[Title 3 CFR ]
[Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition) - January 1, 2001 Edition]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



[[Page i]]

          

          3
          2000 Compilation
          and
          Parts 100-102
          Revised as of January 1, 2001

          The President





          Published by:
          Office of the Federal Register
          National Archives and Records 
          Administration

          A Special Edition of the Federal Register



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                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
                             WASHINGTON: 2001



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
   Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov  Phone: (202) 512-1800  Fax: 202) 512-2250
                Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-0001

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                            TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                                    Page
List of Title 3 Compilations..........................................iv
Explanation of the Code of Federal Regulations.........................v
Explanation of This Title.............................................ix
How To Cite This Title................................................xi
Title 3.............................................................xiii
     2000 Compilation--Presidential Documents..........................1
     Chapter I--Executive Office of the President....................415
Title 3 Finding Aids.................................................425
     Tables..........................................................427
     List of CFR Sections Affected...................................445
     Index...........................................................447
CFR Finding Aids.....................................................455
     Table of CFR Titles and Chapters................................457
     Alphabetical List of Agencies Appearing in the CFR..............475

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                          TITLE 3 COMPILATIONS


------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Title 3 Compilations           Proclamations     Executive Orders
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1936-1938.........................  2161-2286.........    7316-7905
 1938-1943.........................  2287-2587.........    7906-9347
 1943-1948.........................  2588-2823.........   9348-10025
 1949-1953.........................  2824-3041.........  10026-10510
 1954-1958.........................  3042-3265.........  10511-10797
 1959-1963.........................  3266-3565.........  10798-11134
 1964-1965.........................  3566-3694.........  11135-11263
 1966-1970.........................  3695-4025.........  11264-11574
 1971-1975.........................  4026-4411.........  11575-11893
 1976..............................  4412-4480.........  11894-11949
 1977..............................  4481-4543.........  11950-12032
 1978..............................  4544-4631.........  12033-12110
 1979..............................  4632-4709.........  12111-12187
 1980..............................  4710-4812.........  12188-12260
 1981..............................  4813-4889.........  12261-12336
 1982..............................  4890-5008.........  12337-12399
 1983..............................  5009-5142.........  12400-12456
 1984..............................  5143-5291.........  12457-12497
 1985..............................  5292-5424.........  12498-12542
 1986..............................  5425-5595.........  12543-12579
 1987..............................  5596-5759.........  12580-12622
 1988..............................  5760-5928.........  12623-12662
 1989..............................  5929-6084.........  12663-12698
 1990..............................  6085-6240.........  12699-12741
 1991..............................  6241-6398.........  12742-12787
 1992..............................  6399-6520.........  12788-12827
 1993..............................  6521-6643.........  12828-12890
 1994..............................  6644-6763.........  12891-12944
 1995..............................  6764-6859.........  12945-12987
 1996..............................  6860-6965.........  12988-13033
 1997..............................  6966-7061.........  13034-13071
 1998..............................  7062-7161.........  13072-13109
 1999..............................  7162-7262.........  13110-13144
 2000..............................  7263-7389.........  13145-13185
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Beginning with 1976, Title 3 Compilations also include regulations
  contained in Chapter I, Executive Office of the President.
Supplementary publications include: Presidential documents of the Hoover
  Administration (two volumes), Proclamations 1870-2037 and
  Executive Orders 5076-6070; Consolidated Indexes for
  1936-1965; and Consolidated Tables for 1936-1965.


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                               EXPLANATION

    The Code of Federal Regulations is a codification of the general and 
permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the Executive 
departments and agencies of the Federal Government. The Code is divided 
into 50 titles which represent broad areas subject to Federal 
regulation. Each title is divided into chapters which usually bear the 
name of the issuing agency. Each chapter is further subdivided into 
parts covering specific regulatory areas.
    Each volume of the Code is revised at least once each calendar year 
and issued on a quarterly basis approximately as follows:

Title 1 through Title 16.................................as of January 1
Title 17 through Title 27..................................as of April 1
Title 28 through Title 41...................................as of July 1
Title 42 through Title 50................................as of October 1

    The appropriate revision date is printed on the cover of each 
volume.

LEGAL STATUS

    The contents of the Federal Register are required to be judicially 
noticed (44 U.S.C. 1507). The Code of Federal Regulations is prima facie 
evidence of the text of the original documents (44 U.S.C. 1510).

HOW TO USE THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS

    The Code of Federal Regulations is kept up to date by the individual 
issues of the Federal Register. These two publications must be used 
together to determine the latest version of any given rule.
    To determine whether a Code volume has been amended since its 
revision date (in this case, January 1, 2001), consult the ``List 
of CFR Sections Affected (LSA),'' which is issued monthly, and the 
``Cumulative List of Parts Affected,'' which appears in the 
Reader Aids section of the daily Federal Register. These two lists will 
identify the Federal Register page number of the latest amendment of any 
given rule.

EFFECTIVE AND EXPIRATION DATES

    Each volume of the Code contains amendments published in the Federal 
Register since the last revision of that volume of the Code. Source 
citations for the regulations are referred to by volume number and page 
number of the Federal Register and date of publication. Publication 
dates and effective dates are usually not the same and care must be 
exercised by the user in determining the actual effective date. In 
instances where the effective date is beyond the cut-off date for the 
Code a note has been inserted to reflect the future effective date. In 
those instances where a regulation published in the Federal Register 
states a date certain for expiration, an appropriate note will be 
inserted following the text.

OMB CONTROL NUMBERS

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-511) requires 
Federal agencies to display an OMB control number with their information 
collection request.

[[Page vi]]

Many agencies have begun publishing numerous OMB control numbers as 
amendments to existing regulations in the CFR. These OMB numbers are 
placed as close as possible to the applicable recordkeeping or reporting 
requirements.

OBSOLETE PROVISIONS

    Provisions that become obsolete before the revision date stated on 
the cover of each volume are not carried. Code users may find the text 
of provisions in effect on a given date in the past by using the 
appropriate numerical list of sections affected. For the period before 
January 1, 1986, consult either the List of CFR Sections Affected, 
1949-1963, 1964-1972, or 1973-1985, published in seven 
separate volumes. For the period beginning January 1, 1986, a 
``List of CFR Sections Affected'' is published at the end of 
each CFR volume.

CFR INDEXES AND TABULAR GUIDES

    A subject index to the Code of Federal Regulations is contained in a 
separate volume, revised annually as of January 1, entitled CFR Index 
and Finding Aids. This volume contains the Parallel Table of Statutory 
Authorities and Agency Rules (Table I), and Acts Requiring Publication 
in the Federal Register (Table II). A list of CFR titles, chapters, and 
parts and an alphabetical list of agencies publishing in the CFR are 
also included in this volume.
    An index to the text of ``Title 3--The President'' is 
carried within that volume.
    The Federal Register Index is issued monthly in cumulative form. 
This index is based on a consolidation of the ``Contents'' 
entries in the daily Federal Register.
    A List of CFR Sections Affected (LSA) is published monthly, keyed to 
the revision dates of the 50 CFR titles.

REPUBLICATION OF MATERIAL

    There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing 
in the Code of Federal Regulations.

INQUIRIES

    For a legal interpretation or explanation of any regulation in this 
volume, contact the issuing agency. The issuing agency's name appears at 
the top of odd-numbered pages.
    For inquiries concerning CFR reference assistance, call 
202-523-5227 or write to the Director, Office of the Federal 
Register, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 
20408 or e-mail [email protected]

SALES

    The Government Printing Office (GPO) processes all sales and 
distribution of the CFR. For payment by credit card, call 
202-512-1800, M-F 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. e.s.t. or fax your 
order to 202-512-2233, 24 hours a day. For payment by check, 
write to the Superintendent of Documents, Attn: New Orders, P.O. Box 
371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954. For GPO Customer Service call 
202-512-1803.

ELECTRONIC SERVICES

    The texts of the Code of Federal Regulations, The United States 
Government Manual, the Federal Register, Public Laws, Public Papers, 
Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, and the 1995 Privacy Act 
Compilation are available in electronic format at www.access.gpo.gov/
nara/index.html. For more information, contact Electronic Information 
Dissemination Services, U.S. Government Printing Office. Phone 
202-512-1530, or 888-293-6498 (toll-free). 
E-mail, [email protected]

[[Page vii]]

    The Office of the Federal Register maintains a free electronic 
bulletin board service, FREND (Federal Register Electronic News 
Delivery), for public law numbers, Federal Register finding aids, and 
related information. To access by modem: phone, 
202-275-0920.
    In addition, the Federal Register's public inspection list and table 
of contents are also available on the National Archives and Records 
Administration's Fax-on-Demand system. Phone, 
301-713-6905.

                              Raymond A. Mosley,
                                    Director,
                          Office of the Federal Register.

January 1, 2001.

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                        EXPLANATION OF THIS TITLE

    This volume of ``Title 3--The President'' contains a 
compilation of Presidential documents and a codification of regulations 
                        issued by the Executive Office of the President.

         The 2000 Compilation contains the full text of those documents 
      signed by the President that were required to be published in the 
   Federal Register. Signature date rather than publication date is the 
     criterion for inclusion. With each annual volume, the Presidential 
       documents signed in the previous year become the new compilation.

    Chapter I contains regulations issued by the Executive Office of the 
 President. This section is a true codification like other CFR volumes, 
in that its contents are organized by subject or regulatory area and are 
                   updated by individual issues of the Federal Register.

       Presidential documents in this volume may be cited ``3 CFR, 
         2000 Comp.'' Thus, the preferred abbreviated citation for 
   Proclamation 7263 appearing on page 1 of this book, is ``3 CFR, 
       2000 Comp., p. 1.'' Chapter I entries may be cited ``3 
CFR.'' Thus, the preferred abbreviated citation for section 100.1, 
      appearing in chapter I of this book, is ``3 CFR 100.1.''

            This book is one of the volumes in a series that began with 
 Proclamation 2161 of March 19, 1936, and Executive Order 7316 of March 
  13, 1936, and that has been continued by means of annual compilations 
  and periodic cumulations. The entire Title 3 series, as of January 1, 
                  2001, is encompassed in the volumes listed on page iv.

     For readers interested in proclamations and Executive orders prior 
to 1936, there is a two-volume set entitled Proclamations and Executive 
     Orders, Herbert Hoover (March 4, 1929, to March 4, 1933). Codified 
Presidential documents are published in the Codification of Presidential 
   Proclamations and Executive Orders (April 13, 1945--January 20, 
1989). Other public Presidential documents not required to be published 
   in the Federal Register, such as speeches, messages to Congress, and 
     statements, can be found in the Weekly Compilation of Presidential 
Documents and the Public Papers of the Presidents series. Each of these 
 Office of the Federal Register publications is available for sale from 
the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 
                                                               DC 20402.

    This book was prepared in the Presidential Documents and Legislative 
  Division by Anna Glover and Karen A. Thornton, with the assistance of 
                John S. Ashlin, Karen L. Ashlin, and Jennifer S. Mangum.

[[Page x]]



________________________________________________________________________




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________________________________________________________________________


               Cite Presidential documents in this volume
                            3 CFR, 2000 Comp.
                      thus: 3 CFR, 2000 Comp., p. 1
________________________________________________________________________

                  Cite chapter I entries in this volume
                                  3 CFR
                            thus: 3 CFR 100.1


________________________________________________________________________



[[Page xiii]]

________________________________________________________________________



                         TITLE 3--THE PRESIDENT


                                                                    Page

2000 Compilation--Presidential Documents:
     Proclamations.....................................................1
     Executive Orders................................................235
     Other Presidential Documents....................................343
Chapter I--Executive Office of the President:
    Part 100.........................................................416
    Part 101.........................................................416
    Part 102.........................................................416
Finding Aids:
    Table 1--Proclamations...........................................427
    Table 2--Executive Orders........................................431
    Table 3--Other Presidential Documents............................433
    Table 4--Presidential Documents Affected During 1998.............437
    Table 5--Statutes Cited as Authority for Presidential Docu- .....441
      ments
    List of CFR Sections Affected....................................445
    Index............................................................447
CFR Finding Aids:
    Table of CFR Titles and Chapters.................................457
    Alphabetical List of Agencies Appearing in the CFR...............475


[[Page 1]]

                2000 Compilation--Presidential Documents


________________________________________________________________________

                              PROCLAMATIONS

________________________________________________________________________



Proclamation 7263 of January 11, 2000

Establishment of the Agua Fria National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The windswept, grassy mesas and formidable canyons of Agua Fria National 
Monument embrace an extraordinary array of scientific and historic 
resources. The ancient ruins within the monument, with their 
breathtaking vistas and spectacular petroglyphs, provide a link to the 
past, offering insights into the lives of the peoples who once inhabited 
this part of the desert Southwest. The area's architectural features and 
artifacts are tangible objects that can help researchers reconstruct the 
human past. Such objects and, more importantly, the spatial 
relationships among them, provide outstanding opportunities for 
archeologists to study the way humans interacted with one another, 
neighboring groups, and with the environment that sustained them in 
prehistoric times.
The monument contains one of the most significant systems of late 
prehistoric sites in the American Southwest. Between A.D. 1250 and 1450, 
its pueblo communities were populated by up to several thousand people. 
During this time, many dwelling locations in the Southwest were 
abandoned and groups became aggregated in a relatively small number of 
densely populated areas. The monument encompasses one of the best 
examples of these areas, containing important archeological evidence 
that is crucial to understanding the cultural, social, and economic 
processes that accompanied this period of significant change.
At least 450 prehistoric sites are known to exist within the monument 
and there are likely many more. There are at least four major 
settlements within the area, including Pueblo La Plata, Pueblo Pato, the 
Baby Canyon Ruin group, and the Lousy Canyon group. These consist of 
clusters of stone-ma

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sonry pueblos, some containing at least 100 rooms. These settlements are 
typically situated at the edges of steep canyons, and offer a panorama 
of ruins, distinctive rock art panels, and visually spectacular 
settings.
Many intact petroglyph sites within the monument contain rock art 
symbols pecked into the surfaces of boulders and cliff faces. The sites 
range from single designs on boulders to cliffs covered with hundreds of 
geometric and abstract symbols. Some of the most impressive sites are 
associated with major pueblos, such as Pueblo Pato.
The monument holds an extraordinary record of prehistoric agricultural 
features, including extensive terraces bounded by lines of rocks and 
other types of landscape modifications. The agricultural areas, as well 
as other sites, reflect the skills of ancient residents at producing and 
obtaining food supplies sufficient to sustain a population of several 
thousand people.
The monument also contains historic sites representing early Anglo-
American history through the 19th century, including remnants of Basque 
sheep camps, historic mining features, and military activities.
In addition to its rich record of human history, the monument contains 
other objects of scientific interest. This expansive mosaic of semi-
desert grassland, cut by ribbons of valuable riparian forest, is an 
outstanding biological resource. The diversity of vegetative 
communities, topographical features, and relative availability of water 
provide habitat for a wide array of sensitive wildlife species, 
including the lowland leopard frog, the Mexican garter snake, the common 
black hawk, and the desert tortoise. Other wildlife is abundant and 
diverse, including pronghorn, mule deer, and white-tail deer. Javelina, 
mountain lions, small mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and 
neotropical migratory birds also inhabit the area. Elk and black bear 
are present, but less abundant. Four species of native fish, including 
the longfin dace, the Gila mountain sucker, the Gila chub, and the 
speckled dace, exist in the Agua Fria River and its tributaries.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Agua Fria National 
Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Agua Fria National Monument, for the 
purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within the 
boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Agua Fria 
National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. 
The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 
71,100 acres, which is

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the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all 
motorized and mechanized vehicle use off road will be prohibited, except 
for emergency or authorized administrative purposes.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Arizona with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, leasing, or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument. Lands and 
interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by the United 
States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon acquisition of 
title thereto by the United States.
There is hereby reserved, as of the date of this proclamation and 
subject to valid existing rights, a quantity of water sufficient to 
fulfill the purposes for which this monument is established. Nothing in 
this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or reduction of 
any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the United States on 
or before the date of this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable legal authorities, to 
implement the purposes of this proclamation.
Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
Management in issuing and administering grazing leases on all lands 
under its jurisdiction shall continue to apply with regard to the lands 
in the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 4]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD18JA00.025


[[Page 5]]


Proclamation 7264 of January 11, 2000

Establishment of the California Coastal National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The islands, rocks, and pinnacles of the California Coastal National 
Monument overwhelm the viewer, as white-capped waves crash into the 
vertical cliffs or deeply crevassed surge channels and frothy water 
empties back into the ocean. Amidst that beauty lies irreplaceable 
scientific values vital to protecting the fragile ecosystems of the 
California coastline. At land's end, the islands, rocks, exposed reefs, 
and pinnacles off the coast above mean high tide provide havens for 
significant populations of sea mammals and birds. They are part of a 
narrow and important flight lane in the Pacific Flyway, providing 
essential habitat for feeding, perching, nesting, and shelter.
The California Coastal National Monument is a biological treasure. The 
thousands of islands, rocks, exposed reefs, and pinnacles are part of 
the nearshore ocean zone that begins just off shore and ends at the 
boundary between the continental shelf and continental slope. Waters of 
this zone are rich in nutrients from upwelling currents and freshwater 
inflows, supporting a rich array of habitats and organisms. Productive 
oceanographic factors, such as major ocean currents, stimulate critical 
biological productivity and diversity in both nearshore and offshore 
ocean waters.
The monument contains many geologic formations that provide unique 
habitat for biota. Wave action exerts a strong influence on habitat 
distribution within the monument. Beaches occur where wave action is 
light, boulder fields occur in areas of greater wave activity, and rocky 
outcroppings occur where wave action is greatest. The pounding surf 
within boulder fields and rocky shores often creates small, but 
important, habitats known as tidepools, which support creatures uniquely 
adapted for survival under such extreme physical conditions. Although 
shoreline habitats may appear distinct from those off shore, they are 
dependent upon each other, with vital and dynamic exchange of nutrients 
and organisms being essential to maintaining their healthy ecosystems. 
As part of California's nearshore ocean zone, the monument is rich in 
biodiversity and holds many species of scientific interest that can be 
particularly sensitive to disturbance.
The monument's vegetative character varies greatly. Larger rocks and 
islands contain diverse growth. Dudleya, Atriplex-Baeria-Rumex, mixed 
grass-herb, Polypodium, Distichlis, ice plant, Synthyris-Poppy, Eymus, 
Poa-Baeria, chaparral, and wetlands vegetation are all present. Larger 
rocks and islands contain a diverse blend of the vegetation types.
The monument provides feeding and nesting habitat for an estimated 
200,000 breeding seabirds. Development on the mainland has forced 
seabirds that once fed and nested in the shoreline ecosystem to retreat 
to the areas protected by the monument. Pelagic seabird species inhabit 
salt or brackish water environments for at least part of their annual 
cycle and breed on offshore islands and rocks. Gulls, the endangered 
California least tern, the threatened brown pelican, and the snowy 
plover, among countless others, all feed on the vegetation and establish 
their nests in the monu

[[Page 6]]

ment. Both bald eagles and peregrine falcons are found within the 
monument.
The monument also provides forage and breeding habitat for several 
mammal species. Pinnipeds are abundant, including the threatened 
southern sea otter and the Guadalupe fur seal. The monument contains 
important shelter for male California sea lions in the winter and 
breeding rookeries for threatened northern (Steller) sea lions in the 
spring.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the California Coastal 
National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the California Coastal National Monument, for 
the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all 
unappropriated or unreserved lands and interests in lands owned or 
controlled by the United States in the form of islands, rocks, exposed 
reefs, and pinnacles above mean high tide within 12 nautical miles of 
the shoreline of the State of California. The Federal land and interests 
in land reserved are encompassed in the entire 840 mile Pacific 
coastline, which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care 
and management of the objects to be protected.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, leasing, or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument. Lands and 
interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by the United 
States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon acquisition of 
title thereto by the United States.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable legal authorities, to 
implement the purposes of this proclamation.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.

[[Page 7]]

Nothing in this proclamation shall enlarge or diminish the jurisdiction 
or authority of the State of California or the United States over 
submerged or other lands within the territorial waters off the coast of 
California.
Nothing in this proclamation shall affect the rights or obligations of 
any State or Federal oil or gas lessee within the territorial waters off 
the California coast.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7265 of January 11, 2000

Establishment of the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument is a vast, biologically 
diverse, impressive landscape encompassing an array of scientific and 
historic objects. This remote area of open, undeveloped spaces and 
engaging scenery is located on the edge of one of the most beautiful 
places on earth, the Grand Canyon. Despite the hardships created by 
rugged isolation and the lack of natural waters, the monument has a long 
and rich human history spanning more than 11,000 years, and an equally 
rich geologic history spanning almost 2 billion years. Full of natural 
splendor and a sense of solitude, this area remains remote and 
unspoiled, qualities that are essential to the protection of the 
scientific and historic resources it contains.
The monument is a geological treasure. Its Paleozoic and Mesozoic 
sedimentary rock layers are relatively undeformed and unobscured by 
vegetation, offering a clear view to understanding the geologic history 
of the Colorado Plateau. Deep canyons, mountains, and lonely buttes 
testify to the power of geological forces and provide colorful vistas. A 
variety of formations have been exposed by millennia of erosion by the 
Colorado River. The Cambrian, Devonian, and Mississippian formations 
(Muav Limestone, Temple Butte Formation, and the Redwall Limestone) are 
exposed at the southern end of the lower Grand Wash Cliffs. The 
Pennsylvanian and Permian formations (Calville Limestone, Esplanade 
Sandstone, Hermit Shale, Toroweap Formation, and the Kaibab Formation) 
are well exposed within the Parashant, Andrus, and Whitmore Canyons, and 
on the Grand Gulch Bench. The Triassic Chinle and Moenkopi Formations 
are exposed on the Shivwits Plateau, and the purple, pink, and white 
shale, mudstone, and sandstone of the Triassic Chinle Formation are 
exposed in Hells Hole.
The monument encompasses the lower portion of the Shivwits Plateau, 
which forms an important watershed for the Colorado River and the Grand

[[Page 8]]

Canyon. The Plateau is bounded on the west by the Grand Wash Cliffs and 
on the east by the Hurricane Cliffs. These cliffs, formed by large 
faults that sever the Colorado Plateau slicing north to south through 
the region, were and are major topographic barriers to travel across the 
area. The Grand Wash Cliffs juxtapose the colorful, lava-capped 
Precambrian and Paleozoic strata of the Grand Canyon against the highly 
faulted terrain, recent lake beds, and desert volcanic peaks of the 
down-dropped Grand Wash trough. These cliffs, which consist of lower and 
upper cliffs separated by the Grand Gulch Bench, form a spectacular 
boundary between the basin and range and the Colorado Plateau geologic 
provinces. At the south end of the Shivwits Plateau are several 
important tributaries to the Colorado River, including the rugged and 
beautiful Parashant, Andrus, and Whitmore canyons. The Plateau here is 
capped by volcanic rocks with an array of cinder cones and basalt flows, 
ranging in age from 9 million to only about 1000 years old. Lava from 
the Whitmore and Toroweap areas flowed into the Grand Canyon and dammed 
the river many times over the past several million years. The monument 
is pocketed with sinkholes and breccia pipes, structures associated with 
volcanism and the collapse of underlying rock layers through ground 
water dissolution.
Fossils are abundant in the monument. Among these are large numbers of 
invertebrate fossils, including bryozoans and brachiopods located in the 
Calville limestone of the Grand Wash Cliffs, and brachiopods, 
pelecypods, fenestrate bryozoa, and crinoid ossicles in the Toroweap and 
Kaibab formations of Whitmore Canyon. There are also sponges in nodules 
and pectenoid pelecypods throughout the Kaibab formation of Parashant 
Canyon.
The Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument contains portions of 
geologic faults, including the Dellenbaugh fault, which cuts basalt 
flows dated 6 to 7 million years old, the Toroweap fault, which has been 
active within the last 30,000 years, the Hurricane fault, which forms 
the Hurricane Cliffs and extends over 150 miles across northern Arizona 
and into Utah, and the Grand Wash fault, which bounds the west side of 
the Shivwits Plateau and has approximately 15,000 feet of displacement 
across the monument.
Archaeological evidence shows much human use of the area over the past 
centuries. Because of their remoteness and the lack of easy road access, 
the sites in this area have experienced relatively little vandalism. 
Their good condition distinguishes them from many prehistoric resources 
in other areas. Prehistoric use is documented by irreplaceable rock art 
images, quarries, villages, watchtowers, agricultural features, burial 
sites, caves, rockshelters, trails, and camps. Current evidence 
indicates that the monument was utilized by small numbers of hunter-
gatherers during the Archaic Period (7000 B.C. to 300 B.C.). Population 
and utilization of the monument increased during the Ancestral Puebloan 
Period from the Basketmaker II Phase through the Pueblo II Phase (300 
B.C. to 1150 A.D.), as evidenced by the presence of pit houses, 
habitation rooms, agricultural features, and pueblo structures. 
Population size decreased during the Pueblo III Phase (1150 A.D. to 1225 
A.D.). Southern Paiute groups replaced the Pueblo groups and were 
occupying the monument at the time of Euro-American contact. 
Archeological sites in the monument include large concentrations of 
ancestral Puebloan (Anasazi or Hitsatsinom) villages, a large, intact 
Pueblo II village, numerous archaic period archeological sites, 
ancestral

[[Page 9]]

Puebloan sites, and Southern Paiute sites. The monument also contains 
areas of importance to existing Indian tribes.
In 1776, the Escalante-Dominguez expedition of Spanish explorers passed 
near Mount Trumbull. In the first half of the 19th century, Jedediah 
Smith, Antonio Armiijo, and John C. Fremont explored portions of this 
remote area. Jacob Hamblin, a noted Mormon pioneer, explored portions of 
the Shivwits Plateau in 1858 and, with John Wesley Powell, in the 1870s. 
Clarence Dutton completed some of the first geological explorations of 
this area and provided some of the most stirring written descriptions. 
Having traversed this area by wagon at the request of the territorial 
legislature, Sharlot Hall recommended it for inclusion within the State 
of Arizona when it gained Statehood in 1912. Early historic sawmills 
provided timber that was hauled 70 miles along the Temple Trail wagon 
road from Mt. Trumbull down the Hurricane Cliffs to St. George, Utah. 
Ranch structures and corrals, fences, water tanks, and the ruins of 
sawmills are scattered across the monument and tell the stories of the 
remote family ranches and the lifestyles of early homesteaders. There 
are several old mining sites dating from the 1870s, showing the history 
of mining during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The remote and 
undeveloped nature of the monument protects these historical sites in 
nearly their original context.
The monument also contains outstanding biological resources preserved by 
remoteness and limited travel corridors. The monument is the junction of 
two physiographic ecoregions: the Mojave Desert and the Colorado 
Plateau. Individually, these regions contain ecosystems extreme to each 
other, ranging from stark, arid desert to complex, dramatic higher 
elevation plateaus, tributaries, and rims of the Grand Canyon. The 
western margin of the Shivwits Plateau marks the boundary between the 
Sonoran/Mojave/Great Basin floristic provinces to the west and south, 
and the Colorado Plateau province to the northeast. This intersection of 
these biomes is a distinctive and remarkable feature. Riparian corridors 
link the plateau to the Colorado River corridor below, allowing wildlife 
movement and plant dispersal. The Shivwits Plateau is in an arid 
environment with between 14 to 18 inches of precipitation a year. Giant 
Mojave Yucca cacti proliferate in undisturbed conditions throughout the 
monument. Diverse wildlife inhabit the monument, including a trophy-
quality mule deer herd, Kaibab squirrels, and wild turkey. There are 
numerous threatened or endangered species as well, including the Mexican 
spotted owl, the California condor, the desert tortoise, and the 
southwestern willow flycatcher. There are also candidate or sensitive 
species, including the spotted bat, the western mastiff bat, the 
Townsend's big eared bat, and the goshawk, as well as two federally 
recognized sensitive rare plant species: Penstemon distans and Rosa 
stellata. The ponderosa pine ecosystem in the Mt. Trumbull area is a 
biological resource of scientific interest, which has been studied to 
gain important insights regarding dendroclimatic reconstruction, fire 
history, forest structure change, and the long-term persistence and 
stability of presettlement pine groups.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases

[[Page 10]]

shall be confined to the smallest area compatible with the proper care 
and management of the objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Grand Canyon-
Parashant National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument, 
for the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands 
and interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within 
the boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Grand Canyon-
Parashant National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this 
proclamation. The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of 
approximately 1,014,000 acres, which is the smallest area compatible 
with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all 
motorized and mechanized vehicle use off road will be prohibited, except 
for emergency or authorized administrative purposes.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Arizona with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument. Sale of 
vegetative material is permitted only if part of an authorized science-
based ecological restoration project. Lands and interests in lands 
within the proposed monument not owned by the United States shall be 
reserved as a part of the monument upon acquisition of title thereto by 
the United States.
This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of Federal law nor 
relinquish any water rights held by the Federal Government existing on 
this date. The Federal land managing agencies shall work with 
appropriate State authorities to ensure that water resources needed for 
monument purposes are available.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service, pursuant to 
applicable legal authorities, to implement the purposes of this 
proclamation. The National Park Service and the Bureau of Land 
Management shall manage the monument cooperatively and shall prepare an 
agreement to share, consistent with applicable laws, whatever resources 
are necessary to properly manage the monument; however, the National 
Park Service shall continue to have primary management authority over 
the portion of the monument within the Lake Mead National Recreation 
Area, and the Bureau of Land Management shall have primary management 
authority over the remaining portion of the monument.

[[Page 11]]

The Bureau of Land Management shall continue to issue and administer 
grazing leases within the portion of the monument within the Lake Mead 
National Recreation Area, consistent with the Lake Mead National 
Recreation Area authorizing legislation. Laws, regulations, and policies 
followed by the Bureau of Land Management in issuing and administering 
grazing leases on all lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to 
apply to the remaining portion of the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation. Warning is hereby given to 
all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove 
any feature of this monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the 
lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 12]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD18JA00.026


[[Page 13]]


Proclamation 7266 of January 11, 2000

Boundary Enlargement of the Pinnacles National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Pinnacles National Monument was established on January 16, 1908, for the 
purpose of protecting its natural rock formations, known as Pinnacles 
Rocks, and the series of talus caves underlying them. The monument sits 
within one of the most complex and fascinating geologic terrains in 
North America, an area where rock masses have been sliced apart, 
transported for up to hundreds of miles, and then reassembled into a 
fantastic geologic mixture. The monument holds only half of an ancient 
volcano; the other half is found 195 miles to the southeast in northern 
Los Angeles County. The volcano was split apart and transported north by 
an early strand of the San Andreas Fault, known as the Chalone Creek 
Fault, which lies within the monument. The pinnacles inside the monument 
are composed mainly of volcanic breccia, a mixture of angular blocks of 
volcanic lava, pumice, and ash. The occurrence of the pinnacles within 
the monument is unusual, as some of these volcanic rocks also contain 
marine fossils.
Since 1908, the boundaries of the monument have been enlarged on five 
occasions by presidential proclamations issued pursuant to the 
Antiquities Act (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431). Proclamation 1660 of May 
7, 1923, added 562 acres to include additional natural formations with a 
series of caves underlying them. Proclamation 1704 of July 2, 1924, 
added adjoining lands that included a spring of water and valuable 
camping sites. Proclamation 1948 of April 13, 1931, added 1,926 acres 
that held additional features of scientific and educational interest and 
for administrative purposes. For these same purposes, the boundary was 
later expanded on July 11, 1933 (Proclamation 2050). Proclamation 2528 
of December 5, 1941, added additional lands adjoining Pinnacles National 
Monument in order to protect more objects of scientific interest in the 
monument area. The boundary of the monument was further expanded by 
statute on October 20, 1976 (Public Law 94-567, 90 Stat. 2693).
The boundary enlargement effected by this proclamation is central to the 
continued preservation of the Pinnacles National Monument's unique 
resources. In addition to containing pieces of the same faults that 
created the tremendous geological formations throughout the monument, 
the expansion lands hold part of the headwaters that drain into the 
basin of the monument. Over millions of years, flash floods and stream 
currents have helped to sculpt the land's natural features. 
Additionally, these lands contain a biological system that must be 
protected if the wild character and ecosystem of the monument are to be 
preserved. The geologic formations provide a stellar habitat for 
important and sometimes fragile biological resources. For example, 
raptor populations, including prairie falcons, golden eagles, red-
shouldered hawks, Cooper's hawks, harriers, white-tailed kites, long-
eared owls, and red-tailed hawks, nest on the rocky formations and 
forage in the broad watershed. The lands within the expansion area 
contain steep, rugged slopes surrounding small canyons. Shallow rocky 
soils, gravel creek beds, and steeply rising topography combine to 
create a dynamic flood environment. The lands preserve a complex 
association of plant communities

[[Page 14]]

characteristic of the chaparral. Along the watercourses, live-oaks, 
buckeyes, and sycamore grow. Blue oak woodlands and grasslands occur on 
the deepest soils. Creeks that flow in and out of the existing monument 
and the expansion lands provide highly valuable riparian habitat for 
wildlife. The western pond turtle, two-striped garter snake, silvery 
legless lizard, threatened California red-legged frog, and California 
horned lizard inhabit these lands. By expanding the monument, these 
unique biological resources can be afforded more complete protection to 
maintain and enhance the ecosystems of the monument.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as an addition to the Pinnacles National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as an addition to the Pinnacles National 
Monument, for the purpose of care, management, and protection of the 
objects of scientific interest situated on lands within the said 
monument, all lands and interests in lands owned or controlled by the 
United States within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
entitled ``Pinnacles National Monument Boundary Enlargement'' attached 
to and forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land and 
interests in land reserved consist of approximately 7,900 acres, which 
is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of 
the objects to be protected.
The enlargement of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, leasing, or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument. Lands and 
interests in lands not owned by the United States shall be reserved as a 
part of the monument upon acquisition of title thereto by the United 
States.
There is hereby reserved, as of the date of this proclamation and 
subject to valid existing rights, a quantity of water sufficient to 
fulfill the purposes for which the monument is established. Nothing in 
this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or reduction of 
any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the United States on 
or before the date of this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the area being added to the 
monument through the National Park Service, under the same laws and

[[Page 15]]

regulations that apply to the rest of the monument, except that 
livestock grazing may be permitted in the area added by this 
proclamation.
Wilderness Study Areas included in the monument will continue to be 
managed under section 603(c) of the Federal Land Policy and Management 
Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.).
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twentieth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 16]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD18JA00.027


[[Page 17]]


Proclamation 7267 of January 14, 2000

Religious Freedom Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

On January 16, 1786, the Virginia legislature enacted a law whose impact 
is still felt around the world today. Authored by Thomas Jefferson and 
introduced by James Madison, this act affirmed religious freedom as one 
of the ``natural rights of mankind'' and pledged that none would 
``suffer on account of his religious opinions or beliefs.'' Recognizing 
the fundamental importance of this right to human dignity, our founders 
modeled the First Amendment to our Constitution on the Virginia statute 
and made religious freedom and tolerance core values of our democracy. 
More than a century and a half later, Eleanor Roosevelt, as the 
Chairperson of the U.N.'s Commission on Human Rights, worked to extend 
that vision to peoples around the world through her contributions to the 
U.N.'s Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Americans draw great strength from the free exercise of religion and 
from the diverse communities of faith that flourish in our Nation 
because of it. Our churches, mosques, synagogues, meetinghouses, and 
other places of worship bring us together, support our families, nourish 
our hearts and minds, and sustain our deepest values. Our religious 
beliefs give direction to our lives and provide moral guidance in the 
daily decisions we make.
Freedom of religion, however, still has enemies. In America in recent 
years, churches and synagogues have been destroyed by arson and people 
have been attacked because of their religious affiliation. Across the 
globe, many people still live in countries where the right to religious 
freedom is restricted or even prohibited. Some totalitarian and 
authoritarian regimes actively persecute those who seek to practice 
their religion, imprisoning, torturing, and even killing men and women 
because of their faith. Other governments monitor and harass religious 
minorities, tolerating and even encouraging hostility or acts of 
violence against them.
 My Administration is committed to safeguarding freedom of religion at 
home and promoting it around the globe. Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement officials are working in partnership to prosecute and 
prevent crimes aimed at people because of their religious affiliation, 
and I have called on the Congress to pass the Hate Crimes Prevention Act 
to strengthen the Federal Government's ability to combat such crimes. On 
the international front, we have made issues of religious liberty a 
consistent and fundamental part of our public diplomacy. My Ambassador 
at Large for International Religious Freedom and his staff have 
crisscrossed the globe, from China and Uzbekistan to Laos and Russia, to 
advance religious freedom and to assist those who are being persecuted 
for their beliefs. In accordance with the International Religious 
Freedom Act that I signed into law in 1998, the United States recently 
published the first annual report on the status of religious freedom 
worldwide and publicly designated the most severe international 
violators. This report highlights the many crucial efforts of 
individuals and agencies in the Federal Government to advocate religious 
freedom abroad, from negotiating with foreign heads of state to pursuing 
individual cases of persecution or discrimination.

[[Page 18]]

As we observe Religious Freedom Day this year, let us give thanks for 
the wisdom of America's founders in protecting our precious right to 
express our beliefs and practice our faith freely and openly. Let us 
resolve to be vigilant in defending that freedom and teaching tolerance 
in our homes, schools, communities, and workplaces. And let us continue 
to lead the world in assisting those who are persecuted because of their 
religious faith and in proclaiming the rights and dignity of every human 
being.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 16, 2000, as 
Religious Freedom Day. I call upon the people of the United States to 
observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs, 
and I urge all Americans to reaffirm their devotion to the fundamental 
principles of religious freedom and tolerance.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7268 of January 14, 2000

Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Just this month, thousands of Americans gathered at the Lincoln Memorial 
to welcome a new year, a new century, and a new millennium. There--where 
37 years ago Martin Luther King, Jr., so eloquently voiced his dream for 
America's future--we pledged not only to keep Dr. King's dream alive, 
but also to bring it to reality in the 21st century.
We are living in a time of unprecedented peace and prosperity for our 
Nation, where the struggles of the valiant and visionary men and women 
who came before us have borne fruit with the guarantee of civil rights 
at home and the triumph of freedom in nations across the globe. But we 
cannot afford to become complacent. As Dr. King so wisely observed, ``We 
have learned to fly the air like birds and swim the sea like fish, but 
we have not learned the simple art of living together as brothers. Our 
abundance has brought us neither peace of mind nor serenity of spirit.''
We must seize this rare moment in our Nation's history to build a 
society in which we accept our differences and honor our common 
humanity. We must unite against the forces of hatred, fear, and 
ignorance that seek to divide us. We must use our economic success and 
our technological prowess to widen the circle of opportunity, to 
eliminate poverty, and to give all our children the education, values, 
and encouragement they need to reach their full potential.
Each year since 1994, when I signed into law the King Holiday and 
Service Act, Americans have marked this observance by devoting the day 
to service projects in their communities. By renovating schools, 
cleaning up neighbor

[[Page 19]]

hoods, tutoring children, donating blood, organizing food drives, or 
reaching out in some other way to those in need, our citizens can work 
together to make this a day on, not a day off, and to make their own 
contributions to Dr. King's legacy of service.
Martin Luther King, Jr., was not content to rest on past successes or to 
compromise his convictions. If he were with us now to mark his 71st 
birthday, he would exhort us not to grow weary in doing good but to 
reach out to one another in the spirit of service and forge a future in 
which all Americans are proud of our diversity and united in our 
reverence for freedom, justice, and equality.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim Monday, January 17, 2000, 
as the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday. I call upon all 
Americans to observe this occasion with appropriate programs, 
ceremonies, and activities in honor of Dr. King's life and achievements 
and in response to his call to service.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7269 of January 19, 2000

National Biotechnology Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As we stand at the dawn of a new century, we recognize the enormous 
potential that biotechnology holds for improving the quality of life 
here in the United States and around the world. These technologies, 
which draw on our understanding of the life sciences to develop products 
and solve problems, are progressing at an exponential rate and promise 
to make unprecedented contributions to public health and safety, a 
cleaner environment, and economic prosperity.
Today, a third of all new medicines in development are based on 
biotechnology. Designed to attack the underlying cause of an illness, 
not just its symptoms, these medicines have tremendous potential to 
provide not only more effective treatments, but also cures. With 
improved understanding of cellular and genetic processes, scientists 
have opened exciting new avenues of research into treatments for 
devastating diseases--like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, diabetes, heart 
disease, AIDS, and cancer--that affect millions of Americans. 
Biotechnology has also given us several new vaccines, including one for 
rotavirus, now being tested clinically, that could eradicate an illness 
responsible for the deaths of more than 800,000 infants and children 
each year.
The impact of biotechnology is far-reaching. Bioremediation technologies 
are cleaning our environment by removing toxic substances from contami

[[Page 20]]

nated soils and ground water. Agricultural biotechnology reduces our 
dependence on pesticides. Manufacturing processes based on biotechnology 
make it possible to produce paper and chemicals with less energy, less 
pollution, and less waste. Forensic technologies based on our growing 
knowledge of DNA help us exonerate the innocent and bring criminals to 
justice.
The biotechnology industry is also improving lives through its 
substantial economic impact. Biotechnology has stimulated the creation 
and growth of small businesses, generated new jobs, and encouraged 
agricultural and industrial innovation. The industry currently employs 
more than 150,000 people and invests nearly $10 billion a year on 
research and development.
Recognizing the extraordinary promise and benefits of this enterprise, 
my Administration has pursued policies to foster biotechnology 
innovations as expeditiously and prudently as possible. We have 
supported steady increases in funding for basic scientific research at 
the National Institutes of Health and other science agencies; 
accelerated the process for approving new medicines to make them 
available as quickly and safely as possible; encouraged private-sector 
research investment and small business development through tax 
incentives and the Small Business Innovation Research program; promoted 
intellectual property protection and open international markets for 
biotechnology inventions and products; and developed public databases 
that enable scientists to coordinate their efforts in an enterprise that 
has become one of the world's finest examples of partnership among 
university-based researchers, government, and private industry.
Remarkable as its achievements have been, the biotechnology enterprise 
is still in its infancy. We will reap even greater benefits as long as 
we sustain the intellectual partnership and public confidence that have 
moved biotechnology forward thus far. We must strengthen our efforts to 
improve science education for all Americans and preserve and promote the 
freedom of scientific inquiry. We must protect patients from the misuse 
or abuse of sensitive medical information and provide Federal regulatory 
agencies with sufficient resources to maintain sound, science-based 
review and regulation of biotechnology products. And we must strive to 
ensure that science-based regulatory programs worldwide promote public 
safety, earn public confidence, and guarantee fair and open 
international markets.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 2000 as National 
Biotechnology Month. I call upon the people of the United States to 
observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 21]]


Proclamation 7270 of January 31, 2000

National African American History Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each year during National African American History Month, as we explore 
the history and culture of African Americans, we discover anew a 
treasure of stories about the triumph of the human spirit, inspiring 
accounts of everyday people rising above the indignities imposed by 
prejudice. These stories are not only an important part of African 
American history, but an essential part of American history.
We are awakened to such stories through the power, beauty, and 
unflinching witness of poets and writers like Maya Angelou, Gwendolyn 
Brooks, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, James Weldon Johnson, 
Toni Morrison, and Alice Walker. We find them in the lives and voices of 
Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Booker T. Washington, and others 
who, rising above slavery, brutality, and bigotry, became great American 
champions of liberty, equality, and dignity. We see them written in the 
achievements of civil rights leaders like Daisy Bates, James Farmer, 
John Lewis, Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Mary Church 
Terrell, Roy Wilkins, and Whitney Young.
Forty years ago this month, a new chapter in African American history 
was written. On February 1, 1960, four courageous young men--freshmen at 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College in Greensboro--sat 
down at a segregated lunch counter in a local store and politely refused 
to leave until they were served. Their nonviolent action challenged a 
barrier that, symbolically and practically, had separated black and 
white Americans for decades and denied equal treatment to African 
American citizens. The extraordinary bravery and determination of Ezell 
Blair, Jr., Franklin McCain, Joseph McNeil, and David Richmond 
galvanized young men and women of conscience across America, setting in 
motion a series of student sit-ins in more than 50 cities and 9 States. 
Subjecting themselves to verbal abuse, physical violence, and unjust 
arrest, thousands of black and white students peacefully demonstrated to 
end segregation in restaurants, theaters, concert halls, and public 
transportation and called for equality in housing, health care, and 
education. Their story of conscience and conviction and their ultimate 
triumph continue to inspire us today.
The theme of this year's African American History Month is ``Heritage 
and Horizons: The African American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st 
Century.'' It is a reminder that the new century on which we have just 
embarked offers us a unique opportunity to write our own chapter in the 
history of African Americans and of our Nation. We can use this time of 
extraordinary prosperity and peace to widen the circle of opportunity in 
America, to recognize that our society's rich diversity is one of our 
greatest strengths, and to unite around the fundamental values that we 
all share as Americans. We can teach our children that America's story 
has been written by men and women of every race and creed and ethnic 
background. And we can ensure that our laws, our actions, and our words 
honor the rights and dignity of every human being.

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim February 2000 as National 
African American History Month. I call upon public officials, educators, 
librarians, and all the people of the United States to observe this 
month with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs that raise 
awareness and appreciation of African American history.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of 
January, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7271 of February 1, 2000

American Heart Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In the past half century, our Nation has made enormous progress in the 
fight against heart disease. Through careful research, scientists and 
doctors have identified key factors--including smoking, high blood 
pressure, high blood cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, and physical 
inactivity--that increase the risk of heart disease. Working with 
dedication and determination, they have developed new treatments and 
procedures, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, defibrillation, clot-
dissolving medicines, angioplasty, and cardiac imaging devices, that 
have saved many lives. As a result of these advances, the death rate 
from coronary heart disease has fallen dramatically in our Nation, with 
a nearly 60-percent reduction since its peak in the mid-1960s.
While these developments are significant, heart disease remains a 
serious health problem. Despite our knowledge of the importance of 
exercise and a proper diet to maintaining a healthy heart, studies 
indicate that both physical inactivity and obesity are on the rise 
throughout our country. Today, more than 58 million Americans have one 
or more types of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and each year nearly 1 
million Americans die from CVD--more than from the next 7 leading causes 
of death combined. Furthermore, rates of coronary heart disease deaths 
and the prevalence of some risk factors remain disproportionately high 
in minority and low-income populations.
As we stand at the dawn of this new century, it is crucial that we build 
on the developments of the last century to reduce the incidence of CVD, 
to address the disparity among various segments of our population, and 
to make further progress in the fight against heart disease. To help 
meet this challenge, my Administration has launched the Healthy People 
2010 initiative, which addresses health problems that can be prevented 
through better care and increased public awareness. Among the 
initiative's ambitious goals are improving the prevention, detection, 
and treatment of heart disease risk factors, earlier identification and 
quicker response in the treat

[[Page 23]]

ment of heart attacks, and prevention of recurrent cardiovascular 
events, such as second strokes.
The work of researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute 
of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) also holds great promise for 
the fight against heart disease. With the completion of their monumental 
project of mapping and sequencing all human chromosomes, we will soon 
have the capability to identify at birth all those who are genetically 
predisposed to heart disease and provide them with the treatment and 
guidance they need through the years to live longer, healthier lives.
The Federal Government will continue to support research and public 
education to improve heart health through the National Heart, Lung, and 
Blood Institute, also at NIH. And all Americans should remain grateful 
that the American Heart Association, through its research and education 
programs and its vital network of dedicated volunteers, maintains a 
crucial role in bringing about much-needed advances in the prevention 
and treatment of heart disease.
In recognition of the importance of the ongoing fight against 
cardiovascular disease, the Congress, by Joint Resolution approved 
December 20, 1963 (77 Stat. 843; 36 U.S.C. 101b), has requested that the 
President issue an annual proclamation designating February as 
``American Heart Month.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim February 2000 as American Heart Month. I 
invite the Governors of the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
officials of other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the United 
States, and the American people to join me in reaffirming our commitment 
to combating cardiovascular disease and strokes.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7272 of February 11, 2000

National Consumer Protection Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Americans have long enjoyed shopping from the comfort of their homes. 
Door-to-door sales and mail-order catalogs have given consumers the 
opportunity to choose from a wide variety of products while saving 
precious time for family and personal interests. As we move into the 
digital age, the Internet and other information technologies have made 
electronic commerce possible, and on-line shopping is opening doors for 
consumers, established retailers, and small entrepreneurs across the 
Nation. With these opportunities, however, come certain risks for home 
shoppers. Advances in telecommunications and marketing technology bring 
new opportunities for unfair, deceptive, or fraudulent practices that 
target consumers where they live. It is now easier than ever for 
perpetrators of fraud to reach shoppers

[[Page 24]]

in their homes; consequently, it is more important than ever that 
consumers know their rights, understand the risks, and know to whom they 
can turn for recourse.
While there are risks to home shopping, including unwanted 
solicitations, ill-advised purchases, and failure to deliver items 
purchased, consumers can protect themselves against these dangers by 
taking basic, commonsense precautions. Home shoppers should ascertain 
the seller's location and reputation; give out personal information only 
if they know who is collecting it, why it is being collected, and how it 
will be used; and report problems that they cannot resolve with the 
vendor.
In order to protect consumers, the Federal Trade Commission, the 
Department of Justice, the Consumer Federation of America, the American 
Association of Retired Persons, the National Association of Consumer 
Agency Administrators, and the National Association of Attorneys General 
have joined forces to inform Americans about their rights as home 
shoppers, about merchant responsibilities, and about how to enjoy safely 
the benefits of shopping from home. This information is available in 
writing, by telephone, and on-line, helping to educate consumers about 
such issues as how to stop unwanted telemarketing or mail-order 
solicitations and when to provide private information to an on-line 
business.
I encourage all Americans to take advantage of this opportunity to learn 
more about safe shopping from home. By becoming wise and well-informed 
consumers, we can reduce the incidence of fraud and deception in the 
marketplace.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim February 14 through 
February 20, 2000, as National Consumer Protection Week. I call upon 
government officials, industry leaders, consumer advocates, and the 
American people to participate in programs promoting safe and reliable 
shopping from home and to raise public awareness about the dangers of 
deceptive and fraudulent practices targeting home shoppers.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7273 of February 16, 2000

To Facilitate Positive Adjustment to Competition From
Imports of Certain Steel Wire Rod

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. On July 12, 1999, the United States International Trade Commission 
(USITC) transmitted to the President a report on its investigation under 
section 202 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 
U.S.C. 2252), with respect to imports of certain steel wire rod provided 
for in sub

[[Page 25]]

headings 7213.91, 7213.99, 7227.20 and 7227.90.60 of the Harmonized 
Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS). The USITC commissioners were 
equally divided with respect to the determination required under section 
202(b) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2252(b)) regarding whether such steel 
wire rod is being imported into the United States in such increased 
quantities as to be a substantial cause of serious injury, or threat of 
serious injury, to the domestic industry producing a like or directly 
competitive article.
2. Section 330(d)(1) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (the ``Tariff 
Act'') (19 U.S.C. 1330(d)(1)) provides that when the USITC is required 
to determine under section 202(b) of the Trade Act whether increased 
imports of an article are a substantial cause of serious injury, or the 
threat thereof, and the commissioners voting are equally divided with 
respect to such determination, then the determination agreed upon by 
either group of commissioners may be considered by the President as the 
determination of the USITC. Having reviewed the determinations of both 
groups of commissioners, I have decided to consider the determination of 
the group of commissioners voting in the affirmative to be the 
determination of the USITC.
3. Pursuant to section 311(a) of the North American Free Trade Agreement 
Implementation Act (the ``NAFTA Implementation Act'') (19 U.S.C. 
3371(a)), the USITC made negative findings with respect to imports of 
steel wire rod from Mexico and Canada. The USITC commissioners voting in 
the affirmative also transmitted to the President their recommendations 
made pursuant to section 202(e) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2252(e)) 
with respect to the action that would address the serious injury or 
threat thereof to the domestic industry and be most effective in 
facilitating the efforts of the domestic industry to make a positive 
adjustment to import competition.
4. Pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253), and after 
taking into account the considerations specified in section 203(a)(2) of 
the Trade Act, I have determined to implement action of a type described 
in section 203(a)(3) and to provide exclusions for enumerated steel wire 
rod products (``excluded products''). Pursuant to section 312(a) of the 
NAFTA Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 3372(a)), I have determined that 
imports of steel wire rod from Mexico, considered individually, do not 
account for a substantial share of total imports and do not contribute 
importantly to the serious injury, or threat of serious injury, found by 
the USITC, and that imports from Canada, considered individually, do not 
contribute importantly to such injury or threat. Accordingly, pursuant 
to section 312(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 3372(b)), I 
have excluded steel wire rod the product of Mexico or Canada from the 
action I am taking under section 203 of the Trade Act.
5. Such action shall take the form of a tariff-rate quota on imports of 
steel wire rod (other than excluded products), provided for in HTS 
subheadings 7213.91, 7213.99, 7227.20 and 7227.90.60, imposed for a 
period of 3 years plus 1 day, with annual increases in the within-quota 
quantities and annual reductions in the rate of duty applicable to goods 
entered in excess of those quantities in the second and third years, as 
provided for in the Annex to this proclamation.
6. Except for products of Mexico and of Canada, which shall all be 
excluded from this restriction, such tariff-rate quota shall apply to 
imports of steel wire rod from all countries. Pursuant to section 
203(a)(1)(A) of the

[[Page 26]]

Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(a)(1)(A)), I have further determined that this 
action will facilitate efforts by the domestic industry to make a 
positive adjustment to import competition and provide greater economic 
and social benefits than costs.
7. Section 604 of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes 
the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant 
provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, 
and actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
restriction.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including but not limited to 
sections 203 and 604 of the Trade Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to establish a tariff-rate quota on imports of steel 
wire rod (other than excluded products), classified in HTS subheadings 
7213.91, 7213.99, 7227.20 and 7227.90.60, subchapter III of chapter 99 
of the HTS is modified as provided in the Annex to this proclamation.
    (2) Such imported steel wire rod that is the product of Mexico or of 
Canada shall be excluded from the tariff-rate quota established by this 
proclamation, and such imports shall not be counted toward the tariff-
rate quota limits that trigger the over-quota rates of duty.
    (3) I hereby suspend, pursuant to section 503(c)(1) of the Trade Act 
(19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(1)), duty-free treatment for steel wire rod the 
product of beneficiary countries under the Generalized System of 
Preferences (GSP) (Title V of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2461-
2467)); pursuant to section 213(e)(1) of the Caribbean Basin Economic 
Recovery Act, as amended (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 2703(e)(1)), duty-free 
treatment for steel wire rod the product of beneficiary countries under 
that Act (19 U.S.C. 2701-2707); pursuant to section 204(d)(1) of the 
Andean Trade Preference Act, as amended (ATPA)(19 U.S.C. 3203(d)(1)), 
duty-free treatment for steel wire rod the product of beneficiary 
countries under that Act (19 U.S.C. 3201-3206); and pursuant to section 
403(a) of the Trade and Tariff Act of 1984 (19 U.S.C. 2112 note), duty-
free treatment for steel wire rod the product of Israel under the United 
States-Israel Free Trade Area Implementation Act of 1985 (the ``IFTA 
Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2112 note), to the extent necessary to apply the 
tariff-rate quota to those products, as specified in the Annex to this 
proclamation.
    (4) During each of the first three quarters of a quota year, any 
articles subject to the tariff-rate quota that are entered, or withdrawn 
from warehouse for consumption, in excess of one-third of the annual 
within-quota quantity for that quota year (as specified in the Annex to 
this proclamation) shall be subject to the over-quota rate of duty then 
in effect. During the fourth quarter of a quota year, any articles 
subject to the tariff-rate quota that are entered, or withdrawn from 
warehouse for consumption, in excess of the remaining quantity of the 
annual within-quota quantity for that quota year shall be subject to the 
over-quota rate of duty then in effect. The remaining quantity shall be 
determined by subtracting the total quantity of goods entered at the in-
quota rate during the first three quarters of the quota year from the 
annual within-quota quantity for that quota year.

[[Page 27]]

    (5) Effective at the close of March 1, 2003, or at the close of the 
date which may earlier be proclaimed by the President as the termination 
of the import relief set forth in the Annex to this proclamation, the 
suspension of duty-free treatment under the GSP, the CBERA, the ATPA and 
the IFTA Act shall terminate, unless otherwise provided in such later 
proclamation, and qualifying goods the product of beneficiary countries 
or of Israel entered under such programs shall again be eligible for 
duty-free treatment.
    (6) Effective at the close of March 1, 2004, or such other date that 
is one year from the close of this relief, the U.S. note and tariff 
provisions established in the Annex to this proclamation shall be 
deleted from the HTS.
    (7) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (8) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation, 
including the Annex hereto, shall be effective with respect to goods 
entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after March 
1, 2000, and shall continue in effect as provided in the Annex to this 
proclamation, unless such actions are earlier expressly modified or 
terminated.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD18FE00.027


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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD18FE00.029


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Proclamation 7274 of February 18, 2000

To Facilitate Positive Adjustment to Competition From Imports of Certain 
Circular Welded Carbon Quality Line Pipe

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

    1. On December 22, 1999, the United States International Trade 
Commission (USITC) transmitted to the President an affirmative 
determination in its investigation under section 202 of the Trade Act of 
1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2252), with respect to 
imports of certain circular welded carbon quality line pipe (line pipe) 
provided for in subheadings 7306.10.10 and 7306.10.50 of the Harmonized 
Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS). The USITC determined that 
line pipe is being imported in such increased quantities as to be a 
substantial cause of serious injury or the threat of serious injury to 
the domestic industry producing a like or directly competitive article.
    2. Pursuant to section 311(a) of the North American Free Trade 
Agreement Implementation Act (the ``NAFTA Implementation Act'') (19 
U.S.C. 3371(a)), the USITC made negative findings with respect to 
imports of line pipe from Mexico and Canada. The USITC also transmitted 
to the President its recommendations made pursuant to section 202(e) of 
the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2252(e)) with respect to the action that would 
address the serious injury or threat thereof to the domestic industry 
and be most effective in facilitating the efforts of the domestic 
industry to make a positive adjustment to import competition.
    3. Pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253), and 
after taking into account the considerations specified in section 
203(a)(2) of the Trade Act, I have determined to implement action of a 
type described in section 203(a)(3). Pursuant to section 312(a) of the 
NAFTA Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 3372(a)), I have determined that 
imports of line pipe from Mexico, considered individually, do not 
contribute importantly to the serious injury, or threat of serious 
injury, found by the USITC, and that imports from Canada, considered 
individually, do not contribute importantly to such injury or threat. 
Accordingly, pursuant to section 312(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act 
(19 U.S.C. 3372(b)), I have excluded line pipe the product of Mexico or 
Canada from the action I am taking under section 203 of the Trade Act.
    4. Such action shall take the form of an increase in duty on imports 
of certain line pipe provided for in HTS subheadings 7306.10.10 and 
7306.10.50, imposed for a period of 3 years plus 1 day, with the first 
9,000 short tons of imports that are the product of each supplying 
country excluded from the increased duty during each year that this 
action is in effect, and with annual reductions in the rate of duty in 
the second and third years, as provided for in the Annex to this 
proclamation.
    5. Except for products of Mexico and Canada, which shall be excluded 
from this action, the increase in duty shall apply to imports of line 
pipe from all countries. Pursuant to section 203(a)(1)(A) of the Trade 
Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(a)(1)(A)), I have further determined that this 
action will facili

[[Page 33]]

tate efforts by the domestic industry to make a positive adjustment to 
import competition and provide greater economic and social benefits than 
costs.
    6. Section 604 of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), 
authorizes the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import 
treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
restriction.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including but not limited to 
sections 203 and 604 of the Trade Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to establish an increase in duty on imports of certain 
line pipe classified in HTS subheadings 7306.10.10 and 7306.10.50, 
subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTS is modified as provided in the 
Annex to this proclamation.
    (2) Such imported line pipe that is the product of Mexico or of 
Canada shall not be subject to the increase in duty established by this 
proclamation.
    (3) I hereby suspend, pursuant to section 503(c)(1) of the Trade Act 
(19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(1)), duty-free treatment for line pipe the product of 
beneficiary countries under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) 
(Title V of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2461-2467)); pursuant 
to section 213(e)(1) of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act, as 
amended (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 2703(e)(1)), duty-free treatment for line 
pipe the product of beneficiary countries under that Act (19 U.S.C. 
2701-2707); pursuant to section 204(d)(1) of the Andean Trade Preference 
Act, as amended (ATPA) (19 U.S.C. 3203(d)(1)), duty-free treatment for 
line pipe the product of beneficiary countries under that Act (19 U.S.C. 
3201-3206); and pursuant to section 403(a) of the Trade and Tariff Act 
of 1984 (19 U.S.C. 2112 note), duty-free treatment for line pipe the 
product of Israel under the United States-Israel Free Trade Area 
Implementation Act of 1985 (the ``IFTA Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2112 note), to 
the extent necessary to apply the increase in duty to those products, as 
specified in the Annex to this proclamation.
    (4) Effective at the close of March 1, 2003, or at the close of the 
date that may earlier be proclaimed by the President as the termination 
of the import relief set forth in the Annex to this proclamation, the 
suspension of duty-free treatment under the GSP, the CBERA, the ATPA, 
and the IFTA Act shall terminate, unless otherwise provided in such 
later proclamation, and qualifying goods the product of beneficiary 
countries or of Israel entered under such programs shall again be 
eligible for duty-free treatment.
    (5) Effective at the close of March 1, 2004, or such other date that 
is 1 year from the close of this relief, the U.S. note and tariff 
provisions established in the Annex to this proclamation shall be 
deleted from the HTS.
    (6) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (7) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation, 
including the Annex hereto, shall be effective with respect to goods 
entered, or with

[[Page 34]]

drawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after March 1, 2000, and 
shall continue in effect as provided in the Annex to this proclamation, 
unless such actions are earlier expressly modified or terminated.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD23FE00.087


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Proclamation 7275 of February 22, 2000

Registration Under the Military Selective Service Act

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Section 3 of the Military Selective Service Act, as amended (50 U.S.C. 
App. 453), provides that male citizens of the United States and other 
male persons residing in the United States who are between the ages of 
18 and 26, except those exempted by sections 3 and 6(a) of the Military 
Selective Service Act, must present themselves for registration at such 
time or times and place or places, and in such manner as determined by 
the President. Section 6(k) provides that such exceptions shall not 
continue after the cause for the exemption ceases to exist.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by the Military Selective Service 
Act, as amended (50 U.S.C. App. 451 et seq.), do hereby proclaim as 
follows:
Section 1. Paragraph 1-201 of Proclamation 4771 of July 2, 1980, is 
amended to read:
    ``1-2. Places and Times for Registration.
    1-201. Persons who are required to be registered and who are in the 
United States shall register at the places and by the means designated 
by the Director of Selective Service. These places and means may include 
but are not limited to any classified United States Post Office, the 
Selective Service Internet web site, telephonic registration, 
registration on approved Government forms, registration through high 
school and college registrars, and the Selective Service reminder 
mailback card.''
Sec. 2. Paragraph 1-202 of Proclamation 4771 of July 2, 1980, is amended 
to read:
    ``1-202. Citizens of the United States who are required to be 
registered and who are not in the United States, shall register via any 
of the places and methods authorized by the Director of Selective 
Service pursuant to paragraph 1-201 or present themselves at a United 
States Embassy or Consulate for registration before a diplomatic or 
consular officer of the United States or before a registrar duly 
appointed by a diplomatic or consular officer of the United States.''
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day 
of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 38]]



Proclamation 7276 of February 29, 2000

National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths 
in the United States. Estimates show that physicians will diagnose 
approximately 130,000 new cases of colorectal cancer this year, and, of 
those persons diagnosed, more than 56,000 will die from the disease. 
Colorectal cancer takes such a deadly toll because it usually has no 
identifiable symptoms and often goes undetected until it is too late to 
treat.
Our most effective weapon in defeating colorectal cancer is early 
detection and treatment. Through a regular screening program that 
includes fecal blood testing, periodic partial or full colon 
examinations, or both, health professionals can detect and remove pre-
cancerous polyps before they turn into cancer. Such cancer screening 
should become a routine part of preventive health care for anyone over 
the age of 50, because the risk of developing colorectal cancer 
increases with age. Individuals with a personal or family history of 
inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer or polyps, or ovarian, 
endometrial, or breast cancer are also at a higher risk for developing 
colorectal cancer.
We can draw hope from the progress that is being made in colorectal 
cancer research. The National Cancer Institute of the National 
Institutes of Health recently launched a large research study to test 
two of the most promising drugs to treat colorectal cancer, and new 
technologies are giving us more powerful tools to increase the ease and 
accuracy of colorectal screening. By continuing to support such 
research, raising awareness of risk factors for the disease, promoting 
the widespread adoption of regular screening, and encouraging everyone 
to exercise regularly, we can save thousands of lives each year and 
dramatically reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2000 as National 
Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. I encourage health care providers, 
advocacy groups, policymakers, and concerned citizens across the country 
to help raise public awareness of the risks and methods of prevention of 
colorectal cancer and to use the power of our knowledge to defeat this 
silent disease.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 39]]


Proclamation 7277 of February 29, 2000

Women's History Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Last spring, three women astronauts paused during a shuttle mission to 
pay homage to the past. Thousands of miles into space, floating above 
the floor of the shuttle, they raised a women's suffrage banner and 
posed for a picture. Astronaut Ellen Ochoa, a participant in this 
special tribute and a member of the President's Commission on the 
Celebration of Women in American History, said, ``We wanted to show how 
far women have come in this century and to honor the people who fought 
for our rights.'' Each year during the month of March, citizens across 
our country pause to honor the many heroes whose diligence and 
determination have helped to forge our Nation and enable people like 
Ellen Ochoa and her colleagues to soar so high.
Women's History Month is about highlighting the extraordinary 
achievements of women throughout our history, while recognizing the 
equally significant obstacles they had to overcome along the road to 
success. It is about the women who bravely donned uniforms and fought 
for our country. It is about the passion and vision of women educators 
like Mary McLeod Bethune, who, with only $1.50 in her pocket, founded a 
school for young black women. It is about the perseverance and 
pioneering spirit of women like Margaret Chung, the first Chinese 
American woman physician, who supported herself through medical school 
by washing dishes and lecturing on China. It is about Alice Paul's fight 
for the vote and Elizabeth Wanamaker Peratrovich's campaign to end 
discrimination against Alaska Natives. It is about the writings of Zora 
Neale Hurston, the paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe, the leadership of 
labor organizer Dolores Huerta, and the trailblazing artistry of 
photographer Margaret Bourke-White. It is also about the millions of 
unsung women whose contributions have made life better for their 
families and their communities.
Inspired by the courageous pioneers who came before them, women today 
continue to shape our Nation's destiny. Last year, Air Force Lieutenant 
Colonel Eileen Collins became the first woman commander of a space 
shuttle mission. American violinists Sarah Chang, Pamela Frank, and 
Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg were the first women to take home the 
prestigious Avery Fisher Prize in its 25-year history. And, in a game 
attended by the largest crowd of all time for a women's sporting event, 
the U.S. women's soccer team captured the World Cup. Today, 58 women 
hold seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, and 9 women are United 
States Senators. More women hold high-level positions in my 
Administration than in any other in history. And in the private sector, 
women own nearly 9 million small businesses, employing millions of 
Americans and contributing significantly to the strength of our economy.
As we honor the past and celebrate the present, we must also focus on 
the future. Our choices today will have an enormous impact on the 
destiny of our daughters and granddaughters, our sons and grandsons. We 
must rededicate ourselves to forging a society in which gender no longer 
predetermines a person's opportunities or station in life. We must 
shatter the glass

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ceiling; eradicate wage discrimination; and ensure that every American 
has the tools to meet both family and work responsibilities and to 
retire in security. By breaking down the remaining barriers and opening 
wide the doors of opportunity, we can make the future brighter for women 
and for all Americans.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2000 as Women's 
History Month. I encourage all Americans to observe this month with 
appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities, and to remember 
throughout the year the many contributions of courageous women who have 
made our Nation strong.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7278 of February 29, 2000

American Red Cross Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

After the great San Francisco earthquake of 1906, President Theodore 
Roosevelt asked his fellow Americans to respond by contributing to the 
American Red Cross, ``the only organization chartered and authorized by 
Congress to act at times of great national calamity.'' Almost a century 
later, the American Red Cross continues to serve our Nation and the 
world, providing compassionate assistance to people suffering in the 
aftermath of personal, local, national, or international disasters.
As one of our country's premier humanitarian organizations, the Red 
Cross provides disaster relief to millions of people both at home and 
abroad. In the past year alone, the American Red Cross rose to meet many 
challenges--from Hurricane Floyd on the eastern seaboard to the Kosovo 
relief effort to the terrible earthquakes and floods that struck 
countries around the globe. Following the tragic shootings at Columbine 
High School and in other schools and places of work and worship, the 
American Red Cross sent in crisis counselors to support grieving 
families and friends of the victims. In Taiwan and in Turkey, the 
American Red Cross worked with other Red Cross affiliates to provide 
solace and support to earthquake survivors; after the crash of EgyptAir 
Flight 990, Red Cross grief counselors brought comfort to victims' 
families. In total, the American Red Cross responded to nearly 64,000 
disaster incidents last year alone and helped provide information to 
thousands of families separated from loved ones by war or disaster.
The services that the American Red Cross provides go beyond disaster 
relief. Its biomedical services program provides patients in more than 
3,000

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hospitals nationwide with the latest in high-quality, state-of-the-art 
blood and tissue services. Last year it provided more than 700,000 
emergency and personal services for military personnel and their 
families, including relaying messages from their families to the three 
American servicemen held captive by Yugoslav forces. And in communities 
across the Nation, more than 12 million people received Red Cross 
instruction in lifesaving techniques last year, ranging from first aid 
and CPR to water safety and boat handling.
Forming the backbone of the American Red Cross is a vast network of 
nearly 4.5 million blood donors and 1.3 million dedicated volunteers who 
ensure that help will be there when and where it is needed. Virtually 
every community in the United States is served by an American Red Cross 
chapter, Blood Services region, or both; and as we have seen 
demonstrated so dramatically over time, no community is immune to the 
sudden and devastating disasters that require the services and 
stewardship of the American Red Cross. Each of us owes a lasting debt of 
gratitude to this extraordinary organization that has given so much to 
our people, our country, and our world.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America and Honorary Chairman of the American Red Cross, by virtue of 
the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United 
States, do hereby proclaim March 2000 as American Red Cross Month. I 
urge all the people of the United States to demonstrate support for 
their local Red Cross chapters and to become actively involved in 
furthering the humanitarian mission of the American Red Cross.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
February, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7279 of March 1, 2000

Irish-American Heritage Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

More than two centuries ago, our founders envisioned a new Nation, a 
land free from tyranny and filled with opportunity, prosperity, and 
liberty for all. Many Irish people, faced with severe hardship in their 
homeland, embraced the dream of a more promising future and left behind 
Ireland's shores, their families, and their friends for a new beginning 
in America. Each year during the month of March, we celebrate these 
courageous men and women of Ireland and remember with pride their many 
contributions to our Nation.
With strength, courage, wit, and creativity, Irish Americans have 
flourished in our diverse Nation of immigrants. Writers such as Flannery 
O'Connor and Eugene O'Neill have transformed our literature; 
entrepreneurs like

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Henry Ford helped revolutionize American industry; performers such as 
Gregory Peck and Helen Hayes have enriched the arts; patriots such as 
Audie Murphy, our most decorated soldier of World War II, redefined the 
meaning of courage; and social reformers such as suffragist Leonora 
Barry and labor organizer Mary Kenney O'Sullivan fought for the rights 
of others. Generations of Irish Americans have worked alongside their 
fellow Americans to build a more perfect Union, and America is a 
stronger Nation because of them.
During his visit to Ireland in 1963, President Kennedy reminded us that 
``our two nations, divided by distance, have been united by history.'' 
Today, people on both sides of the Atlantic are united not only by 
history, but also once again by a dream of a better way of life. In the 
spring of 1998, the people of Ireland and Northern Ireland sought to 
make that dream a reality at home when they voted overwhelmingly in 
support of the Good Friday Accord. America remains committed to the 
Irish people as they continue working to forge a brighter future in 
their own land. The road ahead is long, but the promise of peace is 
still within reach, and its rewards are great. This month, as we 
celebrate Saint Patrick's Day and our shared heritage with Ireland, we 
remember as well our common love of liberty, commitment to progress, and 
quest for lasting peace, and we look toward a future as proud as our 
past.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 2000 as Irish-
American Heritage Month. I call upon all the people of the United States 
to observe this month with appropriate ceremonies, programs, and 
activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of March, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7280 of March 6, 2000

Save Your Vision Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Sight is a precious gift that enables us to experience the wonder of the 
world around us; but few of us think about what we would do if we lost 
our vision. Unfortunately, millions of Americans must face this 
challenge because of conditions like cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic eye 
disease, or age-related macular degeneration.
Our most powerful tool in the battle against vision loss is early 
detection. A dilated eye examination can reveal signs of many eye 
diseases and disorders long before a patient experiences pain or any 
other noticeable symptom. Through early intervention and treatment, the 
vision loss accompanying such diseases can be reduced, postponed, or 
even prevented. Pro

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tective eyewear can also play a vital role in saving vision, 
particularly for individuals who use chemicals or operate machinery.
There is hope as well for people who suffer from low vision. Affecting 1 
in 20 Americans, low vision is an impairment that cannot be corrected by 
standard glasses, contact lenses, medicine, or surgery, and interferes 
with one's ability to participate in everyday activities. While it can 
occur in people of all ages and backgrounds, low vision primarily 
affects the growing population of people over 65 years old; other higher 
risk populations, including Hispanic and African Americans, are more 
likely to develop low vision at an earlier age.
While vision loss usually cannot be restored, vision rehabilitation 
techniques and products can make daily life much easier for people with 
low vision. From improved lighting in stairways and closets to talking 
clocks and computers to large-print labels on appliances, there are 
numerous products and services that can help people with low vision 
maintain their confidence and independence, and improve their overall 
quality of life.
Every day, physicians and researchers make progress in the search for 
better treatments--and ultimately a cure--for vision loss. In this new 
century, emerging technologies will improve upon existing visual devices 
and techniques, and new medications will ensure more effective treatment 
of eye diseases and disorders. By investing in research and technology 
and committing to regular comprehensive eye examinations, we can ensure 
a brighter, healthier future for ourselves and our children.
To remind Americans of the importance of safeguarding their eyesight, 
the Congress, by joint resolution approved December 30, 1963 (77 Stat. 
629; 36 U.S.C. 138), has authorized and requested the President to 
proclaim the first week in March of each year as ``Save Your Vision 
Week.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim March 5 through March 11, 2000, as Save Your 
Vision Week. I urge all Americans to participate by making eye care and 
eye safety an important part of their lives and to ensure that dilated 
eye examinations are included in their regular health maintenance 
programs. I invite eye care professionals, the media, and all public and 
private organizations dedicated to preserving eyesight to join in 
activities that will raise awareness of the measures we can take to 
protect and sustain our vision.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of March, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7281 of March 17, 2000

National Poison Prevention Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Children face many dangers growing up, including some which we cannot 
foresee or prevent. But the danger of accidental poisoning from 
medicines, household chemicals, or other substances used routinely in 
the home is something we can--and must--stop. Each year during National 
Poison Prevention Week, we assess our progress in saving lives and 
reaffirm our national commitment to preventing injuries or deaths from 
poisoning.
We have indeed made progress in the nearly 4 decades since the Congress 
first authorized this annual observance. In 1962, almost 450 children 
died of poisoning after swallowing medicines or household chemicals. By 
1996, that tragic statistic had been reduced to 47. Our goal is to 
reduce it to zero.
The first and most effective means to achieving this goal is the proper 
use of child-resistant packaging, which the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission requires for many medicines and household chemicals. While 
this special packaging is child-resistant, however, it is not 
childproof; therefore, it is essential that adults keep potentially 
poisonous substances locked away from children.
Our second line of defense is America's poison control centers, where 
lifesaving information is only a phone call away. If a poisoning does 
occur, parents or other caregivers can call one of these centers and 
immediately learn the appropriate actions to take to mitigate the 
poison's effects. Last month, I was proud to sign into law the Poison 
Control Center Enhancement and Awareness Act, which authorizes $140 
million over the next 5 years to fund our Nation's poison control 
centers, to carry out a national public awareness campaign, and to 
establish a national toll-free poison control hotline. Each year, more 
than 2 million poisonings are reported, a million of which involve 
children, and this new funding will ensure that callers have immediate 
access to the vital services and information they need to save lives.
I thank the Poison Prevention Week Council, which brings together 35 
national organizations to distribute poison prevention information to 
pharmacies, public health departments, and safety organizations 
nationwide, for its vital role in the progress Americans have made in 
reducing accidental poisonings. By following its lead, properly using 
child-resistant packaging, keeping poisonous substances locked away from 
children, and keeping the number of a poison prevention center close by 
the telephone, we can greatly reduce accidental poisonings.
To encourage the American people to learn more about the dangers of 
accidental poisonings and to take responsible preventive measures, the 
Congress, by joint resolution approved September 26, 1961 (75 Stat. 
681), has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation 
designating the third week of March of each year as ``National Poison 
Prevention Week.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning March 19, 2000,

[[Page 45]]

as National Poison Prevention Week. I call upon all Americans to observe 
this week by participating in appropriate programs and activities and by 
learning how to protect our children from poisonous substances.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of 
March, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7282 of March 24, 2000

Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A., 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As we welcome a new millennium, America stands at a unique moment in 
time. We can look back over the past century, where we experienced 
profound advances in science, medicine, and technology that 
fundamentally altered the world in which we live. At the same time, we 
can look ahead to a new century filled with unparalleled promise and 
unlimited possibilities for further progress.
Throughout our Nation's history, education has been at the heart of 
achievement in America, and it is the key to meeting the challenges and 
seizing the opportunities that lie before us. To succeed in the global 
community of the 21st century, we must provide all our citizens with a 
world-class, well-rounded education. We must ensure that every American 
has not only the knowledge and the skills he or she needs to flourish, 
but also a solid foundation of moral guidance and values. As the 
technology revolution breaks down barriers of geography, culture, and 
economic status, it is more crucial than ever that young people learn 
the importance of tolerance, cooperation, and sharing. Imbued with these 
values and enriched by a quality education, our children can look 
forward to a bright future.
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the Lubavitcher Rebbe, recognized 
early the importance of such comprehensive learning. In addition to 
being one of the world's highly respected religious leaders, he was also 
an accomplished scholar in mathematics and science. Understanding that 
both secular education and spiritual training contribute enormously to 
human development, he sought to provide young people with fresh 
opportunities for academic, social, and moral enrichment through the 
more than 2,000 educational and social institutions he established 
throughout our country and around the world. His efforts continue to 
bear fruit today, helping a new generation to develop into responsible 
and mature adults.
As we observe this special day, let us renew our commitment to 
excellence in education and to nurturing our young people's academic and 
spiritual development. Let us also remember the example of Rabbi 
Schneerson and pass on to our children the values and knowledge that 
have strengthened our Nation in the past and that will empower us to 
face the challenges of the future.

[[Page 46]]

NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 28, 2000, as 
Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A. I invite Government officials, 
educators, volunteers, and all the citizens of the United States to 
observe this day with appropriate activities, programs, and ceremonies.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fourth day 
of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7283 of March 24, 2000

Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and 
American Democracy, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Two thousand five hundred years ago, the birth of democracy in Greece 
ushered in one of the true golden ages of Western civilization. The 
flowering of political, social, and artistic innovation in Greece served 
as the source of many of our most treasured gifts--the philosophy of 
Plato and Socrates, the plays of Sophocles and Aristophanes, the heroic 
individualism that rings in the epic poetry of Homer.
But Ancient Greece's greatest legacy is the establishment of democratic 
government. America's founders were deeply influenced by the passion for 
truth and justice that guided Greek political theory. In ratifying our 
Constitution, they forever enshrined these principles in American law 
and created a system of government based on the Hellenic belief that the 
authority to govern derives directly from the people.
While our democracy has its roots in Greek thought, the friendship 
between our two nations flows from our shared values, common goals, and 
mutual respect. This kinship with the Greek people was reflected in the 
enthusiasm with which America embraced modern Greece's fight for 
independence 179 years ago. Many Americans fought alongside the Greeks, 
while stirring speeches by President James Monroe and Daniel Webster led 
the Congress to send funds and supplies to aid the Greeks in their 
struggle for freedom.
Our alliance with Greece has remained strong. Together we have stood up 
to the forces of oppression in conflicts from World War II to the 
Persian Gulf, we have joined as strategic partners in NATO, and we have 
worked to build peace, stability, and prosperity in the Balkans. Through 
decades of challenge and change, our friendship has endured and 
deepened, and together we have proved the fundamental truth of the Greek 
proverb, ``The passion for freedom never dies.''
That passion for freedom has also beckoned generations of Greek men and 
women to America's shores, and today we celebrate and give thanks for 
the myriad contributions Greek Americans have made to our national life.

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More than a million citizens of Greek descent live in America today, and 
their devotion to family, faith, community, and country has enriched our 
society immeasurably.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 25, 2000, as 
Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and 
American Democracy. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with 
appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fourth day 
of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7284 of March 31, 2000

Cancer Control Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Since the discovery of the DNA double helix in 1953, we have learned 
much about the relationship between genetics and cancer, and researchers 
have begun to isolate and study genes whose alteration and dysfunction 
may cause the disease. In the last decade, increased understanding of 
cancer and growing public awareness of its symptoms and risks have 
helped us to reverse the upward trend in cancer rates in our Nation. 
Cancer cases and death rates have declined slightly but steadily in the 
United States; the 5-year survival rate has improved for all cancers; 
and 8.4 million Americans are now cancer survivors.
Despite these encouraging trends, this is no time for complacency. Last 
year alone, more than 1 million people were diagnosed with cancer, and 
more than 560,000 died from it. And cancer rates are still 
disproportionately high among certain racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic 
groups. That is why my Administration remains committed to fighting this 
deadly disease in every sector of our population. Since 1998, we have 
boosted investment in biomedical research at the National Institutes of 
Health by an unprecedented $4.1 billion, including a dramatic increase 
in funding for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the primary Federal 
cancer research agency.
Early detection and preventative treatment remain the best weapons we 
have in the battle against this disease, and several promising 
initiatives at the NCI will improve our effectiveness in both areas. The 
NCI recently issued a ``Director's Challenge'' to spur research 
nationwide into defining key genetic changes that mark tumors as 
malignant or precancerous. This information will improve the way tumors 
are classified and lay the ground work for more precise molecular 
diagnosis. The NCI is also developing and testing molecular markers 
specific to certain cancers, as well as working on new technologies to 
improve detection. This research will help doctors to intervene early, 
with minimally invasive procedures, to prevent the disease from becoming 
full-blown.

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Another powerful weapon in our crusade is information. Better 
understanding of risk factors can help people make smarter choices--like 
quitting smoking or undergoing needed cancer screening. The Cancer 
Information Service (CIS), a free education service provided by the NCI, 
acts as the public's link to clear and understandable cancer 
information. I encourage Americans seeking information on the latest 
cancer research and treatments to call CIS at 1-800-4-CANCER or to 
access the NCI directly on the Internet at http://www.cancer.gov.
Finally, as we intensify our efforts to fight cancer, we must ensure 
that no American is left behind. The NCI is working to implement cancer 
control and prevention programs in minority and underserved communities, 
as well as to increase minority participation in clinical trials and 
research. As a result of these efforts, nearly 20 percent of the more 
than 20,000 patients now entering clinical treatment trials are from an 
ethnic minority group.
Investment in science and technology produced tremendous progress in 
health care during the last century. In this new century, we must 
reaffirm our dedication to the research, information sharing, and access 
to care that will help us ultimately win the fight against cancer.
In 1938, the Congress of the United States passed a joint resolution (52 
Stat. 148; 36 U.S.C. 103) requesting the President to issue an annual 
proclamation declaring April as ``Cancer Control Month.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim April 2000 as Cancer Control Month. I invite 
the Governors of the 50 States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the 
Mayor of the District of Columbia, and the appropriate officials of all 
other areas under the American flag to issue similar proclamations. I 
also call upon health care professionals, private industry, community 
groups, insurance and managed care companies, and all other interested 
organizations and individuals to unite in support of our Nation's 
determined efforts to control cancer.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of 
March, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7285 of March 31, 2000

National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Children are our link to the future and our hope for a better tomorrow. 
Within a few short years, we will look to today's children for the 
vision, strength, creativity, and leadership to guide our Nation through 
the challenges of this new century. If they are to grow into healthy, 
happy adults and responsible citizens, we must provide our children with 
the love, nurturing, and protection they need and deserve.

