19    Smith
      20    Steck
      31    Stephens
      21    Swanson
            Thomas
      22    Trammell
      23    Tydings
      24    Tyson
            Wagner
      28    Walsh of Mass
            Walsh of Mont
            Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 9, 1929]

JANUARY 9, 1929

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Minority, Jan. 9, 1929.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on January 9, 1929, in 
the Democratic Minority Conference Room in the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
The assembly was called to order by the Chairman, Senator PRobinson.
The roll was then called by the Secretary, and the following were 
present: Bayard, Black, Bratton, Broussard, Bruce, Caraway, Copeland, 
Ferris, Fletcher, George, Gerry, Glass, Harrison, Hawes, Hayden, Heflin, 
McKellar, Pittman, Ransdell, Robinson, Sheppard, Stephens, Swanson, 
Thomas, Tyson, Wagner, Walsh of Mass., Walsh of Mont., Wheeler.
Senator Robinson addressed the meeting and stated that it was called for 
the purpose of discussing Flood Relief. He also informed the Conference 
that it was [not] intended to attempt to bind the members in connection 
with any legislation, but simply to give the members a chance to 
understand the question fully before it came up on the floor. He also 
stated that he thought Flood Relief legislation should be considered 
from a non-partisan standpoint.

Senator Ransdell then offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED by the Conference that legislation pertaining to 
  flood control is of primary importance to the nation, is 
  non-partisan in nature, and should be considered without 
  regard to political partisanship.
   That the chairman of the Conference be authorized to 
  appoint a select committee of Senators to study the problem 
  and confer with Senators of all parties and other committees 
  or bureaus for the purpose of obtaining the widest possible 
  knowledge with regard to the subject and to advise with 
  regard thereto.

Senators Hawes, Swanson, Caraway, Pittman, Simmons and Walsh of Montana 
discussed the resolution.
The resolution was unanimously adopted.
Senator Harrison made a motion that the three ranking minority members 
of all committees be appointed by his resolution to keep the Chairman of 
the Conference informed of important pending legislation, and that when 
such Committee, or Chairman should deem it advisable, a Conference of 
the Minority be called for the discussion of important legislation.
The motion was seconded by Senator Walsh of Massachusetts, and was 
unanimously carried. There being no further business, the Conference 
adjourned.

                                                               Secretary

[Roll call, Jan. 9, 1929]
[PRESENT]
            Ashurst     a
            Barkley     a
       1    Bayard
       2    Black
            Blease      a
       3    Bratton
       4    Broussard
       5    Bruce
       6    Caraway
       7    Copeland
      32    Dill
            Edwards     a
       8    Ferris
       9    Fletcher
      27    George
      10    Gerry
      11    Glass
      33    Harris
      26    Harrison
      12    Hawes
      13    Hayden
      14    Heflin
            Kendrick    a
            King        a
      15    McKellar
            Mayfield    a
            Neely       a
            Overman     a
      16    Pittman
      17    Ransdell
            Reed        a
      18    Robinson
      19    Sheppard
      31    Simmons
            Smith       a
      30    Steck
      20    Stephens
      21    Swanson
      28    Thomas
            Trammell    a
            Tydings     a
      22    Tyson
      29    Wagner
      23    Walsh of Mass.
      24    Walsh of Mont.
      25    Wheeler
                   Seventy-first Congress (1929-1931)

   [Editor's Note. In the election of 1928, the Democratic ticket of New 
York Governor Al Smith and Senate Democratic Minority Leader Joseph T. 
Robinson lost to the Republican ticket of Secretary of Commerce Herbert 
Hoover and Senate Republican Majority Leader Charles Curtis. Democrats 
also lost 7 seats in the Senate, increasing the Republican majority to 
56 to 39, with 1 Farmer-Laborite. In the House, the Republicans enjoyed 
an expanded majority of 270 to 164. Among the major items of concern to 
Democratic senators when they returned were passage of a Flood Relief 
bill, following the disastrous Mississippi River flood of 1927; and the 
impending Smoot-Hawley Tariff. Completely unanticipated was the Wall 
Street stock market crash that would occur in October 1929, triggering 
the Great Depression and reversing the two parties' political fortunes.]
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 5, 1929]

MARCH 5, 1929

Minutes of a Conference of Democratic Senators held in the Minority 
Rooms of the Capitol, March 5, 1929, at 10 o'clock, a.m.
The Conference was called to order by Senator Joseph T. Robinson of 
Arkansas. Senator King was named as secretary pro tem. The following 
senators answered to the roll call: Ashurst, Black, Blease, Bratton, 
Broussard, Caraway, Connally, Copeland, Dill, Fletcher, George, Glass, 
Harris, Harrison, Hawes, Hayden, Heflin, Kendrick, King, McKellar, 
Overman, Pittman, Ransdell, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Smith, Steck, 
Stephens, Swanson, Thomas, Trammell, Tydings, Tyson, Walsh of 
Massachusetts, Walsh of Montana.
Senator Robinson stated that the object of the Conference was to effect 
an organization of the Democratic Senators who were to serve in the 71st 
Congress. Senator Overman was called to the chair and thereupon Senator 
Ashurst presented the name of Senator Joseph T. Robinson for the 
position of Minority Leader and chairman of the Democratic Conference. 
Senator Heflin presented the name of Senator Swanson, who promptly 
[declined] to permit his name to be considered and seconded the 
nomination of Senator Robinson. All Senators except Senator Heflin voted 
for Senator Robinson and he was thereupon elected to the position of 
Minority Leader and chairman of the Democratic Conference.
Senator King nominated Senator Thomas J. Walsh for the position of vice 
chairman, Senator Black as secretary, and Senator Sheppard, of Texas, 
for the position of Whip, and each was chosen by acclamation for the 
respective positions named. Colonel Edwin A. Halsey was unanimously 
chosen for the position of acting assistant doorkeeper and Leslie L. 
Biffle was chosen for the position of assistant on the floor of the 
Senate.
Senator Robinson was escorted to the chair by Senators Ashurst, Swanson, 
and Walsh and thanked the Senators for the confidence expressed and for 
the support given him as Minority Leader in the past and for the honor 
conferred in again nominating him for the important position for which 
he had just been chosen. He briefly referred to the coming special 
session of Congress and the question of the prospective tariff and farm 
relief legislation. Considerable discussion ensued as to the position to 
be taken by the Democrats upon the tariff question and the legislation 
dealing with farm relief. It was suggested that there should be, as far 
as practicable, cooperation between the Democratic members of the 
Finance Committee and Agriculture Committee of the Senate in preparing 
and considering legislation for the special session to convene in April 
next. The discussion was participated in by Senators Walsh, King, 
Thomas, Swanson, Hawes, McKellar, Heflin, Simmons, and Kendrick. The 
consensus of opinion was that before the Democratic senators could 
determine upon any policy it was necessary to ascertain what measures 
were to be proposed by the Republicans and definite action was postponed 
to a later date.
Senator King called attention to the propaganda in favor of imposing 
tariff upon sugar imported from the Philippine Islands and from Porto 
Rico and stated that in his opinion the Democrats should carry out the 
promises made in the Jones Act and urge legislation granting 
independence to the Filipinos.
Senator Robinson referred to the statements made to him by Republican 
leaders that the Democrats should suffer a loss of two members upon the 
important committees of the Senate. He stated that he had informed the 
Republican leaders that in his opinion the Democrats would oppose any 
reduction in Committee memberships. He stated, however, that the 
Democrats might be compelled to submit to the loss of one member upon 
the important committees. The matter was left to the chairman and the 
Steering committee with the suggestion that they do all within their 
power to secure fair representation for the minority upon all Senate 
committees.

Senator Swanson offered the following resolution which was unanimously 
agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the chairman of the Caucus, the vice 
  chairman and the Whip shall be ex-officio members of the 
  Steering Committee; that the chairman of the Caucus may 
  appoint not exceeding ten senators who, together with the ex 
  officio members, shall constitute the Steering Committee 
  which said committee shall assign representatives on the 
  several committees of the Senate and, from time to time, 
  make selections to fill vacancies as they arise.

Senator Pittman was unanimously chosen for the position as president pro 
tem of the Senate. Upon motion of Senator King the Chairman and the Whip 
were authorized to select and present to the Senate when it was 
organized, names for the position of sergeant at arms and for other 
positions created by the Senate and for the filling of which no 
provision has been made.
There being no further business, upon motion the Conference Padjourned.

                                                      Secretary pro tem.
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 25, 1929]

 APRIL 25, 1929

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Minority, April 25, 1929.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on April 25, 1929, in 
the Democratic Minority Conference Room in the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
The assembly was called to order by the Chairman, Senator PRobinson.
The roll was then called by the Secretary, and the following were 
present: Barkley, Black, Bratton, Caraway, Connally, Dill, Fletcher, 
George, Harris, Harrison, Hawes, Hayden, Heflin, Kendrick, King, 
McKellar, Overman, Pittman, Robinson, Sheppard, Simmons, Smith, Steck, 
Swanson, Thomas, Trammell, Tydings, Tyson, Wagner, Walsh of Mass., Walsh 
of Mont.
Senator Robinson suggested that he had called a Conference because he 
thought it was wise to consider matters coming up in the Senate at that 
time. He also thought that it was proper to further discuss Flood 
Relief.
Senator Caraway made some remarks concerning the Farm Bill. He stated 
that he favored a bill with the Debenture Plan.
There was a general discussion upon the subject of the Debenture, 
entered into by Senators Simmons, Tyson, Smith, Swanson and Walsh of 
Montana. Other Senators discussed other questions concerning Farm 
Relief.
There being no further business, the Conference adjourned.

                                                  [signed] Hugo L. Black

                                                               Secretary

[Roll call, April 25, 1929]
[PRESENT]
            Ashurst
     Barkley
     Black
            Blease
     Bratton
            Broussard
     Caraway
     Connally
            Copeland
     Dill
     Fletcher
     George
            Glass
     Harris
     Harrison
     Hawes
     Hayden
     Heflin
     Kendrick
     King
     McKellar
     Overman
     Pittman
            Ransdell
     Robinson
     Sheppard
     Simmons
     Smith
     Steck
            Stephens
     Swanson
     Thomas
     Trammell
     Tydings
     Tyson
     Wagner
     Walsh of Mass
     Walsh of Mont
            Wheeler
                   Seventy-second Congress (1931-1933)

   [Editor's Note: As the Great Depression worsened, Senate Democrats 
increased their ranks from 39 to 47, creating a tie with the Republicans 
if they gained the vote of the one Farmer-Laborite independent. The vote 
of Republican Vice President Charles Curtis, however, guaranteed that 
the Republicans would retain control of the Senate. In the House, the 
margin was 217 to 217, also with a single independent; but deaths and 
special elections swung the House majority to the Democrats, making John 
Nance Garner Speaker.
  As a sign of the sharp divisions within the Senate Republican ranks, a 
band of progressive Republicans in the Senate refused to support the 
conservative New Hampshire Republican Senator George Moses for president 
pro tempore. For a month, a deadlock persisted as the progressive 
Republicans withheld their votes from both the Republican and Democratic 
candidates. Finally, Vice President Curtis ruled that Moses would 
continue to serve as president pro tempore until a successor was 
elected. Moses held the post for the remainder of the Seventy-second 
Congress, until he was defeated for reelection to the Senate in 1932.
  The 1930 election also saw the return of J. Hamilton Lewis to the 
Senate. Having created the post of party whip in 1913, Lewis was chosen 
once again as whip in 1931.]
____________________________________________________

                                                      [December 4, 1931]

DECEMBER 4, 1931

Minutes of the Conference of Democratic Minority, Dec. 4. 1931.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on December 4th, 1931, 
in the Democratic Conference Room in the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
The assembly was called to order by the Chairman, Senator PRobinson.
The roll was then called by the Secretary, Senator Black, and the 
following were present: Ashurst, Bailey, Bankhead, Barkley, Black, 
Broussard, Bulkley, Bulow, Byrnes, Connally, Coolidge, Costigan, Dill, 
Fletcher, George, Glass, Gore, Harris, Harrison, Hawes, Hayden, Hull, 
Kendrick, King, Logan, McGill, McKellar, Morrison, Neely, Pittman, 
Robinson, Sheppard, Swanson, Thomas, Trammell, Tydings, Wagner, Walsh of 
Mass., Walsh of Mont.
A telegram from Senator J. Hamilton Lewis was read, expressing his 
regret that he could not be present at the Conference.
Senator Harrison announced that Senator Stephens could not be present 
because of illness, but he would come if his vote should be needed.
Senator Robinson announced that the first business was the election of 
officers.
Senator Harrison then took the chair and Senator Ashurst nominated 
Senator Robinson for Chairman of the Conference, and Senator Robinson 
was unanimously elected.
Senator Glass nominated Senator Walsh of Montana, as Assistant Chairman, 
and he was unanimously elected. Senator Swanson nominated Senator Black 
as Secretary, and he was unanimously elected. Senator Sheppard was 
unanimously elected the Democratic Whip. Senator Swanson offered the 
following resolution:

  RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference and the Vice-
  chairman and the Whip shall be ex-officio members of the 
  Steering Committee; that the Chairman of the Conference be 
  authorized to appoint not exceeding ten (10) Senators, who, 
  together with the ex-officio members, shall constitute a 
  steering committee, which said committee shall assign 
  representation on the several committees of the Senate and 
  from time to time make selections to fill vacancies as they 
  arise.

This resolution was unanimously adopted.
Senator Swanson nominated Senator Pittman as candidate for President pro 
tem of the Senate, and Senator Pittman was unanimously chosen.
Considerable discussion arose concerning the question of a President pro 
tem. Senator Gore suggested that the Democrats should make a motion to 
declare the Presidency pro tem vacant. Senator Robinson suggested that 
we should not inject ourselves into the controversy between the 
insurgents and the regular Republicans, but should proceed in the 
regular way to support our candidate.
Numerous Senators discussed the proposition. In response to a question 
from Senator Costigan, the Chairman announced that this Conference never 
bound its members.

Senator King then offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That it is the desire of this Conference that 
  Edwin A. Halsey be continued in his present position as 
  Secretary for the Minority and that he be elected to that 
  position.

The motion of Senator King was unanimously carried, and Mr. Halsey was 
named as Secretary to the Minority Conference.
Senator McKellar nominated Edwin A. Halsey as our candidate for 
Secretary of the Senate, and this motion was unanimously carried.
A message came to the Conference from Mrs. Caraway that she was 
unavoidably absent, and would be glad to act with the Conference.
Senator Walsh nominated Mr. J.L. Dobell, of Butte, Montana, as the 
Democratic candidate for Sergeant at Arms. Senator Gore nominated John 
M. Young of Florida, formerly of Oklahoma, for the same position. Mr. 
Dobell was named by the Conference as its candidate.

Senator King then offered the following Resolution:

   Moved that the Chairman of the Conference be authorized 
  when the Senate meets for organization to nominate for the 
  various positions herein mentioned the persons heretofore 
  selected by this Conference for such positions.

and this motion was unanimously carried.

Senator King offered a resolution as follows:

   Moved that the leader of the Democratic Conference be 
  authorized to name a candidate for the position of floor 
  assistant.

and it was unanimously carried.

Senator King offered the following resolution:

   Upon motion of Senator King, Senator Robinson, as Chairman 
  of the Conference is authorized to name the Committee on 
  Patronage which would be authorized to distribute whatever 
  positions were allowed the Minority under the practice of 
  the PSenate.

and it was unanimously carried.

 Senator Harrison offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED: That a Committee of Senators, of which the 
  Chairman and Vice-Chairman of the Conference shall be 
  members, be appointed by the Chairman of the Conference to 
  constitute a Committee to cooperate with a similar Committee 
  of the Democrats of the House, in obtaining as nearly as 
  possible, united action between the Democratic membership of 
  the two houses.

and this motion was unanimously carried.

Senator King offered the following resolution:

   Moved that the thanks of the Democratic Conference be 
  extended to M.E. Tydings for his faithful and efficient 
  service as Chairman of the Senate Democratic Committee.

and it was unanimously carried.
Senator Robinson announced that if a challenge of Senator Bankhead 
should be made in an effort to prevent his taking the oath of office, 
that it was his purpose to make or cause to be made, a substitute motion 
providing for Senator Bankhead to be seated. A discussion of this 
proposition then occurred, participated in by Senators George, Walsh and 
Black.
Senator Robinson then introduced to the Conference Senators Bailey, 
Bankhead, Costigan, Coolidge, Hull, Bulow, Byrnes and Gore.
There being no further business, the Conference adjourned.

                                                     [signed] Hugo Black

                                                               Secretary
                              WESTERN UNION

            Hon. Joseph T. Robinson
            Minority Leader US Senate

Personal situation make impossible for me to be present at meeting 
called for Friday. Please take this wire as authority to vote me in 
anything as to organization and program that would be in your judgment 
to advantage of the causes you all represent. I was not sure I had the 
right to be at Caucus not having been previously sworn in for 
legislative service. Best wishes to all the assemblage.

                                                       J. Hamilton Lewis

[Roll Call, December 4, 1931]
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst    1
      Bailey     2
      Bankhead   3
      Barkley    4
      Black      5
             Bratton
      Broussard  6
      Bulkley    7
      Bulow      8
      Byrnes     9
             Caraway
      Connally  10
      Coolidge  11
            Copeland
      Costigan  12
      Dill      13
      Fletcher  14
      George    15
      Glass     16
      Gore      17
      Harris    18
      Harrison  19
      Hawes     20
      Hayden    21
      Hull      22
      Kendrick  23
      King      24
            Lewis
      Logan     25
            Long
      McGill     26
      McKellar   27
      Morrisson 28
      Neely     29
      Pittman   30
      Robinson  31
      Sheppard  32
            Smith
            Stephens
      Swanson   33
      Thomas    34
      Trammell  35
      Tydings   36
      Wagner    37
      Walsh of M38s
      Walsh of M39t
             Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 8, 1932]

JULY 8, 1932

Minutes, Conference of Democratic Minority, July 8, 1932.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on the 8th of July 1932, 
in the Democratic Conference Room of the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
There was a quorum present, and Senator Robinson stated that the meeting 
was called for the discussion of a Relief Bill and the question of 
adjournment. He also stated that while he hoped that the measure 
concerning relief would be fully discussed, that no binding action was 
contemplated by the Chairman in this meeting.
Thereafter the following Senators entered into discussion of the Relief 
Measure: Wagner, Long, Pittman, Bulkley, Glass, Harrison, Connally, 
George, Hull, Bailey, Gore, McKellar, King, Dill, Trammell, Sheppard, 
Morrison and Tydings.
The measure under discussion was the Relief Bill, which had been sent to 
Conference between the House and the Senate. The Conferees had agreed 
upon a measure. The discussion, in the main, was based upon the argument 
that the Senate should back up the House, and the position of the House, 
which the Speaker [John Nance Garner] had so strongly favored.
In order to ascertain the sentiment of the Senators present, a vote was 
taken, and it was found that eighteen (18) favored adopting the 
Conference Report, and eleven (11) were opposed to adopting the 
Conference Report.
It appearing that further discussion was desirable, the Conference 
agreed to recess until July 9th, 1932, at 10 a.m., in the Conference 
Room of the Capitol.

                                                     [signed] Hugo Black

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, July 8, 1932]
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
      Bailey
            Bankhead
            Barkley
      Black
      Bratton
      Broussard
      Bulkley
      Bulow
      Byrnes
      Caraway
      Cohen
      Connally
      Coolidge
      Copeland
            Costigan
      Dill
            Fletcher
      George
      Glass
      Gore
      Harrison
      Hawes
      Hayden
      Hull
      Kendrick
            King
            Lewis
            Logan
      Long
      McGill
            McKellar
      Morrison
            Neely
      Pittman
      Robinson
      Sheppard
            Smith
      Stephens
            Swanson
            Thomas
      Trammell
      Tydings
      Wagner
      Walsh of Mass
             Walsh of Mont
            Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                          [July 9, 1932]

JULY 9, 1932

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Minority, July 9, 1932.
The Democratic Conference assembled at ten a.m. on July 9, 1932, in the 
Democratic Conference Room of the Capitol, Washington, D.C.
The Conference resumed its session after the recess of yesterday (July 
8th, 1932).
Senator Robinson reported to the Conference that no concessions would be 
made by the House, so that the vote in the Senate must be taken on the 
Conference Report, as it had been agreed upon. Senators Hayden and 
Wagner discussed the proposition. Senator Copeland announced that he did 
not like the plan adopted in the Conference Report, but that he would 
vote for it.
Senators Fletcher, McKellar and Kendrick discussed the Conference on the 
War Appropriations Bill, particularly as it related to the proposal to 
reduce the Army by 2,000 officers. Senators Fletcher and McKellar 
thought that a reduction should be agreed to. Senator Kendrick opposed 
the reduction. Senator Hawes and Senator Byrnes both opposed this 
reduction.
There being no further business the Conference adjourned.

                                                     [signed] Hugo Black

                                                               Secretary

[Roll Call, July 9, 1932]
[PRESENT]
            Ashurst
            Bailey
            Bankhead
            Barkley
      Black
      Bratton
      Broussard
      Bulkley
      Bulow
      Byrnes
      Caraway
      Cohen
      Connally
      Coolidge
      Copeland
            Costigan
      Dill
      Fletcher
      George
            Glass
      Gore
      Harrison
      Hawes
             Hayden
      Hull
      Kendrick
            King
            Lewis
            Logan
            Long
      McGill
      McKellar
      Morrison
            Neely
      Pittman
      Robinson
      Sheppard
            Smith
      Stephens
            Swanson
            Thomas
      Trammell
            Tydings
      Wagner
            Walsh of Mass
            Walsh of Mont
            Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 23, 1932]

DECEMBER 23, 1932

Minutes of Senate Democratic Conference, December 23, 1932.
On December 23, 1932, the roll was called and a quorum found present.
The Committee Report on Nominations was confirmed.
Then the Conference agreed to vote the Bingham Resolution be sent to the 
Judiciary Committee.
Senator Walsh suggested a committee to consider reduction of 
expenditures.
Senator Byrnes suggested that his committee was doing that now.