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However, many of America's children are not safe, even in their own 
homes. The statistics are staggering. Every year, there are nearly one 
million reported incidents of child abuse; and even more disturbing, 
more than 2,000 of these incidents result in the child's death. Whether 
suffering neglect, harsh physical punishment, sexual abuse, or 
psychological trauma, the children who survive will carry the scars of 
their abuse for the rest of their lives.
We now know that there are a variety of risk factors that contribute to 
child abuse and neglect--including parental substance abuse, lack of 
parenting skills and knowledge, domestic violence, or extreme stress--
and there are practical measures and programs we can use to mitigate 
such factors. Social service providers can offer substance abuse 
programs for adults with children; schools can offer educational 
programs to teach parenting skills to teen mothers or instruct children 
on how to protect themselves from sexual predators; faith organizations 
can offer respite care for parents of children with special needs; and 
employers can introduce family-friendly policies, from child care to 
parental leave to flexible work schedules, to reduce the stress on 
working families.
Keeping children safe is a community responsibility, and prevention must 
be a community task. Every segment of society must be involved, 
including health and law enforcement professionals, schools, businesses, 
the media, government agencies, community and faith organizations, and 
especially parents themselves. Teachers and physicians need to recognize 
the symptoms of child abuse; parents need to ask for help in overcoming 
addictions or controlling violent behavior; communities must be willing 
to fund programs and services to protect children from abuse; and the 
media needs to raise public awareness of the availability of those 
programs and services.
My Administration is committed to doing its part to ensure the health 
and well-being of all our Nation's children. We have worked to increase 
funding at the State level for child protection programs and family 
preservation services. Working with the Congress, we have enacted the 
Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and the Adoption and Safe 
Families Act, and we have established the Safe and Stable Families 
Program. Just a few weeks ago, I signed into law the Child Abuse 
Prevention and Enforcement Act, which gives State and local officials 
greater flexibility in using Department of Justice grant programs to 
prevent child abuse and neglect. This new legislation will increase 
funding to enforce child abuse and neglect laws, to enhance the 
investigation of child abuse and neglect crimes, and to promote programs 
to prevent such abuse and neglect. Through these and other measures, we 
continue our efforts to create a society where every child is cherished 
and no child bears the lasting scars of abuse or neglect.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 2000 as National 
Child Abuse Prevention Month. I call upon all Americans to observe this 
month by demonstrating our gratitude to those who work to keep our 
children safe, and by taking action in our own communities to make them 
healthy places where children can grow and thrive.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of 
March, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7286 of April 1, 2000

Census Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Every 10 years, as mandated by our Constitution, all persons living in 
the United States are called upon to participate in the census. As the 
foremost method of gathering information about our Nation, the census 
plays a crucial role in helping us to maintain our democratic form of 
government.
An accurate census helps to ensure that the rights and needs of every 
person are recorded and recognized as we shape public policies, 
programs, and services. Too often in the past, children, minorities, and 
low-income individuals have not been counted and, as a result, have not 
been fully and fairly served. Census data are also used to determine the 
number of seats each State is allocated in the U.S. House of 
Representatives, and State and local governments depend upon these data 
to draw legislative districts that accurately represent their residents.
The census also serves as the basis for many public funding and private 
investment decisions. Census results play a part in determining the 
portion each State receives of more than $185 billion in funds 
distributed by the Federal Government each year. State and local public 
officials use census data to decide where to build public facilities 
such as schools, roads, hospitals, and libraries. Census data also are a 
valuable resource for businesses that are trying to identify where to 
build stores, office buildings, or shopping centers.
The census is unique. It reaches every population group, from America's 
long-time residents to its most recent immigrants, and every age group 
from newborns to centenarians. The census touches every social class and 
every racial and ethnic group. The census is truly a democratic process 
in which we all can participate.
Census 2000 offers each of us an important opportunity to shape the 
future of our Nation. By taking part, we help ensure the well-being of 
our families and our communities, and we fulfill one of our fundamental 
civic duties. The U.S. Census Bureau has taken unprecedented steps to 
ensure full participation in this first census of the new millennium. At 
the same time, the Bureau will continue its long tradition of protecting 
the personal information of America's citizens, and no other Government 
agency will be able to see any individual or family census form. I 
strongly urge every man and woman living in the United States to fill 
out and return his or her census form or to cooperate with census takers 
who will help them do so.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitu

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tion and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 1, 2000, as 
Census Day. I call upon all the people of the United States to observe 
this day with ceremonies, activities, and programs that raise awareness 
of the importance of participating in Census 2000.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of April, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7287 of April 7, 2000

National Volunteer Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each year our Nation is blessed by the service of more than 100 million 
Americans who take time out of their busy lives to reach out to those in 
need. Volunteers come from every age group and walk of life, yet they 
share a common conviction: that by giving of themselves, they can bridge 
the divide between strangers, create stronger families, and build better 
communities.
National Volunteer Week offers us a chance to thank the many volunteers 
whose work and compassion add so much to the quality of our lives. It 
also gives those who have never volunteered the opportunity to learn 
more about the many organizations that would benefit from their time and 
talents. People who enjoy sports can volunteer at a Special Olympics 
event; those who love the arts can work as docents in a gallery or 
historic home; those who love to read can share that love through a 
literacy program.
Our success with the AmeriCorps program demonstrates the power and 
promise of community service in America. Since we passed the National 
and Community Service Trust Act in 1993, more than 150,000 young people 
have served in AmeriCorps. They have taught or mentored more than 4 
million children; helped to immunize more than a million people; worked 
to build some 11,000 homes; and sparked a new spirit of community 
service across our Nation. In my proposed budget for fiscal 2001, I have 
included funding to reach our goal of 100,000 AmeriCorps members in 
service each year. I have also outlined a new AmeriCorps Reserves 
program that will allow us to call upon AmeriCorps alumni during times 
of special need, such as following natural disasters. The Corporation 
for National Service will commit $10 million to create a new ``E-
corps''--750 qualified AmeriCorps volunteers who will help to bring 
digital opportunity to communities by providing technical support to 
school computer systems, tutoring at Community Technology Centers, and 
offering technical training for careers in the information technology 
sector. Through a new Community Coaches program, we will place adults in 
1,000 schools to help engage students in service programs that will 
connect them to the wider community. And through new Youth Empowerment 
Grants, we will reward social entrepreneurship among young people who 
are seeking solutions to problems such as youth violence and alienation.

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Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., reminded us that ``everyone can be great 
because anyone can serve.'' During National Volunteer Week, let us pause 
to thank all who have responded to that call to greatness, and let each 
of us make our own commitments to volunteer in our neighborhoods and 
communities.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 9 through April 15, 
2000, as National Volunteer Week. I call upon all Americans to observe 
this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities to 
express appreciation to the volunteers among us for their commitment to 
service and to encourage the spirit of volunteerism in our families and 
communities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7288 of April 8, 2000

Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

    This year on Pan American Day and during Pan American Week, we 
celebrate the springtime of a new century in which the fundamental 
ideals of democracy and human rights are blossoming across our 
hemisphere. We stand at the threshold of a new era of economic 
development and prosperity with a common determination to meet the 
challenges and seize the opportunities that face the Americas.
    Building on the agreements forged at the last two Summits of the 
Americas in Miami and Santiago, we are witnessing unprecedented 
cooperation within our hemisphere. Efforts such as the negotiations on a 
Free Trade Area of the Americas, now progressing toward a concrete 
agreement in 2005, exemplify our commitment to building a self-
sustaining and widely shared prosperity. We continue to work creatively 
through the Organization of American States to encourage constitutional 
solutions to political crises such as those that occurred in Paraguay 
and Ecuador. And we have witnessed elections in our region that were 
models of civic participation and a testament to the strength and 
vibrancy of democratic government in the Western Hemisphere. Such 
achievements illustrate that the well-being of our neighbors is 
fundamental to our own security and prosperity. We look forward to the 
Third Summit of the Americas in Quebec City, where the democratically 
elected leaders of 34 nations from North, Central, and South America 
will gather to review our progress, identify new challenges, and further 
enhance our cooperation.
    Even with our significant progress, however, challenges remain. The 
34 free and democratically elected nations of this hemisphere must work 
to

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gether to ensure that Cuba, the only country that has not embraced our 
common vision, becomes a member of our community of democracies. By 
doing so, we can ensure that all the people in our hemisphere share in 
the blessings of freedom and in the promise of the global economy, 
living and working and raising their families in dignity and with hope 
for the future.
    NOW, THEREFORE I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States 
of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution 
and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim Friday, April 14, 
2000, as Pan American Day and April 9 through April 15, 2000 as Pan 
American Week. I urge the Governors of the 50 States, the Governor of 
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the officials of other areas under 
the flag of the United States to honor these observances with 
appropriate ceremonies and activities.
    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7289 of April 8, 2000

National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

    As we stand at the dawn of a new century, we reflect with pride on 
all that our Nation has accomplished in the 224 years since we first 
declared our independence. Today we enjoy unprecedented peace and 
prosperity, and, as it has for generations, America shines as a beacon 
of democracy, freedom, and opportunity for peoples around the world.
    Yet the blessings we rejoice in today were won at great cost. 
Millions of young Americans who stepped forward in times of crisis or 
conflict to defend our Nation and uphold our values around the world 
sacrificed their freedom and lost their lives. The century just past 
will forever be known as the American century, not only because of our 
economic strength, military might, and technological prowess, but also 
because of the character, determination, and indomitable spirit our 
people demonstrated time and again.
    That character and spirit have never been more evident than when 
Americans have been held captive as prisoners of war. Suffering hunger, 
fear, isolation, and uncertainty, stripped of their freedom and often 
subjected to physical and psychological torture, American POWs 
nonetheless continued to serve our Nation with honor, dignity, and 
remarkable courage. For many, the long, agonizing days stretched into 
years, and the loss of freedom and the cruel separation from family, 
home, and friends left scars that the passage of time can never erase.
    We owe a profound debt of gratitude to these heroes who stood face 
to face with the forces of tyranny and oppression, true to our country 
and to the spirit of freedom even in captivity. We owe a debt as well to 
their fami

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lies, whose faith and fortitude have been an unceasing source of 
strength to our Nation in many of our darkest hours. As we observe this 
special day for the first time in this new century, let us remember and 
honor the sacrifices of America's prisoners of war and their families; 
and let us keep faith with them by remaining resolute in defending 
liberty and securing a just and peaceful world for the generations to 
come.
    NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 9, 
2000, as National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day. I call upon 
all Americans to join me in remembering former American prisoners of war 
who suffered the hardships of enemy captivity. I also call upon Federal, 
State, and local government officials and private organizations to 
observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, programs, and activities.
    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7290 of April 10, 2000

National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

    This week marks the 20th anniversary of National Crime Victims' 
Rights Week. Over the past two decades, we have made enormous progress 
in our efforts to build safer communities and to reshape our criminal 
justice system so that it better protects victims' rights and responds 
more compassionately to their needs.
    In the 7 years since I first proclaimed National Crime Victims' 
Rights Week, my Administration has worked hard to achieve some of the 
most progressive criminal justice reforms in our Nation's history. 
Recognizing the urgent plea from millions of Americans to restore safety 
and security to their neighborhoods, in 1994 I signed into law the 
Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act, which funds 100,000 
additional police officers to fight crime and protect our citizens. In 
Federal court cases, this law also gives victims of violent crime and 
sexual abuse the right to speak out in court before sentencing, 
providing them the opportunity to describe the impact such victimization 
has had on their lives. To help protect our communities from gun 
violence, we enacted the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, 
requiring background checks for potential handgun purchasers. Since its 
passage, more than 500,000 attempted gun purchases by felons, fugitives, 
and other prohibited persons have been prevented, saving an untold 
number of lives. And we worked to pass the assault weapons ban to keep 
these deadly firearms off our streets.
    We also fought to pass the Violence Against Women Act, which 
addresses the complex dynamics of gender-motivated violence and seeks to 
ensure

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justice for women who live in daily fear for their safety and often for 
their lives. By providing support services for victims of domestic 
violence and sexual assault and empowering prosecutors with new tools to 
target offenders, we have sent a clear message that our society will not 
tolerate violence against women.
    Thanks to the concerted efforts of crime victims' advocates, many of 
whom are survivors themselves, government at all levels is focused on 
ensuring victims' rights. Today, all States have enacted laws 
safeguarding crime victims' rights in the criminal justice process, and 
32 States have amended their constitutions accordingly.
    Despite this progress, millions of Americans still fall prey to 
criminals each year. In the past year alone, gun violence alone has 
taken an enormous toll across our Nation. To address this, my 
Administration has proposed the 21st Century Policing Initiative to 
provide 50,000 more police officers for our streets, requested more 
funding for our Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative to reduce 
school and youth violence, and put forth the largest national gun 
enforcement initiative in our Nation's history. I continue to call on 
the Congress to strengthen our Nation's hate crime laws and to pass 
commonsense gun legislation to keep guns out of the wrong hands; and we 
should pass the Victims' Rights Amendment to the Constitution.
    Criminal victimization is at its lowest level in 25 years, but we 
can do more. As we observe National Crime Victims' Rights Week, as we 
near the fifth anniversary of the tragic bombing in Oklahoma City and 
the first anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School, let us 
vow to continue working together to prevent crime and violence. Let us 
also pledge to honor the needs and rights of victims whose lives have 
been forever altered by crime. And let us recognize the courage and 
determination of the thousands of men and women across our country who 
dedicate themselves daily to the protection of victims' rights.
    NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 9 
to April 15, 2000, as National Crime Victims' Rights Week. I urge all 
Americans to remember crime victims and their families by working to 
reduce violence, to assist those harmed by crime, and to make our 
communities and homes safer places in which to live and raise our 
families.
    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7291 of April 12, 2000

National D.A.R.E. Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Children face many challenges in today's complex society. Peer pressure 
to abuse drugs and alcohol; negative influences in films, music, 
television, and videos; school violence; gang activities; fear and low 
self-esteem--any or all of these pressures can lead young people to make 
unwise choices that can jeopardize their future and even their lives. 
Since 1983, however, there has been a strong positive influence in the 
lives of America's children that is helping them to navigate safely 
through these dangers and uncertainties: Drug Abuse Resistance Education 
(D.A.R.E.).
D.A.R.E. was developed jointly by the Los Angeles Police Department and 
the Los Angeles Unified School District and continues to draw its 
strength from partnerships among law enforcement officials, schools, 
parents, and communities. Under the program, specially trained police 
officers conduct classroom lessons designed to teach children from 
kindergarten through the 12th grade how to make healthy choices, 
overcome negative influences, avoid destructive behavior, and resist the 
lure of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.
The D.A.R.E. curriculum has several components designed to meet the 
changing needs of students as they mature. From the visitation program 
for children in kindergarten and the early elementary school years to 
the core curriculum for highly vulnerable fifth and sixth graders to 
reinforcement programs for middle school, junior high, and senior high 
students, D.A.R.E. helps young people of all ages develop the skills and 
self-confidence to recognize and resist negative influences. And this 
year, D.A.R.E. has pledged to use a specialized curriculum to reach out 
to thousands of parents and help them talk to their children about 
drugs.
My Administration is also taking forceful measures to help our young 
people make the decision to reject drugs. We are continuing to expand 
the unprecedented National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign in order to 
change the attitudes of an entire generation of young people; a campaign 
that is working across all race, gender, grade level, and income lines. 
The campaign is already paying dividends for American families: studies 
show that growing numbers of parents are talking to their children about 
the dangers of drug use, and youth drug use is down 13 percent in just 
one year. We have also expanded the Safe and Drug-Free Schools program 
and the Drug-Free Communities program.
Through efforts like these and the commitment of programs like D.A.R.E., 
we can ensure that America's children have the skills, self-esteem, and 
guidance they need to reject substance abuse and violence and to create 
for themselves a bright and healthy future.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 13, 2000, as 
National D.A.R.E. Day. I call upon our youth, parents, educators, and 
all

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the people of the United States to observe this day with appropriate 
programs and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7292 of April 14, 2000

National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Organ and tissue transplantation offers us the extraordinary opportunity 
to share with others one of our most precious gifts--the gift of life. 
By donating tissues and organs, living donors and the families who have 
lost loved ones are rewarded with the knowledge that they have saved and 
enhanced many lives. Thanks to donors' generosity and compassion, 
transplant recipients across our country are able to work, care for 
their families, and look forward to a brighter future. Thanks to donors' 
selflessness, many children who were not expected to see their first 
birthday are playing, learning to walk, and entering school.
The future of the thousands of Americans awaiting transplants, however, 
depends on the willingness of their fellow citizens to become organ and 
tissue donors. More than 68,000 patients are on the national organ 
transplant waiting list; each day, 13 of them will die because the 
organs they need have not been donated; and every 16 minutes, a new name 
will be added to that waiting list.
To address this critical and growing need, Vice President Gore and 
Secretary of Health and Human Services Shalala launched the National 
Organ and Tissue Donation Initiative in December of 1997. This public-
private partnership was designed to raise awareness of the success of 
organ and tissue transplantation and to educate our citizens about the 
urgent need for increased donation. Working with partners such as health 
care organizations, estate planning attorneys, faith communities, 
educational organizations, the media, minority organizations, and 
business leaders, the Initiative is reaching out to Americans of all 
ages, backgrounds, and races, asking them to consider donation. In its 
first year alone, the Initiative made a measurable impact, as organ 
donation increased by 5.6 percent.
But donations are still falling short nationwide. As we observe National 
Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week, I urge all Americans to consider 
becoming donors. Becoming a prospective organ and tissue donor is an 
easy, two-step process. Potential donors need only indicate their 
intention on their driver's license or donor card, which is available 
from a number of organizations by mail or on-line, and notify their 
families and friends of their wish to donate. I also encourage organ and 
tissue recipients to tell others how their lives and health have changed 
because of the generosity of a donor and his or her family; and I join 
the friends and families of do

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nors in remembering with pride and gratitude all those who gave of 
themselves so that others might live.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 16 through April 22, 
2000, as National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week. I urge all 
health care professionals, educators, the media, public and private 
organizations concerned with organ donation and transplantation, and all 
Americans to join me in promoting greater awareness and acceptance of 
this humanitarian action.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7293 of April 14, 2000

National Park Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

We are fortunate to live in an era when the explosive growth of 
technology has put at our fingertips an extraordinary array of 
information. But even during this technological revolution, one of 
America's richest and most fascinating educational resources is also 
among its oldest: our national park system. Our national parks are 
living libraries and laboratories, where all Americans can experience 
the beauty and variety of nature and learn about our Nation's history 
and culture.
Preserving the rare and unusual as well as the spectacular and 
beautiful, our national parks provide botanists, wildlife biologists, 
chemists, and other scientists the opportunity to conduct research into 
the fragile ecosystems that affect the health of people, plants, and 
animals around the world. Geologists and paleontologists find in our 
national parks the story of our continent, from the Grand Canyon's 
geologic formations to the ancient bones resting at Dinosaur National 
Monument.
The national park system also captures America's more recent history. In 
the National Historic Sites and along the National Historic Trails 
maintained by the men and women of the National Park Service, we learn 
about the lives and achievements of American heroes like Lewis and 
Clark, Sojourner Truth, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth 
Cady Stanton, the Wright Brothers, and Thomas Edison. From Fort 
Necessity in Pennsylvania, where a young George Washington saw action in 
the French and Indian War, to the quiet acres of Gettysburg, where one 
of the Civil War's bloodiest battles was fought, to the Edmund Pettus 
Bridge in Selma, Alabama, where the modern civil rights movement reached 
its emotional peak 35 years ago, Americans can see and touch their 
history.
Today, we have 379 national parks, and each site offers a unique 
opportunity to experience the wonder of nature, to stand in the 
footprints of his

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tory, to learn about our culture and our society, to study the natural 
world, and to look toward the future. As we observe National Park Week, 
I join all Americans in thanking the men and women of the National Park 
Service for their dedication in caring for these special places. We are 
indebted to them for preserving and protecting our natural and cultural 
heritage, not only for our enjoyment and education today, but also for 
the benefit of generations to come.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 17 through April 23, 
2000, as National Park Week.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7294 of April 14, 2000

National Recall Round-Up Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Every year, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) researches the 
safety of more than 15,000 types of products used by the American people 
and secures the recall of defective or potentially dangerous products. 
Last year alone, the CPSC negotiated almost 300 recalls involving more 
than 74 million individual consumer products that presented a 
significant risk to the public. Despite these recalls and additional 
safety alerts issued by the CPSC, many consumers are still using 
products that may seriously injure or even kill them or their children, 
and people are still able to purchase these products at flea markets, 
secondhand stores, and garage or yard sales.
The CPSC estimates that some 29 million Americans will suffer injuries 
involving consumer products this year, and 22,000 will lose their lives. 
To reduce these tragic statistics, the CPSC is working to increase 
public awareness of recalled products and to ensure that such 
potentially hazardous products are removed from people's homes. As a 
vital part of this effort, the CPSC is conducting the fourth annual 
Recall Round-Up Campaign this year in partnership with the U.S. Postal 
Service. With the cooperation and active involvement of State and local 
officials, health and safety organizations, the media, and community 
groups, this innovative public safety campaign will sponsor activities 
in communities across the Nation to publicize the products that have 
been recalled, to encourage Americans to repair, return, or destroy any 
recalled products that may still be in their homes or businesses, and to 
urge them to stay alert and informed about such products when purchasing 
secondhand items.
This year's Recall Round-Up will focus on a number of previously 
recalled consumer products that pose a threat to children in particular, 
including

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certain infant car seats; swimming pool dive sticks that can cause 
impalement injuries to young children; television carts that can tip 
over; tubular metal cribs that can entrap children; and old cribs, hair 
dryers, and children's drawstring jackets that fail to meet the most 
current safety standards. Last year's campaign succeeded in reaching 
some 55 million consumers; this year, with the assistance of the U.S. 
Postal Service, the CPSC hopes to reach millions more--especially 
parents and child care providers--with these lifesaving messages.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 18, 2000, as 
National Recall Round-Up Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this 
day by working with safety, health, and consumer agencies and other 
appropriate community organizations to organize and conduct local round-
ups of dangerous and defective consumer products and to warn parents, 
child care providers, and the general public about the hazards of using 
recalled consumer products.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7295 of April 15, 2000

Establishment of the Giant Sequoia National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The rich and varied landscape of the Giant Sequoia National Monument 
holds a diverse array of scientific and historic resources. Magnificent 
groves of towering giant sequoias, the world's largest trees, are 
interspersed within a great belt of coniferous forest, jeweled with 
mountain meadows. Bold granitic domes, spires, and plunging gorges 
texture the landscape. The area's elevation climbs from about 2,500 to 
9,700 feet over a distance of only a few miles, capturing an 
extraordinary number of habitats within a relatively small area. This 
spectrum of ecosystems is home to a diverse array of plants and animals, 
many of which are rare or endemic to the southern Sierra Nevada. The 
monument embraces limestone caverns and holds unique paleontological 
resources documenting tens of thousands of years of ecosystem change. 
The monument also has many archaeological sites recording Native 
American occupation and adaptations to this complex landscape, and 
historic remnants of early Euroamerican settlement as well as the 
commercial exploitation of the giant sequoias. The monument provides 
exemplary opportunities for biologists, geologists, paleontologists, 
archaeologists, and historians to study these objects.
Ancestral forms of giant sequoia were a part of the western North 
American landscape for millions of years. Giant sequoias are the largest 
trees ever to have lived, and are among the world's longest-lived trees, 
reaching ages of more than 3,200 years or more. Because of this great 
longevity, giant se

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quoias hold within their tree rings multi-millennial records of past 
environmental changes such as climate, fire regimes, and consequent 
forest response. Only one other North American tree species, the high-
elevation bristlecone pine of the desert mountain ranges east of the 
Sierra Nevada, holds such lengthy and detailed chronologies of past 
changes and events.
Sequoias and their surrounding ecosystems provide a context for 
understanding ongoing environmental changes. For example, a century of 
fire suppression has led to an unprecedented failure in sequoia 
reproduction in otherwise undisturbed groves. Climatic change also has 
influenced the sequoia groves; their present highly disjunct 
distribution is at least partly due to generally higher summertime 
temperatures and prolonged summer droughts in California from about 
10,000 to 4,500 years ago. During that period, sequoias were rarer than 
today. Only following a slight cooling and shortening of summer 
droughts, about 4,500 years ago, has the sequoia been able to spread and 
create today's groves.
These giant sequoia groves and the surrounding forest provide an 
excellent opportunity to understand the consequences of different 
approaches to forest restoration. These forests need restoration to 
counteract the effects of a century of fire suppression and logging. 
Fire suppression has caused forests to become denser in many areas, with 
increased dominance of shade-tolerant species. Woody debris has 
accumulated, causing an unprecedented buildup of surface fuels. One of 
the most immediate consequences of these changes is an increased hazard 
of wildfires of a severity that was rarely encountered in pre-
Euroamerican times. Outstanding opportunities exist for studying the 
consequences of different approaches to mitigating these conditions and 
restoring natural forest resilience.
The great elevational range of the monument embraces a number of 
climatic zones, providing habitats for an extraordinary diversity of 
plant species and communities. The monument is rich in rare plants and 
is home to more than 200 plant species endemic to the southern Sierra 
Nevada mountain range, arrayed in plant communities ranging from low-
elevation oak woodlands and chaparral to high-elevation subalpine 
forest. Numerous meadows and streams provide an interconnected web of 
habitats for moisture-loving species.
This spectrum of interconnected vegetation types provides essential 
habitat for wildlife, ranging from large, charismatic animals to less 
visible and less familiar forms of life, such as fungi and insects. The 
mid-elevation forests are dominated by massive conifers arrayed in a 
complex landscape mosaic, providing one of the last refugia for the 
Pacific fisher in California. The fisher appears to have been extirpated 
from the northern Sierra Nevada mountain range. The forests of the 
monument are also home to great gray owl, American marten, northern 
goshawk, peregrine falcon, spotted owl, and a number of rare amphibians. 
The giant sequoias themselves are the only known trees large enough to 
provide nesting cavities for the California condor, which otherwise must 
nest on cliff faces. In fact, the last pair of condors breeding in the 
wild was discovered in a giant sequoia that is part of the new monument. 
The monument's giant sequoia ecosystem remains available for the return 
and study of condors.
The physiography and geology of the monument have been shaped by 
millions of years of intensive uplift, erosion, volcanism, and 
glaciation. The monument is dominated by granitic rocks, most noticeable 
as domes and

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spires in areas such as the Needles. The magnificent Kern Canyon forms 
the eastern boundary of the monument's southern unit. The canyon follows 
an ancient fault, forming the only major north-south river drainage in 
the Sierra Nevada. Remnants of volcanism are expressed as hot springs 
and soda springs in some drainages.
Particularly in the northern unit of the monument, limestone outcrops, 
remnants of an ancient seabed, are noted for their caves. Subfossil 
vegetation entombed within ancient woodrat middens in these caves has 
provided the only direct evidence of where giant sequoias grew during 
the Pleistocene Era, and documents substantial vegetation changes over 
the last 50,000 or more years. Vertebrate fossils also have been found 
within the middens. Other paleontological resources are found in meadow 
sediments, which hold detailed records of the last 10 millennia of 
changing vegetation, fire regimes, and volcanism in the Sierra Nevada. 
The multi-millennial, annual- and seasonal-resolution records of past 
fire regimes held in giant sequoia tree-rings are unique worldwide.
During the past 8,000 years, Native American peoples of the Sierra 
Nevada have lived by hunting and fishing, gathering, and trading with 
other people throughout the region. Archaeological sites such as lithic 
scatters, food-processing sites, rock shelters, village sites, 
petroglyphs, and pictographs are found in the monument. These sites have 
the potential to shed light on the roles of prehistoric peoples, 
including the role they played in shaping the ecosystems on which they 
depended.
One of the earliest recorded references to giant sequoias is found in 
the notes of the Walker Expedition of 1833, which described ``trees of 
the redwood species, incredibly large . . . .'' The world became aware 
of giant sequoias when sections of the massive trees were transported 
east and displayed as curiosities for eastern audiences. Logging of 
giant sequoias throughout the Sierra Nevada mountain range began in 
1856. Logging has continued intermittently to this day on nonfederal 
lands within the area of the monument. Early entrepreneurs, seeing 
profit in the gigantic trees, began acquiring lands within the present 
monument under the Timber and Stone Act in the 1880s. Today our 
understanding of the history of the Hume Lake and Converse Basin areas 
of the monument is supported by a treasure trove of historical 
photographs and other documentation. These records provide a unique and 
unusually clear picture of more than half a century of logging that 
resulted in the virtual removal of most forest in some areas of the 
monument. Outstanding opportunities exist for studying forest resilience 
to large-scale logging and the consequences of different approaches to 
forest restoration.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States to 
be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels of land, 
the limits of which in all cases, shall be confined to the smallest area 
compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be 
protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Giant Sequoia 
National Monument:

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Giant Sequoia National Monument, for the 
purpose of protecting the objects identified in the above preceding 
paragraphs, all lands and interests in lands owned or controlled by the 
United States within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
entitled ``Proposed Giant Sequoia National Monument'' attached to and 
forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land and interests in 
land reserved consist of approximately 327,769 acres, which is the 
smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected as identified in the above preceding paragraphs.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from entry, location, 
selection, sale, leasing, or other disposition under the public land 
laws including, but not limited to, withdrawal from locating, entry, and 
patent under the mining laws and from disposition under all laws 
relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange that 
furthers the protective purposes of the monument. Lands and interests in 
lands within the boundaries of the monument not owned by the United 
States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon acquisition of 
title thereto by the United States.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Timber sales under contract as of the date of the proclamation and 
timber sales with a decision notice signed after January 1, 1999, but 
prior to December 31, 1999, may be completed consistent with the terms 
of the decision notice and contract. No portion of the monument shall be 
considered to be suited for timber production, and no part of the 
monument shall be used in a calculation or provision of a sustained 
yield of timber from the Sequoia National Forest. Removal of trees, 
except for personal use fuel wood, from within the monument area may 
take place only if clearly needed for ecological restoration and 
maintenance or public safety.
The Secretary of Agriculture shall manage the monument, along with the 
underlying Forest, through the Forest Service, pursuant to applicable 
legal authorities, to implement the purposes and provisions of this 
proclamation. The Secretary of Agriculture shall prepare, within 3 years 
of this date, a management plan for this monument, and shall promulgate 
such regulations for its management as deemed appropriate. The plan will 
provide for and encourage continued public and recreational access and 
use consistent with the purposes of the monument.
Unique scientific and ecological issues are involved in management of 
giant sequoia groves, including groves located in nearby and adjacent 
lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park 
Service. The Secretary, in consultation with the National Academy of 
Sciences, shall appoint a Scientific Advisory Board to provide 
scientific guidance during the development of the initial management 
plan. Board membership shall represent a range of scientific disciplines 
pertaining to the objects to be protected, including, but not 
necessarily limited to, the physical, biological, and social sciences.
The Secretary, through the Forest Service, shall, in developing any 
management plans and any management rules and regulations governing the

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monument, consult with the Secretary of the Interior, through the Bureau 
of Land Management and the National Park Service. The final decision to 
issue any management plans and any management rules and regulations 
rests with the Secretary of Agriculture. Management plans or rules and 
regulations developed by the Secretary of the Interior governing uses 
within national parks or other national monuments administered by the 
Secretary of the Interior shall not apply within the Giant Sequoia 
National Monument.
The management plan shall contain a transportation plan for the monument 
that provides for visitor enjoyment and understanding about the 
scientific and historic objects in the monument, consistent with their 
protection. For the purposes of protecting the objects included in the 
monument, motorized vehicle use will be permitted only on designated 
roads, and non-motorized mechanized vehicle use will be permitted only 
on designated roads and trails, except for emergency or authorized 
administrative purposes or to provide access for persons with 
disabilities. No new roads or trails will be authorized within the 
monument except to further the purposes of the monument. Prior to the 
issuance of the management plan, existing roads and trails may be closed 
or altered to protect the objects of interest in the monument, and 
motorized vehicle use will be permitted on trails until but not after 
December 31, 2000.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to diminish or enlarge the 
jurisdiction of the State of California with respect to fish and 
wildlife management.
There is hereby reserved, as of the date of this proclamation and 
subject to valid existing rights, a quantity of water sufficient to 
fulfill the purposes for which this monument is established. Nothing in 
this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or reduction of 
any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the United States on 
or before the date of this proclamation.
Laws, regulations, and policies pertaining to administration by the 
Department of Agriculture of grazing permits and timber sales under 
contract as of the date of this proclamation on National Forest System 
lands within the boundaries of the monument shall continue to apply to 
lands within the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to affect existing special 
use authorizations; existing uses shall be governed by applicable laws, 
regulations, and management plans.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7296 of April 21, 2000

Bicentennial of the Library of Congress

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The Library of Congress is truly America's library. Established on April 
24, 1800, as the Congress prepared to transfer the Federal Government 
from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., it is our country's oldest 
Federal cultural institution. With Thomas Jefferson's private library--
acquired in 1815--as its core, the Library of Congress has reflected 
from its earliest days the breadth and variety of Jefferson's interests 
and his love of democracy, expanding the store of human knowledge, and 
helping ensure the free flow of ideas.
Two centuries later, the Library's collections remain diverse and 
expansive, containing materials on virtually every subject, in virtually 
every medium. The Library houses approximately 120 million items, 
including more than 18 million books and some of the world's largest 
collections of maps, manuscripts, photographs, prints, newspapers, sound 
recordings, motion pictures, and other research materials. The Library 
also offers wide-ranging services to the Government and the public, 
serving simultaneously as a legislative library and the major research 
arm of the United States Congress; the copyright agency of the United 
States; the world's largest law library; and a major center for 
preserving research materials and for digitizing documents, manuscripts, 
maps, motion pictures, and other specialized materials for use on the 
Internet.
Today, America's library is also the world's library. An international 
resource of unparalleled reach, the Library of Congress provides 
services through its 21 reading rooms in 3 buildings on Capitol Hill as 
well as electronically through its web site, which registers more than 4 
million transactions each workday from people around the globe. With its 
remarkable collections and resources, the Library has truly fulfilled 
its stated mission to make ``available and useful . . . and to sustain 
and preserve a universal collection of knowledge and creativity for 
future generations.''
Libraries have always enabled people, in the words of James Madison, to 
``arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.'' These words, 
inscribed at the entrance of the James Madison Memorial Building of the 
Library of Congress, are a tribute to the Library's past and a 
sustaining goal as it embarks on its third century.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 24, 2000, as a time 
to commemorate the Bicentennial of the Library of Congress. I call upon 
the people of the United States to observe this occasion with 
appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities that celebrate the many 
contributions the Library of Congress has made to strengthening our 
democracy and our national culture.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7297 of April 28, 2000

National Charter Schools Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Providing our children the high-quality education they need to succeed 
is one of the greatest challenges we face as a Nation, and helping 
communities establish public charter schools is one of the best ways we 
can meet that challenge.
Charter schools--public schools that are started by parents, educators, 
and communities working in partnership--are open to students of every 
background and ability. They also afford greater autonomy and 
flexibility in staffing decisions, curriculum design, and other areas 
than traditional public schools do. In return for this flexibility, 
charter schools must set and meet the highest standards, and they can 
remain open only as long as they do so.
These schools are helping us to meet many of our Nation's most important 
education goals. They are driving change in public schools across 
America by showing the benefits of greater parent participation, longer 
school years, higher academic standards, and character education. 
Charter schools offer reform, innovation, and increased choice in public 
education, and, by doing so, they spur improvement throughout our public 
school system.
I am proud that my Administration has taken a leadership role in 
promoting and funding public charter schools. When I took office almost 
8 years ago, there was only one charter school in our Nation. By 
September of last year, that number had grown to more than 1,600 in 30 
States and the District of Columbia, with more than 250,000 students 
enrolled and many more on waiting lists. Since 1994, the Federal 
Government has invested almost $400 million in public charter schools. 
Last August, I announced the release of almost $100 million in 
Department of Education grants to develop, open, or expand charter 
schools across the country. And my proposed budget for fiscal year 2001 
includes $175 million for the Department of Education's Public Charter 
Schools Program. These grants and funds will help cover the costs of 
opening new schools and help existing charter schools hire more well-
trained teachers, buy more books, computers, and educational software, 
and ensure that classrooms are safe and accessible for all students. 
Finally, these funds will aid charter schools as they develop 
accountability systems to measure whether they are meeting or exceeding 
State standards.
During National Charter Schools Week, I commend the many dedicated 
parents, educators, students, and other concerned citizens who, working 
together, have started charter schools in their communities to meet the 
grow

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ing demand for excellence, creativity, and choice in education. Because 
of their vision and leadership, charter schools across our Nation are 
helping to raise standards, expectations, and accountability in all of 
America's public schools. By investing in charter schools, we are 
investing in our Nation's future.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 1 through May 5, 2000, 
as National Charter Schools Week. I encourage the American people to 
mark this observance with appropriate programs and activities that raise 
awareness of the many contributions that public charter schools make to 
the education of our children and the success of our Nation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day 
of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7298 of April 28, 2000

Law Day, U.S.A., 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The freedom of America's citizens is sustained by American law. In 
crafting the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, our Nation's founders 
wisely understood that liberty and law are equally important to ensuring 
human rights and preserving human dignity. Law without freedom becomes 
tyranny; freedom without law becomes chaos.
The theme of this year's Law Day observance, ``Speak up for Democracy 
and Diversity,'' reminds us of the vital role that the law and America's 
legal community have played in protecting our freedoms and extending 
them to an ever-widening circle of Americans. Many signal victories for 
civil rights have been won in the courts by men and women of conscience 
whose commitment to the Constitution and the rule of law compelled them 
to speak out against bigotry and discrimination. Many Americans have 
found champions among the legal profession to defend their rights and to 
uphold our Nation's promise of equality and justice for all. From the 
War for Independence to the War Between the States, from emancipation in 
the 19th century to women's suffrage and the civil rights movement in 
the 20th century, courageous Americans have risen to the challenge of 
improving upon our laws and extending their protections to all of our 
citizens.
Today, thanks in large measure to the efforts of our Nation's legal 
community, people of all backgrounds, races, and religions are working, 
living, and learning side by side. The doors of opportunity are open 
wider than ever. But despite the advances we have made, we still see in 
our society stubborn obstacles to true freedom and justice--obstacles 
such as poverty, unemployment, and lingering discrimination. That is why 
I have called America's legal community to action once again to lead the 
fight for equal

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justice under law. Whether promoting racial diversity in our judicial 
system and the legal profession, using their knowledge of the law to 
help underserved communities increase homeownership and 
entrepreneurship, or providing skilled representation to low-income 
Americans to ensure the protection of their rights, our Nation's lawyers 
can make important and lasting differences in preserving justice and 
promoting freedom and equality.
I encourage all Americans to observe Law Day by reflecting on the impact 
that our Nation's laws have had upon the quality of our lives and the 
strength of our democracy. From the promise of a more perfect union 
prescribed in the Preamble to the Constitution to the daily rulings of 
our modern-day justice system, our Nation's system of laws has made real 
our founders' vision and sustained their fundamental values. As we 
continue to work for a more just society for all, let us celebrate our 
legal heritage and reaffirm our reverence for the rule of law, which has 
safeguarded our liberty and preserved our democracy for more than 200 
years.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, in accordance with Public Law 87-20 of April 7, 1961, do hereby 
proclaim May 1, 2000, as Law Day, U.S.A. I urge the people of the United 
States to consider anew how our laws protect our freedoms and contribute 
to our national well-being. I call upon members of the legal profession, 
civic associations, educators, librarians, public officials, and the 
media to promote the observance of this day with appropriate programs 
and activities. I also call upon public officials to display the flag of 
the United States on all government buildings throughout the day.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day 
of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7299 of April 29, 2000

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Over the last two centuries, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have 
contributed immeasurably to the richness of our dynamic, multicultural 
society. Whether recent immigrants or descendants of families who have 
been here for generations, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders embody 
many of our Nation's core values, including devotion to family, 
commitment to hard work, and pride in their heritage.
The people of this diverse and rapidly growing community have 
contributed to every aspect of our national life--from engineering and 
computer science to government, the arts, and sports. For example, Vinod 
Dahm helped to revolutionize computer technology through the invention 
of the pentium chip. Governors Benjamin Cayetano of Hawaii and Gary 
Locke of Washington have devoted their lives to public service. The 
talents of nov

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elist Amy Tan have delighted readers across our Nation, while architect 
and sculptor Maya Lin's stirring memorials to the Vietnam War and the 
Civil Rights Movement have uplifted and inspired all who have 
experienced them. And diver Greg Louganis and football star Junior Seau 
have thrilled sports fans everywhere with their skill and athleticism.
While many Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders today are thriving, 
others are still struggling to overcome obstacles. Because of oppression 
in their countries of origin, some new immigrants have arrived without 
having completed their education; once here, some have encountered 
language and cultural barriers and discrimination. Pacific Islanders, 
too, must overcome barriers to opportunity caused by their geographic 
isolation and the consequences of Western influences on their unique 
culture. For these and other reasons, too many Asian Americans and 
Pacific Islanders face low-paying jobs, inadequate health care, and lack 
of educational opportunity.
To assist this community in meeting these challenges, last June I signed 
an Executive order establishing the White House Initiative on Asian 
Americans and Pacific Islanders. The Initiative's goal is to improve the 
quality of life for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders by increasing 
their participation in Federal programs--including health, human 
services, education, housing, labor, transportation, economic, and 
community development programs--which may not have served them in the 
past.
My Administration remains dedicated to building an America that 
celebrates and draws strength from its diversity. Let us use this month 
to reflect on the many gifts Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have 
brought to our nation and embrace the contributions that Americans of 
all backgrounds make to our increasingly multicultural society.
To honor the accomplishments of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders 
and to recognize their many contributions to our Nation, the Congress, 
by Public Law 102-450, has designated the month of May as ``Asian/
Pacific American Heritage Month.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 2000 as Asian/Pacific American Heritage 
Month. I call upon the people of the United States to observe this 
occasion with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7300 of April 29, 2000

 Loyalty Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In the Declaration of Independence and in the Constitution, our Nation's 
founders first articulated the enduring ideals that have sustained our 
de

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mocracy--freedom, self-determination, justice, and equality. Each year 
we set aside this special day to reaffirm our allegiance to those ideals 
and to our beloved country.
The power and promise of our country's principles moved men and women 
throughout the American colonies to declare their allegiance to a new 
country and a new form of government that respected the rights of the 
individual. Throughout the decades, millions of immigrants drawn to 
America's freedom proved their loyalty to their adopted Nation in the 
words of the oath of citizenship and in their daily lives--working hard, 
striving to build a better future for their families and communities, 
serving in our Armed Forces, upholding our laws, and participating in 
our democracy.
Other Americans have showed their loyalty by courageously challenging 
our Nation to live up to its ideals. We owe a profound debt to the 
heroes and visionaries who opposed slavery, reformed labor practices, 
won the right to vote for women, marched for civil rights, and spoke out 
with conscience and conviction whenever we have failed to uphold the 
highest standards of freedom and justice.
We find perhaps the strongest and most moving evidence of loyalty to 
America in the service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform. 
From the War of Independence to today's peacekeeping missions around the 
world, generations of Americans have shown their allegiance by defending 
our Nation against tyrants and terrorists, protecting our national 
interests wherever they are threatened, and promoting our values across 
the globe.
On this first Loyalty Day of the 21st century, all Americans should give 
thanks that we live in a Nation that inspires such fidelity. And we 
should remember with pride the loyal patriots who have gone before us, 
whose character and efforts built America, preserved it in times of 
peril, and gave life to our founders' dreams.
Recognizing the importance of loyalty to the continued strength of our 
country and success of our democracy, the Congress, by Public Law 85-
529, has designated May 1 of each year as ``Loyalty Day.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 1, 2000, as Loyalty Day. I urge all 
Americans to recall the valor and selflessness of all those who made 
this Nation worthy of our love and loyalty and to express our own 
loyalty through appropriate patriotic programs, ceremonies, and 
activities. I also call upon Government officials to display the flag of 
the United States in support of this national observance.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
April, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7301 of May 2, 2000

Older Americans Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Older Americans are a treasured link to our past. With courage, hard 
work, and unwavering devotion to family, community, and country, our 
older citizens helped to make the 20th century the American century. 
They preserved our freedom through the crucible of World War II; opposed 
Communist aggression in Korea and through the long, dark years of the 
Cold War; marched for labor reform and civil rights; raised their 
families, volunteered in their communities, and often postponed their 
own dreams to fulfill the dreams of their children. Their character, 
values, and patriotism laid the foundation for the peace and prosperity 
we enjoy today.
Older Americans have indeed contributed much to the story of our past; 
and they have much still to offer our future. Today, people are living 
longer, more active, and more independent lives than ever before, and 
one in four Americans between the ages of 65 and 69 has a job, either 
part-time or full-time. Many older Americans want to work, are able to 
work, and have skills and experience that businesses need in today's 
booming economy.
Recognizing the changing role of older men and women in our society, 
this year the Congress unanimously passed, and I was pleased to sign 
into law, the Senior Citizens' Freedom to Work Act of 2000, which ushers 
in a new era of opportunity for older Americans. Before passage of this 
landmark legislation, seniors who continued to work after age 65 risked 
having some of their Social Security benefits withheld until they 
stopped working or turned 70 years old. By eliminating this confusing 
and outdated retirement earnings test, the new legislation will ensure 
that millions of older workers who wish to continue working will be able 
to keep their full Social Security benefits regardless of their age or 
earning level.
It is appropriate that we enact this new law in the year when we 
celebrate the 65th anniversary of Social Security and the 35th 
anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act. Millions 
of older citizens have been assisted by these programs, and, as the baby 
boom generation ages, millions more will be relying on them in this new 
century.
To recognize the profound debt our Nation owes its older citizens, and 
to prepare wisely for the impact that increasing longevity will have on 
nearly every aspect of our society in the coming years, we must reaffirm 
our commitment to saving Social Security, strengthening Medicare--
including a prescription drug benefit--and modernizing, improving, and 
reauthorizing the Older Americans Act. We must also enact my 
Administration's long-term care initiative, which, among other important 
measures, provides tax relief and support services to the millions of 
family caregivers who devote countless hours to helping older loved ones 
remain in their homes and communities. By doing so, we can both honor 
the immeasurable contributions that older men and women bring to our 
national life and ensure that they lead independent, active, fulfilling 
lives for many years to come.

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2000 as Older 
Americans Month. I urge Government officials, business people, community 
leaders, educators, volunteers, and all the people of the United States 
to celebrate the contributions older Americans have made, and continue 
to make, to the progress and prosperity of our Nation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of May, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7302 of May 2, 2000

Jewish Heritage Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

For centuries, Jews from every corner of the globe have come to America 
seeking the right to worship in freedom and to pursue their individual 
hopes and dreams in peace. For many, the journey was a desperate flight 
from oppression and persecution to a new life in a new country. 
Bolstered by powerful family and community ties and drawing strength and 
hope from their ancient religious traditions, Jews in America not only 
survived the difficult transition, but also thrived.
From science and the arts to business and the law; as teachers, 
physicians, journalists, judges, musicians, and policymakers; from 
neighborhood stores to the corridors of Congress; from the Armed Forces 
to the Supreme Court, generations of American Jews have succeeded in 
every sector of our society. And the rewards of that success are shared 
by us all. Our Nation has benefited immeasurably from the character, 
values, and achievements of our Jewish citizens.
Building on the Jewish tradition of hospitality toward strangers and 
acutely aware of the long and tragic history of prejudice and 
persecution against their people, Jews in America have committed 
themselves to tolerance, justice, human rights, and the rule of law. 
American Jews have shared their resources generously with health and 
human services programs, civil rights groups, educational institutions, 
arts organizations, and so many more. In communities across our Nation, 
in small towns and big cities, synagogues and yeshivas have become 
centers of community service and civic responsibility.
During Jewish Heritage Week, let us acknowledge and give thanks for the 
many contributions that Jews have brought to our national life and 
character, and let us celebrate the rich religious and ethnic threads 
that Jewish men and women have woven into the tapestry that is America.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 7 through May

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14, 2000, as Jewish Heritage Week. I urge all Americans to observe this 
week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of May, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7303 of May 4, 2000

National Day of Prayer, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Throughout our Nation's history, Americans have come before God with 
humble hearts to ask forgiveness, to seek wisdom, and to offer 
thanksgiving and praise. The framers of our democracy, on a quest for 
freedom and equality, were fueled by an abiding faith in a just and 
loving God, to whom they turned often for guidance and strength.
Succeeding generations of Americans, striving to preserve that freedom 
in the face of challenges posed by enemies abroad or conflict at home, 
also turned their hearts and minds to God in prayer. Today, whether 
celebrating the special moments in our lives, searching for strength and 
meaning in the face of problems or grief, or simply giving thanks for 
the blessing of a new day, Americans continue to use the powerful medium 
of prayer.
Now more than ever, Americans treasure our religious freedom, which 
embraces the many diverse communities of faith that have infused our 
society and our cultural heritage through more than two centuries. 
Millions of Americans gratefully sustain the tradition of prayer in 
churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, and other houses of worship 
across our country.
And we continue to rely on our faith as a pillar of strength, even in 
this era of unprecedented peace and prosperity. We pray for the spirit 
of reconciliation, so that we may overcome the divisions of race, 
religion, culture, and background that have scarred our society in 
recent years. We pray for the spirit of compassion so that we will reach 
out to others who have not shared equally in this world's bounteous 
blessings--those here at home who struggle for economic and educational 
opportunity and those around the globe whose lives have been darkened by 
the shadows of poverty, oppression, natural disaster, or disease. And we 
must always pray for wisdom--the wisdom to raise children with strong 
values and loving hearts; the wisdom to live in harmony with our 
environment and to preserve its health and beauty for the benefit of 
future generations; and the wisdom to keep America the world's greatest 
hope for freedom, peace, and human dignity in the 21st century.
The Congress, by Public Law 100-307, has called on our citizens to 
reaffirm the role of prayer in our society and to honor the religious 
diversity our freedom permits by recognizing annually a ``National Day 
of Prayer.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 4, 2000, as a National Day of

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Prayer. I encourage the citizens of this great Nation to pray, each in 
his or her own manner, seeking strength from God to face today's 
challenges, seeking guidance for tomorrow's uncertainties, and giving 
thanks for the rich blessings that our country has enjoyed throughout 
its history.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of May, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7304 of May 5, 2000

Global Science and Technology Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

At its core, science is an international endeavor. The fundamental 
workings of nature--the function of a gene, the quantum behavior of 
matter and energy, the chemistry of the atmosphere--are not the sole 
province of any one nation. At the same time, many of the greatest 
challenges our Nation faces are of global concern. Issues such as 
poverty, disease, pollution, and sustainable energy production transcend 
national boundaries, and their solutions require international 
collaboration. With the advent of the Internet and the revolution in 
communications technology, such cooperation is more achievable--and more 
productive--than ever before.
In recent years, America has participated in numerous scientific 
endeavors that illustrate the feasibility and the benefits of 
international cooperation. For example, as one of 16 participating 
nations, we are advancing the frontiers of space exploration through a 
partnership to build the International Space Station. Working together 
in the unique environment of space, we will strive to solve crucial 
problems in medicine and ecology and lay the foundations for developing 
space-based commerce.
We are also participating in an international scientific effort to map 
and sequence all human chromosomes. With the completion of the Human 
Genome Project, we will have unprecedented knowledge about the cause of 
such genetic diseases as muscular dystrophy and Alzheimer's and greater 
hope of preventing them in the future.
Since the 1980s, under the auspices of the United Nations Environment 
Program and the World Meteorological Organization, American scientists 
have been working with hundreds of scientists around the world to 
identify, understand, and raise public awareness about the threat to our 
planet's ozone layer. Our collaborative efforts have led to an 
international agreement to eliminate nearly all production of offending 
chemicals in industrialized countries and to work to reduce their 
production in developing countries.
Our Nation continues to reap rewards from these and other important 
international scientific efforts. We benefit enormously from the large 
and growing international scientific community within our borders. For 
generations, the world's brightest scientists have come to our country 
to study and con

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duct research, and many choose to remain here permanently. From Albert 
Einstein to four of this year's Nobel laureates, foreign-born scientists 
in America have made extraordinary contributions to science and 
technology and have played a vital role in the unprecedented prosperity 
and economic growth we have experienced in recent years.
The great French scientist Louis Pasteur noted more than a century ago 
that ``science knows no country, because knowledge belongs to humanity, 
and is the torch which illuminates the world.'' During Global Science 
and Technology Week, America joins the world community in celebrating 
the immeasurable benefits we have enjoyed from international scientific 
collaboration and looks forward to a future of even greater 
achievements.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 7 to May 13, 2000, as 
Global Science and Technology Week. I call upon students, educators, and 
all the people of the United States to learn more about the 
international nature of science and technology and the contributions 
that international scientists have made to our Nation's progress and 
prosperity.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of May, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7305 of May 10, 2000

Mother's Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

We are living in a new century and a new age, where the revolution in 
communications technology is changing almost every aspect of human 
experience. But even in this new era of global connections, there is 
perhaps no more powerful link than the love between mother and child.
That bond is a child's first experience of the world, and that love is 
often the deepest source of the self-esteem, courage, and character that 
children need to thrive. Mothers are their children's first teachers; 
they are their inspiring role models whose generosity, compassion, and 
unconditional acceptance give children the strength and encouragement to 
reach their fullest potential and to make their own contributions to 
their families, communities, and country.
Even in this age of spectacular technological advances, mothers still 
face the daunting challenges of balancing the responsibilities of home 
and work and meeting the changing emotional, educational, and physical 
needs of their children. Mothers strive to provide a safe and nurturing 
environment. They help their children navigate the often stormy waters 
of an increasingly complicated world. They teach their children to 
approach conflict with words, not violence; to cherish the richness of 
our diversity and reject prejudice in any form; and to believe in 
themselves.

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Each year we set aside this special day to acknowledge all that our 
mothers--whether biological or foster, adoptive or stepmothers--have 
given us. It is a time to reflect on all we have gained from their 
unwavering care, guidance, and sacrifice, and a time to express openly 
our deep gratitude and abiding love. The Congress, by a joint resolution 
approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 770), has designated the second Sunday in 
May of each year as ``Mother's Day'' and requested the President to call 
for its appropriate observance.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 14, 2000, as Mother's Day. Whether we 
are able to share this special day with our mothers in person or are 
blessed only with our memories of their love, in our hearts they remain 
with us always. I urge all Americans to express their love and respect 
for their mothers on this day, to speak the words of appreciation we too 
often neglect to say, and to observe this day with appropriate 
ceremonies, activities, and programs.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of May, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7306 of May 11, 2000

 National Equal Pay Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Long before President Kennedy signed into law the Equal Pay Act of 1963, 
women had proved their ability to contribute to America's labor market. 
During World War II, when labor shortages offered women an unprecedented 
opportunity to work outside the home, women excelled at jobs 
traditionally reserved for men. Yet, despite their enormous contribution 
to maintaining American production lines, women in the workforce were 
paid less than their male counterparts.
For most of our Nation's history, in fact, women have served within a 
sharply segregated workforce, enjoying fewer educational and training 
opportunities than men and struggling all too often to disprove 
confining stereotypes about their roles and capabilities. But throughout 
the decades, women of courage, energy, and determination have continued 
to enter the workforce and open doors of opportunity for succeeding 
generations. Today, more women are in the labor force than ever before; 
the female unemployment rate is at its lowest in more than 40 years; the 
poverty rate for households headed by women is the lowest ever recorded; 
and the pay gap has narrowed substantially since 1963.
Despite these gains, the battle for equal pay for women is far from 
over. Although 37 years have passed since the passage of the Equal Pay 
Act, the average woman today must still work an additional 17 weeks a 
year to earn what the average man earns. That pay gap grows wider as 
women grow

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older, and it is widest for women of color. African American women earn 
64 cents for every dollar earned by white men, and Hispanic women earn 
just 55 cents. While some of these disparities can be attributed to 
differences in education, experience, and occupation--which themselves 
often reflect troubling inequities--several studies confirm that a 
significant pay gap persists even after we account for these factors.
My Administration has worked hard to ensure that every American is 
treated with fairness and dignity in the workplace, and this year I 
proposed a $27 million equal pay initiative in my fiscal year 2001 
budget to combat unfair pay practices against women. This initiative 
includes $10 million in funding for the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission (EEOC) to identify more quickly and respond more effectively 
to wage discrimination. The initiative would also enable the EEOC to 
launch a public service campaign to educate employees and employers 
about their rights and responsibilities under equal pay laws. In 
addition, the initiative includes funding for the Department of Labor to 
train women for jobs they have not traditionally held, such as those in 
the high-paying technology sector, and to help employers recruit and 
train qualified women for nontraditional occupations.
I have also urged the Congress to strengthen existing wage 
discrimination laws by promptly passing the Paycheck Fairness Act. This 
proposed legislation would provide increased penalties for equal pay 
violations; prohibit employers from punishing employees who share salary 
information with coworkers; and provide funding for research on wage 
discrimination and for increased training for EEOC employees who work on 
wage discrimination cases.
Throughout the decades, working women have persevered in their struggle 
for equal pay, buoyed by an unshakable faith in their own skills and 
self-worth and a firm commitment to the ideals of our democracy. On 
National Equal Pay Day, I urge all Americans to join the crusade to 
secure equal pay for women and to create a just and honorable work 
environment in which all our citizens are rewarded fairly for their 
talents, experience, and contributions.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 11, 2000, 
as National Equal Pay Day. I call upon government officials, law 
enforcement agencies, business leaders, educators, and the American 
people to recognize the full value of the skills and contributions of 
women in the labor force. I urge all employers to review their wage 
practices and ensure that all their employees are paid equitably for 
their work.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7307 of May 11, 2000

Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

From our earliest days as a Nation, America has been blessed with 
citizens of courage and character who have dedicated their lives to 
keeping the peace in our communities. Five years after the creation of 
the U.S. Marshals Service in 1789, U.S. Marshal Robert Forsyth was shot 
and killed in the line of duty. He was the first of more than 14,000 law 
enforcement personnel since that time to give his life to uphold the law 
and protect the people he was sworn to serve.
Our Nation owes a lasting debt of gratitude to the men and women of our 
law enforcement community who, each day, put their lives at risk to 
protect us and ensure the safety of our families and homes. Because of 
their skill, valor, and commitment, we have begun to turn the tide on 
crime in America. The murder rate is at its lowest level in more than 30 
years, and the overall crime rate is at its lowest point in 25 years. 
There are many reasons for this progress, but police chiefs, 
policymakers, and citizens alike agree that the dedication of our law 
enforcement officers and the spread of community policing have been 
critical factors. Today, in cities and communities across America, 
residents and police officers are working in partnership, forming 
neighborhood watch organizations, banding together against drug dealers 
and gangs, and building connections that are the core of community life 
and the foundation of a civil society.
Unfortunately, we need look no further than the tragic losses suffered 
by law enforcement officers to recognize the risks that these brave men 
and women face every day. Last year, 50 police officers were struck down 
in the line of duty, and another 84 lost their lives in accidents. For 
these heroes, the safety of their fellow citizens was their purpose and 
passion, and they made the ultimate sacrifice to fulfill their duty.
We can never repay these gallant men and women for their service or 
adequately comfort their families. We can only honor their memory--not 
only in words and ceremony, but in our determination to promote justice, 
uphold the law, and preserve the peace and safety they helped purchase 
with their lives.
By a joint resolution approved October 1, 1962 (76 Stat. 676), the 
Congress has authorized and requested the President to designate May 15 
of each year as ``Peace Officers Memorial Day'' and the week in which it 
falls as ``Police Week,'' and, by Public Law 103-322 (36 U.S.C. 136), 
has directed that the flag be flown at half-staff on Peace Officers 
Memorial Day.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 15, 2000, as Peace Officers Memorial Day 
and May 14 through May 20, 2000, as Police Week. I call upon the people 
of the United States to observe these occasions with appropriate 
ceremonies, programs, and activities. I also request the Governors of 
the United States and of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, as well as the 
appropriate officials of all units of government, to direct that the 
flag of the United States be flown at half-staff on Peace Officers 
Memorial Day on all

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buildings, grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and 
all areas under its jurisdiction and control. I also invite all 
Americans to display the flag at half-staff from their homes on that 
day.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7308 of May 15, 2000

National Defense Transportation Day and National
Transportation Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Throughout the past century, America's national transportation system 
has played a crucial role in strengthening our economy, protecting our 
safety, and improving the quality of life for all Americans. 
Interconnecting networks of railroads, ports, and waterways have 
transported millions of passengers and billions of dollars' worth of 
freight. Our national highway system connected cities to rural 
communities and people to jobs. The Wright Brothers' invention of the 
airplane gave birth to a world-class aviation system that revolutionized 
travel, created new industries, and brought the nations of the world 
closer. The quality and versatility of all these modes of transportation 
gave our Nation a powerful defense tool as well, enabling us to move 
troops and materiel swiftly and efficiently in times of conflict and 
crisis. Now, as we begin a new century, our national transportation 
system must embrace exciting new possibilities and new challenges.
One of the most important of those challenges is safety. Advances in 
technology offer us great hope for progress in reducing accidents and 
fatalities. For example, the Federal Aviation Administration is working 
in partnership with the airline industry, pilots, technicians, and air 
traffic controllers to use improved forecasting and new communications 
technology to detect severe weather sooner, to let pilots and passengers 
know promptly about anticipated delays, and to centralize air traffic 
decisionmaking during severe storms in order to reduce delays. 
Automobile manufacturers are also using new technologies and design 
innovations--from stronger metals to new safety lights to advanced brake 
technology--to prevent accidents and save lives.
Another of our great transportation challenges is to develop alternative 
fuels and clean energy sources that will not harm our environment. 
Earlier this year, I signed an Executive Order to ensure the Federal 
Government's leadership in reducing petroleum consumption and promoting 
the use of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). By developing and using 
AFVs, we can reduce greenhouse gases and other pollutants, enhance our 
Nation's energy self-sufficiency by reducing the demand for imported 
oil, and create new products and jobs.

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If we make wise and informed choices today and in the years to come, we 
can make our communities more livable, give our citizens greater choice 
and mobility, protect our environment, and help create a truly global 
community. The 20th century was indeed a golden age for transportation; 
the 21st century can be an even brighter one.
In recognition of the importance of our Nation's transportation system 
to our national security and economic health, and in honor of the many 
dedicated men and women who have ensured its continued excellence 
through the years, the United States Congress, by joint resolution 
approved May 16, 1957 (36 U.S.C. 120), has designated the third Friday 
in May of each year as ``National Defense Transportation Day'' and, by 
joint resolution approved May 14, 1962 (36 U.S.C. 133), declared that 
the week during which that Friday falls be designated ``National 
Transportation Week.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim Friday, May 19, 2000, as National Defense 
Transportation Day and May 14 through May 20, 2000, as National 
Transportation Week. I urge all Americans to observe these occasions 
with appropriate ceremonies, programs, and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7309 of May 18, 2000

National Safe Boating Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Living in a country bordered by oceans and blessed with abundant lakes 
and rivers, Americans have made recreational boating one of our Nation's 
most popular pastimes. Each year, more than 74 million Americans take to 
the water with family and friends to relax and enjoy the beauty of the 
natural world.
But each year, for too many Americans, boating ends in tragedy. Most 
boating-related injuries and deaths are the result of human error and 
poor judgment, caused, for example, by excessive speed, failure to 
follow safe navigation rules, and drinking or taking drugs while 
operating watercraft. These injuries could easily be prevented by using 
common sense and making safety the first priority.
Boating accidents can occur at any time--whether the water is smooth or 
turbulent and whether the boater is experienced or a novice. One of the 
best ways to make a recreational boating experience safe and enjoyable 
is to ensure that everyone on board always wears a life jacket. To 
reinforce this lifesaving message, the National Safe Boating Campaign 
has once again selected the theme ``Boat Smart from the Start! Wear Your 
Life Jacket!'' for this year's observance. Recreational boating 
organizations, including the National Safe Boating Council and the 
National Association of State Boat

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ing Law Administrators, as well as the U.S. Coast Guard, other Federal 
agencies, and State and local governments, are continuing to promote 
safety through education by emphasizing the importance of wearing life 
jackets and practicing boating and water safety.
In recognition of the importance of safe boating practices, the 
Congress, by joint resolution approved June 4, 1958 (36 U.S.C. 131), as 
amended, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim annually 
the 7-day period ending on the last Friday before Memorial Day as 
``National Safe Boating Week.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 20 through May 26, 2000, as National 
Safe Boating Week. I encourage the governors of the 50 States and the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and officials of other areas subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States, to join in observing this occasion 
and to urge all Americans to use safe boating practices throughout the 
year.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7310 of May 19, 2000

World Trade Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The prosperity the United States enjoys today is due, in no small part, 
to our strong trading relationships with other nations. The World Trade 
Organization, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and 270 other 
agreements have helped us to open new markets for U.S. products and 
services, create thousands of new jobs, and keep our economy growing 
without inflation. The African Growth and Opportunity Act and the United 
States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act that I signed into law this 
week will build on this progress by lowering trade barriers and 
strengthening our economic partnership with nations in sub-Saharan 
Africa and the Caribbean basin.
The theme of World Trade Week this year, ``Working the Web of Trade,'' 
reflects the particular importance of the Internet as a new and rapidly 
accelerating factor in world trade. The Internet holds enormous 
commercial potential and brings extraordinary opportunities directly 
into homes and workplaces across the United States and around the world. 
Linking businesses and consumers more quickly and directly than ever 
before, the worldwide web is a powerful tool, available 24 hours a day, 
7 days a week, that allows even the smallest company to conduct business 
on a global scale.
My Administration has worked hard to encourage America's businesses and 
workers to embrace this worldwide web of opportunity and its potential 
to enhance productivity at home and access to markets abroad. By in

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vesting in research and development, improving the quality of science 
and mathematics education in our schools, teaching workers new skills to 
fill jobs in the technology sector, and keeping e-commerce fair, safe, 
and competitive, we can stimulate our export industries, sustain this 
remarkable period of growth and prosperity, and ensure America's 
continued leadership in the global economy.
This week, when the Congress takes up legislation to grant Permanent 
Normal Trade Relations status to the People's Republic of China, it will 
have an opportunity to further the progress we have made in building 
strong trading relationships. PNTR for China will increase America's 
competitiveness in the global marketplace, reduce tariffs, and give 
American workers and farmers unprecedented access to China's more than 
one billion consumers.
World trade, whether conducted in person, on paper, or on line, remains 
a cornerstone of American economic growth. But even more important, 
trade plays a vital role in improving opportunity and prosperity around 
the globe. Free and fair international trade is one of the most 
effective tools we have to bring people together, raise living standards 
in developed and developing nations alike, promote human dignity, and 
improve long-term prospects for democracy, stability, and world peace.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 21 through May 27, 
2000, as World Trade Week. I invite the people of the United States to 
observe this week with events, trade shows, and educational programs 
that celebrate the benefits of international trade to our economy and 
our world.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7311 of May 19, 2000

Small Business Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The men and women who own and operate our Nation's 25 million small 
businesses have made, and continue to make, an indispensable 
contribution to America's economic strength and success. These 
entrepreneurs possess many of the characteristics that have always 
defined the American spirit: a fierce independence, an extraordinary 
work ethic, and an uncompromising commitment to building a better life. 
Taking risks to fulfill their dreams, they have made a profound and 
positive impact on the lives and futures of their fellow citizens.
America's small business owners represent more than 99 percent of all 
employers, and they employ more than half of the private sector 
workforce.

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They create 80 percent of the new jobs in our economy, and last year 
they generated 51 percent of our Nation's gross national product--more 
than $16 trillion. Small business owners are leaders in innovation, 
creating a wellspring of new technology, new products, and more 
effective business processes.
Recognizing the important role small businesses play in the life of our 
Nation and in the vitality of our economy, my Administration is 
committed to continuing and expanding their success so that more 
Americans have the opportunity for prosperity and a secure future for 
themselves and their families. By balancing the Federal budget, we freed 
up capital for starting and expanding small businesses. We have put in 
place policies and programs that grant tax and regulatory relief and 
expand access to capital and overseas markets for small businesses. And 
we have strengthened America's workforce through investment in 
education, training, and improved benefits.
Through the Small Business Administration, we guaranteed more than $12 
billion in loans to nearly 50 thousand companies last year alone; opened 
the door to $4.2 billion in venture capital investment for 2,000 
companies; and provided management and technical assistance to more than 
900,000 small businesses. Through our New Markets Initiative and our 
efforts to bridge the digital divide, my Administration is helping to 
create opportunities for small businesses by promoting public and 
private sector investment in underserved communities and expanding e-
commerce capability.
During Small Business Week, we salute America's millions of small 
business owners; men and women of courage and initiative whose future is 
limited only by their imagination and whose success has created better 
lives for us all.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 21 through May 27, 
2000, as Small Business Week. I call upon government officials and all 
the people of the United States to observe this week with appropriate 
ceremonies, activities, and programs that celebrate the achievements of 
small business owners and encourage the development of new enterprises.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this nineteenth day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7312 of May 22, 2000

National Maritime Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Americans have always looked to the sea as a source of prosperity and 
security. Bounded by two oceans and the Gulf of Mexico, with the Great

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Lakes, the Saint Lawrence Seaway, scores of harbors, ports, and inlets, 
and thousands of miles of inland river shorelines, our Nation has been 
blessed with an unparalleled means of moving passengers and freight, 
protecting our freedom, and linking our citizens with the world.
Today, 95 percent of our imports and exports are moved by water--more 
than one billion metric tons of cargo--and our waterways currently 
handle 140 million passengers a year. Our domestic fleet is one of our 
most productive and cost-effective modes of transportation, moving 24 
percent of the Nation's cargo at less than 2 percent of America's total 
freight cost. The men and women of the U.S. Merchant Marine and the 
thousands of other workers in our Nation's maritime industry have made 
immeasurable contributions to our economic strength, standard of living, 
and leadership in the global marketplace.
The U.S. Merchant Marine plays an equally important role in maintaining 
our national security. In times of conflict or crisis, the Armed Forces 
rely upon the Merchant Marine's sealift capability to transport 
critically needed equipment and supplies. Time and again, American 
mariners have demonstrated their willingness and ability to meet often 
daunting challenges. From World War II to Korea to Vietnam, from Desert 
Storm to the Balkans and in numerous incidents in between, the U.S. 
Merchant Marine has responded with courage, patriotism, and a steadfast 
devotion to duty.
The 21st century will hold new challenges for our maritime industry, 
including an anticipated doubling of cargo and passenger traffic in the 
next two decades. If we are to meet those challenges, we must maintain a 
robust U.S.-flag fleet, crewed by American mariners. Last September, the 
Secretary of Transportation presented to the Congress a blueprint for 
modernizing our Marine Transportation System--the waterways, ports, 
railways, and roads that move people and goods to, from, and on the 
water. We must build more and better ships, modernize our shipyards, 
create deeper ports for today's ever larger containerships and ocean 
liners, and maintain a skilled maritime workforce. We must also ensure 
that local, State, and Federal agencies, the U.S. military, the maritime 
industry, shippers, labor unions, environmental groups, and other 
concerned organizations work in partnership to carry out this blueprint.
As we celebrate National Maritime Day this year, we also mark the 50th 
anniversary of the U.S. Maritime Administration. Throughout the past 
five decades, the dedicated men and women of this agency have worked to 
improve the competitiveness of our maritime industry in world markets 
and to strengthen our ability to respond swiftly and effectively in 
times of crisis. On behalf of a grateful Nation, I salute these 
outstanding public servants for their commitment to the U.S. Merchant 
Marine and to the shipbuilding, repair services, ports, and intermodal 
water and land transportation systems they need to function efficiently.
In recognition of the importance of the U.S. Merchant Marine to our 
Nation's prosperity and security, the Congress, by a joint resolution 
approved May 20, 1933, has designated May 22 of each year as ``National 
Maritime Day'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue 
annually a proclamation calling for its appropriate observance.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 22, 2000, as National Maritime Day. I 
urge all Americans to observe this day with appropriate programs,

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ceremonies, and activities and by displaying the flag of the United 
States in their homes and in their communities. I also request that all 
merchant ships sailing under the American flag dress ship on that day.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day 
of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7313 of May 24, 2000

Day of Honor, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Fifty-five years ago this month, the torch of freedom burned bright in 
Europe once again as Nazi Germany surrendered to the Allied Forces. Four 
months later, with the defeat of Imperial Japan, World War II--history's 
bloodiest and most destructive conflict--finally came to an end.
That war's unprecedented threat to world peace, freedom, and human 
rights called forth an unprecedented response from the American people. 
United and determined after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, American 
men and women poured into factories and shipyards, working around the 
clock to build ships, planes, tanks, and guns. Millions of others risked 
their lives to defend our Nation and preserve the ideals of democracy. 
By the war's end, some 15 million had served in our Armed Forces, 
including more than 1,200,000 African Americans, 300,000 Hispanic 
Americans, 50,000 Asian Americans, 20,000 Native Americans, 6,000 Native 
Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and 3,000 Native Alaskans.
These minority members of our Armed Forces served with honor and 
distinction in battles around the globe. Many of them--like the Tuskegee 
Airmen, the Japanese American troops of the Army's ``Go For Broke'' 
regiment, and the Native American Code Talkers who played a vital role 
in winning the war in the Pacific--were renowned for their bravery and 
dedication. America's minority veterans fought other important battles 
as well--battles against prejudice, ignorance, and discrimination. Many 
gave their lives on foreign soil for the freedom they had never fully 
shared at home. Many of those who survived returned home from the war 
and worked to make real in America the ideals for which they had fought 
so hard and for which so many of their comrades in arms had died.
On this Day of Honor, we have the opportunity--and the responsibility--
to acknowledge the contributions our minority veterans have made to the 
peace and freedom we enjoy today. I ask my fellow citizens to join me in 
saluting the African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, Native 
American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, Native Alaskan, and other 
minority members who served so valiantly in our Armed Forces during 
World War II and to remember those who died in service to our country. 
Their extraordinary devotion to duty is a reminder to us all that our 
Nation's diversity is not a cause for division, but rather one of our 
greatest strengths.

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The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 44, has authorized and 
requested the President to issue a proclamation in recognition of the 
minority veterans who served in World War II.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim May 25, 2000, as the Day of Honor, 2000. I 
call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate programs, 
ceremonies, and activities paying tribute to the service and sacrifice 
of the minority veterans of our Armed Forces who served during World War 
II.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fourth day 
of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7314 of May 26, 2000

To Modify the Quantitative Limitations Applicable to Imports of Wheat 
Gluten

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. On May 30, 1998, pursuant to section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2253), I issued Proclamation 
7103, which imposed quantitative limitations on certain wheat gluten 
imports provided for in subheadings 1109.00.10 and 1109.00.90 of the 
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) for a period of 3 
years plus 1 day, with annual increases in such quota limits of 6 
percent during the second and the third year. I exempted imports of 
wheat gluten that is the product of certain countries, including 
designated beneficiary countries under the Generalized System of 
Preferences (``GSP countries''), from the application of the 
quantitative limitations.
2. On December 1, 1999, the United States International Trade Commission 
(USITC) issued a report, as required under section 204(a)(2) of the 
Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2254(a)(2)), on the results of its monitoring of 
developments with respect to the domestic wheat gluten industry. The 
USITC report notes that in the 12-month period prior to the imposition 
of the quota (June 1, 1997-May 31, 1998), 440,000 pounds of wheat gluten 
entered the United States from Poland. During the first quota year (June 
1, 1998-May 31, 1999), imports from Poland grew to 5,004,000 pounds, or 
more than eleven times the amount of the previous year, accounting for 
2.9 percent of total U.S. imports. The USITC report has been provided to 
me (Investigation Number TA-204-2). More recent data from the United 
States Customs Service indicate that in the first 10 months of the 
second quota year (June 1999-March 2000), imports from Poland totaled 
8,965,800 pounds, accounting for 6.9 percent of total U.S. imports.
3. Section 204(b)(1)(A) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2254(b)(1)(A)) 
authorizes the President, after taking into account the report of the 
USITC required under section 204(a)(2) of the Trade Act and seeking 
advice from the Sec

[[Page 88]]

retary of Commerce and the Secretary of Labor, to reduce, modify, or 
terminate an action taken under section 203 of the Trade Act when the 
President determines that changed economic circumstances so warrant.
4. After taking into account the information provided in the USITC's 
report, and after receiving advice from the Secretary of Commerce and 
the Secretary of Labor, I have determined, on the basis that increased 
imports of wheat gluten the product of Poland have impaired the 
effectiveness of the action I proclaimed in 1998 under section 203 of 
the Trade Act, that changed economic circumstances warrant a 
modification in the action. Accordingly, I have decided to include in 
the action imports of wheat gluten the product of Poland, beginning June 
1, 2000.
5. Pursuant to section 203(g) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2253(g)), I 
have further determined to provide for the efficient and fair 
administration of the quantitative limitation on imports of wheat gluten 
by allocating on a quarterly basis the quantitative limitations 
applicable during the third year of the action.
6. Pursuant to section 503(b)(2) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(b)(2)), no article shall be eligible for duty-free treatment 
provided under section 501 of the Trade Act if that article is subject 
to an action proclaimed under section 203.
7. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the 
President to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant provisions 
of that Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, and actions 
thereunder, including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including but not limited to 
sections 204, 503, and 604 of the Trade Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to modify the scope of the quantitative limitations 
applicable to imports of wheat gluten under HTS heading 1109, and to 
allocate the quota quantities for the third quota year on a quarterly 
basis, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTS is modified as set forth 
in the Annex to this proclamation.
    (2) Such imported wheat gluten that is the product of Poland shall 
be included within the scope of the quantitative limitations during the 
third quota year, as provided in the Annex.
    (3) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (4) Effective at the close of June 1, 2002, or such other date that 
is 1 year from the close of the action taken under section 203 of the 
Trade Act, as modified by this proclamation, HTS subheadings 9903.11.08 
through 9903.11.11 and the superior text thereto shall be deleted from 
the HTS.
    (5) Pursuant to section 503(b)(2) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(b)(2)), duty-free treatment for certain wheat gluten that is the 
product of beneficiary countries under the Generalized System of 
Preferences (GSP) (Title V of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2461-
2467)), is suspended.

[[Page 89]]

    (6) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation and the 
Annex thereto shall be effective with respect to goods entered, or 
withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. EDT 
June 1, 2000, and shall continue in effect through the close of June 1, 
2001, unless such actions are earlier expressly modified or terminated.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON


ANNEX

Section A
Effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for 
consumption, on or after 12:00 a.m. EDT June 1, 2000, subheading 
1109.00.10 and subheading 1109.00.90 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule 
of the United States are each modified by deleting the symbol ``A'' in 
the rates of duty 1-special subcolumn.
Section B
Effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for 
consumption, on or after 12:00 a.m. EDT June 1, 2000, subheading 
9903.11.07 is deleted and the following new subheadings and superior 
text thereto are inserted in lieu thereof, with the superior text at the 
same level of indentation as the article description of subheading 
9903.11.06:


         ``:Wheat gluten, whether or not dried, except products of Canada,                                     :
         :of Mexico, of Israel, of beneficiary countries under the Caribbean                                   :
         :Basin Economic Recovery Act (as enumerated in general note 7 to                                      :
         :this schedule) or the Andean Trade Preference Act (as enumerated                                     :
         :in general note 11 to this schedule), or of countries (except Poland)                                :
         :enumerated in general note 4(a) to this schedule as that note                                        :
         :existed on June 1, 1998 (provided for in subheadings 1109.00.10                                      :
         :and 1109.00.90), if entered during the period from June 1, 2000,                                     :
         :through June 1, 2001, inclusive:                                                                     :
 

9903.11.08  : If entered during the period from June 1, 2000, through                                       :
            : August 31, 2000, in the respective aggregate quantity of                                      :
            : goods the product of a foreign country specified below,                                       :
            : after which no wheat gluten the product of such country                                       :
            : may be entered during the remainder of such period:                                           :

                               :  Australia...................................................    : 7,953,500 kg
                               :  European Community..........................................    : 6,885,750 kg
                               :  Other countries.............................................    : 1,318,250 kg

9903.11.09  : If entered during the period from September 1, 2000, through                                  :
            : through November 30, 2000, in the respective aggregate                                        :

[[Page 90]]

            : quantity of goods the product of a foreign country specified                                  :
            : below, after which no wheat gluten the product of such                                        :
            : country may be entered during the remainder of such period:                                   :

                               :  Australia...................................................    : 7,953,500 kg
                               :  European Community..........................................    : 6,885,750 kg
                               :  Other countries.............................................    : 1,318,250 kg

9903.11.10  : If entered during the period from December 1, 2000, through                                   :
            : February 28, 2001, in the respective aggregate quantity of                                    :
            : goods the product of a foreign country specified below, after                                 :
            : which no wheat gluten the product of such country may be                                      :
            : entered during the remainder of such period:                                                  :

                               :  Australia...................................................    : 7,953,500 kg
                               :  European Community..........................................    : 6,885,750 kg
                               :  Other countries.............................................    : 1,318,250 kg

9903.11.11  : If entered during the period from March 1, 2001, through                                      :
            : June 1, 2001, in the respective aggregate quantity of goods                                   :
            : the product of a foreign country specified below, after which                                 :
            : no wheat gluten the product of such country may be entered                                    :
            : during the remainder of such period:                                                          :

                               :  Australia...................................................    : 7,953,500 kg
                               :  European Community..........................................    : 6,885,750 kg
                               :  Other countries.............................................  : 1,318,250 kg''



Proclamation 7315 of May 26, 2000

Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

For many Americans, Memorial Day has come to signify the beginning of 
summer, the opening of the neighborhood pool, and a time for picnics and 
barbecues. In the midst of these festivities, however, we can too often 
overlook the holiday's true meaning. Memorial Day was first observed in 
1868 in remembrance of those who died in the Civil War; since then our 
Nation has set this day aside as a solemn occasion on which to pay 
tribute to all the men and women who have died in service to our 
country.

[[Page 91]]

Throughout our Nation's history, brave Americans have donned our 
country's uniform to defend our freedom and uphold our values, often far 
from home and in the face of grave danger. From the battles of the 
Revolutionary War through the epic struggles of World Wars I and II to 
today's peacekeeping missions in a world with sophisticated weapons and 
terrorist threats, the men and women of our Armed Forces have served 
with skill and courage. While the challenges they face have changed with 
each passing year, their devotion to duty and to country has remained 
steadfast.
For more than a million Americans, that devotion cost them their lives 
but secured for us priceless freedom, peace, and security. While we 
should remember these patriots every day for the profound contribution 
they have made to our Nation, we should honor them with special 
gratitude on Memorial Day.
This year, to reaffirm the true meaning of Memorial Day, we begin a new 
tradition by observing a ``National Moment of Remembrance.'' I ask all 
Americans to unite on Memorial Day in acknowledging the service of 
America's fallen heroes. Let us reflect on the profound debt we owe to 
those brave men and women who gave their lives for our Nation, and let 
us teach current and future generations that our freedom, peace, and 
prosperity were achieved only through the sacrifice of those who came 
before them.
In recognition of those courageous Americans, the Congress, by joint 
resolution approved on May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has requested the 
President to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United 
States to observe each Memorial Day as a day of prayer for permanent 
peace and designating a period on that day when the American people 
might unite in prayer. In support of the new tradition of a National 
Moment of Remembrance, the Congress has passed H.Con.Res. 302 calling on 
the people of the United States to observe a National Moment of 
Remembrance on Memorial Day.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim Memorial Day, May 29, 2000, as a day of 
prayer for permanent peace, and I designate 3:00 p.m. local time on that 
day as the time to join in prayer and to observe the National Moment of 
Remembrance. I urge the press, radio, television, and all other media to 
participate in this observance.
I also request the Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth 
of Puerto Rico, and the appropriate officials of all units of 
government, to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff until noon on 
this Memorial Day on all buildings, grounds, and naval vessels 
throughout the United States and in all areas under its jurisdiction and 
control, and I request the people of the United States to display the 
flag at half-staff from their homes for the customary forenoon period.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of 
May, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 92]]



Proclamation 7316 of June 2, 2000

Gay and Lesbian Pride Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Gay and lesbian Americans have made important and lasting contributions 
to our Nation in every field of endeavor. Too often, however, gays and 
lesbians face prejudice and discrimination; too many have had to hide or 
deny their sexual orientation in order to keep their jobs or to live 
safely in their communities.
In recent years, we have made some progress righting these wrongs. Since 
the Stonewall uprising in New York City more than 30 years ago, the gay 
and lesbian rights movement has united gays and lesbians, their families 
and friends, and all those committed to justice and equality in a 
crusade to outlaw discriminatory laws and practices and to protect gays 
and lesbians from prejudice and persecution.
I am proud of the part that my Administration has played to achieve 
these goals. Today, more openly gay and lesbian individuals serve in 
senior posts throughout the Federal Government than during any other 
Administration. To build on our progress, in 1998 I issued an Executive 
Order to prohibit discrimination in the Federal civilian workforce based 
on sexual orientation, and my Administration continues to fight for the 
Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would outlaw discrimination in 
the workplace based on sexual orientation.
Yet many challenges still lie before us. As we have learned from recent 
tragedies, prejudice against gays and lesbians can still erupt into acts 
of hatred and violence. I continue to call upon the Congress to pass 
meaningful hate crimes legislation to strengthen the Department of 
Justice's ability to prosecute hate crimes committed due to the victim's 
sexual orientation.
With each passing year the American people become more receptive to 
diversity and more open to those who are different from themselves. Our 
Nation is at last realizing that gays and lesbians must no longer be 
``strangers among friends,'' as the civil rights pioneer David Mixner 
once noted. Rather, we must finally recognize these Americans for what 
they are: our colleagues and neighbors, daughters and sons, sisters and 
brothers, friends and partners.
This June, recognizing the joys and sorrows that the gay and lesbian 
movement has witnessed and the work that remains to be done, we observe 
Gay and Lesbian Pride Month and celebrate the progress we have made in 
creating a society more inclusive and accepting of gays and lesbians. I 
hope that in this new millennium we will continue to break down the 
walls of fear and prejudice and work to build a bridge to understanding 
and tolerance, until gays and lesbians are afforded the same rights and 
responsibilities as all Americans.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2000 as Gay and 
Lesbian Pride Month. I encourage all Americans to observe this month 
with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities that celebrate our 
di

[[Page 93]]

versity and recognize the gay and lesbian Americans whose many and 
varied contributions have enriched our national life.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of June, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7317 of June 9, 2000

Establishment of the Canyons of the Ancients National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Containing the highest known density of archaeological sites in the 
Nation, the Canyons of the Ancients National Monument holds evidence of 
cultures and traditions spanning thousands of years. This area, with its 
intertwined natural and cultural resources, is a rugged landscape, a 
quality that greatly contributes to the protection of its scientific and 
historic objects. The monument offers an unparalleled opportunity to 
observe, study, and experience how cultures lived and adapted over time 
in the American Southwest.
The complex landscape and remarkable cultural resources of the Canyons 
of the Ancients National Monument have been a focal point for 
archaeological interest for over 125 years. Archaeological and historic 
objects such as cliff dwellings, villages, great kivas, shrines, sacred 
springs, agricultural fields, check dams, reservoirs, rock art sites, 
and sweat lodges are spread across the landscape. More than five 
thousand of these archaeologically important sites have been recorded, 
and thousands more await documentation and study. The Mockingbird Mesa 
area has over forty sites per square mile, and several canyons in that 
area hold more than three hundred sites per square mile.
People have lived and labored to survive among these canyons and mesas 
for thousands of years, from the earliest known hunters crossing the 
area 10,000 years ago or more, through Ancestral Puebloan farmers, to 
the Ute, Navajo, and European settlers whose descendants still call this 
area home. There is scattered evidence that Paleo-Indians used the 
region on a sporadic basis for hunting and gathering until around 7500 
B.C. During the Archaic period, generally covering the next six thousand 
years, occupation of the Four Corners area was dominated by hunters and 
gatherers.
By about 1500 B.C., the more sedentary Basketmakers spread over the 
landscape. As Ancestral Northern Puebloan people occupied the area 
around 750 A.D., farming began to blossom, and continued through about 
1300 A.D., as the area became part of a much larger prehistoric cultural 
region that included Mesa Verde to the southeast. Year-round villages 
were established, originally consisting of pit house dwellings, and 
later evolving to well-recognized cliff-dwellings. Many archaeologists 
now believe that throughout this time span, the Ancestral Northern 
Puebloan people periodi

[[Page 94]]

cally aggregated into larger communities and dispersed into smaller 
community units. Specifically, during Pueblo I (about 700-900 A.D.) the 
occupation and site density in the monument area increased. Dwellings 
tended to be small, with three or four rooms. Then, during Pueblo II 
(about 900-1150 A.D.), settlements were diminished and highly dispersed. 
Late in Pueblo II and in early Pueblo III, around 1150 A.D., the size 
and number of settlements again increased and residential clustering 
began. Later pueblos were larger multi-storied masonry dwellings with 
forty to fifty rooms. For the remainder of Pueblo III (1150-1300 A.D.), 
major aggregation occurred in the monument, typically at large sites at 
the heads of canyons. One of these sites includes remains of about 420 
rooms, 90 kivas, a great kiva, and a plaza, covering more than ten acres 
in all. These villages were wrapped around the upper reaches of canyons 
and spread down onto talus slopes, enclosed year-round springs and 
reservoirs, and included low, defensive walls. The changes in 
architecture and site planning reflected a shift from independent 
households to a more communal lifestyle.
Farming during the Puebloan period was affected by population growth and 
changing climate and precipitation patterns. As the population grew, the 
Ancestral Puebloans expanded into increasingly marginal areas. Natural 
resources were compromised and poor soil and growing conditions made 
survival increasingly difficult. When dry conditions persisted, Pueblo 
communities moved to the south, southwest, and southeast, where 
descendants of these Ancestral Puebloan peoples live today.
Soon after the Ancestral Puebloans left the monument area, the nomadic 
Ute and Navajo took advantage of the natural diversity found in the 
variable topography by moving to lower areas, including the monument's 
mesas and canyons, during the cooler seasons. A small number of forked 
stick hogans, brush shelters, and wickiups are the most obvious remnants 
of this period of occupation.
The natural resources and spectacular land forms of the monument help 
explain why past and present cultures have chosen to live in the area. 
The geology of the monument evokes the very essence of the American 
Southwest. Structurally part of the Paradox Basin, from a distance the 
landscape looks deceptively benign. From the McElmo Dome in the southern 
part of the monument, the land slopes gently to the north, giving no 
indication of its true character. Once inside the area, however, the 
geology becomes more rugged and dissected. Rising sharply to the north 
of McElmo Creek, the McElmo Dome itself is buttressed by sheer sandstone 
cliffs, with mesa tops rimmed by caprock, and deeply incised canyons.
The monument is home to a wide variety of wildlife species, including 
unique herpetological resources. Crucial habitat for the Mesa Verde 
nightsnake, long-nosed leopard lizard, and twin-spotted spiny lizard can 
be found within the monument in the area north of Yellow Jacket Canyon. 
Peregrine falcons have been observed in the area, as have golden eagles, 
American kestrels, red-tailed hawks, and northern harriers. Game birds 
like Gambel's quail and mourning dove are found throughout the monument 
both in dry, upland habitats, and in lush riparian habitat along the 
canyon bottoms.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of

[[Page 95]]

historic or scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned 
or controlled by the Government of the United States to be national 
monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels of land, the limits 
of which in all cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible 
with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Canyons of the 
Ancients National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, 
for the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands 
and interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within 
the boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Canyons of 
the Ancients National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this 
proclamation. The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of 
approximately 164,000 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with 
the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or other disposition under the public land 
laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and 
patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
relating to mineral leasing, other than by exchange that furthers the 
protective purposes of the monument, and except for oil and gas leasing 
as prescribed herein.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall prohibit all motorized and mechanized 
vehicle use off road, except for emergency or authorized administrative 
purposes.
Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by 
the United States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon 
acquisition of title thereto by the United States.
Because most of the Federal lands have already been leased for oil and 
gas, which includes carbon dioxide, and development is already 
occurring, the monument shall remain open to oil and gas leasing and 
development; provided, the Secretary of the Interior shall manage the 
development, subject to valid existing rights, so as not to create any 
new impacts that interfere with the proper care and management of the 
objects protected by this proclamation; and provided further, the 
Secretary may issue new leases only for the purpose of promoting 
conservation of oil and gas resources in any common reservoir now being 
produced under existing leases, or to protect against drainage.
The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a transportation plan that 
addresses the actions, including road closures or travel restrictions, 
necessary to protect the objects identified in this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable legal authorities, to 
implement the purposes of this proclamation.

[[Page 96]]

The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Colorado with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of Federal law. 
Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or 
reduction of any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the 
United States on or before the date of this proclamation. The Bureau of 
Land Management shall work with appropriate State authorities to ensure 
that any water resources needed for monument purposes are available.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
rights of any Indian tribe.
Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or leases on all 
lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to apply with regard to the 
lands in the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to affect the management of 
Hovenweep National Monument by the National Park Service (Proclamation 
1654 of March 2, 1923, Proclamation 2924 of May 1, 1951, and 
Proclamation 2998 of November 26, 1952).
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 97]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD13JN00.001


[[Page 98]]


Proclamation 7318 of June 9, 2000

Establishment of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

With towering fir forests, sunlit oak groves, wildflower-strewn meadows, 
and steep canyons, the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is an 
ecological wonder, with biological diversity unmatched in the Cascade 
Range. This rich enclave of natural resources is a biological 
crossroads--the interface of the Cascade, Klamath, and Siskiyou 
ecoregions, in an area of unique geology, biology, climate, and 
topography.
The monument is home to a spectacular variety of rare and beautiful 
species of plants and animals, whose survival in this region depends 
upon its continued ecological integrity. Plant communities present a 
rich mosaic of grass and shrublands, Garry and California black oak 
woodlands, juniper scablands, mixed conifer and white fir forests, and 
wet meadows. Stream bottoms support broad-leaf deciduous riparian trees 
and shrubs. Special plant communities include rosaceous chaparral and 
oak-juniper woodlands. The monument also contains many rare and endemic 
plants, such as Greene's Mariposa lily, Gentner's fritillary, and 
Bellinger's meadowfoam.
The monument supports an exceptional range of fauna, including one of 
the highest diversities of butterfly species in the United States. The 
Jenny Creek portion of the monument is a significant center of fresh 
water snail diversity, and is home to three endemic fish species, 
including a long-isolated stock of redband trout. The monument contains 
important populations of small mammals, reptile and amphibian species, 
and ungulates, including important winter habitat for deer. It also 
contains old growth habitat crucial to the threatened Northern spotted 
owl and numerous other bird species such as the western bluebird, the 
western meadowlark, the pileated woodpecker, the flammulated owl, and 
the pygmy nuthatch.
The monument's geology contributes substantially to its spectacular 
biological diversity. The majority of the monument is within the Cascade 
Mountain Range. The western edge of the monument lies within the older 
Klamath Mountain geologic province. The dynamic plate tectonics of the 
area, and the mixing of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary geological 
formations, have resulted in diverse lithologies and soils. Along with 
periods of geological isolation and a range of environmental conditions, 
the complex geologic history of the area has been instrumental in 
producing the diverse vegetative and biological richness seen today.
One of the most striking features of the Western Cascades in this area 
is Pilot Rock, located near the southern boundary of the monument. The 
rock is a volcanic plug, a remnant of a feeder vent left after a volcano 
eroded away, leaving an outstanding example of the inside of a volcano. 
Pilot Rock has sheer, vertical basalt faces up to 400 feet above the 
talus slope at its base, with classic columnar jointing created by the 
cooling of its andesite composition.
The Siskiyou Pass in the southwest corner of the monument contains 
portions of the Oregon/California Trail, the region's main north/south 
travel route first established by Native Americans in prehistoric times, 
and used

[[Page 99]]

by Peter Skene Ogden in his 1827 exploration for the Hudson's Bay 
Company.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Cascade-Siskiyou 
National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, for 
the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within the 
boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Cascade-Siskiyou 
National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. 
The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 
52,000 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care 
and management of the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument.
There is hereby reserved, as of the date of this proclamation and 
subject to valid existing rights, a quantity of water sufficient to 
fulfill the purposes for which this monument is established. Nothing in 
this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or reduction of 
any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the United States on 
or before the date of this proclamation.
The commercial harvest of timber or other vegetative material is 
prohibited, except when part of an authorized science-based ecological 
restoration project aimed at meeting protection and old growth 
enhancement objectives. Any such project must be consistent with the 
purposes of this proclamation. No portion of the monument shall be 
considered to be suited for timber production, and no part of the 
monument shall be used in a calculation or provision of a sustained 
yield of timber. Removal of trees from within the monument area may take 
place only if clearly needed for ecological restoration and maintenance 
or public safety.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall prohibit all motorized and mechanized 
vehicle use off road and shall close the Schoheim Road, except for 
emergency or authorized administrative purposes.

[[Page 100]]

Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by 
the United States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon 
acquisition of title thereto by the United States.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable legal authorities 
(including, where applicable, the Act of August 28, 1937, as amended (43 
U.S.C. 1181a-1181j)), to implement the purposes of this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare, within 3 years of this 
date, a management plan for this monument, and shall promulgate such 
regulations for its management as he deems appropriate. The management 
plan shall include appropriate transportation planning that addresses 
the actions, including road closures or travel restrictions, necessary 
to protect the objects identified in this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall study the impacts of livestock 
grazing on the objects of biological interest in the monument with 
specific attention to sustaining the natural ecosystem dynamics. 
Existing authorized permits or leases may continue with appropriate 
terms and conditions under existing laws and regulations. Should grazing 
be found incompatible with protecting the objects of biological 
interest, the Secretary shall retire the grazing allotments pursuant to 
the processes of applicable law. Should grazing permits or leases be 
relinquished by existing holders, the Secretary shall not reallocate the 
forage available under such permits or for livestock grazing purposes 
unless the Secretary specifically finds, pending the outcome of the 
study, that such reallocation will advance the purposes of the 
proclamation.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Oregon with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD13JN00.002


[[Page 102]]


Proclamation 7319 of June 9, 2000

Establishment of the Hanford Reach National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The Hanford Reach National Monument is a unique and biologically diverse 
landscape, encompassing an array of scientific and historic objects. 
This magnificent area contains an irreplaceable natural and historic 
legacy, preserved by unusual circumstances. Maintained as a buffer area 
in a Federal reservation conducting nuclear weapons development and, 
more recently, environmental cleanup activities, with limits on 
development and human use for the past 50 years, the monument is now a 
haven for important and increasingly scarce objects of scientific and 
historic interest. Bisected by the stunning Hanford Reach of the 
Columbia River, the monument contains the largest remnant of the shrub-
steppe ecosystem that once blanketed the Columbia River Basin. The 
monument is also one of the few remaining archaeologically rich areas in 
the western Columbia Plateau, containing well-preserved remnants of 
human history spanning more than 10,000 years. The monument is equally 
rich in geologic history, with dramatic landscapes that reveal the 
creative forces of tectonic, volcanic, and erosive power.
The monument is a biological treasure, embracing important riparian, 
aquatic, and upland shrub-steppe habitats that are rare or in decline in 
other areas. Within its mosaic of habitats, the monument supports a 
wealth of increasingly uncommon native plant and animal species, the 
size and diversity of which is unmatched in the Columbia Basin. 
Migrating salmon, birds, and hundreds of other native plant and animal 
species rely on its natural ecosystems.
The monument includes the 51-mile long ``Hanford Reach,'' the last free-
flowing, nontidal stretch of the Columbia River. The Reach contains 
islands, riffles, gravel bars, oxbow ponds, and backwater sloughs that 
support some of the most productive spawning areas in the Northwest, 
where approximately 80 percent of the upper Columbia Basin's fall 
chinook salmon spawn. It also supports healthy runs of naturally-
spawning sturgeon and other highly-valued fish species. The loss of 
other spawning grounds on the Columbia and its tributaries has increased 
the importance of the Hanford Reach for fisheries.
The monument contains one of the last remaining large blocks of shrub-
steppe ecosystems in the Columbia River Basin, supporting an unusually 
high diversity of native plant and animal species. A large number of 
rare and sensitive plant species are found dispersed throughout the 
monument. A recent inventory resulted in the discovery of two plant 
species new to science, the Umtanum desert buckwheat and the White 
Bluffs bladderpod. Fragile microbiotic crusts, themselves of biological 
interest, are well developed in the monument and play an important role 
in stabilizing soils and providing nutrients to plants.
The monument contains significant breeding populations of nearly all 
steppe and shrub-steppe dependent birds, including the loggerhead 
shrike, the sage sparrow, the sage thrasher, and the ferruginous hawk. 
The Hanford Reach and surrounding wetlands provide important stop-over 
habitat for

[[Page 103]]

migratory birds, as well as habitat for many resident species. The area 
is important wintering habitat for bald eagles, white pelicans, and many 
species of waterfowl such as mallards, green-winged teal, pintails, 
goldeneye, gadwall, and buffleheads. The monument's bluff habitats 
provide valuable nesting sites for several bird species, including 
prairie falcons, and important perch sites for raptors such as peregrine 
falcons.
Many species of mammals are also found within the monument, including 
elk, beaver, badgers, and bobcats. Insect populations, though less 
conspicuous, include species that have been lost elsewhere due to 
habitat conversion, fragmentation, and application of pesticides. A 
recent biological inventory uncovered 41 species and 2 subspecies of 
insects new to science and many species not before identified in the 
State of Washington. Such rich and diverse insect populations are 
important to supporting the fauna in the monument.
In addition to its vital biological resources, the monument contains 
significant geological and paleontological objects. The late-Miocene to 
late-Pliocene Ringold Formation, known as the White Bluffs, was formed 
from river and lake sediments deposited by the ancestral Columbia River 
and its tributaries. These striking cliffs form the eastern bank of the 
Columbia for nearly half of the length of the Reach, and are significant 
for the mammalian fossils that they contain. Fossil remains from 
rhinoceros, camel, and mastodon, among others, have been found within 
these bluffs.
The Hanford Dune Field, located on the western shore of the Columbia in 
the southeastern part of the monument, is also of geologic significance. 
This active area of migrating barchan dunes and partially stabilized 
transverse dunes rises 10 to 16 feet above the ground, creating sandy 
habitats ranging from 2 to several hundred acres in size.
The monument also contains important archaeological and historic 
information. More than 10,000 years of human activity in this largely 
arid environment have left extensive archaeological deposits. Areas 
upland from the river show evidence of concentrated human activity, and 
recent surveys indicate extensive use of arid lowlands for hunting. 
Hundreds of prehistoric archaeological sites have been recorded, 
including the remains of pithouses, graves, spirit quest monuments, 
hunting camps, game drive complexes, quarries, and hunting and kill 
sites. A number of Native American groups still have cultural ties to 
the monument. The monument also contains some historic structures and 
other remains from more recent human activities, including homesteads 
from small towns established along the riverbanks in the early 20th 
century.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Hanford Reach 
National Monument:

[[Page 104]]

NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Hanford Reach National Monument, for the 
purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within the 
boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Hanford Reach 
National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. 
The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 
195,000 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with the proper 
care and management of the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, the 
Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Energy shall prohibit all 
motorized and mechanized vehicle use off road, except for emergency or 
other federally authorized purposes, including remediation purposes. 
There is hereby reserved, as of the date of this proclamation and 
subject to valid existing rights, a quantity of water in the Columbia 
River sufficient to fulfill the purposes for which this monument is 
established. Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as a 
relinquishment or reduction of any water use or rights reserved or 
appropriated by the United States on or before the date of this 
proclamation.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall prohibit livestock grazing.
The monument shall be managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
under existing agreements with the Department of Energy, except that the 
Department of Energy shall manage the lands within the monument that are 
not subject to management agreements with the Service, and in developing 
any management plans and rules and regulations governing the portions of 
the monument for which the Department of Energy has management 
responsibility, the Secretary of Energy shall consult with the Secretary 
of the Interior.
As the Department of Energy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
determine that lands within the monument managed by the Department of 
Energy become suitable for management by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will assume management by 
agreement with the Department of Energy. All agreements between the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Energy shall be 
consistent with the provisions of this proclamation.
Nothing in this proclamation shall affect the responsibility of the 
Department of Energy under environmental laws, including the remediation 
of hazardous substances or the restoration of natural resources at the 
Hanford facility; nor affect the Department of Energy's statutory 
authority to control public access or statutory responsibility to take 
other measures for environmental remediation, monitoring, security, 
safety, or emergency prepared

[[Page 105]]

ness purposes; nor affect any Department of Energy activities on lands 
not included within the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Washington with respect to fish and 
wildlife management.
Nothing in this proclamation shall enlarge or diminish the rights of any 
Indian tribe.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Nothing in this proclamation shall interfere with the operation and 
maintenance of existing facilities of the Columbia Basin Reclamation 
Project, the Federal Columbia River Transmission System, or other 
existing utility services that are located within the monument. Existing 
Federal Columbia River Transmission System facilities located within the 
monument may be replaced, modified and expanded, and new facilities 
constructed within the monument, as authorized by other applicable law. 
Such replacement, modification, expansion, or construction of new 
facilities shall be carried out in a manner consistent with proper care 
and management of the objects of this proclamation, to be determined in 
accordance with the management arrangements previously set out in this 
proclamation.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 106]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD13JN00.003


[[Page 107]]


Proclamation 7320 of June 9, 2000

Establishment of the Ironwood Forest National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The landscape of the Ironwood Forest National Monument is swathed with 
the rich, drought-adapted vegetation of the Sonoran Desert. The monument 
contains objects of scientific interest throughout its desert 
environment. Stands of ironwood, palo verde, and saguaro blanket the 
monument floor beneath the rugged mountain ranges, including the Silver 
Bell Mountains. Ragged Top Mountain is a biological and geological crown 
jewel amid the depositional plains in the monument.
The monument presents a quintessential view of the Sonoran Desert with 
ancient legume and cactus forests. The geologic and topographic 
variability of the monument contributes to the area's high biological 
diversity. Ironwoods, which can live in excess of 800 years, generate a 
chain of influences on associated understory plants, affecting their 
dispersal, germination, establishment, and rates of growth. Ironwood is 
the dominant nurse plant in this region, and the Silver Bell Mountains 
support the highest density of ironwood trees recorded in the Sonoran 
Desert. Ironwood trees provide, among other things, roosting sites for 
hawks and owls, forage for desert bighorn sheep, protection for saguaro 
against freezing, burrows for tortoises, flowers for native bees, dense 
canopy for nesting of white-winged doves and other birds, and protection 
against sunburn for night blooming cereus.
The ironwood-bursage habitat in the Silver Bell Mountains is associated 
with more than 674 species, including 64 mammalian and 57 bird species. 
Within the Sonoran Desert, Ragged Top Mountain contains the greatest 
richness of species. The monument is home to species federally listed as 
threatened or endangered, including the Nichols turk's head cactus and 
the lesser long-nosed bat, and contains historic and potential habitat 
for the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl. The desert bighorn sheep in the 
monument may be the last viable population indigenous to the Tucson 
basin.
In addition to the biological and geological resources, the area holds 
abundant rock art sites and other archeological objects of scientific 
interest. Humans have inhabited the area for more than 5,000 years. More 
than 200 sites from the prehistoric Hohokam period (600 A.D. to 1450 
A.D.) have been recorded in the area. Two areas within the monument have 
been listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Los Robles 
Archeological District and the Cocoraque Butte Archeological District. 
The archeological artifacts include rhyolite and brown chert chipped 
stone, plain and decorated ceramics, and worked shell from the Gulf of 
California. The area also contains the remnants of the Mission Santa 
Ana, the last mission constructed in Pimeria Alta.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all

[[Page 108]]

cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible with the proper 
care and management of the objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Ironwood Forest 
National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Ironwood Forest National Monument, for the 
purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within the 
boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Ironwood Forest 
National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. 
The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 
128,917 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with the proper 
care and management of the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument.
For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall prohibit all motorized and mechanized 
vehicle use off road, except for emergency or authorized administrative 
purposes.
Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by 
the United States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon 
acquisition of title thereto by the United States.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable legal authorities, to 
implement the purposes of this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a transportation plan that 
addresses the actions, including road closures or travel restrictions, 
necessary to protect the objects identified in this proclamation.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Arizona with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of Federal law. 
Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or 
reduction of any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the 
United States on or before the date of this proclamation. The Bureau of 
Land Management shall work with appropriate State authorities to ensure 
that any water resources needed for monument purposes are available.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
rights of any Indian tribe.

[[Page 109]]

Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or leases on all 
lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to apply with regard to the 
lands in the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD13JN00.004


[[Page 111]]


Proclamation 7321 of June 9, 2000

Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Our long national journey has brought the United States safely to a new 
century and to a position of unprecedented leadership in the world. 
Throughout that journey, one symbol has endured as a badge of honor for 
every American and a beacon of hope for the oppressed: the flag of the 
United States.
For more than two centuries, ``Old Glory'' has challenged us to make 
real the highest ideals of the patriots and visionaries who chose it as 
our national symbol in the early days of our Republic. The flag of the 
United States has inspired us in battle, reassured us in times of peace, 
and comforted us at moments of great national grief. In its white 
stripes, we recognize the sanctity of the American ideals on which our 
Republic was founded: liberty, justice, equality, and the guarantee of 
individual rights. In its red stripes, we salute the generations of 
American patriots who have shed their blood to keep our flag flying over 
a free Nation. And in the cluster of white stars on an unchanging blue 
field, we read the story of America's remarkable evolution from 13 small 
colonies to 50 great States, with millions of citizens from every race, 
creed, and country united by the hopes and history we share as 
Americans.
To commemorate the adoption of our flag, the Congress, by joint 
resolution approved August 3, 1949 (63 Stat. 492), designated June 14 of 
each year as ``Flag Day'' and requested the President to issue an annual 
proclamation calling for a national observance and for the display of 
the flag of the United States on all Federal Government buildings. In a 
second joint resolution approved June 9, 1966 (80 Stat. 194), the 
Congress requested the President also to issue annually a proclamation 
designating the week during which June 14 falls as ``National Flag 
Week'' and calling upon all citizens of the United States to display the 
flag during that week.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim June 14, 2000, as Flag Day and the week 
beginning June 11, 2000, as National Flag Week. I direct the appropriate 
officials to display the flag on all Federal Government buildings during 
that week, and I urge all Americans to observe Flag Day and National 
Flag Week by flying the Stars and Stripes from their homes and other 
suitable places.
I also call upon the people of the United States to observe with pride 
and all due ceremony those days from Flag Day through Independence Day, 
also set aside by the Congress (89 Stat. 211), as a time to honor our 
Nation, to celebrate our heritage in public gatherings and activities, 
and to recite publicly the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the 
United States of America.

[[Page 112]]

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7322 of June 13, 2000

225th Anniversary of the United States Army

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

On June 14, 1775, the Second Continental Congress authorized the 
enlistment of ten companies of riflemen in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and 
Virginia as the first units of the Continental Army. Few could have 
foreseen that this small band of citizen-soldiers would lay the 
cornerstone of freedom for our Nation and the foundation for what would 
become the finest army in the world.
For 225 years, in war and in peace, every generation of American 
soldiers has served our Nation with unwavering courage, skill, and 
commitment. The first soldiers of the Continental Army gave life to the 
United States of America in 1776. In the following century, the Army 
protected our new country's frontiers and preserved our Union through 
the terrible strife of the Civil War. In the 20th century, American 
soldiers fought and died in two World Wars to defend democracy and win 
the global struggle against fascism. And, for the last half of the 20th 
century, in Korea and Vietnam and throughout the dark decades of the 
Cold War, our Army shielded the free world from the forces of communism 
and ensured the triumph of democracy.
Today, the men and women of America's Army--Active, National Guard, and 
Reserve--continue to advance our Nation's interests around the world. 
Across the globe, in the face of aggression, tyranny, and despair, our 
soldiers have responded as allies, liberators, and humanitarians. All 
Americans rightly take pride in this truly American institution and its 
enduring strength and vitality.
In the Roosevelt Room of the White House, the flag of the United States 
Army stands proudly, bearing 173 streamers that mark the battles fought 
and won. From Lexington in 1775 to Southwest Asia in 1991, these 
colorful banners are a striking visual reminder of the U.S. Army's 
glorious history and a silent tribute to the hundreds of thousands of 
soldiers whose sacrifices have kept our Nation free. As we mark the 
Army's 225th anniversary, I ask all Americans to join me in reflecting 
with pride and gratitude on the contributions of the loyal and 
courageous men and women who have served in the United States Army to 
preserve our liberty, uphold our values, and advance our interests.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim June 14, 2000, as the 225th Anniversary of 
the United States Army. I urge all Americans to observe this day with 
appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities that celebrate the 
history, heritage, and service of the United States Army.

[[Page 113]]

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of 
June, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7323 of June 16, 2000

Father's Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each year, Americans set aside the third Sunday in June to pay special 
tribute to our fathers, who for many of us are the first and most 
important men in our lives. The role of father is a unique blessing and 
a profound responsibility, one at the very heart of our Nation's 
families and communities. When we are young, our father's nurturing 
brings us comfort and security. As we grow, our dads are our teachers 
and coaches--whether we are learning to read or to play a sport--and 
they instill in us cherished values of honor, courage, hard work, and 
respect for others. Later, as adults, we look to our fathers for advice 
and friendship. On all the paths of life, our fathers encourage us when 
we hesitate, support us when we falter, and cheer us when we succeed.
American fathers today must balance the demands of work and family. As 
our growing economy has helped America's families meet their financial 
needs, the pressure to maintain that balance has increased. For the 
health of our families, it is important that fathers have the time, the 
support, and the parenting skills necessary to fulfill their children's 
moral and emotional needs as well as provide for their physical well-
being. Throughout our Administration, Vice President Gore and I have 
encouraged fathers to take an active and responsible role in their 
children's lives. This year, in recognition of Father's Day, I am 
directing the Department of Health and Human Services, along with 
certain other Federal agencies, to develop guidance for State and local 
governments, community providers, and families on Federal resources that 
are available to promote responsible fatherhood.
On this first Father's Day of the 21st century, let us honor our 
fathers, both living and deceased, for believing in our dreams and 
helping us to achieve them. Throughout the year, let us continue to 
reflect on the importance of fathers--whether biological, foster, 
adoptive, or stepfathers--as role models in our lives. And let us 
express our gratitude for the many gifts they bring to our lives by 
passing on their legacy of love and caring to our own children.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, in accordance with a joint resolution of the Congress approved 
April 24, 1972 (36 U.S.C. 142a), do hereby proclaim Sunday, June 18, 
2000, as Father's Day. I invite the States, communities across our 
country, and all the citizens of the United States to observe this day 
with appropriate ceremonies and activities that demonstrate our deep 
appreciation and abiding love for our fathers.

[[Page 114]]

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of 
June, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7324 of June 23, 2000

50th Anniversary of the Korean War and National Korean War Veterans 
Armistice Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Fifty years ago, on June 25, 1950, armed forces from North Korea 
shattered the peace in the Land of the Morning Calm as they crossed the 
38th Parallel and launched an invasion of South Korea. The communist 
forces advanced rapidly and, at the outset, appeared close to easy 
victory. President Truman, recognizing the threat to our South Korean 
allies and their democracy, responded swiftly and decisively. Through 
the United Nations Security Council, he marshaled international 
opposition to the invasion and, on June 27, 1950, committed the first 
U.S. forces to combat in South Korea.
On some of the world's harshest terrain, through the scorching heat of 
summer and the numbing cold of winter, American troops fought with 
steely determination and uncommon courage. As they gained ground, 
pushing the North Koreans back toward the 38th parallel, American 
families began to hope that our troops would be home by Christmas. But 
in November, at the Yalu River in North Korean territory, American 
forces encountered a new and daunting antagonist: Chinese forces had 
joined their North Korean allies, and the tide of battle turned once 
again.
Through months of attack and counterattack, falling back and regaining 
ground, U.S. troops and our allies refused to succumb to enemy forces. 
The war dragged into a bloody stalemate and long, bitter talks ensued. 
Finally, negotiators signed an armistice agreement at Panmunjom on July 
27, 1953. North Korea withdrew across the 38th parallel, and the 
Republic of South Korea regained its status as a free, democratic 
nation. For the first time in history, a world organization of nations 
had taken up arms to oppose aggression and, thanks largely to the valor, 
skill, and perseverance of almost 2,000,000 Americans, had succeeded.
In later years, the Korean War would sometimes be called ``the Forgotten 
War.'' But we have not forgotten. We pay honor to the courage of our 
veterans who fought in Korea and to the thousands who died there or 
whose fate is still unknown. We recall the grief of their families and 
the gratitude of the people of South Korea. We remember that, in the 
Korean War, our soldiers' brave stand against communism laid the 
foundations of peace and freedom that so many nations enjoy today.
Over the next 3-1/2 years, Americans will gather to observe the 50th 
anniversary of the Korean War and honor our veterans. The Secretary of 
Defense will help coordinate many of these events and will develop com

[[Page 115]]

memorative and educational materials to help inform the American public 
about our veterans' many contributions and sacrifices.
The Congress, by Public Law 106-195, has authorized and requested the 
President to issue a proclamation in observance of the 50th anniversary 
of the Korean War, and by Public Law 104-19 (36 U.S.C. 127), the 
Congress has designated July 27, 2000, as ``National Korean War Veterans 
Armistice Day'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue 
a proclamation in observance of that day.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby urge all Americans to observe the 50th Anniversary of 
the Korean War and do hereby proclaim July 27, 2000, as National Korean 
War Veterans Armistice Day. I call upon all Americans to observe these 
periods with appropriate ceremonies and activities that honor and give 
thanks to our distinguished Korean War veterans. I also ask Federal 
departments and agencies and interested groups, organizations, and 
individuals to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff on July 
27, 2000, in memory of the Americans who died as a result of their 
service in Korea.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-third day of 
June, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7325 of June 29, 2000

To Modify Duty-Free Treatment Under the Generalized
System of Preferences and for Other Purposes

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Pursuant to sections 501, 503(a)(1)(A), and 503(c)(1) of title V of 
the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2461, 
2463(a)(1)(A), and 2463(c)(1)), the President may designate or withdraw 
designation of specified articles provided for in the Harmonized Tariff 
Schedule of the United States (HTS) as eligible for preferential tariff 
treatment under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) when 
imported from designated beneficiary developing countries.
2. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(A)), beneficiary developing countries, except those 
designated as least-developed beneficiary developing countries pursuant 
to section 503(c)(2)(D) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(D)), are 
subject to competitive need limitations on the preferential treatment 
afforded under the GSP to eligible articles.
3. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(C) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(C)), a country that is no longer treated as a beneficiary 
developing country with respect to an eligible article may be 
redesignated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to such 
article if imports of such article from such country did not exceed the 
competitive need limitations in section 503(c)(2)(A) (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(A)) during the preceding calendar year.

[[Page 116]]

4. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(F) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(F)), the President may disregard the competitive need 
limitation provided in section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) of the 1974 Act (19 
U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(A)(i)(II)) with respect to any eligible article if the 
appraised value of the total imports of such article into the United 
States during the preceding calendar year does not exceed an amount set 
forth in section 503(c)(2)(F)(ii) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(F)(ii)).
5. Pursuant to section 503(d) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2463(d)), the 
President may waive the application of the competitive need limitations 
in section 503(c)(2)(A) with respect to any eligible article from any 
beneficiary developing country if certain conditions are met.
6. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(E) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(E)), section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) shall not apply with respect 
to any eligible article if a like or directly competitive article was 
not produced in the United States on January 1, 1995.
7. Pursuant to sections 501 and 503(a)(1)(A) of the 1974 Act, and after 
receiving advice from the International Trade Commission in accordance 
with section 503(e), I have determined to designate certain articles, 
previously designated under section 503(a)(1)(B), as eligible articles 
when imported from any beneficiary developing country.
8. Pursuant to section 503(c)(1) of the 1974 Act, I have determined to 
limit the application of duty-free treatment accorded to certain 
articles from certain beneficiary developing countries.
9. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act, I have determined 
that certain beneficiary countries should no longer receive preferential 
tariff treatment under the GSP with respect to certain eligible articles 
imported in quantities that exceed the applicable competitive need 
limitation.
10. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(C) of the 1974 Act, I have determined 
that certain countries should be redesignated as beneficiary developing 
countries with respect to certain eligible articles that previously had 
been imported in quantities exceeding the competitive need limitations 
of section 503(c)(2)(A).
11. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(F) of the 1974 Act, I have determined 
that the competitive need limitation provided in section 
503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) should be waived with respect to certain eligible 
articles from certain beneficiary developing countries.
12. Pursuant to section 503(d) of the 1974 Act, I have determined that 
the competitive need limitations of section 503(c)(2)(A) should be 
waived with respect to certain eligible articles from certain 
beneficiary developing countries. I have received the advice of the 
International Trade Commission on whether any industries in the United 
States are likely to be adversely affected by such waivers, and I have 
determined, based on that advice and on the considerations described in 
sections 501 and 502(c), that such waivers are in the national economic 
interest of the United States.
13. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(E) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(c)(2)(E)), I have determined that the limitation provided for in 
section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) shall not apply with respect to HTS 
subheading 3817.10.50 because no like or directly competitive article 
was produced in the United States on January 1, 1995.

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14. Section 604 of the 1974 Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes 
the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant 
provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, 
and actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
restriction.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including but not limited to 
title V and section 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to provide that one or more countries that have not 
been treated as beneficiary developing countries with respect to one or 
more eligible articles should be designated as beneficiary developing 
countries with respect to such article or articles for purposes of the 
GSP, and that one or more countries should no longer be treated as 
beneficiary developing countries with respect to one or more eligible 
articles for purposes of the GSP, general note 4(d) to the HTS is 
modified as provided in section A of Annex I to this proclamation.
    (2)(a) In order to designate certain articles as eligible articles 
for purposes of the GSP when imported from any beneficiary developing 
country, the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn for certain HTS 
subheadings is modified as provided in section B(1) of Annex I to this 
proclamation.
     (b) In order to provide preferential tariff treatment under the GSP 
to a beneficiary developing country that has been excluded from the 
benefits of the GSP for certain eligible articles, the Rates of Duty 1-
Special subcolumn for each of the HTS subheadings enumerated in section 
B(2) of Annex I to this proclamation is modified as provided in such 
section.
     (c) In order to provide that one or more countries should not be 
treated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to certain 
eligible articles for purposes of the GSP, the Rates of Duty 1-Special 
subcolumn for each of the HTS subheadings enumerated in section B(3) of 
Annex I to this proclamation is modified as provided in such section.
    (3) A waiver of the application of section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 
Act shall apply to the eligible articles in the HTS subheadings and to 
the beneficiary developing countries set forth in Annex II to this 
proclamation.
    (4) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive Orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (5)(a) The modifications made by Annex I to this proclamation shall 
be effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from 
warehouse for consumption, on or after July 1, 2000.
     (b) The action taken in Annex II to this proclamation shall be 
effective on the date of publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
Register.
     (c) The action taken in paragraph 13 of this proclamation shall be 
effective on the date of publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
Register.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
June, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 118]]

Annex I
Modifications to the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States 
(HTS)
Effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse 
for consumption, on or after July 1, 2000.
Section A. General note 4(d) to the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
United States (HTS) is modified by:
(1). deleting the following subheadings and the country set out opposite 
such subheadings:

        0811.20.40 Chile             ...........................  7202.5
                                                                   0.00
                                                                   Russi
                                                                   a
        1701.91.10 Brazil            ...........................  ......

(2). adding, in numerical sequence, the following provisions and 
countries set out opposite them:

               0713.90.80 India                                        ..............  5007.90.30 India
               0714.90.45 Costa Rica                                   ..............  5702.39.10 India
               1102.90.30 El Salvador                                  ..............  6302.99.10 India
               2001.90.45 India                                        ..............  7113.19.25 India
               2008.19.25 Peru                                         ..............  7113.20.25 India
               2008.99.45 Dominican Republic                           ..............  7418.19.10 India
               4010.19.50 Brazil                                       ..............  8211.95.50 Pakistan
               4104.39.20 India                                        ..............  8450.90.20 Ecuador
               4412.92.40 Ecuador                                      ..............  8708.99.67 Brazil

(3). adding, in alphabetical order, the country or countries set out 
opposite the following subheadings:

        0714.20.10 Colombia                 .......  2008.50.20 Turkey
        1602.50.20 Brazil                   .......  2905.42.00 Brazil
        1702.30.22 Jamaica                  .......  3212.90.00 Colombia
        2004.10.40 Peru                     .......  4106.20.30 Pakistan
        2008.19.30 Turkey                   .......  7801.99.30 Colombia

Section B. Each enumerated article's preferential tariff treatment under 
the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) in the HTS is modified as 
provided in this section.
(1). For subheadings 7202.99.10 and 8104.30.00, the Rates of Duty 1-
Special subcolumn is modified by deleting the symbol ``A+'' and 
inserting an ``A'' in lieu thereof.
(2). For the following subheadings, the Rates of Duty 1-Special 
subcolumn is modified by deleting the symbol ``A*'' and inserting an 
``A'' in lieu thereof.

              0811.20.40                                                                ........................
              1701.91.10                                                                ........................
              7202.50.00                                                                ........................

(3). For the following provisions, the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn 
is modified by deleting the symbol ``A'' and inserting an ``A*'' in lieu 
thereof:

[[Page 119]]

          0713.90.80   2008.19.25   4412.92.40   7113.19.25   8450.90.20
          0714.90.45   2008.99.45   5007.90.30   7113.20.25   8708.99.67
          1102.90.30   4010.19.50   5702.39.10   7418.19.10
          2001.90.45   4104.39.20   6302.99.10   8211.95.50

Annex II
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS)
Subheadings and Countries Granted Waivers of the Application of Section 
503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act

                HTS Subheading                                               Country
                7202.50.00                                                   Russia
                7202.99.10                                                   Brazil


Proclamation 7326 of June 29, 2000

To Extend Nondiscriminatory Treatment (Normal Trade Relations Treatment) 
to the Products of Albania and Kyrgyzstan

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Albania has made progress, since its emergence from communism, toward 
democratic rule and the creation of a market economy. Further, I have 
found Albania to be in full compliance with the freedom of emigration 
requirements under title IV of the Trade Act of 1974 (the ``Trade Act'') 
(19 U.S.C. 2431, et seq.). In 1998, Albania concluded a bilateral 
investment treaty with the United States. Albania is in the process of 
acceding to the World Trade Organization (WTO). The extension of 
unconditional normal trade relations treatment to the products of 
Albania will permit the United States to avail itself of all rights 
under the WTO with respect to Albania when that country becomes a member 
of the WTO.
2. Pursuant to section 301(b) of Public Law 106-200, 114 Stat. 289, and 
having due regard for the findings of the Congress in section 301(a) of 
that law, I hereby determine that title IV of the Trade Act should no 
longer apply to Albania.
3. Since 1991, Kyrgyzstan has made great progress toward democratic rule 
and toward creating a free-market economic system. Further, I have found 
Kyrgyzstan to be in full compliance with the freedom of emigration 
requirements under title IV of the Trade Act. In 1994, Kyrgyzstan 
concluded a bilateral investment treaty with the United States, and in 
1999 Kyrgyzstan became a member of the WTO. The extension of 
unconditional normal trade relations treatment to the products of 
Kyrgyzstan will permit the United States to avail itself of all rights 
under the WTO with respect to Kyrgyzstan.
4. Pursuant to section 302(b) of Public Law 106-200, 114 Stat. 289-90, 
and having due regard for the findings of the Congress in section 302(a) 
of that

[[Page 120]]

law, I hereby determine that title IV of the Trade Act should no longer 
apply to Kyrgyzstan.
NOW, THEREFORE, I WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, including but not limited to sections 
301(b)(1)(B) and 302(b)(1)(B) of Public Law 106-200, do hereby proclaim 
that:
    (1) Nondiscriminatory treatment (normal trade relations treatment) 
shall be extended to the products of Albania;
    (2) The extension of nondiscriminatory treatment to the products of 
Albania shall be effective as of the date of signature of this 
proclamation;
    (3) Nondiscriminatory treatment (normal trade relations treatment) 
shall be extended to the products of Kyrgyzstan;
    (4) The extension of nondiscriminatory treatment to the products of 
Kyrgyzstan shall be effective as of the date of signature of this 
proclamation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
June, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7327 of July 1, 2000

Spirit of the ADA Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 10 years ago 
this month signaled a transformation in our Nation's public policies 
toward people with disabilities. America is now a dramatically 
different--and better--country because of the ADA.
In the last 10 years, we have worked hard to eliminate harmful 
stereotypes and have grown to understand disability as a natural part of 
the human experience. We are taking steps, such as renovating and 
constructing public accommodations to make them fully accessible, to 
ensure that people with disabilities are fully integrated into our 
communities and workplaces. And we have come to appreciate that people 
with disabilities are a key element--and an untapped resource--in 
sustaining our Nation's historic economic growth.
Throughout our Administration, Vice President Gore and I have worked 
hard to achieve the ADA's core goals--equality of opportunity, full 
participation, independent living, and economic self-sufficiency. Our 
Administration has vigorously defended the ADA in court cases across the 
Nation; we are collaborating with State Medicaid directors to implement 
the Supreme Court's 1999 Olmstead decision, which prohibits unjustified 
isolation of institutionalized persons with disabilities; we helped 
ensure that 80 percent

[[Page 121]]

of America's public transit buses are now accessible; we are 
implementing the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act, 
which I proudly signed into law last December; we have worked closely 
with schools and colleges to improve the enrollment, retention, and 
graduation of students with disabilities; and my Task Force on 
Employment of Adults with Disabilities is developing far-reaching 
policies for a comprehensive, coordinated employment agenda.
We still have much to accomplish. Because the many barriers confronting 
people with disabilities took generations to develop, breaking them down 
requires consistent, coordinated, and farsighted effort. We must work 
aggressively to increase the employment rates of people with 
disabilities by attacking a range of work disincentives, including 
barriers to education, health care, technology, housing, and 
transportation. We must provide real choices for people with 
disabilities to live and work in their communities with the necessary 
services and supports. And we must be vigilant in protecting the rights 
we have secured through decades of legal activism. I am encouraged that 
the first 10 years of the ADA's life have provided us with a solid 
foundation for meeting these challenges.
To mark the ADA's 10th anniversary and the 25th anniversary of the 
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the American 
Association of People with Disabilities has organized a nationwide 
``Spirit of ADA'' Torch Relay. Twenty-four cities from coast to coast 
are hosting official relay events, and hundreds of communities are 
organizing additional local events as part of this national celebration. 
The Spirit of ADA's organizing theme is ``Renew the Pledge'' to 
encourage individuals, organizations, and government entities to 
reaffirm their commitment to the principles of the ADA and IDEA. Vice 
President Gore and I are proud to join in the celebration and to renew 
our own pledge to help advance the cause of disability rights.
Promoting disability rights not only improves the lives of the 54 
million Americans with disabilities, it improves all of our lives. As 
President Franklin Roosevelt recognized more than 60 years ago, in words 
that are now inscribed on the FDR Memorial in our Nation's capital: ``No 
Country, however rich, can afford the waste of its human resources.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim July 2000 as Spirit of the 
ADA Month, 2000. I urge government officials, business people, community 
leaders, educators, and all the people of the United States, to 
celebrate the contributions people with disabilities have made, and 
continue to make, to the progress and prosperity of our Nation, and to 
renew our commitment to upholding the nondiscrimination principles of 
the ADA and IDEA.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of July, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fourth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 122]]


Proclamation 7328 of July 6, 2000

To Amend the Generalized System of Preferences

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Section 502(c)(7) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade 
Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2462(c)(7)), provides that, in determining whether to 
designate any country a beneficiary developing country under this 
section, the President shall take into account whether that country has 
taken or is taking steps to afford internationally recognized worker 
rights to workers in that country. Section 502(d)(1) of the Trade Act 
(19 U.S.C. 2462(d)(1)) provides that the President may withdraw, 
suspend, or limit the application of duty-free treatment under the 
Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) with respect to any designated 
beneficiary developing country based on consideration of the factors set 
forth in sections 501 and 502(c) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2461 and 
2462(c)). Section 502(f)(2) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2462(f)(2)) 
requires the President to notify the Congress and the affected country, 
at least 60 days before termination, of the President's intention to 
terminate the affected country's designation as a beneficiary developing 
country for purposes of the GSP.
2. Section 502(e) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2462(e)) provides that the 
President shall terminate the designation of a country as a beneficiary 
developing country if the President determines that such country has 
become a ``high income'' country as defined by the official statistics 
of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. 
Termination is effective on January 1 of the second year following the 
year in which such determination is made.
3. Pursuant to section 502(d) of the Trade Act, and having considered 
the factors set forth in sections 501 and 502(c), I have determined that 
it is appropriate to suspend Belarus's GSP benefits because it has not 
taken and is not taking steps to afford workers in that country 
internationally recognized worker rights. In order to reflect the 
suspension of benefits under the GSP for articles imported from Belarus, 
I have determined that it is appropriate to modify general note 4(a) of 
the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS).
4. Pursuant to section 502(e) of the Trade Act, I have determined that 
Malta, French Polynesia, New Caledonia, and Slovenia meet the definition 
of a ``high income'' country as defined by the official statistics of 
the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. Accordingly, 
pursuant to section 502(e) of the Trade Act, I am terminating the 
preferential treatment under the GSP for articles that are currently 
eligible for such treatment and that are imported from Malta, French 
Polynesia, New Caledonia, and Slovenia, effective January 1, 2002.
5. Section 604 of the Trade Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes 
the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant 
provisions of that Act, and of other Acts affecting import treatment, 
and actions thereunder.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitu

[[Page 123]]

tion and the laws of the United States of America, including but not 
limited to Title V and section 604 of the Trade Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to reflect the suspension of benefits under the GSP 
with respect to Belarus, general note 4(a) of the HTS is modified by 
deleting ``Belarus'' from the list of independent countries, effective 
with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for 
consumption, on or after 60 days after the date of publication of this 
proclamation in the Federal Register.
    (2) In order to terminate the designation of Malta, French 
Polynesia, New Caledonia, and Slovenia as beneficiary developing 
countries under the GSP, general note 4(a) of the HTS is modified by:
      (a) deleting ``Malta'' and ``Slovenia'' from the list of 
independent countries, and
      (b) deleting ``French Polynesia'' and ``New Caledonia'' from the 
list of nonindependent countries and territories, effective with respect 
to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or 
after January 1, 2002.
    (3) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive Orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of July, 
in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of the 
United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7329 of July 7, 2000

President Lincoln and Soldiers' Home National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each year from 1862 through 1864, President Abraham Lincoln and his 
family left the White House to take up residence during the warm weather 
months at Anderson Cottage, a home in northwest Washington, D.C., on the 
grounds of a site then known as the Soldiers' Home. It is estimated that 
President Lincoln spent one quarter of his presidency at this home, 
riding out to it many evenings from late June until early November. The 
house and surrounding land are now part of the U.S. Soldiers' and 
Airmen's Home, a component of the Armed Forces Retirement Home, an 
independent establishment in the executive branch. This house and its 
grounds are objects of great historic significance and interest.
It was here, in September of 1862, that President Lincoln completed the 
drafting of the Emancipation Proclamation. His second floor bedroom and 
much of the rest of the house are configured as they were when he was in 
residence, and original mantels, woodwork, and windows are retained. A 
magnificent copper beech tree under which he read and relaxed is still 
growing at the site. It was also from this house that, in July of 1864, 
he

[[Page 124]]

traveled 2 miles north to view the battle of Fort Stevens, during which 
he actually came under fire as he stood beside the Union troops 
defending the capital. The house has been designated a National Historic 
Landmark by the National Park Service.
The land was purchased by the Federal Government through the Soldiers' 
Home Trust Fund in 1851 to establish a home for invalid and disabled 
soldiers of the U.S. Army, the first such attempt to provide for members 
of the regular army. The house was first used as a summer retreat by 
President Buchanan from 1857 to 1860, and continued to be used as such 
by several presidents, including President Hayes from 1877 to 1880 and 
President Arthur from 1882 to 1884. It became known as Anderson Cottage 
in honor of Major Robert Anderson, the Union commanding officer at Fort 
Sumter at the outbreak of the Civil War.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of lands, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the President Lincoln 
and Soldiers' Home National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the President Lincoln and Soldiers' Home 
National Monument for the purpose of protecting the objects identified 
above, all lands and interests in lands owned or controlled by the 
United States within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
entitled ``President Lincoln and Soldiers' Home National Monument'' 
attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land 
and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 2.3 acres, which 
is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of 
the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land or other Federal laws, including but not limited to 
withdrawal from location, entry, and patent under the mining laws, and 
from disposition under all laws relating to mineral and geothermal 
leasing.
The monument historically has been a part of the U.S. Soldiers' and 
Airmen's Home, a facility administered by the Armed Forces Retirement 
Home, an independent establishment of the Executive Branch. The Armed 
Forces Retirement Home, through the U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, 
shall manage the monument as an integral part of that surrounding 
facility and consistent with the purposes and provisions of this 
proclamation. In managing the monument, the Armed Forces Retirement Home 
shall consult with the Secretary of the Interior through the National 
Park Service.

[[Page 125]]

For the purpose of preserving, restoring, and enhancing the public's 
appreciation of the monument, the Armed Forces Retirement Home shall 
prepare, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior through the 
National Park Service, a management plan for this monument within 3 
years of this date. Further, to the extent authorized, the Armed Forces 
Retirement Home shall promulgate, in consultation with the Secretary of 
the Interior through the National Park Service, regulations for the 
proper care and management of the objects identified above.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation. Warning is hereby given to 
all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove 
any feature of this monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the 
lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of 
July, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD13JY00.050


[[Page 127]]


Proclamation 7330 of July 14, 2000

Captive Nations Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

When President Eisenhower signed the first Captive Nations Week 
Proclamation in 1959, the fate of freedom around the world was still far 
from certain. While the United States and our Allies had defeated Adolf 
Hitler and the Axis Powers in World War II, a partitioned Berlin stood 
as a bleak symbol of a divided Europe, and millions throughout Asia, 
Africa, and South America continued to suffer under communist and 
authoritarian regimes.
Today, as we embark on a new century, democracy is on the rise across 
the globe. More than half the world's people live under governments of 
their own choosing. The Iron Curtain has been lifted, allowing the light 
of liberty into the nations of Central and Eastern Europe. Democratic 
rule has swept through the countries of Latin America, replacing abusive 
military regimes with elected civilian governments. And in Africa and 
Asia, many nations have finally gained independence.
This rising tide of freedom is no accident of history; it was achieved 
through the courage, determination, and sacrifice of millions of men and 
women here in America and in captive nations around the world. Whether 
speaking out in the halls of the United Nations for those silenced by 
oppressive regimes, standing guard through frigid nights on the DMZ in 
Korea, or sharing the fruits of liberty through the Peace Corps, 
generations of Americans have made sure that our country is an ally and 
source of hope for all people yearning for freedom and dignity. Around 
the globe, freedom-loving people have risked and often sacrificed their 
lives to end oppression, whether uniting against tyranny through the 
Solidarity movement in Poland or defying intimidation and violence to 
vote in free elections in El Salvador and Nicaragua.
The tide keeps turning toward democracy, human rights, and free market 
economies. Yet there remain tyrants who use brutality, ethnic cleansing, 
guns, and prisons to silence voices of reason and tolerance within their 
countries. As a Nation born of the ideals of freedom, justice, and human 
dignity, America has a solemn obligation to continue speaking out on 
behalf of these still-captive nations and their people and lend them our 
support. We draw strength for this task from the knowledge that our 
cause is right and inspiration from the people of former captive nations 
who are flourishing today.
The Congress, by Joint Resolution approved July 17, 1959 (73 Stat. 212), 
has authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation 
designating the third week in July of each year as ``Captive Nations 
Week.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim July 16 through July 22, 2000, as Captive 
Nations Week. I call upon the people of the United States to observe 
this week with appropriate ceremonies and activities and to rededicate 
ourselves to the principles of freedom, human rights, and self-
determination for all the peoples of the world.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
July, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7331 of July 21, 2000

Parents' Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Parents play a crucial role in shaping our lives and the life of our 
Nation. They nurture us as infants when we are unable to help ourselves, 
protect us as toddlers when we wander into trouble, encourage us as 
adolescents when we dream about the future, and guide us as adults as we 
face the challenges and opportunities of our own families and careers. 
It is through their care that we learn the invaluable lessons of love, 
family, and community; and it is through their selflessness that we come 
to understand the joy of making a difference in the life of another.
Throughout our Administration, Vice President Gore and I have strived to 
provide parents with the tools they need to meet their responsibilities. 
The Family and Medical Leave Act, which I signed in 1993, has allowed 
more than 20 million Americans to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to 
care for a newborn or an ailing relative without fear of losing their 
job. We have also worked to make child care safer, better, and more 
affordable for millions of families, and we have expanded preschool and 
after-school programs to give parents more flexibility in balancing the 
demands of job and family. And we have worked hard for parents to make 
the dream of a college education for their sons and daughters a 
reality--with new HOPE scholarships, more work-study opportunities, 
higher Pell grants, and more affordable student loans.
Parenting is a lifetime commitment and a lifetime challenge--it involves 
balancing the demands of family, friends, career, and community. Yet 
parenting is also one of life's greatest gifts. To hold one's sleeping 
baby, watch one's children take their first tottering steps and hear 
them say their first words, boast with pride about their first home run 
or first music recital, and witness firsthand their journey into 
adulthood--these are some of the most precious rewards of parenthood.
Only when we pass from childhood to adulthood can we appreciate the 
value of our parents and the extent of their sacrifices. For these, we 
owe our parents--whether biological or adoptive, stepparents or foster 
parents-- a profound debt of gratitude. On Parents' Day and throughout 
the year, let us pay tribute to America's parents, whose unconditional 
love and constant devotion have helped create a bright future for the 
next generation.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States and consistent with Public Law 103-362, do 
hereby proclaim Sunday, July 23, 2000, as Parents' Day. I call upon

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all Americans to join together in observing this day with appropriate 
ceremonies and activities to honor our Nation's parents.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-first day of 
July, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7332 of August 1, 2000

Helsinki Human Rights Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Twenty-five years ago today, in a world marked by brutal divisions and 
ideological conflict, the United States joined 33 European nations and 
Canada in signing the Helsinki Final Act. That watershed event 
established the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) 
and affirmed an international commitment to respect ``freedom of 
thought, conscience, religion or belief, for all without distinction as 
to race, sex, language, or religion.''
During the Cold War, the Helsinki Principles were the rallying point for 
courageous men and women who confronted tyranny--often at great personal 
risk--to win the fundamental freedoms set forth by the Final Act. Today, 
citizens of our vast Euro-Atlantic community from Vancouver to 
Vladivostok live by, or aspire to live, by those fundamental freedoms. 
The Helsinki Final Act has been instrumental in the progress we have 
made together toward building a Europe that is whole and free; a Europe 
where our partnership for peace is overcoming the possibility of war. 
The Helsinki Final Act continues to shape our vision for the future of 
transatlantic cooperation, and the Helsinki accords remain the basic 
definition of common goals and standards for how all countries in the 
new Europe should treat their citizens and one another.
The evolution of the CSCE into the Organization for Security and 
Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) reflects the changing face of Europe. The 
OSCE's integrated structure of commitments in the areas of human rights, 
economics, arms control, and conflict resolution provides a defining 
framework for a free and undivided Europe. The United States will 
continue to promote the OSCE's efforts to build security within and 
cooperation among democratic societies; to defuse conflicts; to battle 
corruption and organized crime; and to champion human rights, 
fundamental freedoms, and the rule of law throughout the Euro-Atlantic 
community. We remain committed to the OSCE's essential work of bringing 
peace and civil society back to Bosnia and Kosovo, and we are grateful 
to the many dedicated men and women engaged in the OSCE's field 
missions, who in many ways are our front line of conflict prevention in 
Europe.
Today, as we mark the 25th anniversary of the Helsinki Final Act, the 
United States takes pride in remembering our role as one of its original 
signatories--a ringing call for freedom and human dignity that played a 
deci

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sive role in lifting the Iron Curtain and ending the tragic division of 
Europe.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim August 1, 2000, as 
Helsinki Human Rights Day and reaffirm our Nation's support for the full 
implementation of the Helsinki Final Act. I urge the American people to 
observe this anniversary with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
activities that reflect our dedication to the noble principles of human 
rights and democracy. I also call upon the governments and peoples of 
all other signatory states to renew their commitment to comply with the 
principles established and consecrated in the Helsinki Final Act.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of 
August, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7333 of August 24, 2000

Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Today, America is enjoying the longest economic expansion in our 
history, with 22 million new jobs created since my Administration took 
office in 1993 and the lowest unemployment and inflation rates in more 
than 30 years. The American people are looking to the future with 
renewed hope and optimism, eager to embrace the exciting opportunities 
and meet the new challenges of a dynamic and evolving global 
marketplace.
If we are to extend this remarkable period of growth and sustain our 
leadership of the world economy, we must use this time of extraordinary 
prosperity to ensure that every citizen of our Nation plays a role in 
our economic growth and benefits from its rewards. One of the surest 
means of achieving that goal is to promote the full inclusion of 
minority enterprises in the mainstream of our economy.
My Administration has encouraged the growth and success of minority 
businesses by ensuring their participation in Government procurement; 
introducing the New Markets Initiative to bring jobs and capital to 
America's underserved communities; and strengthening the Community 
Reinvestment Act. Over the last 8 years, the Small Business 
Administration has guaranteed $18 billion in loans to more than 80,000 
minority-owned firms. And the Department of Commerce's Minority Business 
Development Agency (MBDA) has assisted more than 430,000 minority-owned 
businesses with start-up and expansion financing. At Minority Business 
Development Centers across the country, the MBDA also assists minority 
clients by providing a variety of business services, including the 
preparation of business plans, market research and development, 
financial counseling, and bid preparation.

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All Americans stand to benefit from the success of our minority 
entrepreneurs. With energy and determination, these hardworking men and 
women create jobs, attract investment, bolster pride, and generate 
revenue in communities across our Nation. People of different races, 
people of diverse ethnic backgrounds, people with disabilities--all have 
skills, new ideas, and fresh perspectives to bring to the marketplace. 
Minority entrepreneurs have unique contributions to make to our economy 
and the talent and imagination to produce goods and services that meet 
the needs of their fellow Americans and of consumers around the world.
The unprecedented strength of America's free enterprise system 
demonstrates that when people have access to the tools and opportunities 
they need, there is no limit to what they can achieve. During Minority 
Enterprise Development Week, let us reaffirm our national commitment to 
equality in the economic as well as the civic life of our Nation by 
providing minority entrepreneurs around the country with an equal 
opportunity to use their abilities, creativity, and motivation to move 
our Nation forward. By doing so, we will help preserve America's 
leadership in the global economy.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 24 through 
September 30, 2000, as Minority Enterprise Development Week. I call on 
all Americans to join together with minority entrepreneurs across the 
country in appropriate observances.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fourth day 
of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7334 of August 26, 2000

Women's Equality Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In March of 1776, 4 months before the signing of the Declaration of 
Independence, Abigail Adams sent a letter to her husband John in 
Philadelphia, where he was participating in the Second Continental 
Congress. ``...[I]n the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be 
necessary for you to make,'' she wrote, ``I desire you would Remember 
the Ladies, and be more generous and favourable to them than your 
ancestors.'' Almost a century and a half would pass before her desire 
was realized with the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the 
Constitution, guaranteeing women's suffrage.
The road to civic, economic, and social equality for women in our Nation 
has been long and arduous, marked by frustrations and setbacks, yet 
inspired by the courageous actions of many heroic Americans, women and 
men alike. Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, 
Lucretia Mott, Frederick Douglass, Lucy Stone--these and so many others

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refused to remain silent in the face of injustice. Speaking out at 
rallies, circulating pamphlets and petitions, lobbying State 
legislatures, risking public humiliation and even incarceration, 
suffragists slowly changed the minds of their fellow Americans and the 
laws of our Nation.
Thanks to their efforts, by the mid-19th century some States recognized 
the right of women to own property and to sign contracts independent of 
their spouses. In 1890, Wyoming became the first State to recognize a 
woman's right to vote. Thirty years later, the 19th Amendment made 
women's suffrage the law of the land. But it would take another 40 years 
to pass the Equal Pay Act of 1963, which promised women the same salary 
for performing the same jobs as men, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 
which outlawed employment discrimination based on gender. Another 8 
years would pass before Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 
assured American women equal opportunity in education and sports 
programs.
However, the promise of true equality has yet to be realized. Despite 
historic changes in laws and attitudes, a significant wage gap between 
men and women persists, in traditional sectors as well as in emerging 
fields, such as information technology. While employment of computer 
scientists, programmers, and operators has increased at a breathtaking 
rate--by 80 percent since 1983--fewer than one in three of these high-
wage jobs is filled by a woman. A recent report by the Council of 
Economic Advisers noted that, even after allowing for differences in 
education, age, and occupation, the wage gap between men and women in 
high-technology professions is still approximately 12 percent--a gap 
similar to that estimated in the labor market at large--and that, in 
both the old economy and the new, the gap is even wider for women of 
color.
To combat unfair pay practices and to close the wage gap between men and 
women once and for all, I have called on the Congress to support my 
Administration's Equal Pay Initiative and to pass the Paycheck Fairness 
Act. And in May of this year, I announced the creation of a new Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Equal Pay Task Force to empower 
EEOC field staff with the legal, technical, and investigatory support 
they need to pursue charges of pay discrimination and to take 
appropriate action whenever such discrimination occurs. I have also 
proposed in my fiscal 2001 budget an initiative under which the National 
Science Foundation will provide $20 million in grants to postsecondary 
institutions and other organizations to promote the full participation 
of women in the science and technology fields.
Today, a new century lies before us, offering us a fresh opportunity to 
make real the promise that Abigail Adams dreamed of more than two 
centuries ago. As we celebrate Women's Equality Day and the 80th 
anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, let us keep faith 
with our mothers, wives, sisters, and daughters by removing any 
lingering barriers in their path to true equality.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim August 26, 2000, as 
Women's Equality Day. I call upon the citizens of our great Nation to 
observe this day with appropriate programs and activities.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-sixth day of 
August, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7335 of August 27, 2000

To Modify Duty-Free Treatment Under the Generalized
System of Preferences

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Pursuant to sections 501 and 502 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended 
(the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2461 and 2462), the President is 
authorized to designate countries as beneficiary developing countries 
for purposes of the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP).
2. Pursuant to sections 501 and 502 of the 1974 Act, and having due 
regard for the eligibility criteria set forth therein, I have determined 
that it is appropriate to designate Nigeria as a beneficiary developing 
country for purposes of the GSP.
3. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the President 
to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS) 
the substance of the relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts 
affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the 
removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or 
other import restriction.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including but not limited to 
title V and section 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to reflect in the HTS the addition of Nigeria as a 
beneficiary country under the GSP, general note 4(a) to the HTS is 
modified by adding ``Nigeria'' to the list of independent countries, 
effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse 
for consumption, on or after the date of signature of this proclamation.
    (2) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive Orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day 
of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7336 of August 31, 2000

America Goes Back to School, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

For America's students, the new school year is a time for learning 
lessons, making friends, and setting goals. For America's parents, it is 
a time to focus on the role education plays in their children's lives 
and future. And for our Nation, it is a time to strengthen our efforts 
to improve the quality of education and to make America's schools safe, 
nurturing places where children can reach their full potential.
This year a record 53 million young people will fill our schools--the 
highest enrollment in our Nation's history--and communities across the 
country are struggling to provide adequate classroom space and to hire 
qualified teachers to meet students' needs. To assist local school 
districts in meeting these critical challenges, my Administration's 
proposed education budget for fiscal 2001 includes tax credits and loans 
to help communities build and modernize 6,000 schools and to make 
emergency repairs to another 25,000. We have also requested an 
additional $1.75 billion to meet our goal of hiring 100,000 qualified 
teachers to reduce class size in the early grades and $1 billion in new 
funds to recruit and train high-quality teachers for every grade level. 
And we have proposed dramatic increases in the Federal investment in 
after-school and summer school programs, safe and drug-free schools, and 
support to help States and districts to turn around failing schools. 
These critical investments, coupled with my Administration's ongoing 
commitment to high standards and accountability, will help children 
across the country reach their full potential.
While the Federal Government has an important role to play in improving 
the quality of American education, it is the efforts of local school 
boards, families, and communities, working together, that make the 
crucial difference in preparing our children for the future. Parents who 
read with their children, monitor homework and out-of-school activities, 
demand high academic standards and challenging coursework, and encourage 
greater community support and investment in school activities have an 
enormous impact on their children's academic success. Similarly, 
businesses with family-friendly leave policies, community organizations 
that offer after-school programs, libraries that provide access to 
computers and educational software, volunteers who help children read or 
who serve as mentors--all of these people and programs help create 
supportive environments that enable students to make the most of their 
education.
America Goes Back to School is a nationwide initiative, in partnership 
with the Department of Education, to encourage and support family and 
community involvement in improving children's learning. The initiative's 
theme, ``Challenge Our Students and They Will Soar,'' reflects the 
importance of setting high expectations for America's young people and 
reminds us that we each have a role to play in providing our Nation's 
students with the schools, teachers, and standards they need to achieve 
their dreams and succeed in this new century.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitu

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tion and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 4 
through September 10, 2000, as a time when America Goes Back to School. 
I encourage parents, schools, community and State leaders, businesses, 
civic and religious organizations, and the people of the United States 
to observe this period with appropriate ceremonies and activities 
expressing support for high academic standards and promoting family and 
community involvement in providing a quality education for every child.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of 
August, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence of 
the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7337 of September 5, 2000

Health in Aging Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

At the beginning of the 20th century, there were only 3 million older 
Americans; today, at the dawn of the 21st century, there are 34 million 
older citizens in our Nation, and we anticipate that, by the year 2050, 
one in four Americans will be 65 or older. We can be grateful that 
because of extraordinary advances in medicine, technology, and science, 
as well as increased public awareness of the importance of good 
nutrition and physical fitness, these older citizens are now living 
longer, more active, more productive lives than any previous generation.
The dramatic increase in the life span of our citizens, however, 
presents us with new challenges. While Americans are no longer dying 
from many of the diseases that affected previous generations, they must 
now contend with chronic conditions such as arthritis, osteoporosis, 
heart and lung disease, dementia, and stroke. These conditions are major 
causes of disability and death in our Nation, and their financial 
impact, in terms of medication, treatment, and long-term care costs, can 
be crushing. Older Americans now pay an average of more than $1,200 a 
year for prescription drugs, up from $559 in 1992, and that amount is 
projected to increase to more than $2,800 over the next decade. Millions 
of these older citizens have no prescription drug coverage at all, and 
millions more have expensive, inadequate coverage or are at risk of 
losing what coverage they have.
My Administration has taken a number of important actions to meet these 
new challenges. We have proposed a new affordable Medicare prescription 
drug benefit option available to all beneficiaries. This new benefit 
should ensure that every beneficiary, whether covered under Medicare, 
managed care, or a retiree health plan, will be able to access 
prescription drug coverage, including protection against catastrophic 
drug costs. We have also proposed an initiative to assist millions of 
older Americans and their families in meeting the financial challenges 
of long-term care, including a $3,000 tax credit for people with long-
term care needs or their caregivers and improved equity in Medicaid 
eligibility for people living in home- and community-based settings 
rather than nursing facilities.

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We are continuing our research efforts into chronic conditions that 
affect older Americans, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's 
disease, and diabetes, and I am proud that my proposed budget for fiscal 
2001 includes a historic $1 billion increase in funding for the National 
Institutes of Health. And, most important, we remain committed to 
meeting the health and financial needs of older Americans by protecting 
and strengthening Social Security and Medicare and modernizing, 
improving, and reauthorizing the Older Americans Act.
But there is still much to do if we are to sustain the health and 
quality of life of our increasingly aging population. We must raise 
awareness of the unique needs of older Americans and ensure that 
caregivers and health professionals are specially trained to treat the 
elderly. We must expand our research efforts into chronic conditions 
that affect older Americans. And we must improve health care financing, 
delivery, and administrative structures so that health plans and 
providers have the flexibility they need to reduce the prevalence of 
chronic diseases, slow the rate of disability progression, and ensure 
the continuity and quality of care.
The health of older Americans varies from individual to individual and 
can depend on many factors, but we all recognize the critical importance 
of quality medical care, financial security, and a caring support system 
to sustaining a high quality of life. As our Nation's population ages, 
let us work together to ensure that these essential components of good 
health are available to every American.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2000 as Health 
in Aging Month, 2000. I urge government officials, health care 
providers, business and community leaders, and the American people to 
work together to promote healthy aging and to ensure that older citizens 
enjoy fulfilling, independent, and productive lives.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7338 of September 14, 2000

National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

American society today embraces a remarkable breadth of cultures, and 
Hispanics are an integral part of this diversity. The Hispanic American 
community is a collage of distinct groups, including people with roots 
in Central and South America, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Spain. 
Hispanics have been an important part of the history and heritage of the 
Americas since the earliest days of European colonization, and today 
Hispanic Americans are the youngest and fastest-growing minority 
community in our Na

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tion. Devoted to family, faith, country, and hard work, they bring 
unique perspectives and experiences to our national community and 
character.
The vibrant Hispanic influence can be seen in all aspects of American 
life and culture, from distinctive cuisine to colorful festivals, and 
from the rhythms and melodies of traditional music to the contagious 
beat of today's most popular songs. Throughout our Nation, Hispanic men 
and women have distinguished themselves in every endeavor and, with our 
cultural and linguistic ties to our trading partners throughout the 
Western Hemisphere, Hispanic Americans are crucial to maintaining our 
Nation's competitiveness and prosperity in the global economy of the 
21st century.
Not long ago I had the privilege of awarding the Presidential Medal of 
Freedom, our Nation's highest civilian honor, to Cruz Reynoso, a man who 
has devoted his life to promoting civil rights and championing equal 
opportunity for all our people. A son of Mexican immigrants, he has 
lived the American Dream, going to college and working his way up to 
become the first Hispanic American to serve on the California Supreme 
Court. A force for positive social change in our Nation, he is just one 
of many talented Hispanic Americans enriching our national life.
Cruz Reynoso's success underscores what we already know: education and 
equal opportunity are the keys to ensuring that people of Hispanic 
heritage can take full advantage of America's promise. My Administration 
has focused on improving educational opportunities for Hispanic children 
through the Hispanic Education Action Plan, as well as by reducing class 
sizes across our Nation, greatly expanding the Head Start program, 
working to turn around failing schools, and making college more 
affordable through tax incentives and scholarships. By expanding the 
Earned Income Tax Credit, raising the minimum wage, and moving people 
from welfare to work, my Administration has also helped expand economic 
opportunity for Hispanic American working families. We have brought the 
Hispanic unemployment rate to its lowest level on record and the 
Hispanic poverty rate to a 20-year low. We have also worked hard to 
create an Administration that truly reflects America, with the most 
Hispanic appointees and the most Hispanic judicial nominees in our 
Nation's history.
Even as Hispanic Americans grow in number and influence in our country, 
they have not forgotten their roots; they have not forgotten the pain of 
discrimination, of being ignored or left behind. Instead, millions of 
courageous and compassionate Hispanic men and women across our country 
are working to create a just and equal society, uniting around a firm 
commitment to build One America in this new century.
In honor of the many contributions that Hispanic Americans have made and 
continue to make to our Nation and culture, the Congress, by Public Law 
100-402, has authorized and requested the President to issue annually a 
proclamation designating September 15 through October 15 as ``National 
Hispanic Heritage Month.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim September 15 through October 15, 2000, as 
National Hispanic Heritage Month. I call upon all Americans to observe 
this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7339 of September 14, 2000

National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Rooted in the segregated South of more than a century ago, Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) for decades were the sole source 
of higher education for African Americans. Generations of African 
American educators, physicians, lawyers, scientists, and other 
professionals found at HBCUs the knowledge, experience, and 
encouragement they needed to reach their full potential. Over the years, 
HBCUs have compiled an enviable record of achievement, educating almost 
forty percent of our Nation's black college graduates. Today, building 
on that tradition of excellence in education, HBCUs confer the majority 
of bachelor's degrees and advanced degrees awarded to black students in 
the physical sciences, mathematics, computer science, engineering, and 
education.
And HBCUs have accomplished this record in the face of daunting 
challenges--including limited financial resources and a relatively high 
percentage of disadvantaged students--without resorting to high tuition 
fees. The faculty and staff of HBCUs have created a nurturing 
environment for their students, set high academic standards and 
expectations, and served as inspiring role models for the young people 
around them. As a result, the dropout rate at HBCUs is much lower than 
for African American students at other educational institutions, and 
enrollment remains high.
In addition to educating many of our Nation's most distinguished African 
American professionals, HBCUs reach out to improve the quality of life 
in surrounding communities. Whether renovating housing, providing job 
training, instituting Head Start and senior citizen programs, mentoring 
elementary and high school students, or teaching nutrition, the students 
and faculty of HBCUs share their time, talents, and educational 
resources to make a positive difference in thousands of lives. Just as 
important, HBCUs serve as living repositories of African American 
history and heritage, preserving the words and artifacts of proud 
generations of African Americans and reminding us of the crucial part 
these men and women have played in the history of our Nation.
For well over a century, HBCUs have made their mark as vital 
institutions of higher learning. They have educated millions of young 
people, and today they maintain their lead role in preparing African 
Americans and students of all races for the challenges and opportunities 
of this new century.

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 17 through 
September 23, 2000, as National Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities Week. I call upon the people of the United States, 
including government officials, educators, and administrators, to 
observe this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities 
honoring America's Historically Black Colleges and Universities and 
their graduates.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7340 of September 14, 2000

National POW/MIA Recognition Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the onset of the Korean War and 
the 25th anniversary of the end of the war in Vietnam. For many 
Americans, these milestones bring difficult memories; for former 
prisoners of war and the families of those still missing in action, 
these anniversaries evoke particularly painful memories and emotions.
In both of these conflicts, hundreds of thousands of brave Americans 
left their homes and families to defend freedom and democracy in the 
face of communist aggression. Thousands lost their lives in battle, and 
the fate of 10,000 Americans is still unknown--they are missing in 
action. We know that many Americans held captive were subjected to 
unspeakable horrors, but throughout maintained their honor, strong faith 
in our Nation, and indomitable spirit.
There are approximately 50,000 courageous former POWs living among us, 
including those held captive during World War II. Many still cope with 
the physical and emotional effects of their captivity. We owe a profound 
debt of gratitude to these quiet heroes who served our Nation so well 
and sacrificed so much. And to the families of those still missing in 
action, we pledge our unwavering commitment to achieve the fullest 
possible accounting for their loved ones and to seek the recovery, 
repatriation, and identification of the remains of those who have died.
On September 15, 2000, the flag of the National League of Families of 
American Prisoners of War and Missing in Southeast Asia, a black and 
white banner symbolizing America's missing service members and our 
unshakable resolve to ascertain their fate, will be flown over the White 
House, the U.S. Capitol, the Departments of State, Defense, and Veterans 
Affairs, the Selective Service System Headquarters, the Vietnam Veterans 
Memorial, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, national cemeteries, and 
other locations across our country--a powerful reminder to the world 
that we will keep faith with those who so faithfully served America.

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 15, 2000, as 
National POW/MIA Recognition Day. I call upon all Americans to join me 
in remembering former American prisoners of war who suffered the 
hardships of enemy captivity and those missing in action whose fate is 
still undetermined. I call upon Federal, State, and local government 
officials and private organizations to observe this day with appropriate 
ceremonies and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7341 of September 15, 2000

National Farm Safety and Health Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Throughout history, America's farmers and ranchers have worked our land 
with skill, energy, and determination. They have endured floods and 
droughts, survived bitter winters and scorching summers, seen crops 
devastated by insects and livestock lost to disease. Through hard times 
and good times alike they have labored, making American agriculture the 
most efficient and productive source of food and fiber in the world.
Beyond the natural and economic challenges our Nation's agricultural 
workers face each year are the daily physical hazards associated with 
their profession, including handling livestock, using chemicals, and 
operating powerful machinery. To reduce the level of preventable 
workplace accidents that have taken such a toll on our country's 
agricultural communities, engineers and manufacturers have worked 
diligently to make farm equipment safer. Today, tractors and other farm 
machinery come with standard safety features such as rollover 
protection, bypass starting systems, and tamper-proof guarding and 
shielding.
However, designing safer farm machinery is only part of the solution. We 
must also ensure that agricultural workers are aware of the benefits of 
new safety features and that they strive to use and maintain them. 
Safety and health organizations are accomplishing this vital task by 
offering hands-on, interactive training programs in farming and ranching 
communities across the country. Through safety day camps and farm safety 
programs targeted specifically for children and adolescents growing up 
on farms and ranches, they are helping to protect the well-being of the 
most vulnerable members of our agricultural communities.
My Administration is also working hard to improve the health and safety 
of rural Americans. For example, we created the E-rate program, which, 
among other things, secures low-cost Internet connections for rural 
health clinics and hospitals. We have also urged the Congress to fund a 
meaning

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ful Medicare prescription drug benefit that would provide affordable, 
dependable coverage to all beneficiaries, including more than 9 million 
Medicare beneficiaries in rural communities across the Nation. Compared 
to their urban counterparts, rural beneficiaries have lower incomes and 
more limited access to pharmacies, and are less likely to have any 
prescription drug coverage. Rural beneficiaries generally pay more for 
prescription drugs than urban beneficiaries and are more likely to go 
without needed medication because of its expense. Meaningful drug 
coverage for Medicare beneficiaries would help improve the health and 
quality of life of millions of older members of our Nation's farming and 
ranching communities.
All Americans owe a debt of gratitude to our country's farmers and 
ranchers, whose hard work puts food on our tables and helps ensure our 
Nation's leadership of the global economy. We can best acknowledge that 
debt by recognizing the importance of continually improving the health 
and safety of America's agricultural workers, not only during this 
special observance, but also throughout the year.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 17 through 
September 23, 2000, as National Farm Safety and Health Week. I call upon 
government agencies, organizations, and businesses that serve our 
agricultural sector to strengthen their efforts to promote safety and 
health programs among our Nation's farm and ranch workers. I ask 
agricultural workers to take advantage of the diverse educational and 
training programs and technical advancements that can help them avoid 
injury and illness. I also call upon our Nation to recognize Wednesday, 
September 20, 2000, as a day to focus on the risks facing young people 
on farms and ranches. Finally, I call upon the citizens of our Nation to 
reflect on the bounty we enjoy thanks to the labor and dedication of 
agricultural workers across our land.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7342 of September 15, 2000

Ovarian Cancer Awareness Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Ovarian cancer is one of the deadliest cancers affecting American women 
today. This year alone, 14,000 women will die from ovarian cancer, and 
more than 23,000 will be diagnosed with the disease. While ovarian 
cancer is very treatable when detected early, currently 75 percent of 
new cases are not diagnosed until the disease is in its late stages of 
development, when treatment is less effective. With early detection, 
women have a survival rate of over 90 percent; diagnosis in its later 
stages, however, dramatically reduces the chances of survival to just 25 
percent.

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Unfortunately, there is still no reliable and quick screening test for 
ovarian cancer like the Pap smear for cervical cancer or the mammogram 
for breast cancer. In addition, its symptoms--such as abdominal 
discomfort or bloating, cramps, unaccountable weight gain or loss, 
abnormal bleeding--can often be mistaken for signs of less serious 
conditions. Consequently, raising awareness of risk factors for ovarian 
cancer is a crucial weapon in our effort to save lives. While every 
woman has the potential to develop ovarian cancer, the risk is higher 
for those who have never given birth; who are over the age of 50; or who 
have a family history of ovarian, breast, or colon cancer.
Research into the causes and treatment of ovarian cancer still offers us 
the best hope for progress in defeating this disease that has taken such 
a deadly toll on American families. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) 
is currently sponsoring a large-scale cancer screening trial to explore, 
among other issues, the usefulness of testing women's blood for 
abnormally high levels of CA-125, a substance known as a tumor marker, 
which is often discovered in higher than normal amounts in the blood of 
women with ovarian cancer. Researchers are also evaluating the 
effectiveness of ultrasound testing as a tool for early detection. To 
learn more about the genetic causes of ovarian cancer, the NCI's Cancer 
Genetics Network has established registries to track cancers within 
families to identify possible inherited risks.
As with every disease, knowledge is crucial to overcoming ovarian 
cancer. Ovarian Cancer Awareness Week offers us an invaluable 
opportunity to educate Americans about the symptoms and risk factors of 
the disease, to alert health care providers about the need for vigilance 
in recognizing those symptoms and risks early, and to promote increased 
funding for research into more effective methods of diagnosis and 
treatment. The more we know about ovarian cancer, the more women and 
their families can live out their lives free from the shadow of this 
devastating disease.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 17 through 
September 23, 2000, as Ovarian Cancer Awareness Week. I encourage the 
American people to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and 
activities that raise awareness of the need for early diagnosis and 
treatment of this deadly disease.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7343 of September 17, 2000

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In the spring of 1787, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander 
Hamilton, James Madison, and other prominent leaders gathered once again 
in Philadelphia to offset a looming crisis in the life of our young 
democracy. The Articles of Confederation, a blueprint for government 
that they had hammered out in the Second Continental Congress in 1777, 
had proved too weak and ineffective to achieve a balance of power 
between the new Federal Government and the States. Rising to this fresh 
challenge, our founders crafted a new charter of government--the United 
States Constitution--that has proven to be a masterpiece of political 
philosophy.
Wise about human nature and wary of unlimited power, the authors of our 
Constitution created a government where power resides not with one 
person or institution but with three separate and equal branches of 
government. It guarantees for our citizens the right and responsibility 
to choose leaders through free elections, giving Americans the means to 
enact political change without resorting to violence, insurrection, or 
revolution. And, with its carefully crafted system of checks and 
balances, the Bill of Rights, and its process of amendment, the 
Constitution maintains an inspired balance between authority and freedom 
and between the ideals of unity and individual rights.
 For more than 200 years the Constitution has provided our Nation with 
the resilience to survive trying times and the flexibility to correct 
past injustices. At every turning point in our history, the letter and 
spirit of the Constitution have enabled us to reaffirm our union and 
expand the meaning of liberty. Its success can be measured by the 
millions of people who have left their homelands over the past two 
centuries to become American citizens. Its influence can be measured by 
the number and vigor of new democracies springing up across the globe.
In giving us the Constitution, our founders also gave us a powerful 
example of citizenship. They were deeply involved in governing our 
Nation and passionately committed to improving our society. The rights 
we sometimes take for granted today were secured by their courage and by 
the blood of patriots during the Revolutionary War. As we observe 
Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, let us remember that with the 
many gifts bestowed on us by the Constitution comes the responsibility 
to be informed and engaged citizens; to take an active role in the civic 
life of our communities and our country; and to uphold the ideals of 
unity and liberty that have sustained us since our earliest days as a 
Nation.
In commemoration of the signing of the Constitution and in recognition 
of the importance of active, responsible citizenship in preserving the 
Constitution's blessings for our Nation, the Congress, by joint 
resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 U.S.C. 106), designated September 17 
as ``Citizenship Day,'' and by joint resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 
U.S.C. 108), requested that the President proclaim the week beginning 
September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as ``Constitution 
Week.''

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim September 17, 2000, as Citizenship Day and 
September 17 through September 23, 2000, as Constitution Week. I call 
upon Federal, State, and local officials, as well as leaders of civic, 
educational, and religious organizations, to conduct meaningful 
ceremonies and programs in our schools, houses of worship, and other 
community centers to foster a greater understanding and appreciation of 
the Constitution and the rights and duties of citizenship. I also call 
on all citizens to rededicate themselves to the principles of the 
Constitution.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7344 of September 22, 2000

Gold Star Mother's Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

America's Armed Forces have stood watch over our freedom for more than 
two centuries. They have held posts on lonely ridges, spent long days 
and nights at sea, and faced danger in the skies. They have sacrificed 
their youth, their time, and even their lives to sustain the foundation 
on which our country was built and to protect the democratic values that 
keep our country strong and free.
The mothers of these courageous men and women have also bravely stood 
watch--in homes once filled with the laughter of children--and waited 
for word from their loved ones. When the guns of battle fell silent, 
many mothers' homes were once again filled with the boisterous commotion 
of their children returning from distant lands. But the homes of Gold 
Star Mothers remained silent. Their children had made the ultimate 
sacrifice for our Nation, and Gold Star Mothers were left with the 
profound sorrow of their heartbreaking loss.
But America's Gold Star Mothers rose above their personal tragedy, and 
today they continue to stand watch over our Nation. Reaching out to 
improve the lives of others and to ensure that the noble contributions 
of their sons and daughters are not forgotten, they are powerful 
examples of service and sacrifice for us all. With dignity, courage, and 
compassion, they have worked to promote patriotism, foster peace and 
goodwill, and extend a helping hand to veterans and those in need. Their 
generosity of spirit has touched the lives of countless Americans and 
made certain that the selflessness their children demonstrated in 
service to our country remains a prominent part of our national 
character.
For their steadfast devotion to duty and their unwavering commitment to 
carrying on the proud legacy of their children, we honor these Gold Star 
Mothers each year. The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115 of June 
23, 1936 (49 Stat. 1895), has designated the last Sunday in September as

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``Gold Star Mother's Day'' and has authorized and requested the 
President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, September 24, 2000, as Gold Star 
Mother's Day. I call upon all government officials to display the United 
States flag over government buildings on this solemn day. I also 
encourage the American people to display the flag and to hold 
appropriate meetings in their homes, places of worship, or other 
suitable places as a public expression of the sympathy and respect that 
our Nation holds for our Gold Star Mothers.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day 
of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7345 of September 22, 2000

National Older Workers Employment Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As a Nation, we are growing older, and so is our workforce. Today, there 
are 49 million workers in America aged 45 years or older--approximately 
35 percent of America's labor force--and by 2008, that number will grow 
to 62 million, or about 40 percent of the workforce. One in four 
Americans between the ages of 65 and 69 has at least a part-time job, 
and 80 percent of the ``baby boom'' generation intends to keep working 
past the age of 65. Increasingly, older Americans want to work, and for 
most, the opportunity to work adds not only to the length but also to 
the quality of their lives.
The abilities, experience, and strong work ethic of these older 
Americans are a precious resource for our Nation in today's strong 
economy. With the unemployment rate at its lowest level in more than a 
generation, businesses urgently need to hire more workers if they are to 
keep pace with the demand for their products and services. Too often 
overlooked or underutilized, older workers offer employers a broad and 
diverse pool of talent.
Recognizing the importance of older workers to our Nation and our 
economy, the Congress unanimously passed, and I was proud to sign into 
law, the Senior Citizens' Freedom to Work Act of 2000. This legislation 
eliminates the Social Security retirement earnings test, a provision 
that withheld benefits from Americans working beyond the age of 65. It 
allows older Americans to enjoy the extra income and personal 
fulfillment that work offers without being penalized, and it ensures 
that companies facing labor shortages will have a greater supply of 
experienced workers. The Act will also help our economy grow without 
inflation and encourage Americans to work longer, thus contributing more 
to the tax base and to the Social Security trust fund at precisely the 
time when the percentage of younger workers paying into the system will 
be decreasing.