                                                               Secretary

 [A second account of the same session read as follows:]

Minutes of Conference of Democratic Senators held in the Marble Room of 
the Capitol Building, December 23, 1932 at 10:30 a.m.
All nominations unanimously confirmed by Conference.
Conference agreed to support motion to refer Bingham resolution to the 
Judiciary Committee.
Senator Walsh (Mass.) suggested that a committee of Senators be 
appointed to consider the reduction of government expenditures.
Senator Byrnes (S.C.) suggested that his committee was giving the matter 
of reduction of government expenditures consideration.

December 23, 1932
[PRESENT]
      Ashurst
            Bailey
      Bankhead
      Barkley
      Black
            Bratton
            Broussard
      Bulkley
      Bulow
      Byrnes
      Caraway
      Cohen
      Connally
      Coolidge
      Copeland
      Costigan
            Dill
      Fletcher
      George
            Glass
      Gore
      Harrison
      Hawes
      Hayden
      Hull
      Kendrick
      King
      Lewis
      Logan
            Long
      McGill
      McKellar
            Neely
      Pittman
      Reynolds
      Robinson
      Sheppard
      Smith
            Stephens
      Swanson
      Thomas
      Trammell
      Tydings
      Wagner
      Walsh of Mass
      Walsh of Mont
      Wheeler

December 23, 1932
[vote on motion to refer Bingham
resolution?]
     YEAS        NAYS
            Ashurst
      Bailey
      Bankhead
      Barkley
      Black
            Bratton
            Broussard
      Bulkley
      Bulow
            Byrnes   
            Caraway  
            Cohen    
            Connally 
      Coolidge
      Copeland
            Costigan
            Dill
      Fletcher
            George   
            Glass
            Gore     
            Harrison 
      Hawes
      Hayden
      Hull
      Kendrick
            King     
      Lewis
      Logan
            Long
      McGill
            McKellar 
            Neely
      Pittman
      Reynolds
      Robinson
      Sheppard
      Smith
            Stephens
      Swanson
      Thomas
      Trammell
      Tydings
            Wagner   
      Walsh of Mass
      Walsh of Mont
            Wheeler  
                    Seventy-third Congress (1933-1935)

   [Editor's Note: With the election of Franklin D. Roosevelt as 
president in 1932, Democrats took the majority in the Senate by a margin 
of 59 to 36, with one independent. In the House, Democrats held a 313 to 
117 majority, with five independents. The Senate met in special session 
from March 4 through March 6 to confirm cabinet nominations. President 
Roosevelt then called Congress into extraordinary session from March 9 
to June 15, 1933, a period that became known as the ``first hundred 
days'' of the New Deal. A profusion of majority legislative initiatives 
aimed at recovery, relief, and reform of the economic system rushed 
through Congress in one of the most productive legislative periods in 
history.
  In the previous period of Democratic majority, during the Wilson 
administration from 1913 to 1919, Senate Democrats had adopted a binding 
caucus rule. When Democrats achieved a majority in the House in 1931, 
Speaker John Nance Garner restored the binding caucus, noting ``if they 
didn't stay bound, I'd put 'em down in my book and they'd never get 
through paying for it.'' But Robinson could not persuade the Senate 
caucus to restore the binding rule, and therefore used the caucus far 
less frequently to set policy and promote party unity. Instead, in 1933 
Democrats created their first policy committee.
  Organizing the Senate for the first time in fourteen years, the 
Democrats elected as secretary of the Senate Edwin A. Halsey, who had 
worked in many capacities for the Senate since 1897, and as sergeant at 
arms Chesley Jurney, who had served as secretary to Senators Culberson 
and Copeland. Senator Henry F. Ashurst described them in his diary as 
``cultured, courteous men, of elegant deportment.'']
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 6, 1933]

MARCH 6, 1933

Minutes of Senate Democratic Conference, March 6, 1933.
The meeting was called and a quorum present.
Election of a Chairman was then taken up. Senator Robinson turned over 
the chair to Senator Harrison.
Senator Byrnes nominated Senator Joseph T. Robinson.
Senator King seconded the nomination of Senator Robinson, and moved he 
be nominated by acclamation. Senator McAdoo also seconded, and Senator 
Robinson was unanimously nominated.
Senator Robinson pledged his support to the incoming administration.
The next order of business was the election of a Vice Chairman. Senator 
Hayden nominated Senator Kendrick,1 and this was seconded by 
Senator Wheeler. The motion was unanimously carried.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ The position of vice chairman of the Conference was recognized as 
that of assistant leader. Senator Kendrick died on November 3, 1933, and 
Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky replaced him as vice chairman.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Sheppard nominated Senator Lewis of Illinois as Party Whip. He 
was unanimously elected.
Senator King nominated Senator Black as Secretary, and he was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Tydings nominated Senator Pittman as candidate for President pro 
tem, and he was unanimously elected.
Senator Glass nominated Edwin Halsey as Democratic Candidate for 
Secretary of the Senate, and he was unanimously selected as Democratic 
Candidate for Secretary of the Senate.
Senator Smith nominated as candidate for Sergeant at Arms, Charles E. 
Jackson, of South Carolina.
Senator Wheeler nominated J.L. Dobell, of Montana, as Democratic 
Candidate for Sergeant at Arms.
Senator Copeland nominated Chesley W. Jurney, of Texas, for Sergeant at 
Arms.
Senator Reynolds nominated Arthur Simmons, of North Carolina for 
Sergeant at Arms.
Senator Harrison seconded the nomination of Mr. Dobell.
Senator Sheppard seconded the nomination of Mr. Jurney.
Senator King also seconded the nomination of Mr. Dobell.
Senator Black moved that the election be by ballot and a majority be 
necessary for election, and that if no majority be obtained the low man 
be dropped on each succeeding ballot.
Senator Ashurst sent word that he was ill, and requested that Senator 
Hayden be permitted to cast his vote, and this was agreed to.
Senator Pittman's message was received, to the effect that he wanted to 
vote for Dobell and his request was granted.
Senator Bratton being absent on account of illness, at his request 
Senator Dill was given the right to cast his vote.
On the fourth ballot Mr. Jurney was nominated 29 to 26.
Senator Walsh nominated Leslie Biffle for Secretary of the Majority, and 
he was unanimously elected.
Senator Robinson nominated Dr. [ZeBarney Thorne] Phillips for Chaplain 
of the Senate during the pleasure of the Conference, and he was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Fletcher nominated Hal P. Phillips, of Florida, as Assistant 
Secretary to the Majority.
Senator McKellar nominated Walker Totty, of Tennessee, as Assistant 
Secretary to the Majority.
Senator Hayden suggested and moved that the Assistant Secretary of the 
Majority be named by the Rules Committee. The motion was carried and the 
selection of the Assistant Secretary to the Majority was referred to the 
Committee on Rules.

Senator George offered [the following] resolution (1):

   RESOLVED, That a Steering Committee is hereby authorized to 
  be created to consist of the Chairman, the Vice-Chairman, 
  the Whip and the Secretary, as ex-officio members, and 
  eleven (11) additional members to be appointed by the 
  Chairman.

The resolution was agreed to.

Senator King offered [the following] resolution (2):

   RESOLVED, That a committee of this Conference to be known 
  as the Policy Committee is hereby created to consist of the 
  Chairman and twelve (12) additional members to be appointed 
  by the Chairman.

The resolution was agreed to.

Senator Harrison offered a resolution authorizing the Steering Committee 
to assign members of the committees (3):

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be and the same is 
  hereby authorized to assign members of this Conference to 
  committees and to report said assignments to the Senate.

 Senator Robinson introduced [the following] resolution (4):

   RESOLVED, That until further ordered the Chairman is 
  authorized to convene Democratic Senators in Caucus for the 
  purpose of considering any measure recommended by the 
  President; and that all Democratic Senators shall be bound 
  by the vote of the majority of the Caucus; Provided that any 
  Senator may be excused from voting for any such measure upon 
  his express statement to the Caucus that said measure is 
  contrary to his conscientious judgment or that said measure 
  is in violation of pledges made to his constituents as a 
  candidate.

Senator Long stated that he would not be bound by any Caucus.
Senator McGill stated that he could not agree to this resolution and 
said he would not feel that he could conscientiously be bound by it.
Senators Adams and Connally agreed to it.
Senator Dill favored the resolution.
Senator Costigan recorded his view that it is necessary for him on any 
final vote to reserve his right for final expression on that vote.
Senator Bankhead favored the resolution.

Senator George offered an amendment to the resolution, by adding as 
follows:

   RESOLVED FURTHER, That for the purposes of this resolution, 
  two thirds of the whole number of Democratic Senators shall 
  constitute a quorum of the [Caucus].

New members were introduced by the Chairman.
Senator Hayden made a report of the Patronage Committee stating that 
each Senator would have patronage to the extent of ____________________ 
under the Rules, as follows: [no further text].

                                                Hugo L. Black, Secretary

                                           [Votes on] Sergeant at Arms



1st Ballot                   2nd Ballot                   3rd Ballot                   4th Ballot
Jackson   18                 Jackson   18                 Jackson   16                Dobell     26
Dobell     16                Dobell     18                Dobell     20               Jurney    29
Jurney    20                 Jurney    20                 Jurney    20
Simmons    2
         ----
           56


[Roll Call, March 6, 1933]
[PRESENT]
      Adams
            Ashurst
      Bachman
      Bailey
      Bankhead
      Barkley
      Black
      Bone
            Bratton
     Brown
      Bulkley
      Bulow
      Byrd
      Byrnes
      Caraway
      Clark
      Connally
      Coolidge
      Copeland
      Costigan
      Dieterich
      Dill
      Duffy
      Fletcher
      George
      Glass
      Gore
      Harrison
      Hayden
             Kendrick
      King
      Lewis
      Logan
      Lonergan
      Long
      McAdoo
      McCarran
      McGill
      McKellar
      Murphy
      Neely
      Overton
            Pittman
      Pope
      Reynolds
      Robinson
      Russell
      Sheppard
      Smith
      Stephens
      Thomas, of Okla
      Thomas, of Utah
      Trammell
      Tydings
      Van Nuys
      Wagner
      Walsh
      Wheeler

Vote on Caucus Resolution
March 6, 1933
     YEAS        NAYS
      Adams
      Ashurst
      Bachman
      Bailey
      Bankhead
      Barkley
      Black
      Bone
      Bratton
      Brown
      Bulkley
      Bulow
      Byrd
      Byrnes
            Caraway
      Clark
      Connally
      Coolidge
      Copeland
            Costigan 
      Dieterich
      Dill
      Duffy
      Fletcher
      George
      Glass
      Gore
      Harrison
      Hayden
      Kendrick
      King
      Lewis
      Logan
      Lonergan
            Long     
             McAdoo
      McCarran
            McGill   
      McKellar
      Murphy
             Neely
      Overton
      Pittman
      Pope
      Reynolds
      Robinson
      Russell
      Sheppard
            Smith
      Stephens
      Thomas, of Okla
      Thomas, of Utah
      Trammell
      Tydings
      Van Nuys
      Wagner
      Walsh
             Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 14, 1933]

MARCH 14, 1933

Minutes of Senate Democratic Conference, March 14, 193[3].
At 10:30 a.m. on March 14, 193[3], the roll was called and a quorum was 
present.
There was a request from the Senators named: Carter Glass, Henry F. 
Ashurst, John B. Kendrick, Robert F. Wagner, Josiah W. Bailey, William 
H. King, to be voted though absent.
Senator McCarran moved that no proxy votes be counted. The motion was 
lost.
The Chair then asked if there was any objection to proxy votes.

Senator Harrison offered a resolution as follows:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Caucus that its 
  members support H.R. 2820 to maintain the credit of the 
  United States Government, only as are recommended by the 
  Finance Committee.2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ The Economy Act of 1933 was proposed by President Roosevelt on 
March 10 and passed the House on March 11 by a vote of 266 to 138. 
Seeking to balance the budget, the act reduced government salaries, 
veterans' pensions, and payments on veterans' nonservice-related 
disabilities. The Senate approved the act on March 15 by a vote of 62 to 
13.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Black offered an amendment to authorize suits on insurance 
policies issued to soldiers.
Senator McCarran asked to be excused because he was going to a Committee 
meeting.
Senator Walsh discussed the bill and said that he expected to be free to 
vote for amendments.
Senator Barkley explained insurance contracts.
Senator Connally expressed the hope that the Caucus would not try to 
bind Senators on amendments to bill. He called attention to the fact 
that Senators George and Walsh were not called on for conference on the 
bill and Senator Harrison said he was not called on to express his 
views.
Senator McKellar said he would vote for the bill. He stated he intended 
to offer an amendment to authorize the President to cut off subsidies 
under certain terms.
Senator Copeland agreed with Senator Walsh that we should be free to 
vote on amendments in the Senate.
Senator Logan expressed himself as favoring Senator Harrison's 
resolution in its present form.
Senator Robinson agreed with the views expressed.
Senator Dill expressed himself as not favoring the resolution in its 
present form.
Senator Trammell asked the privilege of being permitted to vote against 
the bill on objectionable grounds.
Senator McGill res[erv]ed the right to offer an amendment and to vote 
against the bill if he saw fit. His amendment would put Spanish War 
Veterans on the same basis as Civil War Veterans.
Senator Robinson said that the President had expressed himself against 
this proposal.
Senator Clark stated that he could not vote for the bill because he was 
conscientiously against it, and because it was contrary to promises he 
had made to his constituents.
Senator Van Nuys announced that on account of pledges he had made, he 
would resume his right to vote on amendments, but that to be regular he 
would vote for the bill.
Senator Russell said that due to commitments, he must reserve the right 
to vote as he saw fit.
Senator Neely said he would vote against Senator Harrison's resolution; 
that he reserved the right to vote for or against amendments; but that 
he would then vote for the bill.
Senator Overton stated he must ask to be relieved from the Caucus unless 
amendments were passed.
Senator Adams stated that he must be released, unless he had a right to 
vote on amendments.
Senator Gore will vote for the bill, amended or not amended.
Senator McAdoo says financing will not be effected by the passage or 
failure of passage of this bill, and he would like to have it put to a 
vote on amendments.
Senator Reynolds wants the right to vote on amendments in the Senate.
Senator Bulkley moved to amend by striking out the clause ----.
Amended by the vote to strike out the clause as to amendments, the bill 
was carried.
The Resolution, as amended, was adopted.
Senator Hayden ex[illegible] himself.

                                                               Secretary
                           United States Senate
                       Committee on Appropriations

                                                         March 14, 1933.

Dear Senator Robinson:

  Please be good enough to cast my vote in the Caucus for the pending 
economy bill. I am detained in an important meeting of the Banking and 
Currency Committee.

                                                        Sincerely Yours,
                                                            Carter Glass

   [The following names are handwritten on the letter below Glass' 
signature:]

             Ashurst       Kendrick       Wagner       Bailey       King

March 14, 1933
[PRESENT]
      50    Adams
       1    Ashurst   proxy
       2    Bachman
       3    Bailey      p
      45    Bankhead
      46    Barkley
       4    Black
       5    Bone
       6    Bratton
       7    Brown
      47    Bulkley
       8    Bulow
       9    Byrd
            Byrnes
      10    Caraway
      11    Clark
      12    Connally
            Coolidge
      13    Copeland
            Costigan
      14    Dieterich   p
            Dill
      15    Duffy
            Fletcher
      17    George
      18    Glass
            Gore
      19    Harrison
      20    Hayden
      21    Kendrick    p
      22    King        p
      23    Lewis       p
      24    Logan       p
      25    Lonergan    p
            Long
      26    McAdoo      p
      27    McCarran    p
      28    McGill
      29    McKellar
      30    Murphy
      31    Neely
      32    Overton
            Pittman
      33    Pope
      47    Reynolds
      34    Robinson
      35    Russell
      36    Sheppard
      37    Smith
      38    Stephens
            Thomas, of Okla
      39    Thomas, of Utah
      40    Trammell
      41    Tydings
      42    Van Nuys
      43    Wagner      p
      44    Walsh
            Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 30, 1934]

APRIL 30, 1934

Minutes of Senate Democratic Conference, April 30, 1934.
Roll was called and a quorum was present, composed of the following 
Senators: Adams, Ashurst, Bachman, Bankhead, Barkley, Black, Bone, 
Brown, Bulkley, Bulow, Byrnes, Clark, Connally, Copeland, Costigan, 
Dieterich, Dill, Duffy, Erickson, Fletcher, George, Gore, Harrison, 
Hatch, Hayden, King, Logan, Lonergan, Long, McCarran, McGill, McKellar, 
O'Mahoney, Overton, Pittman, Pope, Robinson, Russell, Sheppard, Smith, 
Stephens, Thomas, of Oklahoma, Thomas, of Utah, Tydings, Wagner.
Senator Robinson explained that the meeting was called to consider the 
President's Reciprocal Tariff Measure.3 He expressed his 
approval of the measure and hoped that the Senators could support it, 
although no effort was made to bind Senators. He called upon Senators to 
express themselves.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ Secretary of State Cordell Hull pressed Congress to enact 
legislation, giving the president power to lower tariff rates for those 
nations that would reciprocate. On March 29, the House passed the Trade 
Agreement bill by a vote of 274 to 111, and in June the Senate approved 
the measure by a 57-to-33 vote.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Harrison explained the previous status of the bill and said that 
it was hoped to report it out on Wednesday. He also explained the 
measure.
Senator Long stated that he had expected Senator Glass, who agreed with 
him as to this bill, to be present. He favors reciprocal tariff 
agreement if the treaty comes back to the Senate for approval or 
disapproval.
Senator Dieterich strongly favored the bill and opposed reporting 
agreement to Congress.
Senator George says Congress can constitutionally delegate power to the 
President to make trade agreements so far as treaty making power is 
concerned, and believes the Supreme Court will hold it is not delegation 
[of] legislative power.
Senator Clark favors the bill.
Senator Barkley favors the bill.
Senator Smith favors the bill.
Senator Pittman favors the bill.
Senator King says he will likely vote for the measure on account of his 
loyalty to the Party.
Senator Dill believes it is a great mistake to bring up the bill at this 
Session of Congress.
Senator Copeland favors the bill.
Vice-President [John Nance Garner] favors the bill.

                                                  [signed] Hugo L. Black

                                                               Secretary
                   Seventy-fourth Congress (1935-1937)

   [Editor's Note: The popularity of the New Deal helped swell the ranks 
of Senate Democrats to 69 to 25, with two independents. The House 
Democratic margin was 322 to 103 Republicans and 10 independents. 
Although lacking the emergency atmosphere of the first hundred days, 
this ``second New Deal'' period produced significant legislation, 
including the Social Security Act, the Wagner Labor Act, and Rural 
Electrification. Then on May 27, 1935, the Supreme Court dealt a severe 
blow to the Roosevelt administration by striking down the National 
Industrial Recovery Act of 1933. The Court accused Congress of 
unconstitutionally delegating its legislative powers to an executive 
agency. The ruling jeopardized other New Deal initiatives, which now 
faced Supreme Court review.]
____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 2, 1935]

JANUARY 2, 1935

Minutes of Senate Democratic Conference, January 2, 193[5].
Roll was called and the following forty-seven Senators were present: 
Adams, Bailey, Barkley, Bilbo, Black, Bone, Bulow, Burke, Byrnes, 
Caraway, Clark, Connally, Coolidge, Copeland, Duffy, Fletcher, George, 
Gerry, Gore, Guffey, Harrison, Hatch, Hayden, Holt, Lewis, Logan, 
Lonergan, Maloney, McGill, Minton, Murray, Neely, O'Mahoney, Pittman, 
Pope, Radcliffe, Robinson, Russell, Schwellenbach, Sheppard, Thomas 
(Oklahoma), Thomas (Utah), Trammell, Truman, Van Nuys, Wagner, Wheeler.
Senator Robinson addressed the Conference. Among other things he said 
that while the Senate is a continuing body and election of new officers 
might not be necessary, he favors election at the beginning of each new 
Congress.
He said that previous Session was in the midst of appalling condition 
creating an emergency that made haste more important than deliberation, 
but such will not be necessary at this Session.
Senator Copeland took the chair and Senator Harrison nominated Senator 
Robinson and he was unanimously elected.
Senator Robinson nominated Senator Black for Secretary and he was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Lewis was nominated for Whip by Senator Byrnes and was 
unanimously elected.
Senator George nominated Senator Pittman for President pro tempore, and 
Senator Lewis seconded it and he was unanimously Pelected.
Senator Pittman moved that the Chairman be authorized to appoint a 
Steering Committee and Policy Committee of such members as he saw fit, 
and to appoint an assistant from time to time as he saw fit. Motion was 
unanimously carried.
Senator Harrison moved that Steering Committee be clothed with authority 
to make the appropriate assignment of committees and report them to the 
Senate.
Senator Gore moved and motion was unanimously carried to instruct the 
Chairman to nominate Senate officers to hold over if found necessary.

                                                           Hugo L. Black

                                                               Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 10, 1935]

MAY 10, 1935

Senate Democratic Conference, May 10, 1935.
Quorum present.
Senator Robinson presiding--Conference called for purpose of consulting 
together with reference to expediting program. He called attention to 
NRA Resolution reported by Finance Committee and called on Harrison, 
Chairman, Finance Committee, to discuss it.
Harrison explained NRA Resolution as reported and method adopted to 
reach agreement in Committee.
Senator King expressed his approval of Resolution reported by Finance 
Committee.
Senator Barkley favored a two year extension and explained his amendment 
to resolution which would permit codes for intra-state business that 
``substantially and materially affects interstate commerce.'' He will 
offer his amendment on the floor.
Senator Clark favors resolution.
Senator Gore favors extension only as provided in resolution.
Senator Robinson does not believe there is sufficient time to pass 
general NRA law before June 15, 1935. He would prefer two year extension 
but would subordinate his own views, if necessary.
Senator Barkley asked if Conference would express views.
Senator Robinson said he would submit two questions to Conference as 
advisory only, not binding.
First: Does Conference believe two year extension advisable?
Second: Should suggestion of Senator Barkley be adopted?
Senator Fletcher moved Conference approve resolution offered by 
Committee.
General discussion--Barkley and King.
Adams favors two years extension.
Senator Barkley moved it is sense of the Conference that NRA be extended 
two years.
Gerry discussed it.
Motion lost.
Barkley moved that substance of his amendment be adopted as the one 
touching intra-state commerce.
Senator Walsh moved that Barkley be permitted to offer his amendment and 
discuss it on the floor.
Senator King said he would offer amendments if Barkley did, and would 
discuss them at length.
Barkley's motion--
Senator Pittman moved that it was the sense of the Conference that no 
amendments be offered. Motion carried by rising vote.
Byrd reserved the right to vote.