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Older Americans have contributed much to the life of our Nation and to 
the extraordinary growth and prosperity we enjoy today. We owe them our 
respect and gratitude; we also owe them the opportunity to continue 
working as long as they desire. Through laws such as the Older Americans 
Act, which I have called on the Congress to reauthorize and strengthen, 
the Age Discrimination Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, 
and now the Senior Citizens' Freedom to Work Act, the United States 
Government guarantees that opportunity. And, through the Senior 
Community Service Employment Program at the Department of Labor and the 
Administration on Aging at the Department of Health and Human Services, 
older workers have access to the programs and services they need to 
continue making their own vital contributions to the American workplace.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 24 through 
September 30, 2000, as National Older Workers Employment Week. I urge 
employers across the Nation to recognize the energy and ability of older 
Americans and to develop new strategies for recruiting and utilizing 
older workers. I also encourage public officials responsible for job 
placement, training, and related services to intensify their efforts 
throughout the year to assist older workers in finding suitable jobs and 
training.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day 
of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7346 of September 29, 2000

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As we once again observe National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we can 
be heartened by the progress we have made in the battle against breast 
cancer. Today we have a better under standing of what causes the 
disease, and advances in research are leading to improvements in 
detection and diagnosis and to treatments that are improving patients' 
quality of life and chances of survival.
Two million Americans today are breast cancer survivors, thanks in large 
part to earlier detection and more effective treatments. Statistics from 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that nearly 70 
percent of women aged 50 and older have had a mammogram in the past 2 
years, compared with only 27 percent in 1987. While these increases were 
found among women at all income levels, those with lower incomes are 
still less likely to be screened than those at higher income levels. The 
National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Health Care Financing 
Administration are working together to inform women aged 65 and older 
that Medicare coverage is available for mammography screenings; and the 
CDC's National

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Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection provides free or low-cost 
mammograms to uninsured, low-income, and elderly women. And, to assist 
the thousands of low-income uninsured women whose breast cancer was 
detected through federally funded screening programs, my proposed budget 
for fiscal 2001 includes a new Medicaid option to fund the lifesaving 
follow-up treatment they need to increase their chances of survival.
Research is one of our most powerful tools in our effort to eradicate 
breast cancer, and I am proud that my Administration has made historic 
increases in funding for biomedical research. A number of Federal 
agencies and programs are adding to our knowledge about the disease. The 
National Toxicology Program (NTP), which is part of the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Services, is studying chemical 
compounds that may cause cancer in humans. Based on data from the NTP, 
agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and 
Drug Administration are working to reduce human exposure to environ 
mental agents that might increase the risk for breast and other cancers. 
The NCI, through the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project and the 
Triana Community Health Initiative, is exploring the possible 
relationship between different sources of pollution and the incidence of 
breast cancer. Findings from these studies will help researchers and 
health care providers identify women who are at higher risk for breast 
cancer and develop better strategies for preventing the disease.
The NCI's landmark Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) focused on 
tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen medication that helps reduce the chance that 
women who are at higher risk for breast cancer will develop the disease. 
Building on the success of the BCPT, a current study of tamoxifen and 
raloxifene will determine whether raloxifene is as effective as 
tamoxifen, with fewer side effects. The NCI is also sponsoring clinical 
trials of sentinel node biopsy, a procedure where the surgical removal 
of a small number of lymph nodes can determine whether cancer has spread 
outside of the breast.
The American people have also played a role in funding research through 
activities such as the purchase of the 40-cent breast cancer awareness 
stamp from the U.S. Postal Service. The sale of this stamp has raised 
millions of dollars for breast cancer research, and, on July 28 of this 
year, I was proud to sign legislation authorizing the sale of this 
special stamp for an additional 2 years.
We are gaining ground in our fight against breast cancer, but we cannot 
become complacent. This year alone, more than 40,000 Americans will die 
from the disease, and an estimated 184,200 new cases will be diagnosed. 
We must continue to raise awareness among our friends, loved ones, and 
fellow citizens about the importance of screening and early detection 
and the need to support new research. By doing so, we will one day 
triumph over this devastating disease and ensure a brighter, healthier 
future for our children.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2000 as National 
Breast Cancer Awareness Month. I call upon government officials, 
businesses, communities, health care professionals, educators, 
volunteers,

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and all the people of the United States to publicly reaffirm our 
Nation's strong and continuing commitment to controlling and curing 
breast cancer.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7347 of September 29, 2000

National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act and the 10th anniversary of the Americans 
with Disabilities Act (ADA). These two landmark civil rights laws have 
opened the doors of opportunity for people with disabilities and 
increased our awareness of the enormous contributions that Americans 
with disabilities can make to our national life.
A decade ago, when we were debating the Americans with Disabilities Act, 
critics said that making workplaces, public transportation, public 
facilities, and telecommunications more accessible would be too costly 
and burdensome. But they have been proved wrong. Since passage of the 
ADA in 1990, more than a million men and women with disabilities have 
entered the labor force and, as taxpayers, consumers, and workers, they 
are contributing to a period of unprecedented prosperity and record 
employment in our country.
Throughout my Administration, we have worked hard to break down the 
barriers that people with disabilities continue to face on a daily 
basis. In 1998, I signed the Workforce Investment Act, requiring that 
information technology purchased by the Federal Government be accessible 
to people with disabilities. In 1999, I was proud to sign the Ticket to 
Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act, which enables Americans with 
disabilities to retain their Medicare or Medicaid coverage when they go 
to work, because no one should have to choose between health care and a 
job. We are also dramatically expanding the income students with 
disabilities can earn while retaining access to disability benefits; and 
to lead by example, we are hiring more people with disabilities 
throughout the Federal Government.
Today's revolution in information and communications technology offers 
us powerful new tools to expand employment and training opportunities 
for people with disabilities. Whether translating web pages aloud for 
people who are blind or visually impaired, creating captioning for those 
who are deaf or hard of hearing, or enabling people with physical 
disabilities to control a computer through eye movement and brain waves, 
these technologies show enormous potential for increasing access to 
employment and full participation in society. We are exploring ways that 
Medicare and Medicaid can be enhanced to cover the cost of assistive 
technology so that

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people can live and work more independently in the communities of their 
choosing. And I was pleased to announce on September 21 that dozens of 
corporate leaders from the technology sector and the presidents of many 
of America's leading research universities have pledged to make their 
products and services accessible to and usable by people with 
disabilities.
A new generation of young people with disabilities is growing up in 
America today--graduating from high school, going to college, and 
preparing to participate fully in the workplace. They have a right to 
make the most of their potential, and our Nation must make the most of 
their intellect, talents, and abilities. By working together to break 
down barriers for Americans with disabilities, we will keep our economy 
growing, make a lasting investment in the future of our country, and 
uphold our fundamental commitment to justice and equality for all our 
people.
To recognize the enormous potential of individuals with disabilities and 
to encourage all Americans to work toward their full integration into 
the workforce, the Congress, by joint resolution approved August 11, 
1945, as amended (36 U.S.C. 121), has designated October of each year as 
``National Disability Employment Awareness Month.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim October 2000 as National Disability 
Employment Awareness Month. I call upon Government officials, educators, 
labor leaders, employers, and the people of the United States to observe 
this month with appropriate programs and activities that reaffirm our 
determination to fulfill the letter and spirit of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7348 of September 29, 2000

National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Domestic violence transcends all ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic 
boundaries. Its perpetrators abuse their victims both physically and 
mentally, and the effects of their attacks are far-reaching--weakening 
the very core of our communities. Domestic violence is particularly 
devastating because it so often occurs in the privacy of the home, which 
is meant to be a place of shelter and security. During the month of 
October, all Americans should contemplate the scars that domestic 
violence leaves on our society and what each of us can do to prevent it.
Because domestic violence usually takes place in private, many Americans 
may not realize how widespread it is. According to the National Violence 
Against Women Survey, conducted jointly by the Centers for Disease Con

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trol and Prevention and the National Institute of Justice, each year in 
the United States approximately 1.5 million women are raped and/or 
physically assaulted by their current or former husbands, partners, or 
boyfriends. Many of these women are victimized more than once over the 
course of a year. As unsettling as these statistics are, it is also 
disturbing to realize that the children of battered women frequently 
witness these attacks, thus becoming victims themselves.
My Administration has worked hard to reduce domestic violence in our 
Nation and to assist victims and their families. The cornerstone of our 
efforts has been the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), which the 
Congress passed with bipartisan support in 1994 and which I signed into 
law as part of our comprehensive crime control bill. This important 
piece of legislation, which contains a broad array of ground-breaking 
measures to combat violence against women, combines tough penalties with 
programs to prosecute offenders and provide assistance to women who are 
survivors of violence.
In the 6 years since I signed VAWA into law, the legislation has 
provided more than $1.6 billion to support prosecutors, law enforcement 
officials, courts, victim advocates, and intervention efforts. We have 
quadrupled funding for battered women's shelters, created the National 
Domestic Violence Hotline, and supported community outreach and 
prevention programs, children's counseling, and child protection 
services. The Department of Justice has awarded more than 900 
discretionary grants and 280 STOP (Services, Training, Officers, 
Prosecutors) Violence Against Women formula grants to help State, 
tribal, and local governments and community-based organizations 
establish specialized domestic violence and sexual assault units, train 
personnel, enforce laws, develop policies, assist victims of violence, 
and hold abusers accountable.
These VAWA programs are making a difference across the country. A recent 
report by the Bureau of Justice Statistics shows that the number of 
women experiencing violence at the hands of an intimate partner declined 
21 percent from 1993 to 1998. I call on the Congress to reauthorize and 
strengthen VAWA so that we may continue to build on the progress we have 
made in combating domestic violence in our Nation.
Through VAWA and other initiatives and programs, we are striving to 
create a responsive legal system in American communities that not only 
prevents domestic violence and sexual assault, but also ensures that 
every victim has immediate access to helpful information and emergency 
assistance. By taking strong public action against this crime, we are 
creating a society that promotes strong values, fosters a safe, loving 
home environment for every family, and refuses to tolerate domestic 
violence in any form.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2000 as National 
Domestic Violence Awareness Month. I call upon government officials, law 
enforcement agencies, health professionals, educators, community 
leaders, and the American people to join together to end the domestic 
violence that threatens so many of our people.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Inde

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pendence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7349 of September 29, 2000

Child Health Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As parents and as concerned citizens, we have a profound responsibility 
to ensure that America's children not only receive a healthy start in 
life, but also that they continue to grow and develop in a nurturing 
environment where they have the opportunity to reach their full 
potential.
Recognizing the importance of healthy, happy children to the future of 
our Nation, my Administration has strived to offer America's families 
the tools they need to fulfill their responsibilities. In 1997, I was 
proud to sign into law the Child Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the 
largest investment in children's health care since the creation of 
Medicaid 35 years ago. This innovative program allows States to use 
Federal funds to provide health insurance for children of working 
families whose incomes are too high to qualify for Medicaid but too low 
to afford private health insurance. Children with health insurance are 
more likely to receive the immunizations and other preventive care they 
need to avoid serious illnesses and to enjoy a healthier start in life. 
In March of 1997, only 4 States provided such coverage for children. 
Today, 30 States have plans approved to cover qualified children, and I 
have proposed an additional $5.5 billion over the next 10 years to cover 
even more children and to raise awareness of CHIP among families who may 
not realize they are eligible.
In addition to quality health care, children need nutritious meals every 
day. I am pleased that our national school lunch program provides 
healthy lunches to more than 25 million students in more than 96,000 
schools across our nation, ensuring that some of our most vulnerable 
children can look forward to at least one healthy meal each day. We can 
also be heartened to know that children enrolled in programs funded 
under the Department of Agriculture's Special Supplemental Program for 
Women, Infants, and Children not only receive the nutritious food they 
need, but also are immunized earlier, perform better in school, and 
spend less time in the doctor's office.
Since 1965, in addition to engaging parents in the early educational 
development of their children, the Head Start program has provided 
medical, mental health, nutrition, and dental services to more than 17 
million children from birth to age 5. My Administration will continue 
this investment by increasing Head Start funding in our proposed fiscal 
2001 budget by $1 billion--the largest Head Start expansion in history.
It is also our responsibility to ensure that our children feel part of a 
safe, strong, nurturing community. Through our Safe Schools/Healthy 
Students initiative, my Administration is helping parents, school 
principals, police,

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and mental health providers to collaborate on local solutions to school 
and youth violence. My proposed budget for fiscal 2001 includes an 
increase of more than $100 million for this program. I have also called 
on the Congress to allow eligible workers under the Family and Medical 
Leave Act to take up to 24 hours of additional leave each year to meet 
family obligations, including school activities such as parent-teacher 
conferences. America is enjoying a period of unprecedented economic 
success today; but we will never be truly successful as a Nation until 
we ensure that all families have the tools and opportunity they need in 
order to raise healthy children. To acknowledge the importance of our 
children's health, the Congress, by joint resolution approved May 18, 
1928, as amended (36 U.S.C. 105), has called for the designation of the 
first Monday in October as ``Child Health Day'' and has requested the 
President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim Monday, October 2, 2000, as Child Health 
Day. I call upon families, schools, communities, and governments to 
dedicate themselves to promoting and protecting the health and well-
being of all our children.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
September, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7350 of October 2, 2000

To Implement the African Growth and Opportunity Act and To Designate 
Eritrea as a Beneficiary Developing Country for Purposes of the 
Generalized System of Preferences

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Section 111(a) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of 
Public Law 106-200) (AGOA) amends Title V of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
amended (the ``1974 Act''), to provide, in new section 506A(a) (19 
U.S.C. 2466a(a)), that the President is authorized to designate 
countries listed in section 107 of the AGOA as ``beneficiary sub-Saharan 
African countries.''
2. Section 112(a) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(a)) provides that eligible 
textile and apparel articles that are imported directly into the customs 
territory of the United States from a beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
country shall enter the United States free of duty and free of 
quantitative limitations, provided that the country has satisfied the 
requirements of section 113(a) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3722(a)) relating 
to the establishment of procedures to protect against unlawful 
transshipments, and section 113(b)(1)(B) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 
3722(b)(1)(B)) relating to the implementation of procedures and 
requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of the North American Free 
Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

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3. Section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(b)(3)(B)) provides 
special rules for certain apparel articles imported from ``lesser 
developed beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries.''
4. Section 112(c) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(c)) provides that the 
President shall eliminate the existing quotas on textile and apparel 
articles imported into the United States (a) from Kenya within 30 days 
after that country adopts an effective visa system to prevent unlawful 
transshipment of textile and apparel articles and the use of counterfeit 
documents relating to the importation of the articles into the United 
States, and (b) from Mauritius within 30 days after that country adopts 
such a visa system.
5. In order to implement the tariff treatment provided under the AGOA, 
it is necessary to modify the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United 
States (HTS), thereby incorporating the substance of the relevant 
provisions of the AGOA.
6. Sections 501 and 502 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2461 and 2462) 
authorize the President to designate countries as beneficiary developing 
countries for purposes of the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP).
7. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the President 
to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant provisions of that 
Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, and actions 
thereunder, including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
8. I have determined that it is appropriate to authorize the United 
States Trade Representative (USTR) to perform the functions specified in 
sections 112(c) and 113(b)(1)(B) of the AGOA and to make the findings 
identified in section 113(a) of the AGOA and to perform certain 
functions under section 604 of the 1974 Act.
9. For Sierra Leone, I have determined that it is appropriate to 
authorize the USTR to determine the effective date of its designation as 
a beneficiary sub-Saharan African country.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, including section 301 of title 3, United 
States Code, sections 111, 112, and 113 of the AGOA, and sections 501, 
502, 506A, and 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to provide for the preferential treatment provided for 
in section 112(a) of the AGOA, the HTS is modified as provided in the 
Annex to this proclamation.
    (2) The following countries are designated as beneficiary sub-
Saharan African countries pursuant to section 506A(a) of the 1974 Act:
    Republic of Benin
    Republic of Botswana
    Republic of Cape Verde
    Republic of Cameroon
    Central African Republic
    Republic of Chad

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    Republic of Congo
    Republic of Djibouti
    State of Eritrea
    Ethiopia
    Gabonese Republic
    Republic of Ghana
    Republic of Guinea
    Republic of Guinea-Bissau
    Republic of Kenya
    Kingdom of Lesotho
    Republic of Madagascar
    Republic of Malawi
    Republic of Mali
    Islamic Republic of Mauritania
    Republic of Mauritius
    Republic of Mozambique
    Republic of Namibia
    Republic of Niger
    Federal Republic of Nigeria
    Republic of Rwanda
    Democratic Republic of So Tom and Principe
    Republic of Senegal
    Republic of Seychelles
    Republic of Sierra Leone
    Republic of South Africa
    United Republic of Tanzania
    Republic of Uganda
    Republic of Zambia
    (3) For purposes of section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA, the following 
designated beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries shall be considered 
lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries:
    Republic of Benin
    Republic of Cape Verde
    Republic of Cameroon
    Central African Republic
    Republic of Chad
    Republic of Congo

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    Republic of Djibouti
    State of Eritrea
    Ethiopia
    Republic of Ghana
    Republic of Guinea
    Republic of Guinea-Bissau
    Republic of Kenya
    Kingdom of Lesotho
    Republic of Madagascar
    Republic of Malawi
    Republic of Mali
    Islamic Republic of Mauritania
    Republic of Mozambique
    Republic of Niger
    Federal Republic of Nigeria
    Republic of Rwanda
    Democratic Republic of So Tom and Principe
    Republic of Senegal
    Republic of Sierra Leone
    United Republic of Tanzania
    Republic of Uganda
    Republic of Zambia
    (4) The USTR is authorized to determine whether each designated 
beneficiary sub-Saharan African country has satisfied the requirements 
of section 113(a) of the AGOA relating to the establishment of 
procedures to protect against unlawful transshipments and section 
113(b)(1)(B) of the AGOA relating to the implementation of procedures 
and requirements similar in all material respects to the relevant 
procedures and requirements under chapter 5 of the NAFTA. The 
determination or determinations of the USTR under this paragraph shall 
be set forth in a notice or notices that the USTR shall cause to be 
published in the Federal Register. Such notice or notices shall modify 
the HTS by listing the countries that satisfy the requirements of 
sections 113(a) and 113(b)(1)(B) of the AGOA. To implement such 
determination or determinations, the USTR is authorized to exercise the 
authority provided to the President under section 604 of the 1974 Act to 
embody modifications and technical or conforming changes in the HTS.
    (5) The USTR is authorized to determine whether Kenya and Mauritius 
have satisfied the requirements of section 112(c) of the AGOA. The 
determination or determinations of the USTR under this paragraph shall 
be set forth in a notice or notices that the USTR shall cause to be 
published in the Federal Register. Within 30 days after any such 
determination by the USTR, the USTR shall cause the existing quotas on 
textile and apparel arti

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cles imported into the United States from such country to be eliminated 
by direction to the appropriate agencies or departments. To implement 
such determination or determinations, the USTR is authorized to exercise 
the authority provided to the President under section 604 of the 1974 
Act to embody modifications and technical or conforming changes in the 
HTS.
    (6) The USTR is authorized to determine the effective date of the 
designation of the Republic of Sierra Leone as a beneficiary sub-Saharan 
African country and, therefore, the date upon which Sierra Leone will be 
considered a lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan African country. 
The determination of the USTR under this paragraph shall be set forth in 
a notice that the USTR shall cause to be published in the Federal 
Register. To implement such determination, the USTR is authorized to 
exercise the authority provided to the President under section 604 of 
the 1974 Act to embody modifications and technical or conforming changes 
in the HTS.
    (7) Pursuant to sections 501 and 502 of the 1974 Act, Eritrea is 
designated as a beneficiary developing country for purposes of the GSP.
    (8) In order to reflect in the HTS the designation of Eritrea as a 
beneficiary developing country under the GSP, general note 4(a) to the 
HTS is modified by inserting in alphabetical sequence ``Eritrea'' in the 
list of independent countries.
    (9) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (10) This proclamation is effective on the date of signature of this 
proclamation, except that (a) the modifications to the HTS made by the 
Annex to this proclamation, as further modified by any notice to be 
published in the Federal Register as described in paragraph 4 of this 
proclamation, shall be effective on the date announced by the USTR in 
such notice, and (b) the designation of the Republic of Sierra Leone as 
a beneficiary sub-Saharan African country shall be effective on the date 
announced by the USTR in the Federal Register.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7351 of October 2, 2000

To Implement the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade
Partnership Act

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Section 211 of the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership 
Act (Title II of Public Law 106-200) (CBTPA), which amends section 
213(b) of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 
2703(b)), provides that certain preferential tariff treatment may be 
provided to eligible articles that are the product of any country that 
the President designates as a ``CBTPA beneficiary country'' pursuant to 
section 213(b)(5)(B) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(5)(B)), provided 
that the President determines that the country has satisfied the 
requirements of section 213(b)(4)(A)(ii) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 
2703(b)(4)(A)(ii)) relating to the implementation of procedures and 
requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of the North American Free 
Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
2. Section 211 of the CBTPA, which amends section 213(b) of the CBERA 
(19 U.S.C. 2703(b)), provides that eligible textile and apparel articles 
of a designated CBTPA beneficiary country shall enter the United States 
free of duty and free of quantitative limitations, provided that the 
President determines that the country has satisfied the requirements of 
section 213(b)(4)(A)(ii) of the CBERA relating to the implementation of 
procedures and requirements similar to those in chapter 5 of the NAFTA.
3. Section 212 of the CBTPA, which amends section 213(a) of the CBERA 
(19 U.S.C. 2703(a)), provides duty-free treatment for certain liqueurs 
and spirituous beverages produced in Canada from rum that originates in 
a designated beneficiary country or the Virgin Islands of the United 
States.
4. In order to implement the tariff treatment provided under the CBTPA, 
it is necessary to modify the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United 
States (HTS), thereby incorporating the substance of the relevant 
provisions of the CBTPA.
5. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974 (the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 
2483) authorizes the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import 
treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
restriction.
6. I have determined that it is appropriate to authorize the United 
States Trade Representative (USTR) to perform the functions specified in 
section 213(b)(4)(A)(ii) of the CBERA and certain functions under 
section 604 of the 1974 Act.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, including section 301 of title 3, United 
States Code, sections 211 and 212 of the CBTPA, section 213 of the 
CBERA, and section 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:

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    (1) In order to provide for the preferential treatment provided for 
in section 213 of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703), as amended by the CBTPA, 
the HTS is modified as provided in the Annex to this proclamation.
    (2) The following countries are designated as CBTPA beneficiary 
countries pursuant to section 213(b)(5)(B) of the CBERA:
    Antigua and Barbuda
    Aruba
    Bahamas
    Barbados
    Belize
    Costa Rica
    Dominica
    Dominican Republic
    El Salvador
    Grenada
    Guatemala
    Guyana
    Haiti
    Honduras
    Jamaica
    Montserrat
    Netherlands Antilles
    Nicaragua
    Panama
    St. Kitts and Nevis
    Saint Lucia
    Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
    Trinidad and Tobago
    British Virgin Islands
    (3) The USTR is authorized to determine whether each designated 
beneficiary country has satisfied the requirements of section 
213(b)(4)(A)(ii) of the CBERA relating to the implementation of 
procedures and requirements similar in all material respects to the 
relevant procedures and requirements under chapter 5 of the NAFTA. To 
implement such determination or determinations, the USTR is authorized 
to exercise the authority provided to the President under section 604 of 
the 1974 Act to embody modifications and technical or conforming changes 
in the HTS. The determination or determinations of the USTR under this 
paragraph shall be set forth in a notice or notices that the USTR shall 
cause to be published in the Federal Register. Such notice or notices 
shall modify general note 17 of the HTS by listing the countries that 
satisfy the requirements of section 213(b)(4)(A)(ii) of the CBERA.

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    (4) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (5) This proclamation is effective on the date of signature of this 
proclamation, except that the modifications to the HTS made by the Annex 
to this proclamation, as further modified by any notice to be published 
in the Federal Register as described in paragraph 3 of this 
proclamation, shall be effective on the date announced by the USTR in 
such notice.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7352 of October 5, 2000

German-American Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As we celebrate German-American Day and the many contributions that 
German Americans have made to our national community, we also mark the 
10th anniversary of German unification. The historic achievements of the 
last 10 years are all the more remarkable when we remember the dark days 
of the Cold War, a time when many citizens in Eastern Europe and around 
the globe lived under governments of oppression and tyranny. Nowhere was 
the threat more real than in West Berlin, where Americans and Germans 
stood together in defense of democracy and commitment to freedom. 
Ultimately, after almost three decades of division, the Berlin Wall came 
down and the people of Germany were reunited. Today, Americans and 
Germans are working together to ensure that democracy will be an abiding 
legacy for future generations throughout Europe.
Our present efforts are only the latest chapter of our shared history. 
In 1683, German Mennonites seeking religious tolerance landed near 
Philadelphia. Their arrival marked the beginning of waves of German 
immigration that would ebb and flow with the tides of history, 
ultimately bringing more than 7 million people to our shores. Today, 
nearly a quarter of all Americans can trace their ancestry back to their 
Germanic roots, and they continue to enrich our Nation with a proud 
heritage marked by a strong commitment to family, work, duty, and 
country.
Many prominent German Americans have strengthened our society through 
the years. Publisher Johann Peter Zenger championed freedom of the press 
in the early 18th century, and Thomas Nast's powerful cartoons increased 
public awareness of corruption within Tammany Hall in 19th-century New 
York. During the American Revolution, Baron de Kalb and Friedrich von 
Steuben fought valiantly for our freedom, just as Dwight Eisenhower and 
Chester Nimitz did in World War II. German Americans who have enriched 
America's cultural, scientific, and economic life include writers John 
Steinbeck and Erich Maria Remarque; physicists Albert Einstein and Maria 
Goeppert-Mayer; philosophers Hannah Arendt and Paul Tillich; and 
industrialists and business leaders John D. Rockefeller and John 
Wanamaker.
Behind the many well-known individuals who have played a prominent part 
in our history are millions of German immigrants whose names are not 
widely recognized, yet who profoundly shaped the America we know today. 
Industrious German Americans helped settle our cities and frontiers; 
defend democracy during times of conflict; promote our prosperity in 
times of peace; and preserve the bonds of family and heritage that our 
Nation shares with the people of Germany. As we celebrate German-
American Day and the 10th anniversary of German unification and look 
ahead to the promise of a new century, America recognizes with pride and 
gratitude the important role that German Americans continue to play in 
the life of our Nation and celebrates the strength of our friendship 
with Germany.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim Friday, October

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6, 2000, as German-American Day. I encourage all Americans to remember 
and celebrate the important contributions made to our country by our 
millions of citizens of German descent and to celebrate our close ties 
to the people of Germany.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7353 of October 6, 2000

Afterschool Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each weekday afternoon in America, the ringing of school bells signals 
not just the end of the school day, but also the beginning of a period 
when 8 to 15 million of our children are home alone. These so-called 
``latchkey'' children can be found in every American community, whether 
urban, suburban, or rural; they are the children of working parents who, 
for a variety of reasons, are unable to arrange or afford a better 
alternative. Not surprisingly, most juvenile crimes are committed and 
most children are likely to become victims of crime during the 5 or 6 
hours immediately after the school day ends.
Providing appropriate supervision for children after school is one of 
the more difficult challenges that working parents face. Recognizing 
this, my Administration has worked hard to provide parents with 
alternative afternoon activities for their children. Through our 21st 
Century Community Learning Centers program, under the leadership of 
Education Secretary Richard Riley, we are providing schools and 
community organizations with funding to create and expand learning 
opportunities for children in a drug-free, supervised environment. This 
program enables schools to stay open longer so that students have places 
to do their homework, receive counseling about the dangers of substance 
abuse, and participate with mentors in a wide array of academic and 
recreational activities that challenge their imagination and broaden 
their horizons.
In the 4 years since we created the 21st Century Community Learning 
Centers program, hundreds of thousands of children across our country 
have enrolled in safe and smart afterschool programs. My proposed budget 
for fiscal 2001 will more than double the Federal commitment to this 
program, enabling us to reach as many as 2.5 million students next year. 
These community learning centers provide America's parents with the 
comforting assurance that, while they are out earning a living, their 
children are participating in engaging and constructive afterschool 
activities.
To highlight the growing need for afterschool programs, the Afterschool 
Alliance--a partnership of public, private, and nonprofit organizations 
dedicated to raising awareness and expanding resources for afterschool 
programs--has announced a nationwide project called ``Lights On

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Afterschool!'' On October 12 of this year, schools, community centers, 
museums, libraries, and parks across the country will host activities to 
inform families about the places currently open to children after school 
and the need to provide additional centers where children can 
participate in engaging, stimulating activities until their parents 
return from work.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim the week of October 8 to 
October 14, 2000, as Afterschool Week. I encourage parents, students, 
educators, community and business leaders, and concerned citizens to 
participate in ``Lights On Afterschool!'' activities on Thursday, 
October 12. I also urge all Americans to recognize the importance of 
providing afterschool programs in their communities to promote the 
safety and well-being of our Nation's children.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7354 of October 6, 2000

Fire Prevention Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each year, fire takes a heavy toll on the lives and property of 
thousands of Americans. Approximately 100 firefighters and 4,000 
civilians die in fires annually; some 25,000 civilians sustain injuries 
and an average of $8 billion in property is destroyed. Last year alone, 
America's fire departments responded to almost 2 million fires. Most of 
these fires occurred in homes, as did 80 percent of last year's fire 
fatalities. It is clear from these tragic statistics that if we can 
better educate Americans about fire safety and prevention, we can save 
thousands of lives every year.
The most important lesson we can teach about fire is how rapidly it can 
spread. From the time a smoke alarm sounds in a typical home, a family 
may have as little as 2 minutes to escape safely. Knowing how to use 
those minutes wisely is the key to survival. I urge every American to 
develop and practice regularly a home fire escape plan that identifies 
two ways out of each room and establishes a meeting place where 
household members can reunite outside the home. In addition, it is 
crucial that smoke alarms be installed and properly maintained on every 
level of the home.
To raise public awareness of the importance of home fire escape plans, 
the National Fire Protection Association, in partnership with the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency through its United States Fire 
Administration and America's fire departments, launched a 3-year program 
in 1998 called ``Fire Drills: The Great Escape!'' To date, this program 
is credited with saving at least 58 lives. In support of this program, 
on Wednesday, October 11, at 7:00 p.m. local time, fire departments in 
communities across America

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will sound the alarm signaling the start of ``The Great Escape'' fire 
drill to test the effectiveness of families' fire escape plans. I 
encourage all Americans to participate in this important and potentially 
lifesaving event.
As we observe this week, let us also express our pride in and gratitude 
for the devoted service of our Nation's firefighters and emergency 
response personnel. They uphold our country's finest values--commitment 
and community, teamwork and trust, courage and sacrifice. Day in and day 
out, these extraordinary men and women put their lives on the line to 
protect our families and our property from the devastating effects of 
fire, and many of them pay the ultimate price for their devotion. We 
will honor their memory on Sunday, October 8, 2000, at the National 
Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service in Emmitsburg, Maryland.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 8 through October 
14, 2000, as Fire Prevention Week. I encourage the people of the United 
States to take an active role in fire prevention not only during this 
week, but also throughout the year. I call upon every citizen to pay 
tribute to our firefighters and emergency response personnel who have 
lost their lives or been injured in the line of duty and to those brave 
men and women who carry on their noble tradition of service.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7355 of October 6, 2000

National School Lunch Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

One of the best ways we can move forward as a society is to meet our 
obligations to our children. President Harry Truman recognized this 
profound responsibility when he signed the National School Lunch Act 
into law in 1946. The significance of this legislation went beyond the 
daily meal that children would receive; the National School Lunch 
Program firmly established the Federal Government's commitment to work 
in partnership with States, schools, and the agricultural community to 
administer a major program designed to improve children's diets and, in 
turn, their overall health and well-being.
Today, more than 96,000 schools serve lunches to over 27 million 
children every day--more than half of them for free or at a reduced 
price, so that no schoolchild in America, regardless of family income, 
need go hungry at lunchtime. We have also built on the program's success 
by establishing a number of child nutrition initiatives administered by 
the Department of Agriculture--from the School Breakfast Program, which 
helps ensure eligible children are ready to learn; to the Summer Food 
Service Program, which

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serves healthy meals and snacks to low-income children during long 
school vacations; to the Child and Adult Care Food Program, which 
provides nutritious meals and snacks to infants and young children in 
day care and to adults with physical or mental disabilities who are 
enrolled in adult day care. Most recently, we authorized funding through 
the Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act of 1998 to make snacks available 
to children and teenagers enrolled in after-school programs.
We can be proud that these school meal programs promote the well-being 
of some of our Nation's most vulnerable children by providing them with 
the nourishment they need to develop healthy bodies and sound minds. 
Nutritious meals help students reach their full potential by keeping 
them alert and attentive in the classroom. As both common sense and 
extensive scientific research confirm, a hungry child cannot focus on 
schoolwork as well as one who has been fed a nutritious meal.
The National School Lunch Program also offers us a valuable tool for 
identifying children who are eligible for health insurance under 
Medicaid or the State Children's Health Insurance Program. Since 60 
percent of children who lack adequate health coverage participate in the 
school lunch program, sharing eligibility information can improve our 
outreach efforts and bring us closer to our goal of universal health 
care for all of America's children. My proposed budget for fiscal 2001 
sets aside $345 million over 10 years to help schools share information 
with Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program so that 
we can enhance our efforts to reach eligible children and their 
families. In addition, this summer I announced an initiative to expand 
the school lunch program to the developing world. This initiative will 
make school lunches and breakfasts available in the poorest countries 
for the poorest children, helping students whose deficiencies in 
nutrition affect their cognitive development and attracting children who 
otherwise might never attend school.
As we observe National School Lunch Week this year, let us pay tribute 
to the thousands of State and local school food service professionals 
across America whose hard work and dedication make these programs a 
reality for our children; and let us acknowledge the important role 
school lunches play in the healthy development of so many students.
In recognition of the contributions of the National School Lunch Program 
to the health, education, and well-being of our Nation's children, the 
Congress, by joint resolution of October 9, 1962 (Public Law 87-780), 
has designated the week beginning the second Sunday in October of each 
year as ``National School Lunch Week'' and has requested the President 
to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim October 8 through October 14, 2000, as 
National School Lunch Week. I call upon all Americans to recognize those 
individuals whose efforts contribute so much to the success of our 
national child nutrition programs, whether at the Federal, State, or 
local level.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7356 of October 6, 2000

National Children's Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Children hold a special place in our lives, and raising healthy, happy 
children is the greatest success any parent can hope to achieve; it 
should also be an important goal of every member of society, because 
children are profoundly influenced by the people and environment around 
them. The strongest influence, of course, is often child's family; but 
good schools and nurturing communities also play a vital role in helping 
children reach their full potential.
Over the past 7-1/2 years, my Administration has worked with families 
and communities across the country to meet the needs of America's 
children, and we can be proud of what we have accomplished together. We 
have made education one of our highest priorities, to ensure that every 
child is empowered with the knowledge and skills necessary to achieve 
personal fulfillment and success. By expanding Head Start and Early Head 
Start for preschoolers; promoting high academic standards, smaller class 
sizes, teacher quality, and charter schools for primary and secondary 
school students; and providing loans, scholarships, and tax credits so 
that millions of young Americans can attend college, we are building a 
world-class education system that will serve our children well.
We have achieved other important legislative victories for children and 
families, including a $500 child tax credit, a $1 per hour increase in 
the minimum wage, expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit, passing the 
Family and Medical Leave Act, enacting the largest expansion of health 
insurance for children ever, and creating incentives to move more 
children from foster care to safe, loving, and permanent homes. As a 
result of these victories, the child poverty rate in our country has 
dropped by 22 percent since 1993; millions of working parents have taken 
time off to care for a new child or sick relative; child immunization 
rates are at an all-time high, with 90 percent of toddlers receiving 
crucial vaccinations; and adoptions increased nearly 65 percent between 
1996 and 1999.
We have shown our commitment to ensuring that every child grows up in a 
safe and nurturing environment through additional measures such as teen 
pregnancy prevention efforts, welfare reform that moves families from 
economic dependency to self-sufficiency, expanded access to affordable 
housing and homeownership, and responsible fatherhood initiatives to 
ensure that fathers provide both the financial and emotional support 
their children need. And, to help working families provide for their 
children, we are continuing our efforts to improve access to high-
quality, safe, and affordable child care. We know that from infancy 
through adolescence, in child-care settings and after-school programs, 
children can learn and thrive with the right care, attention, and 
education. We owe them no less.
As we observe National Children's Day this year, let us recommit 
ourselves to using every resource in this time of unprecedented 
prosperity to build a bright future for all our children. Let us show 
our love for them not only through our words, but also by making the 
tough decisions and important

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investments necessary to give them the opportunity to achieve their 
dreams.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 8, 2000, as 
National Children's Day. I urge all Americans to express their love and 
appreciation for children on this day and every day throughout the year, 
and to work within their communities to nurture, love, and teach all our 
children. I invite Federal officials, State and local governments, and 
particularly all American families to join together in observing this 
day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities to honor our 
Nation's children.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7357 of October 6, 2000

Columbus Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

During this first year of the new century, the American people have 
devoted time and thought to the people and events of our Nation's past 
so that we might better prepare for the challenges of the future. While 
Christopher Columbus' epic voyage took place almost three centuries 
before the founding of our democracy, his journey helped shape our 
national experience and offers important lessons as we chart our own 
course for the 21st century.
One of the most valuable of those lessons is the importance of 
sustaining our spirit of adventure, our willingness to explore new 
concepts and new horizons. Columbus, after careful study and planning, 
rejected the conventional thinking of his time, sailed for the open 
seas, and succeeded in opening up a New World for the people of Europe. 
Like Columbus, our founders rejected the familiar paths of the past and 
ventured boldly to create a new form of government that has profoundly 
shaped world history. Explorers, pioneers, inventors, artists, 
entrepreneurs--all have found a refuge in America and a chance to 
achieve their dreams.
Today we have other worlds to explore--from the deepest oceans to the 
outermost reaches of space to the genetic code of human life. The same 
adventurous spirit that propelled Columbus' explorations will enable us 
to challenge old assumptions, acquire new knowledge, and broaden the 
horizons of humankind.
Columbus' story illustrates the importance of diversity. Columbus was 
born and raised in Italy; he learned much of his seafaring knowledge and 
experience from Portuguese sailors and navigators; and he put those 
skills in service to the King and Queen of Spain, who funded his 
explorations. By

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establishing a safe, reliable route between Europe and the New World, 
Columbus opened the door for subsequent explorers from Spain, France, 
and England and for the millions of immigrants who would be welcomed by 
America in later centuries. But the encounters between Columbus and 
other European explorers and the native peoples of the Western 
Hemisphere also underscore what can happen when cultures clash and when 
we are unable to understand and respect people who are different from 
us.
While more than 500 years have passed since Christopher Columbus first 
sailed to these shores, the lessons of his voyage are still with us. 
Brave, determined, open to new ideas and new experiences, in many ways 
he foreshadowed the character of the American people who honor him 
today.
In tribute to Columbus' many achievements, the Congress, by joint 
resolution of April 30, 1934 (48 Stat. 657), and an Act of June 28, 1968 
(82 Stat. 250), has requested the President to proclaim the second 
Monday in October of each year as ``Columbus Day.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim October 9, 2000, as Columbus Day. I call 
upon the people of the United States to observe this day with 
appropriate ceremonies and activities. I also direct that the flag of 
the United States be displayed on all public buildings on the appointed 
day in honor of Christopher Columbus.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7358 of October 6, 2000

Leif Erikson Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

This year, as we mark the beginning of a new millennium, we also 
celebrate the 1000th anniversary of Europe's first contact with North 
America. At the turn of the last millennium, the legendary explorer Leif 
Erikson--son of Iceland, grandson of Norway--sailed across the cold 
waters of the Atlantic from his home in Greenland to the eastern coast 
of North America, completing the first documented voyage of Europeans to 
the New World.
In the ensuing centuries, millions of other men and women followed the 
lead of these brave Vikings--some seeking riches, some seeking 
adventure, all in search of a new and better life. Families from 
Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Sweden, and Norway would make their new homes 
in communities like New Sweden, Delaware; Oslo, Minnesota; and Denmark, 
Iowa, bringing with them a reverence for freedom and a deep love of 
democracy that stemmed from their own egalitarian traditions. More than 
10 million Americans today can trace their roots to the Nordic 
countries, and their family ties, traditions, and values have 
strengthened the warm friendship our Nation has always enjoyed with the 
people of Scandinavia.

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In celebration of this friendship and our shared pride in Leif Erikson's 
exploits, Americans have joined with the Nordic countries to commemorate 
this special anniversary. The Smithsonian Institution sponsored a 
traveling exhibit earlier this year to highlight the Viking explorations 
of North America; the Library of Congress hosted an international 
symposium on the ancient texts of the Icelandic Sagas, many of which 
were displayed in the United States for the first time; and we joined 
Iceland in creating our first jointly issued coin to commemorate Leif 
Erikson's historic voyage.
These cultural initiatives reflect the strong ties and long history 
between the United States and the Nordic countries, and we continue to 
cooperate on many mutual goals. The Nordic countries are our full 
partners in the Northern Europe Initiative (NEI), which we launched in 
1997 to build on the dramatic progress toward a free Europe that 
occurred following the break-up of the Soviet Union. Through the NEI, we 
are working together to promote democracy, stability, and prosperity in 
the Baltic nations and northwest Russia, to facilitate their fuller 
integration into Western institutions, and to cooperate on such cross-
border issues as energy, health, law enforcement, and the environment. 
In addition, many of the best and brightest entrepreneurs in America and 
the Nordic countries are collaborating to encourage trade and the spread 
of innovative ideas and technologies around the world. Americans and 
Nordics alike value courage, independence, energy, and resourcefulness; 
working together in this new millennium, we are charting a new course 
for our people just as exciting and full of promise as the one Leif 
Erikson traveled a thousand years ago.
In honor of Leif Erikson and of our Nordic American heritage, the 
Congress, by joint resolution (Public Law 88-566) approved on September 
2, 1964, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim October 
9 of each year as ``Leif Erikson Day.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim Monday, October 9, 2000, as Leif Erikson 
Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate 
ceremonies, activities, and programs to honor our rich Nordic American 
heritage.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7359 of October 10, 2000

Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons Impeding 
the Peace Process in Sierra Leone

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In light of the longstanding political and humanitarian crisis in Sierra 
Leone, I have determined that it is in the interests of the United 
States to restrict the entry into the United States as immigrants and 
nonimmigrants

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of certain foreign nationals who plan, engage in, or benefit from 
activities that support the Revolutionary United Front or that otherwise 
impede the peace process in Sierra Leone, and the spouses, children of 
any age, and parents of such persons.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, by the power vested in me as 
President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of 
America, including section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
of 1952, as amended (8 U.S.C. 1182(f)), and section 301 of title 3, 
United States Code, hereby find that the unrestricted immigrant and 
nonimmigrant entry into the United States of persons described in 
section 1 of this proclamation would, except as provided for in section 
2 or 3 of this proclamation, be detrimental to the interests of the 
United States. I therefore hereby proclaim that:
Section 1. The entry into the United States as immigrants and 
nonimmigrants of persons who plan, engage in, or benefit from activities 
that support the Revolutionary United Front or that otherwise impede the 
peace process in Sierra Leone, and the spouses, children of any age, and 
parents of such persons, is hereby suspended.
Sec. 2. Section 1 shall not apply with respect to any person otherwise 
covered by section 1 where the entry of such person would not be 
contrary to the interests of the United States.
Sec. 3. Persons covered by sections 1 and 2 shall be identified pursuant 
to such procedures as the Secretary may establish under section 5 of 
this proclamation.
Sec. 4. Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to derogate from 
United States obligations under applicable international agreements.
Sec. 5. The Secretary of State shall have responsibility to implement 
this proclamation pursuant to such procedures as the Secretary may 
establish.
Sec. 6. This proclamation is effective immediately and shall remain in 
effect, in whole or in part, until such time as the Secretary of State 
determines that it is no longer necessary and should be terminated, in 
whole or in part. The Secretary of State's determination shall be 
effective upon publication of such determination in the Federal 
Register.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7360 of October 10, 2000

Eleanor Roosevelt Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Eleanor Roosevelt was one of the most influential figures of the 20th 
century, and her life spanned some of the most dramatic and challenging

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events in modern history. Steadfast in her commitment to America, 
democracy, and a world that honored human rights, she told Americans 
across the Nation, ``We are on trial to show what democracy means.'' 
Through the Great Depression, two world wars, the Holocaust, the 
creation of the United Nations, the Cold War, and the civil rights 
movement, her singular integrity and clear moral vision helped forge a 
better life for people around the world.
Eleanor Roosevelt was our longest-serving First Lady, and her dedicated 
efforts as a political leader, humanitarian, social activist, and 
journalist have made her an icon to millions. During the 12 years of 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Administration, she traveled tirelessly 
around the country, listening to the American people's problems, 
concerns, joys, and fears. She saw firsthand the ravages that poverty, 
greed, ignorance, and bigotry wreaked on the lives of ordinary 
Americans. She advocated strongly for our Nation's disadvantaged--urging 
an end to child labor, pushing for the establishment of a minimum wage, 
speaking out for workers' rights, confronting racial discrimination in 
New Deal programs, and encouraging greater power and independence for 
women in the workplace.
But perhaps her greatest achievement would come in the years after her 
husband's death. A delegate to the General Assembly of the newly created 
United Nations from 1945 to 1951, Eleanor Roosevelt was elected 
Chairperson of the U.N.'s Human Rights Commission in 1946. She played a 
pivotal role in drafting the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and 
its final language vividly reflects her humanitarian ideals and 
uncompromising commitment to the inherent worth of every human being. 
The first article of the Declaration, ``All human beings are born free 
and equal in dignity and rights,'' set the standard by which all future 
human rights charters would be judged.
Whether working for the United Nations, the NAACP, the Girl Scouts, the 
Presidential Commission on the Status of Women, or the National 
Conference of Christians and Jews, Eleanor Roosevelt devoted her 
boundless energy to creating a world defined by respect for and 
dedication to democratic values. She was a woman ahead of her time, and 
her achievements transcend her generation. As we seek to chart a steady 
course for America, democracy, and human rights in this new century, we 
need only look to her values, character, and accomplishments to provide 
us with an unfailing moral compass.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 11, 2000, the 
anniversary of her birthday, as Eleanor Roosevelt Day. I call upon 
government officials, educators, labor leaders, employers, diplomats, 
human rights activists, and citizens of the United States to observe 
this day with appropriate programs and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7361 of October 10, 2000

General Pulaski Memorial Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Each year on October 11, we solemnly pause to honor the life and 
achievements of Casimir Pulaski, a true hero whose devotion to liberty 
has inspired the gratitude of the American people for more than 200 
years.
Born to wealth and privilege in Poland, Pulaski sacrificed both by 
joining his father and brothers in the fight against tyranny and foreign 
oppression in his beloved homeland. His battlefield exploits earned him 
a leading position among Polish patriotic forces as well as renown and 
admiration throughout Europe. After years of braving insurmountable 
odds, however, Pulaski and his fellow freedom fighters were overwhelmed 
by enemy forces. Undaunted, he continued to battle for Poland's freedom 
while in exile in Turkey and France.
Impressed by Pulaski's military record and reverence for freedom, 
Benjamin Franklin wrote from his post in Paris to George Washington and 
succeeded in helping Pulaski secure a commission in the Continental 
Army. As a result of Pulaski's brave and able conduct at the battle of 
Brandywine Creek in 1777, the Continental Congress granted him a 
Brigadier General commission and the command of all Continental Army 
cavalry forces. For the next 2 years, General Pulaski contributed much 
to the American cause in the Revolutionary War through his battlefield 
expertise, mastery of cavalry tactics, and extraordinary courage. On 
October 9, 1779, Pulaski was gravely wounded at the siege of Savannah 
while leading patriot forces against fire from enemy batteries. He died 
2 days later, far from his beloved homeland and mourned by the brave 
Americans whose cause he had made his own.
Today, as both the United States and Poland enjoy freedom and growing 
prosperity and look forward to a bright future as friends and NATO 
allies, we remember with profound appreciation Casimir Pulaski's resolve 
and sacrifice and the generations of Poles and Americans like him who 
valiantly fought to secure the peace and liberty we enjoy today.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim Wednesday, October 11, 
2000, as General Pulaski Memorial Day. I encourage all Americans to 
commemorate this occasion with appropriate programs and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7362 of October 12, 2000

Death of American Servicemembers Aboard the United States Ship Cole

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As a mark of respect for those who died on the United States Ship COLE, 
I hereby order, by the authority vested in me as President of the United 
States by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff upon all 
public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, 
and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of 
Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and 
possessions until sunset, Monday, October 16, 2000. I also direct that 
the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same length of time at all 
United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other 
facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels 
and stations.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7363 of October 12, 2000

100th Anniversary of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

On October 12, 1900, the United States Navy commissioned its first 
submarine, the U.S.S. Holland. Few people realized that this vessel 
would be the first in a long line of innovative and technically 
sophisticated ships that would launch a new era in our national defense.
Although early-20th century submarines were small, cramped, and somewhat 
limited in use, a few visionary American naval leaders recognized their 
great potential as both offensive and defensive weapons. By the end of 
World War I, American submarines were patrolling our Nation's coasts and 
supporting Allied efforts to keep the sea lanes open along the European 
coast and around the British Isles. In the 1930s, thanks to the 
determination of submarine force leaders and notable improvements by 
ship designers and builders, U.S. submarines evolved into a powerful 
offensive force, equipped with enough fuel, food, and weapons to sustain 
long-range, independent, open-sea patrols.
In 1941, when Imperial Japanese forces destroyed much of the U.S. battle 
fleet in the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Navy Submarine 
Force stepped into the breach and played a pivotal role in winning the 
war in the Pacific. With submerged attacks during daylight hours and 
surface at

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tacks at night, U.S. submarines inflicted a devastating toll on the 
Japanese Imperial Navy and merchant marine. By war's end, our submarine 
force had sunk 30 percent of the enemy's naval force and 60 percent of 
their merchant ships. But this impressive victory came at a heavy price: 
the submarine force suffered the highest casualty rate of any component 
of the U.S. Armed Services. Of the 16,000 Americans who served in 
submarines during the war, more than 3,500 gave their lives.
As the Cold War dawned, the U.S. Submarine Force once again helped to 
turn the tide of history, this time by deterring war. In 1954, under the 
leadership of Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, nuclear power was introduced to 
the fleet on the U.S.S. Nautilus. Together with advances in hull design, 
silencing techniques, and sonic detection, nuclear power dramatically 
improved the speed, stealth, and range of U.S. submarines. By the 1960s, 
when ballistic missiles were successfully launched from submerged 
submarines, the U.S. Navy Submarine Force helped protect the Free World 
from Soviet aggression by conducting reconnaissance missions and by 
ensuring that the United States could retaliate effectively against any 
nuclear attack from the Soviet Union or its allies.
The end of the Cold War, however, did not bring an end to the challenges 
facing our submarine force, as the outbreak of regional disturbances 
replaced the threat of all-out nuclear conflict. Modern submarines, with 
their ability to remain submerged for long periods of time, excel at 
gathering timely and accurate information about potential trouble spots 
around the globe. Should the need arise, our submarine force can also 
exercise powerful offensive capabilities, as it did during Operation 
Desert Storm in Kuwait and Iraq and Operation Allied Force in Kosovo. 
Today's submariners continue to build on a proud tradition of service by 
protecting U.S. interests, defending our freedom and that of our allies, 
and helping to shape a more peaceful world in the 21st century.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 12, 2000, as the 
100th Anniversary of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force. I call upon all 
Americans to observe this centennial celebration with appropriate 
programs, ceremonies, and activities in honor of those patriots, past 
and present, who have played a part in the rich history of the U.S. Navy 
Submarine Force--from ship designers and builders to logisticians and 
support personnel to submarine crews and their families--and in tribute 
to those who gave their lives for our freedom. Because of the vision, 
dedication, courage, and selflessness of generations of these brave 
Americans, the United States today has a submarine force second to none, 
whose unprecedented contributions to intelligence, deterrence, and 
offensive military capability will continue to serve as a strong pillar 
of our Nation's security in the years to come.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7364 of October 16, 2000

Amending Proclamation 7362, Display of the Flag at Half-Staff as a Mark 
of Respect for Those Who Died on the United States Ship Cole

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

By the authority vested in me as President of the United States by the 
Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order 
to extend the display of the flag at half-staff as a mark of respect for 
those who died on the United States Ship COLE, it is hereby ordered that 
Proclamation 7362 of October 12, 2000, is amended by deleting in the 
first sentence the words ``Monday, October 16'' and inserting in their 
place the words ``Wednesday, October 18.''
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7365 of October 14, 2000

National Character Counts Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The term ``character'' is derived from an ancient Greek word meaning 
``to inscribe,'' reflecting the conviction that character is not innate, 
but rather is instilled through the influence, example, and guidance of 
the people around us. One of our greatest responsibilities as adults and 
citizens, therefore, is to ensure that we teach our children, by word 
and deed, the values that will help them develop into men and women of 
strong character.
This vital endeavor begins with the family and particularly with 
parents, who are their children's first teachers. The process continues 
in our schools--not only in the classroom, but also in the hallways, in 
the cafeteria, and on the playing field. We have many opportunities to 
instill in our children the elements of good character--citizenship, 
fairness, compassion, honesty, tolerance, and responsibility--and it is 
up to every citizen and organization to make the most of these 
opportunities.
My Administration has strived to assist parents, caregivers, teachers, 
and religious and community leaders in this vital effort. We have worked 
with the entertainment industry to increase educational programming on 
television and to create a voluntary ratings system to help parents 
reinforce the values they want to impart to their children. And 4 years 
ago, I was proud to sign legislation that requires new televisions sold 
in our country to include the V-chip, a device that allows parents to 
control the programs that their children watch on television. 
Recognizing the significant amount of

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time our children spend in school, we have also created partnerships 
with States under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to assist 
school districts in developing curriculum materials, providing teacher 
training, and integrating character education into the curriculum. We 
have funded innovative after-school programs to offer young people 
mentors and role models to inspire them and to engage them in productive 
activities at the end of the school day.
We have also promoted citizen service--one of the greatest character-
building tools available to our society. Through initiatives such as 
America Reads, the Corporation for National and Community Service, the 
National Senior Service Corps, the Peace Corps, and AmeriCorps, 
Americans of every age, background, gender, and race are experiencing 
the rewards of helping others, and in the process becoming more 
responsible citizens. We can also teach young Americans a vital lesson 
about character by exercising our right to vote and participating in the 
democratic process--a process that Americans of notable character 
established more than two centuries ago.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 15 through October 
21, 2000, as National Character Counts Week. I call upon the people of 
the United States, government officials, educators, religious, 
community, and business leaders to commemorate this week with 
appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7366 of October 14, 2000

National Forest Products Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In the early years of the 20th century, President Theodore Roosevelt 
challenged his fellow citizens to begin the vital task of conserving the 
precious natural resources with which America has been so abundantly 
blessed. As part of his notable conservation achievements, he 
consolidated 65 million acres of Federal forest reserves into the 
National Forest System and created the United States Forest Service to 
provide wise stewardship of these lands for future generations.
Today, the National Forest System comprises more than 190 million acres 
of forests and grasslands, a priceless remnant of the great wilderness 
that once stretched across our country. Whether sustaining ecosystems, 
supplying water, providing lumber, or offering recreation, these 
precious areas benefit millions of Americans.

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We must continue to sustain the health and beauty of the forestlands 
President Roosevelt first set aside for us so many decades ago. I am 
proud that my Administration has made significant progress in improving 
the management of Federal forestlands. With science-based planning and 
research, we have sought to achieve a balance between strengthening 
protections for wildlife and water quality and providing a steady, 
sustainable supply of the building materials, paper products, and other 
commodities we need to meet the challenges of our growing economy.
America's forests have always offered us unique and irreplaceable 
benefits. They are a treasured inheritance, and we must ensure in this 
new century that our policies and actions sustain this precious legacy 
for the prosperity and well-being of generations to come.
To recognize the importance of our forests in ensuring the long-term 
welfare of our Nation, the Congress, by Public Law 86-753 (36 U.S.C. 
123), has designated the week beginning on the third Sunday in October 
of each year as ``National Forest Products Week'' and has authorized and 
requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance of this 
week.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim October 15 through October 21, 2000, as 
National Forest Products Week. I call upon all Americans to observe this 
week with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7367 of October 14, 2000

White Cane Safety Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Last month at the Olympic Games in Sydney, American runner Marla Runyan 
made history in the women's 1500-meter race. She was not considered a 
favorite in the event and won no medals, placing ninth in the final 
competition. But as the first legally blind athlete ever to qualify for 
and compete in an Olympic event, Marla set an extraordinary precedent 
and proved to millions of people across the globe that disability need 
not be a limitation on achievement or a barrier to success.
Marla Runyan's accomplishment reflects the spirit of two historic pieces 
of legislation whose milestone anniversaries we celebrate this year. Ten 
years ago, the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law to 
guarantee access to public accommodations and services and to outlaw 
workplace discrimination for people with disabilities. Twenty-five years 
ago, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act became law, 
ensuring that people with disabilities have access to a free and 
appropriate public education. Both of these laws have made a significant 
impact on the lives of millions

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of Americans with disabilities by allowing them to pursue their dreams 
and make their own contributions to our society.
But even before passage of these landmark laws, the white cane was 
helping to open doors of opportunity for many blind and visually 
impaired Americans. With proper training, people using the white cane 
can enjoy greater mobility and safety by determining the location of 
curbs, steps, uneven pavement, and other physical obstacles in their 
path. The white cane has given them the freedom to travel independently 
to their schools and workplaces and to participate more fully in the 
life of their communities.
The white cane is a simple tool, but, like Marla Runyan's 
accomplishments, it reminds us that the only barriers against people 
with disabilities are discriminatory attitudes and practices that our 
society has too often placed in their way. As we observe White Cane 
Safety Day, let us reaffirm our commitment to building a society where 
we embrace the talents, energy, and contributions of every individual.
To honor the many achievements of blind and visually impaired citizens 
and to recognize the white cane's significance in advancing 
independence, the Congress, by joint resolution approved October 6, 
1964, has designated October 15 of each year as ``White Cane Safety 
Day.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 2000, as White Cane Safety Day. 
I call upon the people of the United States, government officials, 
educators, and business leaders to observe this day with appropriate 
programs, ceremonies, and activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7368 of October 20, 2000

National Day of Concern About Young People and Gun Violence, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Every day in America, approximately 10 children are shot and killed. 
Children 15 years old and younger are murdered with firearms at a higher 
rate in this country than in 25 other industrialized countries combined. 
These tragedies are an urgent reminder that we must not waver in our 
national commitment to reduce gun violence and to make our society safer 
for our children.
We are beginning to see some progress in our efforts. Since 1992, the 
national violent crime rate has dropped by more than 20 percent; violent 
crimes committed with firearms have dropped by 35 percent; and the 
firearms homicide rate has fallen over 40 percent. We have achieved much 
of

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this progress by embracing a collaborative, community-based approach to 
gun crime prevention and reduction.
Gun violence issues differ in each community, and no single program or 
approach works everywhere. In response to a directive I issued last year 
to help reduce gun violence and save lives, United States Attorneys and 
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Field Division Directors 
for each of our Nation's 94 Federal judicial districts have developed 
locally coordinated gun violence reduction strategies. Working closely 
with local law enforcement, elected officials, and other community 
leaders, they are tailoring plans to local needs and developing 
strategies to prevent gun crimes from occurring and crack down on gun 
criminals.
 A major goal of our strategy to reduce gun violence and ensure the 
safety of our children is to keep guns out of the wrong hands. We passed 
the Brady Act to help accomplish this goal by requiring that every 
person who purchases a firearm from a federally licensed dealer submit 
to a background check. To date, Brady background checks have prevented 
more than 536,000 felons and other prohibited individuals from acquiring 
firearms. We also succeeded in banning assault weapons, making ``zero 
tolerance'' for guns in schools the law of the land, and passing 
legislation that prohibits juveniles from possessing handguns. However, 
our determination to reduce gun violence must not stop there. I have 
called on the Congress to build on these measures by passing legislation 
that closes the gun show loophole, mandates child safety locks with 
every handgun sold, and bans large-capacity ammunition clips.
We have also provided funding for more than 100,000 community police 
officers; for the Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiative to reduce 
youth violence through collaborative, community-based efforts; and for 
the 21st Century Community Learning Centers--safe places where students 
can go after school to participate in constructive activities and avoid 
the dangers of guns, gangs, and drugs.
But none of these efforts can succeed without the commitment of 
America's youth. It takes courage to resist negative peer pressure; it 
takes character to settle disputes without resorting to violence; and it 
takes a sense of personal responsibility to tell an adult when others 
fail to live up to these standards. On this National Day of Concern, I 
ask every young American to sign a Student Pledge Against Gun Violence, 
which contains a solemn oath never to bring a gun to school, never to 
use a gun to settle a dispute, and to use their influence to keep others 
from using guns. By doing so, they will take an important, life-
affirming step toward a brighter and safer future.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 21, 2000, as a 
National Day of Concern About Young People and Gun Violence. On this 
day, I call upon young people in classrooms and communities across the 
United States to voluntarily sign the Student Pledge Against Gun 
Violence. I also call upon all Americans to commit themselves anew to 
helping our Nation's young people reject violence and to make our 
schools and neighborhoods safe places for learning and recreation.

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IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of 
October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7369 of October 24, 2000

United Nations Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Fifty-five years ago, the United States played a leading role in 
founding the United Nations, and the treaty creating the U.N. was signed 
in San Francisco. Today, we are proud to serve as host country for the 
United Nations, whose headquarters in New York City stands as an 
enduring symbol of the promise of international peace and cooperation.
The United States remains fully committed to the principles of the 
United Nations Charter, and we support efforts to make the U.N. a more 
effective tool to meet the challenges of our changing world. Many of 
those challenges--poverty, disease, ethnic violence, and regional 
conflict--recognize no borders and can only be addressed by nations 
working together with shared resources and common goals. The United 
Nations is uniquely positioned to facilitate such collaborative efforts.
Today, more than half the world's people live under governments of their 
own choosing, an achievement that reflects the role the U.N. has played 
as a steadfast peacemaker and staunch advocate of international human 
rights. But three- fourths of those people live in developing countries, 
and more than a billion of them live in abject poverty. Through agencies 
such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the U.N. is 
working to address this gap between the world's richest and poorest 
countries by supporting comprehensive debt relief and providing billions 
of dollars in loans and grants to developing nations for projects that 
promote health, nutrition, education, entrepreneurship, and civil 
society.
While the devastating world wars of the 20th century are now a part of 
history, ethnic and regional conflicts continue to threaten global 
stability and contribute to human misery. Millions of innocent people 
have lost their lives in such conflicts, and millions of families have 
been driven from their homelands to seek refuge in neighboring nations. 
Through its international diplomacy efforts, peacekeeping operations, 
and humanitarian assistance, the United Nations serves as a beacon of 
hope for countries torn apart by ethnic, religious, or regional strife.
In September of this year, the leaders of 189 countries came together in 
New York at the United Nations Millennium Summit. This unprecedented 
gathering of international leaders reaffirmed that the importance of the 
U.N.'s mission is undiminished after more than 5 decades of 
extraordinary challenge and global change.
As we observe United Nations Day this year, let us celebrate the spirit 
of international cooperation and dedication to peace enshrined in the 
U.N.

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Charter. For 55 years, the United Nations has led the world in 
addressing international security problems and promoting human rights 
and human dignity. Today we reaffirm our commitment to this vital 
institution and pledge to work with other member nations to ensure that 
the U.N. is equipped with the resources it needs to remain a powerful 
instrument of the international community and an effective force for the 
common good.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 24, 2000, as 
United Nations Day. I encourage all Americans to educate themselves 
about the activities and accomplishments of the United Nations and to 
observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, programs, and activities 
devoted to enhancing international cooperation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fourth day 
of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the 
Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-
fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7370 of November 5, 2000

National Family Caregivers Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

All Americans owe a debt of gratitude to the family caregivers among 
us--the generous, compassionate individuals who daily face the challenge 
of caring for loved ones who are frail, chronically ill, or living with 
disabilities that restrict their independence. These everyday heroes, 
living quietly among us in families and communities across the country, 
are the major source of long-term care in America. By providing billions 
of dollars' worth of caregiving services each year, they dramatically 
reduce the demands on our Nation's health care system and make an 
extraordinary contribution to the quality of life of their loved ones.
Caregivers often pay an emotional and physical price as well as a 
financial one. Few enjoy any free time because they must juggle the 
demands of home and work while meeting the special needs of the 
individuals in their care. Many do not have the support of other family 
members or friends and consequently experience depression, a sense of 
isolation, and the stress of knowing they must carry out their important 
duties alone. Studies have indicated that such caregiver stress can have 
a physical consequence, contributing to a higher mortality rate among 
elderly caregivers who themselves have a history of chronic illness.
But caregivers should not have to face their challenges alone, and my 
Administration has worked hard to ensure that they will not have to do 
so. I am pleased that the Congress has finally passed the Older 
Americans Act Amendments of 2000, which will strengthen and improve the 
services available to senior citizens in every State, from home-
delivered meals to transportation services to legal assistance. This 
legislation also includes au

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thorization for our new National Family Caregiver Support Program, which 
will provide quality respite care and other support services to hundreds 
of thousands of families who are struggling to care for loved ones.
The Long-Term Care Security Act that I signed into law in September 
authorizes the Office of Personnel Management to negotiate with private 
insurers to offer more affordable, high-quality, long-term care 
insurance policies to Federal employees, retirees, and their families. 
This initiative will help some 13 million Americans better prepare for 
the future and ease the fear of having to deplete their life savings to 
care for a loved one.
We must also help families who need long-term care assistance right now. 
I continue to call on the Congress to provide a $3,000 tax credit for 
the millions of Americans with long-term care needs and the families who 
care for them. Passage of a new, voluntary Medicare prescription drug 
benefit would also go a long way toward easing the financial burden on 
family caregivers.
Caregiving touches us all, either within our own families or within our 
communities. As we observe National Family Caregivers Month, let us 
thank the millions of devoted men and women across our Nation who enable 
our loved ones who are frail, chronically ill, or living with 
disabilities to live in dignity in the warmth and familiarity of home.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2000 as National 
Family Caregivers Month. I call upon all Americans to acknowledge and 
honor the contributions of caregivers to the quality of our national 
life.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7371 of November 7, 2000

National Adoption Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Families are the cornerstone of our Nation. Yet, today, tens of 
thousands of America's children are living within our child welfare 
system, without the sustained love and care of permanent families. For 
many of these children, often shuttled from one living situation to 
another, adoption opens the door to loving parents and permanent homes, 
where they can put down roots and learn what it means to be part of a 
safe, stable family. Adoption gives children who have been orphaned, 
abandoned, or abused a precious second chance at happiness; a chance to 
love and be loved and to reach their full potential in a secure, 
supportive environment.

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While foster care offers children a safe temporary haven, adoption 
allows children to have the permanent homes they deserve. That is why 
increasing the chances of adoption for children in the foster care 
system has been one of my Administration's chief goals. Over the last 8 
years, we have worked with the Congress to craft legislation that makes 
it easier, faster, and more affordable for parents to adopt children. 
Adoptive parents--like all new parents--can now take time off to care 
for their newly adopted children without fear of losing their jobs. We 
have ensured health coverage for adopted children with special needs, 
barred discrimination and delays of adoptions on the basis of race or 
ethnicity, provided tax cuts to families adopting children, and offered 
States financial incentives to move children more rapidly from foster 
care into the permanent homes of loving families.
We are beginning to see dramatic results from these efforts. Last year 
alone, 46,000 foster children were adopted--an increase of nearly 65 
percent since 1996. All 50 States, as well as the District of Columbia 
and Puerto Rico, have succeeded in increasing the number of children 
adopted from their child welfare systems. This puts us well on the way 
to meeting my goal of doubling the annual number of adoptions from 
28,000 in 1996 to 56,000 in 2002.
Despite our efforts, nearly 20,000 18-year-olds still leave foster care 
each year without the emotional, social, and financial support that 
adoptive families provide. To help them make the challenging transition 
to successful, independent adulthood, I signed the Foster Care 
Independence Act last year. This legislation provides young people who 
are growing too old for the foster care system with better educational 
opportunities and access to health care, training, housing assistance, 
counseling, and other services.
As we observe National Adoption Month, we should take pride in our 
progress, but realize that there is more work to be done. Let us 
recommit ourselves to giving our Nation's most vulnerable children what 
every child deserves and needs--a safe, stable home and a loving family. 
And let us also give thanks for the many generous and compassionate 
families who, through adoption, have opened their hearts and homes and 
changed a child's life forever.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2000 as National 
Adoption Month. I urge all Americans to observe this month with 
appropriate programs and activities to honor adoptive families and to 
participate in efforts to find permanent, loving homes for waiting 
children.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7372 of November 8, 2000

National American Indian Heritage Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians are a special 
part of the tapestry of our Nation's history. As keepers of a rich and 
ancient cultural heritage, Native Americans share with all of us the 
beauty of their art, the power of their songs, and the grace of their 
people. As individuals, they have distinguished themselves in virtually 
every field, from the arts to the sciences, from the world of sports to 
the world of commerce.
This month, we celebrate the culture and contributions of the first 
Americans. We also remember with sorrow the suffering they endured 
because of past Federal actions and policies that had long-term and 
often devastating consequences for Native Americans and their culture. 
But, as the new millennium dawns, there is reason for optimism. During 
my 1999 New Markets tour of the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota 
and my visit to the Navajo Nation in New Mexico in April of this year, I 
saw firsthand a strength of spirit and hope sweeping through Indian 
Country. The Vice President and I have worked with tribes to foster this 
hope--through economic development initiatives and improved education 
and health care.
We still have much to accomplish, however. While my Administration has 
worked hard to bridge the digital divide and bring the Information 
Superhighway to Indian Country, some areas still do not have telephone 
and power lines. We continue striving to provide American Indians with 
the tools they need to strengthen family and community life by fighting 
poverty, crime, alcohol and drug abuse, and domestic violence, and we 
are working with tribes to improve academic achievement and strengthen 
tribal colleges.
We are also seeking to ensure that tribal leaders have a voice equal to 
that of Federal and State officials in addressing issues of concern to 
all our citizens. I reaffirmed that commitment to tribal sovereignty and 
self-determination by issuing this month a revised Executive Order on 
Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments. This order 
builds on prior actions and strengthens our government-to-government 
relationship with Indian tribes by ensuring that all Executive 
departments and agencies consult with Indian tribes and respect tribal 
sovereignty as the agencies consider policy initiatives that affect 
Indian communities.
This year, my Administration proposed the largest budget increase ever 
for a comprehensive Native American initiative for health care, 
education, infrastructure, and economic development. Just last month, as 
part of the Department of the Interior appropriations legislation, I 
signed into law one segment of this budget initiative that includes 
significant investments for school construction in Indian Country and 
the largest funding increase ever for the Indian Health Service. These 
are the kinds of investments that will empower tribal communities to 
address an array of needs and, ultimately, to achieve a better standard 
of living.
Back in 1994, when I first met with the tribal leaders of more than 500 
Indian nations at the White House, I saw the strength and determination 
that

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have enabled Native Americans to overcome extraordinary barriers and 
protect their hard-won civil and political rights. Since then, by 
working together, we have established a new standard for Federal Indian 
policy--one that promotes an effective government-to-government 
relationship between the Federal Government and the tribes, and that 
seeks to ensure greater prosperity, self-reliance, and hope for all 
Native Americans. While we cannot erase the tragedies of the past, we 
can create a future where all of our country's people share in America's 
great promise.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2000 as National 
American Indian Heritage Month. I urge all Americans, as well as their 
elected representatives at the Federal, State, local, and tribal levels, 
to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
activities.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7373 of November 9, 2000

Boundary Enlargement of the Craters of the Moon National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

The Craters of the Moon National Monument was established on May 2, 1924 
(Presidential Proclamation 1694), for the purpose of protecting the 
unusual landscape of the Craters of the Moon lava field. This ``lunar'' 
landscape was thought to resemble that of the Moon and was described in 
the Proclamation as ``weird and scenic landscape peculiar to itself.'' 
The unusual scientific value of the expanded monument is the great 
diversity of exquisitely preserved volcanic features within a relatively 
small area. The expanded monument includes almost all the features of 
basaltic volcanism, including the craters, cones, lava flows, caves, and 
fissures of the 65-mile-long Great Rift, a geological feature that is 
comparable to the great rift zones of Iceland and Hawaii. It comprises 
the most diverse and geologically recent part of the lava terrain that 
covers the southern Snake River Plain, a broad lava plain made up of 
innumerable basalt lava flows that erupted during the past 5 million 
years.
Since 1924, the monument has been expanded and boundary adjustments made 
through four presidential proclamations issued pursuant to the 
Antiquities Act (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431). Presidential Proclamation 
1843 of July 23, 1928, expanded the monument to include certain springs 
for water supply and additional features of scientific interest. 
Presidential Proclamation 1916 of July 9, 1930, Presidential 
Proclamation 2499 of July 18, 1941, and Presidential Proclamation 3506 
of November 19, 1962, made further

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adjustments to the boundaries. In 1996, a minor boundary adjustment was 
made by section 205 of the Omnibus Parks and Public Lands Management Act 
of 1996 (Public Law 104-333, 110 Stat. 4093, 4106).
This Proclamation enlarges the boundary to assure protection of the 
entire Great Rift volcanic zone and associated lava features, all 
objects of scientific interest. The Craters of the Moon, Open Crack, 
Kings Bowl, and Wapi crack sets and the associated Craters of the Moon, 
Kings Bowl, and Wapi lava fields constitute this volcanic rift zone 
system. Craters of the Moon is the largest basaltic volcanic field of 
dominantly Holocene age (less than 10,000 years old) in the conterminous 
United States. Each of the past eruptive episodes lasted up to several 
hundred years in duration and was separated from other eruptive episodes 
by quiet periods of several hundred years to about 3,000 years. The 
first eruptive episode began about 15,000 years ago and the latest ended 
about 2,100 years ago.
Craters of the Moon holds the most diverse and youngest part of the lava 
terrain that covers the southern Snake River Plain of Idaho, a broad 
plain made up of innumerable basalt lava flows during the past 5 million 
years. The most recent eruptions at the Craters of the Moon took place 
about 2,100 years ago and were likely witnessed by the Shoshone people, 
whose legend speaks of a serpent on a mountain who, angered by 
lightening, coiled around and squeezed the mountain until the rocks 
crumbled and melted, fire shot from cracks, and liquid rock flowed from 
the fissures as the mountain exploded. The volcanic field now lies 
dormant, in the latest of a series of quiet periods that separate the 
eight eruptive episodes during which the 60 lava flows and 25 cinder 
cones of this composite volcanic field were formed. Some of the lava 
flows traveled distances of as much as 43 miles from their vents, and 
some flows diverged around areas of higher ground and rejoined 
downstream to form isolated islands of older terrain surrounded by new 
lava. These areas are called ``kipukas.''
The kipukas provide a window on vegetative communities of the past that 
have been erased from most of the Snake River Plain. In many instances, 
the expanse of rugged lava surrounding the small pocket of soils has 
protected the kipukas from people, animals, and even exotic plants. As a 
result, these kipukas represent some of the last nearly pristine and 
undisturbed vegetation in the Snake River Plain, including 700-year-old 
juniper trees and relict stands of sagebrush that are essential habitat 
for sensitive sage grouse populations. These tracts of relict vegetation 
are remarkable benchmarks that aid in the scientific study of changes to 
vegetative communities from recent human activity as well as the role of 
natural fire in the sagebrush steppe ecosystem.
The Kings Bowl lava field and the Wapi lava field are included in the 
enlarged monument. The Kings Bowl field erupted during a single fissure 
eruption on the southern part of the Great Rift about 2,250 years ago. 
This eruption probably lasted only a few hours to a few days. The field 
preserves explosion pits, lava lakes, squeeze-ups, basalt mounds, and an 
ash blanket. The Wapi field probably formed from a fissure eruption 
simultaneously with the eruption of the Kings Bowl field. With more 
prolonged activity over a period of months to a few years, the Wapi 
field formed a low shield volcano. The Bear Trap lava tube, located 
between the Craters of the Moon and the Wapi lava fields, is a cave 
system more than 15 miles long. The lava tube is remarkable for its 
length and for the number of well

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preserved lava-cave features, such as lava stalactites and curbs, the 
latter marking high stands of the flowing lava forever frozen on the 
lava tube walls. The lava tubes and pit craters of the monument are 
known for their unusual preservation of winter ice and snow into the hot 
summer months, due to shielding from the sun and the insulating 
properties of the basalt.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as an addition to the Craters of the Moon National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as an addition to the Craters of the Moon 
National Monument, for the purpose of protecting the objects identified 
above, all lands and interests in lands owned or controlled by the 
United States within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
entitled ``Craters of the Moon National Monument Boundary Enlargement'' 
attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land 
and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 661,287 acres, 
which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
management of the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry, and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all 
laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange 
that furthers the protective purposes of the monument. For the purpose 
of protecting the objects identified above, the Secretary shall prohibit 
all motorized and mechanized vehicle use off road, except for emergency 
or authorized administrative purposes.
Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by 
the United States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon 
acquisition of title thereto by the United States.
The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a transportation plan that 
addresses the actions, including road closures or travel restrictions, 
necessary to protect the objects identified in this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the area being added to the 
monument through the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park 
Service, pursuant to legal authorities, to implement the purposes of 
this proclamation. The National Park Service and the Bureau of Land 
Management shall manage the monument cooperatively and shall prepare an 
agreement to share, consistent with applicable laws, whatever resources 
are necessary to manage properly the monument; however, the National 
Park Service shall have primary management authority over the portion of 
the monu

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ment that includes the exposed lava flows, and shall manage the area 
under the same laws and regulations that apply to the current monument. 
The Bureau of Land Management shall have primary management authority 
over the remaining portion of the monument, as indicated on the map 
entitled, ``Craters of the Moon National Monument Boundary 
Enlargement.''
Wilderness Study Areas included in the monument will continue to be 
managed under section 603(c) of the Federal Land Policy and Management 
Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1701-1782).
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Idaho with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of Federal law. 
Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or 
reduction of any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the 
United States on or before the date of this proclamation. The Secretary 
shall work with appropriate State authorities to ensure that water 
resources needed for monument purposes are available.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
rights of any Indian tribe.
Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or leases on all 
lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to apply with regard to the 
lands in the monument administered by the Bureau of Land Management.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation.
Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, 
injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this monument and not to 
locate or settle upon any of the lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7374 of November 9, 2000

Vermilion Cliffs National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Amid the sandstone slickrock, brilliant cliffs, and rolling sandy 
plateaus of the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument lie outstanding 
objects of scientific and historic interest. Despite its arid climate 
and rugged isolation, the monument contains a wide variety of biological 
objects and has a long and rich human history. Full of natural splendor 
and a sense of solitude, this area remains remote and unspoiled, 
qualities that are essential to the protection of the scientific and 
historic objects it contains.
The monument is a geological treasure. Its centerpiece is the majestic 
Paria Plateau, a grand terrace lying between two great geologic 
structures, the East Kaibab and the Echo Cliffs monoclines. The 
Vermilion Cliffs, which lie along the southern edge of the Paria 
Plateau, rise 3,000 feet in a spectacular escarpment capped with 
sandstone underlain by multicolored, actively eroding, dissected layers 
of shale and sandstone. The stunning Paria River Canyon winds along the 
east side of the plateau to the Colorado River. Erosion of the 
sedimentary rocks in this 2,500 foot deep canyon has produced a variety 
of geologic objects and associated landscape features such as 
amphitheaters, arches, and massive sandstone walls.
In the northwest portion of the monument lies Coyote Buttes, a 
geologically spectacular area where crossbeds of the Navajo Sandstone 
exhibit colorful banding in surreal hues of yellow, orange, pink, and 
red caused by the precipitation of manganese, iron, and other oxides. 
Thin veins or fins of calcite cut across the sandstone, adding another 
dimension to the landscape. Humans have explored and lived on the 
plateau and surrounding canyons for thousands of years, since the 
earliest known hunters and gatherers crossed the area 12,000 or more 
years ago. Some of the earliest rock art in the Southwest can be found 
in the monument. High densities of Ancestral Puebloan sites can also be 
found, including remnants of large and small villages, some with intact 
standing walls, fieldhouses, trails, granaries, burials, and camps.
The monument was a crossroad for many historic expeditions. In 1776, the 
Dominguez-Escalante expedition of Spanish explorers traversed the 
monument in search of a safe crossing of the Colorado River. After a 
first attempt at crossing the Colorado near the mouth of the Paria River 
failed, the explorers traveled up the Paria Canyon in the monument until 
finding a steep hillside they could negotiate with horses. This took 
them out of the Paria Canyon to the east and up into the Ferry Swale 
area, after which they achieved their goal at the Crossing of the 
Fathers east of the monument. Antonio Armijo's 1829 Mexican trading 
expedition followed the Dominguez route on the way from Santa Fe to Los 
Angeles.
Later, Mormon exploring parties led by Jacob Hamblin crossed south of 
the Vermilion Cliffs on missionary expeditions to the Hopi villages. 
Mormon pioneer John D. Lee established Lee's Ferry on the Colorado River 
just south of the monument in 1871. This paved the way for homesteads in 
the monument, still visible in remnants of historic ranch structures and 
associ

[[Page 200]]

ated objects that tell the stories of early settlement. The route taken 
by the Mormon explorers along the base of the Paria Plateau would later 
become known as the Old Arizona Road or Honeymoon Trail. After the 
temple in St. George, Utah was completed in 1877, the Honeymoon Trail 
was used by Mormon couples who had already been married by civil 
authorities in the Arizona settlements, but also made the arduous trip 
to St. George to have their marriages solemnized in the temple. The 
settlement of the monument area by Mormon pioneers overlapped with 
another historic exploration by John Wesley Powell, who passed through 
the monument during his scientific surveys of 1871.
The monument contains outstanding biological objects that have been 
preserved by remoteness and limited travel corridors. The monument's 
vegetation is a unique combination of cold desert flora and warm desert 
grassland, and includes one threatened species, Welsh's milkweed. This 
unusual plant, known only in Utah and Arizona, colonizes and stabilizes 
shifting sand dunes, but is crowded out once other vegetation 
encroaches.
Despite sporadic rainfall and widely scattered ephemeral water sources, 
the monument supports a variety of wildlife species. At least twenty 
species of raptors have been documented in the monument, as well as a 
variety of reptiles and amphibians. California condors have been 
reintroduced into the monument in an effort to establish another wild 
population of this highly endangered species. Desert bighorn sheep, 
pronghorn antelope, mountain lion, and other mammals roam the canyons 
and plateaus. The Paria River supports sensitive native fish, including 
the flannelmouth sucker and the speckled dace.
Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431) 
authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare by public 
proclamation historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, 
and other objects of historic or scientific interest that are situated 
upon the lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United 
States to be national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof 
parcels of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
objects to be protected.
WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to reserve 
such lands as a national monument to be known as the Vermilion Cliffs 
National Monument:
NOW, THEREFORE, I, William J. Clinton, President of the United States of 
America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 of the Act of June 
8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do proclaim that there are hereby 
set apart and reserved as the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, for 
the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States within the 
boundaries of the area described on the map entitled ``Vermilion Cliffs 
National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. 
The Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 
293,000 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with the proper 
care and management of the objects to be protected.
All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of this 
monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all forms of entry, 
location, selection, sale, or leasing or other disposition under the 
public land laws, including but not limited to withdrawal from location, 
entry,

[[Page 201]]

and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by exchange that 
furthers the protective purposes of the monument. For the purpose of 
protecting the objects identified above, the Secretary shall prohibit 
all motorized and mechanized vehicle use off road, except for emergency 
or authorized administrative purposes.
Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not owned by 
the United States shall be reserved as a part of the monument upon 
acquisition of title thereto by the United States.
The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument through the 
Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable legal authorities, to 
implement the purposes of this proclamation.
The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a transportation plan that 
addresses the actions, including road closures or travel restrictions, 
necessary to protect the objects identified in this proclamation.
The establishment of this monument is subject to valid existing rights.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or diminish the 
jurisdiction of the State of Arizona with respect to fish and wildlife 
management.
This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of Federal law. 
Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as a relinquishment or 
reduction of any water use or rights reserved or appropriated by the 
United States on or before the date of this proclamation. The Secretary 
shall work with appropriate State authorities to ensure that any water 
resources needed for monument purposes are available.
Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or leases on all 
lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to apply with regard to the 
lands in the monument.
Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any existing 
withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, the national 
monument shall be the dominant reservation. Warning is hereby given to 
all unauthorized persons not to appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove 
any feature of this monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the 
lands thereof.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7375 of November 10, 2000

Veterans Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

On this day, in ceremonies across our Nation and around the world, 
Americans gather to pay tribute to our veterans. In community centers 
and church halls, at VFW posts and U.S. embassies, in quiet cemeteries 
and on battlefields fallen silent, we pause to honor the brave men and 
women of our Armed Forces whose devotion to duty and willingness to 
serve have sustained our country for more than two centuries.
Over the course of our history, some 41 million Americans have served--
and more than a million have died--so that we might live in freedom. We 
are the beneficiaries of their courage, their sacrifice, and their 
vigilance; and so are countless freedom-loving people around the world.
In the past century alone, through two world wars and the long, tense 
struggle of the Cold War; on the front lines in Korea, Vietnam, Beirut, 
Grenada, Panama, Somalia, Haiti, the Persian Gulf, and the Balkans, our 
brave men and women in uniform have risked their lives to protect U.S. 
interests, assist our allies, promote peace, and advance our ideals. 
Thanks to their extraordinary record of service, more people now live 
under democratic rule than at any other time in history. And today, 
America is a stronger Nation in a more secure world because of our 
veterans.
President Kennedy once said, ``Democracy is never a final achievement. 
It is a call to untiring effort, to continual sacrifice and to the 
willingness, if necessary, to die in its defense.'' Today we give thanks 
to the veterans of our Armed Forces for showing that willingness. 
Whether serving on bases and in ports at home or deployed across the 
globe, they have endured hardship and danger to protect our Nation and 
assist our allies. The story of America has been written, in large part, 
by the deeds of our veterans--deeds that bind us to our past, inspire us 
in the present, and strengthen us to meet the challenges of the future.
In honor of those who have served in our Armed Forces, the Congress has 
provided (5 U.S.C. 6103 (a)) that November 11 of each year shall be set 
aside as a legal public holiday to honor America's veterans. On Veterans 
Day, we pay tribute to all those who have served in our Armed Forces, 
and we remember with deep respect those who paid the ultimate price for 
our freedom. America's veterans have answered the highest calling of 
citizenship, and they continue to inspire us with the depth of their 
patriotism and the generosity of their service.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim Saturday, November 11, 2000, as Veterans 
Day. I urge all Americans to acknowledge the courage and sacrifice of 
our veterans through appropriate public ceremonies and private prayers. 
I call upon Federal, State, and local officials to display the flag of 
the United States and to encourage and participate in patriotic 
activities in their communities. I invite civic and fraternal 
organizations, places of worship, schools, businesses, unions, and the 
media to support this national observance with suitable commemorative 
expressions and programs.

[[Page 204]]

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7376 of November 13, 2000

International Education Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Today we live in a global community, where all countries must work as 
partners to promote peace and prosperity and to resolve international 
problems. One of the surest ways to develop and strengthen such 
partnerships is through international education programs.
These programs enable students to learn other languages, experience 
other cultures, develop a broader understanding of global issues, and 
make lasting friendships with their peers in other countries who will 
one day guide the political, cultural, and economic development of their 
nations. Some of America's staunchest friends abroad are those who have 
experienced our country firsthand as exchange students or who have been 
exposed to American values through contact with American students and 
scholars studying overseas.
Since World War II, the Federal Government has worked in partnership 
with colleges, universities, and other educational organizations to 
sponsor programs that help our citizens gain the international 
experience and skills needed to meet the challenges of an increasingly 
interdependent world. At the same time, American educational 
institutions have developed study programs that attract students from 
all over the world to further their education in the United States.
One of the largest and most renowned of these international education 
initiatives is the Fulbright Program, which was founded by Senator J. 
William Fulbright more than half a century ago. Since its inception, the 
program has provided nearly a quarter of a million participants from the 
United States and 140 other nations--participants chosen for their 
academic and professional qualifications and leadership potential--with 
the opportunity to study and teach abroad and to gain knowledge of 
global political, economic, and cultural institutions. As Senator 
Fulbright envisioned, this program has proved to be a vital and positive 
force for peace and understanding around the world.
To build on this tradition of excellence in international education, I 
signed a memorandum in April of this year directing the heads of 
Executive departments and agencies to work with educational 
institutions, State and local governments, private organizations, and 
the business community to develop a coordinated national policy on 
international education. We must reaffirm our national commitment to 
encouraging students from other countries to study in the United States, 
promote study abroad by U.S. students, and support the exchange of 
teachers, scholars, and citizens at all

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levels of society. By doing so, we can expand our citizens' intellectual 
and cultural horizons, strengthen America's economic competitiveness, 
increase under standing between nations and peoples, and, as Senator 
Fulbright so eloquently stated, direct ``the enormous power of human 
knowledge to the enrichment of our own lives and to the shaping of a 
rational and civilized world order.''
 NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States 
of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution 
and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 13 through 
November 17, 2000, as International Education Week. I urge all Americans 
to observe this week with events and programs that celebrate the 
benefits of international education to our citizens, our economy, and 
the world.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirteenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7377 of November 15, 2000

America Recycles Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As we look forward to Thanksgiving, our annual celebration of America's 
great bounty, it is appropriate to observe America Recycles Day and 
focus on how to preserve that bounty for the benefit of future 
generations.
Recycling waste and purchasing products made from recycled materials are 
among the easiest and most effective measures every American can take to 
conserve our resources and create a cleaner environment. Currently, our 
country recovers more than 28 percent of the billions of pounds of waste 
generated by Americans annually--an effort that translates into enough 
savings to supply the energy needs of 9 million U.S. households. But the 
recycling process succeeds only when recovered materials are returned to 
retailers as new products that are purchased by consumers; otherwise, 
the recycled products themselves must be disposed of as waste.
Buying recycled products conserves resources, reduces water and air 
pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, and saves energy. While 
beneficial for the environment, the recycling process is good for our 
economy as well. By promoting the development of markets for recycled 
products, we are also creating new jobs, many of which are in America's 
inner cities, where job creation is particularly critical. It is 
estimated that while incinerating 10,000 tons of waste creates 1 job, 
and landfilling the same amount creates 6 jobs, recycling the same 
10,000 tons creates 36 jobs. Nationwide, recycling and remanufacturing 
provide 1 million jobs and $100 billion in revenue.
To ensure the Federal Government's leadership in the recycling effort, I 
signed an Executive Order in 1998 directing all Federal agencies to 
expand

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and strengthen their commitment to recycling and buying recycled-content 
and environmentally preferable products. The Federal Government now 
purchases more than $350 million in recycled-content products annually--
an increase of $112 million a year, or 30 percent, from just a decade 
ago.
America Recycles Day helps us to build on this progress by uniting 
environmental and community organizations, business and industry, and 
agencies at all levels of government as partners in the vital effort to 
keep recycling working. By encouraging every business and consumer in 
America to start or enhance recycling efforts and to buy recycled-
content products, we can sustain our economy, improve our environment, 
and preserve our precious natural resources for the sake of generations 
to come.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 15, 2000, as 
America Recycles Day. I urge all Americans to observe this day with 
appropriate ceremonies and activities and to take personal 
responsibility for the environment not only by recycling, but also by 
choosing to purchase and use products made from recycled materials.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7378 of November 15, 2000

National Great American Smokeout Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In the 24 years since the American Cancer Society organized the first 
Great American Smokeout, our country has made encouraging progress in 
our battle to reduce the devastating human and economic toll that 
tobacco products take on our society. Today we have a more comprehensive 
understanding of the dangers of tobacco use and the sophisticated 
marketing tactics used by tobacco companies, and we have developed more 
effective methods for helping people break their addiction to tobacco 
products.
Despite the progress we have made, tobacco remains the leading cause of 
preventable death in our Nation, with more than 400,000 casualties from 
tobacco-related illness each year. Since the first report of the Surgeon 
General on smoking and health was issued in 1964, 10 million Americans 
have died from causes attributed to smoking. More than 50 million 
Americans are currently addicted to tobacco. Every day, another 3,000 
young Americans become regular smokers; of these, nearly 1,000 will die 
prematurely.
A recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health has shown 
that young people become addicted to nicotine much more quickly than we 
previously thought. Adolescents who smoke as infrequently as once a 
month still experience symptoms of addiction. That is why my 
Administration has urged the Congress to raise the tax on cigarettes and 
grant authority to the

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Food and Drug Administration to limit tobacco marketing and sales to 
youth. I have also called on all the States to devote a substantial 
portion of their tobacco settlement funds to reduce youth smoking. 
Currently, tobacco companies are spending nearly $7 billion a year to 
market their products, dramatically more than the Federal Government and 
all 50 States combined are spending on tobacco prevention and cessation 
programs.
My Administration has also joined with the American Cancer Society and 
other public health organizations in calling for public and private 
health plans to provide coverage for and access to proven tobacco 
cessation methods. We know that helping people quit smoking produces 
immediate and long-term health benefits--saving money and saving lives.
National Great American Smokeout Day presents all of us with the 
opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to the health and safety of all 
Americans. Smokers who quit smoking for the duration of the day can lead 
by example and take the first crucial step toward better health. 
Nonsmokers can teach children about the dangers of using tobacco and 
strengthen our Nation's efforts to eliminate young people's exposure to 
secondhand smoke.Through efforts like the Great American Smokeout and 
the implementation of proven tobacco prevention programs, we are moving 
toward my Administration's goal of cutting smoking rates among teens and 
adults in half within the decade.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 16, 2000, as 
national Great American Smokeout Day. I call upon all Americans to join 
together in an effort to educate our children about the dangers of 
tobacco use and to take this opportunity to practice a healthy lifestyle 
that sets a positive example for young people.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7379 of November 16, 2000

National Farm-City Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Since our earliest days as a Nation, farmers have tilled the rich soil 
of this great land, feeding their families, our country, and people 
around the world. While America has changed from an agricultural to an 
industrial society, the American farm has remained a vital thread in the 
fabric of our national life. Farmers and ranchers exemplify the values 
on which our country was founded--hard work, faith, family, and devotion 
to community and to the land--and they have made American agriculture a 
leading global industry and a source of pride for our Nation.

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By providing their fellow Americans with an abundant supply of safe, 
high-quality food and fiber, our country's farmers and ranchers help 
sustain a quality of life that is unmatched around the world. In this 
new century, their role is becoming even more important as they strive 
to meet the challenge of feeding the world's people while preserving our 
fertile land, clean water, and other precious natural resources.
Farmers and ranchers, however, do not accomplish these crucial tasks 
alone. Farm workers, shippers, inspectors, processors, agribusiness 
companies, marketers, grocers, and many others play vital roles in the 
extraordinary productivity of America's agricultural industry. These 
farm-city partnerships strengthen our free enterprise system and remind 
us that the talents, energy, and hard work of millions of Americans have 
contributed to the unprecedented prosperity we enjoy today.
This week, as we gather with our families in thanks for the bounty 
bestowed upon us, let us remember with gratitude the hardworking men and 
women in rural and urban communities who devote their lives to 
producing, processing, and delivering the world's safest, most abundant 
supply of food and fiber.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 17 through 
November 23, 2000, as National Farm-City Week. I call upon all 
Americans, in rural and urban communities alike, to join in recognizing 
the achievements of all those who work together to promote America's 
agricultural abundance.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7380 of November 17, 2000

National Family Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Our families are perhaps the strongest influence in our lives. Anyone 
who grows up in a strong, nurturing family, grounded in the values of 
love and responsibility, will have a distinct advantage in achieving the 
most important tasks of adulthood--living fully, working productively, 
contributing to society, and forming one's own strong, stable family.
Our Nation, too, draws its strength and character from America's 
families, so as citizens we must do everything we can to support their 
well-being and self-sufficiency. Over the past 8 years, my 
Administration has strived to create an economic and social climate 
where families can flourish. We have strengthened the economy; enacted a 
higher minimum wage; expanded tax credits for working families; created 
greater access to higher education, quality health care, and affordable 
child care; and, with passage

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of the Family and Medical Leave Act, made it easier for working adults 
to take leave to care for an ailing family member without putting their 
jobs at risk. We have also been successful in moving thousands of 
children from temporary homes in foster care to permanent families where 
they can grow and flourish.
We are fortunate to be members of a larger family as well, composed not 
only of our immediate relatives, but also of our neighbors, colleagues, 
communities, and fellow citizens. As members of this extended family, we 
must learn to appreciate the value and diversity of other families' 
traditions; we must reach out to help those families who are still in 
need; and we must share responsibility for the care and development of 
all our Nation's children. In this season of Thanksgiving, let us be 
grateful for the knowledge that America is a Nation of families, 
standing together to make our country a better place in which to live 
and to make the future a brighter one for our children.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 19 through 
November 25, 2000, as National Family Week. I call upon Federal, State, 
and local officials to honor American families with appropriate programs 
and activities. I encourage educators, community organizations, and 
religious leaders to celebrate the strength and values we draw from 
family relationships, and I urge all the people of the United States to 
reaffirm their own family ties and to reach out to other families in 
friendship and goodwill.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7381 of November 17, 2000

Thanksgiving Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

We have much to be grateful for this Thanksgiving Day. Our Nation is 
free, prosperous, and at peace. The remarkable growth in human knowledge 
and technological innovation offers real hope for defeating the age-old 
enemies of humanity: poverty, famine, and disease. Our dynamic economy 
continues to generate millions of new jobs, and, as wages rise and 
unemployment falls to its lowest level in more than a generation, 
millions of American families are sharing in the bounty of this great 
land for the first time.
Sharing in God's blessings is at the heart of Thanksgiving and at the 
core of the American spirit. At Plymouth in 1621, the Pilgrims 
celebrated their first harvest in the New World thanks to the generosity 
of their Native American neighbors. In return, the Pilgrims invited 
these tribal members to share in their harvest festival. At Thanksgiving 
this year and every year,

[[Page 210]]

in worship services and family celebrations across our country, 
Americans carry on that tradition of giving, sharing not only with 
family and friends, but also with those in need throughout their 
communities.
Every generation of Americans has benefited from the generosity, 
talents, efforts, and contributions of their fellow citizens. All of us 
have been enriched by the diverse cultures, traditions, and beliefs of 
the millions of people who, by birth or choice, have come to call 
America their home. All of us are beneficiaries of our founders' wisdom 
and of the service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform. While 
Americans are an independent people, we are interdependent as well, and 
our greatest achievements are those we have accomplished together.
As we celebrate Thanksgiving, let us remember with gratitude that 
despite our differences in background, age, politics, or race, each of 
us is a member of our larger American family and that, working together, 
there is nothing we cannot accomplish in this promising new century.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim Thursday, November 23, 
2000, as a National Day of Thanksgiving. I encourage all the people of 
the United States to assemble in their homes, places of worship, and 
community centers to share the spirit of fellowship and prayer and to 
reinforce the ties of family and community; to express heartfelt thanks 
to God for our many blessings; and to reach out in gratitude and 
friendship to our brothers and sisters across this land who, together, 
comprise our great American family.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventeenth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7382 of November 30, 2000

World AIDS Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

As the global community observes the 13th annual World AIDS Day, we 
remember with sorrow our friends, loved ones, neighbors, and colleagues 
who have lost their lives to AIDS, and we reaffirm our shared commitment 
to carry on the fight until our battle against this devastating disease 
is won.
We can be proud of our efforts over the past 8 years. My Administration 
has worked aggressively to increase funding for AIDS research; to find 
better treatments, a vaccine, and a cure; to enhance HIV prevention 
efforts; and to help ensure that those living with HIV and AIDS receive 
the health care they need. Federal funding for such activities has 
doubled on the national front and tripled internationally, reaching 
nearly $11 billion last year alone, and I recently named a Presidential 
Envoy for AIDS Cooperation.

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Building on this commitment, last month I signed into law the Ryan White 
CARE Act Amendments of 2000, improving the Federal Government's most 
comprehensive program for providing services to Americans living with 
HIV/AIDS. Our investment is producing results and, thanks to new 
treatments, many people with AIDS are living longer and experiencing a 
better quality of life than ever before.
But our battle is far from over. Last year, 3 million people died from 
HIV/AIDS--the highest global total reported since the pandemic began. 
Current estimates indicate that more than 50 million people have been 
infected with HIV since the virus was first identified more than 15 
years ago, and some 21.8 million people have died from HIV/AIDS. The 
number of children orphaned as a result of HIV/AIDS is estimated to be 
more than 13.2 million.
Because the spread of HIV has reached catastrophic proportions in many 
areas of our global community, AIDS has become a national and 
international security threat. The United States is working hard to 
develop partnerships with other nations and to mobilize a greatly 
expanded global response to address HIV/AIDS through our Leadership and 
Investment in Fighting an Epidemic Initiative. And this week, we will 
host a White House Summit of Religious Leaders to underscore the 
important role the world's faith communities play in preventing the 
spread of HIV and in caring for those affected by HIV. Many care and 
treatment programs around the world are operated by religious-based 
organizations, and often these groups provide the only available source 
of care. The summit will highlight successful efforts and raise 
awareness of our moral obligations in addressing HIV and AIDS.
Our goals are clear, and our resolve is firm. Working with our partners 
at home and abroad, we will triumph over the tragedy of HIV/AIDS and 
ensure a bright, healthy future for our children.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim December 1, 2000, as World 
AIDS Day. I invite the Governors of the States and the Commonwealth of 
Puerto Rico, officials of the other territories subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States, and the American people to join me in 
reaffirming our commitment to defeating HIV and AIDS. I encourage every 
American to participate in appropriate commemorative programs and 
ceremonies in workplaces, houses of worship, and other community 
centers, to reach out to protect and educate our people, and to provide 
hope and help to all who are living with HIV and AIDS.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of 
November, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7383 of December 1, 2000

To Implement Title V of the Trade and Development Act of 2000 and To 
Modify the Generalized System of Preferences

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Title V of the Trade and Development Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-200) 
(the ``Act'') modifies the tariff treatment of certain imported wool 
articles.
2. Section 501(a)(1) of the Act amends the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of 
the United States (HTS) to create a new heading, 9902.51.11, for imports 
of certain worsted wool fabrics with average fiber diameters greater 
than 18.5 microns. Section 501(d) of the Act limits the quantity of 
imports under heading 9902.51.11, on an annual basis, to 2,500,000 
square meter equivalents or such other quantity proclaimed by the 
President pursuant to section 504(b)(3) of the Act.
3. Section 501(b)(1) of the Act amends the HTS to create a new heading, 
9902.51.12, for imports of certain worsted wool fabrics with average 
fiber diameters of 18.5 microns or less. Section 501(d) of the Act 
limits the quantity of imports under heading 9902.51.12, on an annual 
basis, to 1,500,000 square meter equivalents or such other quantity 
proclaimed by the President pursuant to section 504(b)(3) of the Act.
4. Section 501(b)(2) of the Act authorizes the President to proclaim a 
reduction in the rate of duty applicable to imports of worsted wool 
fabrics classified under heading 9902.51.12 of the HTS that is necessary 
to equalize such rate of duty with the most favored nation rate of duty 
applicable to imports of such worsted wool fabrics into Canada.
5. Section 501(e) of the Act provides that in implementing the 
limitation on the quantity of imports of worsted wool fabrics under 
headings 9902.51.11 and 9902.51.12 of the HTS, the President, consistent 
with U.S. international obligations, shall take such action as he 
determines appropriate to ensure that such fabrics are fairly allocated 
to persons who cut and sew men's and boys' worsted wool suits and suit-
type jackets and trousers in the United States and who apply for an 
allocation based on the amount of such suits cut and sewn during the 
prior calendar year.
6. Section 503(a) of the Act requires the President to proclaim 8-digit 
tariff categories for certain wool yarn and wool fabrics with an average 
fiber diameter of 18.5 microns or less, and men's or boys' suits, suit-
type jackets, and trousers of worsted wool fabric, made of wool yarn 
with an average diameter of 18.5 microns or less. Section 503(b) of the 
Act authorizes the President to make conforming changes in the HTS to 
take into account the new tariff categories proclaimed under section 
503(a).
7. Section 504(a) of the Act requires the President to monitor market 
conditions in the United States, including domestic demand, domestic 
supply, and increases in domestic production, of worsted wool fabrics 
and their components in the market for (i) men's or boys' worsted wool 
suits, suit-type jackets, and trousers, (ii) worsted wool fabrics and 
yarn used in the manufacture of such apparel articles, and (iii) wool 
used in the production of such fabrics and yarn.

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8. Section 504(b)(1) requires the President, on an annual basis, to 
consider requests from domestic manufacturers of apparel products made 
of worsted wool fabrics described in section 504(a) to modify the 
limitation on the quantity of imports of worsted wool fabrics under 
headings 9902.51.11 and 9902.51.12 of the HTS.
9. Section 504(b)(3) of the Act authorizes the President, after taking 
into account the market conditions set forth in section 504(b)(2) of the 
Act, to modify the limitation on the quantity of imports of worsted wool 
fabrics under headings 9902.51.11 and 9902.51.12 of the HTS, provided 
that any such modification shall not exceed 1,000,000 square meter 
equivalents annually for each heading, and to proclaim any such 
modifications.
10. Section 504(c) requires the President to issue regulations to 
implement the provisions of section 504.
11. I have determined that it is appropriate to authorize the Secretary 
of Commerce (Secretary) to perform certain functions specified in 
sections 501(e) and 504(b) of the Act.
12. I have determined that it is appropriate to authorize the United 
States Trade Representative (USTR) to perform certain functions 
specified in section 504(a) of the Act.
 13. Sections 501 and 502 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the 
``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2461 and 2462), authorize the President to 
designate countries as beneficiary developing countries and as least-
developed beneficiary developing countries for purposes of the 
Generalized System of Preferences (GSP).
14. Pursuant to Executive Order 11888 of November 24, 1975, Western 
Samoa was designated as a beneficiary developing country for purposes of 
the GSP. I have determined that the designation of Western Samoa as a 
beneficiary developing country under the GSP should be modified so that 
the designation applies to Samoa. Furthermore, pursuant to section 502 
of the 1974 Act, and having due regard for the eligibility criteria set 
forth therein, I have determined that it is appropriate to designate 
Samoa as a least-developed beneficiary developing country for purposes 
of the GSP.
15. Proclamation 6425 of April 29, 1992, suspended the application of 
duty-free treatment under the GSP for certain handloomed cotton fabrics 
imported from India. On September 14, 2000, the United States Government 
and the Government of India entered into a Memorandum of Understanding 
in which the United States agreed to restore GSP treatment for certain 
handloomed cotton fabrics. Pursuant to section 501 of the 1974 Act, I 
have determined that it is appropriate to restore GSP treatment for 
these articles to give effect to the Memorandum of Understanding.
16. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the 
President to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant provisions 
of that Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, and actions 
thereunder, including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including section 301

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of title 3, United States Code, title V of the Act, and sections 501, 
502, and 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to provide separate tariff treatment for the articles 
specified in section 503(a) of the Act, the HTS is modified as provided 
in section A of the Annex to this proclamation.
    (2) In order to make conforming changes to take into account the new 
permanent tariff categories established in section A of the Annex to 
this proclamation, the HTS is further modified as provided in section B 
of the Annex to this proclamation.
    (3) The Secretary is authorized to exercise the authority set forth 
in section 501(e) of the Act to allocate the quantity of imports of 
worsted wool fabrics under headings 9902.51.11 and 9902.51.12. Any 
determination by the Secretary under this paragraph shall be set forth 
in a notice or notices that the Secretary shall cause to be published in 
the Federal Register.
    (4) The Secretary is authorized to monitor the most favored nation 
rate of duty applicable to imports into Canada of worsted wool fabrics 
of the kind classified under heading 9902.51.12 of the HTS and shall 
notify the President of any reduction, effective on or after May 18, 
2000, in the Canadian most favored nation rate of duty on such imports. 
The Secretary shall cause to be published in the Federal Register a 
notice describing any such reduction.
    (5) The Secretary is authorized to exercise the authority set forth 
in section 504(b)(1) of the Act to consider, on an annual basis, 
requests from domestic manufacturers of apparel products made of worsted 
wool fabrics described in section 504(a) to modify the limitation on the 
quantity of imports of worsted wool fabrics under headings 9902.51.11 
and 9902.51.12 of the HTS.
    (6) The Secretary is authorized to determine, under section 
504(b)(3) of the Act, whether the limitation on the quantity of imports 
of worsted wool fabrics under headings 9902.51.11 and 9902.51.12 of the 
HTS should be modified and to recommend to the President that 
appropriate modifications be made.
    (7) The Secretary is authorized to issue regulations to implement 
the provisions of sections 501 and 504(b) of the Act, the implementation 
of which have been delegated to the Secretary pursuant to paragraphs 3, 
4, 5, and 6 of this proclamation.
    (8) The USTR is authorized to exercise the authority set forth in 
section 504(a) of the Act to monitor market conditions in the United 
States for the worsted wool articles specified in that section.
    (9) In order to reflect a change in the name of a designated 
beneficiary developing country for purposes of the GSP, general note 
4(a) to the HTS is modified by striking ``Western Samoa'' and by 
inserting in alphabetical sequence in lieu thereof ``Samoa'' in the 
enumeration of independent beneficiary developing countries.
    (10) Samoa is designated as a least-developed beneficiary developing 
country for purposes of the GSP and title V of the 1974 Act. In order to 
reflect such designation, general note 4(b)(i) to the HTS, enumerating 
those countries designated as least-developed beneficiary developing 
countries

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for purposes of the GSP, is modified by inserting in alphabetical 
sequence ``Samoa.''
    (11) In order to provide that India is again treated as a 
beneficiary developing country with respect to certain certified 
handloomed cotton fabrics for purposes of the GSP program, the HTS is 
modified as provided in section C of the Annex to this proclamation.
    (12) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive Orders 
that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this proclamation are 
superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
    (13) This proclamation is effective on the date of signature of this 
proclamation, except that the designation of Samoa as a least-developed 
beneficiary developing country shall be effective with respect to 
articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or 
after the date that is 60 days from the date of publication of this 
proclamation in the Federal Register.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7384 of December 4, 2000

National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

Driving is an integral part of American culture and daily living; but it 
is also a privilege that carries great responsibility. To protect 
ourselves and others, we must always be safe, sober, and drug-free 
behind the wheel.
As a Nation, we have made steady progress in reducing alcohol-related 
deaths through stronger laws, tougher enforcement, and increased public 
awareness. Last year, alcohol-related traffic fatalities reached a 
historic low. But even one death is still one too many; that is why I 
was pleased to sign into law this October a nationwide impaired-driving 
standard of .08 blood alcohol content (BAC). Once all 50 States set 
their BAC limits to .08, we can save hundreds of lives and prevent 
thousands of injuries each year on America's streets and highways.
There are other measures we are taking to reduce the incidence of drunk 
driving. Last December, the Department of Transportation unveiled the 
``You Drink and Drive. You Lose.'' campaign, an effort to promote 
greater public awareness of the dangers of impaired driving. In just 1 
year, hundreds of communities and law enforcement agencies have joined 
the campaign, helping to reach nearly 100 million Americans with this 
simple but lifesaving message.
In memory of the thousands of victims who have lost their lives to 
alcohol- and drug-impaired drivers, I ask all motorists to participate 
in ``National Lights On for Life Day'' on December 15, 2000, by driving 
with their vehicle headlights illuminated. By doing so, we will call 
attention to this devastating national problem and remind others on the 
road of their responsibility to drive sober and drug-free.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim December 2000 as National 
Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month. I urge all Americans to 
acknowledge the dangers of impaired driving, to make the right choice by 
designating a sober driver, to prevent impaired family members and 
friends from getting behind the wheel, and to help teach our young 
drivers the importance of alcohol- and drug-free driving. I also call on 
all State, county, and local leaders to make safety a top priority and 
to work together to make our Nation's transportation system the safest 
it can be.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7385 of December 6, 2000

National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

While the bitter winds of war raged across much of the world on the 
morning of December 7, 1941, the United States was still at peace. At 
Pearl Harbor, the 130 vessels of the U.S. Pacific Fleet lay tranquil in 
the Sunday silence. Then, at 7:55 a.m., that silence was shattered by 
the sound of falling bombs and the rattle of machine-gun fire, as the 
war came home to America.
In making such a devastating preemptive strike, the forces of Imperial 
Japan sought to weaken our national spirit and cripple our military 
might. But our attackers would soon learn that they had seriously 
misjudged the character of the American people and the strength of our 
democracy. Though 21 ships were sunk or badly damaged, 347 aircraft 
destroyed or in need of significant repair, and some 3,500 Americans 
dead or injured, the attack on Pearl Harbor galvanized our Nation into 
action, reaffirmed our commitment to freedom, and strengthened our 
resolve to prevail.
Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, millions of Americans volunteered 
to serve in the Armed Forces. Millions of others filled factories and 
shipyards as the great industrial engine of our free enterprise system 
was harnessed to produce the planes, tanks, ships, and guns that armed 
the forces of freedom. Many of the ships sunk during the attack on Pearl 
Harbor were raised and repaired to sail once again with the U.S. Pacific 
Fleet--the same fleet that in September of 1945 would witness the 
surrender of Imperial Japan.
On Veterans Day this year, America celebrated the groundbreaking for a 
memorial in our Nation's capital dedicated to our World War II veterans. 
This memorial will stand as a testament to the countless brave Americans 
who responded to the attack on Pearl Harbor and the threat to our 
freedom by answering the call to service; both at home and overseas. It 
will also stand as testament to the spirit of a Nation that believes 
profoundly in the ideals upon which it was founded, and it will serve as 
an enduring reminder of what Americans can accomplish when we work 
together to achieve our common goals.
The outpouring of support for this memorial, from young and old alike, 
shows that the American people's deep conviction in our Nation's values 
has not diminished in the intervening years. We will never forget the 
men and women who took up arms in the greatest struggle humanity has 
ever known; nor will we forget the lessons they taught us: that we must 
remain ever vigilant, determined, and ready to advance the cause of 
freedom whenever and wherever it is threatened.
The Congress, by Public Law 103-308, has designated December 7, 2000, as 
``National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day.''
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim December 7, 2000, as National Pearl Harbor 
Remembrance Day. I urge all Americans to observe this day with

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appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities in honor of the 
Americans who served at Pearl Harbor. I also ask all Federal departments 
and agencies, organizations, and individuals to fly the flag of the 
United States at half- staff on this day in honor of those Americans who 
died as a result of the attack on Pearl Harbor.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7386 of December 9, 2000

Human Rights Day, Bill of Rights Day, and Human Rights Week, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

On December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights was ratified. A century and a 
half later, on December 10, 1948, the United Nations General Assembly 
adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Though separated by 
more than 150 years, these two documents are not dusty relics of a 
distant past--the ideas they so powerfully express continue to shape the 
destiny of individuals and nations across the globe.
Because the rights guaranteed by these documents, such as freedom of 
conscience, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, and freedom from 
arbitrary arrest, are such an inherent part of America's history and 
national character, we at times may take them for granted. We sometimes 
forget that people elsewhere in the world are suffering, struggling, and 
even dying because these rights are denied them by oppressive 
governments. In countries such as Afghanistan, Burma, and the Sudan, men 
and women are harassed, arrested, and executed for worshipping according 
to their conscience. In many corners of the world, modern-day slavery 
still exists, with criminals trafficking in women and children and 
profiting from their servitude.
But there is hope for the future. Globalization and the revolution in 
information technology are helping to break down the former barriers of 
geography and official censorship. People fighting for human rights in 
disparate places around the world can talk to one another, learn from 
one another, and shine the light of public scrutiny on the dark corners 
of the world. Free nations can work in concert to combat human rights 
abuses, as the United States did last spring when we joined with the 
Philippines and more than 20 other Asian and Pacific nations to develop 
a regional action plan to combat trafficking in persons and protect 
trafficking victims.
The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., once said that the arc of the 
moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice. We have seen the 
truth of that statement in the history of America, where each generation 
has strived to live up to our founders' vision of human dignity: that we 
are all created equal and that we all have the right to life, liberty, 
and the pursuit of happiness. But that statement holds true for the 
world's history as well; in our

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own lifetime, we have seen the fall of the Berlin Wall and the triumph 
of democracy in the Cold War. More people live in freedom today than at 
any other time in history.
But that march toward freedom is not inevitable; it is advanced by 
individual acts of courage and will; by the strong voices of people 
refusing to be silenced by their oppressors; by the willingness of free 
people and free nations to defend the rights of men, women, and 
children. Heroes like Lech Walesa in Poland, Vaclav Havel in the Czech 
Republic, Nelson Mandela in South Africa, and Aung San Suu Kyi in Burma 
are powerful reminders of how precious our human rights are and how high 
the cost is to sustain them. The Bill of Rights and the Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights that we celebrate this week are not merely 
proud words preserved on paper; they are a pledge written on our 
consciences and to oppressed people everywhere, so that they too will 
some day know the meaning of dignity and the blessing of human rights.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim December 10, 2000, as 
Human Rights Day; December 15, 2000, as Bill of Rights Day; and the week 
beginning December 10, 2000, as Human Rights Week. I call upon the 
people of the United States to celebrate these observances with 
appropriate activities, ceremonies, and programs that demonstrate our 
national commitment to the Bill of Rights, the Universal Declaration of 
Human Rights, and promotion and protection of human rights for all 
people.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this Ninth day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7387 of December 14, 2000

Wright Brothers Day, 2000

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

In 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright were poised on the brink of one of 
history's most remarkable advances. For years, the two brothers had been 
mesmerized by the principle of flight and had studied birds to 
understand how these fascinating creatures rose, fell, and darted 
through the air. The Wright Brothers' studies affirmed what they had 
long believed: that powered, controlled human flight was possible. After 
much research and experimentation and many trials and failures, the 
brothers tested their prototype biplane on the windy dunes of Kitty 
Hawk, North Carolina. On December 17, their efforts were rewarded and 
their dream realized when the Wright Flyer rose through the air, soaring 
for 12 seconds and traveling 120 feet.
While it took humanity thousands of years to reach that pivotal moment, 
we have achieved stunning advances in aviation in the past century 
alone. Less than 25 years after the Wright Brothers' inaugural flight, 
Charles Lind

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bergh conquered the Atlantic Ocean flying nonstop aboard The Spirit of 
St. Louis; in less than 50 years, Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier; 
and in less than 70 years, the United States reached the heavens and 
landed two men on the Moon. Today, we continue to explore the frontiers 
of space as the International Space Station orbits the Earth.
The creative vision, ingenuity, and indomitable spirit that sparked the 
Wright Brothers' achievement still power our Nation's aviation 
accomplishments today. Air travel is a vital part of life in America, 
and people across the country depend on our air transportation system to 
link them with one another and to sustain our growing economy. Last year 
alone, U.S. airlines safely transported almost 700 million passengers on 
13 million flights.
The gift of flight has immeasurably strengthened our Nation and enriched 
the lives of people around the world. It is only fitting that we should 
remember on December 17 the two visionary Americans whose scientific 
curiosity, independent thinking, and technical genius began a new era 
that has taken us to the threshold of space and beyond.
The Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 17, 1963 (77 Stat. 
402; 36 U.S.C. 143), has designated December 17 of each year as ``Wright 
Brothers Day'' and has authorized and requested the President to issue 
annually a proclamation inviting the people of the United States to 
observe that day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, do hereby proclaim December 17, 2000, as Wright Brothers Day.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON



Proclamation 7388 of December 18, 2000

To Modify Duty-Free Treatment Under the Generalized System of 
Preferences for Sub-Saharan African Countries and for Other Purposes

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. Section 506A(b)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the ``1974 
Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2466a(b)(1)), as added by section 111(a) of the 
African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of Public Law 106-200) 
(AGOA), authorizes the President to provide duty-free treatment under 
the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) to any article described in 
section 503(b)(1)(B) through (G) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
2463(b)(1)(B)-(G)) that is the growth, product, or manufacture of a 
designated beneficiary sub-Saharan African country, if, after taking 
into account the advice of the United States International Trade 
Commission (USITC), the President determines that such ar

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ticle is not import-sensitive in the context of imports from beneficiary 
sub-Saharan African countries.
2. Proclamation 7350 of October 2, 2000, designated certain countries 
listed in section 107 of the AGOA as beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries.
3. Pursuant to section 506A(b)(1) of the 1974 Act, and having taken into 
account the advice of the USITC, I have determined that certain articles 
are not import-sensitive in the context of imports from beneficiary sub-
Saharan African countries. I have determined to designate those articles 
as eligible for duty-free treatment under the GSP. I have decided to 
designate these articles by inserting the symbol ``D'' in the Rates of 
Duty 1-Special subcolumn of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United 
States (HTS) for subheadings covering such articles.
4. Section 213(b)(3)(A) of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act 
(CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(3)(A)), as amended by section 211(a) of the 
United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (Title II of Public 
Law 106-200) (CBTPA), provides that the tariff treatment accorded at any 
time during the transition period defined in section 213(b)(5)(D) of the 
CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(5)(D)), as amended by section 211(a) of the 
CBTPA, to certain articles that are originating goods of designated 
CBTPA beneficiary countries shall be identical to the tariff treatment 
that is accorded at such time under Annex 302.2 of the North American 
Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to an article described in the same 8-digit 
subheading of the HTS that is a good of Mexico and is imported into the 
United States. Such articles are described in section 213(b)(1)(B) 
through (F) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(1)(B)-(F)), as amended by 
section 211(a) of the CBTPA.
5. Proclamation 7351 of October 2, 2000, designated certain countries as 
CBTPA beneficiary countries and reflected in the HTS the tariff 
treatment provided under the CBTPA, which became effective on that date 
with respect to those CBTPA beneficiary countries enumerated in a 
Federal Register notice issued by the United States Trade 
Representative. The Annex to Proclamation 7351 designated certain HTS 
subheadings covering articles described in section 213(b)(1)(B) through 
(F) of the CBERA as eligible for the tariff treatment authorized by 
section 213(b)(3)(A) of the CBERA. Certain HTS provisions covering 
watches and watch parts and footwear were inadvertently omitted. I have 
determined that these provisions should be designated as covering 
articles eligible for the tariff treatment authorized by section 
213(b)(3)(A) of the CBERA.
6. Proclamation 7351 incorporated into the HTS the provisions of the 
CBTPA concerning the tariff treatment of certain textile and apparel 
articles imported into the United States from designated CBTPA 
beneficiary countries, pursuant to section 213(b)(2) of the CBERA (19 
U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)), as amended by section 211(a) of the CBTPA. I have 
determined that a technical error in one of the legal notes to chapter 
98 of the HTS created by the Annex to that proclamation should be 
corrected.
7. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the President 
to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant provisions of that 
Act, and of other acts affecting import treatment, and actions 
thereunder, including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.

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NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States of America, including title V and section 
604 of the 1974 Act, section 111 of the AGOA, section 211 of the CBTPA, 
and section 213 of the CBERA, do proclaim that:
    (1) In order to provide duty-free treatment under the GSP to certain 
articles when imported from designated beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries, the HTS is modified as provided in Annex I to this 
proclamation.
    (2) In order to accord, at any time during the transition period, to 
certain watches and watch parts described in section 213(b)(1)(E) of the 
CBERA, when such watches and watch parts are CBTPA originating goods, 
the identical tariff treatment that is accorded at such time under Annex 
302.2 of the NAFTA to an article described in the same 8-digit 
subheading of the HTS that is a good of Mexico and is imported into the 
United States, chapter 91 of the HTS is modified as provided in Annex II 
to this proclamation.
    (3) In order to make a technical correction in U.S. note 2(c) to 
subchapter XX of chapter 98 of the HTS, such note is modified as 
provided in Annex II to this proclamation.
    (4) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive orders 
that are inconsistent with this proclamation are superseded to the 
extent of such inconsistency.
    (5)(a) The modifications made by Annex I to this proclamation shall 
be effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from 
warehouse for consumption, on or after the date of publication of this 
proclamation in the Federal Register.
 (b) The modifications made by Annex II to this proclamation shall be 
effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse 
for consumption, on or after October 2, 2000.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighteenth day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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Proclamation 7389 of December 29, 2000

To Extend Nondiscriminatory Treatment (Normal Trade Relations Treatment) 
to the Products of the Republic of Georgia

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

1. The Republic of Georgia (Georgia) has made progress, since its 
emergence from communism, toward democratic rule and the creation of a 
free market economy. Georgia has also made considerable progress toward 
respecting fundamental human rights consistent with the objectives of 
title IV of the Trade Act of 1974 (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2431, 
et seq.). Further, I have found Georgia to be in full compliance with 
the freedom of emigration requirements under the Trade Act. In 1993, 
Georgia concluded a bilateral trade agreement with the United States and 
in 1994 concluded a bilateral investment treaty with the United States. 
Georgia acceded to the World Trade Organization (WTO) on June 14, 2000. 
The extension of unconditional normal trade relations treatment to the 
products of Georgia will permit the United States to avail itself of all 
rights under the WTO with respect to Georgia.
2. Pursuant to section 3002 of Public Law 106-476, 114 Stat. 2101, 2175, 
and having due regard for the findings of the Congress in section 3001 
of that law, I hereby determine that title IV of the Trade Act should no 
longer apply to Georgia.
NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
America, acting under the authority vested in me by the Constitution and 
the laws of the United States, including but not limited to section 3002 
of Public Law 106-476, do hereby proclaim that:
    (1) Nondiscriminatory treatment (normal trade relations treatment) 
shall be extended to the products of Georgia; and
    (2) The extension of nondiscriminatory treatment to the products of 
Georgia shall be effective as of the date of signature of this 
proclamation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of 
December, in the year of our Lord two thousand, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

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________________________________________________________________________

                            EXECUTIVE ORDERS

________________________________________________________________________



Executive Order 13145 of February 8, 2000

To Prohibit Discrimination in Federal Employment Based on Genetic 
Information

By the authority vested in me as President of the United States by the 
Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is ordered 
as follows:
Section 1. Nondiscrimination in Federal Employment on the Basis of 
Protected Genetic Information.
    1-101. It is the policy of the Government of the United States to 
provide equal employment opportunity in Federal employment for all 
qualified persons and to prohibit discrimination against employees based 
on protected genetic information, or information about a request for or 
the receipt of genetic services. This policy of equal opportunity 
applies to every aspect of Federal employment.
    1-102. The head of each Executive department and agency shall extend 
the policy set forth in section 1-101 to all its employees covered by 
section 717 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended (42 
U.S.C. 2000e-16).
    1-103. Executive departments and agencies shall carry out the 
provisions of this order to the extent permitted by law and consistent 
with their statutory and regulatory authorities, and their enforcement 
mechanisms. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission shall be 
responsible for coordinating the policy of the Government of the United 
States to prohibit discrimination against employees in Federal 
employment based on protected genetic information, or information about 
a request for or the receipt of genetic services.
Sec. 2. Requirements Applicable to Employing Departments and Agencies.
    1-201. Definitions.
    (a) The term ``employee'' shall include an employee, applicant for 
        employment, or former employee covered by section 717 of the 
        Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended (42 U.S.C. 2000e-16).

[[Page 236]]

    (b) Genetic monitoring means the periodic examination of employees 
        to evaluate acquired modifications to their genetic material, 
        such as chromosomal damage or evidence of increased occurrence of 
        mutations, that may have developed in the course of employment 
        due to exposure to toxic substances in the workplace, in order to 
        identify, evaluate, respond to the effects of, or control adverse 
        environmental exposures in the workplace.
    (c) Genetic services means health services, including genetic tests, 
        provided to obtain, assess, or interpret genetic information for 
        diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, or for genetic education or 
        counseling.
    (d) Genetic test means the analysis of human DNA, RNA, chromosomes, 
        proteins, or certain metabolites in order to detect disease-related 
        genotypes or mutations. Tests for metabolites fall within the 
        definition of ``genetic tests'' when an excess or deficiency of the 
        metabolites indicates the presence of a mutation or mutations. The 
        conducting of metabolic tests by a department or agency that are not 
        intended to reveal the presence of a mutation shall not be 
        considered a violation of this order, regardless of the results of 
        the tests. Test results revealing a mutation shall, however, be 
        subject to the provisions of this order.
    (e) Protected genetic information.
          (1) In general, protected genetic information means:
                (A) information about an individual's genetic tests;
                (B) information about the genetic tests of an 
                    individual's family members; or
                (C) information about the occurrence of a disease, or 
                    medical condition or disorder in family members of 
                    the individual.
          (2) Information about an individual's current health status 
              (including information about sex, age, physical exams, and 
              chemical, blood, or urine analyses) is not protected 
              genetic information unless it is described in subparagraph 
              (1).
    1-202. In discharging their responsibilities under this order, 
departments and agencies shall implement the following nondiscrimination 
requirements.
    (a) The employing department or agency shall not discharge, fail or 
        refuse to hire, or otherwise discriminate against any employee with 
        respect to the compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of 
        employment of that employee, because of protected genetic 
        information with respect to the employee, or because of information 
        about a request for or the receipt of genetic services by such 
        employee.
    (b) The employing department or agency shall not limit, segregate, or 
        classify employees in any way that would deprive or tend to deprive 
        any employee of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely 
        affect that employee's status, because of protected genetic 
        information with respect to the employee or because of information 
        about a request for or the receipt of genetic services by such 
        employee.
    (c) The employing department or agency shall not request, require, 
        collect, or purchase protected genetic information with respect to 
        an employee, or information about a request for or the receipt of 
        genetic services by such employee.

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    (d) The employing department or agency shall not disclose protected 
        genetic information with respect to an employee, or information 
        about a request for or the receipt of genetic services by an 
        employee except:
          (1) to the employee who is the subject of the information, at 
              his or her request;
          (2) to an occupational or other health researcher, if the 
              research conducted complies with the regulations and 
              protections provided for under part 46 of title 45, of the 
              Code of Federal Regulations;
          (3) if required by a Federal statute, congressional subpoena, or 
              an order issued by a court of competent jurisdiction, except 
              that if the subpoena or court order was secured without the 
              knowledge of the individual to whom the information refers, 
              the employer shall provide the individual with adequate 
              notice to challenge the subpoena or court order, unless the 
              subpoena or court order also imposes confidentiality 
              requirements; or
          (4) to executive branch officials investigating compliance with 
              this order, if the information is relevant to the 
              investigation.
    (e) The employing department or agency shall not maintain protected 
        genetic information or information about a request for or the 
        receipt of genetic services in general personnel files; such 
        information shall be treated as confidential medical records and 
        kept separate from personnel files.
Sec. 3. Exceptions.
    1-301. The following exceptions shall apply to the nondiscrimination 
requirements set forth in section 1-202.
    (a) The employing department or agency may request or require 
        information defined in section 1-201(e)(1)(C) with respect to an 
        applicant who has been given a conditional offer of employment or 
        to an employee if:
          (1) the request or requirement is consistent with the 
              Rehabilitation Act and other applicable law;
          (2) the information obtained is to be used exclusively to 
              assess whether further medical evaluation is needed to 
              diagnose a current disease, or medical condition or disorder, 
              or under the terms of section 1-301(b) of this order;
          (3) such current disease, or medical condition or disorder 
              could prevent the applicant or employee from performing the 
              essential functions of the position held or desired; and
          (4) the information defined in section 1-201(e)(1)(C) of this 
              order will not be disclosed to persons other than medical 
              personnel involved in or responsible for assessing whether 
              further medical evaluation is needed to diagnose a current 
              disease, or medical condition or disorder, or under the terms 
              of section 1-301(b) of this order.
    (b) The employing department or agency may request, collect, or 
        purchase protected genetic information with respect to an employee, 
        or any information about a request for or receipt of genetic 
        services by such employee if:

[[Page 238]]

          (1) the employee uses genetic or health care services provided 
              by the employer (other than use pursuant to section 1-301(a) 
              of this order);
          (2) the employee who uses the genetic or health care services 
              has provided prior knowing, voluntary, and written 
              authorization to the employer to collect protected genetic 
              information;
          (3) the person who performs the genetic or health care services 
              does not disclose protected genetic information to anyone 
              except to the employee who uses the services for treatment of 
              the individual; pursuant to section 1-202(d) of this order; 
              for program evaluation or assessment; for compiling and 
              analyzing information in anticipation of or for use in 
              a civil or criminal legal proceeding; or, for payment or 
              accounting purposes, to verify that the service was performed 
              (but in such cases the genetic information itself cannot be 
              disclosed);
          (4) such information is not used in violation of sections 1-202(a) 
              or 1-202(b) of this order.
    (c) The employing department or agency may collect protected genetic 
        information with respect to an employee if the requirements of part 
        46 of title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations are met.
    (d) Genetic monitoring of biological effects of toxic substances in the 
        workplace shall be permitted if all of the following conditions are 
        met:
          (1) the employee has provided prior, knowing, voluntary, and 
              written authorization;
          (2) employee is notified when the results of the monitoring are 
              available and, at that time, the employer makes any protected 
              genetic information that may have been acquired during the 
              monitoring available to the employee and informs the employee 
              how to obtain such information;
          (3) the monitoring conforms to any genetic monitoring regulations 
              that may be promulgated by the Secretary of Labor; and
          (4) the employer, excluding any licensed health care professionals 
              that are involved in the genetic monitoring program, receives 
              results of the monitoring only in aggregate terms that do not 
              disclose the identity of specific employees.
    (e) This order does not limit the statutory authority of a Federal 
        department or agency to:
          (1) promulgate or enforce workplace safety and health laws and 
              regulations;
          (2) conduct or sponsor occupational or other health research that 
              is conducted in compliance with regulations at part 46 of 
              title 45, of the Code of Federal Regulations; or
          (3) collect protected genetic information as a part of a lawful 
              program, the primary purpose of which is to carry out 
              identification purposes.
Sec. 4. Miscellaneous.
    1-401. The head of each department and agency shall take appropriate 
action to disseminate this policy and, to this end, shall designate a 
high level official responsible for carrying out its responsibilities 
under this order.
    1-402. Nothing in this order shall be construed to:

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    (a) limit the rights or protections of an individual under the 
        Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 701, et seq.), the Privacy 
        Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), or other applicable law; or
    (b) require specific benefits for an employee or dependent under the 
        Federal Employees Health Benefits Program or similar program.
    1-403. This order clarifies and makes uniform Administration policy 
and does not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
enforceable at law by a party against the United States, its officers or 
employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    February 8, 2000.



Executive Order 13146 of February 29, 2000

President's Council on the Future of Princeville,
North Carolina

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to develop 
recommendations for Federal agency actions to address the future of 
Princeville, North Carolina, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. Princeville, North Carolina (Princeville) has a 
unique place in American history. This small city in eastern North 
Carolina was the first city in the United States founded by ex-slaves. 
In its history, Princeville has been damaged by floods many times. 
Recently, it was devastated by floods caused by Hurricane Floyd. In 
response to the damage, appropriate Federal agencies have already begun 
repair and recovery efforts to assist Princeville. However, it is the 
policy of this Administration to do more to help this city that occupies 
such a significant place in our history. Therefore, this order will 
create an interagency council to develop recommendations for further 
actions to address the future of Princeville.
Sec. 2. Establishment. (a) There is established the ``President's 
Council on the Future of Princeville, North Carolina'' (Council). The 
Council shall comprise the Secretaries of Defense, Agriculture, 
Commerce, Labor, Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban 
Development, Transportation, the Director of the Office of Management 
and Budget (OMB), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, the Commander of the Army Corps of Engineers, the Administrator 
of the Small Business Administration, the Director of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, the Assistant to the President for Domestic 
Policy, the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, and the 
Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs, or their 
designees, and such other executive department and agency (agencies) 
representatives as the President may deem appropriate. The Council shall 
consult with other agencies and State and local governments, as 
appropriate.
    (b) The Director of the Office of Management and Budget, or his 
designee, shall serve as Chair of the Council.

[[Page 240]]

Sec. 3. Functions. The Council shall develop recommendations for the 
President on further agency and legislative actions that can be 
undertaken to address the future of Princeville. In developing the 
recommendations, the Council shall consider, among other things: (a) the 
unique historic and cultural importance of Princeville in American 
history; (b) the views and recommendations of the relevant State and 
local governments, the private sector, citizens, community groups, and 
non-profit organizations, on actions that they all could take to enhance 
the future of Princeville and its citizens; and (c) agency assessments 
andrecommendations to repair and rebuild Princeville, and, to the extent 
practicable, protect Princeville from future floods. The Council, 
through its Chair, shall submit its recommendations to the President. 
Where appropriate, the Council's recommendations shall include draft 
legislation requesting additional funding or other authorities to aid in 
the reconstruction and protection of Princeville.
Sec. 4. Coordination. At the request of the Chair, agencies shall 
cooperate with and provide information to the Council.
Sec. 5. Judicial Review. This order is not intended to, nor does it 
create, any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at 
law by a party against the United States, it agencies, its officers or 
employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    February 29, 2000.



Executive Order 13147 of March 7, 2000

White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), and in order to establish the 
White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy, 
it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Establishment. There is established in the Department of 
Health and Human Services (Department) the White House Commission on 
Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy (Commission). The 
Commission shall be composed of not more than 15 members appointed by 
the President from knowledgeable representatives in health care practice 
and complementary and alternative medicine. The President shall 
designate a Chair from among the members of the Commission. The 
Secretary of Health and Human Services (Secretary) shall appoint an 
Executive Director for the Commission.
Sec. 2. Functions. The Commission shall provide a report, through the 
Secretary, to the President on legislative and administrative 
recommendations for assuring that public policy maximizes the benefits 
to Americans of complementary and alternative medicine. The 
recommendations shall address the following:

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    (a) the education and training of health care practitioners in 
complementary and alternative medicine;
    (b) coordinated research to increase knowledge about complementary 
and alternative medicine practices and products;
    (c) the provision to health care professionals of reliable and 
useful information about complementary and alternative medicine that can 
be made readily accessible and understandable to the general public; and
    (d) guidance for appropriate access to and delivery of complementary 
and alternative medicine.
Sec. 3. Administration. (a) To the extent permitted by law, the heads of 
executive departments and agencies shall provide the Commission, upon 
request, with such information and assistance as it may require for the 
purpose of carrying out its functions.
    (b) Each member of the Commission shall receive compensation at a 
rate equal to the daily equivalent of the annual rate specified for 
Level 1V of the Executive Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5315) for each day during 
which the member is engaged in the performance of the duties of the 
Commission. While away from their homes or regular places of business in 
the performance of the duties of the Commission, members shall be 
allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as 
authorized by law for persons serving intermittently in Government 
service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
    (c) The Department shall provide the Commission with funding and 
with administrative services, facilities, staff, and other support 
services necessary for the performance of the Commission's functions.
    (d) In accordance with guidelines issued by the Administrator of 
General Services, the Secretary shall perform the functions of the 
President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. 
App.), with respect to the Commission, except that of reporting to the 
Congress.
    (e) The Commission shall terminate 2 years from the date of this 
order unless extended by the President prior to such date.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    March 7, 2000.



Executive Order 13148 of April 21, 2000

Greening the Government Through Leadership in
Environmental Management

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Emergency Planning 
and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (42 U.S.C. 11001-11050) (EPCRA), 
the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 13101-13109) (PPA), the 
Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q) (CAA), and section 301 of title 3, 
United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:
PART 1--PREAMBLE

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Section 101. Federal Environmental Leadership. The head of each Federal 
agency is responsible for ensuring that all necessary actions are taken 
to integrate environmental accountability into agency day-to-day 
decisionmaking and long-term planning processes, across all agency 
missions, activities, and functions. Consequently, environmental 
management considerations must be a fundamental and integral component 
of Federal Government policies, operations, planning, and management. 
The head of each Federal agency is responsible for meeting the goals and 
requirements of this order.
PART 2--GOALS
Sec. 201. Environmental Management. Through development and 
implementation of environmental management systems, each agency shall 
ensure that strategies are established to support environmental 
leadership programs, policies, and procedures and that agency senior 
level managers explicitly and actively endorse these strategies.
Sec. 202. Environmental Compliance. Each agency shall comply with 
environmental regulations by establishing and implementing environmental 
compliance audit programs and policies that emphasize pollution 
prevention as a means to both achieve and maintain environmental 
compliance.
Sec. 203. Right-to-Know and Pollution Prevention. Through timely 
planning and reporting under the EPCRA, Federal facilities shall be 
leaders and responsible members of their communities by informing the 
public and their workers of possible sources of pollution resulting from 
facility operations. Each agency shall strive to reduce or eliminate 
harm to human health and the environment from releases of pollutants to 
the environment. Each agency shall advance the national policy that, 
whenever feasible and cost-effective, pollution should be prevented or 
reduced at the source. Funding for regulatory compliance programs shall 
emphasize pollution prevention as a means to address environmental 
compliance.
Sec. 204. Release Reduction: Toxic Chemicals. Through innovative 
pollution prevention, effective facility management, and sound 
acquisition and procurement practices, each agency shall reduce its 
reported Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) releases and off-site transfers 
of toxic chemicals for treatment and disposal by 10 percent annually, or 
by 40 percent overall by December 31, 2006.
Sec. 205. Use Reduction: Toxic Chemicals and Hazardous Substances and 
Other Pollutants. Through identification of proven substitutes and 
established facility management practices, including pollution 
prevention, each agency shall reduce its use of selected toxic 
chemicals, hazardous substances, and pollutants, or its generation of 
hazardous and radioactive waste types at its facilities by 50 percent by 
December 31, 2006. If an agency is unable to reduce the use of selected 
chemicals, that agency will reduce the use of selected hazardous 
substances or its generation of other pollutants, such as hazardous and 
radioactive waste types, at its facilities by 50 percent by December 31, 
2006.
Sec. 206. Reductions in Ozone-Depleting Substances. Through evaluating 
present and future uses of ozone-depleting substances and maximizing the 
purchase and the use of safe, cost effective, and environmentally 
preferable alternatives, each agency shall develop a plan to phase out 
the procurement

[[Page 243]]

of Class I ozone-depleting substances for all nonexcepted uses by 
December 31, 2010.
Sec. 207. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Landscaping. Each 
agency shall strive to promote the sustainable management of Federal 
facility lands through the implementation of cost-effective, 
environmentally sound landscaping practices, and programs to reduce 
adverse impacts to the natural environment.
PART 3--PLANNING AND ACCOUNTABILITY
Sec. 301. Annual Budget Submission. Federal agencies shall place high 
priority on obtaining funding and resources needed for implementation of 
the Greening the Government Executive Orders, including funding to 
address findings and recommendations from environmental management 
system audits or facility compliance audits conducted under sections 401 
and 402 of this order. Federal agencies shall make such requests as 
required in Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-11.
Sec. 302. Application of Life Cycle Assessment Concepts. Each agency 
with facilities shall establish a pilot program to apply life cycle 
assessment and environmental cost accounting principles. To the maximum 
extent feasible and cost-effective, agencies shall apply those 
principles elsewhere in the agency to meet the goals and requirements of 
this order. Such analysis shall be considered in the process established 
in the OMB Capital Programming Guide and OMB Circular A-11. The 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in coordination with the 
Workgroup established in section 306 of this order, shall, to the extent 
feasible, assist agencies in identifying, applying, and developing tools 
that reflect life cycle assessment and environmental cost accounting 
principles and provide technical assistance to agencies in developing 
life cycle assessments and environmental cost accounting assessments 
under this Part.
Sec. 303. Pollution Prevention to Address Compliance. Each agency shall 
ensure that its environmental regulatory compliance funding policies 
promote the use of pollution prevention to achieve and maintain 
environmental compliance at the agency's facilities. Agencies shall 
adopt a policy to preferentially use pollution prevention projects and 
activities to correct and prevent noncompliance with environmental 
regulatory requirements. Agency funding requests for facility compliance 
with Federal, State, and local environmental regulatory requirements 
shall emphasize pollution prevention through source reduction as the 
means of first choice to ensure compliance, with reuse and recycling 
alternatives having second priority as a means of compliance.
Sec. 304. Pollution Prevention Return-on-Investment Programs. Each 
agency shall develop and implement a pollution prevention program at its 
facilities that compares the life cycle costs of treatment and/or 
disposal of waste and pollutant streams to the life cycle costs of 
alternatives that eliminate or reduce toxic chemicals or pollutants at 
the source. Each agency shall implement those projects that are life-
cycle cost-effective, or otherwise offer substantial environmental or 
economic benefits.
Sec. 305. Policies, Strategies, and Plans.
    (a) Within 12 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
ensure that the goals and requirements of this order are incorporated 
into existing agency environmental directives, policies, and documents 
affected by the

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requirements and goals of this order. Where such directives and policies 
do not already exist, each agency shall, within 12 months of the date of 
this order, prepare and endorse a written agency environmental 
management strategy to achieve the requirements and goals of this order. 
Agency preparation of directives, policies, and documents shall reflect 
the nature, scale, and environmental impacts of the agency's activities, 
products, or services. Agencies are encouraged to include elements of 
relevant agency policies or strategies developed under this part in 
agency planning documents prepared under the Government Performance and 
Results Act of 1993, Public Law 103-62.
    (b) By March 31, 2002, each agency shall ensure that its facilities 
develop a written plan that sets forth the facility's contribution to 
the goals and requirements established in this order. The plan should 
reflect the size and complexity of the facility. Where pollution 
prevention plans or other formal environmental planning instruments have 
been prepared for agency facilities, an agency may elect to update those 
plans to meet the requirements and goals of this section.
    (c) The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Council shall develop 
acquisition policies and procedures for contractors to supply agencies 
with all information necessary for compliance with this order. Once the 
appropriate FAR clauses have been published, agencies shall use them in 
all applicable contracts. In addition, to the extent that compliance 
with this order is made more difficult due to lack of information from 
existing contractors, or concessioners, each agency shall take practical 
steps to obtain the information needed to comply with this order from 
such contractors or concessioners.
Sec. 306. Interagency Environmental Leadership Workgroup. Within 4 
months of the date of this order, EPA shall convene and chair an 
Interagency Environmental Leadership Workgroup (the Workgroup) with 
senior-level representatives from all executive agencies and other 
interested independent Government agencies affected by this order. The 
Workgroup shall develop policies and guidance required by this order and 
member agencies shall facilitate implementation of the requirements of 
this order in their respective agencies. Workgroup members shall 
coordinate with their Agency Environmental Executive (AEE) designated 
under section 301(d) of Executive Order 13101 and may request the 
assistance of their AEE in resolving issues that may arise among members 
in developing policies and guidance related to this order. If the AEEs 
are unable to resolve the issues, they may request the assistance of the 
Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ).
Sec. 307. Annual Reports. Each agency shall submit an annual progress 
report to the Administrator on implementation of this order. The reports 
shall include a description of the progress that the agency has made in 
complying with all aspects of this order, including, but not limited to, 
progress in achieving the reduction goals in sections 502, 503, and 505 
of this order. Each agency may prepare and submit the annual report in 
electronic format. A copy of the report shall be submitted to the 
Federal Environmental Executive (FEE) by EPA for use in the biennial 
Greening the Government Report to the President prepared in accordance 
with Executive Order 13101. Within 9 months of the date of this order, 
EPA, in coordination with the Workgroup established under section 306 of 
this order, shall prepare guidance regarding the information and timing 
for the annual re

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port. The Workgroup shall coordinate with those agencies responsible for 
Federal agency reporting guidance under the Greening the Government 
Executive orders to streamline reporting requirements and reduce agency 
and facility-level reporting burdens. The first annual report shall 
cover calendar year 2000 activities.
PART 4--PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP
Sec. 401. Agency and Facility Environmental Management Systems. To 
attain the goals of section 201 of this order:
    (a) Within 18 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
conduct an agency-level environmental management system self assessment 
based on the Code of Environmental Management Principles for Federal 
Agencies developed by the EPA (61 Fed. Reg. 54062) and/or another 
appropriate environmental management system framework. Each assessment 
shall include a review of agency environmental leadership goals, 
objectives, and targets. Where appropriate, the assessments may be 
conducted at the service, bureau, or other comparable level.
    (b) Within 24 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
implement environmental management systems through pilot projects at 
selected agency facilities based on the Code of Environmental Management 
Principles for Federal Agencies and/or another appropriate environmental 
management system framework. By December 31, 2005, each agency shall 
implement an environmental management system at all appropriate agency 
facilities based on facility size, complexity, and the environmental 
aspects of facility operations. The facility environmental management 
system shall include measurable environmental goals, objectives, and 
targets that are reviewed and updated annually. Once established, 
environmental management system performance measures shall be 
incorporated in agency facility audit protocols.
Sec. 402. Facility Compliance Audits. To attain the goals of section 202 
of this order:
    (a) Within 12 months of the date of this order, each agency that 
does not have an established regulatory environmental compliance audit 
program shall develop and implement a program to conduct facility 
environmental compliance audits and begin auditing at its facilities 
within 6 months of the development of that program.
    (b) An agency with an established regulatory environmental 
compliance audit program may elect to conduct environmental management 
system audits in lieu of regulatory environmental compliance audits at 
selected facilities.
    (c) Facility environmental audits shall be conducted periodically. 
Each agency is encouraged to conduct audits not less than every 3 years 
from the date of the initial or previous audit. The scope and frequency 
of audits shall be based on facility size, complexity, and the 
environmental aspects of facility operations. As appropriate, each 
agency shall include tenant, contractor, and concessioner activities in 
facility audits.
    (d) Each agency shall conduct internal reviews and audits and shall 
take such other steps, as may be necessary, to monitor its facilities' 
compliance with sections 501 and 504 of this order.

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    (e) Each agency shall consider findings from the assessments or 
audits conducted under Part 4 in program planning under section 301 of 
this order and in the preparation and revisions to facility plans 
prepared under section 305 of this order.
    (f) Upon request and to the extent practicable, the EPA shall 
provide technical assistance in meeting the requirements of Part 4 by 
conducting environmental management reviews at Federal facilities and 
developing policies and guidance for conducting environmental compliance 
audits and implementing environmental management systems at Federal 
facilities.
Sec. 403. Environmental Leadership and Agency Awards Programs.
    (a) Within 12 months of the date of this order, the Administrator 
shall establish a Federal Government environmental leadership program to 
promote and recognize outstanding environmental management performance 
in agencies and facilities.
    (b) Each agency shall develop an internal agency-wide awards program 
to reward and highlight innovative programs and individuals showing 
outstanding environmental leadership in implementing this order. In 
addition, based upon criteria developed by the EPA in coordination with 
the Workgroup established in section 306 of this order, Federal 
employees who demonstrate outstanding leadership in implementation of 
this order may be considered for recognition under the White House 
awards program set forth in section 803 of Executive Order 13101 of 
September 14, 1998.
Sec. 404. Management Leadership and Performance Evaluations.
    (a) To ensure awareness of and support for the environmental 
requirements of this order, each agency shall include training on the 
provisions of the Greening the Government Executive orders in standard 
senior level management training as well as training for program 
managers, contracting personnel, procurement and acquisition personnel, 
facility managers, contractors, concessioners, and other personnel as 
appropriate. In coordination with the Workgroup established under 
section 306 of this order, the EPA shall prepare guidance on 
implementation of this section.
    (b) To recognize and reinforce the responsibilities of facility and 
senior headquarters program managers, regional environmental 
coordinators and officers, their superiors, and, to the extent 
practicable and appropriate, others vital to the implementation of this 
order, each agency shall include successful implementation of pollution 
prevention, community awareness, and environmental management into its 
position descriptions and performance evaluations for those positions.
Sec. 405. Compliance Assistance.
    (a) Upon request and to the extent practicable, the EPA shall 
provide technical advice and assistance to agencies to foster full 
compliance with environmental regulations and all aspects of this order.
    (b) Within 12 months of the date of this order, the EPA shall 
develop a compliance assistance center to provide technical assistance 
for Federal facility compliance with environmental regulations and all 
aspects of this order.
    (c) To enhance landscaping options and awareness, the United States 
Department of Agriculture (USDA) shall provide information on the 
suitability, propagation, and the use of native plants for landscaping 
to all

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agencies and the general public by USDA in conjunction with the center 
under subsection (b) of this section. In implementing Part 6 of this 
order, agencies are encouraged to develop model demonstration programs 
in coordination with the USDA.
Sec. 406. Compliance Assurance.
    (a) In consultation with other agencies, the EPA may conduct such 
reviews and inspections as may be necessary to monitor compliance with 
sections 501 and 504 of this order. Each agency is encouraged to 
cooperate fully with the efforts of the EPA to ensure compliance with 
those sections.
    (b) Whenever the Administrator notifies an agency that it is not in 
compliance with section 501 or 504 of this order, the agency shall 
provide the EPA a detailed plan for achieving compliance as promptly as 
practicable.
    (c) The Administrator shall report annually to the President and the 
public on agency compliance with the provisions of sections 501 and 504 
of this order.
Sec. 407. Improving Environmental Management. To ensure that government-
wide goals for pollution prevention are advanced, each agency is 
encouraged to incorporate its environmental leadership goals into its 
Strategic and Annual Performance Plans required by the Government 
Performance and Results Act of 1993, Public Law 103-62, starting with 
performance plans accompanying the FY 2002 budget.
PART 5--EMERGENCY PLANNING, COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW, AND POLLUTION 
PREVENTION
Sec. 501. Toxics Release Inventory/Pollution Prevention Act Reporting. 
To attain the goals of section 203 of this order:
    (a) Each agency shall comply with the provisions set forth in 
section 313 of EPCRA, section 6607 of PPA, all implementing regulations, 
and future amendments to these authorities, in light of applicable EPA 
guidance.
    (b) Each agency shall comply with these provisions without regard to 
the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) or North American 
Industrial Classification System (NAICS) delineations. Except as 
described in subsection (d) of this section, all other existing 
statutory or regulatory limitations or exemptions on the application of 
EPCRA section 313 to specific activities at specific agency facilities 
apply to the reporting requirements set forth in subsection (a) of this 
section.
    (c) Each agency required to report under subsection (a) of this 
section shall do so using electronic reporting as provided in EPA's 
EPCRA section 313 guidance.
    (d) Within 12 months of the date of this order, the Administrator 
shall review the impact on reporting of existing regulatory exemptions 
on the application of EPCRA section 313 at Federal facilities. Where 
feasible, this review shall include pilot studies at Federal facilities. 
If the review indicates that application of existing exemptions to 
Federal Government reporting under this section precludes public 
reporting of substantial amounts of toxic chemicals under subsection 
501(a), the EPA shall prepare guidance, in coordination with the 
Workgroup established under section 306 of this order, clarifying 
application of the exemptions at Federal facilities. In developing the 
guidance, the EPA should consider similar application of such regulatory 
limitations and exemptions by the private sector. To the extent

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feasible, the guidance developed by the EPA shall be consistent with the 
reasonable application of such regulatory limitations and exemptions in 
the private sector. The guidance shall ensure reporting consistent with 
the goal of public access to information under section 313 of EPCRA and 
section 6607 of PPA. The guidance shall be submitted to the AEEs 
established under section 301(d) of Executive Order 13101 for review and 
endorsement. Each agency shall apply any guidance to reporting at its 
facilities as soon as practicable but no later than for reporting for 
the next calendar year following release of the guidance.
    (e) The EPA shall coordinate with other interested Federal agencies 
to carry out pilot projects to collect and disseminate information about 
the release and other waste management of chemicals associated with the 
environmental response and restoration at their facilities and sites. 
The pilot projects will focus on releases and other waste management of 
chemicals associated with environmental response and restoration at 
facilities and sites where the activities generating wastes do not 
otherwise meet EPCRA section 313 thresholds for manufacture, process, or 
other use. Each agency is encouraged to identify applicable facilities 
and voluntarily report under subsection (a) of this section the releases 
and other waste management of toxic chemicals managed during 
environmental response and restoration, regardless of whether the 
facility otherwise would report under subsection (a). The releases and 
other waste management of chemicals associated with environmental 
response and restoration voluntarily reported under this subsection will 
not be included in the accounting established under sections 503(a) and 
(c) of this order.
Sec. 502. Release Reduction: Toxic Chemicals. To attain the goals of 
section 204 of this order:
    (a) Beginning with reporting for calendar year 2001 activities, each 
agency reporting under section 501 of this order shall adopt a goal of 
reducing, where cost effective, the agency's total releases of toxic 
chemicals to the environment and off-site transfers of such chemicals 
for treatment and disposal by at least 10 percent annually, or by 40 
percent overall by December 31, 2006. Beginning with activities for 
calendar year 2001, the baseline for measuring progress in meeting the 
reduction goal will be the aggregate of all such releases and off-site 
transfers of such chemicals for treatment and disposal as reported by 
all of the agency's facilities under section 501 of this order. The list 
of toxic chemicals applicable to this goal is the EPCRA section 313 list 
as of December 1, 2000. If an agency achieves the 40 percent reduction 
goal prior to December 31, 2006, that agency shall establish a new 
baseline and reduction goal based on agency priorities.
    (b) Where an agency is unable to pursue the reduction goal 
established in subsection (a) for certain chemicals that are mission 
critical and/or needed to protect human health and the environment or 
where agency off-site transfer of toxic chemicals for treatment is 
directly associated with environmental restoration activities, that 
agency may request a waiver from the EPA for all or part of the 
requirement in subsection (a) of this section. As appropriate, waiver 
requests must provide: (1) an explanation of the mission critical use of 
the chemical; (2) an explanation of the nature of the need for the 
chemical to protect human health; (3) a description of efforts to 
identify a less harmful substitute chemical or alternative processes to 
reduce the release and transfer of the chemical in question; and (4) a 
description of the off-site transfers of toxic chemicals for treatment 
directly associ

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ated with environmental restoration activities. The EPA shall respond to 
the waiver request within 90 days and may grant such a waiver for no 
longer than 2 years. An agency may resubmit a request for waiver at the 
end of that period. The waiver under this section shall not alter 
requirements to report under section 501 of this order.
    (c) Where a specific component (e.g., bureau, service, or command) 
within an agency achieves a 75 percent reduction in its 1999 reporting 
year publicly reported total releases of toxic chemicals to the 
environment and off-site transfers of such chemicals for treatment and 
disposal, based on the 1994 baseline established in Executive Order 
12856, that agency may independently elect to establish a reduction goal 
for that component lower than the 40 percent target established in 
subsection (a) of this section. The agency shall formally notify the 
Workgroup established in section 306 of this order of the elected 
reduction target.
Sec. 503. Use Reduction: Toxic Chemicals, Hazardous Substances, and 
Other Pollutants. To attain the goals of section 205 of this order:
    (a) Within 18 months of the date of this order, each agency with 
facilities shall develop and support goals to reduce the use at such 
agencies' facilities of the priority chemicals on the list under 
subsection (b) of this section for identified applications and purposes, 
or alternative chemicals and pollutants the agency identifies under 
subsection (c) of this section, by at least 50 percent by December 31, 
2006.
    (b) Within 9 months of the date of this order the Administrator, in 
coordination with the Workgroup established in section 306 of this 
order, shall develop a list of not less than 15 priority chemicals used 
by the Federal Government that may result in significant harm to human 
health or the environment and that have known, readily available, less 
harmful substitutes for identified applications and purposes. In 
addition to identifying the applications and purposes to which such 
reductions apply, the Administrator, in coordination with the Workgroup 
shall identify a usage threshold below which this section shall not 
apply. The chemicals will be selected from listed EPCRA section 313 
toxic chemicals and, where appropriate, other regulated hazardous 
substances or pollutants. In developing the list, the Administrator, in 
coordination with the Workgroup shall consider: (1) environmental 
factors including toxicity, persistence, and bio-accumulation; (2) 
availability of known, less environmentally harmful substitute chemicals 
that can be used in place of the priority chemical for identified 
applications and purposes; (3) availability of known, less 
environmentally harmful processes that can be used in place of the 
priority chemical for identified applications and purposes; (4) relative 
costs of alternative chemicals or processes; and (5) potential risk and 
environmental and human exposure based upon applications and uses of the 
chemicals by Federal agencies and facilities. In identifying 
alternatives, the Administrator should take into consideration the 
guidance issued under section 503 of Executive Order 13101.
    (c) If an agency, which has facilities required to report under 
EPCRA, uses at its facilities less than five of the priority chemicals 
on the list developed in subsection (b) of this section for the 
identified applications and purposes, the agency shall develop, within 
12 months of the date of this order, a list of not less than five 
chemicals that may include priority chemicals under subsection (b) of 
this section or other toxic chemicals, hazardous

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substances, and/or other pollutants the agency uses or generates, the 
release, transfer or waste management of which may result in significant 
harm to human health or the environment.
    (d) In lieu of requirements under subsection (a) of this section, an 
agency may, upon concurrence with the Workgroup established under 
section 306 of this order, develop within 12 months of the date of this 
order, a list of not less than five priority hazardous or radioactive 
waste types generated by its facilities. Within 18 months of the date of 
this order, the agency shall develop and support goals to reduce the 
agency's generation of these wastes by at least 50 percent by December 
31, 2006. To the maximum extent possible, such reductions shall be 
achieved by implementing source reduction practices.
    (e) The baseline for measuring reductions for purposes of achieving 
the 50 percent reduction goal in subsections (a) and (d) of this section 
for each agency is the first calendar year following the development of 
the list of priority chemicals under subsection (b) of this section.
    (f) Each agency shall undertake pilot projects at selected 
facilities to gather and make publicly available materials accounting 
data related to the toxic chemicals, hazardous substances, and/or other 
pollutants identified under subsections (b), (c), or (d) of this 
section.
    (g) Within 12 months of the date of this order, the Administrator 
shall develop guidance on implementing this section in coordination with 
the Workgroup. The EPA shall develop technical assistance materials to 
assist agencies in meeting the 50 percent reduction goal of this 
section.
    (h) Where an agency can demonstrate to the Workgroup that it has 
previously reduced the use of a priority chemical identified in 
subsection 503(b) by 50 percent, then the agency may elect to waive the 
50 percent reduction goal for that chemical.
Sec. 504. Emergency Planning and Reporting Responsibilities. Each agency 
shall comply with the provisions set forth in sections 301 through 312 
of the EPCRA, all implementing regulations, and any future amendments to 
these authorities, in light of any applicable guidance as provided by 
the EPA.
Sec. 505. Reductions in Ozone-Depleting Substances. To attain the goals 
of section 206 of this order:
    (a) Each agency shall ensure that its facilities: (1) maximize the 
use of safe alternatives to ozone-depleting substances, as approved by 
the EPA's Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program; (2) 
consistent with subsection (b) of this section, evaluate the present and 
future uses of ozone-depleting substances, including making assessments 
of existing and future needs for such materials, and evaluate use of, 
and plans for recycling, refrigerants, and halons; and (3) exercise 
leadership, develop exemplary practices, and disseminate information on 
successful efforts in phasing out ozone-depleting substances.
    (b) Within 12 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
develop a plan to phase out the procurement of Class I ozone-depleting 
substances for all nonexcepted uses by December 31, 2010. Plans should 
target cost effective reduction of environmental risk by phasing out 
Class I ozone depleting substance applications as the equipment using 
those substances

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reaches its expected service life. Exceptions to this requirement 
include all exceptions found in current or future applicable law, 
treaty, regulation, or Executive order.
    (c) Each agency shall amend its personal property management 
policies and procedures to preclude disposal of ozone depleting 
substances removed or reclaimed from its facilities or equipment, 
including disposal as part of a contract, trade, or donation, without 
prior coordination with the Department of Defense (DoD). Where the 
recovered ozone-depleting substance is a critical requirement for DoD 
missions, the agency shall transfer the materials to the DoD. The DoD 
will bear the costs of such transfer.
PART 6--LANDSCAPING MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
Sec. 601. Implementation.
    (a) Within 12 months from the date of this order, each agency shall 
incorporate the Guidance for Presidential Memorandum on Environmentally 
and Economically Beneficial Landscape Practices on Federal Landscaped 
Grounds (60 Fed. Reg. 40837) developed by the FEE into landscaping 
programs, policies, and practices.
    (b) Within 12 months of the date of this order, the FEE shall form a 
workgroup of appropriate Federal agency representatives to review and 
update the guidance in subsection (a) of this section, as appropriate.
    (c) Each agency providing funding for nonfederal projects involving 
landscaping projects shall furnish funding recipients with information 
on environmentally and economically beneficial landscaping practices and 
work with the recipients to support and encourage application of such 
practices on Federally funded projects.
Sec. 602. Technical Assistance and Outreach. The EPA, the General 
Services Administration (GSA), and the USDA shall provide technical 
assistance in accordance with their respective authorities on 
environmentally and economically beneficial landscaping practices to 
agencies and their facilities.
PART 7--ACQUISITION AND PROCUREMENT
Sec. 701. Limiting Procurement of Toxic Chemicals, Hazardous Substances, 
and Other Pollutants.
    (a) Within 12 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
implement training programs to ensure that agency procurement officials 
and acquisition program managers are aware of the requirements of this 
order and its applicability to those individuals.
    (b) Within 24 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
determine the feasibility of implementing centralized procurement and 
distribution (e.g., ``pharmacy'') programs at its facilities for 
tracking, distribution, and management of toxic or hazardous materials 
and, where appropriate, implement such programs.
    (c) Under established schedules for review of standardized 
documents, DoD and GSA, and other agencies, as appropriate, shall review 
their standardized documents and identify opportunities to eliminate or 
reduce their use of chemicals included on the list of priority chemicals 
developed by the EPA under subsection 503(b) of this order, and make 
revisions as appropriate.

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    (d) Each agency shall follow the policies and procedures for toxic 
chemical release reporting in accordance with FAR section 23.9 effective 
as of the date of this order and policies and procedures on Federal 
compliance with right-to-know laws and pollution prevention requirements 
in accordance with FAR section 23.10 effective as of the date of this 
order.
Sec. 702. Environmentally Benign Adhesives. Within 12 months after 
environmentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives for paper products 
become commercially available, each agency shall revise its 
specifications for paper products using adhesives and direct the 
purchase of paper products using those adhesives, whenever technically 
practicable and cost effective. Each agency should consider products 
using the environmentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives approved 
by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and listed on the USPS Qualified 
Products List for pressure sensitive recyclable adhesives.
Sec. 703. Ozone-Depleting Substances. Each agency shall follow the 
policies and procedures for the acquisition of items that contain, use, 
or are manufactured with ozone-depleting substances in accordance with 
FAR section 23.8 and other applicable FAR provisions.
Sec. 704. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Landscaping 
Practices.
    (a) Within 18 months of the date of this order, each agency shall 
have in place acquisition and procurement practices, including provision 
of landscaping services that conform to the guidance referred to in 
section 601 of this order, for the use of environmentally and 
economically beneficial landscaping practices. At a minimum, such 
practices shall be consistent with the policies in the guidance referred 
to in section 601 of this order.
    (b) In implementing landscaping policies, each agency shall purchase 
environmentally preferable and recycled content products, including EPA-
designated items such as compost and mulch, that contribute to 
environmentally and economically beneficial practices.
PART 8--EXEMPTIONS
Sec. 801. National Security Exemptions. Subject to subsection 902(c) of 
this order and except as otherwise required by applicable law, in the 
interest of national security, the head of any agency may request from 
the President an exemption from complying with the provisions of any or 
all provisions of this order for particular agency facilities, provided 
that the procedures set forth in section 120(j)(1) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as 
amended (42 U.S.C. 9620(j)(1)), are followed, with the following 
exceptions: (a) an exemption issued under this section will be for a 
specified period of time that may exceed 1 year; (b) notice of any 
exemption granted under this section for provisions not otherwise 
required by law is only required to the Director of OMB, the Chair of 
the CEQ, and the Director of the National Security Council; and (c) an 
exemption under this section may be issued due to lack of 
appropriations, provided that the head of the agency requesting the 
exemption shows that necessary funds were requested by the agency in its 
budget submission and agency plan under Executive Order 12088 of October 
13, 1978, and were not contained in the President's budget request or 
the Congress failed to make available the requested appropriation. To 
the maximum extent practicable, and without compromising national 
security, each agency shall strive to comply with the purposes, goals, 
and implemen

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tation steps in this order. Nothing in this order affects limitations on 
the dissemination of classified information pursuant to law, regulation, 
or Executive order.
Sec. 802. Compliance. After January 1, 2002, OMB, in consultation with 
the Chair of the Workgroup established by section 306 of this order, may 
modify the compliance requirements for an agency under this order, if 
the agency is unable to comply with the requirements of the order. An 
agency requesting modification must show that it has made substantial 
good faith efforts to comply with the order. The cost-effectiveness of 
implementation of the order can be a factor in OMB's decision to modify 
the requirements for that agency's compliance with the order.
PART 9--GENERAL PROVISIONS
Sec. 901. Revocation. Executive Order 12843 of April 21, 1993, Executive 
Order 12856 of August 3, 1993, the Executive Memorandum on 
Environmentally Beneficial Landscaping of April 26, 1994, Executive 
Order 12969 of August 8, 1995, and section 1-4. ``Pollution Control 
Plan'' of Executive Order 12088 of October 13, 1978, are revoked.
Sec. 902. Limitations.
    (a) This order is intended only to improve the internal management 
of the executive branch and is not intended to create any right, 
benefit, or trust responsibility, substantive or procedural, enforceable 
at law by a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, 
or any other person.
    (b) This order applies to Federal facilities in any State of the 
United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto 
Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, the 
Northern Mariana Islands, and any other territory or possession over 
which the United States has jurisdiction. Each agency with facilities 
outside of these areas, however, is encouraged to make best efforts to 
comply with the goals of this order for those facilities.
    (c) Nothing in this order alters the obligations under EPCRA, PPA, 
and CAA independent of this order for Government-owned, contractor-
operated facilities and Government corporations owning or operating 
facilities or subjects such facilities to EPCRA , PPA, or CAA if they 
are otherwise excluded. However, each agency shall include the releases 
and other waste management of chemicals for all such facilities to meet 
the agency's reporting responsibilities under section 501 of this order.
    (d) Nothing in this order shall be construed to make the provisions 
of CAA sections 304 and EPCRA sections 325 and 326 applicable to any 
agency or facility, except to the extent that an agency or facility 
would independently be subject to such provisions.
Sec. 903. Community Outreach. Each agency is encouraged to establish a 
process for local community advice and outreach for its facilities 
relevant to aspects of this and other related Greening the Government 
Executive orders. All strategies and plans developed under this order 
shall be made available to the public upon request.
PART 10--DEFINITIONS
For purposes of this order:

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Sec. 1001. General. Terms that are not defined in this part but that are 
defined in Executive Orders 13101 and 13123 have the meaning given in 
those Executive orders. For the purposes of Part 5 of this order all 
definitions in EPCRA and PPA and implementing regulations at 40 CFR 
Parts 370 and 372 apply.
Sec. 1002. ``Administrator'' means the Administrator of the EPA.
Sec. 1003. ``Environmental cost accounting'' means the modification of 
cost attribution systems and financial analysis practices specifically 
to directly track environmental costs that are traditionally hidden in 
overhead accounts to the responsible products, processes, facilities or 
activities.
Sec. 1004. ``Facility'' means any building, installation, structure, 
land, and other property owned or operated by, or constructed or 
manufactured and leased to, the Federal Government, where the Federal 
Government is formally accountable for compliance under environmental 
regulation (e.g., permits, reports/records and/or planning requirements) 
with requirements pertaining to discharge, emission, release, spill, or 
management of any waste, contaminant, hazardous chemical, or pollutant. 
This term includes a group of facilities at a single location managed as 
an integrated operation, as well as government owned contractor operated 
facilities.
Sec. 1005. ``Environmentally benign pressure sensitive adhesives'' means 
adhesives for stamps, labels, and other paper products that can be 
easily treated and removed during the paper recycling process.
Sec. 1006. ``Ozone-depleting substance'' means any substance designated 
as a Class I or Class II substance by EPA in 40 CFR Part 82.
Sec. 1007. ``Pollution prevention'' means ``source reduction,'' as 
defined in the PPA, and other practices that reduce or eliminate the 
creation of pollutants through: (a) increased efficiency in the use of 
raw materials, energy, water, or other resources; or (b) protection of 
natural resources by conservation.
Sec. 1008. ``Greening the Government Executive orders'' means this order 
and the series of orders on greening the government including Executive 
Order 13101 of September 14, 1998, Executive Order 13123 of June 3, 
1999, Executive Order 13134 of August 12, 1999, and other future orders 
as appropriate.
Sec. 1009. ``Environmental aspects'' means the elements of an 
organization's activities, products, or services that can interact with 
the environment.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    April 21, 2000.