                                                  [signed] Hugo L. Black

                                                               Secretary

Senate Democratic Conference
May 10, 1935
[PRESENT]
      Adams
      Ashurst
      Bachman
      Bailey
      Bankhead
      Barkley
      Bilbo
      Black
      Bone
      Brown
      Bulkley
      Bulow
      Burke
      Byrd
            Byrnes
            Caraway
      Clark
      Connally
      Coolidge
     Copeland
            Costigan
            Dieterich
            Donahey
      Duffy
      Fletcher
      George
      Gerry
            Glass
      Gore
      Guffey
      Harrison
            Hatch
      Hayden
      King
      Lewis
      Logan
      Lonergan
            Long
      Maloney
      McAdoo
            McCarran
      McGill
      McKellar
      Minton
            Moore
      Murphy
      Murray
      Neely
      O'Mahoney
            Overton
      Pittman
      Pope
      Radcliffe
            Reynolds
      Robinson
      Russell
            Schwellenbach
      Sheppard
            Smith
            Thomas, of Okla
      Thomas, of Utah
      Trammell
      Truman
      Tydings
            Van Nuys
            Wagner
      Walsh
            Wheeler
                   Seventy-fifth Congress (1937-1939)

   [Editor's Note: The election of 1936 created the largest party 
majorities in Congress since the one-party ``Era of Good Feelings'' a 
century earlier. Senate Democrats enjoyed a 76-to-16 majority, with four 
independents. House Democrats held 334 seats to 88 Republicans and 13 
independents. Shortly after the election, however, President Roosevelt 
announced his plan to enlarge the Supreme Court, adding one new justice 
for every member over the age of seventy, to a total of fifteen. This 
action was widely viewed as an effort to ``pack'' the Supreme Court with 
administration supporters, in retaliation for a series of Court rulings 
declaring key New Deal legislation unconstitutional. The Court fight 
badly divided congressional Democrats, especially given that the tiny 
Republican minority decided to keep quiet and allow Democrats who 
opposed the plan to take the lead in stopping it. Senate Democratic 
Leader Joseph Robinson personally led the fight for the president's 
court bill, but on July 14, 1937, Robinson died of a heart attack. When 
Senators Alben Barkley and Pat Harrison campaigned to succeed Robinson 
as floor leader, President Roosevelt intervened in Barkley's behalf. 
Barkley won the leadership by a single vote, but animosities from the 
incident further divided the party and defeated the administration's 
legislative initiatives.]
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 22, 1937]

JULY 22, 1937

Minutes of Senate Democratic Conference, July 22, 1937.
The meeting was called to order by Senator Barkley, a quorum being 
present.
The Secretary read the call for the meeting.
Senator Barkley announced he was ready to accept all proxies, and that 
Senators Bankhead and Hayden were away on account of illness; that their 
votes would be accepted. He also said that it was immaterial as to 
whether ballot would be secret or open.
Senator Barkley then asked Senator Pittman to preside.
Senator Pittman asked if there was any objection to having the vote by 
secret ballot. Senator Bulkley objected and said that the ballot should 
be taken by roll call.
Senator Byrnes moved that secret ballot be taken, and Senator Tydings 
seconded the motion. The motion was carried.
Senator Byrnes moved that the nomination be made without speeches, and 
the motion was carried.
Senator Tydings moved that the Senators named be called, and they come 
forward and vote.
Senator Barkley and Senator Harrison were nominated for Leader of the 
Senate. The ballots resulted in Barkley 38 and Harrison 37. Barkley was 
declared elected Conference Chairman. [Two handwritten copies of the 
ballot tallies were signed [Richard] Russell and Josh Lee.]
Senator Barkley promised his best efforts in serving the Democratic 
Party and the country.
The meeting was adjourned.

                                                Hugo L. Black--Secretary
                      Democratic Conference Chairmen

Oscar Underwood--Alabama

  March 5, 1921.

      ``unanimously selected as Minority leader and Chairman of the 
        Democratic Caucus.''
      succeeding Senator Hitchcock.

Joseph T. Robinson--Arkansas

  December 3, 1923.

      ``on motion of Senator Simmons, Senator Robinson was unanimously 
        elected by acclamation.''
      succeeding Senator Underwood.

Alben W. Barkley--Kentucky

  July 22, 1937

      ``Barkley was declared elected Conference Chairman.''
      succeeding Senator Robinson.
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 31, 1938]

DECEMBER 31, 1938

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Saturday, December 31, 1938, at 
10:30 o'clock a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky) called meeting to order.
Senator Josh Lee (Oklahoma) was chosen temporary secretary but due to 
illness, he was unable to be present.
Leslie L. Biffle, Secretary for the Majority, was designed acting 
secretary in Senator Lee's absence.
Roll call developed quorum.
Senator Barkley asked Senator Harrison (Mississippi) to act as temporary 
Chairman.
Senator Key Pittman (Nevada) nominated Senator Alben W. Barkley 
(Kentucky) for permanent Chairman of Conference. Senator J. Hamilton 
Lewis (Illinois) seconded the nomination. Senator Barkley was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Barkley addressed the Conference.
Senator Sherman Minton (Indiana) nominated Senator Lewis for Whip. 
Senator Millard E. Tydings (Maryland) seconded the nomination. Senator 
Lewis was unanimously elected by rising vote.
Senator William H. King (Utah) nominated Senator Josh Lee (Oklahoma) for 
Secretary of Conference. Senator Lee was unanimously elected.
Senator Barkley announced that it was not necessary to have election of 
Secretary of the Senate, Sergeant-at-Arms, and Secretary for the 
Majority, inasmuch as these are hold-over officers.
Senator J. Hamilton Lewis moved the election of Senator Minton as 
assistant Whip. Senator Minton was unanimously elected.
Senator Barkley introduced newly elected Senators.

Senator James F. Byrnes (South Carolina) introduced the following 
resolution, which was unanimously adopted:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be authorized 
  to assign members of the Conference to vacancies on the 
  Steering and Policy Committees.

 Senator Guy M. Gillette (Iowa) presented the following resolution, 
which was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be and same is hereby 
  authorized to assign members of the Conference to 
  committees, and to report said assignments to the Senate.

 Senator Elbert D. Thomas (Utah) offered the following resolution, which 
was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Conference be extended to 
  the Chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign 
  Committee, Senator Prentiss M. Brown, of Michigan, and his 
  associates, and to the officers and employees for their 
  efforts and activities in behalf of the Democratic 
  Senatorial candidates in the last campaign.
   Members of the Committee: Senators Green, Murray, Connally, 
  and Hatch.
  Secretary-Treasurer: Edwin A. Halsey.
  Director of Speakers' Bureau: Leslie L. Biffle.

There being no further business to be presented to the Conference, 
Senator William H. King (Utah) made a motion, which was duly seconded 
and carried, that the Conference adjourn, subject to the call of the 
Chairman.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                                        Acting Secretary

Quorum, Conference on
December 31, 1938
[PRESENT]
      Adams
            Andrews
            Ashurst
      Bailey
      Bankhead
      Barkley
      Bilbo
            Bone
            Brown
      Bulow
      Burke
      Byrd
      Byrnes
      Caraway
            Chavez
      Clark of Idaho
      Clark of Mo
      Connally
      Donahey
      Downey
            Ellender
      George
            Gerry
      Gillette
      Glass
            Green
      Guffey
      Harrison
      Hatch
      Hayden
            Herring
            Hill
      Holt
            Hughes
            Johnson
      King
            Lee
      Lewis
      Logan
      Lucas
            Maloney
      McCarran
      McKellar
            Mead
      Miller
      Minton
            Murray
            Neely
      O'Mahoney
            Overton
            Pepper
      Pittman
      Radcliffe
      Reynolds
      Russell
      Schwartz
            Schwellenbach
      Sheppard
            Smith
            Thomas, of Okla
      Thomas, of Utah
      Truman
      Tydings
      Van Nuys
            Wagner
            Walsh
             Wheeler
                    Seventy-sixth Congress (1939-1941)

   [Editor's Note: During the 1938 elections, President Roosevelt tried 
to purge from the party those conservative Democrats who increasingly 
opposed the administration's programs. However, all of the Democratic 
senators that the president campaigned against won renomination and 
reelection. In November, Democrats lost 7 seats in the Senate, reducing 
their majority to 69 to 23, with four independents; in the House of 
Representatives Democrats lost 72 seats, bringing their majority to 262 
to 169, and 4 independents. The outbreak of war in Europe helped shift 
the national focus from domestic economic issues to foreign policy, 
restoring some of the unity to congressional Democrats that had been 
disrupted by the court fight in the previous Congress.]
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 19, 1939]

APRIL 19, 1939

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Wednesday afternoon, April 19, 
1939, in the Marble Room of the Capitol.
The Conference was called to order by Senator Alben W. Barkley.
Senator Josh Lee (Oklahoma) was unavoidably detained from the Conference 
and Senator Barkley requested that Leslie L. Biffle, Secretary for the 
Majority, act as temporary secretary.
Senator Barkley memorialized the death of Senator James Hamilton Lewis 
of Illinois.
Senator James F. Byrnes (South Carolina) nominated Senator Sherman 
Minton (Indiana) to be Majority Whip. The nomination was seconded by 
Senators Sheppard, Smathers, King, and others. Senator Minton was 
unanimously elected.
Senator King (Utah) moved the Conference adjourn.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                                        Acting Secretary
                   Seventy-seventh Congress (1941-1943)

   [Editor's Note: In 1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented 
third term as president. Senate Democrats lost 3 seats, bringing their 
majority down to 66 to 28, with 2 independents. In the House, Democrats 
gained 5 seats to hold a 267-to-162 margin, with 3 independents. 
Democratic unity in Congress was reforged as the United States moved 
closer to war. On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, 
leading the United States into war against Japan, Germany and Italy.]
____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 4, 1941]

JANUARY 4, 1941

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Saturday, January 4, 1941, at 
10:30 o'clock a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky) called meeting to order, and 
announced that the Secretary of the Conference is a hold-over position 
unless otherwise designated. Therefore Senator Josh Lee (Oklahoma) 
continued as Secretary.
Roll call developed quorum--fifty-eight Senators being present.
Senator Barkley requested Senator David I. Walsh (Massachusetts) to act 
as temporary chairman.
Senator Pat Harrison (Mississippi) nominated Senator Alben W. Barkley 
(Kentucky) for permanent Chairman of Conference. Senator Albert B. 
Chandler (Kentucky) seconded the nomination. Senator Barkley was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Barkley addressed the Conference, urging unity, and expressed 
appreciation of honor conferred.
Senator Barkley paid high tribute to Senator Carter Glass (Virginia), 
January fourth being his [83rd] birthday. Conference stood and 
applauded. Senator Glass acknowledged tribute with thanks.
Senator Barkley memorialized Senator Key Pittman, late President pro 
tempore of the Senate, who died November 10, 1940.
Senator James F. Byrnes (South Carolina) nominated Senator Pat Harrison 
(Mississippi) for President pro tempore of the Senate. Senator Theodore 
G. Bilbo (Mississippi) and Senator Matthew M. Neely (West Virginia) 
seconded the nomination. Senator Harrison was elected by unanimous 
standing vote.
Senator Harrison acknowledged honor and spoke briefly.
Senator Carl Hayden (Arizona) nominated Senator Lister Hill (Alabama) 
for Whip. He was unanimously elected.
Senator Hill spoke briefly, expressing appreciation of the honor 
Pconferred.
Senator Barkley presented leather black snake whip to Senator Hill as 
symbol of office.
Senator Barkley announced the offices of the Secretary of the Senate, 
Sergeant-at-Arms, and Secretary for the Majority, are hold-over 
positions, unless otherwise designated.
Senator Barkley presented newly elected Democratic members of the 
Senate.
Senator Tom Connally (Texas) spoke briefly, urging unity, and suggesting 
that Party hold conferences before announcing positions on various 
issues.
Senator James F. Byrnes (South Carolina) paid tribute to Leslie L. 
Biffle, Secretary for the Majority, and moved that thanks of the 
Conference be extended to him. Received with prolonged applause and 
motion was carried by unanimous standing vote.
Senator Scott W. Lucas (Illinois) offered the following resolution, 
which was unanimously agreed to.

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be authorized 
  to assign members of the Conference to vacancies on the 
  Steering Committee.

Senator Francis T. Maloney (Connecticut) offered the following 
resolution, which was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be, and same is 
  hereby authorized, to assign members of the Conference to 
  committees, and to report said assignments to the Senate.

 Senator Sheridan Downey (California) offered the following resolution, 
which was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Conference be extended to 
  the Chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign 
  Committee, Senator Theodore Francis Green, of Rhode Island, 
  and his associates, and to the officers and employees for 
  their efforts and activities in behalf of the Democratic 
  Senatorial candidates in the last campaign.

Members of the Committee: Senator Green, Senator Wagner, Senator Adams, 
Senator Ellender, Senator Clark, Idaho. Secretary-Treasurer: Edwin A. 
Halsey. Director of Speakers' Bureau: Leslie L. Biffle.
Senator Barkley announced that there being no further business to be 
considered, the Conference stand adjourned.

                                            [signed] Josh Lee, Secretary

[January 4, 1941]
[PRESENT]
     Adams
     Andrews
             Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Bone
            Brown
     Bulow
     Bunker
     Byrd
     Byrnes
     Caraway
     Chandler
     Chavez
            Clark of Idaho
     Clark of Mo.
     Connally
     Downey
     Ellender
     George
     Gerry
     Gillette
     Glass
     Green
     Guffey
     Harrison
            Hatch
     Hayden
     Herring
     Hill
     Hughes
     Johnson
     Kilgore
     Lee
     Lucas
     Maloney
     McCarran
     McFarland
     McKellar
     Mead
     Miller
     Murdock
     Murray
     Neely
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
            Pepper
     Radcliffe
     Reynolds
     Russell
     Schwartz
     Sheppard
            Smathers
            Smith
     Stewart
            Thomas, of Okla
     Thomas, of Utah
     Truman
     Tunnell
     Tydings
     Van Nuys
     Wagner
     Walsh
     Wheeler
      58
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 10, 1941]

JULY 10, 1941

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, July 10, 1941, at eleven 
o'clock, a.m. in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
The Chairman, Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky), called the meeting to 
order and announced that the purpose of the meeting was to nominate a 
President pro tempore to succeed the late Senator Harrison of 
Mississippi. Senator Barkley memorialized Senator Harrison and then 
announced that nominations were in order.
Senator Kenneth D. McKellar (Tennessee) paid tribute to Senator Harrison 
and then nominated Senator Carter Glass (Virginia) for President pro 
tempore.
Senators Adams (Colorado), Connally (Texas), and Byrd (Virginia) made 
seconding speeches of Senator McKellar's nomination of Senator Glass. 
All these Senators, including the Chairman of the Conference, paid 
glowing tribute to Senator Glass.
There being no further nominations, the Senator from Virginia (Mr. 
Glass) was unanimously nominated.
The Conference adjourned.

                                                       [signed] Josh Lee

                                        Secretary, Democratic Conference

[July 10, 1941]
[PRESENT]
     Adams
     Andrews
             Bailey
            Bankhead
     Barkley
            Bilbo
            Bone
            Brown
            Bulow
     Byrd
     Caraway
            Chandler
     Chavez
     Clark of Idaho
            Clark of Mo.
     Connally
     Downey
            Ellender
     George
            Gerry
            Gillette
            Glass
            Green
     Guffey
     Hatch
            Hayden
            Herring
     Hill
            Hughes
            Johnson
     Kilgore
     Lee
            Lucas
            Maloney
     McCarran
     McFarland
     McKellar
     Mead
            Murdock
            Murray
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
            Pepper
            Radcliffe
            Reynolds
     Rosier
            Russell
     Schwartz
     Smathers
            Smith
            Spencer
     Stewart
            Thomas, of Okla
     Thomas, of Utah
            Truman
            Tunnell
            Tydings
            Van Nuys
            Wagner
            Wallgren
            Walsh
            Wheeler
                   Seventy-eighth Congress (1943-1945)

   [Editor's Note: The 1942 congressional elections saw Senate Democrats 
lose 9 seats, reducing their majority to 57 to 38, with one independent. 
In the House, the Democratic majority was narrowed sharply to 222 to 
209, with 4 independents. The narrower margins helped strengthen a 
coalition of Republicans and conservative Democrats, who sought to 
repeal New Deal legislation and opposed the president on domestic 
legislation.
  During a filibuster in 1942 against legislation to abolish poll taxes, 
Majority Leader Barkley dispatched the Senate sergeant at arms to bring 
absent senators to the chamber. Senator Kenneth McKellar was outraged to 
be awakened at his hotel and brought to the Capitol at night to break a 
filibuster that he supported. Although McKellar sat next to Barkley in 
the Senate chamber, they did not speak for another year. At the 
Democratic Conference meeting on January 7, 1943, McKellar sought to 
defeat Barkley's candidates for party posts, and to strip the majority 
leader of his ability to fill vacancies on the Steering Committee. 
Barkley's threat to resign as leader caused the defeat of McKellar's 
motion.
  Barkley did announce his resignation on February 23, 1944, in protest 
over President Roosevelt's veto of a revenue bill. Objecting to the 
language of the veto message as a ``calculated and deliberate assault 
upon the legislative integrity of every Member of Congress,'' Barkley 
urged the Senate to override the veto, and then submitted his 
resignation to the Democratic Conference. Both the House and Senate 
overrode the veto by wide margins, and Barkley was unanimously reelected 
as Conference chairman. Senator Elbert Thomas noted that ``By his one-
vote margin in the 1937 contest when he was first elected leader, the 
impression was given, and it has been the impression ever since, that he 
spoke to us for the President. Now that he was been unanimously elected, 
he speaks for us to the President.'' 1]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ Allen Drury, A Senate Journal, 1943-1945 (New York: McGraw-Hill, 
1963), pp. 85-97.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 7, 1943]

JANUARY 7, 1943

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, January 7th, 1943, at 
three o'clock, p.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky) called meeting to order, and 
announced that due to the defeat of Senator Josh Lee (Oklahoma) for 
election, it would be necessary for the Conference to select a new 
secretary. He designated Senator Mon Wallgren (Washington) as temporary 
secretary.
Senator Barkley introduced the new Senators as follows: Senators James 
O. Eastland of Mississippi, John L. McClellan of Arkansas, and James G. 
Scrugham of Nevada.
A roll call developed a quorum--fifty Senators being present.
Senator Bennett Champ Clark (Missouri) nominated Senator Alben W. 
Barkley (Kentucky) for permanent Chairman of the Conference. Several 
Senators seconded the nomination. Senator Tom Connally (Texas) asked for 
Senator Barkley's election by acclamation.
Senator Barkley briefly addressed the Conference, urging unity and 
expressed appreciation of the honor conferred upon him.
Senator Carl Hayden (Arizona) nominated Senator Lister Hill (Alabama) 
for Whip. He was unanimously elected.
Senator Homer T. Bone (Washington) nominated his colleague, Senator Mon 
Wallgren (Washington) for permanent secretary. Senator Kenneth D. 
McKellar (Tennessee) nominated Senator Francis Maloney (Connecticut). A 
vote was had by secret ballot, Senator Maloney receiving thirty-one (31) 
votes, and Senator Wallgren, twenty-two (22). The following proxies were 
voted: Senators Byrd for Glass; McKellar for Smith; and Barkley for 
Pepper, Mead and Wagner. Senator Maloney expressed his appreciation to 
the Conference.
The Chairman announced that other officials of the Senate are hold-over 
positions unless otherwise designated. Senator Kenneth D. McKellar 
(Tennessee) moved that the Conference vote on each Pofficial.
Senator Bennett Clark (Missouri) immediately nominated Leslie L. Biffle 
(Arkansas) for the office of Secretary for the Majority. He was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Harry F. Byrd (Virginia) nominated Edwin A. Halsey (Virginia) to 
be Secretary of the Senate. He was unanimously elected.
Senator Tom Connally (Texas) nominated Chesley W. Jurney (Texas) to be 
Sergeant-at-Arms. Senator Kenneth McKellar (Tennessee) nominated Wall 
Doxey (Mississippi).
There was lengthy debate on these nominations, in which several Senators 
participated. Senator Scott W. Lucas (Illinois), chairman of the 
Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, 
made a statement relative to certain official financial transactions by 
Colonel Jurney, and after some debate, Senator Carl A. Hatch (New 
Mexico) made a motion authorizing the Chairman of the Conference to 
appoint a committee of five to investigate the matter and report back to 
the Conference within two weeks. This motion was seconded by Senator 
Connally, and unanimously agreed to.
The Chairman appointed the following Senators as members of the 
committee: Senators Elbert D. Thomas (Utah), Homer T. Bone (Washington), 
Edwin C. Johnson (Colorado), George L. Radcliffe (Maryland), and Allen 
J. Ellender (Louisiana).
Senator Tom Connally (Texas) nominated Reverend Frederick Brown Harris 
(Washington, D.C.) to be Chaplain. This nomination was unanimously 
agreed to.

Senator David I. Walsh (Massachusetts) offered the following resolution, 
which was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be, and same is 
  hereby authorized, to assign members of the Conference to 
  standing committees, and to report said assignments to the 
  PSenate.

 Senator Carl A. Hatch (New Mexico) submitted the following resolution, 
which was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Conference be extended to 
  the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee for their 
  efforts and activities in behalf of the Democratic 
  Senatorial candidates in the last campaign.

Senator Francis Maloney (Connecticut), newly elected Secretary of the 
Conference, was called from the meeting, and at his request, the 
Chairman designed Leslie L. Biffle to act as temporary secretary for the 
afternoon.

Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney (Wyoming) offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be authorized 
  to assign members of the Conference to vacancies on the 
  Steering Committee.