Executive Order 13149 of April 21, 2000

Greening the Government Through Federal Fleet and
Transportation Efficiency

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Energy Policy and 
Conserva

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tion Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.), the Energy Policy Act of 
1992 (Public Law 102-486), section 301 of title 3, United States Code, 
and the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-
388), it is hereby ordered as follows:
PART 1  PREAMBLE
Section 101. Federal Leadership. The purpose of this order is to ensure 
that the Federal Government exercises leadership in the reduction of 
petroleum consumption through improvements in fleet fuel efficiency and 
the use of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and alternative fuels. 
Reduced petroleum use and the displacement of petroleum by alternative 
fuels will help promote markets for more alternative fuel and fuel 
efficient vehicles, encourage new technologies, enhance the United 
States' energy self-sufficiency and security, and ensure a healthier 
environment through the reduction of greenhouse gases and other 
pollutants in the atmosphere.
PART 2  GOALS
Sec. 201. Reduced Petroleum Fuel Consumption. Each agency operating 20 
or more motor vehicles within the United States shall reduce its entire 
vehicle fleet's annual petroleum consumption by at least 20 percent by 
the end of FY 2005, compared with FY 1999 petroleum consumption levels.
Sec. 202. Performance Strategies. Agencies have numerous options for 
developing a strategy to meet the petroleum reduction levels established 
in section 201 of this order. Measures include: the use of alternative 
fuels in light, medium, and heavy-duty vehicles; the acquisition of 
vehicles with higher fuel economy, including hybrid vehicles; the 
substitution of cars for light trucks; an increase in vehicle load 
factors; a decrease in vehicle miles traveled; and a decrease in fleet 
size. Each agency will need a strategy that includes most, if not all, 
of these measures, but can develop a strategy that fits its unique fleet 
configuration and mission requirements. As part of the strategy, each 
agency should attempt to accelerate the introduction of vehicles meeting 
Tier 2 standards. Where feasible, agencies should also consider 
procurement of innovative vehicles, such as hybrid electric vehicles, 
capable of large improvements in fuel economy. The strategy should also 
attempt to minimize costs in achieving the objectives of this order. In 
developing its strategy, each agency shall include the following:
    (a) AFV Acquisition and Use of Alternative Fuels. Each agency shall 
fulfill the acquisition requirements for AFVs established by section 303 
of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Agencies shall use alternative fuels 
to meet a majority of the fuel requirements of those motor vehicles by 
the end of FY 2005. Section 402 of this order addresses related issues 
of alternative fuel infrastructure availability and the ability to track 
alternative fuel usage data; and
    (b) Acquisition of Higher Fuel Economy Vehicles. Agencies shall 
increase the average EPA fuel economy rating of passenger cars and light 
trucks acquired by at least 1 mile per gallon (mpg) by the end of FY 
2002 and at least 3 mpg by the end of FY 2005 compared to FY 1999 
acquisitions.
PART 3  ORGANIZATION AND ACCOUNTABILITY
Sec. 301. Leadership Responsibilities. The Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB), the Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental 
Protection

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Agency (EPA), and the General Services Administration (GSA) shall be 
responsible for providing leadership to the other Federal agencies in 
implementing programs to meet the goals of this order. Therefore, they 
shall perform the following activities:
    (a) OMB shall:

(1) designate a senior official to assume the responsibility for 
coordinating the collection of agency budget and data submissions pursuant 
to this order;

(2) amend and issue budget guidance to the agencies that requires each 
agency to identify in its annual budget submission the funding necessary to 
meet the requirements of this order;

(3) review annual agency budget submissions to determine adequacy in 
meeting the goal of this order and to balance requests for increased 
funding to support achievement of the goals against other mission 
priorities for the agency; and

(4) review agency submissions for the annual report to the Congress, after 
budget decisions are made.

    (b) DOE shall:

(1) issue guidance to agencies, within 90 days of the issuance of this 
order, on preparation and submission of agency strategies for complying 
with this order and the collection and annual reporting of data to 
demonstrate compliance with this order;

(2) review and evaluate agency strategies prior to their submission to OMB;

(3) provide OMB with copies of the agency strategy evaluations;

(4) provide whatever other support OMB requires to facilitate performance 
of OMB's role;

(5) establish the data collection and reporting system outlined in the DOE 
guidance for collecting annual agency performance data on meeting the goals 
of this order and other applicable statutes and policies;

(6) educate personnel from other agencies on the requirements of this 
order, the data collection and reporting system, best practices for 
improving fleet fuel efficiency, and methods for successfully acquiring and 
using AFVs;

(7) review agencies' annual data submissions for accuracy and produce a 
scorecard of agency and overall Federal compliance with this order and 
other applicable statutes and policies; and

(8) report to the President annually on compliance with the order, 
including the scorecard and level of performance in meeting the goals of 
the agencies' strategies.

    (c) EPA shall support DOE and GSA in their efforts to assist the 
agencies in the accelerated purchase of Tier 2 vehicles.
    (d) GSA shall develop and implement strategies that will ease 
agencies' financial and administrative burdens associated with the 
acquisition of AFVs, including:

(1) Agencies shall be allowed to replace their conventionally-fueled 
vehicles with AFVs by making an initial lump-sum payment for the addi

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tional acquisition cost of the AFV and shall be allowed to contribute to 
the higher replacement costs of the AFV incrementally over the term of the 
lease, and have the option of averaging AFV incremental costs across the 
agency fleet as provided by the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

(2) Within 120 days of this order, the Administrator of GSA, in 
consultation with other agencies, shall:

    (A) provide a summary of agency AFV acquisition plans to 
potential AFV manufacturers to assist in their production 
planning. At least 4 months in advance of agency vehicle ordering 
cycles, GSA must provide to agencies the best available 
information on the production plans of AFV manufacturers;
    (B) develop, in coordination with DOE and EPA, methods that 
will help Federal fleet managers to select vehicles to improve 
fleet fuel efficiency and to meet Tier 2 vehicle standards; and
    (C) collaborate with its customer agencies and their 
procurement staff and officials to discuss and plan efforts to 
ensure that the GSA-leased fleet is making progress toward the 
goals of this order.
Sec. 302. Designation of Senior Agency Official. Within 90 days of the 
date of this order, the head of each agency shall designate a senior 
official to assume responsibility for the agency's AFV and fleet fuel 
efficiency programs, and for meeting the requirements of this order. 
Each senior agency official designated by an agency shall be responsible 
for:
    (a) preparing an agency strategy for meeting the goals of this 
order, in accordance with guidance issued by DOE;
    (b) submitting the agency strategy to DOE within 180 days of the 
issuance of this order for evaluation and submission to OMB;
    (c) implementing the data collection and reporting system outlined 
in the DOE guidance for collecting annual agency performance data on 
meeting the goals of this order and reporting the data to DOE;
    (d) ensuring the agency's strategy for meeting the goals of this 
order is incorporated in the annual budget submission to OMB; and
    (e) assembling the appropriate team and resources in the agency 
necessary to attain the goals of this order.
Sec. 303. Management and Government Performance. Agencies may use the 
following management strategies to assist them in meeting the goals of 
this order:
    (a) Awards. Agencies may use employee incentive programs to reward 
exceptional performance in implementing this order.
    (b) Performance Evaluations. Agencies shall, where appropriate, 
include successful implementation of the provisions of this order in the 
position descriptions and performance evaluations of agency heads, the 
senior official, fleet managers, their superiors, and other relevant 
employees.
Sec. 304. Applicability. This order applies to each agency operating 20 
or more motor vehicles within the United States. Agency means an 
executive agency as defined in 5 U.S.C. 105. For the purpose of this 
order, military departments, as defined in 5 U.S.C. 102, are covered 
under the auspices of the Department of Defense.
PART 4  IMPLEMENTATION

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Sec. 401. Vehicle Reporting Credits. When preparing the annual report to 
DOE and OMB, each agency acquisition of an alternative fuel light-duty 
vehicle, regardless of geographic placement, shall count as one credit 
towards fulfilling the AFV acquisition requirements of the Energy Policy 
Act of 1992. Agencies shall receive one additional credit for each 
light-duty AFV that exclusively uses an alternative fuel and for each 
Zero Emission Vehicle of any size. Agencies shall receive three credits 
for dedicated medium-duty AFVs and four credits for dedicated heavy-duty 
AFVs. Agencies can also receive one credit for every 450 gallons of pure 
bio-diesel used in diesel vehicles.
Sec. 402. Infrastructure. To support the use of alternative fuel in 
AFVs, agencies should arrange for fueling at commercial facilities that 
offer alternative fuels for sale to the public.
    (a) Agencies should team with State, local, and private entities to 
support the expansion and use of public access alternative fuel 
refueling stations;
    (b) Agencies should use the authority granted to them in section 304 
of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to establish nonpublic access 
alternative fuel infrastructure for fueling Federal AFVs where public 
fueling is unavailable.
    (c) Agencies are encouraged to work with DOE and GSA to resolve 
alternative fuel usage tracking issues with alternative and petroleum 
fuel providers.
Sec. 403. Procurement of Environmentally Preferable Motor Vehicle 
Products.
    (a) Consistent with Executive Order 13101 and section 6002 of the 
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 42 U.S.C. 6962, effective 
6 months after the date of this order, no Federal agency shall purchase, 
sell, or arrange for the purchase of virgin petroleum motor vehicle 
lubricating oils when re-refined motor vehicle lubricating oils are 
reasonably available and meet the vehicle manufacturer's recommended 
performance standards.
    (b) Consistent with Executive Order 13101 and RCRA section 6962, in 
acquiring and maintaining motor vehicles, agencies shall acquire and use 
United States EPA-designated Comprehensive Procurement Guideline items, 
including but not limited to retread tires, when such products are 
reasonably available and meet applicable performance standards. In 
addition, Federal agencies should consider acquiring other recycled 
content products, such as tires containing a minimum of 5-10 percent 
post-consumer recovered rubber.
    (c) Consistent with Executive Order 13101, Federal agencies are 
encouraged to use biobased motor vehicle products when such products are 
reasonably available and meet applicable performance standards.
PART 5  GENERAL PROVISIONS
Sec. 501. Revocation. Executive Order 13031 of December 13, 1996, is 
revoked.
Sec. 502. Statutory Authority. Agencies must carry out the provisions of 
this order to the extent consistent with their statutory authority.
Sec. 503. Limitations. This order is intended only to improve the 
internal management of the executive branch and is not intended to 
create any

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right, benefit, or trust responsibility, substantive or procedural, 
enforceable at law by a party against the United States, its agencies, 
its officers, or any other person.
Sec. 504. Independent Agencies. Independent agencies and agencies 
excepted from coverage by section 304 are encouraged to comply with the 
provisions of this order.
Sec. 505. Government-Owned Contractor-Operated Vehicles. Agencies must 
ensure that all Government-owned contractor-operated vehicles comply 
with all applicable goals and other requirements of this order and that 
these goals and requirements are incorporated into each contractor's 
management contract.
Sec. 506. Exemptions for Military Tactical, Law Enforcement, and 
Emergency Vehicles. Department of Defense military tactical vehicles are 
exempt from this order. Law enforcement, emergency, and any other 
vehicle class or type determined by OMB, in consultation with DOE, are 
exempted from this order's requirements for Federal fleet fuel 
efficiency and alternative fuel vehicle acquisition. Agencies claiming 
vehicle exemptions must provide information on the number of each class 
or type of vehicle claimed as exempt as well as an estimate of total 
fuel consumption of exempt vehicles on an annual basis. Agencies should 
examine options for increasing fuel efficiency in these exempt vehicles 
and should report actions taken to increase fuel efficiency in these 
vehicles or fleets. All information required by this section must be 
submitted annually under Part 3 of this order.
Sec. 507. Compliance. (a) If an agency fails to meet requirements of the 
Energy Policy Act of 1992 or this order, its report to the DOE and OMB 
under section 302(c) must include an explanation for such failure and an 
updated strategy for achieving compliance using the agency's current and 
requested budgets.
    (b) OMB, in consultation with DOE, may modify the compliance 
requirements for an agency under Part 2 of this order, if the agency is 
unable to comply with the requirements of that part. An agency 
requesting modification must show that it has made substantial good 
faith efforts to comply with that part. The availability and costs of 
alternative fuels and AFVs can be a factor in OMB's decision to modify 
the agency's compliance with Part 2 of this order.
Sec. 508. Definitions. Terms used in this order shall have the same 
definitions as those in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive 
Order 13101, unless specifically changed in guidance to be issued by DOE 
under section 301(b) of this order.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    April 21, 2000.

[[Page 260]]



Executive Order 13150 of April 21, 2000

Federal Workforce Transportation

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Transportation 
Equity Act for the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178), section 1911 of 
the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-486), section 531(a)(1) of 
the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984 (26 U.S.C. 132), and the Federal 
Employees Clean Air Incentives Act (Public Law 103-172), and in order to 
reduce Federal employees' contribution to traffic congestion and air 
pollution and to expand their commuting alternatives, it is hereby 
ordered as follows:
Section 1. Mass Transportation and Vanpool Transportation Fringe Benefit 
Program. (a) By no later than October 1, 2000, Federal agencies shall 
implement a transportation fringe benefit program that offers qualified 
Federal employees the option to exclude from taxable wages and 
compensation, consistent with section 132 of title 26, United States 
Code, employee commuting costs incurred through the use of mass 
transportation and vanpools, not to exceed the maximum level allowed by 
law (26 U.S.C. 132 (f)(2)). These agency programs shall comply with the 
requirements of Internal Revenue Service regulations for qualified 
transportation fringe benefits under section 1.132-9 of title 26, Code 
of Federal Regulations, and other guidance.
    (b) Federal agencies are encouraged to use any nonmonetary incentive 
that the agencies may otherwise offer under any other provision of law 
or other authority to encourage mass transportation and vanpool use, as 
provided for in section 7905(b)(2)(C) of title 5, United States Code.
Sec. 2. Federal Agencies in the National Capital Region. Federal 
agencies in the National Capital Region shall implement a ``transit 
pass'' transportation fringe benefit program for their qualified Federal 
employees by no later than October 1, 2000. Under this program, agencies 
shall provide their qualified Federal employees, in addition to current 
compensation, transit passes as defined in section 132(f)(5) of title 
26, United States Code, in amounts approximately equal to employee 
commuting costs, not to exceed the maximum level allowed by law (26 
U.S.C. 132(f)(2)). The National Capital Region is defined as the 
District of Columbia; Montgomery, Prince George's, and Frederick 
Counties in Maryland; Arlington, Fairfax, Loudon, and Prince William 
Counties in Virginia; and all cities now or hereafter existing in 
Maryland or Virginia within the geographic area bounded by the outer 
boundaries of the combined area of said counties.
Sec. 3. Nationwide Pilot Program. The Department of Transportation, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy shall 
implement a ``transit pass'' transportation fringe benefit program, as 
described in section 2 of this order, for all of their qualified Federal 
employees as a 3 year pilot program by no later than October 1, 2000. 
Before determining whether the program should be extended to other 
Federal employees nationwide, it shall be analyzed by an entity 
determined by the agencies identified in section 4 of this order to 
ascertain, among other things, if it is effective in reducing single 
occupancy vehicle travel and local area traffic congestion.

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Sec. 4. Guidance. Federal agencies shall develop plans to implement this 
order in consultation with the Department of the Treasury, the 
Department of Transportation, the Environmental Protection Agency, the 
Office of Personnel Management, the General Services Administration, and 
the Office of Management and Budget. Federal agencies that currently 
have more generous programs or benefits in place may continue to offer 
those programs or benefits. Agencies shall absorb the costs of 
implementing this order within the sums received pursuant to the 
President's FY 2001 budget request to the Congress.
Sec. 5. Judicial Review. This order is not intended to and does not 
create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at 
law by any party against the United States, its agencies or 
instrumentalities, its officers or employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    April 21, 2000.



Executive Order 13151 of April 27, 2000

Global Disaster Information Network

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to establish a Global 
Disaster Information Network to use information technology more 
effectively to reduce loss of life and property from natural and man-
made disasters, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. (a) It is the policy of this Administration to use 
information technology more effectively to coordinate the Federal 
Government's collection and dissemination of information to appropriate 
response agencies and State governments to prepare for and respond to 
natural and man-made disasters (disasters). As a result of changing 
population demographics in our coastal, rural, and urban areas over the 
past decades, the loss of life and property (losses) from disasters has 
nearly doubled. One of the ways the Federal Government can reduce these 
losses is to use technology more effectively to coordinate its 
collection and dissemination (hereafter referred to collectively as 
``provision'') of information which can be used in both planning for and 
recovering from disasters. While many agencies provide disaster-related 
information, they may not always provide it in a coordinated manner. To 
improve the provision of disaster-related information, the agencies 
shall, as set out in this order, use information technology to 
coordinate the Federal Government's provision of information to prepare 
for, respond to, and recover from domestic disasters.
    (b) It is also the policy of this Administration to use information 
technology and existing channels of disaster assistance to improve the 
Federal Government's provision of information that could be helpful to 
foreign governments preparing for or responding to foreign disasters. 
Currently, the United States Government provides disaster-related 
information to foreign governments and relief organizations on 
humanitarian grounds at the request of foreign governments and where 
appropriate. This information is

[[Page 262]]

supplied by Federal agencies on an ad hoc basis. To increase the 
effectiveness of our response to foreign disasters, agencies shall, 
where appropriate, use information technology to coordinate the Federal 
Government's provision of disaster-related information to foreign 
governments.
    (c) To carry out the policies in this order, there is established 
the Global Disaster Information Network (Network). The Network is 
defined as the coordinated effort by Federal agencies to develop a 
strategy and to use existing technical infrastructure, to the extent 
permitted by law and subject to the availability of appropriations and 
under the guidance of the Interagency Coordinating Committee and the 
Committee Support Office, to make more effective use of information 
technology to assist our Government, and foreign governments where 
appropriate, by providing disaster-related information to prepare for 
and respond to disasters.
Sec. 2. Establishment. (a) There is established an Interagency 
Coordinating Committee (Committee) to provide leadership and oversight 
for the development of the Network. The Office of the Vice President, 
the Department of Commerce through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, and the Department of State, respectively, shall 
designate a representative to serve as Co-chairpersons of the Committee. 
The Committee membership shall comprise representatives from the 
following departments and agencies:
    (1) Department of State;
    (2) Department of Defense;
    (3) Department of the Interior;
    (4) Department of Agriculture;
    (5) Department of Commerce;
    (6) Department of Transportation;
    (7) Department of Energy;
    (8) Office of Management and Budget;
    (9) Environmental Protection Agency;
    (10) National Aeronautics and Space Administration;
    (11) United States Agency for International Development;
    (12) Federal Emergency Management Agency; and
    (13) Central Intelligence Agency.
At the discretion of the Co-chairpersons of the Committee, other 
agencies may be added to the Committee membership. The Committee shall 
include an Executive Secretary to effect coordination between the Co-
chairpersons of the Committee and the Committee Support Office.
    (b) There is established a Committee Support Office (Support Office) 
to assist the Committee by developing plans and projects that would 
further the creation of the Network. The Support Office shall, at the 
request of the Co-chairpersons of the Committee, carry out tasks taken 
on by the Committee.
    (c) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall 
provide funding and administrative support for the Committee and the 
Support Of

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fice. To the extent permitted by law, agencies may provide support to 
the Committee and the Support Office to assist them in their work.
Sec. 3. Responsibilities. (a) The Committee shall:
(1) serve as the United States Government's single entity for all 
    matters, both national and international, pertaining to the 
    development and establishment of the Network;
(2) provide leadership and high-level coordination of Network 
    activities;
(3) provide guidance for the development of Network strategies, goals, 
    objectives, policies, and legislation;
(4) represent and advocate Network goals, objectives, and processes to 
    their respective agencies and departments;
(5) provide manpower and material support for Network development 
    activities;
(6) develop, delegate, and monitor interagency opportunities and ideas 
    supporting the development of the Network; and
(7) provide reports, through the Co-chairpersons of the Committee, to 
    the President as requested or at least annually.
    (b) The Support Office shall:
(1) provide management and administrative support for the Committee;
(2) develop Network strategies, goals, objectives, policies, plans, and 
    legislation in accordance with guidance provided by the Committee;
(3) consult with agencies, States, nongovernment organizations, and 
    international counterparts in developing Network development tasks;
(4) develop and make recommendations concerning Network activities to 
    the agencies as approved by the Committee; and
(5) participate in projects that promote the goals and objectives of the 
    Network.
Sec. 4. Implementation. (a) The Committee, with the assistance of the 
Support Office, shall address national and international issues 
associated with the development of the Network within the context of:
    (1) promoting the United States as an example and leader in the 
development and dissemination of disaster information, both domestically 
and abroad, and, to this end, seeking cooperation with foreign 
governments and international organizations;
    (2) striving to include all appropriate stakeholders in the 
development of the Network; and
    (3) facilitating the creation of a framework that involves public 
and private stakeholders in a partnership for sustained operations of 
the Network.
    (b) Intelligence activities, as determined by the Director of the 
Central Intelligence Agency, as well as national security-related 
activities of the Department of Defense and of the Department of Energy, 
are exempt from compliance with this order.
Sec. 5. Tribal Governments. This order does not impose any requirements 
on tribal governments.

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Sec. 6. Judicial Review. This order does not create any right or 
benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable by law, by a party 
against the United States, its officers, its employees, or any other 
person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    April 27, 2000.



Executive Order 13152 of May 2, 2000

Further Amendment to Executive Order 11478, Equal Employment Opportunity 
in Federal Government

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States, and in order to provide for a uniform policy 
for the Federal Government to prohibit discrimination based on an 
individual's status as a parent, it is hereby ordered that Executive 
Order 11478, as amended, is further amended as follows:
Section 1. Amend the first sentence of section 1 by substituting 
``sexual orientation, or status as a parent.'' for ``or sexual 
orientation.''
Sec. 2. Insert the following new sections 6 and 7 after section 5:
    ``Sec. 6. `Status as a parent' refers to the status of an individual 
who, with respect to an individual who is under the age of 18 or who is 
18 or older but is incapable of self-care because of a physical or 
mental disability, is:
    (a) a biological parent;
    (b) an adoptive parent;
    (c) a foster parent;
    (d) a stepparent;
    (e) a custodian of a legal ward;
    (f) in loco parentis over such an individual; or
    (g) actively seeking legal custody or adoption of such an individual.
    ``Sec. 7. The Office of Personnel Management shall be authorized to 
develop guidance on the provisions of this order prohibiting 
discrimination on the basis of an individual's sexual orientation or 
status as a parent.''
Sec. 3. Amend section 4 by substituting ``and appropriate to carry out 
its responsibilities under this Order.'' for ``appropriate to carry out 
this Order.''
Sec. 4. Renumber current sections 6, 7, and 8 as sections 8, 9, and 10, 
respectively.
Sec. 5. Add a section 11 to read as follows:
    ``Sec. 11. This Executive Order does not confer any right or benefit 
enforceable in law or equity against the United States or its 
representatives.''
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 2, 2000.

[[Page 265]]



Executive Order 13153 of May 3, 2000

Actions To Improve Low-Performing Schools

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), the Department of Education 
Appropriations Act, 2000 (as contained in Public Law 106-113), and in 
order to take actions to improve low-performing schools, it is hereby 
ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. Since 1993, this Administration has sought to raise 
standards for students and to increase accountability in public 
education while investing more resources in elementary and secondary 
schools. While much has been accomplished--there has been progress in 
math and reading achievement, particularly for low-achieving students 
and students in our highest poverty schools--much more can be done, 
especially for low-performing schools.
Sec. 2. Technical Assistance and Capacity Building. (a) The Secretary of 
Education (``Secretary'') shall work with State and local educational 
agencies (``LEAs'') to develop and implement a comprehensive strategy 
for providing technical assistance and other assistance to States and 
LEAs to strengthen their capacity to improve the performance of schools 
identified as low performing. This comprehensive strategy shall include 
a number of steps, such as:

(1) providing States, school districts, and schools receiving funds from 
the school improvement fund established by Public Law 106-113, as well as 
other districts and schools identified for school improvement or corrective 
action under Title I of the ESEA, with access to the latest research and 
information on best practices, including research on instruction and 
educator professional development, and with the opportunity to learn from 
exemplary schools and exemplary State and local intervention strategies and 
from each other, in order to improve achievement for all students in the 
low-performing schools;

(2) determining effective ways of providing low-performing schools with 
access to resources from other Department of Education programs, such as 
funds from the Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration Program, the 
Reading Excellence Act, the Eisenhower Professional Development Program, 
the Class Size Reduction Program, and the 21st Century Community Learning 
Centers Program, and to make effective use of these funds and Title I 
funds;

(3) providing States and LEAs with information on effective strategies to 
improve the quality of the teaching force, including strategies for 
recruiting and retaining highly qualified teachers in high-poverty schools, 
and implementing research-based professional development programs aligned 
with challenging standards;

(4) helping States and school districts build partnerships with technical 
assistance providers, including, but not limited to, federally funded 
laboratories and centers, foundations, businesses, community-based 
organizations, institutions of higher education, reform model providers, 
and other organizations that can help local schools improve;

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(5) identifying previously low-performing schools that have made 
significant achievement gains, and States and school districts that have 
been effective in improving the achievement of all students in low-
performing schools, which can serve as models and resources;

(6) providing assistance and information on how to effectively involve 
parents in the school-improvement process, including effectively involving 
and informing parents at the beginning of the school year about improvement 
goals for their school as well as the goals for their own children, and 
reporting on progress made in achieving these goals;

(7) providing States and LEAs with information on effective approaches to 
school accountability, including the effectiveness of such strategies as 
school reconstitution, peer review teams, and financial rewards and 
incentives;

(8) providing LEAs with information and assistance on the design and 
implementation of approaches to choice among public schools that create 
incentives for improvement throughout the local educational agency, 
especially in the lowest-performing schools, and that maximize the 
opportunity of students in low-performing schools to attend a higher-
performing public school;

(9) exploring the use of well-trained tutors to raise student achievement 
through initiatives such as ``America Reads,'' ``America Counts,'' and 
other work-study opportunities to help low-performing schools;

(10) using a full range of strategies for disseminating information about 
effective practices, including interactive electronic communications;

(11) working with the Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs 
(BIA), to provide technical assistance to BIA-funded low-performing 
schools; and

(12) taking other steps that can help improve the quality of teaching and 
instruction in low-performing schools.

    (b) The Secretary shall, to the extent permitted by law, take 
whatever steps the Secretary finds necessary and appropriate to redirect 
the resources and technical assistance capability of the Department of 
Education (``Department'') to assist States and localities in improving 
low-performing schools, and to ensure that the dissemination of research 
to help turn around low-performing schools is a priority of the 
Department.
Sec. 3. School Improvement Report. To monitor the progress of LEAs and 
schools in turning around failing schools, including those receiving 
grants from the School Improvement Fund, the Secretary shall prepare an 
annual School Improvement Report, to be published in September of each 
year, beginning in 2000. The report shall:
    (a) describe trends in the numbers of LEAs and schools identified as 
needing improvement and subsequent changes in the academic performance 
of their students;
    (b) identify best practices and significant research findings that 
can be used to help turn around low-performing LEAs and schools; and
    (c) document ongoing efforts as a result of this order and other 
Federal efforts to assist States and local school districts in 
intervening in low-per

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forming schools, including improving teacher quality. This report shall 
be publicly accessible.
Sec. 4. Compliance Monitoring System. Consistent with the implementation 
of the School Improvement Fund, the Secretary shall strengthen the 
Department's monitoring of ESEA requirements for identifying and turning 
around low-performing schools, as well as any new requirements 
established for the School Improvement Fund by Public Law 106-113. The 
Secretary shall give priority to provisions that have the greatest 
bearing on identifying and turning around low-performing schools, 
including sections 1116 and 1117 of the ESEA, and to developing an 
ongoing, focused, and systematic process for monitoring these 
provisions. This improved compliance monitoring shall be designed to:
    (a) ensure that States and LEAs comply with ESEA requirements;
    (b) assist States and LEAs in implementing effective procedures and 
strategies that reflect the best research available, as well as the 
experience of successful schools, school districts, and States as they 
address similar objectives and challenges; and
    (c) assist States, LEAs, and schools in making the most effective 
use of available Federal resources.
Sec. 5. Consultation. The Secretary shall, where appropriate, consult 
with executive agencies, State and local education officials, educators, 
community-based groups, and others in carrying out this Executive order.
Sec. 6. Judicial Review. This order is intended only to improve the 
internal management of the executive branch and is not intended to, and 
does not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United States, its 
agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or employees, or any other 
person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 3, 2000.



Executive Order 13154 of May 3, 2000

Establishing the Kosovo Campaign Medal

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including my authority as 
Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, it is 
hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Kosovo Campaign Medal. There is hereby established the Kosovo 
Campaign Medal with suitable appurtenances. Except as limited in section 
2 of this order, and under uniform regulations to be prescribed by the 
Secretaries of the Military Departments and approved by the Secretary of 
Defense, or under regulations to be prescribed by the Secretary of 
Transportation with respect to the Coast Guard when it is not operating 
as a service in the Navy, the Kosovo Campaign Medal shall be awarded to 
members of the Armed Forces of the United States who serve or have 
served in Kosovo or contiguous waters or airspace, as defined by such 
regulations, after

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March 24, 1999, and before a terminal date to be prescribed by the 
Secretary of Defense.
Sec. 2. Relationship to Other Awards. Notwithstanding section 3 of 
Executive Order 10977 of December 4, 1961, establishing the Armed Forces 
Expeditionary Medal and section 3 of Executive Order 12985 of January 
11, 1996, establishing the Armed Forces Service Medal, any member who 
qualified for those medals by reasons of service in Kosovo between March 
24, 1999, and May 1, 2000, shall remain qualified for those medals. Upon 
application, any such member may be awarded the Kosovo Campaign Medal in 
lieu of the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal or the Armed Forces Service 
Medal, but no person may be awarded more than one of these three medals 
by reason of service in Kosovo, and no person shall be entitled to more 
than one award of the Kosovo Campaign Medal.
Sec. 3. Posthumous Award. The Kosovo Campaign Medal may be awarded 
posthumously to any person covered by and under regulations prescribed 
in accordance with the first section of this order.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 3, 2000.



Executive Order 13155 of May 10, 2000

Access to HIV/AIDS Pharmaceuticals and Medical
Technologies

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including sections 141 and chapter 
1 of title III of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2171, 
2411-2420), section 307 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 
2421), and section 104 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended 
(22 U.S.C. 2151b), and in accordance with executive branch policy on 
health-related intellectual property matters to promote access to 
essential medicines, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. (a) In administering sections 301-310 of the Trade 
Act of 1974, the United States shall not seek, through negotiation or 
otherwise, the revocation or revision of any intellectual property law 
or policy of a beneficiary sub-Saharan African country, as determined by 
the President, that regulates HIV/AIDS pharmaceuticals or medical 
technologies if the law or policy of the country:
    (1) promotes access to HIV/AIDS pharmaceuticals or medical 
technologies for affected populations in that country; and
    (2) provides adequate and effective intellectual property protection 
consistent with the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual 
Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement) referred to in section 101(d)(15) of 
the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3511(d)(15)).
    (b) The United States shall encourage all beneficiary sub-Saharan 
African countries to implement policies designed to address the 
underlying causes

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of the HIV/AIDS crisis by, among other things, making efforts to 
encourage practices that will prevent further transmission and infection 
and to stimulate development of the infrastructure necessary to deliver 
adequate health services, and by encouraging policies that provide an 
incentive for public and private research on, and development of, 
vaccines and other medical innovations that will combat the HIV/AIDS 
epidemic in Africa.
Sec. 2. Rationale: (a) This order finds that:
    (1) since the onset of the worldwide HIV/AIDS epidemic, 
approximately 34 million people living in sub-Saharan Africa have been 
infected with the disease;
    (2) of those infected, approximately 11.5 million have died;
    (3) the deaths represent 83 percent of the total HIV/AIDS-related 
deaths worldwide; and
    (4) access to effective therapeutics for HIV/AIDS is determined by 
issues of price, health system infrastructure for delivery, and 
sustainable financing.
    (b) In light of these findings, this order recognizes that:
    (1) it is in the interest of the United States to take all 
reasonable steps to prevent further spread of infectious disease, 
particularly HIV/AIDS;
    (2) there is critical need for effective incentives to develop new 
pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and therapies to combat the HIV/AIDS crisis, 
including effective global intellectual property standards designed to 
foster pharmaceutical and medical innovation;
    (3) the overriding priority for responding to the crisis of HIV/AIDS 
in sub-Saharan Africa should be to improve public education and to 
encourage practices that will prevent further transmission and 
infection, and to stimulate development of the infrastructure necessary 
to deliver adequate health care services;
    (4) the United States should work with individual countries in sub-
Saharan Africa to assist them in development of effective public 
education campaigns aimed at the prevention of HIV/AIDS transmission and 
infection, and to improve their health care infrastructure to promote 
improved access to quality health care for their citizens in general, 
and particularly with respect to the HIV/AIDS epidemic;
    (5) an effective United States response to the crisis in sub-Saharan 
Africa must focus in the short term on preventive programs designed to 
reduce the frequency of new infections and remove the stigma of the 
disease, and should place a priority on basic health services that can 
be used to treat opportunistic infections, sexually transmitted 
infections, and complications associated with HIV/AIDS so as to prolong 
the duration and improve the quality of life of those with the disease;
    (6) an effective United States response to the crisis must also 
focus on the development of HIV/AIDS vaccines to prevent the spread of 
the disease;
    (7) the innovative capacity of the United States in the commercial 
and public pharmaceutical research sectors is unmatched in the world, 
and the participation of both these sectors will be a critical element 
in any successful program to respond to the HIV/AIDS crisis in sub-
Saharan Africa;

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    (8) the TRIPS Agreement recognizes the importance of promoting 
effective and adequate protection of intellectual property rights and 
the right of countries to adopt measures necessary to protect public 
health;
    (9) individual countries should have the ability to take measures to 
address the HIV/AIDS epidemic, provided that such measures are 
consistent with their international obligations; and
    (10) successful initiatives will require effective partnerships and 
cooperation among governments, international organizations, 
nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector, and greater 
consideration should be given to financial, legal, and other incentives 
that will promote improved prevention and treatment actions.
Sec. 3. Scope. (a) This order prohibits the United States Government 
from taking action pursuant to section 301(b) of the Trade Act of 1974 
with respect to any law or policy in beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
countries that promotes access to HIV/AIDS pharmaceuticals or medical 
technologies and that provides adequate and effective intellectual 
property protection consistent with the TRIPS Agreement. However, this 
order does not prohibit United States Government officials from 
evaluating, determining, or expressing concern about whether such a law 
or policy promotes access to HIV/AIDS pharmaceuticals or medical 
technologies or provides adequate and effective intellectual property 
protection consistent with the TRIPS Agreement. In addition, this order 
does not prohibit United States Government officials from consulting 
with or otherwise discussing with sub-Saharan African governments 
whether such law or policy meets the conditions set forth in section 
1(a) of this order. Moreover, this order does not prohibit the United 
States Government from invoking the dispute settlement procedures of the 
World Trade Organization to examine whether any such law or policy is 
consistent with the Uruguay Round Agreements, referred to in section 
101(d) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act.
    (b) This order is intended only to improve the internal management 
of the executive branch and is not intended to, and does not create, any 
right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or 
equity by a party against the United States, its agencies or 
instrumentalities, its officers or employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 10, 2000



Executive Order 13156 of May 17, 2000

Amendment to Executive Order 12871 Regarding the
National Partnership Council

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to provide for a 
uniform policy for the Federal Government relating to labor-management 
partnerships, it is hereby ordered that Executive Order 12871, as 
amended by Executive Order 12983, is further amended as follows:

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Section 1. Section 1(a)(10) of the order is amended by striking ``two'' 
and inserting ``three.''
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 17, 2000.



Executive Order 13157 of May 23, 2000

Increasing Opportunities for Women-Owned Small Businesses

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Small Business Act, 
15 U.S.C. 631, et seq., section 7106 of the Federal Acquisition 
Streamlining Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-355), and the Office of Federal 
Procurement Policy, 41 U.S.C. 403, et seq., and in order to strengthen 
the executive branch's commitment to increased opportunities for women-
owned small businesses, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Executive Branch Policy. In order to reaffirm and strengthen 
the statutory policy contained in the Small Business Act, 15 U.S.C. 
644(g)(1), it shall be the policy of the executive branch to take the 
steps necessary to meet or exceed the 5 percent Government-wide goal for 
participation in procurement by women-owned small businesses (WOSBs). 
Further, the executive branch shall implement this policy by 
establishing a participation goal for WOSBs of not less than 5 percent 
of the total value of all prime contract awards for each fiscal year and 
of not less than 5 percent of the total value of all subcontract awards 
for each fiscal year.
Sec. 2. Responsibilities of Federal Departments and Agencies. Each 
department and agency (hereafter referred to collectively as ``agency'') 
that has procurement authority shall develop a long-term comprehensive 
strategy to expand opportunities for WOSBs. Where feasible and 
consistent with the effective and efficient performance of its mission, 
each agency shall establish a goal of achieving a participation rate for 
WOSBs of not less than 5 percent of the total value of all prime 
contract awards for each fiscal year and of not less than 5 percent of 
the total value of all subcontract awards for each fiscal year. The 
agency's plans shall include, where appropriate, methods and programs as 
set forth in section 4 of this order.
Sec. 3. Responsibilities of the Small Business Administration. The Small 
Business Administration (SBA) shall establish an Assistant Administrator 
for Women's Procurement within the SBA's Office of Government 
Contracting. This officer shall be responsible for:
(a) working with each agency to develop and implement policies to 
    achieve the participation goals for WOSBs for the executive branch 
    and individual agencies;
(b) advising agencies on how to implement strategies that will increase 
    the participation of WOSBs in Federal procurement;

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(c) evaluating, on a semiannual basis, using the Federal Procurement 
    Data System (FPDS), the achievement of prime and subcontract goals 
    and actual prime and subcontract awards to WOSBs for each agency;
(d) preparing a report, which shall be submitted by the Administrator of 
    the SBA to the President, through the Interagency Committee on 
    Women's Business Enterprise and the Office of Federal Procurement 
    Policy (OFPP), on findings based on the FPDS, regarding prime 
    contracts and subcontracts awarded to WOSBs;
(e) making recommendations and working with Federal agencies to expand 
    participation rates for WOSBs, with a particular emphasis on 
    agencies in which the participation rate for these businesses is 
    less than 5 percent;
(f) providing a program of training and development seminars and 
    conferences to instruct women on how to participate in the SBA's 
    8(a) program, the Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) program, the 
    HUBZone program, and other small business contracting programs for 
    which they may be eligible;
(g) developing and implementing a single uniform Federal Government-wide 
    website, which provides links to other websites within the Federal 
    system concerning acquisition, small businesses, and women-owned 
    businesses, and which provides current procurement information for 
    WOSBs and other small businesses;
(h) developing an interactive electronic commerce database that allows 
    small businesses to register their businesses and capabilities as 
    potential contractors for Federal agencies, and enables contracting 
    officers to identify and locate potential contractors; and
(i) working with existing women-owned business organizations, State and 
    local governments, and others in order to promote the sharing of 
    information and the development of more uniform State and local 
    standards for WOSBs that reduce the burden on these firms in 
    competing for procurement opportunities.
Sec. 4. Other Responsibilities of Federal Agencies. To the extent 
permitted by law, each Federal agency shall work with the SBA to ensure 
maximum participation of WOSBs in the procurement process by taking the 
following steps:
(a) designating a senior acquisition official who will work with the SBA 
    to identify and promote contracting opportunities for WOSBs;
(b)  requiring contracting officers, to the maximum extent practicable, 
    to include WOSBs in competitive acquisitions;
(c) prescribing procedures to ensure that acquisition planners, to the 
    maximum extent practicable, structure acquisitions to facilitate 
    competition by and among small businesses, HUBZone small businesses, 
    SDBs, and WOSBs, and providing guidance on structuring acquisitions, 
    including, but not limited to, those expected to result in multiple 
    award contracts, in order to facilitate competition by and among 
    these groups;
(d) implementing mentor-protege programs, which include women-owned 
    small business firms; and

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(e) offering industry-wide as well as industry-specific outreach, 
    training, and technical assistance programs for WOSBs including, 
    where appropriate, the use of Government acquisitions forecasts, in 
    order to assist WOSBs in developing their products, skills, business 
    planning practices, and marketing techniques.
Sec. 5. Subcontracting Plans. The head of each Federal agency, or 
designated representative, shall work closely with the SBA, OFPP, and 
others to develop procedures to increase compliance by prime contractors 
with subcontracting plans proposed under section 8(d) of the Small 
Business Act (15 U.S.C. 637(d)) or section 834 of Public Law 101-189, as 
amended (15 U.S.C. 637 note), including subcontracting plans involving 
WOSBs.
Sec. 6. Action Plans. If a Federal agency fails to meet its annual goals 
in expanding contract opportunities for WOSBs, it shall work with the 
SBA to develop an action plan to increase the likelihood that 
participation goals will be met or exceeded in future years.
Sec. 7. Compliance. Independent agencies are requested to comply with 
the provisions of this order.
Sec. 8. Consultation and Advice. In developing the long-term 
comprehensive strategies required by section 2 of this order, Federal 
agencies shall consult with, and seek information and advice from, State 
and local governments, WOSBs, other private-sector partners, and other 
experts.
Sec. 9. Judicial Review. This order is for internal management purposes 
for the Federal Government. It does not create any right or benefit, 
substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a party 
against the United States, its agencies, its officers, its employees, or 
any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 23, 2000.



Executive Order 13158 of May 26, 2000

Marine Protected Areas

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America and in furtherance of the purposes 
of the National Marine Sanctuaries Act (16 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.), 
National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 
668dd-ee), National Park Service Organic Act (16 U.S.C. 1 et seq.), 
National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), Wilderness 
Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and 
Management Act (16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), Coastal Zone Management Act (16 
U.S.C. 1451 et seq.), Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et 
seq.), Marine Mammal Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 1362 et seq.), Clean 
Water Act of 1977 (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), National Environmental 
Policy Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), Outer Continental Shelf 
Lands Act (42 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.), and other pertinent statutes, it is 
ordered as follows:
Section 1. Purpose. This Executive Order will help protect the 
significant natural and cultural resources within the marine environment 
for the ben

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efit of present and future generations by strengthening and expanding 
the Nation's system of marine protected areas (MPAs). An expanded and 
strengthened comprehensive system of marine protected areas throughout 
the marine environment would enhance the conservation of our Nation's 
natural and cultural marine heritage and the ecologically and 
economically sustainable use of the marine environment for future 
generations. To this end, the purpose of this order is to, consistent 
with domestic and international law: (a) strengthen the management, 
protection, and conservation of existing marine protected areas and 
establish new or expanded MPAs; (b) develop a scientifically based, 
comprehensive national system of MPAs representing diverse U.S. marine 
ecosystems, and the Nation's natural and cultural resources; and (c) 
avoid causing harm to MPAs through federally conducted, approved, or 
funded activities.
Sec. 2. Definitions. For the purposes of this order: (a) ``Marine 
protected area'' means any area of the marine environment that has been 
reserved by Federal, State, territorial, tribal, or local laws or 
regulations to provide lasting protection for part or all of the natural 
and cultural resources therein.
    (b) ``Marine environment'' means those areas of coastal and ocean 
waters, the Great Lakes and their connecting waters, and submerged lands 
thereunder, over which the United States exercises jurisdiction, 
consistent with international law.
    (c) The term ``United States'' includes the several States, the 
District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin 
Islands of the United States, American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth 
of the Northern Mariana Islands.
Sec. 3. MPA Establishment, Protection, and Management. Each Federal 
agency whose authorities provide for the establishment or management of 
MPAs shall take appropriate actions to enhance or expand protection of 
existing MPAs and establish or recommend, as appropriate, new MPAs. 
Agencies implementing this section shall consult with the agencies 
identified in subsection 4(a) of this order, consistent with existing 
requirements.
Sec. 4. National System of MPAs. (a) To the extent permitted by law and 
subject to the availability of appropriations, the Department of 
Commerce and the Department of the Interior, in consultation with the 
Department of Defense, the Department of State, the United States Agency 
for International Development, the Department of Transportation, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, the National Science Foundation, and 
other pertinent Federal agencies shall develop a national system of 
MPAs. They shall coordinate and share information, tools, and 
strategies, and provide guidance to enable and encourage the use of the 
following in the exercise of each agency's respective authorities to 
further enhance and expand protection of existing MPAs and to establish 
or recommend new MPAs, as appropriate:
    (1) science-based identification and prioritization of natural and 
cultural resources for additional protection;
    (2) integrated assessments of ecological linkages among MPAs, 
including ecological reserves in which consumptive uses of resources are 
prohibited, to provide synergistic benefits;

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    (3) a biological assessment of the minimum area where consumptive 
uses would be prohibited that is necessary to preserve representative 
habitats in different geographic areas of the marine environment;
    (4) an assessment of threats and gaps in levels of protection 
currently afforded to natural and cultural resources, as appropriate;
    (5) practical, science-based criteria and protocols for monitoring 
and evaluating the effectiveness of MPAs;
    (6) identification of emerging threats and user conflicts affecting 
MPAs and appropriate, practical, and equitable management solutions, 
including effective enforcement strategies, to eliminate or reduce such 
threats and conflicts;
    (7) assessment of the economic effects of the preferred management 
solutions; and
    (8) identification of opportunities to improve linkages with, and 
technical assistance to, international marine protected area programs.
    (b) In carrying out the requirements of section 4 of this order, the 
Department of Commerce and the Department of the Interior shall consult 
with those States that contain portions of the marine environment, the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, 
American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands, tribes, Regional Fishery Management Councils, and other 
entities, as appropriate, to promote coordination of Federal, State, 
territorial, and tribal actions to establish and manage MPAs.
    (c) In carrying out the requirements of this section, the Department 
of Commerce and the Department of the Interior shall seek the expert 
advice and recommendations of non-Federal scientists, resource managers, 
and other interested persons and organizations through a Marine 
Protected Area Federal Advisory Committee. The Committee shall be 
established by the Department of Commerce.
    (d) The Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of the Interior 
shall establish and jointly manage a website for information on MPAs and 
Federal agency reports required by this order. They shall also publish 
and maintain a list of MPAs that meet the definition of MPA for the 
purposes of this order.
    (e) The Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration shall establish a Marine Protected Area Center to carry 
out, in cooperation with the Department of the Interior, the 
requirements of subsection 4(a) of this order, coordinate the website 
established pursuant to subsection 4(d) of this order, and partner with 
governmental and nongovernmental entities to conduct necessary research, 
analysis, and exploration. The goal of the MPA Center shall be, in 
cooperation with the Department of the Interior, to develop a framework 
for a national system of MPAs, and to provide Federal, State, 
territorial, tribal, and local governments with the information, 
technologies, and strategies to support the system. This national system 
framework and the work of the MPA Center is intended to support, not 
interfere with, agencies' independent exercise of their own existing 
authorities.
    (f) To better protect beaches, coasts, and the marine environment 
from pollution, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), relying upon 
exist

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ing Clean Water Act authorities, shall expeditiously propose new 
science-based regulations, as necessary, to ensure appropriate levels of 
protection for the marine environment. Such regulations may include the 
identification of areas that warrant additional pollution protections 
and the enhancement of marine water quality standards. The EPA shall 
consult with the Federal agencies identified in subsection 4(a) of this 
order, States, territories, tribes, and the public in the development of 
such new regulations.
Sec. 5. Agency Responsibilities. Each Federal agency whose actions 
affect the natural or cultural resources that are protected by an MPA 
shall identify such actions. To the extent permitted by law and to the 
maximum extent practicable, each Federal agency, in taking such actions, 
shall avoid harm to the natural and cultural resources that are 
protected by an MPA. In implementing this section, each Federal agency 
shall refer to the MPAs identified under subsection 4(d) of this order.
Sec. 6. Accountability. Each Federal agency that is required to take 
actions under this order shall prepare and make public annually a 
concise description of actions taken by it in the previous year to 
implement the order, including a description of written comments by any 
person or organization stating that the agency has not complied with 
this order and a response to such comments by the agency.
Sec. 7. International Law. Federal agencies taking actions pursuant to 
this Executive Order must act in accordance with international law and 
with Presidential Proclamation 5928 of December 27, 1988, on the 
Territorial Sea of the United States of America, Presidential 
Proclamation 5030 of March 10, 1983, on the Exclusive Economic Zone of 
the United States of America, and Presidential Proclamation 7219 of 
September 2, 1999, on the Contiguous Zone of the United States.
Sec. 8. General. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed as 
altering existing authorities regarding the establishment of Federal 
MPAs in areas of the marine environment subject to the jurisdiction and 
control of States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto 
Rico, the Virgin Islands of the United States, American Samoa, Guam, the 
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and Indian tribes.
    (b) This order does not diminish, affect, or abrogate Indian treaty 
rights or United States trust responsibilities to Indian tribes.
    (c) This order does not create any right or benefit, substantive or 
procedural, enforceable in law or equity by a party against the United 
States, its agencies, its officers, or any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 26, 2000.

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Executive Order 13159 of June 21, 2000

Blocking Property of the Government of the Russian Federation Relating 
to the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium Extracted From Nuclear 
Weapons

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the International 
Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) (50 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), the 
National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), and section 301 of 
title 3, United States Code.
I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of America, in 
view of the policies underlying Executive Order 12938 of November 14, 
1994, and Executive Order 13085 of May 26, 1998, find that the risk of 
nuclear proliferation created by the accumulation of a large volume of 
weapons-usable fissile material in the territory of the Russian 
Federation constitutes an unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
national security and foreign policy of the United States, and hereby 
declare a national emergency to deal with that threat.
I hereby order:
Section 1. A major national security goal of the United States is to 
ensure that fissile material removed from Russian nuclear weapons 
pursuant to various arms control and disarmament agreements is dedicated 
to peaceful uses, subject to transparency measures, and protected from 
diversion to activities of proliferation concern. As reflected in 
Executive Order 13085, the full implementation of the Agreement Between 
the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the 
Russian Federation Concerning the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium 
Extracted from Nuclear Weapons, dated February 18, 1993, and related 
contracts and agreements (collectively, the ``HEU Agreements'') is 
essential to the attainment of this goal. The HEU Agreements provide for 
the conversion of approximately 500 metric tons of highly enriched 
uranium contained in Russian nuclear weapons into low-enriched uranium 
for use as fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. In furtherance of our 
national security goals, all heads of departments and agencies of the 
United States Government shall continue to take all appropriate measures 
within their authority to further the full implementation of the HEU 
Agreements.
Sec. 2. Government of the Russian Federation assets directly related to 
the implementation of the HEU Agreements currently may be subject to 
attachment, judgment, decree, lien, execution, garnishment, or other 
judicial process, thereby jeopardizing the full implementation of the 
HEU Agreements to the detriment of U.S. foreign policy. In order to 
ensure the preservation and proper and complete transfer to the 
Government of the Russian Federation of all payments due to it under the 
HEU Agreements, and except to the extent provided in regulations, 
orders, directives, or licenses that may hereafter be issued pursuant to 
this order, all property and interests in property of the Government of 
the Russian Federation directly related to the implementation of the HEU 
Agreements that are in the United States, that hereafter come within the 
United States, or that are or hereafter come within the possession or 
control of United States persons, including their overseas branches, are 
hereby blocked and may not be transferred,

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paid, exported, withdrawn, or otherwise dealt in. Unless licensed or 
authorized pursuant to this order, any attachment, judgment, decree, 
lien, execution, garnishment, or other judicial process is null and void 
with respect to any property or interest in property blocked pursuant to 
this order.
Sec. 3. For the purposes of this order: (a) The term ``person'' means an 
individual or entity;
    (b) The term ``entity'' means a partnership, association, trust, 
joint venture, corporation, or other organization;
    (c) The term ``United States person'' means any United States 
citizen; permanent resident alien; juridical person organized under the 
laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States, 
including foreign branches; or any person in the United States; and
    (d) The term ``Government of the Russian Federation'' means the 
Government of the Russian Federation, any political subdivision, agency, 
or instrumentality thereof, and any person owned or controlled by, or 
acting for or on behalf of, the Government of the Russian Federation.
Sec. 4. (a) The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the 
Secretary of State, the Secretary of Energy, and, as appropriate, other 
agencies, is hereby authorized to take such actions, including the 
promulgation of rules and regulations, and to employ all powers granted 
to me by IEEPA, as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this 
order. The Secretary of the Treasury may redelegate any of these 
functions to other officers and agencies of the United States 
Government. All agencies of the United States Government are hereby 
directed to take all appropriate measures within their statutory 
authority to carry out the provisions of this order.
    (b) Nothing contained in this order shall relieve a person from any 
requirement to obtain a license or other authorization from any 
department or agency of the United States Government in compliance with 
applicable laws and regulations subject to the jurisdiction of the 
department or agency.
Sec. 5. This order is not intended to create, nor does it create, any 
right, benefit, or privilege, substantive or procedural, enforceable at 
law by a party against the United States, its agencies, officers, or any 
other person.
Sec. 6. (a) This order is effective at 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time 
on June 22, 2000.
    (b) This order shall be transmitted to the Congress and published in 
the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    June 21, 2000.

[[Page 279]]



Executive Order 13160 of June 23, 2000

Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Race, Sex, Color, National Origin, 
Disability, Religion, Age, Sexual Orientation, and Status as a Parent in 
Federally Conducted Education and Training Programs

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including sections 921-932 of 
title 20, United States Code; section 2164 of title 10, United States 
Code; section 2001 et seq., of title 25, United States Code; section 
7301 of title 5, United States Code; and section 301 of title 3, United 
States Code, and to achieve equal opportunity in Federally conducted 
education and training programs and activities, it is hereby ordered as 
follows:
Section 1. Statement of policy on education programs and activities 
conducted by executive departments and agencies.
1-101. The Federal Government must hold itself to at least the same 
principles of nondiscrimination in educational opportunities as it 
applies to the education programs and activities of State and local 
governments, and to private institutions receiving Federal financial 
assistance. Existing laws and regulations prohibit certain forms of 
discrimination in Federally conducted education and training programs 
and activities--including discrimination against people with 
disabilities, prohibited by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. 
701 et seq., as amended, employment discrimination on the basis of race, 
color, national origin, sex, or religion, prohibited by Title VII of the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000e-17, as amended, discrimination 
on the basis of race, color, national origin, or religion in educational 
programs receiving Federal assistance, under Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Acts of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000d, and sex-based discrimination in 
education programs receiving Federal assistance under Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. 1681 et seq. Through this 
Executive Order, discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, 
national origin, disability, religion, age, sexual orientation, and 
status as a parent will be prohibited in Federally conducted education 
and training programs and activities.
1-102. No individual, on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, 
disability, religion, age, sexual orientation, or status as a parent, 
shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or 
be subjected to discrimination in, a Federally conducted education or 
training program or activity.
Sec. 2. Definitions.
2-201. ``Federally conducted education and training programs and 
activities'' includes programs and activities conducted, operated, or 
undertaken by an executive department or agency.
2-202. ``Education and training programs and activities'' include, but 
are not limited to, formal schools, extracurricular activities, academic 
programs, occupational training, scholarships and fellowships, student 
internships, training for industry members, summer enrichment camps, and 
teacher training programs.

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2-203. The Attorney General is authorized to make a final determination 
as to whether a program falls within the scope of education and training 
programs and activities covered by this order, under subsection 2-202, 
or is excluded from coverage, under section 3.
2-204. ``Military education or training programs'' are those education 
and training programs conducted by the Department of Defense or, where 
the Coast Guard is concerned, the Department of Transportation, for the 
primary purpose of educating or training members of the armed forces or 
meeting a statutory requirement to educate or train Federal, State, or 
local civilian law enforcement officials pursuant to 10 U.S.C. Chapter 
18.
2-205. ``Armed Forces'' means the Armed Forces of the United States.
2-206. ``Status as a parent'' refers to the status of an individual who, 
with respect to an individual who is under the age of 18 or who is 18 or 
older but is incapable of self-care because of a physical or mental 
disability, is:
(a)    a biological parent;
(b)    an adoptive parent;
(c)    a foster parent;
(d)    a stepparent;
(e)    a custodian of a legal ward;
(f)    in loco parentis over such an individual; or
(g)    actively seeking legal custody or adoption of such an individual.
Sec. 3. Exemption from coverage.
3-301. This order does not apply to members of the armed forces, 
military education or training programs, or authorized intelligence 
activities. Members of the armed forces, including students at military 
academies, will continue to be covered by regulations that currently bar 
specified forms of discrimination that are now enforced by the 
Department of Defense and the individual service branches. The 
Department of Defense shall develop procedures to protect the rights of 
and to provide redress to civilians not otherwise protected by existing 
Federal law from discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, 
national origin, disability, religion, age, sexual orientation, or 
status as a parent and who participate in military education or training 
programs or activities conducted by the Department of Defense.
3-302. This order does not apply to, affect, interfere with, or modify 
the operation of any otherwise lawful affirmative action plan or 
program.
3-303. An individual shall not be deemed subjected to discrimination by 
reason of his or her exclusion from the benefits of a program 
established consistent with federal law or limited by Federal law to 
individuals of a particular race, sex, color, disability, national 
origin, age, religion, sexual orientation, or status as a parent 
different from his or her own.
3-304. This order does not apply to ceremonial or similar education or 
training programs or activities of schools conducted by the Department 
of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, that are culturally relevant 
to the children represented in the school. ``Culturally relevant'' 
refers to any class, program, or activity that is fundamental to a 
tribe's culture, customs, traditions, heritage, or religion.
3-305. This order does not apply to (a) selections based on national 
origin of foreign nationals to participate in covered education or 
training programs, if such programs primarily concern national security 
or foreign pol

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icy matters; or (b) selections or other decisions regarding 
participation in covered education or training programs made by entities 
outside the executive branch. It shall be the policy of the executive 
branch that education or training programs or activities shall not be 
available to entities that select persons for participation in violation 
of Federal or State law.
3-306. The prohibition on discrimination on the basis of age provided in 
this order does not apply to age-based admissions of participants to 
education or training programs, if such programs have traditionally been 
age-specific or must be age-limited for reasons related to health or 
national security.
Sec. 4. Administrative enforcement.
4-401. Any person who believes himself or herself to be aggrieved by a 
violation of this order or its implementing regulations, rules, 
policies, or guidance may, personally or through a representative, file 
a written complaint with the agency that such person believes is in 
violation of this order or its implementing regulations, rules, 
policies, or guidance. Pursuant to procedures to be established by the 
Attorney General, each executive department or agency shall conduct an 
investigation of any complaint by one of its employees alleging a 
violation of this Executive Order.
4-402. (a) If the office within an executive department or agency that 
is designated to investigate complaints for violations of this order or 
its implementing rules, regulations, policies, or guidance concludes 
that an employee has not complied with this order or any of its 
implementing rules, regulations, policies, or guidance, such office 
shall complete a report and refer a copy of the report and any relevant 
findings or supporting evidence to an appropriate agency official. The 
appropriate agency official shall review such material and determine 
what, if any, disciplinary action is appropriate.
(b) In addition, the designated investigating office may provide 
appropriate agency officials with a recommendation for any corrective 
and/or remedial action. The appropriate officials shall consider such 
recommendation and implement corrective and/or remedial action by the 
agency, when appropriate. Nothing in this order authorizes monetary 
relief to the complainant as a form of remedial or corrective action by 
an executive department or agency.
4-403. Any action to discipline an employee who violates this order or 
its implementing rules, regulations, policies, or guidance, including 
removal from employment, where appropriate, shall be taken in compliance 
with otherwise applicable procedures, including the Civil Service Reform 
Act of 1978, Public Law No. 95-454, 92 Stat. 1111.
Sec. 5. Implementation and Agency Responsibilities.
5-501. The Attorney General shall publish in the Federal Register such 
rules, regulations, policies, or guidance, as the Attorney General deems 
appropriate, to be followed by all executive departments and agencies. 
The Attorney General shall address:
a.  which programs and activities fall within the scope of education and 
    training programs and activities covered by this order, under 
    subsection 2-202, or excluded from coverage, under section 3 of this 
    order;

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b.  examples of discriminatory conduct;
c.  applicable legal principles;
d.  enforcement procedures with respect to complaints against employees;
e.  remedies;
f.  requirements for agency annual and tri-annual reports as set forth 
    in section 6 of this order; and
g.  such other matters as deemed appropriate.
5-502. Within 90 days of the publication of final rules, regulations, 
policies, or guidance by the Attorney General, each executive department 
and agency shall establish a procedure to receive and address complaints 
regarding its Federally conducted education and training programs and 
activities. Each executive department and agency shall take all 
necessary steps to effectuate any subsequent rules, regulations, 
policies, or guidance issued by the Attorney General within 90 days of 
issuance.
5-503. The head of each executive department and agency shall be 
responsible for ensuring compliance within this order.
5-504. Each executive department and agency shall cooperate with the 
Attorney General and provide such information and assistance as the 
Attorney General may require in the performance of the Attorney 
General's functions under this order.
5-505. Upon request and to the extent practicable, the Attorney General 
shall provide technical advice and assistance to executive departments 
and agencies to assist in full compliance with this order.
Sec. 6. Reporting Requirements.
6-601. Consistent with the regulations, rules, policies, or guidance 
issued by the Attorney General, each executive department and agency 
shall submit to the Attorney General a report that summarizes the number 
and nature of complaints filed with the agency and the disposition of 
such complaints. For the first 3 years after the date of this order, 
such reports shall be submitted annually within 90 days of the end of 
the preceding year's activities. Subsequent reports shall be submitted 
every 3 years and within 90 days of the end of each 3-year period.
Sec. 7. General Provisions.
7-701. Nothing in this order shall limit the authority of the Attorney 
General to provide for the coordinated enforcement of nondiscrimination 
requirements in Federal assistance programs under Executive Order 12250.
Sec. 8. Judicial Review.
8-801. This order is not intended, and should not be construed, to 
create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at 
law by a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or 
its employees. This order is not intended, however, to preclude judicial 
review of final decisions in accordance with the Administrative 
Procedure Act, 5 U.S.C. 701, et seq.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    June 23, 2000.

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Executive Order 13161 of June 29, 2000

Establishment of the Presidential Medal of Valor for Public Safety 
Officers

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, it is ordered:
Section 1. The Presidential Medal of Valor for Public Safety Officers 
(Medal) is established for the purpose of recognizing those public 
safety officers adjudged to have shown extraordinary valor above and 
beyond the call of duty in the exercise of their official duties. As 
used in this section, the term ``public safety officer'' means a person 
serving a public agency with or without compensation:
    (1) as a law enforcement officer, including police, correctional, 
probation, or parole officers;
    (2) as a firefighter or emergency responder; and
    (3) who is employed by the Government of the United States, any 
State of the United States, any officially recognized elective body 
within a State of the United States, or any Federally recognized tribal 
organization.
Sec. 2. Eligible recipients generally will be recommended to the 
President by the Attorney General by April 1 of each year. Pursuant to 
36 U.S.C. 136-137, the President designates May 15 of each year as 
``Peace Officers Memorial Day'' and the week in which it falls as 
``Police Week.'' Presentation of the Medal shall occur at an appropriate 
time during the commemoration of Police Week, as far as is practicable.
Sec. 3. The President may select for the Medal up to ten persons 
annually from among those persons recommended to the President by the 
Attorney General. In submitting recommendations to the President, the 
Attorney General may consult with experts representing all segments of 
the public safety sector, including representatives from law 
enforcement, firefighters, and emergency services.
Sec. 4. Those chosen for recognition shall receive a medal and a 
certificate, the designs of which shall be submitted by the Attorney 
General for the President's approval no later than December 1, 2000. The 
medal and certificate shall be prepared by the Department of Justice.
Sec. 5. The Medal may be given posthumously.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    June 29, 2000.



Executive Order 13162 of July 6, 2000

Federal Career Intern Program

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including sections 3301 and 3302 
of title

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5, United States Code, and in order to provide for the recruitment and 
selection of exceptional employees for careers in the public sector, it 
is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. There is hereby constituted the Federal Career Intern Program 
(Program). The purpose of the Program is to attract exceptional men and 
women to the Federal workforce who have diverse professional 
experiences, academic training, and competencies, and to prepare them 
for careers in analyzing and implementing public programs. ``Career 
Intern'' is a generic term, and agencies may use occupational titles as 
appropriate.
Sec. 2. The Program is another step in the Administration's effort to 
recruit the highest caliber people to the Federal Government, develop 
their professional abilities, and retain them in Federal departments and 
agencies. Cabinet secretaries and agency administrators should view the 
Program as complementary to existing programs that provide career 
enhancement opportunities for Federal employees, and departments and 
agencies are encouraged to identify and make use of those programs, as 
well as the new Program, to meet department and agency needs.
Sec. 3. (a) The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) shall develop 
appropriate merit-based procedures for the recruitment, screening, 
placement, and continuing career development of Career Interns.
    (b) In developing those procedures, the OPM shall provide for such 
actions as deemed appropriate to assure equal employment opportunity and 
the application of appropriate veterans' preference criteria.
Sec. 4. (a) A successful candidate shall be appointed to a position in 
Schedule B of the excepted service at the GS-5, 7, or 9 (and equivalent) 
or other trainee level appropriate for the Program, unless otherwise 
approved by the OPM. The appointment shall not exceed 2 years unless 
extended by the Federal department or agency, with the concurrence of 
the OPM, for up to 1 additional year.
    (b) Tenure for a Career Intern shall be governed by the following 
principles and policies:
(1) Assigned responsibilities shall be consistent with a Career Intern's 
    competencies and career interests, and the purposes of the Program.
(2) Continuation in the Program shall be contingent upon satisfactory 
    performance by the Career Intern throughout the internship period.
(3) Except as provided in subsections (4) and (5) of this section, 
    service as a Career Intern confers no rights to further Federal 
    employment in either the competitive or excepted service upon the 
    expiration of the internship period.
(4) Competitive civil service status may be granted to a Career Intern 
    who satisfactorily completes the internship and meets all other 
    requirements prescribed by the OPM.
(5) Within an agency, an employee who formerly held a career or career-
    conditional appointment immediately before entering the Career 
    Intern Program, and who fails to complete the Career Intern Program 
    for reasons unrelated to misconduct or suitability, shall be placed 
    in a career or career-conditional position in the current agency at 
    no lower grade or pay than the one the employee left to accept the 
    position in the Career Intern Program.
Sec. 5. A Career Intern shall participate in a formal program of 
training and job assignments to develop competencies that the OPM 
identifies as core

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to the Program, and the employing agency identifies as appropriate to 
the agency's mission and needs.
Sec. 6. The OPM shall prescribe such regulations as it determines 
necessary to carry out the purpose of this order.
Sec. 7. The OPM shall provide oversight of the Program.
Sec. 8. Executive Order 12596 of May 7, 1987, is revoked.
Sec. 9. Judicial Review. This order is intended only to improve the 
internal management of the executive branch. It does not create any 
right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable in law or 
equity, by a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers 
or employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    July 6, 2000.



Executive Order 13163 of July 26, 2000

Increasing the Opportunity for Individuals With Disabilities To Be 
Employed in the Federal Government

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to promote an 
increase in the opportunities for individuals with disabilities to be 
employed at all levels and occupations of the Federal Government, and to 
support the goals articulated in section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 791), it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Increasing the Federal Employment Opportunities for 
Individuals with Disabilities. (a) Recent evidence demonstrates that, 
throughout the United States, qualified persons with disabilities have 
been refused employment despite their availability and qualifications, 
and many qualified persons with disabilities are never made aware of 
available employment opportunities. Evidence also suggests that 
increased efforts at outreach, and increased understanding of the 
reasonable accommodations available for persons with disabilities, will 
permit persons with disabilities to compete for employment on a more 
level playing field.
    (b) Based on current hiring patterns and anticipated increases from 
expanded outreach efforts and appropriate accommodations, the Federal 
Government, over the next 5 years, will be able to hire 100,000 
qualified individuals with disabilities. In furtherance of such efforts, 
Federal agencies shall:

(1) Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, 
regulations, and prior Executive orders and Presidential Memoranda;

(2) Expand their outreach efforts, using both traditional and 
nontraditional methods; and

(3) Increase their efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities.

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    (c) As a model employer, the Federal Government will take the lead 
in educating the public about employment opportunities available for 
individuals with disabilities.
    (d) This order does not require agencies to create new positions or 
to change existing qualification standards for any position.
Sec. 2. Implementation. Each Federal agency shall prepare a plan to 
increase the opportunities for individuals with disabilities to be 
employed in the agency. Each agency shall submit that plan to the Office 
of Personnel Management within 60 days from the date of this order.
Sec. 3. Authority to Develop Guidance. The Office of Personnel 
Management shall develop guidance on the provisions of this order to 
increase the opportunities for individuals with disabilities employed in 
the Federal Government.
Sec. 4. Judicial Review. This order is intended only to improve the 
internal management of the executive branch and does not create any 
right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or 
equity by a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, 
its employees, or any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    July 26, 2000.



Executive Order 13164 of July 26, 2000

Requiring Federal Agencies To Establish Procedures To
Facilitate the Provision of Reasonable Accommodation

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 701 et seq.), as amended, and in order to promote a 
model Federal workplace that provides reasonable accommodation for (1) 
individuals with disabilities in the application process for Federal 
employment; (2) Federal employees with disabilities to perform the 
essential functions of a position; and (3) Federal employees with 
disabilities to enjoy benefits and privileges of employment equal to 
those enjoyed by employees without disabilities, it is hereby ordered as 
follows:
Section 1. Establishment of Effective Written Procedures to Facilitate 
the Provision of Reasonable Accommodation. (a) Each Federal agency shall 
establish effective written procedures for processing requests for 
reasonable accommodation by employees and applicants with disabilities. 
The written procedures may allow different components of an agency to 
tailor their procedures as necessary to ensure the expeditious 
processing of requests.
    (b) As set forth in Re-charting the Course: The First Report of the 
Presidential Task Force on Employment of Adults with Disabilities 
(1998), effective written procedures for processing requests for 
reasonable accommodation should include the following:

(1) Explain that an employee or job applicant may initiate a request for 
reasonable accommodation orally or in writing. If the agency requires an

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applicant or employee to complete a reasonable accommodation request form 
for recordkeeping purposes, the form must be provided as an attachment to 
the agency's written procedures;

(2) Explain how the agency will process a request for reasonable 
accommodation, and from whom the individual will receive a final decision;

(3) Designate a time period during which reasonable accommodation requests 
will be granted or denied, absent extenuating circumstances. Time limits 
for decision making should be as short as reasonably possible;

(4) Explain the responsibility of the employee or applicant to provide 
appropriate medical information related to the functional impairment at 
issue and the requested accommodation where the disability and/or need for 
accommodation is not obvious;

(5) Explain the agency's right to request relevant supplemental medical 
information if the information submitted does not clearly explain the 
nature of the disability, or the need for the reasonable accommodation, or 
does not otherwise clarify how the requested accommodation will assist the 
employee to perform the essential functions of the job or to enjoy the 
benefits and privileges of the workplace;

(6) Explain the agency's right to have medical information reviewed by a 
medical expert of the agency's choosing at the agency's expense;

(7) Provide that reassignment will be considered as a reasonable 
accommodation if the agency determines that no other reasonable 
accommodation will permit the employee with a disability to perform the 
essential functions of his or her current position;

(8) Provide that reasonable accommodation denials be in writing and specify 
the reasons for denial;

(9) Ensure that agencies' systems of recordkeeping track the processing of 
requests for reasonable accommodation and maintain the confidentiality of 
medical information received in accordance with applicable law and 
regulations; and

(10) Encourage the use of informal dispute resolution processes to allow 
individuals with disabilities to obtain prompt reconsideration of denials 
of reasonable accommodation. Agencies must also inform individuals with 
disabilities that they have the right to file complaints in the Equal 
Employment Opportunity process and other statutory processes, as 
appropriate, if their requests for reasonable accommodation are denied.

Sec. 2. Submission of Agency Reasonable Accommodation Procedures to the 
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Within 1 year from the 
date of this order, each agency shall submit its procedures to the EEOC. 
Each agency shall also submit to the EEOC any modifications to its 
reasonable accommodation procedures at the time that those modifications 
are adopted.
Sec. 3. Collective Bargaining Obligations. In adopting their reasonable 
accommodation procedures, agencies must honor their obligations to 
notify their collective bargaining representatives and bargain over such 
procedures to the extent required by law.
Sec. 4. Implementation. The EEOC shall issue guidance for the 
implementation of this order within 90 days from the date of this order.

[[Page 288]]

Sec. 5. Construction and Judicial Review. (a) Nothing in this order 
limits the rights that individuals with disabilities may have under the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.
    (b) This order is intended only to improve the internal management 
of the executive branch and does not create any right or benefit, 
substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a party 
against the United States, its agencies, its officers, its employees, or 
any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    July 26, 2000.



Executive Order 13165 of August 9, 2000

Creation of the White House Task Force on Drug Use in Sports and 
Authorization for the Director of the Office of National Drug Control 
Policy To Serve as the United States Government's Representative on the 
Board of the World Anti-Doping Agency

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Office of National 
Drug Control Reauthorization Act of 1998, (21 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), and 
in order to develop recommendations for Federal agency actions to 
address the use of drugs in sports, in particular among young people, it 
is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. The use of drugs in sports has reached a level that 
endangers not just the legitimacy of athletic competition but also the 
lives and health of athletes--from the elite ranks to youth leagues. The 
National Household Survey on Drug Abuse issued in 1999 found that in 
just 1 year's time the rate of steroid use among young people rose 
roughly 50 percent among both sexes and across all age groups. It is the 
policy of my Administration to take the steps needed to help eliminate 
illicit or otherwise banned drug use and doping in sports at the State, 
national, and international level.
Sec. 2. Establishment of a White House Task Force on Drug Use in Sports. 
(a) There is established a White House Task Force on Drug Use in Sports 
(Task Force). The Task Force shall comprise the co-vice chairs of the 
White House Olympic Task Force (the ``Olympic Task Force Vice Chairs''), 
and representatives designated by the Office of National Drug Control 
Policy, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of 
Labor, the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, the 
Office of Management and Budget, the National Security Council, the 
Department of State, the Department of the Treasury, the Department of 
Education, the Department of Justice, the Department of Transportation, 
the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the Substance Abuse and Mental 
Health Services Administration.
    (b) The Task Force shall develop recommendations for the President 
on further executive and legislative actions that can be undertaken to 
address

[[Page 289]]

the problem of doping and drug use in sports. In developing the 
recommendations, the Task Force shall consider, among other things: (i) 
the health and safety of America's athletes, in particular our Nation's 
young people; (ii) the integrity of honest athletic competition; and 
(iii) the views and recommendations of State and local governments, the 
private sector, citizens, community groups, and nonprofit organizations, 
on actions to address this threat. The Task Force, through its Chairs, 
shall submit its recommendations to the President.
    (c) The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (the 
Director), the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, 
and the Olympic Task Force Vice Chairs or their designees shall serve as 
the Task Force Chairs.
    (d) To the extent permitted by law and at the request of the Chairs, 
agencies shall cooperate with and provide information to the Task Force.
Sec. 3. Participation in the World Anti-Doping Agency. (a) As part of my 
Administration's efforts to address the problem of drug use in sports, 
the United States has played a leading role in the formation of a World 
Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) by the Olympic and sports community and the 
nations of the world. Through these efforts, the United States has been 
selected to serve as a governmental representative on the board of the 
WADA. This order will authorize the Director to serve as the United 
States Government's representative on the WADA board.
    (b) Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 1701 et seq., the Director, or in his 
absence his designee, is hereby authorized to take all necessary and 
proper actions to execute his responsibilities as United States 
representative to the WADA.
    (c) To assist the Director in carrying out these responsibilities as 
the United States Government representative to the WADA and to the 
extent permitted by law, Federal employees may serve in their official 
capacity, inter alia, on WADA Committees or WADA advisory committees, 
serving as experts to the WADA.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     August 9, 2000.



Executive Order 13166 of August 11, 2000

Improving Access to Services for Persons With Limited English 
Proficiency

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and to improve access to federally 
conducted and federally assisted programs and activities for persons 
who, as a result of national origin, are limited in their English 
proficiency (LEP), it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Goals.
    The Federal Government provides and funds an array of services that 
can be made accessible to otherwise eligible persons who are not 
proficient in

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the English language. The Federal Government is committed to improving 
the accessibility of these services to eligible LEP persons, a goal that 
reinforces its equally important commitment to promoting programs and 
activities designed to help individuals learn English. To this end, each 
Federal agency shall examine the services it provides and develop and 
implement a system by which LEP persons can meaningfully access those 
services consistent with, and without unduly burdening, the fundamental 
mission of the agency. Each Federal agency shall also work to ensure 
that recipients of Federal financial assistance (recipients) provide 
meaningful access to their LEP applicants and beneficiaries. To assist 
the agencies with this endeavor, the Department of Justice has today 
issued a general guidance document (LEP Guidance), which sets forth the 
compliance standards that recipients must follow to ensure that the 
programs and activities they normally provide in English are accessible 
to LEP persons and thus do not discriminate on the basis of national 
origin in violation of title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as 
amended, and its implementing regulations. As described in the LEP 
Guidance, recipients must take reasonable steps to ensure meaningful 
access to their programs and activities by LEP persons.
Sec. 2. Federally Conducted Programs and Activities.
    Each Federal agency shall prepare a plan to improve access to its 
federally conducted programs and activities by eligible LEP persons. 
Each plan shall be consistent with the standards set forth in the LEP 
Guidance, and shall include the steps the agency will take to ensure 
that eligible LEP persons can meaningfully access the agency's programs 
and activities. Agencies shall develop and begin to implement these 
plans within 120 days of the date of this order, and shall send copies 
of their plans to the Department of Justice, which shall serve as the 
central repository of the agencies' plans.
Sec. 3. Federally Assisted Programs and Activities.
    Each agency providing Federal financial assistance shall draft title 
VI guidance specifically tailored to its recipients that is consistent 
with the LEP Guidance issued by the Department of Justice. This agency-
specific guidance shall detail how the general standards established in 
the LEP Guidance will be applied to the agency's recipients. The agency-
specific guidance shall take into account the types of services provided 
by the recipients, the individuals served by the recipients, and other 
factors set out in the LEP Guidance. Agencies that already have 
developed title VI guidance that the Department of Justice determines is 
consistent with the LEP Guidance shall examine their existing guidance, 
as well as their programs and activities, to determine if additional 
guidance is necessary to comply with this order. The Department of 
Justice shall consult with the agencies in creating their guidance and, 
within 120 days of the date of this order, each agency shall submit its 
specific guidance to the Department of Justice for review and approval. 
Following approval by the Department of Justice, each agency shall 
publish its guidance document in the Federal Register for public 
comment.
Sec. 4. Consultations.
    In carrying out this order, agencies shall ensure that stakeholders, 
such as LEP persons and their representative organizations, recipients, 
and other appropriate individuals or entities, have an adequate 
opportunity to provide input. Agencies will evaluate the particular 
needs of the LEP persons they and their recipients serve and the burdens 
of compliance on the agen

[[Page 291]]

cy and its recipients. This input from stakeholders will assist the 
agencies in developing an approach to ensuring meaningful access by LEP 
persons that is practical and effective, fiscally responsible, 
responsive to the particular circumstances of each agency, and can be 
readily implemented.
Sec. 5. Judicial Review.
    This order is intended only to improve the internal management of 
the executive branch and does not create any right or benefit, 
substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a party 
against the United States, its agencies, its officers or employees, or 
any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     August 11, 2000.



Executive Order 13167 of September 15, 2000

Amendment to Executive Order 13147, Increasing the Membership of the 
White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), and in order to increase the 
membership of the White House Commission on Complementary and 
Alternative Medicine Policy from not more than 15 members to up to 20 
members, it is hereby ordered that the second sentence of section 1 of 
Executive Order 13147 of May 7, 2000, is amended by deleting ``not more 
than 15'' and inserting ``up to 20'' in lieu thereof.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    September 15, 2000.



Executive Order 13168 of September 22, 2000

President's Commission on Improving Economic Opportunity in Communities 
Dependent on Tobacco Production While Protecting Public Health

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), it is hereby ordered as 
follows:
Section 1. Establishment. (a) There is established the ``President's 
Commission on Improving Economic Opportunity in Communities Dependent on 
Tobacco Production while Protecting Public Health'' (the 
``Commission''). The Commission shall be composed of not more than 10 
members to be selected by the Secretary of Agriculture, in consultation 
with the President.

[[Page 292]]

The members may include tobacco producers and quota holders; public 
health experts; Federal, State, and local government representatives; 
and experts in agricultural economics and economic development.
    (b) Two co-chairs shall be selected by the Secretary of Agriculture 
from the membership of the Commission. The co-chairs shall report to the 
President through the Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services.
Sec. 2. Purpose. The Commission shall advise the President on changes 
occurring in the tobacco farming economy and recommend such measures as 
may be necessary to improve economic opportunity and development in 
communities that are dependent on tobacco production, while protecting 
consumers, particularly children, from hazards associated with smoking.
Sec. 3. Functions. (a) The Commission shall collect and review 
information about changes in the tobacco farming economy and Federal, 
State, and local initiatives intended to help tobacco growers, tobacco 
quota holders, and communities dependent on tobacco production pursue 
new economic opportunities. The Commission may make recommendations 
concerning these, and any other, changes and initiatives that may be 
necessary to improve economic opportunity in communities dependent on 
tobacco production. It shall also consider the public health 
implications of such changes and initiatives, including the efforts to 
reduce youth smoking and tobacco-related health consequences in the 
United States and abroad.
    (b) For the purpose of carrying out its functions, the Commission 
may hold hearings, establish subcommittees, and convene and act at such 
times and places as the Commission may find advisable.
Sec. 4. Reports. The Commission shall make a preliminary report to the 
President by December 31, 2000. A final report shall be submitted to the 
President 6 months after the Commission's first meeting.
Sec. 5. Administration. (a) To the extent permitted by law, the heads of 
executive departments and agencies shall provide the Commission, upon 
request, with such information as it may require for the purposes of 
carrying out its functions.
    (b) While engaged in the work of the Commission, members appointed 
from among private citizens of the United States may be allowed travel 
expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by 
law for persons serving intermittently in the Government service (5 
U.S.C. 5701-5707) to the extent funds are available for such purposes.
    (c) To the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability 
of appropriations, the Department of Agriculture shall provide the 
Commission with administrative services, funds, facilities, staff, and 
other support services necessary for the performance of the Commission's 
functions. Notwithstanding any other Executive Order, the functions of 
the President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, 
except that of reporting to the Congress, that are applicable to the 
Committee shall be performed by the Secretary of Agriculture in 
accordance with guidelines that have been issued by the Administration 
of General Services.

[[Page 293]]

Sec. 6. General. The Commission shall terminate 30 days after submitting 
its final report, but not later than 2 years from the date of this 
order, unless extended by the President.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    September 22, 2000.



Executive Order 13169 of October 6, 2000

Assistance to Small Business Exporters and Dislocated
Workers

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Small Business Act, 
15 U.S.C. 631 et seq., the Workforce Investment Act, 29 U.S.C. 2801 et 
seq., and the Trade Act of 1974, 19 U.S.C. 2271 et seq., and in order to 
assist small businesses, including businesses headed by underserved 
populations, in participating in the export of products, and to expedite 
the delivery of adjustment assistance to dislocated workers, it is 
hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. By its accession to the World Trade Organization, the 
People's Republic of China will be required to open its markets to a 
wide range of products and services provided by Americans. In addition, 
the United States has recently enacted a new law to facilitate trade 
with the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean Basin. 
Federal agencies should take steps to assist small businesses, including 
businesses headed by underserved populations, in capitalizing on these 
new opportunities. The agencies should also take steps to assist workers 
who lose their jobs as a result of competition from imports in their 
efforts to secure adjustment assistance benefits for which they are 
eligible.
Sec. 2. Interagency Task Force on Small Business Exports. (a) The 
Secretaries of Commerce and Labor, the Administrator of the Small 
Business Administration, the United States Trade Representative, and the 
Chairman of the Export-Import Bank shall, within 60 days from the date 
of this order, establish an interagency task force through the Trade 
Promotion Coordinating Committee (TPCC). The task force shall facilitate 
exports by United States small businesses, including businesses headed 
by underserved populations, particularly with respect to the People's 
Republic of China and the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa and the 
Caribbean Basin. The TPCC shall submit an annual report to the President 
on the functions carried out by this task force during the preceding 
year. As part of its work, the task force shall assess the extent to 
which the establishment of permanent normal trade relations with the 
People's Republic of China, and the United States enactment of the 
African Growth and Opportunity Act, 19 U.S.C.A. 3701 et seq., and the 
United States- Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act, 19 U.S.C.A. 2701 
note, may contribute to the creation of export opportunities for small 
businesses including businesses headed by underserved populations.

[[Page 294]]

    (b) For the purposes of this order, ``businesses headed by 
underserved populations'' means businesses headed by women or 
minorities, and/or located in rural communities.
Sec. 3. Expedited Response to Worker Dislocation. (a) The Secretary of 
Labor shall expedite the Federal response to worker dislocation through 
the Workforce Investment Act and the Trade Adjustment Assistance program 
by proactively seeking information, from a variety of sources, on actual 
or prospective layoffs, including the media and community and labor 
union members, and by sharing such information with appropriate state 
workforce officials. In addition, the Department of Labor (Labor) shall 
undertake a number of proactive steps to support public outreach 
activities aimed at workers, employers, the media, local officials, the 
community, and labor organizations and their members to improve 
awareness of the adjustment assistance available through Labor programs, 
including, but not limited to:
(1) developing a set of methods to inform employers of the services 
    available through Labor workforce programs, which will explain the 
    requirements of the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification 
    Act, 29 U.S.C. 2101 et seq., and provide information on worker 
    adjustment programs, including the Trade Adjustment Assistance and 
    the basic dislocated worker programs, emphasizing the importance of 
    early intervention to minimize the affects of work layoffs;
(2) improving websites and other modes of communication to provide basic 
    information on dislocated worker and Trade Adjustment Assistance 
    program contacts at the State and local level;
(3) developing a National Toll-Free Help Line to provide universal, 
    accurate, and easy access to information about public workforce 
    services to workers and employers;
(4) providing on-site technical assistance, in partnership with other 
    Federal agencies, when there are layoffs or closures with multi-
    State impact, or when there are dislocations with significant 
    community impact (such as areas that have been affected by numerous 
    layoffs of apparel and textile workers);
(5) informing States directly when a secondary worker impact has been 
    affirmed by Labor; and
(6) to the extent permitted by law, and subject to the availability of 
    appropriations, providing funding or an outreach campaign for 
    secondary workers (i.e., individuals indirectly affected by 
    increased imports from other countries).
    (b) The Secretary of Labor, in consultation with the Secretary of 
Commerce and the United States Trade Representative, shall report 
annually on the employment effects of the establishment of permanent 
normal trade relations with the People's Republic of China.
Sec. 4. Judicial Review. This order does not create any right or 
benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party 
against the United States, its officers, its employees, or any other 
person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    October 6, 2000.

[[Page 295]]


Executive Order 13170 of October 6, 2000

Increasing Opportunities and Access for Disadvantaged Businesses

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Small Business Act 
(15 U.S.C. 631 et seq.), section 7102 of the Federal Acquisition 
Streamlining Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-355, 15 U.S.C. 644 note), the 
Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act (41 U.S.C. 403 et seq.), 
Executive Order 11625, and to provide for increased access for 
disadvantaged businesses to Federal contracting opportunities, it is 
hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of the executive branch to ensure 
nondiscrimination in Federal procurement opportunities for businesses in 
the Small Disadvantaged Business Program (SDBs), businesses in the 
section 8(a) Business Development program of the Small Business 
Administration (8(a)s), and Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) as 
defined in section 6 of Executive Order 11625, of October 13, 1971, and 
to take affirmative action to ensure inclusion of these businesses in 
Federal contracting. These businesses are of vital importance to job 
growth and the economic strength of the United States but have faced 
historic exclusion and underutilization in Federal procurement. All 
agencies within the executive branch with procurement authority are 
required to take all necessary steps, as permitted by law, to increase 
contracting between the Federal Government and SDBs, 8(a)s, and MBEs.
Sec. 2. Responsibilities of Executive Departments and Agencies with 
Procurement Authority. The head of each executive department and agency 
shall carry out the terms of this order and shall designate, where 
appropriate, his or her Deputy Secretary or equivalent to implement the 
terms of this order.
    (a) Each department and agency with procurement authority shall:

(i) aggressively seek to ensure that 8(a)s, SDBs, and MBEs are aware of 
future prime contracting opportunities through wide dissemination of 
contract announcements, including sources likely to reach 8(a)s, SDBs, 
other small businesses, and MBEs. Each department and agency shall use all 
available forms of communication to implement this provision, including the 
Internet, speciality press, and trade press;

(ii) work with the Small Business Administration (SBA) to ensure that 
information regarding sole source contracts awarded through the section 
8(a) program receives the widest dissemination possible to 8(a)s;

(iii) ensure that the price evaluation preference programs authorized by 
the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 are used to the maximum 
extent permitted by law in areas of economic activity in which SDBs have 
historically been underused;

(iv) aggressively use the firms in the section 8(a) program, particularly 
in the developmental stage of the program, so that these firms have an 
opportunity to overcome artificial barriers to Federal contracting and gain 
access to the Federal procurement arena;

[[Page 296]]

(v) ensure that department and agency heads take all reasonable steps so 
that prime contractors meet or exceed Federal subcontracting goals, and 
enforce subcontracting commitments as required by the Small Business Act 
(15 U.S.C. 637(d)) and other related laws. In particular, they shall ensure 
that prime contractors actively solicit bids for subcontracting 
opportunities from 8(a)s and SDBs, and fulfill their SDB and section 8(d) 
subcontracting obligations. Enforcement of SDB subcontracting plan 
commitments shall include assessments of liquidated damages, where 
appropriate, pursuant to applicable contract clauses;

(vi) encourage the establishment of business-to-business mentoring and 
teaming relationships, including the implementation of Mentor-Protege 
programs, to foster the development of the technical and managerial 
capabilities of 8(a)s and SDBs and to facilitate long-term business 
relationships;

(vii) offer information, training, and technical assistance programs for 
8(a)s and SDBs including, where appropriate, Government acquisition 
forecasts in order to assist 8(a)s and SDBs in developing their products, 
skills, business planning practices, and marketing techniques;

(viii) train program and procurement officials regarding the policy of 
including 8(a)s and SDBs in Federal procurement. This includes prescribing 
procedures to ensure that acquisition planners, to the maximum extent 
practicable, structure acquisitions to facilitate competition by SDBs and 
8(a)s, including their participation in the competition of multiple award 
requirements;

(ix) provide the information required by the Department of Commerce when it 
requests data to develop the benchmarks used in the price evaluation 
preference programs authorized by the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act 
of 1994;

(x) ensure that Directors of Offices of Small and Disadvantaged Business 
Utilization carry out their responsibilities to maximize the participation 
of 8(a)s and SDBs in Federal procurement and, in particular, ensure that 
the Directors report directly to the head of each department or agency as 
required by law; and

(xi) as required by law, establish with the Small Business Administration 
small business goals to ensure that the government-wide goal for 
participation of small business concerns is not less than 23 percent of 
Federal prime contracts. Where feasible and consistent with the effective 
and efficient performance of its mission, each agency shall establish a 
goal of achieving a participation rate for SDBs of not less than 5 percent 
of the total value of prime contract awards for each fiscal year and of not 
less than 5 percent of the total value of subcontract awards for each year. 
Each agency shall also establish a goal for awards made to 8(a) firms 
pursuant to section 8(a) of the Small Business Act. These goals shall be 
considered the minimum goals and every effort shall be taken to exceed 
these goals wherever feasible.

    (b) Each department and agency with procurement authority shall:

(i) develop a long-term comprehensive plan to implement the requirements of 
section 2(a) of this order and submit this plan to the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) within 90 days of the date of this 
order. The Director of OMB shall review each plan and re

[[Page 297]]

port to the President on the sufficiency of each plan to carry out the 
terms of this order; and

(ii) annually, by April 30 each year, assess its efforts and the results of 
those efforts to increase utilization of 8(a)s, SDBs, and MBEs as both 
prime contractors and subcontractors and report on those efforts to the 
President through the Director of OMB, who shall review the evaluations 
made of the agency assessments by the Small Business Administration.

Sec. 3. Responsibilities of the Small Business Administration. The 
Administrator of the SBA shall:
    (a) evaluate on a semi-annual basis, using the Federal Procurement 
Data System (FPDS), the achievement of government-wide prime and 
subcontract goals and the actual prime and subcontract awards to 8(a)s 
and SDBs for each department and agency. The OMB shall review SBA's 
evaluation;
    (b) ensure that Procurement Center Representatives receive adequate 
training regarding the section 8(a) and SDB programs and that they 
consistently and aggressively seek opportunities for maximizing the use 
of 8(a)s and SDBs in department and agency procurements; and
    (c) ensure that each department and agency's small and disadvantaged 
business procurement goals as well as the amount of procurement of each 
department and agency with 8(a)s, SDBs, and MBEs is publicly available 
in an easily accessible and understandable format such as through 
publication on the Internet.
Sec. 4. Federal Advertising. Each department or agency that contracts 
with businesses to develop advertising for the department or agency or 
to broadcast Federal advertising shall take an aggressive role in 
ensuring substantial minority-owned entities' participation, including 
8(a), SDB, and MBE, in Federal advertising-related procurements. Each 
department and agency shall ensure that all creation, placement, and 
transmission of Federal advertising is fully reflective of the Nation's 
diversity. To achieve this diversity, special attention shall be given 
to ensure placement in publications and television and radio stations 
that reach specific ethnic and racial audiences. Each department and 
agency shall ensure that payment for Federal advertising is commensurate 
with fair market rates in the relevant market. Each department and 
agency shall structure advertising contracts as commercial acquisitions 
consistent with part 12 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation processes 
and paperwork to enhance participation by 8(a)s, SDBs, and MBEs.
Sec. 5. Information Technology. Each department and agency shall 
aggressively seek to ensure substantial 8(a), SDB, and MBE participation 
in procurements for and related to information technology, including 
procurements in the telecommunications industry. In so doing, the Chief 
Information Officer in each department and agency shall coordinate with 
procurement officials to implement this section.
Sec. 6. General Services Administration Schedules. The SBA and the 
General Services Administration (GSA) shall act promptly to expand 
inclusion of 8(a)s and SDBs on GSA Schedules, and provide greater 
opportunities for 8(a) and SDB participation in orders under such 
schedules. The GSA should ensure that procurement and program officials 
at all levels that use GSA Schedules aggressively seek to utilize the 
Schedule contracts of 8(a)s

[[Page 298]]

and SDBs. The GSA shall allow agencies ordering from designated 8(a) 
firms under the Multiple Award Schedule to count those orders toward 
their 8(a) procurement goals.
Sec. 7. Bundling Contracts. To the extent permitted by law, departments 
and agencies must submit to the SBA for review any contracts that are 
proposed to be bundled. The determination of the SBA with regard to the 
appropriateness of bundling in each instance must be carefully reviewed 
by the department or agency head, or his or her designee, and must be 
given due consideration. If there is an unresolvable conflict, then the 
SBA or the department or agency can seek assistance from the OMB.
Sec. 8. Awards Program. The Secretary of Commerce and the Administrator 
of the SBA shall jointly undertake a feasibility study to determine the 
appropriateness of an awards program for executive departments and 
agencies who best exemplify the letter and intent of this order in 
increasing opportunities for 8(a)s, SDBs, and MBEs in Federal 
procurement. Such study shall be presented to the President within 90 
days of the date of this order.
Sec. 9. Applicability. Independent agencies are requested to comply with 
the provisions of this order.
Sec. 10. Administration, Enforcement, and Judicial Review.
    (a) This order shall be carried out to the extent permitted by law 
and consistent with the Administration's priorities and appropriations.
    (b) This order is not intended and should not be construed to create 
any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a 
party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or its 
employees.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     October 6, 2000.



Executive Order 13171 of October 12, 2000

Hispanic Employment in the Federal Government

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to improve the 
representation of Hispanics in Federal employment, within merit system 
principles and consistent with the application of appropriate veterans' 
preference criteria, to achieve a Federal workforce drawn from all 
segments of society, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of the executive branch to recruit 
qualified individuals from appropriate sources in an effort to achieve a 
workforce drawn from all segments of society. Pursuant to this policy, 
this Administration notes that Hispanics remain underrepresented in the 
Federal workforce: they make up only 6.4 percent of the Federal civilian 
workforce, roughly half of their total representation in the civilian 
labor force. This Executive Order, therefore, affirms ongoing policies 
and recommends additional policies to eliminate the underpresentation of 
Hispanics in the Federal workforce.

[[Page 299]]

Sec. 2. Responsibilities of Executive Departments and Agencies. The head 
of each executive department and agency (agency) shall establish and 
maintain a program for the recruitment and career development of 
Hispanics in Federal employment. In its program, each agency shall:
    (a) provide a plan for recruiting Hispanics that creates a fully 
diverse workforce for the agency in the 21st century;
    (b) assess and eliminate any systemic barriers to the effective 
recruitment and consideration of Hispanics, including but not limited 
to:
(1) broadening the area of consideration to include applicants from all 
    appropriate sources;
(2) ensuring that selection factors are appropriate and achieve the 
    broadest consideration of applicants and do not impose barriers to 
    selection based on nonmerit factors; and
(3) considering the appointment of Hispanic Federal executives to 
    rating, selection, performance review, and executive resources 
    panels and boards;
    (c) improve outreach efforts to include organizations outside the 
Federal Government in order to increase the number of Hispanic 
candidates in the selection pool for the Senior Executive Service;
    (d) promote participation of Hispanic employees in management, 
leadership, and career development programs;
    (e) ensure that performance plans for senior executives, managers, 
and supervisors include specific language related to significant 
accomplishments on diversity recruitment and career development and that 
accountability is predicated on those plans;
    (f) establish appropriate agency advisory councils that include 
Hispanic Employment Program Managers;
    (g) implement the goals of the Government-wide Hispanic Employment 
Initiatives issued by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) in 
September 1997 (Nine-Point Plan), and the Report to the President's 
Management Council on Hispanic Employment in the Federal Government of 
March 1999;
    (h) ensure that managers and supervisors receive periodic training 
in diversity management in order to carry out their responsibilities to 
maintain a diverse workforce; and
    (i) reflect a continuing priority for eliminating Hispanic 
underrepresentation in the Federal workforce and incorporate actions 
under this order as strategies for achieving workforce diversity goals 
in the agency's Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) Annual 
Performance Plan.
Sec. 3. Cooperation. All efforts taken by heads of agencies under 
sections 1 and 2 of this order shall, as appropriate, further 
partnerships and cooperation among Federal, public, and private sector 
employers, and appropriate Hispanic organizations whenever such 
partnerships and cooperation are possible and would promote the Federal 
employment of qualified individuals. In developing the long-term 
comprehensive strategies required by section 2 of this order, agencies 
shall, as appropriate, consult with and seek information and advice from 
experts in the areas of special targeted recruitment and diversity in 
employment.

[[Page 300]]

Sec. 4. Responsibilities of the Office of Personnel Management. The 
Office of Personnel Management is required by law and regulations to 
undertake a Government-wide minority recruitment effort. Pursuant to 
that on-going effort and in implementation of this order, the Director 
of OPM shall:
    (a) provide Federal human resources management policy guidance to 
address Hispanic underrepresentation where it occurs;
    (b) take the lead in promoting diversity to executive agencies for 
such actions as deemed appropriate to promote equal employment 
opportunity;
    (c) within 180 days from the date of this order, prescribe such 
regulations as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this order;
    (d) within 60 days from the date of this order, establish an 
Interagency Task Force, chaired by the Director and composed of agency 
officials at the Deputy Secretary level, or the equivalent. This Task 
Force shall meet semi-annually to:
(1) review best practices in strategic human resources management 
    planning, including alignment with agency GPRA plans;
(2) assess overall executive branch progress in complying with the 
    requirements of this order;
(3) provide advice on ways to increase Hispanic community involvement; 
    and
(4) recommend any further actions, as appropriate, in eliminating the 
    underrepresentation of Hispanics in the Federal workforce where it 
    occurs; and
    (e) issue an annual report with findings and recommendations to the 
President on the progress made by agencies on matters related to this 
order. The first annual report shall be issued no later than 1 year from 
the date of this order.
Sec. 5. Judicial Review. This order is intended only to improve the 
internal management of the executive branch. It does not create any 
right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable in law or 
equity except as may be identified in existing laws and regulations, by 
a party against the United States, its agencies, its officers or 
employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    October 12, 2000.



Executive Order 13172 of October 25, 2000

Amendment to Executive Order 13078, To Expand the Role of the National 
Task Force on Employment of Adults With Disabilities To Include a Focus 
on Youth

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States, and in order to provide for improved access 
to employment and training for youth with disabilities, it is hereby 
ordered that Executive Order 13078 of March 13, 1998, is amended by 
adding to section 2 of that order the following new subsection to read 
as follows: ``(h) To im

[[Page 301]]

prove employment outcomes for persons with disabilities by addressing, 
among other things, the education, transition, employment, health and 
rehabilitation, and independent living issues affecting young people 
with disabilities, executive departments and agencies shall coordinate 
and cooperate with the Task Force to: (1) strengthen interagency 
research, demonstration, and training activities relating to young 
people with disabilities; (2) create a public awareness campaign focused 
on access to equal opportunity for young people with disabilities; (3) 
promote the views of young people with disabilities through 
collaboration with the Youth Councils authorized under the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998; (4) increase access to and utilization of health 
insurance and health care for young people with disabilities through the 
formalization of the Federal Healthy and Ready to Work Interagency 
Council; (5) increase participation by young people with disabilities in 
postsecondary education and training programs; and (6) create a 
nationally representative Youth Advisory Council, to be funded and 
chaired by the Department of Labor, to advise the Task Force in 
conducting these and other appropriate activities.''
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     October 25, 2000.



Executive Order 13173 of October 25, 2000

Interagency Task Force on the Economic Development of the Central San 
Joaquin Valley

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to provide a more 
rapid and integrated Federal response to the economic development 
challenges of the Central San Joaquin Valley (Valley), it is hereby 
ordered as follows:
Section 1.(a) There is established the ``Interagency Task Force on the 
Economic Development of the Central San Joaquin Valley'' (Task Force).
    (b) The Task Force shall include the Secretary of Agriculture, the 
Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Defense, the Attorney General, 
the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Education, the Secretary 
of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development, the Secretary of Energy, the Secretary of Labor, the 
Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Director 
of the Office of Management and Budget, the Director of National Drug 
Control Policy, the Administrator of General Services, the Administrator 
of the Small Business Administration, the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency, or their designees, and such other 
senior executive branch officials as may be determined by the Task 
Force. The Chair of the Task Force shall rotate annually among the 
Secretaries of Agriculture, Housing and Urban Development, and Commerce 
in an order deter mined by those agency heads. Administrative support 
shall be provided by the then-current chair.
    (c) The purpose of the Task Force is to coordinate and improve 
existing Federal efforts for the Valley, in concert with locally led 
efforts, in order to increase the living standards and the overall 
economic performance of

[[Page 302]]

the Valley. Economic development efforts shall include consideration of 
the preservation or enhancement of the natural environment and natural 
resources of the Valley. Specifically, the Task Force shall:
    (1) analyze programs and policies of Task Force member agencies that 
relate to the Valley to determine what changes, modifications, and 
innovations should be considered, if any;
    (2) consider statistical and data analysis, research, and policy 
studies related to the Valley;
    (3) develop, recommend, and implement short-term and long-term 
options for promoting sustainable economic development;
    (4) consult and coordinate activities with State, tribal, and local 
governments, community leaders, Members of Congress, the private sector, 
and other interested parties, paying particular attention to maintaining 
existing authorities of the States, tribes, and local governments, and 
preserving their existing working relationships with other agencies, 
organizations, or individuals;
    (5) coordinate and collaborate on research and demonstration 
priorities of Task Force member agencies related to the Valley;
    (6) integrate Federal initiatives and programs into the design of 
sustainable economic development actions for the Valley; and
    (7) focus initial efforts on pilot communities for implementing a 
coordinated and expedited Federal response to local economic development 
and other needs.
    (d) The Task Force shall issue an interim report to the President by 
January 15, 2001. The Task Force shall issue its first annual report to 
the President by September 15, 2001, with subsequent reports to follow 
annually for a period of 5 years. The reports shall describe the actions 
taken by, and progress of, each member of the Task Force in carrying out 
this order.
Sec. 2. Specific Activities by Task Force Members and Other Agencies. 
The agencies represented on the Task Force shall work together and 
report their actions and progress in carrying out this order to the Task 
Force Chair one month before the reports are due to the President under 
section 1(d) of this order.
Sec. 3. Cooperation. All efforts taken by agencies under sections 1 and 
2 of this order shall, as appropriate, further partnerships and 
cooperation with organizations that represent the Valley and with State, 
tribal, and local governments.
Sec. 4. Definitions. (a) ``Agency'' means an executive agency as defined 
in 5 U.S.C. 105.
    (b) The Central San Joaquin Valley or ``Valley'' means the counties 
of Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Stanislaus, and Tulare in the 
State of California.

[[Page 303]]

Sec. 5. Judicial Review. This order does not create any right or 
benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party 
against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     October 25, 2000.



Executive Order 13174 of October 27, 2000

Commission on Workers, Communities, and Economic Change in the New 
Economy

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), it is hereby ordered as 
follows:
Section 1. Establishment. There is established the ``Commission on 
Workers, Communities, and Economic Change in the New Economy'' 
(Commission). The Commission shall be composed of up to 14 persons to be 
appointed by the President from individuals who represent State or local 
agencies relating to workforce or community development, economists or 
other workforce development experts, labor organizations, business 
leaders, and Members of Congress. The President shall designate a 
Chairperson from among the members of the Commission.
Sec. 2. Functions. The Commission shall conduct a study of matters 
relating to economic dislocation, and worker and community adjustment to 
such dislocations. In carrying out this study, the Commission shall 
examine:

(a) the impact of international trade, technology, globalization, and the 
changing nature of work on both workers and their communities;

(b) the effectiveness of existing Federal programs in assisting workers and 
communities in adjusting to economic change, including the adequacy of the 
design of such programs;

(c) the strategies for providing workplace education and training to assist 
workers in acquiring new skills;

(d) the strategies for assisting communities to adjust to changing economic 
conditions and changes in the mix of employment opportunities in those 
communities;

(e) the role of public-private partnerships in implementing job training 
and community assistance; and

(f) the role of income support and economic security programs in 
facilitating worker adjustment to rapidly changing economic circumstances.

Sec. 3. Report. Not later than 12 months after the first meeting of the 
Commission, the Commission shall prepare and submit to the President and 
the Congress a report that contains a detailed statement of the findings 
and conclusions of the Commission's study carried out under section 2 of 
this order, and includes:

[[Page 304]]

(1) a summary of best practices and policies carried out by employers and 
public-private partnerships in providing workers with the education and 
training needed to effectively adjust to economic change;

(2) a summary of best practices and policies carried out by or on behalf of 
communities in responding to large-scale economic changes; and

(3) any recommendations relating to legislative and administrative actions 
that the Commission determines to be appropriate.

Sec. 4. Administration. (a) Members of the Commission shall serve 
without compensation for their work on the Commission. While engaged in 
the work of the Commission, members appointed from among private 
citizens of the United States may be allowed travel expenses, including 
per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons 
serving intermittently in the Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
    (b) The Department of Labor shall provide the Commission with 
funding and administrative support. The Commission may have paid staff. 
In addition, appropriate Federal agencies may be requested to designate 
staff to assist with the work of the Commission. The Secretary of Labor 
shall perform the functions of the President under the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), except that of reporting to 
the Congress, in accordance with the guidelines and procedures 
established by the Administrator of General Services.
Sec. 5. General Provisions. The Commission shall terminate 30 days after 
submitting its report.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     October 27, 2000.



Executive Order 13175 of November 6, 2000

Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal
Governments

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to establish regular 
and meaningful consultation and collaboration with tribal officials in 
the development of Federal policies that have tribal implications, to 
strengthen the United States government-to-government relationships with 
Indian tribes, and to reduce the imposition of unfunded mandates upon 
Indian tribes; it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Definitions. For purposes of this order:
    (a) ``Policies that have tribal implications'' refers to 
regulations, legislative comments or proposed legislation, and other 
policy statements or actions that have substantial direct effects on one 
or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal 
Government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and 
responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes.
    (b) ``Indian tribe'' means an Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, 
nation, pueblo, village, or community that the Secretary of the Interior 
acknowl

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edges to exist as an Indian tribe pursuant to the Federally Recognized 
Indian Tribe List Act of 1994, 25 U.S.C. 479a.
    (c) ``Agency'' means any authority of the United States that is an 
``agency'' under 44 U.S.C. 3502(1), other than those considered to be 
independent regulatory agencies, as defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5).
    (d) ``Tribal officials'' means elected or duly appointed officials 
of Indian tribal governments or authorized intertribal organizations.
Sec. 2. Fundamental Principles. In formulating or implementing policies 
that have tribal implications, agencies shall be guided by the following 
fundamental principles:
    (a) The United States has a unique legal relationship with Indian 
tribal governments as set forth in the Constitution of the United 
States, treaties, statutes, Executive Orders, and court decisions. Since 
the formation of the Union, the United States has recognized Indian 
tribes as domestic dependent nations under its protection. The Federal 
Government has enacted numerous statutes and promulgated numerous 
regulations that establish and define a trust relationship with Indian 
tribes.
    (b) Our Nation, under the law of the United States, in accordance 
with treaties, statutes, Executive Orders, and judicial decisions, has 
recognized the right of Indian tribes to self-government. As domestic 
dependent nations, Indian tribes exercise inherent sovereign powers over 
their members and territory. The United States continues to work with 
Indian tribes on a government-to-government basis to address issues 
concerning Indian tribal self-government, tribal trust resources, and 
Indian tribal treaty and other rights.
    (c) The United States recognizes the right of Indian tribes to self-
government and supports tribal sovereignty and self-determination.
Sec. 3. Policymaking Criteria. In addition to adhering to the 
fundamental principles set forth in section 2, agencies shall adhere, to 
the extent permitted by law, to the following criteria when formulating 
and implementing policies that have tribal implications:
    (a) Agencies shall respect Indian tribal self-government and 
sovereignty, honor tribal treaty and other rights, and strive to meet 
the responsibilities that arise from the unique legal relationship 
between the Federal Government and Indian tribal governments.
    (b) With respect to Federal statutes and regulations administered by 
Indian tribal governments, the Federal Government shall grant Indian 
tribal governments the maximum administrative discretion possible.
    (c) When undertaking to formulate and implement policies that have 
tribal implications, agencies shall:
    (1) encourage Indian tribes to develop their own policies to achieve 
program objectives;
    (2) where possible, defer to Indian tribes to establish standards; 
and
    (3) in determining whether to establish Federal standards, consult 
with tribal officials as to the need for Federal standards and any 
alternatives that would limit the scope of Federal standards or 
otherwise preserve the prerogatives and authority of Indian tribes.

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Sec. 4. Special Requirements for Legislative Proposals. Agencies shall 
not submit to the Congress legislation that would be inconsistent with 
the policymaking criteria in Section 3.
Sec. 5. Consultation. (a) Each agency shall have an accountable process 
to ensure meaningful and timely input by tribal officials in the 
development of regulatory policies that have tribal implications. Within 
30 days after the effective date of this order, the head of each agency 
shall designate an official with principal responsibility for the 
agency's implementation of this order. Within 60 days of the effective 
date of this order, the designated official shall submit to the Office 
of Management and Budget (OMB) a description of the agency's 
consultation process.
    (b) To the extent practicable and permitted by law, no agency shall 
promulgate any regulation that has tribal implications, that imposes 
substantial direct compliance costs on Indian tribal governments, and 
that is not required by statute, unless:
    (1) funds necessary to pay the direct costs incurred by the Indian 
tribal government or the tribe in complying with the regulation are 
provided by the Federal Government; or
    (2) the agency, prior to the formal promulgation of the regulation,
 (A) consulted with tribal officials early in the process of developing 
the proposed regulation;
 (B) in a separately identified portion of the preamble to the 
regulation as it is to be issued in the Federal Register, provides to 
the Director of OMB a tribal summary impact statement, which consists of 
a description of the extent of the agency's prior consultation with 
tribal officials, a summary of the nature of their concerns and the 
agency's position supporting the need to issue the regulation, and a 
statement of the extent to which the concerns of tribal officials have 
been met; and
 (C) makes available to the Director of OMB any written communications 
submitted to the agency by tribal officials.
    (c) To the extent practicable and permitted by law, no agency shall 
promulgate any regulation that has tribal implications and that preempts 
tribal law unless the agency, prior to the formal promulgation of the 
regulation,
    (1) consulted with tribal officials early in the process of 
developing the proposed regulation;
    (2) in a separately identified portion of the preamble to the 
regulation as it is to be issued in the Federal Register, provides to 
the Director of OMB a tribal summary impact statement, which consists of 
a description of the extent of the agency's prior consultation with 
tribal officials, a summary of the nature of their concerns and the 
agency's position supporting the need to issue the regulation, and a 
statement of the extent to which the concerns of tribal officials have 
been met; and
    (3) makes available to the Director of OMB any written 
communications submitted to the agency by tribal officials.
    (d) On issues relating to tribal self-government, tribal trust 
resources, or Indian tribal treaty and other rights, each agency should 
explore and, where appropriate, use consensual mechanisms for developing 
regulations, including negotiated rulemaking.

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Sec. 6. Increasing Flexibility for Indian Tribal Waivers.
    (a) Agencies shall review the processes under which Indian tribes 
apply for waivers of statutory and regulatory requirements and take 
appropriate steps to streamline those processes.
    (b) Each agency shall, to the extent practicable and permitted by 
law, consider any application by an Indian tribe for a waiver of 
statutory or regulatory requirements in connection with any program 
administered by the agency with a general view toward increasing 
opportunities for utilizing flexible policy approaches at the Indian 
tribal level in cases in which the proposed waiver is consistent with 
the applicable Federal policy objectives and is otherwise appropriate.
    (c) Each agency shall, to the extent practicable and permitted by 
law, render a decision upon a complete application for a waiver within 
120 days of receipt of such application by the agency, or as otherwise 
provided by law or regulation. If the application for waiver is not 
granted, the agency shall provide the applicant with timely written 
notice of the decision and the reasons therefor.
    (d) This section applies only to statutory or regulatory 
requirements that are discretionary and subject to waiver by the agency.
Sec. 7. Accountability.
    (a) In transmitting any draft final regulation that has tribal 
implications to OMB pursuant to Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 
1993, each agency shall include a certification from the official 
designated to ensure compliance with this order stating that the 
requirements of this order have been met in a meaningful and timely 
manner.
    (b) In transmitting proposed legislation that has tribal 
implications to OMB, each agency shall include a certification from the 
official designated to ensure compliance with this order that all 
relevant requirements of this order have been met.
    (c) Within 180 days after the effective date of this order the 
Director of OMB and the Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental 
Affairs shall confer with tribal officials to ensure that this order is 
being properly and effectively implemented.
Sec. 8. Independent Agencies. Independent regulatory agencies are 
encouraged to comply with the provisions of this order.
Sec. 9. General Provisions. (a) This order shall supplement but not 
supersede the requirements contained in Executive Order 12866 
(Regulatory Planning and Review), Executive Order 12988 (Civil Justice 
Reform), OMB Circular A-19, and the Executive Memorandum of April 29, 
1994, on Government-to-Government Relations with Native American Tribal 
Governments.
    (b) This order shall complement the consultation and waiver 
provisions in sections 6 and 7 of Executive Order 13132 (Federalism).
    (c) Executive Order 13084 (Consultation and Coordination with Indian 
Tribal Governments) is revoked at the time this order takes effect.
    (d) This order shall be effective 60 days after the date of this 
order.
Sec. 10. Judicial Review. This order is intended only to improve the 
internal management of the executive branch, and is not intended to 
create any

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right, benefit, or trust responsibility, substantive or procedural, 
enforceable at law by a party against the United States, its agencies, 
or any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     November 6, 2000.



Executive Order 13176 of November 27, 2000

Facilitation of a Presidential Transition

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including 5 U.S.C. 7301, to 
further the purposes of the Presidential Transition Act of 1963, as 
amended, and to assist the transition from this Administration to that 
of the President- elect, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Presidential Transition Coordination. (a) To assist and 
support the transition efforts of the President-elect, there is 
established a Presidential Transition Coordinating Council (Council).
    (b) The Council shall be composed of the following officials or 
their designees:
 1. Chief of Staff to the President;
 2. Counsel to the President;
 3. Assistant to the President and Cabinet Secretary;
 4. Assistant to the President for Management and Administration;
 5. Assistant to the President and Director of Presidential Personnel;
 6. Director of the Office of Management and Budget;
 7. Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation;
 8. Director of the Office of Personnel Management;
 9. Administrator of General Services;
 10. Archivist of the United States;
 11. Commissioner of Internal Revenue;
 12. Director of the Office of Government Ethics; and
 13. Such others as the President may select.
    (c) The Council shall be chaired by the Chief of Staff to the 
President or his designee.
    (d) The Council shall coordinate assistance to the President-elect 
in fulfilling his responsibilities and make every reasonable effort to 
facilitate the transition between administrations. This assistance may 
include, among other things, providing publicly available information 
relevant to facilitating the personnel aspects of a presidential 
transition and such other information that, in the Council's judgement, 
is useful and appropriate as long as providing such information is not 
otherwise prohibited by law.

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Sec. 2. Transition Activities and Materials. (a) The Administrator of 
General Services, in consultation with the Director of the Office of 
Presidential Personnel, the Director of the Office of Personnel 
Management, and the Director of the Office of Government Ethics, shall 
coordinate orientation activities for key prospective Presidential 
appointees.
    (b) The Administrator of General Services, in consultation with the 
Director of the Office of Presidential Personnel, the Director of the 
Office of Personnel Management, and the Archivist of the United States, 
shall develop a transition directory. The transition directory shall 
include Federal publications and materials that provide information on 
the officers, organization, and statutory and administrative 
authorities, functions, duties, responsibilities, and mission of each 
department and agency.
    (c) The White House Office of Presidential Personnel shall 
coordinate with all departments and agencies of the executive branch of 
the Government to produce a catalogue of all positions in their 
respective jurisdictions that are filled by presidential appointment 
requiring Senate confirmation (PAS positions). The catalogue shall 
include:
 (1) the legal authority establishing each PAS position;
 (2) a description of duties and statutory authorities of the position;
 (3) the names of Senate committees that review nominees for the 
position;
 (4) the names of congressional committees with which appointees in the 
position regularly interact; and
 (5) the name and contact information of an experienced executive in the 
agency or department, a previous office holder or a White House Liaison, 
or a comparable individual who can answer questions about the position.
    (d) Executive departments and agencies shall prepare a set of 
orientation materials for new political appointees before the 
inauguration of the President-elect. Copies of all such materials shall 
be provided to the Incoming Transition Team upon its request.
Sec. 3. Transition Agreement. To assist and support the transition 
efforts of the President-elect, a transition agreement between the 
current Administration and the Office of the President-elect will be 
entered into regarding transition procedures and identification of 
transition contacts.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     November 27, 2000.



Executive Order 13177 of December 4, 2000

National Commission on the Use of Offsets in Defense Trade and 
President's Council on the Use of Offsets in Commercial Trade

By the authority vested in the President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including Public Law 106-113 and 
the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App. 2), and in

[[Page 310]]

order to implement section 1247 of Public Law 106-113 (113 Stat. 1501A-
502) and to create a parallel ``President's Council on the Use of 
Offsets in Commercial Trade,'' it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Membership. Pursuant to Public Law 106-113, the ``National 
Commission on the Use of Offsets in Defense Trade'' (Commission) 
comprises 11 members appointed by the President with the concurrence of 
the Majority and Minority Leaders of the Senate and the Speaker and the 
Minority Leader of the House of Representatives. The Commission 
membership includes: (a) representatives from the private sector, 
including one each from (i) a labor organization, (ii) a United States 
defense manufacturing company dependent on foreign sales, (iii) a United 
States company dependent on foreign sales that is not a defense 
manufacturer, and (iv) a United States company that specializes in 
international investment; (b) two members from academia with widely 
recognized expertise in international economics; and (c) five members 
from the executive branch, including a member from the: (i) Office of 
Management and Budget, (ii) Department of Commerce, (iii) Department of 
Defense, (iv) Department of State, and (v) Department of Labor. The 
member from the Office of Management and Budget will serve as 
Chairperson of the Commission and will appoint, and fix the compensation 
of, the Executive Director of the Commission.
Sec. 2. Duties. The Commission will be responsible for reviewing and 
reporting on: (a) current practices by foreign governments in requiring 
offsets in purchasing agreements and the extent and nature of offsets 
offered by United States and foreign defense industry contractors; (b) 
the impact of the use of offsets on defense subcontractors and 
nondefense industrial sectors affected by indirect offsets; and (c) the 
role of offsets, both direct and indirect, on domestic industry 
stability, United States trade competitiveness, and national security.
Sec. 3. Commission Report. Not later than 12 months after the Commission 
is established, it will report to the appropriate congressional 
committees. In addition to the items described in section 2 of this 
order, the report will include: (a) an analysis of (i) the collateral 
impact of offsets on industry sectors that may be different than those 
of the contractor paying offsets, including estimates of contracts and 
jobs lost as well as an assessment of damage to industrial sectors; (ii) 
the role of offsets with respect to competitiveness of the United States 
defense industry in international trade and the potential damage to the 
ability of United States contractors to compete if offsets were 
prohibited or limited; and (iii) the impact on United States national 
security, and upon United States nonproliferation objectives, of the use 
of co-production, subcontracting, and technology transfer with foreign 
governments or companies, that results from fulfilling offset 
requirements, with particular emphasis on the question of dependency 
upon foreign nations for the supply of critical components or 
technology; (b) proposals for unilateral, bilateral, or multilateral 
measures aimed at reducing any detrimental effects of offsets; and (c) 
an identification of the appropriate executive branch agencies to be 
responsible for monitoring the use of offsets in international defense 
trade.
Sec. 4. Administration, Compensation, and Termination. (a) The 
Department of Defense will provide administrative support and funding 
for the Commission and Federal Government employees may be detailed to 
the Commission without reimbursement.

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    (b) Members of the Commission who are not officers or employees of 
the Federal Government will be compensated at a rate of basic pay 
prescribed for level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of 
title 5, United States Code, for each day (including travel time) during 
which such member is engaged in performance of the duties of the 
Commission. Members of the Commission who are officers or employees of 
the Federal Government will serve without compensation in addition to 
that received for their services as officers or employees of the Federal 
Government.
    (c) Members of the Commission will be allowed travel expenses, 
including per diem in lieu of subsistence, under subchapter 1 of chapter 
57 of title 5, United States Code, while on business in the performance 
of services for the Commission.
    (d) The Commission will terminate 30 days after transmitting the 
report required in section 1248(b) of Public Law 106-113 (113 Stat. 
1501A-505).
Sec. 5. Establishment and Membership. (a) There is established, pursuant 
to the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), the 
``President's Council on the Use of Offsets in Commercial Trade'' 
(Council).
    (b) The Council shall be composed of the appointed members of the 
Commission or their designees.
Sec. 6. Duties and Report of the Council. The Council shall review and 
report to the President, through the Director of the Office of 
Management and Budget, on the use of offsets in commercial trade, 
including their impact on the United States defense and commercial 
industrial base. The Council shall consult with and, as appropriate, 
provide information to the Commission.
Sec. 7. Administration. (a) The Department of Defense shall provide 
administrative support and funding for the Council.
    (b) The heads of executive departments and agencies shall, to the 
extent permitted by law, provide to the Council such information as it 
may require for the purpose of carrying out its duties.
    (c) Members of the Council shall serve without compensation.
Sec. 8. General. (a) Notwithstanding any other Executive Order, the 
functions of the President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as 
amended, except that of reporting to the Congress, that are applicable 
to the Council, shall be performed by the Department of Defense in 
accordance with guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of 
General Services.
    (b) The Council shall terminate on the date of the transmission of 
the report required by section 1248(b) of Public Law 106-113 (113 Stat. 
1501A-505).
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    December 4, 2000.

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Executive Order 13178 of December 4, 2000

Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the National Marine 
Sanctuaries Act, (16 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.), and the National Marine 
Sanctuaries Amendments Act of 2000, Public Law 106-513, and in 
furtherance of the purposes of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation 
and Management Act (16 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), Marine Protection, 
Research, and Sanctuaries Act (33 U.S.C. 1401 et seq.), Coastal Zone 
Management Act (16 U.S.C. 1451 et seq.), Endangered Species Act (16 
U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), Marine Mammal Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 1362 et 
seq.), Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), National Historic 
Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), National Wildlife Refuge 
System Administration Act (16 U.S.C. 668dd-ee), and other pertinent 
statutes, it is ordered as follows:
Section 1. Preamble. The world's coral reefs--the rain forests of the 
sea--are in serious decline. These important and sensitive areas of 
biodiversity warrant special protection. While United States waters 
contain approximately 3 percent of the world's coral reefs, 
approximately 70 percent of U.S. coral reefs are in the Northwestern 
Hawaiian Islands. The 3.5 million acres of coral reefs around the 
remote, mostly uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands are spectacular 
and almost undisturbed by humans. The approximately 1,200 mile stretch 
of coral islands, seamounts, banks, and shoals are unquestionably some 
of the healthiest and most extensive coral reefs in the United States. 
In their own right, the spectacular coral reefs and lands provide an 
amazing geological record of volcanic and erosive powers that have 
shaped this area. This vast area supports a dynamic reef ecosystem that 
supports more than 7,000 marine species, of which approximately half are 
unique to the Hawaiian Island chain. This incredibly diverse ecosystem 
is home to many species of coral, fish, birds, marine mammals, and other 
flora and fauna including the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, the 
threatened green sea turtle, and the endangered leatherback and 
hawksbill sea turtles. In addition, this area has great cultural 
significance to Native Hawaiians as well as linkages to early Polynesian 
culture--making it additionally worthy of protection and understanding. 
This is truly a unique and special place, a coral reef ecosystem like no 
place on earth, and a source of pride, inspiration, and satisfaction for 
all Americans, especially the people of Hawaii. It is fully worthy of 
our best efforts to preserve a legacy of America's natural wonders for 
future generations. Due to the special significance of this area, I have 
determined that it is in the best interest of our Nation, and of future 
generations, to provide strong and lasting protection for the coral reef 
ecosystem of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
On May 26, 2000, I directed the Secretaries of Commerce and the 
Interior, working cooperatively with the State of Hawaii and consulting 
with the Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, to develop 
recommendations for a new, coordinated management regime to increase 
protection of the coral reef ecosystem of the Northwestern Hawaiian 
Islands and provide for sustainable use of the area. Upon consideration 
of their recommendations and comments received during the public 
visioning process on this initia

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tive, and based on the statutory authorities set forth above, I am 
issuing this Executive Order.
Sec. 2. Purpose. The purpose of this Executive Order is to ensure the 
comprehensive, strong, and lasting protection of the coral reef 
ecosystem and related marine resources and species (resources) of the 
Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
Sec. 3. Establishment of Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve. There is hereby 
established in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands a coral reef ecosystem 
reserve to be known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef 
Ecosystem Reserve (Reserve). The Reserve shall include submerged lands 
and waters of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, extending approximately 
1,200 nautical miles (nm) long and 100nm wide. The Reserve shall be 
adjacent to and seaward of the seaward boundaries of the State of Hawaii 
and the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, and shall overlay the 
Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge to the extent that it extends 
beyond the seaward boundaries of the State of Hawaii. The boundaries of 
the Reserve are described in section 6 of this order.
Sec. 4. Management Principles. The Secretary of Commerce, or his 
designee, (hereafter ``Secretary'') shall, subject to section 10(b) of 
this order, manage the Reserve in accordance with the following 
principles:
    (a) The principal purpose of the Reserve is the long-term 
conservation and protection of the coral reef ecosystem and related 
marine resources and species of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 
their natural character;
    (b) The Reserve shall be managed using available science and 
applying a precautionary approach with resource protection favored when 
there is a lack of information regarding any given activity, to the 
extent not contrary to law;
    (c) Culturally significant, noncommercial subsistence, cultural, and 
religious uses by Native Hawaiians should be allowed within the Reserve, 
consistent with applicable law and the long-term conservation and 
protection of Reserve resources;
    (d) The Reserve shall be managed using, when appropriate, 
geographical zoning and innovative management techniques to ensure that 
the Reserve resources are protected from degradation or harm;
    (e) To the extent consistent with the primary purpose of the 
Reserve, the Reserve shall be managed to support, promote, and 
coordinate appropriate scientific research and assessment, and long-term 
monitoring of Reserve resources, and the impacts or threats thereto from 
human and other activities, to help better understand, protect, and 
conserve these resources and species for future generations;
    (f) To the extent consistent with the primary purpose of the 
Reserve, the Reserve shall be managed to enhance public awareness, 
understanding, and appreciation of Reserve resources, and the impacts or 
threats thereto from human and other activities;
    (g) The Reserve shall be managed to further restoration and 
remediation of degraded or injured Reserve resources; and
    (h) The Reserve shall be managed to facilitate coordinated 
management among Federal and State agencies and other entities, as 
appropriate, to pro

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vide comprehensive (looking beyond jurisdictional boundaries) 
conservation of the coral reef ecosystem and related marine resources 
and species throughout the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, consistent 
with applicable authorities and the Management Principles of this 
section.
Sec. 5. Implementation. (a) Management of the Reserve. The Secretary 
shall manage the Reserve under the National Marine Sanctuaries Act and 
in accordance with this order.
    (b) Reserve Operations Plan. The Secretary, in consultation with the 
Secretary of the Interior and the Governor of Hawaii, shall develop an 
operations plan to govern the management of the Reserve. In developing 
the Reserve Operations Plan the Secretary shall consider the advice and 
recommendations of the Reserve Council established pursuant to paragraph 
(c) of this section. The Reserve Operations Plan shall be directed at 
priority issues and actions that, at a minimum, provide for:
 (1) Coordinated management among the Reserve, Hawaiian Islands National 
Wildlife Refuge, Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, and the State of 
Hawaii, consistent with relevant authorities;
 (2) Coordination among Federal agencies and the Director of the 
National Science Foundation to make vessels and other resources 
available for conservation and research activities for the Reserve;
 (3) The cleanup and prevention of marine debris in the Reserve;
 (4) The restoration or remediation of any degraded or injured resources 
of the Reserve;
 (5) Research, monitoring, and assessment of the Reserve;
 (6) Education and outreach about the Reserve and its resources and 
efforts to conserve them;
 (7) Enforcement and surveillance for the Reserve, including the use of 
new technologies and coordination with the United States Coast Guard and 
other relevant agencies;
 (8) Identification and coordination with Native Hawaiian interests, 
regarding culturally significant, noncommercial subsistence, cultural, 
and religious uses and locations within the Reserve;
 (9) Identification of potential tourism, recreational, and commercial 
activities within the Reserve and actions necessary to ensure that these 
activities do not degrade the Reserve's resources or diminish the 
Reserve's natural character;
 (10) Use of vessel monitoring systems for any vessel entering or 
transiting the Reserve, if warranted. To this end, the Secretary in 
consultation with the Department of State, United States Coast Guard, 
and the Department of Defense, shall evaluate the need for the 
establishment of vessel monitoring systems and, if warranted, shall 
initiate the steps necessary to have the appropriate domestic agencies, 
and request that the International Maritime Organization, adopt a vessel 
monitoring system requirement for the Reserve;
 (11) Any regulations, in addition to the conservation measures and 
Reserve Preservation Areas established under this order, that the 
Secretary determines are necessary to manage the Reserve in accordance 
with this order; and

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 (12) Coordination of all relevant activities with the process to 
designate the Reserve as a National Marine Sanctuary, as provided under 
paragraph (f) of this section.
    (c) Conservation Measures. The Reserve Operations Plan shall also 
include the conservation measures in section 7 of this order and the 
Reserve Preservation Areas in section 8 of this order.
    (d) Memorandum of Agreement. To further paragraph (b)(1) of this 
section, and subject to section 10(b) of this order, and in particular 
to promote coordinated management of the entirety of the shallow areas 
of the coral reef ecosystem throughout the Northwestern Hawaiian 
Islands, the Secretary shall work with the Secretary of the Interior and 
Governor of the State of Hawaii to enter into one or more memoranda of 
agreement for the coordinated conservation and management of the 
Reserve, Midway Atoll and Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuges, 
and State of Hawaii submerged lands and waters within the Northwestern 
Hawaiian Islands.
    (e) National Marine Sanctuary. The Secretary shall initiate the 
process to designate the Reserve as a national marine sanctuary pursuant 
to sections 303 and 304 of the National Marine Sanctuaries Act (16 
U.S.C. 1433, 1434). In doing so the Secretary shall supplement or 
complement the existing Reserve. The Secretary shall, in consultation 
with the Governor of the State of Hawaii, determine whether State 
submerged lands and waters should be included as part of the sanctuary. 
In designating and managing the sanctuary, the Secretary shall consider 
the advice and recommendations of the Reserve Council established 
pursuant to paragraph (f) of this section.
    (f) Council. After considering input from the Secretary of the 
Interior and Governor of the State of Hawaii, the Secretary shall 
establish a Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve Council pursuant to section 315 
of the National Marine Sanctuaries Act (16 U.S.C. 1445a) to provide 
advice and recommendations on the Reserve Operations Plan and 
designation and management of any sanctuary. The Council shall include:
 (1) Three Native Hawaiian representatives, including one Native 
Hawaiian elder, with experience or knowledge regarding Native Hawaiian 
subsistence, cultural, religious, or other activities in the 
Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
 (2) Three representatives from the non-Federal science community with 
experience specific to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and with 
expertise in at least one of the following areas:
 (A) Marine mammal science.
 (B) Coral reef ecology.
 (C) Native marine flora and fauna of the Hawaiian Islands.
 (D) Oceanography.
 (E) Any other scientific discipline the Secretary determines to be 
appropriate.
 (3) Three representatives from nongovernmental wildlife/marine life, 
environmental, and/or conservation organizations.
 (4) One representative from the commercial fishing industry that 
conducts activities in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

[[Page 316]]

 (5) One representative from the recreational fishing industry that 
conducts activities in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
 (6) One representative from the ocean-related tourism industry.
 (7) One representative from the non-Federal community with experience 
in education and outreach regarding marine conservation issues.
 (8) One citizen-at-large representative.
 (9) One representative from the State of Hawaii as appointed by the 
Governor.
 (10) One representative each, as nonvoting, ex officio members, from 
the Department of the Interior, United States Coast Guard, Department of 
Defense, Department of State, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the 
Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, National 
Science Foundation, Marine Mammal Commission, and Western Pacific 
Regional Fishery Management Council.
    (g) Report. The Secretary shall provide a progress report on the 
implementation of this order to the Chair of the Council on 
Environmental Quality within 1 year from the date of this order.
Sec. 6. Area of the Reserve. The Reserve includes the waters and 
submerged lands of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as follows:
    (a) The seaward boundary of the Reserve is 50nm from the approximate 
center geographical positions of Nihoa Island, Necker Island, French 
Frigate Shoals, Gardner Pinnacles, Maro Reef, Laysan Island, Lisianski 
Island, Pearl and Hermes Reef, Midway Atoll, and Kure Island. Where the 
areas are not contiguous, parallel lines drawn tangent to and connecting 
those semi-circles of the 50nm areas that lie around such areas shall 
delimit the remainder of the Reserve.
    (b) The inland boundary of the Reserve around each of the areas 
named in subparagraph (a) of this section is the seaward boundary of 
Hawaii State waters and submerged lands, and the seaward boundary of the 
Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, as appropriate.
    (c) The Reserve boundary is generally depicted on the map attached 
to this order. The Secretary, after consultation with the Governor of 
the State of Hawaii, may make technical modifications to the boundary of 
the Reserve, including providing straight-line boundaries for the 
Reserve for clarity and ease of identification, as appropriate.
Sec. 7. Protection and Conservation Measures. The conservation measures 
in this section apply throughout the Reserve.
    (a) (1) Commercial Fishing. All currently existing commercial 
Federal fishing permits and current levels of fishing effort and take, 
as determined by the Secretary and pursuant to regulations in effect on 
the date of this order, shall be capped as follows:
 (A) No commercial fishing may occur in Reserve Preservation Areas 
pursuant to section 8 of this order;
 (B) There shall be no increase in the number of permits of any 
particular type of fishing (such as for bottomfishing) beyond the number 
of permits of that type in effect the year preceding the date of this 
order;
 (C) The annual level of aggregate take under all permits of any 
particular type of fishing may not exceed the aggregate level of take 
under all permits

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of that type of fishing in the years preceding the date of this order, 
as determined by the Secretary, provided that the Secretary shall 
equitably divide the aggregate level into individual levels per permit, 
and further provided that the Secretary may make a one-time reasonable 
increase to the total aggregate to allow for the use of two Native 
Hawaiian bottomfishing permits;
 (D) There shall be no permits issued for any particular type of fishing 
for which there were no permits issued in the year preceding the date of 
this order; and
 (E) The type of fishing gear used by any permit holder may not be 
changed except with the permission of the Secretary, as provided under 
paragraph 3 of this section.
    (2) Recreational Fishing. All currently existing (preceding the date 
of this order) levels of recreational fishing effort, as determined by 
the Secretary and pursuant to regulations in effect on the day of this 
order, shall be capped (i.e., no increase of take levels or levels of 
fishing effort, species targeted, or change in gear types) throughout 
the Reserve. However, fishing is further restricted as provided in 
section 8 of this order.
    (3) The Secretary, after consultation with the Secretary of the 
Interior and Governor of the State of Hawaii, and after public review 
and comment and consideration of any advice or recommendations of the 
Reserve Council and Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council, 
may further restrict the fishing activities under subparagraphs (a)(1) 
and (a)(2) of this section if necessary to protect Reserve resources, or 
may authorize or require alternate gear types if such gear would offer 
equal or greater protection for Reserve resources.
    (b) In addition to the conservation measures in paragraph (a) of 
this section, the following activities are prohibited throughout the 
Reserve:
 (1) Exploring for, developing, or producing oil, gas, or minerals;
 (2) Having a vessel anchored on any living or dead coral with an 
anchor, an anchor chain, or an anchor rope when visibility is such that 
the seabed can be seen;
 (3) Drilling into, dredging, or otherwise altering the seabed; or 
constructing, placing, or abandoning any structure, material, or other 
matter on the seabed, except as an incidental result of anchoring 
vessels;
 (4) Discharging or depositing any material or other matter into the 
Reserve, or discharging or depositing any material or other matter 
outside the Reserve that subsequently enters the Reserve and injures any 
resource of the Reserve, except fish parts (i.e., chumming material or 
bait) used in and during authorized fishing operations, or discharges 
incidental to vessel use such as deck wash, approved marine sanitation 
device effluent, cooling water, and engine exhaust; and
 (5) Removal, moving, taking, harvesting, or damaging any living or 
nonliving Reserve resources, except as provided under paragraph (a) of 
this section and sections 8(a) and 9 of this order.
    (c) The Secretary may conduct, or authorize by permit the activities 
listed in subparagraphs (b)(3)-(5) of this section to the extent that 
they are necessary for research, monitoring, education, or management 
activities that further the Management Principles of section 4 of this 
order.
Sec. 8. Reserve Preservation Areas.

[[Page 318]]

    (a) To further protect Reserve resources, the following areas are 
hereby established as Reserve Preservation Areas until some or all are 
made permanent after adequate public review and comment, within which 
all activities referred to in paragraph (b) of this section are 
prohibited.
    (1) From the seaward boundary of Hawaii State waters and submerged 
lands to a mean depth of 100 fathoms (fm) around:
 (A) Nihoa Island, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with the 
requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue seaward of a mean depth of 10fm, unless and until the Secretary 
determines otherwise after adequate public review and comment;
 (B) Necker Island, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with the 
requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue seaward of a mean depth of 20fm, unless and until the Secretary 
determines otherwise after adequate public review and comment;
 (C) French Frigate Shoals;
 (D) Gardner Pinnacles, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with 
the requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue seaward of a mean depth of 10fm, unless and until the Secretary 
determines otherwise after adequate public review and comment;
 (E) Maro Reef, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with the 
requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue seaward of a mean depth of 20fm, unless and until the Secretary 
determines otherwise after adequate public review and comment;
 (F) Laysan Island, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with the 
requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue seaward of a mean depth of 50fm, unless and until the Secretary 
determines otherwise after adequate public review and comment;
 (G) Lisianski Island, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with 
the requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue seaward of a mean depth of 50fm, unless and until the Secretary 
determines otherwise after adequate public review and comment;
 (H) Pearl and Hermes Atoll; and
 (I) Kure Island.
    (2) Twelve nautical miles around the approximate geographical 
centers of:
 (A) The first bank immediately east of French Frigate Shoals;
 (B) Southeast Brooks Bank, which is the first bank immediately west of 
French Frigate Shoals, provided that the closure area shall not be 
closer than approximately 3nm of the next bank immediately west;
 (C) St. Rogatien Bank, provided that the closure area shall not be 
closer than approximately 3nm of the next bank immediately east, 
provided further that bottomfishing in accordance with the requirements 
of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to continue, unless 
and until the Secretary determines otherwise after adequate public 
review and comment;
 (D) The first bank west of St. Rogatien Bank, east of Gardner 
Pinnacles;
 (E) Raita Bank; and

[[Page 319]]

 (F) Pioneer Bank, provided that bottomfishing in accordance with the 
requirements of section 7(a)(1) of this order shall be allowed to 
continue, unless and until the Secretary determines otherwise after 
adequate public review and comment.
    (b) Activities Prohibited Within Reserve Preservation Areas.
    (1) In addition to the conservation measures in section 7 of this 
order, which are applicable to the entire Reserve, the following 
activities are prohibited within the Reserve Preservation Areas listed 
in paragraph (a) of this section, except as expressly otherwise stated 
in this paragraph and sections (8)(a) and 9 of this order:
 (A) Commercial and recreational fishing;
 (B) Anchoring in any area that contains available mooring buoys, or 
anchoring outside an available anchoring area when such area has been 
designated by the Secretary;
 (C) Any type of touching or taking of living or dead coral;
 (D) Discharging or depositing any material or other matter except 
cooling water or engine exhaust; and
 (E) Such other activities that the Secretary identifies after adequate 
public review and comment, and after consideration of any advice and 
recommendations of the Reserve Council.
    (2) Notwithstanding the prohibitions in this paragraph, the 
Secretary may conduct, or authorize by permit, research, monitoring, 
education, or management activities within any Reserve Preservation Area 
that further the Management Principles of section 4 of this order.
    (3) The Reserve Preservation Areas in this section are approximated 
using fathoms. The Secretary will develop straight line boundaries based 
on longitude and latitude coordinates to encompass each Reserve 
Preservation Area, to provide for clarity and ease of identification. 
The Secretary may make technical modifications to any such boundaries.
Sec. 9. Native Hawaiian Uses. Native Hawaiian noncommercial subsistence, 
cultural, or religious uses may continue, to the extent consistent with 
existing law, within the Reserve and Reserve Preservation Areas 
identified under section 8 of this order. The Secretary shall work with 
Native Hawaiian interests to identify those areas where such Native 
Hawaiian uses of the Reserve's resources may be conducted without injury 
to the Reserve's coral reef ecosystem and related marine resources and 
species, and may revise the areas where such activities may occur after 
public review and comment, and consideration of any advice and 
recommendations of the Reserve Council.
Sec. 10. National Wildlife Refuges.
    (a) The Secretary of the Interior, in managing, through the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service the Hawaiian Islands and Midway Atoll National 
Wildlife Refuges pursuant to the National Wildlife Refuge System 
Administration Act (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) and other applicable laws, 
shall follow the Management Principles of section 4 of this order, to 
the extent consistent with applicable law.
    (b) Wherever the Reserve overlaps the Hawaiian Islands National 
Wildlife Refuge, the Reserve shall be managed to supplement and 
complement

[[Page 320]]

management of the Refuge to ensure coordinated conservation and 
management of the Reserve and the Refuge, consistent with the purposes 
and policies of the National Marine Sanctuaries Act, the National Marine 
Sanctuaries Amendments Act of 2000, and this order, and the authorities 
of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the National Wildlife Refuge 
System Administration Act (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) and other laws with 
respect to management of the Refuge. Nothing in this order shall enlarge 
or diminish the jurisdiction or authority of the Secretary or Secretary 
of the Interior in managing the Reserve or Refuge, respectively.
    (c) The Secretary of the Interior, through the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, shall coordinate with the Secretary and the Governor 
of the State of Hawaii, as provided under section 5(b) of this order, to 
ensure coordinated protection and management among the Reserve, Refuges, 
and State, consistent with relevant authorities.
Sec. 11. Administration and Judicial Review.
    (a) International Law. Management of the Reserve and any regulations 
issued pursuant thereto and all other provisions of this order shall be 
applied consistently with the 1983 Presidential Proclamation on the 
Exclusive Economic Zone, the 1988 Presidential Proclamation on the 
Territorial Sea, and the 1999 Presidential Proclamation on Contiguous 
Zone and in accordance with generally recognized principles of 
international law, and with the treaties, conventions, and other 
agreements to which the United States is a party. The Secretary shall 
consult with the Department of State in implementing this order.
    (b) Agency Responsibilities. All Federal agencies whose actions may 
affect the Reserve and any National Marine Sanctuary established by the 
Secretary pursuant to this order shall carry out such actions in 
accordance with applicable laws, regulations and Executive Orders, 
including Executive Orders 13089 of June 11, 1998, and 13158 of May 26, 
2000.
    (c) National Security and Emergency Actions. Consistent with 
applicable law, nothing in this order is intended to apply to military 
activities (including those carried out by the United States Coast 
Guard), including military exercises, conducted within or in the 
vicinity of the Reserve, consistent with the requirements of Executive 
Orders 13089 of June 11, 1998, and 13158 of May 26, 2000. Further, 
nothing in this order is intended to restrict the Department of Defense 
from conducting activities necessary during time of war or national 
emergency, or when necessary for reasons of national security as 
determined by the Secretary of Defense, consistent with applicable law. 
In addition, consistent with applicable law, nothing in this order shall 
limit agency actions to respond to emergencies posing an unacceptable 
threat to human health or safety or to the marine environment and 
admitting of no other feasible solution.
    (d) United States Coast Guard. Nothing in this order is intended to 
limit the authority of the United States Coast Guard to enforce any 
Federal law, or install or maintain aids to navigation.
    (e) Funding. This order shall be carried out subject to the 
availability of appropriated funds and to the extent permitted by law.
    (f) Territorial Waters. Nothing in this order shall enlarge or 
diminish the jurisdiction or authority of the State of Hawaii or the 
United States over

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submerged or other lands within the territorial waters off the coast of 
Hawaii.
    (g) Judicial Review. This order does not create any right or 
benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable in law or equity by a 
party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or any 
person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    December 4, 2000.



Executive Order 13179 of December 7, 2000

Providing Compensation to America's Nuclear Weapons Workers

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including Public Law 106-398, the 
Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 
(Public Law 106-398, the ``Act''), and to allocate the responsibilities 
imposed by that legislation and to provide for further legislative 
efforts, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. Since World War II, hundreds of thousands of men and 
women have served their Nation in building its nuclear defense. In the 
course of their work, they overcame previously unimagined scientific and 
technical challenges. Thousands of these courageous Americans, however, 
paid a high price for their service, developing disabling or fatal 
illnesses as a result of exposure to beryllium, ionizing radiation, and 
other hazards unique to nuclear weapons production and testing. Too 
often, these workers were neither adequately protected from, nor 
informed of, the occupational hazards to which they were exposed.
Existing workers' compensation programs have failed to provide for the 
needs of these workers and their families. Federal workers' compensation 
programs have generally not included these workers. Further, because of 
long latency periods, the uniqueness of the hazards to which they were 
exposed, and inadequate exposure data, many of these individuals have 
been unable to obtain State workers' compensation benefits. This problem 
has been exacerbated by the past policy of the Department of Energy 
(DOE) and its predecessors of encouraging and assisting DOE contractors 
in opposing the claims of workers who sought those benefits. This policy 
has recently been reversed.
While the Nation can never fully repay these workers or their families, 
they deserve recognition and compensation for their sacrifices. Since 
the Administration's historic announcement in July of 1999 that it 
intended to compensate DOE nuclear weapons workers who suffered 
occupational illnesses as a result of exposure to the unique hazards in 
building the Nation's nuclear defense, it has been the policy of this 
Administration to support fair and timely compensation for these workers 
and their survivors. The Federal Government should provide necessary 
information and otherwise help employees of the DOE or its contractors 
determine if their ill

[[Page 322]]

nesses are associated with conditions of their nuclear weapons-related 
work; it should provide workers and their survivors with all pertinent 
and available information necessary for evaluating and processing 
claims; and it should ensure that this program minimizes the 
administrative burden on workers and their survivors, and respects their 
dignity and privacy. This order sets out agency responsibilities to 
accomplish these goals, building on the Administration's articulated 
principles and the framework set forth in the Energy Employees 
Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000. The Departments 
of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Energy shall be responsible for 
developing and implementing actions under the Act to compensate these 
workers and their families in a manner that is compassionate, fair, and 
timely. Other Federal agencies, as appropriate, shall assist in this 
effort.
Sec. 2. Designation of Responsibilities for Administering the Energy 
Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program (``Program'').
    (a) Secretary of Labor. The Secretary of Labor shall have primary 
responsibility for administering the Program. Specifically, the 
Secretary shall:
 (i) Administer and decide all questions arising under the Act not 
assigned to other agencies by the Act or by this order, including 
determining the eligibility of individuals
with covered occupational illnesses and their survivors and adjudicating 
claims for compensation and benefits;
 (ii) No later than May 31, 2001, promulgate regulations for the 
administration of the Program, except for functions assigned to other 
agencies pursuant to the Act or this order;
 (iii) No later than July 31, 2001, ensure the availability, in paper 
and electronic format, of forms necessary for making claims under the 
Program; and
 (iv) Develop informational materials, in coordination with the 
Secretary of Energy and the Secretary of Health and Human Services, to 
help potential claimants understand the Program and the application 
process, and provide these materials to individuals upon request and to 
the Secretary of Energy and the Attorney General for dissemination to 
potentially eligible individuals.
    (b) Secretary of Health and Human Services. The Secretary of Health 
and Human Services shall:
 (i) No later than May 31, 2001, promulgate regulations establishing:
 (A) guidelines, pursuant to section 3623(c) of the Act, to assess the 
likelihood that an individual with cancer sustained the cancer in the 
performance of duty at a Department of Energy facility or an atomic 
weapons employer facility, as defined by the Act; and
 (B) methods, pursuant to section 3623(d) of the Act, for arriving at 
and providing reasonable estimates of the radiation doses received by 
individuals applying for assistance under this program for whom there 
are inadequate records of radiation exposure;
 (ii) In accordance with procedures developed by the Secretary of Health 
and Human Services, consider and issue determinations on petitions by 
classes of employees to be treated as members of the Special Exposure 
Cohort;

[[Page 323]]

 (iii) With the assistance of the Secretary of Energy, apply the methods 
promulgated under subsection (b)(i)(B) to estimate the radiation doses 
received by individuals applying for assistance;
 (iv) Upon request from the Secretary of Energy, appoint members for a 
physician panel or panels to consider individual workers' compensation 
claims as part of the Worker Assistance Program under the process 
established pursuant to subsection (c)(v); and
 (v) Provide the Advisory Board established under section 4 of this 
order with administrative services, funds, facilities, staff, and other 
necessary support services and perform the administrative functions of 
the President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 
U.S.C. App.), with respect to the Advisory Board.
    (c) Secretary of Energy. The Secretary of Energy shall:
 (i) Provide the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Advisory 
Board on Radiation and Worker Health access, in accordance with law, to 
all relevant information pertaining to worker exposures, including 
access to restricted data, and any other technical assistance needed to 
carry out their responsibilities under subsection (b)(ii) and section 
4(b), respectively.
 (ii) Upon request from the Secretary of Health and Human Services or 
the Secretary of Labor, and as permitted by law, require a DOE 
contractor, subcontractor, or
designated beryllium vendor, pursuant to section 3631(c) of the Act, to 
provide information relevant to a claim under this Program;
 (iii) Identify and notify potentially eligible individuals of the 
availability of compensation under the Program;
 (iv) Designate, pursuant to sections 3621(4)(B) and 3622 of the Act, 
atomic weapons employers and additions
to the list of designated beryllium vendors;
 (v) Pursuant to Subtitle D of the Act, negotiate agreements with the 
chief executive officer of each State in which there is a DOE facility, 
and other States as appropriate, to provide assistance to a DOE 
contractor employee on filing a State workers' compensation system 
claim, and establish a Worker Assistance Program to help individuals 
whose illness is related to employment in the DOE's nuclear weapons 
complex, or the individual's survivor if the individual is deceased, in 
applying for State workers' compensation benefits. This assistance shall 
include:
 (1) Submittal of reasonable claims to a physician panel, appointed by 
the Secretary of Health and Human Services and administered by the 
Secretary of Energy, under procedures established by the Secretary of 
Energy, for determination of whether the individual's illness or death 
arose out of and in the course of employment by the DOE or its 
contractors and exposure to a toxic substance at a DOE facility; and
 (2) For cases determined by the physician panel and the Secretary of 
Energy under section 3661(d) and (e) of the Act to have arisen out of 
and in the course of employment by the DOE or its contractors and 
exposure to a toxic substance at a DOE facility, provide assistance to 
the individual in filing for workers' compensation benefits. The 
Secretary shall not contest

[[Page 324]]

these claims and, to the extent permitted by law, shall direct a DOE 
contractor who employed the applicant not to contest the claim;
 (vi) Report on the Worker Assistance Program by making publicly 
available on at least an annual basis claims- related data, including 
the number of claims filed, the number of illnesses found to be related 
to work at a DOE
facility, job location and description, and number of successful State 
workers' compensation claims awarded; and
 (vii) No later than January 15, 2001, publish in the Federal Register a 
list of atomic weapons employer facilities within the meaning of section 
3621(5) of the Act, Department of Energy employer facilities within the 
meaning of section 3621(12) of the Act, and a list of facilities owned 
and operated by a beryllium vendor, within the meaning of section 
3621(6) of the Act.
    (d) Attorney General. The Attorney General shall:
 (i) Develop procedures to notify, to the extent possible, each claimant 
(or the survivor of that claimant if deceased) whose claim for 
compensation under section 5 of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act 
has been or is approved by the Department of Justice, of the 
availability of supplemental compensation and benefits under the Energy 
Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program;
 (ii) Identify and notify eligible covered uranium employees or their 
survivors of the availability of supplemental compensation under the 
Program; and
 (iii) Upon request by the Secretary of Labor, provide information 
needed to adjudicate the claim of a covered uranium employee under this 
Program.
Sec. 3. Establishment of Interagency Working Group.
    (a) There is hereby established an Interagency Working Group to be 
composed of representatives from the Office of Management and Budget, 
the National Economic Council, and the Departments of Labor, Energy, 
Health and Human Services, and Justice.
    (b) The Working Group shall:
 (i) By January 1, 2001, develop a legislative proposal to ensure the 
Program's fairness and efficiency, including provisions to assure 
adequate administrative resources and swift dispute resolution; and
 (ii) Address any impediments to timely and coordinated Program 
implementation.
Sec. 4. Establishment of Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health.
    (a) Pursuant to Public Law 106-398, there is hereby established an 
Advisory Board on Radiation and Health (Advisory Board). The Advisory 
Board shall consist of no more than 20 members to be appointed by the 
President. Members shall include affected workers and their 
representatives, and representatives from scientific and medical 
communities. The President shall designate a Chair for the Board among 
its members.
    (b) The Advisory Board shall:
 (i) Advise the Secretary of Health and Human Services on the 
development of guidelines under section 2(b)(i) of this order;

[[Page 325]]

 (ii) Advise the Secretary of Health and Human Services on the 
scientific validity and quality of dose reconstruction efforts performed 
for this Program; and
 (iii) Upon request by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, 
advise the Secretary on whether there is a class of employees at any 
Department of Energy facility who were exposed to radiation but for whom 
it is not feasible to estimate their radiation dose, and on whether 
there is a reasonable likelihood that such radiation dose may have 
endangered the health of members of the class.
Sec. 5. Reporting Requirements. The Secretaries of Labor, Health and 
Human Services, and Energy shall, as part of their annual budget 
submissions, report to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on 
their activities under this Program, including total expenditures 
related to benefits and program administration. They shall also report 
to the OMB, no later than March 1, 2001, on the manner in which they 
will carry out their respective responsibilities under the Act and this 
order. This report shall include, among other things, a description of 
the administrative structure established within their agencies to 
implement the Act and this order. In addition, the Secretary of Labor 
shall annually report on the total number and types of claims for which 
compensation was considered and other data pertinent to evaluating the 
Federal Government's performance fulfilling the requirements of the Act 
and this order.
Sec. 6. Administration and Judicial Review. (a) This Executive Order 
shall be carried out subject to the availability of appropriations, and 
to the extent permitted by law.
    (b) This Executive Order does not create any right or benefit, 
substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a party 
against the United States, its agencies, its officers or employees, or 
any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     December 7, 2000.



Executive Order 13180 of December 7, 2000

Air Traffic Performance-Based Organization

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to further improve 
the provision of air traffic services, an inherently governmental 
function, in ways that increase efficiency, take better advantage of new 
technologies, accelerate modernization efforts, and respond more 
effectively to the needs of the traveling public, while enhancing the 
safety, security, and efficiency of the Nation's air transportation 
system, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Establishment of the Air Traffic Organization. (a) The 
Secretary of Transportation (Secretary) shall, consistent with his legal 
authorities, move to establish within the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) a performance-based organization to be known as the 
``Air Traffic Organization'' (ATO).

[[Page 326]]

    (b) The ATO shall be composed of those elements of the FAA's Air 
Traffic Services and Research and Acquisition organizations that have 
direct connection and give support to the provision of day-to-day 
operational air traffic services, as determined by the Administrator of 
the Federal Aviation Administration (Administrator). The Administrator 
may delegate responsibility for any operational activity of the air 
traffic control system to the head of the ATO. The Administrator's 
responsibility for general safety, security, and policymaking functions 
for the National Airspace System is unaffected by this order.
    (c) The Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Air Traffic Control 
System, established by the Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and 
Reform Act for the 21st Century (Air-21) (Public Law 106-181), shall 
head the ATO and shall report directly to the Administrator and be 
subject to the authority of the Administrator. The COO, in consultation 
with the Air Traffic Control Subcommittee of the Aviation Management 
Advisory Committee, shall enter into an annual performance agreement 
with the Administrator that sets forth measurable organization and 
individual goals in key operational areas and describes specific targets 
and how such goals will be achieved. The COO may receive an annual bonus 
not to exceed 30 percent of the annual rate of basic pay, based upon the 
Administrator's evaluation of the COO's performance in relation to the 
targets and goals described above.
    (d) The COO shall develop a 5-year strategic plan for the air 
traffic control system, including a clear statement of the mission and 
objectives for the system's safety, efficiency, and productivity. This 
strategic plan must ensure that ATO actions are consistent with long-
term FAA strategies for the aviation system as a whole.
    (e) The COO shall also enter into a framework agreement with the 
Administrator that will establish the relationship of the ATO with the 
other organizations of the FAA.
Sec. 2. Purpose. The FAA's primary mission is to ensure the safety, 
security, and efficiency of the National Airspace System. The purpose of 
this order is to enhance that mission and further improve the delivery 
of air traffic services to the American public by reorganizing the FAA's 
air traffic services and related offices into a performance-based, 
results-oriented, organization. The ATO will be better able to make use 
of the unique procurement and personnel authorities that the FAA 
currently has and to better use the additional management reforms 
enacted by the Congress this year under Air-21. Specifically, the ATO 
shall:
    (a) optimize use of existing management flexibilities and 
authorities to improve the efficiency of air traffic services and 
increase the capacity of the system;
    (b) develop methods to accelerate air traffic control modernization 
and to improve aviation safety related to air traffic control;
    (c) develop agreements with the Administrator of the FAA and users 
of the products, services, and capabilities it will provide;
    (d) operate in accordance with safety performance standards 
developed by the FAA and rapidly respond to FAA safety and security 
oversight findings;
    (e) consult with its customers, the traveling public, including 
direct users such as airlines, cargo carriers, manufacturers, airports, 
general aviation,

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and commercial space transportation providers, and focus on producing 
results that satisfy the FAA's external customer needs;
    (f) consult with appropriate Federal, State, and local public 
agencies, including the Department of Defense and the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, to determine the best practices 
for meeting the diverse needs throughout the National Airspace System;
    (g) establish strong incentives to managers for achieving results; 
and
    (h) formulate and recommend to the Administrator any management, 
fiscal, or legislative changes necessary for the organization to achieve 
its performance goals.
Sec. 3. Aviation Management Advisory Committee. The Air Traffic Control 
Subcommittee of the Aviation Management Advisory Committee shall 
provide, consistent with its responsibilities under Air-21, general 
oversight to ATO regarding the administration, management, conduct, 
direction, and supervision of the air traffic control system.
Sec. 4. Evaluation and Report. Not later than 5 years after the date of 
this order, the Aviation Management Advisory Committee shall provide to 
the Secretary and the Administrator a report on the operation and 
effectiveness of the ATO, together with any recommendations for 
management, fiscal, or legislative changes to enable the organization to 
achieve its goals.
Sec. 5. Definitions. The term ``air traffic control system'' has the 
same meaning as the term defined by section 40102(a)(42) of title 49, 
United States Code.
Sec. 6. Judicial Review. This order does not create any right or 
benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party 
against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or any person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     December 7, 2000.



Executive Order 13181 of December 20, 2000

To Protect the Privacy of Protected Health Information in Oversight 
Investigations

By the authority vested in me as President of the United States by the 
Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is ordered 
as follows:
Section 1. Policy.
It shall be the policy of the Government of the United States that law 
enforcement may not use protected health information concerning an 
individual that is discovered during the course of health oversight 
activities for unrelated civil, administrative, or criminal 
investigations of a non-health oversight matter, except when the balance 
of relevant factors weighs clearly in favor of its use. That is, 
protected health information may not be so used unless the public 
interest and the need for disclosure clearly outweigh the

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potential for injury to the patient, to the physician-patient 
relationship, and to the treatment services. Protecting the privacy of 
patients' protected health information promotes trust in the health care 
system. It improves the quality of health care by fostering an 
environment in which patients can feel more comfortable in providing 
health care professionals with accurate and detailed information about 
their personal health. In order to provide greater protections to 
patients' privacy, the Department of Health and Human Services is 
issuing final regulations concerning the confidentiality of individually 
identifiable health information under the Health Insurance Portability 
and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). HIPAA applies only to ``covered 
entities,'' such as health care plans, providers, and clearinghouses. 
HIPAA regulations therefore do not apply to other organizations and 
individuals that gain access to protected health information, including 
Federal officials who gain access to health records during health 
oversight activities.
Under the new HIPAA regulations, health oversight investigators will 
appropriately have ready access to medical records for oversight 
purposes. Health oversight investigators generally do not seek access to 
the medical records of a particular patient, but instead review large 
numbers of records to determine whether a health care provider or 
organization is violating the law, such as through fraud against the 
Medicare system. Access to many health records is often necessary in 
order to gain enough evidence to detect and bring enforcement actions 
against fraud in the health care system. Stricter rules apply under the 
HIPAA regulations, however, when law enforcement officials seek 
protected health information in order to investigate criminal activity 
outside of the health oversight realm.
In the course of their efforts to protect the health care system, health 
oversight investigators may also uncover evidence of wrongdoing 
unrelated to the health care system, such as evidence of criminal 
conduct by an individual who has sought health care. For records 
containing that evidence, the issue thus arises whether the information 
should be available for law enforcement purposes under the less 
restrictive oversight rules or the more restrictive rules that apply to 
non-oversight criminal investigations.
A similar issue has arisen in other circumstances. Under 18 U.S.C. 3486, 
an individual's health records obtained for health oversight purposes 
pursuant to an administrative subpoena may not be used against that 
individual patient in an unrelated investigation by law enforcement 
unless a judicial officer finds good cause. Under that statute, a 
judicial officer determines whether there is good cause by weighing the 
public interest and the need for disclosure against the potential for 
injury to the patient, to the physician-patient relationship, and to the 
treatment services. It is appropriate to extend limitations on the use 
of health information to all situations in which the government obtains 
medical records for a health oversight purpose. In recognition of the 
increasing importance of protecting health information as shown in the 
medical privacy rule, a higher standard than exists in 18 U.S.C. 3486 is 
necessary. It is, therefore, the policy of the Government of the United 
States that law enforcement may not use protected health information 
concerning an individual, discovered during the course of health 
oversight activities for unrelated civil, administrative, or criminal 
investigations, against that indi vidual except when the balance of 
relevant factors weighs clearly in favor of its use. That is, protected 
health information may not be so used unless the public interest and the 
need for

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disclosure clearly outweigh the potential for injury to the patient, to 
the physician-patient relationship, and to the treatment services.
Sec. 2. Definitions. 
    (a) ``Health oversight activities'' shall include the oversight 
activities enumerated in the regulations concerning the confidentiality 
of individually identifiable health information promulgated by the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services pursuant to the ``Health 
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996,'' as amended.
    (b) ``Protected health information'' shall have the meaning ascribed 
to it in the regulations concerning the confidentiality of individually 
identifiable health information promulgated by the Secretary of Health 
and Human Services pursuant to the ``Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996,'' as amended.
    (c) ``Injury to the patient'' includes injury to the privacy 
interests of the patient.
Sec. 3. Implementation. 
    (a) Protected health information concerning an individual patient 
discovered during the course of health oversight activities shall not be 
used against that individual patient in an unrelated civil, 
administrative, or criminal investigation of a non-health oversight 
matter unless the Deputy Attorney General of the U.S Department of 
Justice, or insofar as the protected health information involves members 
of the Armed Forces, the General Counsel of the U.S. Department of 
Defense, has authorized such use.
    (b) In assessing whether protected health information should be used 
under subparagraph (a) of this section, the Deputy Attorney General 
shall permit such use upon concluding that the balance of relevant 
factors weighs clearly in favor of its use. That is, the Deputy Attorney 
General shall permit disclosure if the public interest and the need for 
disclosure clearly outweigh the potential for injury to the patient, to 
the physician-patient relationship, and to the treatment services.
    (c) Upon the decision to use protected health information under 
subparagraph (a) of this section, the Deputy Attorney General, in 
determining the extent to which this information should be used, shall 
impose appropriate safeguards against unauthorized use.
    (d) On an annual basis, the Department of Justice, in consul tation 
with the Department of Health and Human Services, shall provide to the 
President of the United States a report that includes the following 
information:
    (i) the number of requests made to the Deputy Attorney General for 
authorization to use protected health information discovered during 
health oversight activities in a non-health oversight, unrelated 
investigation;
    (ii) the number of requests that were granted as applied for, 
granted as modified, or denied;
    (iii) the agencies that made the applications, and the number of 
requests made by each agency; and
    (iv) the uses for which the protected health information was 
authorized.
    (e) The General Counsel of the U.S. Department of Defense will 
comply with the requirements of subparagraphs (b), (c), and (d), above. 
The General

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Counsel also will prepare a report, consistent with the requirements of 
subparagraphs (d)(i) through (d)(iv), above, and will forward it to the 
Department of Justice where it will be incorporated into the 
Department's annual report to the President.
Sec. 4. Exceptions.
    (a) Nothing in this Executive Order shall place a restriction on the 
derivative use of protected health information that was obtained by a 
law enforcement agency in a non-health oversight investigation.
    (b) Nothing in this Executive Order shall be interpreted to place a 
restriction on a duty imposed by statute.
    (c) Nothing in this Executive Order shall place any additional 
limitation on the derivative use of health information obtained by the 
Attorney General pursuant to the provisions of 18 U.S.C. 3486.
    (d) This order does not create any right or benefit, substantive or 
procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the United States, the 
officers and employees, or any other person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     December 20, 2000.



Executive Order 13182 of December 23, 2000

Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including the laws cited herein, 
it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Statutory Pay Systems. The rates of basic pay or salaries of 
the statutory pay systems (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 5302(1)), as adjusted 
under 5 U.S.C. 5303(a), are set forth on the schedules attached hereto 
and made a part hereof:
    (a) The General Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5332(a)) at Schedule 1;
    (b) The Foreign Service Schedule (22 U.S.C. 3963) at Schedule 2; and
    (c) The schedules for the Veterans Health Administration of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs (38 U.S.C. 7306, 7404; section 301(a) of 
Public Law 102-40) at Schedule 3.
Sec. 2. Senior Executive Service. The rates of basic pay for senior 
executives in the Senior Executive Service, as adjusted under 5 U.S.C. 
5382, are set forth on Schedule 4 attached hereto and made a part 
hereof.
Sec. 3. Executive Salaries. The rates of basic pay or salaries for the 
following offices and positions are set forth on the schedules attached 
hereto and made a part hereof:
    (a) The Executive Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5312-5318) at Schedule 5;
    (b) The Vice President (3 U.S.C. 104) and the Congress (2 U.S.C. 31) 
at Schedule 6; and

[[Page 331]]

    (c) Justices and judges (28 U.S.C. 5, 44(d), 135, 252, and 461(a)) 
at Schedule 7.
Sec. 4. Uniformed Services. Pursuant to section 601 of Public Law 106-
398, the rates of monthly basic pay (37 U.S.C. 203(a)) for members of 
the uniformed services and the rate of monthly cadet or midshipman pay 
(37 U.S.C. 203(c)) are set forth on Schedule 8 attached hereto and made 
a part hereof.
Sec. 5. Locality-Based Comparability Payments. (a) Pursuant to sections 
5304 and 5304a of title 5, United States Code, locality-based 
comparability payments shall be paid in accordance with Schedule 9 
attached hereto and made a part hereof.
    (b) The Director of the Office of Personnel Management shall take 
such actions as may be necessary to implement these payments and to 
publish appropriate notice of such payments in the Federal Register.
Sec. 6. Administrative Law Judges. The rates of basic pay for 
administrative law judges, as adjusted under 5 U.S.C. 5372(b)(4), are 
set forth on Schedule 10 attached hereto and made a part hereof.
Sec. 7. Effective Dates. Schedule 8 is effective on January 1, 2001. The 
other schedules contained herein are effective on the first day of the 
first applicable pay period beginning on or
Sec. 8. Prior Order Superseded. Executive Order 13144 of December 21, 
1999, is superseded.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     December 23, 2000.

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Executive Order 13183 of December 23, 2000

Establishment of the President's Task Force on Puerto Rico's Status

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, including Public Law 106-346, it 
is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. It is the policy of the executive branch of the 
Government of the United States of America to help answer the questions 
that the people of Puerto Rico have asked for years regarding the 
options for the islands' future status and the process for realizing an 
option. Further, it is our policy to consider and develop positions on 
proposals, without preference among the options, for the Commonwealth's 
future status; to discuss such proposals with representatives of the 
people of Puerto Rico and the Congress; to work with leaders of the 
Commonwealth and the Congress to clarify the options to enable Puerto 
Ricans to determine their preference among options for the islands' 
future status that are not incompatible with the Constitution and basic 
laws and policies of the United States; and to implement such an option 
if chosen by a majority, including helping Puerto Ricans obtain a 
governing arrangement under which they would vote for national 
government officials, if they choose such a status.
Sec. 2. The President's Task Force on Puerto Rico's Status. There is 
established a task force to be known as ``The President's Task Force on 
Puerto Rico's Status'' (Task Force). It shall be composed of designees 
of each member of the President's Cabinet and the Co-Chairs of the 
President's Interagency Group on Puerto Rico (Interagency Group). The 
Task Force shall be co-chaired by the Attorney General's designee and a 
Co-Chair of the Interagency Group.
Sec. 3. Functions. The Task Force shall seek to implement the policy set 
forth in section 1 of this order. It shall ensure official attention to 
and facilitate action on matters related to proposals for Puerto Rico's 
status and the process by which an option can be realized. It shall 
provide advice and recommendations on such matters to the President and 
the Congress. It shall also provide advice and recommendations to assist 
the Executive Office of the President in fulfilling its responsibilities 
under Public Law 106-346 to transfer funding to the Elections Commission 
of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for public education on and a public 
choice among options for Puerto Rico's future status that are not 
incompatible with the Constitution and the basic laws and policies of 
the United States.
Sec. 4. Report. The Task Force shall report on its actions to the 
President not later than May 1, 2001, and thereafter as needed but not 
less than annually on progress made in the determination of Puerto 
Rico's ultimate status.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     December 23, 2000.

[[Page 341]]



Executive Order 13184 of December 28, 2000

Revocation of Executive Order 12834

By the authority vested in me as President of the United States by the 
Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including section 
301 of title 3, United States Code, and sections 3301 and 7301 of title 
5, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Executive Order 12834 of January 20, 1993, ``Ethics Commitments by 
Executive Branch Appointees,'' is hereby revoked, effective at noon 
January 20, 2001. Employees and former employees subject to the 
commitments in Executive Order 12834 will not be subject to those 
commitments after the effective date of this order.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     December 28, 2000.



Executive Order 13185 of December 28, 2000

To Strengthen the Federal Government-University Research Partnership

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the 
laws of the United States of America, and in order to keep the Federal 
Government-University research partnership strong, it is hereby ordered 
as follows:
Section 1. Principles of the Government-University Partnership. The 
partnership in science and technology that has evolved between the 
Federal Government and American universities has yielded benefits that 
are vital to each. It continues to prove exceptionally productive, 
successfully promoting the discovery of knowledge, stimulating 
technological innovation, improving the quality of life, educating and 
training the next generation of scientists and engineers, and 
contributing to America's economic prosperity and national security. In 
order to reaffirm and strengthen this partnership, this order sets forth 
the following guiding and operating principles that are fully described 
in the April 1999 National Science and Technology Council report, 
``Renewing the Government-University Partnership.'' These principles 
shall provide the framework for the development and analysis of all 
future Federal policies, rules, and regulations for the Federal 
Government-University research partnership.
    (a) The guiding principles that shall govern interactions between 
the Federal Government and universities that perform research are:
    (1) Research is an investment in the future;
    (2) The integration of research and education is vital;
    (3) Excellence is promoted when investments are guided by merit 
review; and
    (4) Research must be conducted with integrity.