Senator Kenneth McKellar (Tennessee), as a substitute for the O'Mahoney 
resolution, made a motion that the Conference elect the members of the 
Steering Committee, and submitted the following list of names: Senators 
Barkley (chairman), Glass, McKellar, George, Wheeler, Tydings, Guffey, 
Bankhead, Green, Wagner, Hayden, Lucas, O'Mahoney, Thomas (Utah), 
Connally, Bailey, and Overton. Ex officio members: Hill, Whip and 
Maloney, Secretary.
There was lengthy debate on the motion of Senator McKellar. Senator 
Barkley, the chairman, advised the Conference that if this motion should 
be adopted by the Conference, he would submit his resignation 
immediately as chairman. The McKellar motion was defeated by a vote of 
thirty-three (33) nays, and twenty (20) yeas. This vote was by secret 
ballot, Senator McKellar voting the proxy of Senators Maloney and Smith; 
Senator Byrd voting the proxy of Senator Glass; and Senator Barkley 
voting the proxies of Senators Pepper, Mead, and Wagner.
Senator O'Mahoney's resolution was then adopted by a viva voce vote.

Senator Walter F. George (Georgia) offered the following resolution, 
which was unanimously agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Democratic Conference 
  that during the war period, it is desirable that the 
  Steering Committee be called at convenient intervals to 
  counsel together with respect to questions of major policy 
  and legislation.

The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                              Acting for Senator Maloney
                           United States Senate
                Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads

                                                         January 6, 1943

      Hon. Alben W. Barkley
      United States Senate
      Washington, D.C.

 Dear Senator Barkley:

  Because of my unavoidable absence tomorrow, I am tendering my proxy 
and respectfully request that you vote for me on all matters coming 
before the Conference.
  Regards.

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                                  [signed] James M. Mead
                           United States Senate
                Committee on Post Offices and Post Roads

                                                         January 6, 1943

      Hon. Alben W. Barkley
      United States Senate
      Washington, D.C.

Dear Senator Barkley:

  I am respectfully requesting that you vote me in favor of continuing 
Chesley W. Jurney as Sergeant at Arms of the Senate should there be a 
vote in this connection at the Conference tomorrow.

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                                  [signed] James M. Mead
                              WESTERN UNION
                              Jan. 6, 1943

       Hon [Alben W.] Barkley
      Senate Office Bldg.

  Some things here make it impossible for me to be back in time for 
Caucus. Please exercise my proxy at Caucus. I earnestly hope to be a 
member of the Steering Committee and will appreciate your doing what you 
can to make this possible. Back Monday morning. Best wishes.

                                                           Claude Pepper
                           United States Senate
                  Committee on Agriculture and Forestry

                                                Florence, South Carolina
                                                         January 6, 1943

      Hon. Kenneth McKellar
      United States Senate
       Washington, D.C.

 Dear Senator McKellar:

  I hereby give you my proxy to represent me at the Democratic 
Conference on January 7, 1943.

                                                   Yours very sincerely,
                                                     [signed] E.D. Smith
                           United States Senate

                                             120 Broadway, New York City
                                                         January 5, 1943

      Honorable Alben Barkley
      U.S. Senate
       Washington, D.C.

 Dear Alben:

  It will not be possible for me to attend the Democratic Caucus 
scheduled for Thursday, January 7th. You are hereby authorized to 
exercise my proxy in any matters coming to a vote.

                                                   Very sincerely yours,
                                               [signed] Robert F. Wagner
                           United States Senate
                          Committee on Commerce

                                                         January 7, 1943

  I hereby give my proxy, for use in the Democratic Caucus of this date, 
to Senator Kenneth McKellar.

                                                [signed] Francis Maloney

____________________________________________________

                                                      [January 19, 1943]

JANUARY 19, 1943

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Tuesday, January 19th, 1943, at 
three-thirty o'clock p.m., in Room 201, Senate Office PBuilding.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky), Chairman, called the meeting to 
order, and requested Senator Francis Maloney (Connecticut), the 
secretary, to call the roll, which developed a quorum.
The Chairman inquired if the Special Committee (Senators Thomas (Utah), 
Bone, Ellender, Radcliffe, and Johnson (Colorado)) appointed to 
investigate certain statements made with reference to the official 
transactions of the present sergeant-at-arms, was ready to make a 
report.
The chairman, Senator Thomas (Utah), reported on behalf of the special 
committee, that Chesley W. Jurney, the present sergeant-at-arms, 
preferred that his name not be presented to the Conference for re-
election, and that he would retire as sergeant-at-arms on January 31, 
1943.
Senator Kenneth McKellar (Tennessee) nominated Wall Doxey, of 
Mississippi, to be Sergeant-at-Arms, effective as of February 1, 1943. 
Several senators discussed the election of a sergeant-at-arms.
Senator Joseph F. Guffey (Pennsylvania) moved that the Conference recess 
for one week. This motion was defeated by a vote of sixteen (16) yeas 
and twenty-one (21) nays.
Wall Doxey, of Mississippi, was elected by the Conference to be the 
Democratic candidate for Sergeant-at-Arms.
The Conference discussed briefly patronage matters.
Senator Theodore G. Bilbo (Mississippi) called to the attention of the 
Conference the fact that some Senate Chamber chairs were being 
destroyed. Several Senators entered into the debate of this question.
Senator Barkley (Chairman) was called from the Conference, and requested 
Senator Maloney (Secretary) to act as chairman.
Senator Carl Hatch (New Mexico) made a motion, which was adopted, that 
the Conference request the Rules Committee to investigate the 
destruction of chairs and other furniture.
Conference adjourned subject to call of Chairman.

                                              Francis Maloney, Secretary
                           United States Senate
                      Committee on Military Affairs

                                                         January 8, 1943

       Honorable Alben W. Barkley
      United States Senate
       Washington, D.C.

 My dear Senator:

  I am respectfully requesting that you vote me in favor of the 
Honorable Wall Doxey to succeed Colonel Jurney as Sergeant at Arms of 
the Senate.

With kindest regards, I am,

  Most sincerely yours,

                                              [signed] Harley M. Kilgore
                           United States Senate
                          Committee on Finance

                                                        Washington, D.C.
                                                        January 18, 1943

      Honorable Alben W. Barkley
      Chairman, Democratic Conference

 My dear Senator:

  I am necessarily absent on account of official business of the Senate. 
I desire to cast my vote in the Democratic Conference for Wall Doxey of 
Mississippi for Sergeant at Arms.

                                                   Yours very sincerely,
                                            [signed] Bennett Champ Clark
                              WESTERN UNION
                              Jan. 19, 1943

       Leslie Biffle
      Capitol

  Have wired Bankhead my proxy for Doxey. Regards.

                                                             Lister Hill
                           United States Senate
                               Memorandum
                             January 19, 1943

   I hereby designate Senator John L. McClellan as my Proxy to cast my 
vote in the meeting of the Democratic Caucus of this date.

                                              [signed] Hattie W. Caraway
                           United States Senate

                                                     Lynchburg, Virginia
                                                       January 6th, 1943

      Honorable Harry F. Byrd
      United States Senate
      Washington, D.C.

 My dear Harry:

  I am handing you herewith authorization to use this as my proxy in the 
forthcoming party Caucus, should any issue arise requiring a division or 
vote. I am very much disappointed that I cannot be present but that 
disappointment is relieved by the knowledge that I shall be ably and 
well Prepresented.
  With warmest personal regards,

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                                   [signed] Carter Glass

Roll Call, Jan. 20 [1943]
[PRESENT
     Andrews
       a    Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Bone
     Byrd
       a    Caraway
     Chandler
     Chavez
     Clark of Idaho
       a    Clark of Mo.
     Connally
     Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     George
       a    Gerry
       a    Gillette
       a    Glass
     Green
     Guffey
     Hatch
     Hayden
       a    Hill
     Johnson
       a    Kilgore
     Lucas
     Maloney
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     Mead
     Murdock
     Murray
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
     Pepper
     Radcliffe
       a    Reynolds
       a    Russell
     Scrugham
       a    Smith
     Stewart
     Thomas, of Okla
     Thomas, of Utah
     Truman
     Tunnell
     Tydings
     Van Nuys
     Wagner
     Wallgren
       a    Walsh
     Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 24, 1944]

FEBRUARY 24, 1944

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, February 24, 1944, at 
ten-thirty o'clock a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky), Chairman, called the meeting to 
order and requested the Secretary, Senator Francis Maloney (Connecticut) 
to call the roll, which developed a quorum.
Certain proxies were submitted. Proxies attached hereto.
Senator Barkley discussed his speech of February twenty-third and 
submitted his resignation as Leader. He then asked Senator McKellar 
(Tennessee) to preside, whereupon he (Senator Barkley) retired to his 
office. (Barkley's speech was relative to veto of Tax Bill.)
Senator Bennett Clark (Missouri) made a motion to accept the resignation 
of Senator Barkley, but suggested that he hoped the Conference would 
immediately re-elect him by unanimous vote. Senator Barkley's 
resignation was accepted unanimously.
Senator Tom Connally (Texas) moved that the Conference proceed to the 
election of a Democratic Leader and nominated Senator Barkley. By a roll 
call vote, in which all proxies were voted, Senator Barkley was 
unanimously elected.
Senator Connally made a motion to appoint a committee to advise Senator 
Barkley of his election and to escort him to the Conference Room. The 
motion was agreed to and the acting-Chairman appointed the following 
committee: Senators Connally, George, Thomas of Utah, Walsh of 
Massachusetts, Tydings and Clark of Missouri. The committee escorted 
Senator Barkley to the Conference Room and Senator Connally spoke for 
the committee and urged Senator Barkley to accept the election. Several 
other Senators spoke urging him to immediately accept, which he did, 
expressing his appreciation to the Conference.
The acting-Chairman appointed Senators Tydings and Bailey to escort 
Senator Barkley to the Chair.
Senator Bailey (North Carolina) spoke in praise of Senator Barkley and 
offered the following resolution, which was unanimously Padopted.

  WHEREAS, Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky has served as 
  Majority Leader in the Senate of the United States nearly 
  seven years; and
  WHEREAS, throughout this period he has proved his qualities 
  as a legislative leader, in a time of unprecedented 
  difficulty, to such a degree as to command the unqualified 
  confidence of his fellow Democrats and the full respect of 
  the opposition, at all times being capable and courteous, 
  faithful to his trust, diligent and courageous in discharge 
  of his duties, and equal to all the trying demands of his 
  position;
  NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Caucus of the 
  Democratic Senators that we assure Senator Barkley of our 
  confidence in him as our leader, of our affectionate regard 
  and abiding respect as a fellow Senator, and of our desire 
  that he shall continue to serve us, our Party, and our 
  Country, in the great post of power and duty to which we 
  have repeatedly called him, and which he has honored by 
  service not surpassed in the history of the Senate.

The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                                [signed] Francis Maloney

                                                               Secretary
                           United States Senate
                    Committee on Banking and Currency

                                                       February 24, 1944

      Honorable Francis Maloney
      United States Senate
      Washington, D.C.

 Dear Senator Maloney:

  Circumstances beyond my control prevent me from being at the Caucus 
meeting today.
  I give you my proxy and hope that you will vote it for me. I desire to 
express confidence in Senator Barkley and to vote for his retention as 
majority leader.

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                            [signed] George L. Radcliffe
                              WESTERN UNION
                              Feb. 24, 1944

       Hon Wm Boyle, Secretary
       240 Senate Office Building

   Have Mr. Biffle announce my vote at Caucus for Barkley and in the 
Senate to override veto. Arriving B&O tomorrow morning.

                                                         Harry S. Truman
                              WESTERN UNION
                              Feb. 24, 1944

       Mrs. Martha Sheldon
      Secy Senator Allen Ellender

  Pair me override veto tax bill. Refuse to accept Barkley's 
resignation.

                                                  Allen J. Ellender, USS

[Roll Call, February 24, 1944]
[PRESENT]
     Andrews
     Bailey
     Bankhead
       a    Barkley
     Bilbo
     Bone
     Byrd
     Caraway
       a    Chandler
     Chavez
     Clark of Idaho
     Clark of Mo.
     Connally
       a    Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     George
     Gerry
     Gillette
       a    Glass
     Green
     Guffey
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Jackson
     Johnson
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Maloney
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     Mead
     Murdock
     Murray
       a    O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
       a    Pepper
     Radcliffe
     Reynolds
     Russell
     Scrugham
     Smith
     Stewart
       a    Thomas of Okla
     Thomas, of Utah
     Truman
       a    Tunnell
     Tydings
     Wagner
     Wallgren
     Walsh of Mass.
     Walsh of N.J
     Wheeler
      50

     [?] 
 2
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ Tally sheet appears with microfilm of February 24, 1944 minutes, 
but no such vote is found in the text.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
     YEAS        NAYS
     Andrews
     Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Bone
     Byrd
     Caraway
            Chandler 
     Chavez
     Clark of Idaho
     Clark of Mo.
     Connally
            Downey   
     Eastland
            Ellender 
     George
     Gerry
     Gillette
            Glass    
     Green
     Guffey
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Jackson
     Johnson
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Maloney
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     Mead
     Murdock
     Murray
            O'Daniel 
            O'Mahoney
     Overton
            Pepper   
            Radcliffe
     Reynolds
     Russell
            Scrugham 
     Smith
            Stewart  
            Thomas of
     Thomas of Utah
            Truman   
            Tunnell  
     Tydings
     Wagner
     Wallgren
     Walsh of Mass.
     Walsh of N.J.
     Wheeler
      45    (3 proxies)13
                         
                         
                         
                    Seventy-ninth Congress (1945-1947)

   [Editor's Note: The election of 1944 saw Franklin D. Roosevelt win an 
unprecedented fourth term and Democrats retain control of the Senate by 
a 57-to-38 margin, with 1 Progressive; in the House, Democrats held a 
242-to-191 majority, with 2 independents. Missouri Senator Harry S. 
Truman was elected vice president and was presiding over the Senate on 
April 12, 1945, when President Roosevelt died in Warm Springs, Georgia. 
The war in Europe ended in May, and Japan surrendered on August 14, 
after atomic weapons were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Although 
the war had ended, peace was not easily attainable, as relations between 
the western allies and the Soviet Union began to chill into a forty-year 
cold war.]
____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 5, 1945]

JANUARY 5, 1945

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Friday, January 5, 1945, at two-
thirty o'clock p.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky), Chairman, called the meeting to 
order and inasmuch as Senator Francis Maloney (Connecticut) was unable 
to be present because of illness, designated Leslie L. Biffle as Acting 
Secretary.
The new Senators (Messrs. Fulbright (Arkansas), Hoey (North Carolina), 
Johnston (South Carolina), Magnuson (Washington), McMahon (Connecticut), 
Moses (North Dakota), Myers (Pennsylvania), Taylor (Idaho)) were 
introduced to the Conference by Senator Barkley.
A roll call developed a quorum.
Senator Barkley requested Senator Scott W. Lucas (Illinois) to act as 
temporary Chairman.
Senator Walter F. George (Georgia) addressed the Conference and 
nominated Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky) for chairman of the 
Conference. He was unanimously elected.
Senator Barkley made a statement advising the Senators that Senator 
Carter Glass (Virginia), due to illness, would not accept renomination 
for President pro tempore of the Senate; whereupon Senator Tom Connally 
(Texas), in an eloquent address, nominated Senator Kenneth McKellar 
(Tennessee) for this office. Senator Tom Stewart (Tennessee) in a speech 
seconded the nomination. Senator McKellar was unanimously elected by a 
rising vote. He addressed the Conference, expressing his appreciation 
for the election.
Senator Burton K. Wheeler (Montana) made a motion, which was unanimously 
adopted, authorizing the Chairman of the Conference to draft a 
resolution expressing the appreciation of the Conference to Senator 
Glass for his services rendered as President pro tempore of the Senate. 
The Chairman drafted the following resolution:
 RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE JANUARY MEETING OF THE DEMOCRATIC CONFERENCE 
   ON THE RETIREMENT OF SENATOR GLASS AS PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE OF THE 
                                 SENATE.

   WHEREAS, the Honorable Carter Glass, Senior Senator from 
  Virginia, has for a number of years served as the honored 
  President Pro Tempore of the United States Senate; and,
  WHEREAS, in addition to his long and distinguished service 
  to his country as a member of the House of Representatives, 
  as Secretary of the Treasury, and as United States Senator, 
  he has served with distinction in the position of President 
  Pro Tempore of the Senate; and,
  WHEREAS, Senator Glass expressed his desire not to be 
  considered for re-election as President Pro Tempore during 
  the Seventy-Ninth Congress.
  THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Democratic Conference of 
  the members of the Senate that we express to Senator Glass 
  our profound appreciation of the loyal and distinguished 
  service he has rendered to his country in all the capacities 
  in which he has served, and that we especially express our 
  deep appreciation of the efficiency and courtesy with which 
  he performed the duties of the high office of President Pro 
  Tempore of the Senate during the years of his service in 
  that capacity, and express our regret at his voluntary 
  retirement from this Pposition.
  RESOLVED FURTHER, that the Democratic Conference express to 
  Senator Glass its sincere wish for his speedy and complete 
  recovery to the vigor of health and strength.
  This resolution is unanimously adopted by the Conference.

                                               [signed] Alben W. Barkley

                                                                Chairman
                                              Conference of the Majority

A letter from Senator Charles O. Andrews (Florida) was read, stating 
that he would like to vote for Senator McKellar. Senator Connally 
advised that he was authorized to vote Senator W. Lee O'Daniel (Texas) 
for Senator McKellar.
The Chairman of the Conference spoke glowingly of Senator Harry S. 
Truman (Missouri), Vice President-elect, and the Senator replied 
thereto.
Senator Tom Connally (Texas) addressed the Conference on foreign 
affairs.
Senator Carl Hatch (New Mexico) addressed the Conference in behalf of 
Senator Lister Hill (Alabama) and nominated him for Whip. Senator John 
H. Bankhead (Alabama) seconded the nomination, and upon a motion by 
Senator Carl Hayden (Arizona), Senator Hill was unanimously elected. 
Senator Hill addressed the Conference briefly.
Senator Barkley announced that other officials of the Senate are hold-
over positions unless otherwise designated, whereupon Senator Dennis 
Chavez (New Mexico) moved that they be elected en bloc, which was 
unanimously agreed to. The Chairman then praised the officers very 
generously.

Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney (Wyoming) submitted the following 
resolution, which was agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be, and same is 
  hereby authorized, to assign Democratic Senators to standing 
  committees, and to report said assignments to the Senate.

 Senator Elmer Thomas (Oklahoma) offered the following resolution, which 
was agreed to:

   RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Conference be extended to 
  the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee for their 
  efforts and activities in behalf of the Democratic 
  Senatorial candidates in the last campaign.

Senator Thomas praised the work of the Chairman of the Senatorial 
Campaign Committee, Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney. Senator Barkley and 
others also spoke of the good work done by the Campaign Committee. 
Senator O'Mahoney responded to the various speeches.
Senator Tom Stewart (Tennessee) and Senator Barkley addressed the 
Conference, urging Senators to remain in the Senate Chamber during 
sessions of the Senate.
The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                              Acting for Senator Maloney
                           United States Senate
                       Committee on Naval Affairs

                                                         January 5, 1945

      Senator Alben W. Barkley
      Majority Leader of the Senate
       Washington, D.C.

 Dear Senator Barkley:

  It is with the deepest regret that I find it impossible to be present 
at the meeting today.
  It is particularly distressing because I wanted to be there and vote 
for the nomination of my beloved friend and colleague, Senator McKellar, 
to be President pro tempore of the Senate. This is an honor which he 
richly deserves and in this high office he will reflect not only credit 
to himself but honor on the Senate and the Country.
  With kindest personal regards.

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                             [signed] Charles O. Andrews

Quorum Call [January 5, 1945]
[PRESENT]
            Andrews
     Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Byrd
             Chandler
     Chavez
     Connally
            Downey
            Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
     Gerry
            Glass
     Green
            Guffey
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
            Maloney
     Maybank
     McCarran
            McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     McMahon
            Mead
     Moses
     Murdock
     Murray
     Myers
            O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
            Overton
     Pepper
     Radcliffe
     Russell
            Scrugham
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Truman
            Tunnell
            Tydings
     Wagner
            Wallgren
            Walsh
     Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 1, 1945]

FEBRUARY 1, 1945

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, February 1, 1945, at ten 
o'clock a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky), Chairman, called the meeting to 
order and directed the acting secretary, Leslie L. Biffle, to call the 
roll. The roll call developed a quorum.
Senator Barkley addressed the Conference in regard to the procedure in 
the Senate on the nomination of Henry A. Wallace to be Secretary of 
Commerce.1 Many Senators entered into a general discussion on 
this subject.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ President Roosevelt's nomination of former Vice President Henry A. 
Wallace as secretary of commerce met with considerable opposition in the 
Senate. On January 31, 1945 the Commerce Committee adversely reported 
the nomination to the Senate. After Majority Leader Barkley mollified 
Wallace's critics by agreeing to remove federal lending agencies from 
under the Commerce Department's jurisdiction, the Senate confirmed 
Wallace by a vote of 56 to 32 on March 1.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The nomination of someone to fill the vacancy in the Office of the 
Secretary of the Senate, caused by the death of Colonel Edwin A. Halsey, 
was briefly discussed, and further consideration of the matter was 
postponed.
The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                                        Acting Secretary
                           United States Senate
                          Committee on Finance

                                                        January 31, 1945

      Honorable Alben W. Barkley
      United States Senate
      Washington, D.C.

 Dear Alben:

  It is possible that I will not be able to be at the meeting tomorrow.
  I hope that Leslie Biffle will be offered the position of Secretary of 
the Senate. I know of no man in the United States who is as well fitted 
for the position as he is.
  I sincerely trust that efforts will be made to avoid a floor fight on 
the nomination of Mr. Wallace. It seems to me that it is particularly 
desirable that such a fight be avoided in this matter.
  With the best of wishes, believe me

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                            [signed] George L. Radcliffe
                           United States Senate
                  Committee on Public Lands and Surveys

                                                        February 1, 1945

      Hon. Alben W. Barkley
      Majority Leader
      United States Senate
      Washington, D.C.

 Dear Senator Barkley: I have just received a telegram from Senator 
Hatch in which he asks me to give you his proxy to use as you deem best 
in the Democratic Caucus being held this morning.

                                                       Very truly yours,
                                                   [signed] W.H. McMains
                                      Secretary to Senator Carl A. Hatch

[Roll Call, February 1, 1945]
[PRESENT]
            Andrews
     Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Briggs
     Byrd
            Chandler
     Chavez
     Connally
     Downey
            Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
     Gerry
            Glass
     Green
     Guffey
            Hatch     Proxy
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Mead
     Mitchell
            Moses
     Murdock
     Murray
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
     Pepper
            Radcliffe Proxy
     Russell
            Scrugham
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tunnell
     Tydings
            Wagner
     Walsh
             Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 19, 1945]

APRIL 19, 1945

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, April 19, 1945, at ten-
thirty o'clock a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
The Conference was called to order by the Chairman, Senator Alben W. 
Barkley (Kentucky), who directed that the acting secretary, Leslie L. 
Biffle, call the roll. A quorum was developed.
The Chairman advised the Conference that he had called the meeting for 
the purpose of tendering to the family of the late President Roosevelt 
its sympathy, and also to extend to President Truman its confidence and 
cooperation. Speeches were made by various Senators in this connection 
and on the attendance of Senators in the Senate.

The Chairman presented the following resolution, and upon a motion by 
Senator Kenneth McKellar (Tennessee), it was unanimously adopted:

   RESOLVED, That the Conference of the Majority of the United 
  States Senate shares with the people of the nation and the 
  world the profound sorrow caused by the death of President 
  Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had for twelve years been the 
  acknowledged leader of this nation, and who through that 
  leadership had become a symbol of democracy and freedom 
  throughout the world;
  RESOLVED FURTHER, That this Conference tenders to the family 
  of the late President its deep and abiding sympathy in this 
  hour of their great bereavement;
  RESOLVED FURTHER, That this Conference expresses its 
  confidence in the new President, Harry S. Truman, who has 
  assumed the great responsibilities of the office to which he 
  has been called, and pledges to him its genuine and 
  sympathetic cooperation in bringing the present war to a 
  prompt and victorious conclusion, in establishing a just, 
  honorable and permanent peace, and in so readjusting the 
  economic processes incident to the postwar period as to 
  bring to our nation and to the world the greatest possible 
  happiness and prosperity;
   RESOLVED FURTHER, That a copy of these resolutions be 
  transmitted to the family of the late President Roosevelt 
  and to President Harry S. Truman.

Senator Scott W. Lucas (Illinois) made a motion that the Chairman of the 
Conference be authorized to appoint a committee to call upon the 
President and present the resolution and to advise him of the discussion 
had in the Conference. This motion was unanimously agreed to.
The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                                        Acting Secretary

Quorum Call [April 19, 1945]
[PRESENT]
            Andrews
     Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Briggs
     Byrd
     Chandler
     Chavez
     Connally
     Downey
            Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
     Gerry
            Glass
            Green
     Guffey
     Hatch
     Hayden
            Hill
     Hoey
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     McMahon
            Mead
     Mitchell
     Murdock
            Murray
     Myers
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
            Overton
     Pepper
     Radcliffe
     Russell
            Scrugham
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tunnell
     Tydings
     Wagner
             Walsh
            Wheeler
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 27, 1945]

JULY 27, 1945

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Friday, July 27, 1945, at ten 
o'clock a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky) called the Conference to order and 
directed a roll call to determine whether a quorum was present. A quorum 
was present.
Senator Carl Hayden (Arizona) nominated Senator Brien McMahon 
(Connecticut) to be Secretary of the Conference.2 He was 
unanimously elected.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2\ The previous secretary, Francis Maloney of Connecticut, died on 
January 16, 1945.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Barkley (Kentucky) advised the Conference that he had informally 
appointed a Committee of five, Senators Walter F. George (Georgia), 
Lister Hill (Alabama), Carl Hayden (Arizona), Scott W. Lucas (Illinois), 
and Brien McMahon (Connecticut) to consider the qualifications of the 
various candidates for the position of Secretary for the Majority, but 
the Committee was not ready to make a report at this time.
Senator Barkley was authorized to make committee assignments to Senator 
E.P. Carville, the new Senator from Nevada.
The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                               [signed] Leslie L. Biffle

                                                        Acting Secretary
____________________________________________________

                                                      [October 11, 1945]

OCTOBER 11, 1945

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, October 11, 1945, at 
ten-thirty o'clock a.m., in the Marble Room in the Capitol.
Senator Alben W. Barkley (Kentucky), Chairman, called the meeting to 
order and stated the purpose of the Conference, namely, to select a 
Secretary for the Majority.
Senator Walter F. George (Georgia), Chairman of a special committee of 
five (Senators George, Carl Hayden (Arizona), Lister Hill (Alabama), 
Scott Lucas (Illinois), and Brien McMahon (Connecticut)) appointed by 
Senator Barkley to consider the various candidates for the 
secretaryship, reported that the committee unanimously recommended the 
nomination of Felton M. Johnston (Mississippi), and moved the election 
of Johnston.
Senator Kenneth D. McKellar (Tennessee) addressed the Conference on 
behalf of Walker Totty (Tennessee) and moved his election.
Senator Charles O. Andrews (Florida) addressed the Conference and 
nominated Hal Phillips (Florida).
Senators Dennis Chavez (New Mexico) and Joseph C. O'Mahoney (Wyoming) 
addressed the Conference in behalf of W.H. McMains (New Mexico) and 
moved his election.
Senator Pat McCarran (Nevada) spoke in behalf of Mr. Johnston.
Senator James Mead (New York) addressed the Conference urging that 
someone from the West or North be selected for the position and wished 
to be recorded in opposition to the election of Johnston.
Senator Glen H. Taylor (Idaho) urged the election of someone from some 
other section than the South.
Senator Barkley addressed the Conference, explaining his position with 
reference to the various candidates. A vote was had by raising hands and 
the following result was announced: Johnston--18; Totty--9; McMains--4; 
Phillips--2.
Senator Millard E. Tydings (Maryland) and Senator Dennis Chavez (New 
Mexico) then moved that Johnston be elected by acclamation. Motion 
adopted.
Senator Barkley again addressed the Conference with reference to the 
legislative program.
Senator Tydings addressed the Conference with reference to the bill 
increasing salaries for Senators and Congressmen.
Senator Barkley introduced the new Senator from Ohio, Mr. James W. 
Huffman.
The Conference adjourned, subject to the call of the Chairman.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

Roll Call [October 11, 1945]
[PRESENT]
     Andrews
             Bailey
     Bankhead
     Barkley
            Bilbo
     Briggs
     Byrd
     Carville
            Chandler
     Chavez
     Connally
     Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
            Gerry
            Glass
     Green
     Guffey
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
            Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Mead
     Mitchell
     Murdock
     Murray
     Myers
     O'Daniel
            O'Mahoney
     Overton
     Pepper
     Radcliffe
     Russell
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tunnell
     Tydings
     Wagner
     Walsh
             Wheeler
                           United States Senate
                               MEMORANDUM

                                                        October 15, 1945

   On this date, when the undersigned became Secretary for the Majority, 
the membership of the Steering Committee is as follows:
      Barkley, Ky., Chairman
      Glass, Va.
      McKellar, Tenn.
      George, Ga.
      Wheeler, Mont.
      Tydings, Md.
      Guffey, Pa.
      Bankhead, Ala.
      Green, R.I.
      Wagner, N.Y.
      Hayden, Ariz.
      Lucas, Ill.
      O'Mahoney, Wyo.
      Thomas, Utah
      Connally, Texas

                                      Ex Officio: LHill, Ala., WhipP 
                                      McMahon, Conn., Secretary of the 
                                      Conference

                                             [signed] Felton M. Johnston
                                              Secretary for the Majority
                      Eightieth Congress (1947-1949)

   [Editor's Note: In the 1946 elections Senate Democrats lost 12 seats 
and fell into the minority for the first time in fourteen years. 
Republicans enjoyed a 51-to-45 majority in the Senate and a 246-to-188 
majority in the House. Senate Democrats regrouped to support the 
president's programs, to oppose Republican initiatives, and to forge a 
bipartisan foreign policy. As the Eightieth Congress began, the 
Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 reduced the number of Senate and 
House committees, created new joint committees, established the first 
professional staffs for committees, and authorized each member to 
appoint an administrative assistant. Acting independently of the House, 
the Senate also provided for a paid staff for the party policy 
committees.]
____________________________________________________

                                                       [January 2, 1947]

JANUARY 2, 1947

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, January 2, 1947, at 
10:30 o'clock, a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky, Chairman, called the Conference to 
order and requested the Secretary, Senator McMahon of Connecticut, to 
call the roll to determine the presence of a quorum. Forty-two Senators 
having answered their names, Senator Barkley announced that a quorum was 
present. Senator Barkley then introduced the following new Senators to 
the Conference: Holland of Florida, McGrath of Rhode Island, O'Conor of 
Maryland, Robertson of Virginia, Sparkman of Alabama, and Umstead of 
North Carolina. Senator Barkley stated that the first order of business 
was the election of a Chairman of the Conference. Senator Barkley 
requested that Senator George of Georgia act as temporary Chairman. 
Senator Connally of Texas addressed the Conference and nominated Senator 
Barkley for Chairman of the Conference. The nomination was seconded by 
Senator Tydings of Maryland and many other members, and Senator Barkley 
was unanimously elected by standing vote. Senator Barkley then addressed 
the Conference, expressed his appreciation, and discussed briefly 
various problems facing members of the Conference as minority members of 
the Senate.
Senator Barkley announced that the next order of business was the 
selection of a Minority Whip, stating that Senator Hill of Alabama had 
tendered his resignation as Whip, and paying tribute to Senator Hill's 
efforts and accomplishments in that position. Senator Hill addressed the 
Conference, expressed his appreciation, and stated that his decision to 
resign was final. Senator Russell of Georgia nominated Senator Lucas of 
Illinois for Minority Whip. The nomination was seconded by many 
Senators, and Senator Lucas was elected unanimously by standing vote. 
Senator Lucas addressed the Conference, and expressed appreciation for 
his election.
Senator Barkley announced that the next order of business was the 
election of a Secretary of the Conference. Senator Tydings of Maryland 
nominated Senator McMahon of Connecticut. The nomination was seconded by 
Senator Hill, and Senator McMahon was unanimously elected by voice vote.
Senator Barkley then stated that the Conference should discuss and 
determine the procedure to be followed in connection with committee 
assignments and questions relating to the Steering Committee and the 
Minority Policy Committee, created by Public Law No. 663, 79th Congress 
(First Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1947). Senator Barkley 
stressed the importance of the newly-created Policy Committee, stating 
that while of course it was necessary to work as closely as possible in 
cooperation with the majority, it would necessarily follow that the 
Policy Committee as a group would work in close association with the 
President. Senator Barkley suggested that the Conference first discuss 
the question of the minority committee assignments. Senator McKellar of 
Tennessee stated that in his opinion the Minority Policy Committee 
should be elected by the Conference. Senator Barkley stated that the 
question of how membership on the Policy Committee should be filled 
should be taken up later in the meeting.

Senator Hayden of Arizona submitted the following resolution for himself 
and Senator Overton of Louisiana:

   RESOLVED, That in assigning Democratic Senators to the 
  fifteen standing Committees created by the Act of August 2, 
  1946, `to provide for increased efficiency in the 
  legislative branch of the Government,' each such Committee 
  shall be considered to be an entirely new Committee and 
  Senators shall be assigned to membership thereon by the 
  Steering Committee in accordance with their seniority of 
  service in the Senate with due regard to the preferences 
  expressed by each Senator and his former Committee service.

Senator Hayden then addressed the Conference, explaining the reasons 
which prompted him and Senator Overton in drafting the language as it 
appeared in the resolution. Senator Overton of Louisiana addressed the 
Conference in behalf of the resolution offered by Senator Hayden. The 
following Senators addressed the Conference concerning the resolution, 
and certain Senators asked questions of Senator Hayden and Senator 
Overton regarding certain provisions of the resolution, as offered: 
Senators McCarran of Nevada, Ellender of Louisiana and Connally of 
Texas; and Senators Downey of California, and Byrd of Virginia. Senator 
Hatch of New Mexico, Senator Tydings of Maryland, Senator O'Mahoney of 
Wyoming, Senator Lucas of Illinois, and Senator Thomas of Oklahoma 
addressed the Conference in support of the resolution offered by Senator 
Hayden. Senator McKellar of Tennessee asked if any member of the 
Conference, dissatisfied with his assignments, could bring the matter 
before the Conference, and Senator Barkley stated that undoubtedly in 
such a case a member could appeal to the Conference.
Senator McFarland addressed the Conference and stated that he was 
opposed to the procedure of assigning members in accordance with the 
admission dates into the Union of the States from which the members 
came, adding that at some time in the future he intended offering a 
resolution in opposition to this procedure. The resolution offered by 
Senator Hayden was adopted unanimously by voice vote.
The Conference then discussed the Minority Policy Committee heretofore 
referred to, and Senator Barkley repeated his previous statements 
regarding the committee. Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming recalled the 
suggestion previously made by Senator McKellar that membership on the 
Minority Policy Committee be filled by election by the Conference. 
Senator O'Mahoney addressed the Conference and submitted the following 
resolution:

  RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be authorized 
  to appoint the membership of the Minority Policy Committee, 
  provided for by Public law No. 663, 79th Congress, and that 
  he is hereby named Chairman of such Committee.

The resolution offered by Senator O'Mahoney was adopted by voice vote 
(Senator McKellar of Tennessee voting in the negative). Senator Barkley 
addressed the Conference, and stated that he appreciated the action 
taken by the Conference with respect to the Minority Policy Committee, 
and announced that he would appoint the membership at an early date, 
stating that he would give the membership the most careful 
consideration, and would give proper consideration to appropriate 
geographical distribution of the membership.
In response to an inquiry from Senator McClellan of Arkansas, Senator 
Barkley stated that several years ago when the Democratic membership in 
the Senate was very large, the Steering Committee consisted of fifteen 
members, and two additional ex-officio members; the Whip and the 
Secretary of the Conference, that the present membership consisted of 
thirteen, including the Whip and Secretary; and that as a result of the 
action taken by the Conference today, the membership would number 
twelve, including the Whip and Secretary. In response to an inquiry from 
Senator Thomas of Oklahoma, Senator Barkley stated that the Whip and 
Secretary would not serve as members of the newly-created Policy 
Committee.
Senator Barkley addressed the Conference and stated that with respect to 
committee ratios and assignments to be allowed the minority, he had 
conferred with Senator [Wallace] White of Maine, the Majority Leader, 
and Senator [Robert] Taft of Ohio, and had been advised that the 
minority would be permitted six members on eleven of the standing 
committees, five members on the following committees: Labor and Public 
Welfare, Rules and Administration, and Public Lands; and nine members on 
the Appropriations Committee. Senator Barkley stated that he had 
protested the majority decision regarding committee ratios. Senator 
Russell and several other Senators suggested that when the resolution 
regarding committee membership was offered on the Senate floor, there 
should be some discussion and protest made at that time. Senator Barkley 
replied that he agreed.

Senator McFarland offered the following resolution, which was seconded 
by Senator O'Mahoney, and adopted unanimously by voice vote:

   RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Conference be extended to 
  the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee for their 
  efforts and activities in behalf of the Democratic 
  Senatorial candidates in the last campaign. The members of 
  the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee are as follows: 
  Senator Lucas, Chairman, Senator George, Senator Thomas of 
  Oklahoma, Senator Hoey, Senator Taylor, and Mr. Biffle, 
  Secretary-Treasurer.

Senator Overton of Louisiana offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted unanimously by voice vote:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be, and the same is 
  hereby authorized, to assign Democratic Senators to standing 
  committees, and to report said assignments to the Senate.

(This resolution should be considered in connection with the resolution 
offered by Senator Hayden, which had been previously discussed and 
adopted.)
Senator Barkley then announced that the next order of business would be 
nomination for elective offices of the Senate.
Senator George of Georgia nominated Senator McKellar of Tennessee for 
re-election as President Pro Tempore. The nomination was seconded by 
Senator Tydings of Maryland, and approved unanimously by voice vote. 
Senator McKellar addressed the Conference and expressed his appreciation 
for his nomination, stating that when the matter came up on the Senate 
floor, he intended to ask that Senator [Arthur] Vandenberg of Michigan, 
who had been previously nominated for the position by the Republican 
Conference, be elected unanimously by the Senate.
Senator Connally of Texas nominated Leslie L. Biffle of Arkansas for re-
election as Secretary of the Senate. The nomination was approved 
unanimously by voice vote. Wall Doxey of Mississippi was unanimously 
approved by voice vote as the nominee for the position of Sergeant-at-
Arms. Felton M. Johnston of Mississippi was nominated by Senator Hayden 
of Arizona and Senator McKellar of Tennessee for the position of 
Secretary for the Minority, and was elected unanimously by voice vote.
The Secretary of the Conference, Senator McMahon of Connecticut, called 
the attention of the Conference to the fact that Senator Andrews of 
Florida, Senator Bailey of North Carolina, Senator Bankhead of Alabama, 
and Senator Glass of Virginia had passed away, and moved that 
appropriate resolutions be prepared and forwarded to the families of the 
deceased members. The motion was agreed to unanimously. (See page 457, 
temporary Congressional Record, January 20, 1947.)

Senator Russell of Georgia addressed the Conference and quoted from 
Section 202 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, as follows:

    Each standing Committee of the Senate and the House of 
  Representatives (other than the Appropriations Committees) 
  is authorized to appoint by a majority vote of the committee 
  not more than four professional staff members in addition to 
  the clerical staffs on a permanent basis without regard to 
  political affiliations and solely on the basis of fitness to 
  perform the duties of the office; and said staff members 
  shall be assigned to the chairman and ranking minority 
  member of such committee as the committee may deem 
  advisable. Each such committee is further authorized to 
  terminate the services by a majority vote of the committee 
  of any such professional staff member as it may see fit. 
  Professional staff members shall not engage in any work 
  other than committee business and no other duties may be 
  assigned to them.
                          *    *    *    *    *

    (c) The clerical staff of each standing committee, which 
  shall be appointed by a majority vote of the committee, 
  shall consist of not more than six clerks, to be attached to 
  the office of the chairman, to the ranking minority member, 
  and to the professional staff, as the committee may deem 
  advisable; and the position of committee janitor is hereby 
  abolished. The clerical staff shall handle committee 
  correspondence and stenographic work, both for the committee 
  staff and for the chairman and ranking minority member on 
  matters related to committee work.

 Senator Russell urged all members of the Conference to familiarize 
themselves with the provisions of the Act, in order that the rights of 
the minority be protected in connection with the staffs to be employed 
by the standing committees.
Senator Hayden of Arizona addressed the Conference with reference to the 
question of committee staffs for certain committees of the Senate, and 
urged that the individual members, in calling attention to the rights of 
the minority for proper representation, emphasize the permanency of the 
places called for on the committee staffs. Senator George of Georgia 
addressed the Conference and gave his views as to minority 
representation on committee staffs, using the Committee on Finance as an 
illustration. Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming addressed the Conference 
concerning the minority committee assignments provided for under the 
announcement made by the Republican Conference, and questioned the legal 
right of the majority to decide the ratios in the manner which had been 
announced.
Senator McFarland of Arizona addressed the Conference with reference to 
the numerous special committees previously created by the Senate and now 
in existence, and urged that the members of the Conference oppose the 
continuance of these special committees. He stated that he did not ask 
that the Conference go on record at this particular meeting, but felt it 
advisable that the matter be called to the attention of the members. 
Senator McFarland suggested further that frequent minority conferences 
be held, in order that the members might fully discuss legislative 
matters and other matters of interest to the members as a whole.
Senator Ellender of Louisiana addressed the Conference and gave a resume 
of his Committee's activities (Senatorial Campaign Investigating 
Committee), discussing particularly the probable contests of the seating 
of Senators Bilbo of Mississippi, 1 and O'Conor of Maryland. 
2 Senator Ellender outlined the work of the Committee in the 
Mississippi election particularly, and stated that he felt obliged to 
bring the whole matter of the intended contesting of Senator Bilbo's 
seat to the attention of the Conference in order that it might be 
discussed and a definite procedure determined concerning it. Senator 
Barkley addressed the Conference, briefly outlining the results of a 
conference which he had with Senators White of Maine and Taft of Ohio. 
Senators Overton of Louisiana, Maybank of South Carolina, and Stewart of 
Tennessee addressed the Conference regarding the questions raised about 
the election and seating of Senator Bilbo. Senator Bilbo addressed the 
Conference in his own behalf, urging that members of the Conference read 
all the testimony and his replies to the accusations in the report and 
hearings of the Committee on the Investigation of the National Defense 
Program. (Hearings before the Special Committee, in two parts, dated 
December 12 to 19, 1946, inclusive, and Report No. 110, Part 8, printed 
January 2, 1947.) He insisted that he be allowed to take the oath of 
office, and that he be given ``his day in court'' on the floor of the 
Senate. Senator Ellender again addressed the Conference, stressing the 
Majority Report of the Senatorial Campaign Investigating Committee, in 
which he stated that nothing had been found which warranted the 
opposition to Senator Bilbo. Senator Ellender then moved that the 
Conference go on record as opposing any effort by the Republican 
membership to ask that Senator Bilbo stand aside when his name was 
called to receive the oath of office. Senators Taylor of Idaho, Green of 
Rhode Island, and Wagner of New York addressed the Conference in 
opposition to the motion offered by Senator Ellender. Senator Connally 
of Texas addressed the Conference briefly, stating that he was opposed 
to the theory of requesting a Senator to stand aside in connection with 
the administering of his oath of office. Senator Hatch of New Mexico 
stated that if the motion were put, he would ask that he be permitted to 
withdraw, as he did not feel that he could pass upon such a motion as an 
individual member of the Conference. Senator Barkley addressed the 
Conference briefly, stating that a motion of the type offered by Senator 
Ellender could not result in binding members of the Conference, and that 
he personally would not be bound by any such motion. He stated that he 
did not care to commit himself in advance on a matter which he felt 
should be determined without reference to political affiliation or 
individual personalities; that he doubted the wisdom of the motion 
offered by the Senator from Louisiana, because it involved the integrity 
of the Senate, and that he did not feel Senators should be bound where 
their conscientious convictions and many constitutional questions were 
involved. Senator George of Georgia addressed the Conference, stating 
that he felt Senator Bilbo should be permitted to take the oath of 
office, and that afterwards the matter of his right to the seat should 
be determined by the Senate itself. Senator George reviewed certain of 
the Senate election cases over a long number of years. Senator Stewart 
of Tennessee discussed the case of Senator [William] Langer of North 
Dakota, urging that Senator Bilbo be given the same consideration as 
that given Senator Langer. He added that he doubted the wisdom of the 
motion offered by the Senator from Louisiana. Senator Lucas of Illinois 
discussed the case of Senator Langer of North Dakota, and urged that 
action not be taken on the motion offered by Senator Ellender. Senator 
Bilbo of Mississippi requested that the motion offered by Senator 
Ellender be withdrawn, stating that he desired Senators to be free to 
vote as they pleased after he had ``his day in court,'' but he added 
that he desired that he be permitted to take the oath of office on the 
convening of the Congress. Senator Tydings of Maryland addressed the 
Conference, stating that he thought it wise that the Chairman of the 
Conference confer further with majority leaders as to the course to be 
followed in connection with Senator Bilbo's case, and that the 
Conference adjourn, subject to call. Senator Ellender then withdrew his 
motion, and the Conference adjourned, at 1:50 p.m., subject to call.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1\ In 1946, the Civil Rights Congress protested the primary election 
campaign of Mississippi Senator Theodore Bilbo as designed to deprive 
``qualified Negro electors'' of their right to register to vote. The 
Senate Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the 
Senate sent three investigators to Mississippi, where they heard 
testimony from more than four hundred witnesses. The committee, chaired 
by Senator Allen Ellender, defended local restrictions and recommended 
dismissal of the charges against Bilbo. However, Republican Committee 
member Bourke Hickenlooper of Iowa dissented from these findings and 
called for additional hearings. When the Republicans won the majority in 
the Senate of the Eightieth Congress, they raised further charges 
against Bilbo's campaign rhetoric and his acceptance of illegal gifts 
from war contractors. On January 3, 1947, Idaho Senator Glen Taylor led 
the effort to prevent Bilbo from being seated in the new Congress, until 
the Committee on Rules and Administration had further investigated the 
accusations against him. Senator Bilbo's supporters launched a 
filibuster that prevented the Senate from organizing. On January 4, 
Democratic Leader Alben Barkley announced that Bilbo had returned to 
Mississippi for surgery. Bilbo died on August 21, 1947, without having 
taken his seat.
  \2\ Maryland Governor Herbert O'Conor was elected to the Senate in 
1946 by the narrow margin of 2,232 votes. His Republican challenger, 
John Markey, demanded a recount of the vote in several counties, which 
had not been completed by the opening of the Eightieth Congress. O'Conor 
took the oath of office on January 4, 1947, and the Senate Rules and 
Administration Committee investigated Markey's petition for a full 
recount. On May 13, 1948, the committee issued a report finding 
insufficient evidence of fraud in Maryland, and on May 20 the Senate 
agreed that O'Conor should retain his seat.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary
                           United States Senate
                               MEMORANDUM

                                                        January 15, 1947

   Pursuant to the resolution adopted at the Conference on January 2, 
1947, the Chairman of the Conference, Senator Barkley of Kentucky, named 
the following members of the Minority Policy Committee:
      Barkley, Ky, Chairman
      Tydings, Md.
      Russell, Ga.
      Hatch, N. Mex.
      O'Mahoney, Wyo.
      Green, R.I.
      Hill, Ala.
  The following additional members were invited to meet with the 
Committee whenever necessary and desirable, but without power to vote:
      Lucas, Ill., Whip
      McMahon, Conn., Secretary of the Conference

                                             [signed] Felton M. Johnston
                                              Secretary for the Minority
                           United States Senate
                               MEMORANDUM

                                                         January 3, 1947

  The membership of the Steering Committee as of this date consists of 
the following:
      Barkley, Ky., Chairman
      McKellar, Tenn.
      George, Ga.
      Tydings, Md.
      Green, R.I.
      Wagner, N.Y.
      Hayden, Ariz.
      O'Mahoney, Wyo.
      Thomas, Utah
      Connally, Texas

                                      Ex Officio: LLucas, Ill., WhipP 
                                      McMahon, Conn., Secretary of the 
                                      Conference

   The vacancies which occurred were due to the deaths of Senators Glass 
(Va.) and Bankhead (Ala.) and the retirements of Senators Wheeler 
(Mont.) and Guffey (Pa.). A further vacancy occurred in the regular 
membership when Senator Lucas (Ill.) was designated as Whip.

                                             [signed] Felton M. Johnston
                                              Secretary for the Minority

Roll Call, Jan. 2, 1947
[PRESENT]
     Barkley
     Bilbo
     Byrd
       a    Chavez
     Connally
     Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
     Green
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
       a    Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Murray
      Myers
     O'Conor
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
       a    Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tydings
     Umstead
     Wagner
                              WESTERN UNION

                                                         January 1, 1947

       Sen. K.D. McKellar
      Wash, D.C.

  I may not reach there in time for Ca[ucus]. I have indicated to Sen. 
Barkley my desire to remain on Agriculture and Interstate Commerce. 
Please help me out regards.

                                                             Tom Stewart
                           United States Senate
                               MEMORANDUM

          1. Interstate and Foreign Commerce
          2. Foreign Relations
          3. Armed Services
                              WESTERN UNION

       Bill Golden
      444 Senate Office Building
      Washington, D.C.

   Weather canceled flight tonight Leaving 6 in morning In tomorrow 
evening Have Lucas exercise proxy in Caucus Be sure committee 
preferences be used Will wire en route

                                                      Warren G. Magnuson
                           United States Senate

                                                       January 2, 194[7]

       Honorable Alben W. Barkley, Chairman
      Minority Conference Committee
      Senate Office Building
      Washington, D.C.

Dear Senator Barkley:

   In the Democratic Caucus today, please vote me as favoring 
consideration of committee assignments based on seniority on committees 
rather than seniority in the Senate.

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                                  [signed] Claude Pepper
____________________________________________________

                                                         [March 6, 1947]

MARCH 6, 1947

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, March 6, 1947, at 10:00 
o'clock, a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
Senator Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky, Chairman, called the Conference to 
order and requested the Secretary, Senator McMahon of Connecticut, to 
call the roll to determine the presence of a quorum. Thirty-seven 
Senators having answered their names, Senator Barkley announced that a 
quorum was present.
Senator Barkley announced that he had called the Conference for the 
purpose of having the members discuss pending legislation and any other 
matters which the members desired to bring up for discussion. He stated 
that the first order of business would be a general discussion of the 
Portal-to-Portal Act of 1947 (S. 70 and H.R. 2157). Senator Barkley 
requested that Senator McGrath of Rhode Island, a member of the sub-
committee of the Committee on the Judiciary, which drafted the proposed 
legislation, make a statement to the Conference, and give the members 
the benefit of his views regarding the proposed legislation. Senator 
McGrath made a detailed explanation of the provisions of both the Senate 
and House bills, outlining his objections to certain features thereof, 
and answered questions which were asked by numerous Senators. Following 
Senator McGrath's statement, Senator Barkley and Senator McCarran of 
Nevada both made statements concerning the bill. Senator Barkley then 
stated that he thought it advisable that the Minority members who were 
opposed to the bill as reported by the full Judiciary Committee, make an 
effort to draft a substitute bill to accomplish what the Minority would 
like to see done; and expressed the hope that a Minority report would be 
written in order that the Senate could have the full benefit of the 
views of the Minority members. Senator Barkley stated further that no 
attempt would be made to bind members of the Conference to support the 
Minority substitute, but that he felt it advisable that this procedure 
be followed because of the many objections raised to provisions of the 
Portal-to-Portal legislation.
Senator Barkley then stated that the next order of business would be a 
discussion of the action of the Majority in refusing to consider and to 
report the many Postmaster nominations which had been submitted by the 
President since the convening of this Congress, and all of which are 
pending in the Committee on Civil Service. Senator Barkley requested 
that Senator Chavez of New Mexico, the ranking Minority member of the 
Committee, make a statement to the Conference regarding these 
nominations. Senator Chavez made a detailed explanation to the 
Conference, stating that he had made numerous efforts to have the 
nominations considered and reported by the Committee, but that he had 
not been able to get action thereon. He called the attention of the 
Conference to S. Res. 81, authorizing the Committee on Civil Service to 
investigate the appointment of the first, second, or third class 
Postmasters, adding that at a recent meeting the Committee had discussed 
the resolution, and with some changes it had been favorably reported to 
the Senate. Senator Chavez added that under the rules, this resolution 
had been referred to the Committee on Rules and Administration. Senator 
O'Mahoney then made a statement to the Conference regarding the 
Postmaster nominations, and gave the following information, which had 
been furnished to him by the Department. The Senator stated that as of 
today there are 544 nominees pending before the Committee on Civil 
Service; that of this number 200 are veterans with preference; that 118 
are nominations to Postmasterships where offices have been advanced from 
fourth to third class and are re-appointments (of the 118 mentioned, 12 
are veterans); that 35 nominees are Civil Service classified employees 
who have been promoted from positions within the Service to the position 
of Postmasters (and of these 35, 12 are veterans). Senator O'Mahoney 
added that 329 of the 544 nominees are made up of veterans, re-
appointments, and promotions. He added that 218 of the nominees do not 
fall into any of the groups listed heretofore. The Senator added further 
that of the entire group named, 294 nominees are first on the eligible 
list; 66 are second on the eligible list; and 31 third on the eligible 
list. Senator McFarland of Arizona made a statement in which he 
suggested that motions be made on the floor of the Senate to discharge 
the Committee from the consideration of the nominations. Senator 
McFarland did not press his point, but suggested that it was a matter to 
which members of the Conference should give serious consideration. 
Senator Hayden of Arizona called attention to the fact that S. Res. 81 
was now before the Rules and Administration Committee, of which he is 
the ranking Minority member, and suggested that a Minority report should 
be drafted which the Minority members of the Rules Committee could sign 
and submit to the Senate. After further discussion it was decided that 
Senators Hayden and Chavez collaborate on the drafting of a minority 
report.
Senator Barkley then called to the attention of the Conference the 
pending legislation in the Senate, H.J. Res. 27, proposing an amendment 
to the Constitution of the United States, relating to the term of office 
of the President. The Senator stated that he was not urging that members 
of the Conference oppose the legislation, but did desire to stress the 
history of the question and called the attention of the members of the 
Conference to S. Res. 128, which passed the Senate on February 10, 1928, 
reading as follows:

  RESOLVED, That it is the sense of the Senate that the 
  precedent established by Washington and other Presidents of 
  the United States in retiring from the Presidential office 
  after their second term has become, by universal 
  concurrence, a part of our republican system of Government, 
  and that any departure from this time-honored custom would 
  be unwise, unpatriotic, and fraught with peril to our free 
  institutions.

Senator Barkley discussed briefly the reasons why he opposed the passage 
of H.J. Res. 27, adding that he was giving his personal reasons for 
opposing the legislation, and was not requesting that members bind 
themselves one way or another as to their positions on the legislation.
Senator Green of Rhode Island called attention to a resolution which he 
and Senator [H. Alexander] Smith of New Jersey had introduced, calling 
for a study of the question of Presidential succession, stating that 
hearings had been scheduled by the Rules and Administration Committee. 
The Senator stated that he considered it unwise that action be taken at 
this time on the joint resolution pending in the Senate.3
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \3\ The succession of Harry S. Truman to the presidency in 1945 left 
the office of vice president vacant until after the 1948 elections. 
Under then-current statutes, the next in line to the presidency were 
members of the cabinet. In June 1945, President Truman called on 
Congress to revise the order of succession to place the Speaker of the 
House and president pro tempore of the Senate, elected officials, ahead 
of the appointed cabinet members. When Congress did not act during the 
Seventy-ninth Congress, Truman renewed his request in February, 1947, 
after Republicans had assumed the majority in both the House and Senate. 
The Senate passed S. 564 on June 27 by a vote of 50 to 35, with 
Republicans voting in favor and Democrats opposed. The House passed the 
succession bill on July 10, and President Truman signed it into law on 
June 18.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Barkley then informed the members that he wished to discuss in 
confidence a conference held with the President on February 27, 1947, 
where certain leaders of the House and Senate were present, regarding 
financial assistance to Greece. During the course of his remarks, he 
also called attention to the matter of assistance to Turkey. Senator 
Barkley stressed the fact that the discussion was on an informal basis, 
adding that at that particular meeting, full details of the needs of 
these two countries were not completely available, and that the details 
of the program had not been worked out. He stated that the Greek 
Government had officially requested assistance, and that his purpose in 
addressing the Conference on this subject was to give them as much 
information as was available; adding that at a date in the near future, 
the entire program would be lain before the Congress by the President. 
During the course of Senator Barkley's remarks, Senators McMahon of 
Connecticut, Chavez of New Mexico, and Lucas of Illinois all made brief 
statements, and numerous Senators asked questions of Senator Barkley 
concerning the program as he had outlined it.4
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \4\ On March 12, 1947, President Truman addressed a joint session of 
Congress and called on the United States to support free peoples who are 
resisting subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures''--a 
policy that became known as the Truman Doctrine--and requested that 
Congress provide military aid for Greece and Turkey. On April 27, the 
Senate by a vote of 67 to 23 passed S. 938, which supplied $400 million 
in military and economic aid. The House passed its version of the bill 
on May 9, and the Conference report was approved on May 15, by voice 
votes in both houses.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Hatch of New Mexico expressed his personal appreciation to 
Senator Barkley for having called the Conference and given information 
regarding the program of assistance to Greece and Turkey.
Senator Lucas of Illinois urged that members of the Conference attend 
the sessions of the Senate and Committee meetings, adding that he wished 
personally to congratulate the new members on their attendance and the 
strength which they had given in supporting the Minority on legislation.
Senator Fulbright of Arkansas urged that weekly Minority Conferences be 
held, to which Senator Barkley replied that while he did not believe 
that definite weekly meetings should be held, he did intend calling 
Conferences frequently.
Senator Barkley then called attention to the question of rent control, 
and at his request, Senators Robertson of Virginia and Sparkman of 
Alabama discussed the various proposals that had been submitted to the 
Banking and Currency Committee. Senator Sparkman made an explanation of 
his own bill, S. 778, relating to continuation of rent control.
The Conference adjourned at 12:35 p.m., subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary
  

Quorum, March 6, 1947
[PRESENT]
     Barkley
     Byrd
     Chavez
       a    Connally
       a    Downey
       a    Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
     Green
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Murray
     Myers
     O'Conor
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
       a    Overton
     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
       a    Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
       a    Tydings
     Umstead
       a    Wagner
      37
 - present
a - absent
  
____________________________________________________

                                                          [May 16, 1947]

MAY 16, 1947

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Friday, May 16, 1947, at 10:45 
a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
Senator Barkley of Kentucky, Chairman, called the Conference to order 
and requested the Secretary, Senator McMahon of Connecticut, to call the 
roll to determine the presence of a quorum. Thirty Senators having 
answered their names, Senator Barkley announced that a quorum was 
present.
Senator Barkley, Chairman of the Conference, stated that the purpose of 
the Conference was to discuss H.R. 1, the Individual Income Tax 
Reduction Act of 1947. Senator Barkley outlined the position taken with 
reference to H.R. 1 by the minority members of the Finance Committee, 
and in connection therewith, discussed the legislative history of H.Con. 
Res. 20, the so-called ``Budget Resolution.'' He expressed his opinion 
that no decision should be reached regarding tax reductions until the 
status of the various appropriation bills was known. Senator Barkley 
stated that in the Finance Committee Senator George of Georgia had moved 
a postponement of the consideration of the tax bill to June 15, and that 
the motion was rejected on a straight party vote, 7 yeas, 6 nays. 
Senator Barkley completed his statement by stressing the importance of 
the discussion, and stated that he hoped it would be possible for the 
members of the Conference to reach agreement on the course of action to 
be followed. Senator Barkley then asked Senator George, the ranking 
minority member of the Finance Committee, to make a statement to the 
PConference.
Senator George outlined the history of the consideration of the tax bill 
in the Finance Committee, stating that he had moved the postponement of 
the tax bill for a thirty-day period, which motion was rejected, and 
that Senator Byrd's motion for postponement of ten days was likewise 
rejected. Senator George then outlined the indicated surplus for the 
fiscal years 1947 and 1948, and indicated that the following courses of 
action might be adopted by the Conference: (1) A motion to postpone 
consideration of the tax bill until June 10 or 15, 1947; (2) A motion to 
make whatever tax reductions were finally agreed upon in the Senate bill 
effective January 1, 1948; (3) Opposition to any tax reduction at this 
time. He stated that in his opinion any Democrat could justify his 
opposition to the bill, but he doubted the political advantage to be 
gained by the Conference supporting such a course of action as a 
political party. Senator George added that, assuming some tax reduction 
is to be made, he thought the bill reported by the Republican majority 
as good as could be expected at this time. Senator George then explained 
the bill as passed by the House, and the changes made by the Senate 
committee.
Senator Lucas of Illinois suggested that it might be better procedure 
for a motion first to be made to make the tax reductions effective 
January 1, 1948, to be followed by a motion to postpone consideration of 
the bill until June 10, or 15, 1947.
In reply to Senator Lucas's suggestion, Senator Barkley stated that it 
would probably be necessary to make the postponement motion first, 
inasmuch as the other motion suggested by Senator Lucas would 
undoubtedly require much longer debate. Senator Barkley then requested 
Senator Byrd of Virginia to make any comment he desired regarding the 
tax bill.
Senator Byrd stated that he was very much in favor of a motion to 
postpone consideration of the bill until June 10, 1947. He then outlined 
his own views as to estimate of income for the fiscal year 1948, the 
probable surplus and amount of reduction in appropriations which might 
be expected. He made the suggestion that Senator Barkley move to 
discharge the conferees considering H. Con. Res. 20, the so-called 
``Budget Resolution,'' and request the appointment of new conferees. 
Senator Byrd stated also that he approved not only the postponement 
motion, but also a motion to make tax cuts effective January 1, 1948, 
but he expressed doubt as to the wisdom of the members of the Conference 
as a party voting against any tax reduction at all. He stated that he 
thought each member should vote according to his own individual views.
Senator Lucas then stated that if the motions for postponement and 
making the tax cut effective January 1, 1948 were rejected, he would 
then offer a substitute for the Finance Committee recommendations, the 
first substitute to provide for a 2% reduction in the various surtax 
brackets, an increase in personal exemptions, and provisions to remedy 
the existing community property tax situation. He stated that if this 
substitute were rejected, he would then offer another, first increasing 
the personal exemptions, and second, providing for a 20% surtax 
reduction in each bracket, but eliminating any reference to community 
property.
Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming made a statement explaining his position, 
stating that he personally was opposed to tax reduction at the present 
time.
Senator Connally of Texas then outlined his position, stating that he 
also was opposed to any tax reduction at the present time.
At the suggestion of Senator Tydings of Maryland, the Chairman asked for 
a show of hands first on the question of supporting a motion to postpone 
the consideration of the tax bill until June 10, 1947. By a show of 
hands, the members of the Conference voted unanimously to support such a 
motion. At the suggestion of Senator Tydings of Maryland, the Chairman 
asked for a show of hands on a motion to make any tax reductions 
effective on January 1, 1948. All members of the Conference who were 
present indicated support of the motion except Senator O'Daniel of 
Texas, who stated that he did not wish to commit himself at the present 
time because of the uncertainty of the whole situation.
Senator Barkley informed the Conference that there was no attempt to 
bind members on these motions, and that he had asked for an indication 
of the members' views solely to ascertain the position of the Conference 
members.
Senator Barkley stated that it might be necessary to call another 
Conference on other aspects of the bill or to consider developments that 
might occur during debate on the bill.
Senator Hatch of New Mexico briefly stated his position in opposition to 
any motion that might be made by the Majority to lay on the table the 
motions discussed by the Conference today.
At 12:10 p.m. the Conference adjourned, subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

Quorum Call, May 16, 1947
[PRESENT]
     Barkley
     Byrd
     Chavez
     Connally
             Downey
            Eastland
            Ellender
            Fulbright
     George
     Green
     Hatch
             Hayden
            Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Johnson
            Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
            McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Murray
     Myers
     O'Conor
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
            Overton
            Pepper
     Robertson
            Russell
     Sparkman
            Stewart
     Taylor
            Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tydings
     Umstead
            Wagner
____________________________________________________

                                                         [July 10, 1947]

JULY 10, 1947

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Thursday, July 10, 1947 at 10:30 
a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
Senator Barkley of Kentucky, Chairman, called the Conference to order, 
and after the Secretary for the Minority had informed the Chairman that 
thirty-seven members were present, Senator Barkley stated that he had 
called the Conference primarily for the purpose of discussing the Tax 
Reduction Bill, H.R. 3950. He outlined the history of the previous Tax 
Bill, H.R. 1, and the developments that had caused the Republican 
Majority to submit a new tax bill. He advised the Conference that he was 
authorized to state the President would veto the pending bill, H.R. 
3[9]50, in its present form. He stated further, that he had never 
believed politics should be mixed up in tax legislation, but was 
convinced that the Republican Majority were playing politics in this 
instance. He stated further that because of the importance of the bill 
and the fact that the President had not only vetoed the first bill, but 
had stated definitely he would veto the pending one, he thought members 
should have a full discussion of the consequences involved in the 
question of supporting or overriding the President's veto.5
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \5\  President Truman vetoed H.R. 1, to reduce individual income tax 
payments, on June 16, 1947, and the House sustained the veto on June 17. 
On July 18, the president vetoed H.R. 3950, to reduce individual income 
tax payments. That same day, the House overrode his veto, but the Senate 
sustained it.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Senator Robertson of Virginia made a brief statement in which he called 
the attention of the members of the Conference to the estimated 
revenues, expenditures, and national income, and stressed particularly 
the differences in the estimates of the Treasury and the Joint Committee 
Staff with regard to the estimated national income.
Senator George of Georgia made a statement in which he informed the 
Conference that he intended to support the pending bill, and in the 
event of a veto, he would vote to override the veto. He called attention 
to the inconsistency that would result if the members opposed the 
pending bill on the ground that it involved a considerable loss of 
revenue, and at the same time supported any substitute bills which, 
while differing in substance, resulted in the same revenue loss. He 
stated also that he would vote against any amendments that might be 
offered to the bill. He contended that in the prior veto message the 
President had made only a slight reference to the real issue involved, 
and that he, personally, did not wish to say to the American taxpayer 
that he (the taxpayer) would be the last person to be given relief, 
inasmuch as in this period of inflation it seemed to be the policy to 
give considerable relief to foreign nations. With respect to the so-
called Marshall Plan and what might result therefrom, he stated that he 
would not commit himself at the present time to an expenditure of 
billions for foreign relief.
Senator Overton of Louisiana stated that he intended to sustain the 
President's position because, first, he thought that the Republican 
Majority were playing politics; and, second, that in prosperous times he 
felt that it was preferable that the national debt be reduced.
Senator Johnson of Colorado stated, in connection with questions as to 
what has happened since consideration of the last tax bill to cause the 
change in the attitude of some of those who had previously supported the 
President, that in the first place, the effective date of the 
legislation had been changed to January 1, 1948, and that he justified 
his intended vote in favor of the legislation on the ground that the 
Congress would be paying the terminal leave bonds in cash out of tax 
savings which resulted by the change in date from July 1, 1947 to 
January 1, 1948.
Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming addressed the Conference, stating that he 
intended to support the President in his veto of the pending bill. He 
outlined the fiscal developments since the convening of the 80th 
Congress, called attention to the fact that the Legislative Budget 
Resolution had not passed, stressed the lateness of the regular fiscal 
year appropriation bills, and expressed the opinion that rather than 
decreasing Governmental expenditures, it was obvious that the Congress 
would continue to increase expenditures, most of which resulted from 
World War II. He stated that in his opinion it was foolish to reduce 
taxes at a time when the national income was at its highest, and he 
urged the members of the Conference to support the President.
Senator Tydings of Maryland stated that he was not committing himself as 
to his final position on the bill, but that he thought the members of 
the Conference should consider carefully the position they would be 
placed in by criticizing the Republicans for playing politics and at the 
same time supporting a substitute measure, which would result in the 
same revenue loss.
Senator Hayden of Arizona called the attention of the Conference to S. 
Res. 25, a resolution amending Rule XXII, relating to cloture, Order No. 
85 on the calendar. He stated that he wished the members to know that 
the Majority intended pressing for the adoption of this resolution prior 
to adjournment.
Senator Myers of Pennsylvania called the attention of the members to a 
proposal which had been approved by a subcommittee of the Committee on 
Rules and Administration (by a 2 to 1 party division), recommending that 
the limit of expenditures previously authorized for the employment of 
assistants by the full committee is to be further increased by around 
$100,000, for the purpose of making a thorough investigation of the 
contested West Virginia Senatorial election. The Senator stated that in 
his opinion, carrying on a thorough investigation of the election 
contest in that state would require a considerably larger amount of 
money, and that it would undoubtedly take between a year and eighteen 
months to make such an Pinvestigation.6
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \6\ Unsuccessful Republican candidate Tom Sweeney charged Democratic 
Senator Harley M. Kilgore with election irregularities. The Senate Rules 
and Administration Committee undertook an extensive investigation and in 
July 1949 ruled that Senator Kilgore had been duly elected and was 
entitled to retain his seat.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Prior to adjournment, Chairman Barkley called the attention of the 
members to H. Con. Res. 51, [a] resolution providing against the 
adoption of Reorganization Plan No. 3, submitted by the President on May 
27, 1947. (This Plan deals with reorganization of housing agencies.) 
Senator Barkley stated that it was the intention of the Majority to 
bring the resolution before the Senate prior to adjournment, and that, 
while the resolution itself had been reported adversely, and the 
committee had recommended approval of the President's plan, he wanted 
members to know the importance of the plan itself, and urged that 
careful consideration and study be given it with a view to supporting 
it. He stated that a Conference might be called to discuss the plan.
At 12:07 p.m. the Conference adjourned, subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

July 10, 1947
[PRESENT]
     Barkley
     Byrd
     Chavez
     Connally
             Downey
            Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
     Green
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
            Murray
     Myers
     O'Conor
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
     Stewart
     Taylor
      Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
            Tydings
     Umstead
            Wagner
____________________________________________________

                                                        [March 16, 1948]

MARCH 16, 1948

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Tuesday, March 16, 1948 at 10:30 
a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
Senator Barkley of Kentucky, Chairman, called the Conference to order, 
and after the Secretary for the Conference, Senator McMahon of 
Connecticut, had informed the Chairman that thirty-four members were 
present, Senator Barkley stated that he had called the meeting of the 
Senators for the purpose of discussing the Revenue Act of 1948, H.R. 
4790. He explained the provisions of the bill as reported by the Finance 
Committee, stating that when the bill was pending in the Committee he 
offered on behalf of himself and other Minority members a substitute 
bill, calling for a total reduction of $4,000,000,000, retroactively to 
January 1, 1948. He explained that the substitute involved no change in 
the exemptions, and the so-called ``split income principle'' contained 
in the bill, but related to adjustments in the individual income tax 
rates. Senator Barkley stated that he wished the members of the 
Conference to consider whether or not it would be advisable to support 
the same minority proposal on the floor of the Senate, adding that there 
was no attempt to bind the individual members, and that each would be 
free to vote as he saw fit on final passage of the bill.
Senator George of Georgia addressed the Conference, explaining in detail 
the provisions of the bill as amended by the Finance Committee, and 
comparing those provisions with the bill as it was passed by the House 
of Representatives.
Senator Pepper addressed the Conference briefly, urging that if any tax 
relief were to be given, he believed the reduction should be given to 
persons in the lower income group.
Senator Robertson of Virginia addressed the Conference briefly, 
stressing the existing high individual income tax rates, and urging that 
some income tax relief be given in order to secure incentive capital 
investment.
Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming addressed the Conference in opposition to 
any tax reduction at the present time, stating that while he would 
support a Minority substitute of $4,000,000,000 he would support the 
bill on final passage. He added that he intended to offer a proposal to 
re-apply the excess profits tax.
Senator Connally of Texas addressed the Conference, stating that he was 
inclined to vote against any tax reduction bill on final passage, but 
was not definitely committing himself at the present time. He stated, 
however, that he would support a substitute bill.
Senator McMahon of Connecticut suggested the advisability of a motion 
being made on the Senate floor to delay a vote on the final passage of 
the bill until after the Italian elections on April 18.
Senator George of Georgia again addressed the Conference, stating that 
while he personally favored a reduction of either the amount carried in 
the Committee bill, $4,800,000,000, or the $4,000,000,000 substitute, he 
could understand why members would oppose the bill on passage because of 
the recommendations which the President might make in his address to the 
Congress scheduled for Wednesday, March 17.
Senator Johnson of Colorado addressed the Conference, stating that he 
intended supporting the Committee bill, and that he saw no virtue or 
merit in a $4,000,000,000 reduction bill.
Senator Robertson of Virginia again addressed the Conference, stating 
that he thought the estimates of national income were too high; that he 
would support a Minority substitute bill of $4,000,000,000, adding that 
he thought it better for the Democrats as a whole to support a 
reasonable tax reduction bill.
Senator Barkley then stated that he did not wish to bind the members of 
the Conference, but wanted to secure the reaction of the members 
regarding their support of a substitute bill if he were to offer it. He 
added that he did not wish to offer it if he could not secure the 
substantial support by the members. He raised the question of whether it 
would be better for the Conference to go on record in this particular 
meeting, or whether it would be better to wait for the recommendations 
of the President before any commitment were made.
Senator O'Mahoney moved that a decision regarding the members of the 
Conference supporting a Minority substitute of the $4,000,000,000 be 
postponed until after the president's recommendations had been received. 
The motion was adopted by voice vote.
At 12:05 p.m. the Conference adjourned, subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

March 16, 1948
[PRESENT]
     Barkley
             Byrd
            Chavez
     Connally
            Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     Fulbright
     George
            Green
     Hatch
     Hayden
            Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Johnson
     Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
            Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
            McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
            Murray
     Myers
     O'Conor
     O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Overton
     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
            Stennis
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
            Tydings
     Umstead
            Wagner
      34
____________________________________________________

                                                        [August 7, 1948]

AUGUST 7, 1948

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Saturday, August 7, 1948, at 10:00 
a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
Senator Barkley, Chairman, called the Conference to order after the 
Secretary of the Conference, Senator McMahon of Connecticut, announced 
that thirty-two members were present. (See attached list.)
Senator Barkley began the meeting by stating that he had called it in 
order that Senators might discuss the amendment he proposed to offer to 
S.J. Res. 157 (providing for regulation of consumer installment credit, 
etc.). Senator Barkley stated that his amendment, known as the Anti-
Inflation Act of 1948, proposed to carry out in the main the 
recommendations submitted by the President to the Congress in his 
message of July 27, 1948. (See House Document No. 734, 80th Congress, 2d 
Session). Senator Barkley outlined the President's recommendations, and 
discussed by titles the amendment he proposed to offer. During the 
course of his explanation, he answered questions submitted by various 
members of the Conference. Senator Barkley expressed the hope, not only 
to make a record for the coming presidential campaign, but in order to 
assist Democratic Senators running for re-election and Democratic 
candidates for the Senate, that the amendment receive as large a vote as 
possible from Democratic Senators. He stated that there would be no 
attempt to bind the members of the Conference, but asked that the 
sentiment of the members be expressed by a show of hands. Of the thirty-
two members present, all indicated by a show of hands, with the 
exception of Senators Russell of Georgia and Eastland of Mississippi, 
that they would support Senator Barkley's amendment when it was offered. 
Senators Eastland and Russell asked that they not be recorded, adding 
that they would give the proposal consideration, and hoped to be able to 
support it. (For the text of Senator Barkley's amendment as presented, 
see pages 10221 through 10226, Congressional Record, of August 7, 1948. 
For an explanation of Senator Barkley's amendment, see the debate on 
August 7, 1947 and pages 9633 through 9634, Congressional Record of July 
29, 1948.)
Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming called attention to the Committee amendment 
to S.J. Res. 157, striking Section 2 from the joint resolution. Section 
2 related to the restoration of gold reserve requirements in the Federal 
Reserve System. Senator O'Mahoney urged that members of the Conference 
resist any attempt to reject the Committee amendment, calling attention 
to the fact that Senator Taft had expressed his opposition to the 
striking of this Section and had stated that he would attempt to restore 
the provision of the bill as passed by the House.
Senator O'Mahoney then called attention to the fact that the Majority 
had failed to act favorably on the request of the President relating to 
amending the Displaced Persons Act. He mentioned that while the 
Republican presidential nominee, Governor [Thomas E.] Dewey, had urged 
Republican members of Congress to act favorably, that the Judiciary Sub-
committee by a tie vote had failed to do so. He recommended that during 
the course of the afternoon, prior to adjournment, attention be called 
to this fact, with particular reference to the failure of the majority 
to respond to this request, and to stress that out of the issues before 
Congress (anti-inflation, housing, etc.), this issue was the only one to 
which any reference had been made by Governor Dewey.
Senator Barkley urged that as many Democratic Senators as possible 
participate in the debate so that a complete record could be made for 
the coming campaign.
At 11:00 a.m. the Conference adjourned, subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

August 7, 1948
[PRESENT]
     Barkley
             Byrd
            Chavez
     Connally
            Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     Feazel
     Fulbright
            George
     Green
     Hatch
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Johnson
            Johnston
     Kilgore
     Lucas
     Magnuson
            Maybank
            McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
            McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Murray
     Myers
     O'Conor
            O'Daniel
     O'Mahoney
     Pepper
             Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
     Stennis
             Stewart
            Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tydings
     Umstead
             Wagner
____________________________________________________

                                                     [December 31, 1948]

DECEMBER 31, 1948

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Friday, December 31, 1948 at 10:30 
a.m., in Senator Barkley's room in the Capitol.
The Conference met at 10:30 a.m. and was called to order by Senator 
Lucas of Illinois. Senator Lucas stated that the Chairman of the 
Conference, Senator Barkley of Kentucky, was unable to be present 
because of illness, and had requested that he (Senator Lucas) call the 
meeting to order and preside.
Senator Lucas stated that the first order of business was the election 
of [a] Conference Chairman, explaining that Senator Barkley would not be 
sworn in as Vice President until January 20, 1949, and that he thought 
the Conference should elect Senator Barkley for the interim period.
Senator George of Georgia moved that Senator Barkley be elected as 
Chairman of the Conference and Majority Leader until such time as he 
took the oath of office as Vice President (January 20, 1949). Senator 
McGrath of Rhode Island moved that Senator George's motion be amended so 
that when Senator Barkley took the oath of office, Senator Lucas of 
Illinois be elected Chairman of the Conference and Majority Leader. 
Senator Lucas requested that Senator McMahon of Connecticut put the 
motion, as amended, to the Conference. The motion was put to the 
Conference and carried unanimously by voice vote. Senator Lucas 
addressed the Conference and expressed his appreciation to the members.
Senator Lucas then requested that Senator McMahon of Connecticut, the 
Secretary of the Conference, call the roll to ascertain the presence of 
a quorum. The roll having been called, Senator McMahon stated that 
forty-nine members were present. (See attached roll call.)
Senator Lucas then introduced the following newly-elected Senators, all 
of whom were requested to stand and all received applause from the 
members of the Conference: Senator Anderson, New Mexico; Senator 
Broughton, North Carolina; Senator Chapman, Kentucky; Senator Douglas, 
Illinois; Senator Frear, Delaware; Senator Gillette, Iowa; Senator 
Humphrey, Minnesota; Senator Hunt, Wyoming; Senator Johnson, Texas; 
Senator Kefauver, Tennessee; Senator Kerr, Oklahoma; Senator Long, 
Louisiana; Senator Miller, Idaho; and Senator Neely, West Virginia.

Senator Johnson of Colorado offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the thanks of the Conference be extended to 
  the officers and members of the Democratic Senatorial 
  Campaign Committee for their efforts and activities in 
  behalf of the Democratic Senatorial candidates in the last 
  campaign.

The officers and members of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee 
are as follows: Senator Lucas of Illinois, Chairman; Senator McMahon of 
Connecticut, Vice Chairman; Senator Thomas of Utah; Senator Hill of 
Alabama; Senator Holland of Florida; and Mr. Leslie L. Biffle, 
Secretary-Treasurer.
The resolution was adopted unanimously by voice vote.

Senator McMahon of Connecticut offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Secretary of the Conference be 
  authorized and directed to prepare appropriate resolutions 
  as tributes to the memories of Hon. Theodore G. Bilbo, late 
  a Senator from the State of Mississippi, and Hon. John H. 
  Overton, late a Senator from the State of Louisiana; and 
  that copies of the resolutions be transmitted to the 
  families of the deceased.

The resolution was adopted unanimously by voice vote.

Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Steering Committee be, and the same is 
  hereby authorized to determine the ratios of standing 
  Committees, to assign Democratic Senators to standing 
  committees and to report said assignments to the Senate.

 The resolution was adopted unanimously by voice vote.

Senator Myers of Pennsylvania moved the adoption of the following 
resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be authorized 
  to appoint a Committee on Patronage.

Senator Russell of Georgia asked how many members would be appointed, 
and Senator Lucas stated that in 1933 when the Democrats organized the 
Senate a committee of three was named; that while he was not in a 
position to state definitely the number, he thought the membership would 
consist of three and that he had reason to believe Senator Hayden of 
Arizona would be named Chairman. Senator Russell then stated that 
Senator Lucas' statement was entirely satisfactory to him.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the selection 
of a Whip, effective January 20, 1949. Senator Hill of Alabama nominated 
Senator Myers of Pennsylvania. Senator Tydings of Maryland moved that 
the nominations be closed; the motion was seconded by Senator Pepper of 
Florida; and Senator Myers was elected unanimously by voice vote.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the selection 
of a nominee for President Pro Tempore. He stated that in the past votes 
had been by secret ballot and that proxies were permitted. No member of 
the Conference objected to voting by secret ballot or the counting of 
votes by proxy. Senator O'Conor of Maryland nominated Senator Tydings of 
Maryland. Senator Connally of Texas nominated Senator McKellar of 
Tennessee. Senator Pepper moved that the nominations be closed, which 
was seconded by several members of the Conference, and was carried 
unanimously.
Senator Lucas appointed Senators George of Georgia, Johnson of Colorado, 
and Pepper of Florida, to act as tellers, and designated Senator George 
as Chairman.
After a count of the ballots, Senator George stated that Senator 
McKellar had been selected as the nominee for President Pro Tempore by 
twenty-seven votes over Senator Tydings, who received twenty-five votes. 
The following Senators were voted by proxy: (See attached letters and 
telegrams). Senators Ellender of Louisiana, Magnuson of Washington, and 
Wagner of New York. Senator Tydings moved that the selection of Senator 
McKellar be made unanimous. The motion was carried unanimously by voice 
vote.
Senator McKellar addressed the Conference and expressed his appreciation 
to Senator Tydings and to the members of the Conference for their 
confidence.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the selection 
of the nominee for Secretary of the Senate. Senator McClellan of 
Arkansas nominated Leslie L. Biffle, of Arkansas, to be Secretary of the 
Senate. Senator McFarland, of Arizona, seconded the nomination of Mr. 
Biffle. Senator Pepper moved that the nominations be closed, which 
motion was carried unanimously. Mr. Biffle addressed the Conference and 
expressed his appreciation.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the selection 
of a Secretary of the Majority. Senator Stennis of Mississippi nominated 
Felton M. Johnston of Mississippi. Senator McCarran moved that the 
nominations be closed, which motion was carried unanimously by voice 
vote. Felton M. Johnston was selected unanimously by voice vote.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the selection 
of a nominee for Sergeant-at-Arms. Senator Hayden nominated Joseph C. 
Duke of Arizona. Senator McFarland seconded Mr. Duke's nomination. 
Senator Pepper nominated Derwin W. Darling of Florida. Mr. Darling's 
nomination was seconded by Senator Holland. Senator McGrath nominated 
Mr. William Neale Roach of Washington, D.C. The nominations were then 
closed, without objection.
Senator Lucas appointed Senators George of Georgia, Johnson of Colorado, 
and Pepper of Florida, to act as tellers, and designated Senator George 
as Chairman. Senator George announced that the vote was as follows: Duke 
27, Darling 9, Roach 15. Senator Lucas announced that Joseph C. Duke of 
Arizona had been nominated as Sergeant-at-Arms.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the selection 
of a Chaplain. Senator McKellar nominated Father Donnelly (Reverend John 
F.A. Cavanagh Donnelly, Director General of the Catholic Boys Brigade of 
the United States, Presidential Gardens, Alexandria, Va.) Senator Hill 
of Alabama addressed the Conference, stating that in his opinion it 
would be a mistake to replace the present Chaplain, Dr. Peter Marshall, 
although he had the highest admiration for the former Chaplain, Dr. 
Harris, and moved that Dr. Marshall be retained. Senator Tydings 
addressed the Conference and moved that the Conference give the matter 
of the selection of a Chaplain further consideration and that action 
thereon be postponed until some future meeting. He moved further that 
the Chairman be authorized to appoint a committee of three members to 
assay and examine the situation and make a report to the Conference at 
some subsequent meeting. Senator Tydings' motion was seconded by Senator 
Hoey of North Carolina.
Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming addressed the Conference and stated that he 
favored Senator Tydings' first motion. After a general discussion 
Senator Tydings withdrew his first motion. Senator McKellar withdrew his 
nomination of Father Donnelly. Senator Tydings withdrew his subsequent 
motion and Senator Hill's motion with respect to Dr. Marshall was 
adopted by voice vote. Senator McClellan of Arkansas requested that the 
record show the action of the Conference was not unanimous. Senator 
Lucas stated that he reserved the right to make a statement on the floor 
calling attention to the fact that the Democratic members of the Senate 
were not injecting politics into religion with respect to the position 
of Chaplain, as had the Republicans when they gained control of the 
Senate and replaced Dr. Harris in 1947.

Senator Hayden of Arizona offered the following resolution:

   RESOLVED, That the Chairman of the Conference be 
  authorized, when the Senate meets for organization, to 
  nominate for the various elective positions, the persons 
  heretofore selected by this Conference for such positions.

The resolution was adopted unanimously by voice vote.
Senator Lucas stated that the next order of business was the election of 
a Secretary of the Conference. Senator McCarran of Nevada nominated 
Senator McMahon of Connecticut. Senator Russell of Georgia moved that 
the nominations be closed, which motion was carried unanimously. Senator 
McMahon was then elected unanimously by voice vote.
Senator Connally of Texas addressed the Chair and asked regarding the 
appointment of the Steering Committee. Senator Lucas stated that in line 
with the past precedents of the Conference, the Committee was a 
continuing body, and that if there were no objections on the part of any 
member of the Conference, the chairman would be authorized to fill 
vacancies on the Steering Committee. No objections were raised.
Senator McCarran of Nevada addressed the Conference and suggested that 
in filling vacancies on the Steering Committee, consideration be given 
to a fair geographic distribution of members.
Senator McFarland of Arizona addressed the Conference briefly and stated 
that while he had no desire to reopen the matter of the Chaplain of the 
Senate, he urged that the members of the Conference consider the 
advisability of rotation of Chaplains yearly.
Senator Lucas expressed appreciation to the members of the Conference, 
and urged a full attendance on the following Monday because of the 
possibility of important votes.
The Conference adjourned at 11:55 a.m., subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary
                       120 Broadway, New York City
                            December 28, 1948

       Honorable Alben W. Barkley
       U.S. Senate
      Washington, D.C.

Dear Alben:

  Since I shall be unable to attend the Caucus Meeting on December 31, 
1948, in Washington, I hereby authorize you to vote my proxy for the 
distinguished senior Senator from Maryland, Millard E. Tydings, for 
President pro tempore of the United States Senate.
  With my warmest personal regards and every good wish for 1949, I am

                                                   Yours very sincerely,
                                               [signed] Robert F. Wagner
                       120 Broadway, New York City
                            December 28, 1948

       Honorable Carl Hayden
       U.S. Senate
      Washington, D.C.

 Dear Carl:

  Since I shall be unable to attend the Caucus Meeting on December 31, 
1948, in Washington, I hereby authorize you to vote my proxy for Joseph 
C. Duke for the position of Sergeant-at-Arms of the U.S. Senate.
   With my kindest personal regards and every good wish for 1949, I am

                                                   Yours very sincerely,
                                               [signed] Robert F. Wagner
                              WESTERN UNION

                                                           Dec. 30, 1948

       Hon. Russell B. Long
      U.S. Senator of La.
      Senate Office Bldg.

   This will be your authority to vote for me in my stead for the 
following: Senator McKellar [for] President of the Senate. Leslie Biffle 
[for] Secretary of the Senate. Senator McMahon as Secretary of 
Conference. Senators Barkley and Lucas for Majority Leader, the former 
to serve until January 20th and the latter from January 20. Senators 
Lucas and Myers for Senate Whip, the former to serve until January 20 
and the latter from January 20. Joseph [C.] Duke for Sergeant at Arms of 
the Senate. Felton Johnston for Secretary of Majority, and Rev. Peter 
Marshall for Chaplain. Thanking you and with warm regards.

                                         Allen J. Ellender, U.S. Senator
                              WESTERN UNION

                                                           Dec. 30, 1948

       Senator Scott Lucas
      Senate Office

   Matters here make it necessary I remain in state if possible few more 
days. Will fly there if advisable but would like to avoid trip back and 
forth across continent. Hope Caucus will accept my proxy. Will you ask 
same. This is your authority to so act on all matters pertaining to 
organization. I favor Tydings for President Pro Tem.

                                                      Warren G. Magnuson
                       120 Broadway, New York City
                            December 29, 1948

       Honorable Alben W. Barkley
      U.S. Senate
      Washington, D.C.

Dear Senator:

  I shall be unable to attend the Democratic Caucus meeting preceding 
the organization of the 81st Congress.
  I have already given you my proxy for the election of the President 
pro tempore and have given Senator Hayden my proxy for the election of 
the Sergeant at Arms. This will authorize you to vote my proxy on any 
other matter or issue which may come up during the Caucus meeting.
  With all good wishes for success in the New Year, I am

                                                        Sincerely yours,
                                               [signed] Robert F. Wagner
                              WESTERN UNION

                                                           Dec. 30, 1948

       William Golden
       Care Warren G. Magnuson
      Senate Office Bldg.
      Washington, D.C.

   Have sent my proxy for tomorrow's Caucus on Sergeant at Arms matter. 
Contact Biffle and tell him to vote it as he sees fit. Lucas has proxy.

                                                      Warren G. Magnuson
                           UNITED STATES SENATE
                        Minority Policy Committee

                                                          Dec. 23 [1948]

 Dear Senator Barkley,

   Will you please vote for me in the Caucus (Dec. 31) in case I'm not 
there. For Pres. Pro Tem please vote for Sen. McKellar. In other 
instances please use your judgment.

                                                 [signed] Estes Kefauver

Quorum Call, December 31, 1948
[PRESENT]
     Anderson
       a    Barkley
     Broughton
     Byrd
     Chapman
       a    Chavez
     Connally
     Douglas
     Downey
     Eastland
       a    Ellender
     Frear
     Fulbright
     George
     Gillette
     Green
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Humphrey
     Hunt
     Johnson, Colo.
     Johnson, Tex.
     Johnston
     Kefauver
     Kerr
     Kilgore
     Long
     Lucas
       a    Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
     McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Miller
     Murray
     Myers
     Neely
     O'Conor
     O'Mahoney
     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
     Stennis
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
     Thomas of Utah
     Tydings
       a    Wagner
49 present
5 absent
                    Eighty-first Congress (1949-1951)

   [Editor's Note: In the greatest political upset in American history, 
President Harry S. Truman in 1948 defeated the front-running Republican 
candidate Thomas E. Dewey. Democrats regained the majorities in both the 
Senate (by a margin of 54 to 42) and the House (263 to 171). In the 
aftermath of victory, President Truman proposed an ambitious domestic 
agenda, known as the Fair Deal. However, divisions within the Democratic 
ranks over civil rights stimulated filibusters that disrupted 
legislative harmony. The increasing anticommunist outcry similarly 
distracted attention from domestic reforms. In February 1950, Wisconsin 
Republican Senator Joseph R. McCarthy made an address in Wheeling, West 
Virginia, claiming Communist infiltration of the U.S. Department of 
State. Senate efforts to investigate McCarthy's charges through a 
subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee proved 
ineffectual, and the subcommittee chairman, Millard Tydings, was 
defeated in the 1950 election. The fall of China to the Communists in 
1949 and the outbreak of war in Korea in June 1950 further frustrated 
President Truman's legislative initiatives and probably contributed to 
the election defeats of both Majority Leader Scott Lucas and Majority 
Whip Francis Myers in 1950.]
                           UNITED STATES SENATE
                               MEMORANDUM

                                                        January 20, 1949

  The membership of the Steering Committee is as follows:
      Lucas, Ill., Chairman
      McKellar, Tenn.
      George, Ga.
      Tydings, Md.
      Green, R.I.
      Wagner, N.Y.
      Hayden, Ariz.
      O'Mahoney, Wyo.
      Thomas, Utah
      Connally, Texas

                                      Ex Officio: LMyers, Pa., WhipP 
                                      McMahon, Conn., Secretary of the 
                                      Conference

                                             [signed] Felton M. Johnston
                                              Secretary for the Majority
                           UNITED STATES SENATE
                               MEMORANDUM

                                                        January 20, 1949

   The members of the Majority Policy Committee are as follows:
      Lucas, Chairman (Ill.)
      Tydings, Md.
      Russell, Ga.
      O'Mahoney, Wyo.
      Green, R.I.
      Hill, Ala.
  The following additional members were invited to meet with the 
Committee whenever necessary and desirable, but without power to vote:
      Myers, Pa., Whip
      McMahon, Conn., Secretary of the Conference
  The one vacancy on the Policy Committee was created by the retirement 
of Senator Hatch of New Mexico.

                                             [signed] Felton M. Johnston
                                              Secretary for the Majority
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 1, 1949]

FEBRUARY 1, 1949

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Tuesday, February 1, 1949, at 
10:30 a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
The Conference met at 10:30 a.m. and was called to order by Senator 
Lucas of Illinois, Chairman. Senator Lucas requested the Secretary of 
the Conference, Senator McMahon of Connecticut to call the roll to 
ascertain the presence of a quorum. The roll having been called, Senator 
McMahon stated that forty-seven members were present. (See attached roll 
call.)
Senator Lucas announced that the first order of business was the 
selection of a nominee for the position of Chaplain of the Senate to 
succeed the late Dr. Peter Marshall. Senator McClellan of Arkansas 
nominated Rev. Frederick Brown Harris, D.C., pastor of the Foundry 
Methodist Church, Washington, D.C. A motion by Senator Russell of 
Georgia that the nominations be closed was seconded by Senator Hoey of 
North Carolina, and adopted unanimously by voice vote. Dr. Harris was 
then selected unanimously by voice vote. Senator Lucas requested that 
Senator McClellan notify Dr. Harris of his selection. Senator Connally 
of Texas made a brief statement in which he eulogized Dr. Marshall and 
expressed his gratification that Dr. Harris had been the unanimous 
choice of the Conference. Senator Chavez of New Mexico addressed the 
Conference and stated that while the selection of Dr. Harris was 
entirely agreeable to him, he personally had favored Dr. Edward Hughes 
Pruden, Pastor, First Baptist Church of Washington, D.C. Senator Chavez 
expressed his personal opinion that the position of Chaplain should not 
be made permanent, and suggested that in the future the Conference 
should rotate the position among the various religious faiths.
Senator Lucas then stated that the next order of business related to the 
question of the Legislative Budget (Section 138 of the Legislative 
Reorganization Act of 1946, Public Law 601, 79th Congress). He called 
attention to the fact that under the law the Committees on Ways and 
Means and Appropriations of the House, and the Committees on Finance and 
Appropriations of the Senate were required to report to the respective 
Houses a resolution regarding the legislative budget for the ensuing 
fiscal year, including the estimated overall receipts and expenditures 
for such year; that the report shall contain information concerning the 
amount to be appropriated for expenditures in such year, including an 
amount to be reserved for deficiencies, etc. He called attention to the 
fact that by law, the report was required to be filed by February 15. A 
general discussion followed, in which the following members of the 
Conference participated: Senators George of Georgia, McKellar of 
Tennessee, Pepper of Florida, Tydings of Maryland, Anderson of New 
Mexico, Robertson of Virginia, and Russell of Georgia. The Conference, 
on motion by Senator Russell, which was carried unanimously by voice 
vote, authorized Senators George and McKellar to confer with the 
respective chairmen of the House Committees on Appropriations and Ways 
and Means with a view to fixing a date to which the report on the 
Legislative Budget might be postponed. In addition, on motion of Senator 
Tydings, seconded by Senator Kerr of Oklahoma, which was carried 
unanimously by voice vote, the Conference went on record as suggesting 
that a sub-committee of the four Senate and House committees, charged 
with the responsibility under the law, restudy the entire question of 
the Legislative Budget, and make a report with its recommendations. 
During the discussion, several members of the Conference expressed 
themselves as believing that the section was not workable, and should be 
eliminated. Others stressed the point that at least an attempt should be 
made to comply with the law, and various dates of postponement such as 
April 1, a 60-day period, and May 1 were suggested.
The Chairman then brought up the matter of the Special Committee to 
study the problem of American Small Business, stating that the Committee 
which had originally been created by S. Res. 20, 80th Congress, 1st 
Session, went out of existence as of midnight, January 31, 1949. There 
followed a full discussion by members of the Conference, both in support 
of the continuation of the Small Business Committee as a special 
committee, and in opposition to a Special Committee. Those in opposition 
urged that a regular standing committee or committees handle small 
business problems. The following members spoke in favor of the 
continuation of the Small Business Committee as a special committee: 
Murray of Montana, Pepper of Florida, McMahon of Connecticut, and Green 
of Rhode Island. The following members spoke in opposition to the 
special committee, and urged that the problem be handled by regular 
standing committees: Senators Maybank of South Carolina; Robertson of 
Virginia; McFarland of Arizona, Ellender of Louisiana, Holland of 
Florida, and Fulbright of Arkansas. No vote was taken on the question of 
continuing the Small Business Committee as a special committee.
Senator Ellender of Louisiana asked if it would be appropriate for the 
Conference to take over the Conference room in the Senate Office 
Building now being used by the Minority. Senator Lucas stated that he 
would take the matter under advisement.
The Chairman announced to the members that he intended calling frequent 
Conferences in the future, and stated that if any committee Chairman 
desired him at any time to call a Conference, he would do so.
The Conference adjourned at 11:35 a.m., subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

February 1, 1949
[PRESENT]
     Anderson
     Broughton
     Byrd
     Chapman
     Chavez
     Connally
     Douglas
       x    Downey
     Eastland
     Ellender
     Frear
     Fulbright
     George
     Gillette
     Green
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
     Humphrey
     Hunt
       x    Johnson, Colo.
     Johnson, Tex.
     Johnston
       x    Kefauver
     Kerr
     Kilgore
     Long
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
       x    McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
       x    McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Miller
     Murray
     Myers
     Neely
     O'Conor
       x    O'Mahoney
     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
     Stennis
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
       x    Thomas of Utah
     Tydings
       x    Wagner
     Withers
 - present
x - absent
____________________________________________________

                                                      [February 6, 1949]

FEBRUARY 6, 1949

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Saturday, February 6, 1949, at 
10:30 a.m., in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
The Conference met at 10:30 a.m. and was called to order by the 
Chairman, Senator Lucas of Illinois.
Senator Lucas requested that Senator McMahon of Connecticut, the 
Secretary of the Conference, call the roll to ascertain the presence of 
a quorum. The roll having been called, Senator McMahon announced that 
forty-three members were present. (See attached roll call.)
Senator Lucas opened the Conference by commending the newly-elected 
Senators for the manner in which they have attended committee meetings 
and meetings of the Senate. He stressed the importance of the new, as 
well as the older members, being diligent in attending committee 
meetings, and urged that members who are familiar with bills reported 
from their committees attend the sessions of the Senate when the bills 
were being debated, in order to assist the Chairman during the debate. 
Senator Hill of Alabama joined Senator Lucas in urging full attendance 
by Committee Chairmen and committee members. Senator Lucas called 
attention to the fact that he intended to have the Policy Committee and 
its staff to be of all possible assistance to Committee Chairmen and 
individual members. He then stated that the first order of business was 
a discussion of S. Res. 47, offered by Senator [William] Knowland of 
California, discharging the Committee on Rules and Administration from 
the further consideration of S. Res. 15, relating to certain changes in 
the cloture rule. He stated that on Friday, February 5, the Policy 
Committee had fully discussed the resolution, and had unanimously agreed 
that it should be rejected when called up for consideration on Monday, 
February 8. He discussed the history of the resolution making changes in 
the cloture rule, which was reported by the Rules and Administration 
Committee during the 80th Congress. (See S. Res. 25 and S. Report No. 
87, April 3, 1947.)
Senator Lucas then asked Senator Hayden, Chairman of the Rules and 
Administration Committee, to make a statement to the Conference. Senator 
Hayden did so, making a supplementary historical statement regarding the 
cloture rule and the suggested changes recommended by the Rules and 
Administration Committee during the 80th Congress. There followed a 
general discussion in which the following members participated: Senator 
Myers of Pennsylvania, Senator Chavez of New Mexico, Senator Gillette of 
Iowa, Senator Withers of Kentucky, Senator Hunt of Wyoming, Senator 
Douglas of Illinois, Senator Taylor of Idaho, Senator George of Georgia, 
Senator Pepper of Florida, Senator Humphrey of Minnesota, and Senator 
Broughton of North Carolina. Each of these Senators expressed his 
opposition to the Knowland resolution and urged that the Conference 
members vote to reject the resolution. Several members stated that while 
they personally would oppose the Knowland resolution, they would reserve 
the right to subsequently vote on the floor either for or against 
changes in the cloture rule when the matter was formally presented for 
debate. Senator O'Mahoney of Wyoming commended the new members for their 
attendance at committee meetings and further commended Senator Lucas for 
his policy in calling frequent Conferences where full discussion could 
take place, and also for his statement regarding his desire to have the 
Policy Committee and its staff be of all possible assistance to the 
members.
Senator Chavez of New Mexico moved that it be the sense of the 
Conference that members vote against the Knowland resolution. The motion 
was carried unanimously by a show of hands.
The Conference adjourned at 12:00 o'clock meridian, subject to call.

                                                  [signed] Brien McMahon

                                                               Secretary

February 6 [1949]
[PRESENT]
     Anderson
     Broughton
     Byrd
     Chapman
       x    Chavez
     Connally
     Douglas
       x     Downey
       x     Eastland
     Ellender
     Frear
     Fulbright
     George
     Gillette
       x     Green
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
       x     Humphrey
     Hunt
     Johnson, Colo.
     Johnson, Tex.
     Johnston
       x     Kefauver
       x     Kerr
       x     Kilgore
     Long
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
       x     McCarran
     McClellan
     McFarland
       x     McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
     Miller
     Murray
     Myers
     Neely
       x     O'Conor
     O'Mahoney
       x     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
     Sparkman
     Stennis
     Taylor
     Thomas of Okla
       x     Thomas of Utah
     Tydings
       x     Wagner
     Withers
 - present
x - absent
____________________________________________________

                                                     [February 23, 1949]

FEBRUARY 23, 1949

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Wednesday, February 23, 1949 at 
12:00 noon in Room 201, Senate Office Building.
The Conference met at 12:00 noon, and was called to order by the 
Chairman, Senator Lucas of Illinois.
Senator Lucas requested that Senator McMahon of Connecticut, the 
Secretary of the Conference, call the roll to ascertain the presence of 
a quorum. The roll having been called, Senator McMahon announced that 
thirty-seven members were present. (See attached roll call.)
Senator Lucas announced that he had called the Conference for the 
purpose of discussing the legislative program for the week beginning 
Monday, February 28. He referred to an agreement which he had entered 
into with Senators Hayden of Arizona and [Kenneth] Wherry of Nebraska to 
take up for consideration S. Res. 15, amending the so-called ``cloture'' 
rule of the Senate. He called attention to the fact that the Finance 
Committee had been considering H.R. 1211, extension of the Reciprocal 
Trade Agreements Act, and that he hoped the bill could be reported to 
the Senate by the end of the week. He recalled his previous statement 
that he would not hesitate at any time to lay aside the consideration of 
the cloture resolution in order to bring up important legislative 
measures, and that if the Finance Committee should complete action on 
the Trade Agreements Bill, and report it, he as an individual was 
willing to have that measure taken up for debate. He called attention to 
the fact that the Republicans in the Senate would undoubtedly oppose any 
move to lay aside consideration of the cloture resolution.
Senator Lucas requested the Chairman of the Finance Committee, Senator 
George, to make a statement to the Conference. Senator George stated 
that while he could not make a definite statement as to when action on 
the bill would be completed, he thought it possible that committee 
action might be completed by the end of the week, but he called 
attention to the fact that the Republicans were delaying consideration 
of the bill in order that debate thereon would continue through March 5. 
Senator George explained that under the present Trade Agreements Act, 
the Tariff Commission would by the date of March 5 submit a report 
indicating minimum rates which, in its opinion, will safeguard domestic 
industry against serious injury or threat of injury (the so-called 
``peril point'' report). Senator George stated that in the event the 
Finance Committee should complete its consideration of the bill by 
Friday, February 25, he would ask the Majority Leader to obtain consent 
to report the bill during the recess or adjournment of the Senate.
Senator George of Georgia stated further that he personally hoped the 
Trade Agreements legislation would be called up for consideration on 
Monday, February 28. Senator Lucas then stated that he wanted the 
members of the Conference to discuss the situation fully in order that 
he might ascertain the attitude of the members toward taking up the 
Trade Agreements Bill, or proceeding to debate the Cloture Resolution.
After a general discussion of the issues in which the following members 
of the Conference participated (Senator McMahon of Connecticut, Hayden 
of Arizona, McFarland of Arizona, Robertson of Virginia, Myers of 
Pennsylvania, McCarran of Nevada, O'Mahoney of Wyoming, Green of Rhode 
Island, Russell of Georgia, Magnuson of Washington, Hunt of Wyoming, 
Pepper of Florida, and Neely of West Virginia), Senator Lucas stated 
that in view of the expressions made by members of the Conference, he 
would move on Monday, February 28 to proceed to the consideration of S. 
Res. 15, amending the so-called ``Cloture'' rule of the Senate. He 
stated further that he would call another Conference during the week of 
February 28 for the purpose of discussing the question of the Small 
Business Committee, and possibly to discuss further the future 
legislative program. Senator Lucas then announced to the Conference that 
he personally would oppose any attempts to hold continuous sessions of 
the Senate in connection with consideration and debate on the resolution 
relating to the change in the Cloture rule, and read to the Conference a 
letter addressed to him by the official reporters of the Senate debates, 
Messrs. [James W.] Murphy and [John D.] Rhodes, in which those gentlemen 
called attention to the difficulties they and their staff would 
encounter in the event continuous sessions should be held, and 
requesting that if such a plan were to be put into effect by the 
leadership, they would like to be advised as early as possible in order 
that they might try to make arrangements to cope with the work involved.
The Conference adjourned at 2:00 p.m., subject to call.

                      [signed] Brien McMahon by FMJ [Felton M. Johnston]

                                                               Secretary

February 23, 1949
[PRESENT]
     Anderson
     Broughton
     Byrd
     Chapman
             Chavez
     Connally
     Douglas
     Downey
            Eastland
     Ellender
     Frear
     Fulbright
     George
     Gillette
     Green
     Hayden
     Hill
     Hoey
     Holland
            Humphrey
     Hunt
            Johnson, Colo.
     Johnson, Tex.
            Johnston
            Kefauver
            Kerr
     Kilgore
            Long
     Lucas
     Magnuson
     Maybank
     McCarran
            McClellan
     McFarland
            McGrath
     McKellar
     McMahon
            Miller
     Murray
     Myers
     Neely
            O'Conor
     O'Mahoney
     Pepper
     Robertson
     Russell
            Sparkman
     Stennis
     Taylor
            Thomas of Okla
            Thomas of Utah
            Tydings
            Wagner
     Withers
____________________________________________________

                                                        [April 11, 1949]

APRIL 11, 1949

Minutes of Democratic Conference held Monday, April 11, 1949, in Room 
201, Senate Office Building.
The Conference was called to order by the Chairman, Senator Lucas of 
Illinois, at 10:00 a.m. The Chairman designated Felton M. Johnston, 
Secretary for the Majority, to act as Secretary in the absence of the 
Secretary of the Conference, Senator McMahon of Connecticut, and 
requested that the Acting Secretary call the roll and ascertain the 
presence of a quorum. It was announced that thirty-five members were 
present.
Senator Lucas stated that he had received a letter from Senator McCarran 
of Nevada, suggesting that a meeting of the various standing Committee 
Chairmen be called in an effort to work out a schedule of major standing 
committee meetings so as to avoid conflicting meetings which now occur. 
Senator McCarran stated that he thought such a meeting of Committee 
Chairmen would be helpful. Senator Russell of Georgia suggested that 
prior to a meeting of committee chairmen that each chairman have the 
Chief Clerks of the committees meet in an effort to work out the best 
possible schedule for submission to the Committee Chairmen.
Senator Neely of West Virginia made a statement in which he asked 
whether it would be possible to repeal the Legislative Reorganization 
Act. Senator Lucas replied that he thought it would be advisable to give 
the matter further consideration before any action were taken by the 
Conference itself.
Senator Lucas then stated that he had called the Conference to consider 
the future legislative program: (1) Call of the calendar; (2) H.R. 4046, 
Second Deficiency Appropriation Bill; (3) S. 1070, the Housing Bill of 
1949; and (4) H.R. 1211, Trade Agreements Extension Act of 1949.
Senator Hill of Alabama asked regarding the status of the District of 
Columbia Rent Control Bill. Senator McGrath of Rhode Island, Chairman of 
the District of Columbia Committee, replied that the conference report 
was ready and that he was willing to have it taken up any day during the 
week, that he understood Senator McCarthy of Wisconsin would make an 
address in opposition to the report, but that he did not believe it 
would require any lengthy debate. Senator Hill of Alabama then made a 
statement regarding the Deficiency bill, particularly the provisions 
dealing