[[Page 342]]

    (b) The operating principles that shall assist agencies, 
universities, individual researchers, and auditing and regulatory bodies 
in implementing the guiding principles are:
    (1) Agency cost-sharing policies and practices must be transparent;
    (2) Partners should respect the merit review process;
    (3) Agencies and universities should manage research in a cost-
efficient manner;
    (4) Accountability and accounting are not the same;
    (5) The benefits of simplicity in policies and practices should be 
weighed against the costs;
    (6) Change should be justified by need and the process made 
transparent.
    (c) Each executive branch department or agency that supports 
research at universities shall regularly review its existing policies 
and procedures to ensure that they meet the spirit and intent of the 
guiding and operating principles stated above.
Sec. 2. Office of Science and Technology (OSTP) Review of the 
Government-University Research Partnership. (a) The OSTP, in conjunction 
with the National Science and Technology Council, shall conduct a 
regular review of the Government-University research partnership and 
prepare a report on the status of the partnership. The OSTP should 
receive input from all departments or agencies that have a major impact 
on the Government-University partnership through their support of 
research and education, policy making, regulatory activities, and 
research administration. In addition, OSTP may seek the input of the 
National Science Board and the President's Committee of Advisors for 
Science and Technology, as well as other stakeholders, such as State and 
local governments, industry, the National Academy of Sciences, and the 
Federal Demonstration Partnership.
    (b) The purpose of the review and the report is to determine the 
overall health of the Government-University research partnership, being 
mindful of the guiding and operating principles stated above. The report 
should include recommendations on how to improve the Government- 
University partnership.
    (c) The Director of OSTP shall deliver the report to the President.
Sec. 3. Judicial Review. This order does not create any enforceable 
rights against the United States, its agencies, its officers, or any 
person.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    December 28, 2000.

[[Page 343]]

________________________________________________________________________

                      OTHER PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

________________________________________________________________________


                                                                    Page
Subchapter A--[Reserved]
Subchapter B--Administrative Orders                                  343
Subchapter C--Reorganization Plans                                [None]
Subchapter D--Designations                                        [None]
Appendix A--List of Messages to Congress Transmitting Budget Rescissions 
and Deferrals                                                        413
Appendix B--List of Final Rule Documents                             413
                                                                        


________________________________________________________________________

Subchapter B--Administrative Orders

________________________________________________________________________





Memorandum of January 5, 2000

Delegation of Authority Under Sections 1402 and 1406 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public Law 106-65)

Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense
By the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United 
States, including section 301 of title 3, United States Code, I hereby 
delegate to the Secretary of Defense the duties and responsibilities 
vested in the President by sections 1402 and 1406 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (``the Act'') (Public Law 
106-65).
The Department of Defense shall prepare the report required by section 
1402 of the Act with the assistance of the Department of State, the 
Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, the Department of the 
Treasury, the Director of Central Intelligence, and the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. The Department of Defense shall obtain concurrence on 
the report from the following agencies: the Department of State, the 
Department of Commerce, the Director of Central Intelligence on behalf 
of the Intelligence Community, the Department of the Treasury, and the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation prior to submission to the Congress.

[[Page 344]]

The Departments of Defense and Energy shall jointly prepare the report 
required by section 1406 of the Act with the assistance of the 
Department of State, the Department of Commerce, and the Director of 
Central Intelligence. The Departments of Defense and Energy shall obtain 
concurrence on the report from the following agencies: the Department of 
State, the Department of Commerce, and the Director of Central 
Intelligence on behalf of the Intelligence Community prior to submission 
to the Congress.
Any reference in this memorandum to the provisions of any Act shall be 
deemed to be a reference to such Act or its provisions as may be amended 
from time to time.
You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 5, 2000.



Memorandum of January 5, 2000

Delegation of Authority Under Section 1406 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public Law 106-65)

Memorandum for the Secretary of Energy
By the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United 
States, including section 301 of title 3, United States Code, I hereby 
delegate to the Secretary of Energy and the Secretary of Defense the 
duties and responsibilities vested in the President by section 1406 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (``the 
Act'') (Public Law 106-65).
The Departments of Energy and Defense shall jointly prepare a report 
with the assistance of the Department of State, the Department of 
Commerce, and the Director of Central Intelligence. The Departments of 
Defense and Energy shall obtain concurrence on the report from the 
following agencies: the Department of State, the Department of Commerce, 
and the Director of Central Intelligence on behalf of the Intelligence 
Community prior to submission to the Congress.
Any reference in this memorandum to the provisions of any Act shall be 
deemed to be a reference to such Act or its provisions as may be amended 
from time to time.

[[Page 345]]

You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 5, 2000.



Memorandum of January 5, 2000

Delegation of Authority Under Section 1401(b) of the
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal
Year 2000 (Public Law 106-65)

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
By the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United 
States, including section 301 of title 3, United States Code, I hereby 
delegate to the Secretary of State the duties and responsibilities 
vested in the President by section 1401(b) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (``the Act'') (Public Law 106-
65).
The Department of State shall obtain concurrence on the report from the 
following agencies: the Department of Defense, the Department of 
Commerce, and the Director of Central Intelligence on behalf of the 
Intelligence Community prior to submission to the Congress.
Any reference in this memorandum to the provisions of any Act shall be 
deemed to be a reference to such Act or its provisions as may be amended 
from time to time.
You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 5, 2000.



Notice of January 19, 2000

Continuation of Emergency Regarding Terrorists Who Threaten To Disrupt 
the Middle East Peace Process

On January 23, 1995, by Executive Order 12947, I declared a national 
emergency to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States 
constituted by grave acts of violence committed by foreign terrorists 
that disrupt the Mid

[[Page 346]]

dle East peace process. By Executive Order 12947 of January 23, 1995, I 
blocked the assets in the United States, or in the control of United 
States persons, of foreign terrorists who threaten to disrupt the Middle 
East peace process. I also prohibited transactions or dealings by United 
States persons in such property. On August 20, 1998, by Executive Order 
13099, I identified four additional persons, including Usama bin Ladin, 
who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace process. I have annually 
transmitted notices of the continuation of this national emergency to 
the Congress and the Federal Register. Last year's notice of 
continuation was published in the Federal Register on January 22, 1999. 
Because terrorist activities continue to threaten the Middle East peace 
process and vital interests of the United States in the Middle East, the 
national emergency declared on January 23, 1995, and the measures that 
took effect on January 24, 1995, to deal with that emergency must 
continue in effect beyond January 23, 2000. Therefore, in accordance 
with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), 
I am continuing the national emergency with respect to foreign 
terrorists who threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace process.
This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and transmitted 
to the Congress.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    January 19, 2000.



Memorandum of January 27, 2000

Delegation of Authority To Conduct Assessments and Promulgate 
Regulations on Public Access to Off-Site Consequence Analysis 
Information

Memorandum for the Attorney General[, ] the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency[, and] the Director of the Office of 
Management and Budget
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws 
of the United States of America, including section 112(r)(7)(H) of the 
Clean Air Act (``Act'') (42 U.S.C. 7412(r)(7)(H)), as added by section 3 
of the Chemical Safety Information, Site Security and Fuels Regulatory 
Relief Act (Public Law 106-40), and section 301 of title 3, United 
States Code, I hereby delegate to:
    (1) the Attorney General the authority vested in the President under 
section 112(r)(7)(H)(ii)(I)(aa) of the Act to assess the increased risk 
of terrorist and other criminal activity associated with the posting of 
off-site consequence analysis information on the Internet;
    (2) the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
the authority vested in the President under section 
112(r)(7)(H)(ii)(I)(bb) of the Act to assess the incentives created by 
public disclosure of off-site consequence analysis information for 
reduction in the risk of accidental releases; and

[[Page 347]]

    (3) the Attorney General and the Administrator of EPA, jointly, the 
authority vested in the President under section 112(r)(7)(H)(ii)(II) of 
the Act to promulgate regulations, based on these assessments, governing 
the distribution of off-site consequence analysis information. These 
regulations, in proposed and final form, shall be subject to review and 
approval by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget.
The Administrator of EPA is authorized and directed to publish this 
memorandum in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 27, 2000.



Directive of January 31, 2000

Resolution Regarding Use of Range Facilities on Vieques, Puerto Rico 
(Community Assistance)

Directive to the Secretary of Defense [and] Director, Office of 
Management and Budget
By separate directive I have addressed the resumption of Navy and Marine 
Corps training on the island of Vieques.
1. Provided that training opportunity has resumed and is continuously 
available on Vieques, then within 90 days of this directive, I direct 
the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to request authority and 
funding (which with funding for projects described in paragraph 5(e) of 
the previously referenced directive will total $40 million) from the 
Congress for the following projects:
    (a) To support the construction of a new commercial ferry pier and 
terminal by the Army Corps of Engineers.
    (b) To establish an artificial reef construction and fish 
aggregation program to create substantial new commercial fishing areas 
for Vieques fisherman. Until such time as these new fishing grounds are 
operational, this legislation will authorize direct payments of an 
amount (to be determined by the National Marine Fisheries Services) to 
be paid to registered Vieques commercial fishermen for each day they are 
unable to use existing waters because the Navy is training.
    (c) To support expanding or improving the major cross-island 
roadways and bridges on Vieques.
    (d) To establish an apprenticeship/training program for young people 
on Vieques to facilitate participation in small-scale civic construction 
projects.
    (e) To establish a program with the Government of Puerto Rico to 
preserve the Puerto Mosquito Vieques bioluminescent bay and to commit 
Federal resources to its preservation.

[[Page 348]]

    (f) To establish a professional economic development office for 
Vieques for the purpose of promoting Vieques and attracting jobs to the 
island.
2. The Director of OMB shall publish this directive in the Federal 
Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 31, 2000.



Directive of January 31, 2000

Resolution Regarding Use of Range Facilities on Vieques, Puerto Rico 
(Referendum)

Directive to the Secretary of Defense [and] Director, Office of 
Management and Budget
By virtue of the authority vested in me and in order to further the 
interests of national security and to address the legitimate interests 
and concerns of the residents of Vieques and the people of Puerto Rico, 
I hereby direct the following:
1. The future of Navy training on Vieques will be determined by a 
referendum of the registered voters of Vieques, using Puerto Rico 
electoral laws and regulations as they exist as of the date of this 
directive. This referendum will occur on May 1, 2001, or 270 days prior 
to or following May 1, 2001, the exact date to be specified on the 
request of the Department of the Navy. (This specified date and the 
terms of the referendum must be requested at least 90 days in advance of 
the referendum.) It is understood that the full implementation of this 
directive is contingent upon the Government of Puerto Rico authorizing 
and supporting this referendum, and the cooperation of the Government of 
Puerto Rico as specified in paragraph 5(a).
2. This referendum will present two alternatives. The first shall be 
that the Navy will cease all training not later than May 1, 2003. The 
second will permit continued training, to include live fire training, on 
terms proposed by the Navy. Live fire training is critical to enhance 
combat readiness for all our military personnel and must occur in some 
location.
3. In the event the referendum selects the option of termination of Navy 
activities, then
(a) Navy lands on the Eastern side of Vieques (including the Eastern 
Maneuver Area and the Live Impact Area) will be transferred within 1 
year of the referendum to the General Services Administration (GSA) for 
disposal under the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, 
except for conservation zones, which will be transferred to the 
Department of the Interior for continued preservation.
(b) The GSA will supervise restoration of the lands described in section 
3(a) consistent with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) before it is further 
transferred under

[[Page 349]]

the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, except that the 
Live Impact Area will be swept for ordnance and fenced to meet the same 
range standards used after the closure of the live impact area used by 
Naval Air Station, South Weymouth, Massachusetts. The Government of 
Puerto Rico may request transfer of the restored lands in accordance 
with the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act.
(c) Under no conditions will the land described in this section be 
returned to the Department of Defense or used for military training.
4. In the event the referendum selects the option of continued training 
submitted by the Navy, the Office of Management and Budget will request 
congressional funding to further provide for the enhancement of 
infrastructure and housing on the Western portions of Vieques in the 
amount of $50 million.
5. Between the date of this directive and the referendum, the following 
will occur:
(a) The Department of Defense and the Government of Puerto Rico will 
work in cooperation with relevant Federal authorities to ensure the 
integrity and accessibility of the range is uninterrupted and 
trespassing and other intrusions on the range cease entirely by 
providing complementary support among Federal and Puerto Rican 
jurisdictions.
(b) Navy training on Vieques will recommence, but it shall not exceed 90 
days per calendar year and will be limited to nonexplosive ordnance, 
which may include spotting devices.
(c) The Navy will ensure procedures are in place that will enhance 
safety and will position ships to reduce noise in civilian areas 
whenever possible.
(d) Before any major training occurs on the range, the Government of 
Puerto Rico, through its Secretary of State, will be given 15 days 
notification under the terms of the Memorandum of Understanding of 1983.
(e) The Office of Management and Budget will initiate a funding request 
to the Congress:
(1) to fund a Public Health Service study in coordination with 
appropriate agencies to review health concerns raised by the residents 
of Vieques.
(2) to complete the conveyance of 110 acres of Navy property to extend 
the runway at the Vieques Municipal Airport to accommodate larger 
passenger aircraft; and for the Navy to provide training and 
supplemental equipment to bolster the airport fire, safety, and resource 
capability.
(3) to maintain the ecosystem and conservation zones and implement the 
sea turtle, sea mammal, and Brown Pelican management plans as specified 
in the Memorandum of Understanding of 1983.
(f) Within 30 days of this directive, the Navy will submit legislation 
to the Congress to transfer land on the Western side of Vieques 
surrounding the Naval Ammunition Facility (except 100 acres of land on 
which the ROTHR and Mount Pirata telecommunications sites are located). 
The legislation submitted will provide for land transfer not later than 
December 31, 2000. This transfer will be to the Government of Puerto 
Rico for the benefit of the municipality of Vieques as determined by the 
Planning Board of the Government of Puerto Rico. This land shall be 
restored consistent with CERCLA standards prior to transfer.

[[Page 350]]

6. The Director of OMB shall publish this directive in the Federal 
Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 31, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-10 of January 31, 2000

Determination Pursuant to Section 523 of the Foreign
Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs
Appropriations Act, 2000, as Contained in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act for FY 2000 (Public Law 106-113)

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to section 523 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2000, as Contained in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY 2000 (Public Law 106-113), I 
hereby certify that withholding from international financial 
institutions and other international organizations and programs funds 
appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to that Act is 
contrary to the national interest.
You are authorized and directed to publish this determination in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, January 31, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-11 of February 1, 2000

Assistance Program for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to subsection 517(b) in title V of the Foreign Operations, 
Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public 
Law 106-113), I hereby determine that it is in the national security 
interest of the United States to make available funds appropriated under 
the heading ``Assistance for the Independent States of the Former Soviet 
Union'' in title II of that Act without regard to the restriction in 
that subsection.
You are directed to report this determination to the Congress and 
publish it in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 1, 2000.

[[Page 351]]




Presidential Determination No. 2000-12 of February 10, 2000

United States Military Activities in East Timor

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President, including under 
sections 10(d)(1) and 10(a)(2)(B) of the United Nations Participation 
Act of 1945, as amended (22 U.S.C. 287 et seq.) (the ``Act''), I hereby:

(a) determine that the deployment of United States military forces to 
support East Timor's transition to independence without reimbursement from 
the United Nations is important to the security interests of the United 
States; and

(b) delegate to you the authority contained in section 10(d)(1) of the Act 
with respect to assistance to support East Timor's transition to 
independence that is covered by section 10 of the Act.

You are authorized and directed to report this determination to the 
Congress and to arrange for its publication in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 10, 2000.



Memorandum of February 16, 2000

Action Under Section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974
Concerning Steel Wire Rod

Memorandum for the Secretary of the Treasury [and] the United States 
Trade Representative
On July 12, 1999, the United States International Trade Commission 
(USITC) submitted a report to me of its investigation under section 202 
of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act''), with respect 
to imports of steel wire rod. The USITC commissioners were equally 
divided in their determinations under section 202(b) of the Trade Act of 
whether steel wire rod is being imported into the United States in such 
increased quantities as to be a substantial cause of serious injury or 
threat of serious injury to the domestic steel wire rod industry. The 
report also contained negative findings by the ITC pursuant to section 
311(a) of the North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act 
(the ``NAFTA Implementation Act'') with respect to imports of steel wire 
rod from Canada and Mexico.
Having reviewed the determinations of both groups of commissioners, I 
have decided pursuant to section 330(d)(1) of the Tariff Act of 1930 to 
consider the determination of the group of commissioners voting in the 
affirmative to be the determination of the USITC.
After taking into account all relevant considerations, including the 
factors specified in section 203(a)(2) of the Trade Act, I have 
implemented action of a type described in section 203(a)(3) of that Act. 
I have determined that the most appropriate action is a tariff-rate 
quota on imports of steel wire

[[Page 352]]

rod, other than enumerated steel wire rod products (``excluded 
products''), with an increase in currently scheduled rates of duties for 
imports above the tariff-rate quota level. I have proclaimed such action 
for a period of 3 years and 1 day in order to facilitate efforts by the 
domestic industry to make a positive adjustment to import competition.
Specifically, I have established a tariff-rate quota for steel wire rod 
in an amount equal to 1.58 million net tons in the first year (March 1, 
2000 through February 28, 2001), an amount that is equivalent to 1998 
import levels of covered products from the countries subject to the TRQ 
plus 2 percent (to account for growth in demand). The tariff-rate quota 
amount will increase by 2 percent annually in the second and third years 
of relief. I have established increased rates of duty for imports above 
the tariff-rate quota level: namely 10 percent ad valorem in the first 
year of relief, 7.5 percent ad valorem in the second year of relief, and 
5 percent ad valorem in the third year of relief. In addition, I have 
provided that during each quarter of the first three quarters of a quota 
year, any articles subject to the tariff-rate quota entered or withdrawn 
from warehouse for consumption in excess of one-third of the total 
within-quota quantity for that quota year shall be subject to the over-
quota rate of duty then in effect. During the fourth quarter of a quota 
year, the tariff-rate quota shall apply as though the preceding sentence 
did not have effect, except that any imports subject to the over-quota 
duty as a result of the preceding sentence shall not be counted against 
the in-quota quantity for that quota year. In this regard, I instruct 
the Secretary of the Treasury to publish or otherwise make available on 
a weekly basis, import statistics that will enable importers to identify 
the rate at which the in-quota quantity for that quota year, and the 
portion of the in-quota quantity allotted to that quarter, is being 
filled. I further instruct the Secretary of the Treasury to seek to 
obtain by March 1, 2000 statistical subdivisions in the Harmonized 
Tariff Schedule for the excluded products (specified in the Annex to the 
proclamation). The Secretary of the Treasury will monitor imports of the 
excluded products by country of origin and imports the product of Mexico 
and Canada throughout the period of this action, and report to the 
United States Trade Representative on relevant volumes each quarter 
during the period of this action, or more often as needed, or as the 
United States Trade Representative may request.
I have further determined, pursuant to section 312(a) of the NAFTA 
Implementation Act, that imports of steel wire rod produced in Canada 
and Mexico do not account for a substantial share of total steel wire 
rod imports or are not contributing importantly to the serious injury or 
threat of serious injury. Therefore, pursuant to section 312(b) of the 
NAFTA Implementation Act, the safeguard measure will not apply to 
imports of steel wire rod that is the product of Canada or Mexico.
I have determined that the actions described above will facilitate 
efforts by the domestic industry to make a positive adjustment to import 
competition and provide greater economic and social benefits than costs. 
This action will provide the domestic industry with necessary temporary 
relief from increasing import competition, while also assuring our 
trading partners continued access to the United States market.
Pursuant to section 204 of the Trade Act, the USITC will monitor 
developments with respect to the domestic industry, including the 
progress and specific efforts made by workers and firms in the domestic 
industry to

[[Page 353]]

make a positive adjustment to import competition, and will provide to me 
and to the Congress a report on the results of its monitoring no later 
than the date that is the mid-point of the period during which the 
action I have taken under section 203 of that Act is in effect. I 
further instruct the United States Trade Representative to request the 
USITC pursuant to section 332(g) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended 
(19 U.S.C. 1332(g)) to examine the effects of this action on both the 
domestic wire rod industry and the principal users of wire rod in the 
United States, and to report on the results of its investigation in 
conjunction with its report under section 204(a)(2).
The United States Trade Representative is authorized and directed to 
publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 16, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-13 of February 16, 2000

Determination on Eligibility of the Economic Community of West African 
States (ECOWAS) To Be Furnished Defense
Articles and Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act and the Arms 
Export Control Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 503(a) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and section 3(a)(1) of the Arms 
Export Control Act, I hereby find that the furnishing of defense 
articles and services to the Economic Community of West African States 
will strengthen the security of the United States and promote world 
peace.
You are directed to report this determination to the Congress and to 
publish it in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 16, 2000.



Memorandum of February 18, 2000

Action Under Section 203 of the Trade Act of 1974
Concerning Line Pipe

Memorandum for the Secretary of the Treasury [and] the United States 
Trade Representative
On December 22, 1999, the United States International Trade Commission 
(USITC) submitted a report to me that contained: (1) a determination 
pursu

[[Page 354]]

ant to section 202 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade 
Act''), that certain circular welded carbon quality line pipe (line 
pipe) is being imported into the United States in such increased 
quantities as to be a substantial cause of serious injury or threat of 
serious injury to the domestic line pipe industry; and (2) negative 
findings by the USITC pursuant to section 311(a) of the North American 
Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (the ``NAFTA Implementation 
Act'') with respect to imports of line pipe from Canada and Mexico.
After taking into account all relevant considerations, including the 
factors specified in section 203(a)(2) of the Trade Act, I have 
implemented action of a type described in section 203(a)(3) of that Act. 
I have determined that the most appropriate action is an increase in 
duty on imports of certain line pipe. The additional duty will be 19 
percent ad valorem in the first year of relief, declining to 15 and 11 
percent ad valorem in the second and third years, respectively. The 
first 9,000 short tons of imports from each supplying country will be 
exempted from the increase in duty during each year that the action is 
in effect. I have proclaimed such action for a period of 3 years and 1 
day in order to facilitate efforts by the domestic industry to make a 
positive adjustment to import competition.
In this regard, I instruct the Secretary of the Treasury to publish or 
otherwise make available, on a weekly basis, import statistics that will 
enable importers to identify when imports from each supplying country 
approach and then exceed the 9,000 short ton threshold. I further 
instruct the Secretary of the Treasury to establish monitoring 
categories for those countries with American Petroleum Institute 
certified (API-certified) line pipe production facilities. Any 
importations of line pipe from a country without an API-certified line 
pipe production facility should be treated as line pipe subject to this 
action but monitored for possible transshipment. I further instruct the 
Secretary of the Treasury to seek to obtain by March 1, 2000, a 
statistical subdivision in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule for the 
covered products specified in the Annex to the proclamation. The 
Secretary of the Treasury will monitor line pipe imports that are the 
product of Mexico and Canada by country of origin throughout the period 
of this action and report to the United States Trade Representative on 
relevant volumes each quarter during the period of this action, or more 
often as needed, or as the United States Trade Representative may 
request.
I have determined, pursuant to section 312(a) of the NAFTA 
Implementation Act, that imports of line pipe produced in Canada and 
Mexico, considered individually, do not contribute importantly to the 
serious injury, or threat of serious injury. Therefore, pursuant to 
section 312(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act, the safeguard measure 
will not apply to imports of line pipe that is the product of Canada or 
Mexico.
I have determined that the actions described above will facilitate 
efforts by the domestic industry to make a positive adjustment to import 
competition and provide greater economic and social benefits than costs. 
This action will provide the domestic industry with necessary temporary 
relief from increasing import competition, while also assuring our 
trading partners continued access to the U.S. market.
Pursuant to section 204 of the Trade Act, the USITC will monitor 
developments with respect to the domestic industry, including the 
progress and specific efforts made by workers and firms in the domestic 
industry to

[[Page 355]]

make a positive adjustment to import competition, and will provide to me 
and to the Congress a report on the results of its monitoring no later 
than the date that is the mid-point of the period during which the 
action I have taken under section 203 of that Act is in effect. I 
further instruct the United States Trade Representative to request the 
USITC pursuant to section 332(g) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended 
(19 U.S.C. 1332(g)), to examine the effects of this action on both the 
domestic line pipe industry and the principal users of line pipe in the 
United States, and to report on the results of its investigation in 
conjunction with its report under section 204(a)(2).
The United States Trade Representative is authorized and directed to 
publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 18, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-14 of February 18, 2000

Vietnamese Cooperation in Accounting for United States
Prisoners of War and Missing in Action (POW/MIA)

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
As provided under section 610 of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000, 
as contained in the Consolidated Appropriations Act for FY 2000 (Public 
Law 106-113), I hereby determine, based on all information available to 
the United States Government, that the Government of the Socialist 
Republic of Vietnam is fully cooperating in good faith with the United 
States in the following four areas related to achieving the fullest 
possible accounting for Americans unaccounted for as a result of the 
Vietnam War:

1) resolving discrepancy cases, live sightings, and field activities;

2) recovering and repatriating American remains;

3) accelerating efforts to provide documents that will help lead to the 
fullest possible accounting of POW/MIAs; and,

4) providing further assistance in implementing trilateral investigations 
with Laos.

I further determine that the appropriate laboratories associated with 
POW/MIA accounting are thoroughly analyzing remains, material, and other 
information and fulfilling their responsibilities as set forth in 
subsection (B) of section 609 of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999, 
as contained in the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 1999 (Public Law 105-277), and information 
pertaining to this accounting is being made available to immediate 
family members in compliance with 50 U.S.C. 435 note.

[[Page 356]]

I have been advised by the Department of Justice and believe that 
section 610 is unconstitutional because it purports to use a condition 
on appropriations as a means to direct my execution of responsibilities 
that the Constitution commits exclusively to the President. I am 
providing this determination as a matter of comity, while reserving the 
position that the condition enacted in section 610 is unconstitutional.
In making this determination, I have taken into account all information 
available to the U.S. Government as reported to me, the full range of 
ongoing accounting activities in Vietnam, including joint and unilateral 
Vietnamese efforts, and the concrete results we have attained as a 
result. Finally, in making this determination, I wish to reaffirm my 
continuing personal commitment to the entire POW/MIA community, 
especially to the immediate families, relatives, friends, and supporters 
of these brave individuals, and to reconfirm that the central, guiding 
principle of my Vietnam policy is to achieve the fullest possible 
accounting of our prisoners of war and missing in action.
You are authorized and directed to report this determination to the 
appropriate committees of the Congress and to publish it in the Federal 
Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 18, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-15 of February 24, 2000

U.S. Contribution to the Korean Peninsula Energy Development 
Organization (KEDO): Certification and Waiver Under the Heading 
``Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related Programs'' in 
Title II of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related 
Programs Appropriations Act, 2000, as Enacted in Public Law 106-113

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to section 576(b) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, 
and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2000 (the Act), as enacted in 
the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public Law 106-113), 
I hereby certify that:

(1) the parties to the Agreed Framework have taken and continue to take 
demonstrable steps to implement the Joint Declaration on Denuclearization 
of the Korean Peninsula in which the Government of North Korea has 
committed not to test, manufacture, produce, receive, possess, store, 
deploy, or use nuclear weapons, and not to possess nuclear reprocessing or 
uranium enrichment facilities;

(2) the parties to the Agreed Framework have taken and continue to take 
demonstrable steps to pursue the North-South dialogue; and

(3) North Korea is complying with all provisions of the Agreed Framework.

[[Page 357]]

Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 576(d) of the Act, I 
hereby determine that it is vital to the national security interests of 
the United States to furnish up to $15 million in funds made available 
under the heading ``Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and 
Related Programs'' of the Act, for assistance for KEDO, and therefore I 
hereby waive the requirement in section 576(b) to certify that:

(4) North Korea has not diverted assistance provided by the United States 
for purposes for which it was not intended; and

(5) North Korea is not seeking to develop or acquire the capability to 
enrich uranium, or any additional capability to reprocess spent nuclear 
fuel.

You are hereby authorized and directed to report this certification and 
waiver to the Congress and to arrange for its publication in the Federal 
Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 24, 2000.



Notice of February 25, 2000

Continuation of the National Emergency Relating to Cuba and of the 
Emergency Authority Relating to the Regulation of the Anchorage and 
Movement of Vessels

On March 1, 1996, by Proclamation 6867, I declared a national emergency 
to address the disturbance or threatened disturbance of international 
relations caused by the February 24, 1996, destruction by the Government 
of Cuba of two unarmed U.S.-registered civilian aircraft in 
international airspace north of Cuba. In July 1996 and on subsequent 
occasions, the Government of Cuba stated its intent to forcefully defend 
its sovereignty against any U.S.-registered vessels or aircraft that 
might enter Cuban territorial waters or airspace while involved in a 
memorial flotilla and peaceful protest. Since these events, the 
Government of Cuba has not demonstrated that it will refrain from the 
future use of reckless and excessive force against U.S. vessels or 
aircraft that may engage in memorial activities or peaceful protest 
north of Cuba. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the 
National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing the 
national emergency with respect to Cuba and the emergency authority 
relating to the regulation of the anchorage and movement of vessels set 
out in Proclamation 6867.
This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and transmitted 
to the Congress.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
     February 25, 2000.

[[Page 358]]




Presidential Determination No. 2000-16 of February 29, 2000

Presidential Determination on Major Illicit Drug Producing and Drug 
Transit Countries

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 490(b)(1)(A) of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (the ``Act''), I hereby 
determine and certify that the following major illicit drug producing 
and/or major illicit drug transit countries (and certain jurisdictions) 
have cooperated fully with the United States, or have taken adequate 
steps on their own, to achieve full compliance with the goals and 
objectives of the 1988 United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic 
in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances:

The Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, 
Guatemala, Hong Kong, India, Jamaica, Laos, Mexico, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, 
Taiwan, Thailand, Venezuela, and Vietnam.

By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 490(b)(1)(B) of the 
Act, I hereby determine that it is in the vital national interests of 
the United States to certify the following major illicit drug producing 
and/or major illicit drug transit countries:

Cambodia, Haiti, Nigeria, and Paraguay.

I have determined that the following major illicit drug producing and/or 
major illicit drug transit countries do not meet the standards set forth 
in section 490(b) for certification:

Afghanistan, Burma.

In making these determinations, I have considered the factors set forth 
in section 490 of the Act, based on the information contained in the 
International Narcotics Control Strategy Report of 2000. Analysis of the 
relevant U.S. vital national interests, as required under section 
490(b)(3) of the Act in the case of the countries certified on this 
basis, is attached. Given that the performance of all of these 
countries/jurisdictions has differed, I have also attached an 
explanatory statement for each of the other countries/jurisdictions 
subject to this determination.
You are hereby authorized and directed to publish this determination in 
the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, February 29, 2000.


Statements of Explanation
    Afghanistan
    In 1999 Afghanistan cultivated a larger opium poppy crop and 
harvested more opium gum than any other country by a wide margin. U.S. 
sources estimate a 23 percent increase in the opium harvest, while 
United Nations Drug Control Program (UNDCP) data point to a more 
dramatic 70 percent

[[Page 359]]

increase. There were also increases in the refining of opium into heroin 
and in drug trafficking from Afghanistan into neighboring countries. The 
largest of Afghanistan's factions, the Taliban, which controls 85-90 
percent of Afghanistan and 97 percent of the area where opium is 
cultivated, derives significant income from every phase of drug 
production and trafficking. In spite of its own 1997 ban on the 
cultivation of opium poppy, the Taliban acknowledge they tax the crop at 
about 10 percent, and allow it to be sold in open bazaars. Crop taxation 
imparts legitimacy to opium cultivation and distribution, and means that 
the Taliban benefits directly from the entire opium business. The 
Taliban also receives payments directly from traffickers.
    The United States Government (USG) has spoken about the drug problem 
directly with Taliban officials and indirectly through the UNDCP. We 
have repeatedly urged the Taliban to enforce its 1997 ban on opium poppy 
cultivation. The Taliban response was at least a 23 percent increase in 
opium production over 1998. We also urged the Taliban to honor its 
commitments to reduce poppy cultivation in exchange for the delivery of 
alternative development assistance. But in a Non-Governmental 
Organization (NGO) project area receiving generous USG funding, poppy 
cultivation surged 68 percent, according to a UNDCP survey. Heroin labs 
are proliferating throughout Afghanistan, particularly near 
international borders.
    The Taliban claims success for some counter-drug measures. According 
to the UNDCP, the Taliban destroyed 34 drug laboratories. The Taliban 
also has made unverified claims of seizures of 500 kg of opium, 70 kg of 
heroin, and 1200 liters of acetic anhydride and other heroin production 
chemicals. The Taliban Leader, Mullah Omar, who promulgated the 1997 ban 
on opium cultivation, ordered a one-third nation-wide reduction in poppy 
cultivation for the 1999-2000 growing season but, as noted, past 
commitments were not honored.
    Overall, there was a sharp increase in poppy cultivation, in 
refining of opium into heroin, and in trafficking of illicit opiates in 
Afghanistan. There is a growing body of evidence that the largest of 
Afghanistan's factions, the Taliban, is fully complicit in every phase 
of drug production and trafficking. Sharp increases in large-scale opium 
cultivation and trafficking in Afghanistan, plus the failure of the 
authorities to initiate an appropriate law enforcement response, 
preclude a determination that Afghanistan has taken adequate steps on 
its own or that it has sufficiently cooperated with USG counter-drug 
efforts to meet the goals and objectives of the UN 1988 Drug Convention, 
to which Afghanistan is a party. In the absence of verifiable and 
unambiguous steps by the Taliban to stop the promotion of poppy 
cultivation (such as an end to the opium crop tax), the United States 
and other concerned countries are compelled to redirect their counter-
drug efforts to interdiction and border control strategies in 
surrounding countries.
    The Bahamas
    The Bahamas is a major transit country for drugs en route to the 
United States from South America and the Caribbean. The Government of 
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas (GCOB) and the USG continue to enjoy a 
productive counter-drug working relationship.
    The Bahamas is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention, and the GCOB 
works to meet its goals and objectives as well as those of U.S.-Bahamas 
bi

[[Page 360]]

lateral drug control agreements. The GCOB places a high priority on 
combating drug transshipments through its archipelago and works closely 
with the USG on Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (OPBAT). The USG 
looks forward to assisting The Bahamas to improve its maritime end-game 
capability, without which sustained drug interdiction, arrest and 
conviction of traffickers, and the forfeiting of their assets is 
improbable. Given the volume of commercial shipping through The Bahamas, 
the GCOB needs to rigorously implement its chemical control laws to 
prevent illegal diversion of precursor and essential chemicals.
    Bahamian authorities continue monitoring bank compliance and 
investigating suspicious financial transactions under the 1996 money 
laundering law. Increased supervision of the offshore banking sector and 
training of all financial sector employees, however, will be necessary 
in order to increase the number of suspicious activity reports, which is 
still very small given the size of The Bahamas financial services 
sector. Despite several public statements of commitment, the GCOB has 
not established a financial intelligence unit (FIU) or to seek 
membership in the Egmont Group. In 1999, the GCOB passed legislation 
which allows designation of the United States under Bahamian asset 
forfeiture laws, based on reciprocity. This will allow Bahamian courts 
to enforce U.S. forfeiture orders in many cases.
    The GCOB took further steps in 1999 to strengthen its judicial 
system, with USG assistance. Despite these efforts, no major Bahamian 
drug trafficker has been convicted in The Bahamas and sent to prison, 
due largely to continuing delays in the courts. In addition, weak bail 
laws allow arrested drug traffickers to obtain bail and continue 
transshipping drugs while awaiting trail. Notwithstanding committed and 
talented judicial leadership, The Bahamas needs to improve the 
effectiveness of its court system and its Attorney General's office in 
gaining convictions against major drug traffickers. The Bahamas also 
needs to improve its responsiveness to U.S. requests under the mutual 
legal assistance treaty (MLAT) and to speed the processing of 
extradition cases.
    In October 1999, for the first time in recent history, a Bahamian 
law enforcement official was assassinated, allegedly by Bahamian drug 
dealers in retaliation for his stand against a corrupt official or to 
prevent his testimony. The GCOB should ratify the Inter-American 
Convention against Corruption and assure that corrupt public officials 
are effectively prosecuted. Finally, the GCOB needs to move quickly to 
complete and adopt a comprehensive national drug strategy containing 
goals and objectives as well as measures of effectiveness.
    Bolivia
    Exceeding the schedule of its own five year plan to eliminate all 
illicit coca from Bolivia, in 1999 the Banzer administration eradicated 
an unprecedented 16,999 hectares of coca, for a net reduction of 43 
percent.
    Although Bolivia remains the world's third largest producer of 
cocaine, with the ability to produce a potential 70 metric tons, 
Bolivian cocaine became less marketable in 1999 due to a very successful 
law enforcement effort to prevent precursor chemicals from being 
smuggled in from neighboring countries. As a result of significant law 
enforcement pressure, Bolivian cocaine producers were forced to use less 
efficient means of processing with substitute or recycled chemicals, and 
cutting agents, such as manitol. The purity of finished Bolivian cocaine 
hydrochloride (HCl) dropped to as

[[Page 361]]

low as 47 percent, causing Brazilian and other traffickers to buy only 
Bolivian cocaine base and finish the processing in Brazil.
    The GOB began preparations for an eradication program in the Yungas 
in 2000 to eliminate the coca exceeding the legally allowable 12,000 
hectares. There is evidence that Yungas coca is being diverted to the 
illicit market for conversion to cocaine products.
    Despite a slight downturn in the Bolivian export sector in 1999, 
export volumes of nearly all alternative development crops improved. 
Banana exports to Chile and Argentina increased 20 percent over 1998. 
Demand for alternative development assistance by former coca farmers, 
however, is exceeding supply.
    In 1999, the Bolivian legislature enacted the final portion of the 
judicial reform package, the new code of criminal procedures. It 
establishes an accusatory, adversarial, oral, public criminal trial 
system that may also help to diminish corruption and improve the 
credibility of the judicial system. The new code permits the police to 
use undercover agents and to make controlled deliveries of illicit drugs 
and other contraband. The Judicial Council, created in 1998 to 
depoliticize the selection of judges and to serve as a mechanism for 
disciplining members of the judiciary, had some of its powers to 
administratively remove corrupt judges diminished by the Constitutional 
Tribunal, which ruled that members of the judiciary can only be removed 
subsequent to a final judgement by a criminal court.
    For the third year since the passage of the anti-money laundering 
law, no action was taken against money laundering. The legal ambiguities 
regarding asset seizure and forfeiture have not been resolved, and the 
system remains inefficient.
    Brazil
    Brazil is a significant transit country for illicit drugs en route 
to the United States, and a major producer of precursor chemicals and 
synthetic drugs. Since taking office in 1995, the administration of 
President Fernando Enrique Cardoso has demonstrated a firm commitment to 
countering the flow of illegal drugs through Brazilian territory, and to 
establishing an effective law enforcement infrastructure capable of 
taking action against the domestic and international criminal syndicates 
engaged in drug trafficking. In 1999, the Government of Brazil (GOB) 
worked closely with regional neighbors and U.S. law enforcement agencies 
in pursuit of mutual counter-drug objectives, achieving particularly 
impressive results against corruption and money laundering.
    The most visible initiative in 1999 was the formation in April of 
the Congressional Panel of Inquiry (CPI) on drug trafficking. The 
Panel's high-profile investigations into the country's organized drug 
networks have led to over 115 arrests, including many tainted government 
officials. Through its actions, the CPI has illustrated the drug trade's 
corrosive effect on public institutions and energized previously 
isolated voices against corruption and trafficker impunity.
    Criminal interests have long exploited Brazil's highly developed 
financial sector, particularly as a haven for illicit-drug profits. In 
1999 the GOB demonstrated a firm commitment to fighting the problem of 
money laundering, and implemented regulations to increase the 
effectiveness of Brazil's anti-money laundering regime. The Brazilian 
Central Bank created a

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special internal agency to trace money laundering, and Brazil joined the 
Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and the Egmont Group, two 
international bodies charged with improving anti-money laundering 
efforts.
    Brazilian authorities seized more cocaine in 1999 than in 1998, and 
cannabis seizures increased by six-fold. As in past years, Brazilian 
authorities identified no opium or coca production in 1999. The GOB 
acted vigorously against cannabis production in the country's northeast, 
eradicating over three times as many hectares as in 1998.
    Burma
    Burma is the world's second largest source of illicit opium and 
heroin, exceeded only by Afghanistan, and currently accounts for 
approximately 80 percent of the total production of Southeast Asian 
opium. Largely due to severe drought conditions in poppy growing areas, 
production and cultivation continued to decline significantly in 1999 
for the third year in a row. In 1999 there were an estimated 89,500 
hectares under opium poppy cultivation, down 31 percent from 1998. This 
hectarage yielded a maximum of 1,090 metric tons of opium gum, 38 
percent lower than in 1998 and less than half the average production 
during the last decade. The Government of Burma (GOB) maintained most of 
its opium crop-eradication efforts and expanded the program to an 
additional 9,800 acres.
    Seizures of methamphetamine in 1999 exceeded 1998's record figures, 
although opium and heroin seizures were well below 1998 levels. Burma 
made its first airport seizures of illicit drugs in 1999. While there 
were cases of drug interdiction and arrests of members of some cease-
fire groups for drug trafficking, the GOB has been unwilling or unable 
to take on the most powerful groups directly. Cease-fire agreements with 
insurgent ethnic groups dependent on the drug trade implicitly tolerate 
continued involvement in drug trafficking for varying periods of time. 
The ethnic armies, such as the United Wa State Army and the Myanmar 
National Democratic Alliance Army, remain armed and heavily involved in 
the heroin trade.
    The GOB expressed support for eradication efforts, crop 
substitution, and development assistance, but allocated few resources to 
such projects. GOB policy is to force the leaders in the ethnic areas to 
spend their own revenues, including from the drug trade, on social and 
physical infrastructure. The approach limits the GOB's ability to 
continue or expand its counter-drug efforts.
    Burma's 1993 Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law conforms 
to the 1988 UN Drug Convention and contains useful legal tools for 
addressing money laundering, seizing drug-related assets, and 
prosecuting drug conspiracy cases. GOB officials, claiming they lack 
sufficient expertise, have been slow to implement the law, targeting 
few, if any, major traffickers and their drug-related assets. Money 
laundering in Burma and the return of drug profits laundered elsewhere 
are thought to be significant factors in the overall Burmese economy, 
although the extent of this problem is impossible to measure accurately. 
The cease-fire agreements condone money laundering, as the government 
encouraged these groups to invest in ``legitimate'' businesses as an 
alternative to trafficking, thus extending to them the opportunity to 
sanitize past illicit proceeds with investments in hotels and 
construction companies, for example.

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    The Burmese continued to refuse to render drug lord Chang Qifu on 
grounds that he had not violated his 1996 surrender agreement. The 1988 
UN Drug convention obligates parties, including Burma, to prosecute such 
traffickers.
    The GOB's counter-drug efforts in 1999 showed progress in a number 
of areas: methamphetamine and ephedrine seizures increased; crop 
eradication continued with modest expansion; anti-drug forces conducted 
more vigorous law-enforcement efforts; and members of some cease-fire 
groups were arrested for drug trafficking. Such efforts must be stepped 
up, however, if they are to have a significant impact on the overall 
trafficking problem.
    On balance, the USG remains concerned that Burma's efforts are not 
commensurate with the extent of the drug problem within its borders. 
Large-scale poppy cultivation and opium production continue, decreasing 
in the last few years largely because of severe drought conditions 
rather than eradication programs. The GOB's effective toleration of 
money laundering, its unwillingness to implement its drug laws, and its 
failure to render notorious traffickers under indictment in the United 
States all continue to be serious concerns.
    Cambodia
    In view of Cambodia's geographic location and general state of 
lawlessness, it is likely that drugs transited Cambodia en route the 
West, including the United States. For that reason, Cambodia was 
designated a major drug transit country in 1999. Political turmoil in 
Cambodia has effectively precluded a fully credible anti-drug effort for 
the last two years. Although Cambodia has taken some positive steps to 
improve drug enforcement in 1999, these steps were insufficient to 
qualify for full certification.
    Steps forward included increased emphasis on eradication of illicit 
marijuana plantations. Prime Minister Hun Sen and others have publicly 
threatened provincial governors with dismissal if they tolerate 
marijuana cultivation. At least one large (160 hectare, or about 400 
acre) plantation was eradicated as the deadline for certification 
approached. There were also several first-time drug seizures at Phnom 
Penh's international airport. The President and the Chief Prosecutor of 
the Phnom Penh Municipal Court were removed for corruption; other judges 
are under investigation. A police commander, suspected of dealing in 
illicit drugs was removed, and Cambodia reorganized a supervisory 
coordinating agency called the National Drug Policy Board, replacing 
officials generally viewed as ineffective with more respected officials. 
High level government officials made statements emphasizing their 
opposition to synthetic drug production in Cambodia, and pressed efforts 
to confiscate unauthorized weapons, both positive steps in countering a 
drift towards lawlessness. Cooperation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement 
Administration (DEA) was excellent.
    Corruption remains an endemic problem in Cambodia, however, and this 
problem adversely affects drug law enforcement. Poorly paid and ill-
trained police and judicial officials have frequently looked the other 
way in drug and other criminal cases. Cambodia remains a refuge for 
criminal elements because enforcement is ineffective and corrupt 
officials can be paid to release those that may be apprehended. The 
combination of incompetence and venality, even at high levels in 
government and the police, pose an ongoing challenge to improved drug 
law enforcement. In short, there has been

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no fundamental institutional reform to meet the law enforcement 
challenge Cambodia faces from drug traffickers and other lawless 
elements. Thus, despite some improvements, Cambodia still failed to meet 
the legal standards for full certification.
    A vital national interests certification is necessary this year in 
order to protect U.S. vital national interests in Cambodia, including 
promoting democracy in Cambodia and stability in the region. Democracy 
in Cambodia is not yet firmly established. The democratically-elected 
coalition government, which came to power in Cambodia last year 
continues to face enormous challenges on all fronts, including the 
formation of an international tribunal to try former leaders of the 
Khmer Rouge. Cambodia also remains vulnerable to drug trafficking and 
other crime upsurges. Should counter-drug sanctions be imposed, it would 
not be possible for the United States to provide strategically-placed 
assistance to respond to potential crises or to strengthen Cambodia's 
economic and institutional bases for a democratic system. On balance, 
the risks to U.S. interests in promoting democracy and stability in the 
region if counter-drug sanctions were imposed would outweigh the risks 
posed by Cambodia's failure to fully implement effective drug control.
    Colombia
    Colombia remains the world's largest cocaine producer: over three-
quarters of the world's cocaine hydrochloride is processed in Colombia. 
Still, Colombia met the certification criteria in 1999 due to important 
strides made in combating illicit drugs and its full cooperation with 
USG counter-drug efforts. The Pastrana administration has demonstrated a 
clear commitment to combating the illegal drug industry in Colombia. 
That commitment led to a number of very concrete achievements in 1999.
    In September, the Government of Colombia (GOC) unveiled its ``Plan 
Colombia,'' a comprehensive strategy to address the many interrelated 
challenges facing the country. The USG supports the work of the GOC in 
formulating and beginning to implement this comprehensive strategy. 
Importantly, both ``Plan Colombia'' and the Pastrana administration's 
National Drug Control Strategy couple alternative development with 
aerial eradication of illicit crops.
    Colombian authorities continued to cooperate with the USG on a 
variety of specific projects. In October, Operation Millennium, a 
coordinated operation among Colombian, Mexican and U.S. law enforcement 
agencies, resulted in the arrest of more than 30 suspects.
    The Colombian National Police (CNP) continued its outstanding 
counter-drug tradition. The CNP received increased support from the 
Colombian armed services and is poised to begin joint operations in 
southern Colombia with the army's first special counter-drug battalion. 
Such joint operations are vital for the future of the program due to the 
threat to counter-drug operations from heavily armed traffickers and 
other illegal armed groups that are involved in many aspects of drug 
trafficking.
    The GOC made particularly strong advances in combating maritime 
trafficking. A port security program is now operating in all of the 
nation's major ports, and in the past year resulted in the seizure of 16 
metric tons of cocaine. In September, a standing interdiction operations 
plan was signed to augment an existing maritime agreement, leading to 
three U.S.-

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Colombian combined maritime interdiction patrols. Also in September, 
U.S. and Colombian authorities reached an accommodation concerning the 
volume of evidence required by Colombian prosecutors and other 
evidentiary concerns.
    GOC efforts have also focused on drug trafficking by air. The 
percentage of successful Colombian Air Force (FAC) interdiction attempts 
has increased from 25 percent in 1997 to nearly 40 percent in 1999. At 
the same time, the number of suspicious aircraft which radar has 
detected flying to or from Colombia has fallen from 231 in 1997 to fewer 
than 100 in 1999. The CNP's civil aviation registration program 
inspected 343 aircraft in 1999, seizing 50 of these for violations.
    The aerial eradication program succeeded in treating more than 
50,000 hectares of illicit crops in 1999, although totals were less than 
last year's record level. The CNP also had a strong year in terms of 
seizures, totaling 30 metric tons of cocaine hydrochloride and base, 140 
metric tons of coca leaf, and 644 kilos of heroin, morphine and opium.
    The level of cooperation between the Colombian military and police 
continued to improve in 1999. Information sharing advanced to a higher 
level with the inclusion of both military and CNP personnel at the Joint 
Intelligence Center (JIC), while interdiction and eradication efforts 
both received a boost with the creation of the new counter-drug 
battalion. Created to work hand-in-glove with the CNP's anti-drug units, 
the battalion will provide the police with needed support as operations 
move into high-risk, coca-rich areas such as Putumayo Department.
    In November, the GOC extradited alleged heroin trafficker Jaime 
Orlando Lara Nausa, the first Colombian citizen extradited to the United 
States in nine years. Behind the very public leadership of President 
Pastrana, Colombian officials proceeded despite drug traffickers' 
attempted legal roadblocks and bombings possibly linked to the 
extraditions. This commitment demonstrated the GOC's willingness to send 
drug traffickers to justice in the United States regardless of 
citizenship.
    GOC officials also enacted important institutional changes in 1999. 
The National Judicial Police Council adopted a unified training 
curriculum and made it mandatory for all Colombian investigators after 
January 2000. For the first time, all Colombian law enforcement 
investigators will receive the same training.
    Overall, Colombian counter-drug efforts continued to improve in 
1999, demonstrating the true commitment of the Pastrana administration 
to cooperate fully with the United States in combating the illegal 
traffic in drugs.
    Dominican Republic
    The Dominican Republic is a significant transit country for South 
American drugs, mostly cocaine, moving to the United States. Drugs are 
transported into the Dominican Republic by air, sea, and across the land 
border with Haiti. They are then moved onward by air and sea to Puerto 
Rico and mainland United States.
    During 1999, the Government of the Dominican Republic (GODR) 
continued to cooperate fully with the USG on counter-drug goals and 
objectives.

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    The GODR extradited nine Dominicans to the United States in 1999, 
and kept several other fugitives in custody awaiting decisions on 
extradition requests. The National Drug Council (CND) drafted a National 
Drug Strategy. A group of private attorneys energetically promoted the 
passage of a newly drafted anti-money laundering bill modeled on current 
Organization of American States (OAS) standards. The GODR began the 
process of developing an anti-corruption bill. The draft strategy and 
both bills are scheduled for submission to congress in 2000.
    A ministerial-level bilateral meeting with Haiti achieved historic 
border control accords, which were subsequently approved at the highest 
levels of the GODR. In 1999, the GODR activated a fourth border control 
unit, deployed its drug detection dog unit to the Haitian border, and 
took steps to double the size of the dog unit in 2000.
    Dominican forces participated in combined operations under the 
bilateral Maritime Counter-drug Interdiction Agreement. The GODR 
extended for one-year temporary overflight authority for USG anti-drug 
aircraft and vessels. In cooperation with the U.S. military, the 
Dominican Navy and Army engaged in joint counter-drug exercises.
    The National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD) worked closely with its 
counterpart, the DEA, on drug, fugitive, and special investigations, 
drug operations, and border interdiction during 1999. DNCD has begun to 
require its special unit personnel to take polygraphs, and has also 
initiated pre-employment and periodic random drug testing for its 
employees.
    For the first time, the GODR authorized wiretaps for use in drug 
prosecutions. It also arrested and jailed on passport fraud charges the 
top money manager for the Coneo family, the dominant Colombian drug 
trafficking organization operating on Hispaniola.
    We will continue to encourage the Dominican Republic to regularize 
its extradition process. GODR should also: act on a pending amendment to 
enhance the bilateral maritime agreement; increase cocaine seizures, 
which amounted to less than half the amount seized in 1998; and 
strengthen its weak judicial system, which continues to hamper law 
enforcement efforts.
    Ecuador
    Ecuador continues to serve as a major transit route for cocaine 
destined for the United States, and for precursor chemicals destined for 
drug processing labs in Colombia and Peru. Despite suffering under the 
effects of the country's worst economic crisis in seventy years, the 
Government of Ecuador (GOE) pursued an active counter-drug agenda in 
1999 to considerable effect, and cooperation between the GOE and the USG 
was excellent.
    The Ecuadorian National Police (ENP) seized a record 10 metric tons 
of cocaine and coca base in 1999, more than doubling 1998's total of 3.9 
metric tons. Heroin seizures also increased significantly, from 58 
kilograms in 1998 to 81 kilograms in 1999. The ENP also seized a record 
amount of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and other precursor chemicals.
    Along with these tactical successes, the GOE implemented structural 
reforms to their judicial system and law enforcement agencies that have 
the potential to enhance the country's law enforcement infrastructure. A 
unified anti-drug division was established within the ENP, consolidating 
various specialized interdiction units into a coherent organization for 
the first

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time. The customs service was privatized to maximize efficiency and 
bolster interdiction efforts. In November 1999, the Ecuadorian Congress 
passed a new criminal procedural code, intended to alter the country's 
criminal justice system from a secretive, inquisitorial to an open, 
accusatorial system similar to the U.S. model. In addition, the GOE 
published a five-year counter-drug strategy which clearly identifies the 
roles and responsibilities of relevant GOE agencies in the fight against 
international drug trafficking.
    The GOE also increased its commitment to regional interdiction 
efforts, most visibly in November 1999 when the GOE and the USG 
completed a 10-year agreement permitting U.S. regional counter-drug 
detection and monitoring missions to operate from an Ecuadorian air 
force base in Manta. The GOE also completed a Joint Information 
Coordination Center (JICC) in Guayaquil, and plans to integrate this 
center with the national anti-drug division headquarters.
    Guatemala
    In 1999, President Arzu continued to implement the peace accords 
that ended 36 years of internal conflict. Government of Guatemala (GOG) 
efforts are now focused on combating violent crime, organized crime and 
other domestic problems. The GOG fully cooperated with the United States 
in combating counter-drug trafficking in Guatemala and elsewhere in the 
region. Guatemala has taken steps to implement, at the operational 
level, the provisions of the 1988 UN Drug convention. However, 
legislative support for ratification of a full maritime counter-drug 
agreement and adoption of money laundering legislation has not yet been 
obtained.
    Guatemala's location, scarce law enforcement resources, and a weak 
judiciary and penal system permitted its continued use by traffickers as 
a transshipment and storage point for cocaine destined for the United 
States via Mexico. Along with increased use of motor vehicle and 
container shipments, there has been an increase in airdrops of illicit 
drugs over Guatemalan territory for consolidation and transshipment. 
With USG assistance, the Department of Anti-Narcotics Police (DOAN) has 
stepped up training to develop air interdiction and related 
capabilities. The expanding self-funded port security program and the 
trained DOAN agents have made impressive seizures in the past year.
    The consolidation of the National Civilian Police (PNC) continues on 
track with full integration of the DOAN. The USG-trained DOAN seized 
over 10 metric tons of cocaine in 1999. This year the drug prosecutor 
assistance program maintained its 90 percent conviction rate, with some 
traffickers receiving sentences of up to 20 years. Somewhat disturbing, 
however, were several cases in which judges released suspected drug 
traffickers on questionable grounds. The new drug prosecutor's field 
office opened this year in Quetzaltenango accounted for 110 successful 
prosecutions in 1999.
    Guatemala is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention, and most GOG 
law enforcement activities are fully consistent with its goals and 
objectives. However, some of the convention's provisions have not been 
codified into law and regulations, including provisions on extradition 
and money laundering. The GOG does not encourage or facilitate illicit 
production or distribution of illicit drugs or controlled substances.

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    In 1999 the GOG began implementation of its national drug policy, 
the anti-drug master plan and national strategy which incorporates both 
demand and supply reduction objectives to be accomplished by specified 
ministries. The GOG provided additional funding to the plan's 
implementers to attack the alarming increase in drug abuse documented 
last year. The GOG also took major steps in implementing assets seizure 
and precursor chemicals regulations.
    Haiti
    Haiti is a significant transshipment point for drugs, primarily 
cocaine, moving through the Caribbean from South America to the United 
States. The USG cannot certify Haiti as having fully cooperated with the 
United States on drug control, or as having taken adequate steps on its 
own, to meet the goals and objectives of the 1988 UN Drug Convention, to 
which Haiti is a party. However, U.S. vital national interests require 
that foreign assistance continue to be provided to Haiti.
    The USG recognizes that because Haiti had no Parliament during 1999, 
no legislation could be enacted or international agreements ratified. 
However, Haiti failed to make sufficient progress on many anti-drug 
objectives that did not require parliamentary action, but only 
implementation by the Government of Haiti (GOH). The GOH failed to: 
draft or update any pending anti-money laundering or anti-corruption 
legislation; revise and implement the draft national drug control 
strategy; create mechanisms to enforce standards of conduct and 
liabilities for GOH officials in accordance with the Declaration of 
Principles signed by Haiti at the 1997 Bridgetown Summit; vigorously 
investigate and prosecute drug-related corruption involving GOH 
officials; resolve and report on the ``450 kilo affair'' in which 
policemen were allegedly involved in the 1998 theft of a large cocaine 
shipment; set up a special financial analysis unit to combat money 
laundering; and join the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF).
    Haiti also failed to make sufficient progress in the area of law 
enforcement. Part of its overall lack of success in this area is due to 
Haiti's inadequate judicial system; the still limited capabilities of 
the five-year-old Haitian National Police (HNP); and the inexperience of 
the three-year-old police anti-drug unit (BLTS). In addition, the HNP 
currently does not have the ability to intercept drug airdrops. The GOH 
failed to increase its drug seizure rate over 1998's performance; the 
amount of cocaine seized in 1999 was one-third that of 1998, although 
the estimated flow of cocaine increased by nearly one-quarter. The GOH 
also failed to double the size of the BLTS as planned, or to enforce 
interagency cooperation between the HNP and the customs and immigration 
services. This lack of cooperation continues to impede counter-drug 
efforts inside the customs control areas at the airport and other ports 
of entry in Haiti.
    GOH's international cooperation in 1999 was significant, including 
ongoing implementation of the 1997 U.S.-Haiti maritime counter-drug 
interdiction agreement even though parliamentary action to bring the 
agreement into force has not yet been accomplished. GOH cooperated with 
several international counter-drug operations, one of which resulted in 
the arrest and expulsion from Haiti of two key members of a major 
international drug operation. Haitian authorities also continued to work 
with their counter-drug counterparts in the Dominican Republic to stem 
the flow of illicit drugs over the land border.

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    U.S. vital national interests require that Haiti be certified. A 
cutoff of bilateral assistance mandated by denial of certification would 
threaten security and democratic stability in Haiti, both of which bear 
immediately and directly on U.S. ability to disrupt the flow of both 
illicit drugs and undocumented Haitian migrants into the United States. 
A cutoff would require termination of important USG initiatives, 
including programs targeting electoral support, police development, 
economic growth, education, social stability, hunger and environmental 
degradation. These programs attack the roots of Haitian poverty and 
hopelessness, chief catalysts for Haitian involvement in the drug trade 
and illegal immigration into the United States. The programs also 
address the underlying problems in the Haitian law enforcement and 
judicial system, especially endemic corruption and the lack of a strong 
professional tradition, both of which contribute to weak counter-drug 
performance. If critical U.S. aid is withdrawn, and U.S. support for the 
electoral process and public security is curtailed, assistance to 
illicit traffickers of drugs and migrants will be an unintended 
consequence.
    The risks posed to U.S. vital national interests by a cutoff of 
bilateral assistance outweigh the risks posed by Haiti's failure to 
cooperate fully with the USG, or to take adequate steps on its own, to 
combat the illicit drugs. Accordingly, Haiti is granted a vital national 
interests certification.
    Hong Kong
    Although the USG continued to view Hong Kong as a major drug transit 
center in 1999 because of its location and developed infrastructure, 
Hong Kong's role as a major transit/staging area for the shipment of 
heroin and methamphetamine to the United States appears to have 
diminished over the last three years.
    In 1999 Hong Kong continued its exemplary efforts to stop illicit 
drugs from being trafficked across its border with China and through its 
port. Through October 1999, Hong Kong officials seized 205 kilograms of 
heroin (nearly the amount seized in all of 1998), 35.8 kilograms of 
cannabis, 16.7 kilograms of cocaine, and 9,811 kilograms of 
methamphetamine. In the same period, 7,620 individuals were arrested for 
drug-related offenses. Drug-detection capabilities were enhanced in 
several important areas: the number of drug-sniffing dogs at the border 
and airport increased from 124 to 133; and high-tech equipment was 
procured to detect illicit drugs in packages, facilitate the inspection 
of baggage and cargo, and use in clearing air and sea cargo.
    With respect to precursor chemicals, Hong Kong amended legislation 
to tighten control of the transshipment, removal, and storage of 
potassium permanganate and to require a license from the Commissioner of 
Customs and Excise before potassium permanganate can be imported, 
exported, or manufactured. Control of several additional chemicals was 
also tightened in 1999 in response to resolutions passed by the UN 
Commission on Narcotic Drugs. The legislature also began working to 
amend legislation to enhance control of norephedrine.
    Hong Kong also introduced new legislation to strengthen the anti-
money-laundering regime and laws affecting drug profits and organized 
crime. New reporting requirements for financial transactions went into 
effect, and sentences for money laundering have been lengthened.

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    Hong Kong and U.S. law enforcement agencies continued to cooperate 
effectively on investigations into the movement of illegal drugs and on 
money-laundering cases. The Mutual Legal Assistance Agreement received 
legislative approval in Hong Kong and will enter into force in early 
2000. The Transfer of Sentenced Persons Agreement with the United States 
and with Sri Lanka came into force. Hong Kong also concluded similar 
agreements with other countries and the European Union.
    In 1999 Hong Kong continued to implement new initiatives to 
strengthen its already outstanding counter-drug efforts, and Hong Kong 
authorities at all levels continued their close cooperation with the 
United States and other countries to defeat drug trafficking.
    India
    India is the world's largest producer of licit opium. Located 
between Afghanistan and Burma, the two primary world sources of 
illicitly grown opium, India also is a transit point for heroin, 
generally destined for Europe. Heroin is produced in and trafficked 
through India, but evidence to indicate that significant quantities of 
heroin from India reach the United States is scant. The Government of 
India (GOI) has a cooperative working relationship with DEA, and India 
is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention.
    The GOI uncovered a trafficking network operating in several Indian 
cities to ship locally-produced heroin to Sri Lanka, and seized a 
related heroin lab and over 100 kg of heroin. The GOI also broke up and 
arrested an international trafficking operation routing Afghan heroin to 
North America and seized 77 kilograms of heroin. Overall, heroin 
seizures rose 7 percent. More importantly, two well-organized 
trafficking operations were disrupted.
    The GOI tightened controls on the precursor ephedrine hydrochloride 
by listing it as a controlled substance under its Narcotic Drugs and 
Psychotropic Substance Act. The GOI traced 9 tons of acetic anhydride 
intended for Afghanistan and had it seized in Dubai. The GOI enacted 
money-laundering legislation at the end of 1999.
    The GOI annually takes forceful steps to prevent illicit cultivation 
and production. The GOI appears to have had genuine success in reducing 
illicit poppy cultivation, which in 1999 was just a fraction of what it 
was five years ago. India met formally with Pakistan in 1999 to discuss 
drug matters and is committed to continuing the process and to 
developing practical results, whichhave been limited to date. In 1999 
India also met with Burmese officials to discuss cross-border counter-
drug issues.
    Production and stockpile of licit opium in India has clearly not 
exceeded licit demand. On the contrary, India's stockpile has been 
barely adequate for some time. The GOI did not make as much progress as 
hoped for this year in rebuilding its depleted buffer stock of licit 
opium. With excellent weather, the harvest should have been 1300 metric 
tons, but at least in part due to some diversion from licit production, 
the harvest was only 971 tons, too small to rebuild stocks to levels 
recommended by the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB). The GOI 
did boost opium production from 260 to 971 metric tons, sufficient to 
satisfy international demand for licit opium, even if carry-over stocks 
remain inadequate.

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    India is the only licit opium producing country with a notable 
diversion problem. However, the exact extent of this diversion is 
unclear. India has had an elaborate and expensive-to-maintain system in 
place to counter this threat of diversion for years, and India took 
important additional steps to avert diversion this year. For example, to 
discourage diversion of licit opium, the GOI raised prices paid to 
farmers, and added other incentives for higher yields. The GOI also 
threatened stiff penalties for those convicted of diversion. Licit opium 
diversion controls expanded in 1998-1999 and have been continued in 
1999-2000. Still, credible reports suggest that diversion may have 
increased during the 1998-1999 growing season despite GOI actions. 
Although India is taking adequate steps to prevent significant 
diversion, there are additional measures India could take to improve its 
control regime. The GOI has not yet agreed to USG suggestions to 
undertake a comprehensive joint licit opium yield survey, which would 
provide a firmer scientific basis for the GOI to set Minimum Qualifying 
Yields (MQY) for farmers. Setting these yields correctly, by region, 
helps limit diversion.
    Jamaica
    Jamaica is a major transit point for South American cocaine en route 
to the United States as well as the largest Caribbean producer and 
exporter of marijuana. During 1999, the Government of Jamaica (GOJ) made 
progress towards meeting the goals and objectives of the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention. At regional meetings, GOJ officials actively supported 
counter-drug initiatives. Bilateral counter-drug cooperation is good and 
improving. In the area of maritime law enforcement, Jamaican forces 
continued to participate in combined operations under the U.S.-Jamaica 
bilateral maritime agreement.
    In March 1999, Jamaica took an important step in its effort to 
create an anti-money laundering regime which meets international 
standards by amending the 1996 Money Laundering Act to require the 
reporting of suspicious transactions. However, further amendment to the 
law is required to address the critical issue of money laundering in 
relation to the proceeds of other serious crime. The GOJ has stated 
that, as a first step, it has drafted amendments to the money-laundering 
act that will add fraud and firearms offenses as predicate offenses. The 
GOJ is in the process of establishing a financial analysis unit to 
identify money-laundering activities, but has not yet provided staff for 
the unit. Jamaica's current asset forfeiture regime does not permit the 
GOJ to take full advantage of the forfeiture mechanism to augment the 
resources of its anti-drug agencies and deprive criminals of the 
proceeds of their crime. Current law requires the conviction of a 
criminal drug defendant prior to commencing a forfeiture action. In 
1999, Parliament passed legislation permitting the GOJ to enter into 
agreements with other governments to share assets confiscated from drug 
traffickers and other criminals. The GOJ enacted a Precursor Chemicals 
Act and has budgeted for implementation of chemical controls. In late 
1999, the GOJ introduced a bill in Parliament establishing drug courts; 
the bill passed both houses and now awaits the Governor General's 
signature.
    Transparency International and other organizations have reported 
that corruption is viewed as a grave problem in Jamaica--drug 
trafficking adds to the problem. The GOJ's anti-corruption legislation, 
introduced in Parliament in 1998, passed the House and Senate in 
different versions; a compromise bill is currently being crafted by a 
joint select committee of Par

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liament. The GOJ's position is that passage of the Anti-Corruption Act 
must occur before it can ratify the Inter-American Convention Against 
Corruption, which Jamaica signed in March 1996. The GOJ has a policy of 
investigating credible reports of police corruption, including those 
related to drugs, but more needs to be done to root out corruption in 
the public sector.
    The GOJ extradited four people to the United States in 1999; there 
are sixteen active pending extradition requests. In 1999, the GOJ 
developed, with USG assistance, a special fugitive apprehension team to 
target and apprehend fugitives from justice. The team has thus far 
located three fugitives and provided information for several U.S.-based 
investigations. The GOJ arrested 6,718 drug offenders in 1999. 
Nevertheless, no major drug traffickers were arrested or convicted 
during 1999, and they continue to operate with apparent impunity. The 
GOJ agreed in 1998 to develop a vetted special investigative unit to 
target drug kingpins, but the unit is not yet in existence. While the 
GOJ has stated its intention to enact wiretap legislation, the proposal 
for such legislation is still under discussion in the Cabinet.
    The GOJ exceeded the marijuana eradication goal of 800 hectares set 
out in the Fiscal Year 1998 Letter of Agreement (LOA) with the USG. In 
addition, the GOJ agreed in the LOA to pay a share of the marijuana 
eradication teams' salaries, currently funded by the USG, beginning in 
June 2000. While the GOJ made some progress in implementing the 
recommendations contained in a 1997 assessment, security at Jamaica's 
ports remains a concern. The GOJ needs to take steps to improve security 
at its ports, including implementation of the remaining recommendations 
from the 1997 assessment. Additionally, the GOJ should consider 
providing the means to admit evidence obtained by ion scan technology in 
Jamaican courts. The GOJ has in place a national drug control strategy 
that covers both supply and demand reduction; the GOJ should add to its 
strategy specific goals and objectives and measures of effectiveness. 
Jamaica is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention.
    Laos
    Laos is a major drug-producing country; it remains the world's third 
largest producer of illicit opium, behind Afghanistan and Burma. 
Although opium cultivation fell 16 percent in 1999, the USG estimates 
Laos' opium production for that year at 140 metric tons, identical to 
the 1998 estimate. Somewhat improved weather conditions increased 
estimated average yields, allowing total production to remain unchanged. 
Crop substitution project areas funded by the USG continued to show no 
commercial opium cultivation, only low level production sufficient for 
some local addict consumption.
    Laos cooperates with the USG and the UNDCP on crop control/
substitution projects designed to eliminate opium cultivation. The 
administration of Phongsali Province is providing enthusiastic support 
for the new USG-funded project there. The province administration 
assigned support personnel, held a meeting of district directors from 
throughout the province, and is expressing full support for the project 
to village headmen. In May 1999, the Government of Laos (GOL) agreed to 
a joint goal with the UNDCP to eliminate opium cultivation in Laos 
within six years; efforts to raise the estimated $80 million needed to 
reach this goal are underway. The highland farmers who grow opium now 
have no other viable option. Even if

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the farmers understood how to grow other crops and had the wherewithal 
to do so (neither of which is the case) they would lack accessible 
markets for their products. An ambitious project, requiring years of 
careful planning and implementation, is essential to create an 
alternative to opium. Such a plan would need alternative development, 
law enforcement, and demand reduction elements. Once developed, the plan 
would replace the previous GOL counter-drug master plan, which dates 
from 1993 and was also developed with UNDCP assistance.
    Law enforcement efforts continue. USG-funded counter-drug offices 
law enforcement offices were opened in two more provinces. These 
offices, now in six provinces, along with other provincial police 
offices, reported 143 drug-related criminal cases in 1999, resulting in 
the arrests of 348 suspects (including 10 foreign nationals). Most 
arrests were of small-scale traffickers. These cases involved the 
seizure of 14.7 kilograms of heroin, 225.8 kilograms of opium, 806,700 
methamphetamine tablets, and 2.2 metric tons of marijuana. Opium and 
heroin seizures fell significantly from record 1998 levels, as there was 
no case to match the 1998 destruction of a heroin laboratory. The number 
of arrests and quantity of opium seized are roughly equal to last year's 
totals, but the quantity of heroin seized has fallen significantly from 
the past two years. Methamphetamine seizures rose slightly. The quantity 
of heroin has dropped, in part, because none of the seizures was a very 
large shipment. Furthermore, it is believed traffickers have changed 
their routes and methods. For example, seizures in the United States of 
opium-filled parcels from Laos have jumped.
    The GOL works very closely with its foreign assistance partners to 
combat drug trafficking and has registered steady progress this past 
year. The GOL also continues its important efforts to address the socio-
economic problems underlying poppy cultivation. Corruption and 
inefficiency remain significant challenges to Lao counter-drug efforts. 
The GOL should continue to work with its foreign assistance partners to 
improve the administration of justice and to find alternatives to 
growing poppy.
    Mexico
    In 1999, the Government of Mexico (GOM) made substantial efforts to 
confront the major threats to public health and democratic institutions 
posed by transnational drug-trafficking organizations. Agreement on 
unprecedented, bilaterally negotiated Performance Measures of 
Effectiveness (PMEs) enhanced maritime cooperation, and performance 
improvements in the interdiction/eradication realm were encouraging. 
Corruption and judicial obstacles to the swift extradition of fugitives, 
however, remained impediments to a more productive counter-drug 
relationship.
    A new $500 million public security plan, including establishment of 
the new Federal Preventative Police, complemented close bilateral 
counter-drug cooperation in 1999. That undertaking, which will take 
several years to implement fully, restructures several existing law 
enforcement agencies, and has already begun to improve police coverage 
and crime investigation. Steps are underway to acquire new technology, 
such as aerial radar platforms and upgraded telecommunications, and 
redistribute land, air, and maritime assets to improve coverage of 
priority areas. An interagency interdiction operation disrupted a major 
cartel's operations on the Yucatan Peninsula as part of a broad-based 
effort to reduce the flow of drugs into Mexico from Central and South 
America.

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    Marijuana eradication was up 39 percent over 1998 and net production 
down 19 percent for the year. Eradication of opium poppy, while down 10 
percent from 1998, combined with reduced cultivation to yield a more 
than 25 percent drop in net opium gum production. The GOM made over 
8,000 drug-related arrests, including: major cartel co-founder Juan 
Quintero Payan and key associates Oscar Benjamin Garcia Davila and Jaime 
Aguilar Gastelum. The Mexican Congress passed a new law codifying the 
use of seized/forfeited assets and creating a new office in the treasury 
ministry to manage these assets.
    Mexico's achievements continued to be undermined by chronic 
institutional weaknesses, particularly drug-related corruption. The GOM 
has taken steps to strengthen internal controls, including expanding the 
mandate of the Attorney General's Office's (PGR) confidence control 
center and investigating numerous individual cases of suspected 
corruption. One such investigation implicated former Quintana Roo 
Governor Mario Villanueva, currently a fugitive from justice. President 
Zedillo has made combating corruption a national priority, but he 
acknowledged success will take time.
    The USG and GOM cooperated closely on a wide range of law 
enforcement and drug abuse prevention efforts in 1999, guided by a 
National Drug Strategy agreed to in 1998 and accompanying PMEs. The 
first formal evaluation of the PMEs was completed in December 1999. 
Significant maritime seizures in the final seven months of year 
demonstrated enhanced U.S.-Mexican cooperation, as did agreement by the 
two countries in November to establish a new interdiction working group 
under the binational High-Level Contact Group on Drug Control (HLCG). 
The USG provided technical and material support and training to Mexican 
agencies in furtherance of the GOM's justice sector modernization 
initiative, demand reduction programs and other efforts.
    In 1999, the USG and GOM continued to work closely on fugitive 
issues. The GOM extradited 14 fugitives to the United States, including 
two Mexican national drug traffickers, one of whom was also sought for 
the murder of a U.S. Border Patrol agent. In keeping with its historic 
1996 decision to begin approving Mexican nationals for extradition in 
appropriate cases, the GOM appealed, with mixed results, several Mexican 
appellate court decisions barring extradition. The GOM has appealed to 
the Mexican Supreme Court a case which could resolve conflicting 
decisions by lower appellate courts and, thus, expedite delivery of 
fugitives in the future. Regrettably, Mexico has yet to extradite a 
major Mexican national drug trafficker.
    The USG and GOM are committed at the highest levels to continued 
cooperation in efforts to defeat and dismantle heavily armed and well-
financed trans-border drug trafficking organizations. In recent years, 
the two governments have constructed an unprecedented framework for 
coordination, a mechanism for evaluation, and fora for regular 
consultation on counter-drug issues. Through daily working-level 
interaction between counterpart agencies, policy-level discussions in 
the HLCG and other bilateral entities, and collaboration in multilateral 
groups, the two governments are finding increasingly productive ways to 
work together against the formidable threat drug trafficking poses to 
both nations.
     Nigeria 
    Nigeria has failed to fully meet the criteria for cooperation with 
the United States on counter-drug matters and has not taken adequate 
steps on

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its own to meet the goals of the 1988 UN Drug Convention. U.S. vital 
national interests, however, require that Nigeria be certified so that 
the assistance that would otherwise be withheld remains available to 
support the continuing transition to democratic civilian rule and the 
increased efforts to improve cooperation on drug and other crime issues 
evident under the democratic government.
    Nigeria remains the hub of African drug trafficking. Nigerian poly-
crime organizations operate extensive global trafficking networks, 
dominate the Sub-Saharan drug markets, and account for a large part of 
the heroin imported into the United States. They also transport South 
American cocaine to Europe, Asia and elsewhere in Africa, especially 
South Africa, and export marijuana to Europe and West Africa.
    The counter-drug efforts of the Government of Nigeria (GON) remain 
unfocused and lacking in material support. The new democratic government 
of President Obasanjo's strong public denunciation of drug trafficking 
and financial crimes is a welcome change from the high-level 
indifference that characterized most of Nigerian military rule. However, 
there have been no new actions or policies to bring about change.
    The year 1999 saw the continuation of efforts limited largely to 
interdiction of low-level couriers and destruction of cannabis crops. 
Although the new government signaled its willingness to work with the 
USG on extradition issues, Nigeria did not extradite anyone in response 
to outstanding U.S. extradition requests. Well-drafted counter-drug 
legislation is already on the books, but remains largely un-enforced.
    Nigerian law enforcement agencies did not significantly improve 
their counter-drug performance in 1999. There were no major trafficker 
prosecutions or arrests by the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency 
(NDLEA) in 1999. Total heroin seizures increased, due primarily to a 
large seizure at Kano Airport. The NDLEA has signaled a willingness to 
increase its professional expertise, but institutional limitations make 
it difficult for Nigerian law enforcement officials to make progress 
against increasingly sophisticated criminals. Asset seizures did not 
become a useful counter-drug tool. Awareness of the local drug abuse 
problem is growing, but demand reduction efforts have been limited in 
scope and success.
    Nigerian money launderers operate sophisticated global networks to 
repatriate illicit proceeds from drug trafficking, financial fraud, and 
other crimes. In 1995, the GON enacted a decree to combat illicit drug-
derived money laundering, but enforcement has been uneven, yielding few 
seizures and no convictions. Nigeria is a party to the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention.
    Newly-elected President Obasanjo retired 143 military officers 
tainted by positions they held during the military government. Anti-
corruption legislation has been proposed, but is stalled in the senate. 
Sporadic progress against corruption within the NDLEA contributed to its 
reputation as Nigeria's most professional law enforcement body. The 
NDLEA made regular arrests of individual drug couriers in 1999, but did 
not arrest or prosecute any major traffickers. Assets have been seized, 
but no forfeitures, which require convictions, have been made. The NDLEA 
chairman was briefly held in contempt for refusing to release several 
hundred thousand dollars worth of vehicles while their owner's case 
proceeds slowly through the legal system. The DEA received good 
cooperation from the NDLEA, but rampant corruption prevents sharing of 
sensitive information. NDLEA actions at air

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ports, including breaking up a ring that involved airline and government 
employees, have made trafficking through airports more risky. There is 
an active cannabis eradication program, but figures are not available 
and supply easily meets demand. NDLEA has opened well-publicized anti-
drug clubs at the universities, supplying them with anti-drug literature 
and videos.
    Nigeria is one of the most important countries in Africa. What 
happens in Nigeria politically and economically will, to a large degree, 
determine whether there is stability and progress toward democracy and 
economic reform in West Africa. If Nigeria's ongoing transition fails, 
the result might easily be an implosion of government and the collapse 
of the economy, triggering a humanitarian disaster in Africa's most 
populous country (over 100 million people) and a destabilizing exodus of 
Nigerians to neighboring states. Such an upheaval could also disrupt the 
movement of high-quality Nigerian oil, which accounts for more than 
seven percent of total U.S. petroleum imports.
    If, on the other hand, Nigeria's transition succeeds, it will be an 
example to all of Africa, and that success has the potential to promote 
economic growth and greater transparency in government. Nigeria could 
become an engine for growth in West Africa. A stable and democratic 
Nigeria will permit greater cooperation between law enforcement 
agencies, and the opportunity to reduce the impact of the Nigerian 
criminals who prey on the American people.
    The military's acceptance of its appropriate role in a functioning 
democracy, and the new civilian government's ability to govern, will be 
critically impaired if Nigeria is deprived of the full range of USG 
support. Building a political consensus and meeting the challenges of a 
collapsing economy will also depend in no small part on outside 
assistance and expertise.
    Denial of certification would block assistance the new 
democratically-elected government needs to meet these challenges, 
seriously damaging the prospects for success of stable, transparent 
democracy in Nigeria. U.S. vital national interests require providing 
humanitarian, economic and security assistance to Nigeria as well as 
counter-drug assistance from all sources. The risk of not doing so now 
would jeopardize not only Nigeria's fledgling democracy, but also 
Nigeria's attempts to reinvigorate its failing economy and support for 
democracy and peacekeeping throughout the region. Further, any new 
civilian government's ability to work with the USG on all issues, 
including counter-drug and other law enforcement, will depend on its 
access to multilateral lending and U.S. technical and economic 
assistance. The risks posed by the cutoff of assistance clearly outweigh 
the risks associated with GON's inadequate counter-drug performance over 
the past year.
    Pakistan
    In 1999, Pakistan made progress towards eliminating opium production 
by the year 2000 by reducing poppy cultivation by 48 percent. The poppy 
crop fell to a record-low of 1570 hectares. Cooperation on drug control 
with the USG has been excellent and the formation with DEA assistance of 
a Special Investigative Cell (SIC) within the Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) 
was a major achievement. The overall record on drug interdiction was 
encouraging, with heroin seizures up 57 percent and several arrests of 
high-profile traffickers. The resolve of the Government of Pakistan 
(GOP) to prevent the

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reemergence of heroin/morphine laboratories remained firm. Pakistan 
extradited four drug fugitives to the United States and arrested six 
others, a significant improvement on previous years. Efforts to extend 
application of the Control of Narcotic Substances Act (CNSA) and the 
Anti-Narcotics Force Act (ANFA) to tribal areas in North West Frontier 
Province (NWFP) are continuing.
    Pakistan's cabinet approved the drug control master plan in early 
1999, but implementation has been slowed by a lack of funds. The GOP's 
counter-drug policies and cooperation with the USG were unaffected by 
the October 1999 coup. Pakistan is a party to the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention.
    Pakistani law enforcement tripled opium seizures from 3.65 to 11.50 
metric tons, and increased heroin seizures by 57 percent, from 2.36 to 
3.90 metric tons. Pakistan's illicit drug seizures were up significantly 
compared to the same period in 1998. The ANF is Pakistan's principal 
drug law enforcement agency. In 1999 the GOP began to examine ways to 
strengthen the institutional capacity and performance of the ANF. With 
DEA assistance, the ANF formed a vetted unit, or Special Investigative 
Cell, thereby improving intelligence collection and investigative 
capacity, and took steps toward recruiting new personnel. The ANF also 
arrested two politically powerful traffickers, one a prominent 
journalist and influential politician, the other a member of the then-
ruling party, leading to the break-up of a gang of corrupt officials 
posted at Islamabad airport. All are awaiting trial.
    1999 was a record setting year for ANF seizures of heroin and opium 
recovered in individual raids (a 213 percent increase in heroin 
seizures), with ANF Baluchistan making major contributions. Particularly 
noteworthy were a 760 kilogram heroin seizure in Kharan District of 
Baluchistan and a seizure in Turbat District of Baluchistan of 2951 
kilograms of opium, 2580 kilograms of hashish and 111 kilograms of 
heroin. Apart from the ANF, the law enforcement agencies most actively 
engaged in drug seizures include the police, customs and the Frontier 
Corps.
    In a major improvement over previous years, in 1999 the GOP arrested 
six drug fugitives and extradited four defendants to the United States. 
There are 15 pending extradition requests. In Baluchistan the ANF and 
Frontier Corps detected and challenged a number of Afghan convoys, 
resulting in firefights and seizures of 5.8 metric tons of opium, 1.1 
tons of heroin, and seven vehicles. The killing of three traffickers and 
serious wounding of one ANF soldier may reflect the increased challenges 
posed by well-armed traffickers.
    There were no convictions of major drug traffickers in 1999. 
Prosecution continued to drag out in the courts. However, the GOP has 
funded the establishment of five special drug courts to process drug 
cases more efficiently. Chemical controls are adequate, but there is 
still diversion of acetic anhydride from licit imports. Pakistan is not 
a major money laundering country, but, given the level of drug 
trafficking, smuggling, and official corruption, money laundering almost 
certainly occurs, mostly by means of unofficial, traditional money 
transfer facilities, known as ``hawala.''
    The USG believes that Pakistan made an excellent contribution to 
international drug control efforts. We will support GOP efforts to 
target major heroin trafficking organizations and increase seizures of 
large shipments of opiates and precursor chemicals.

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    Panama
    The Government of Panama (GOP) continues to demonstrate its 
willingness to combat transnational drug trafficking. The GOP seized 
significant amounts of illicit drugs in 1999, despite apparent changes 
in trafficking routes. The new Mireya Moscoso administration has 
demonstrated its commitment to combat drug trafficking, money 
laundering, and other transnational crimes. Immediately after taking 
office, the new administration set up an anti-corruption unit in the 
Ministry of Economy and Finance. Panama's law enforcement agencies 
continue to maintain excellent relations with their U.S. counterparts.
    Panama is a major transshipment point for illicit drugs smuggled 
from Colombia. Cocaine is stockpiled in Panama prior to being repackaged 
for passage to the United States and Europe. Panama's location, largely 
unpatrolled coastlines, advanced infrastructure, underdeveloped judicial 
system, and well-developed financial services sector make it a 
crossroads for transnational crime, such as drug trafficking, money 
laundering, illicit arms sales and alien smuggling. According to USG 
statistics, GOP agencies seized 2,576 kilograms of cocaine, 1,558 
kilograms of marijuana, 46 kilograms of heroin, and 600 liters of acetic 
anhydride; they also made 131 arrests for international drug-related 
offenses in 1999.
    The GOP continued to implement its own national counter-drug plan, 
the ``National Drug Strategy 1996-2001.'' Panama also made significant 
progress in implementing its comprehensive chemical control program.
    The highest U.S. priorities in the coming year will be signing a 
full six part bilateral counter-drug maritime agreement, expanding anti-
money laundering legislation, increasing efforts to control the Black 
Market Peso Exchange, and improving prosecutions of money launderers and 
drug traffickers. Other U.S. priorities in Panama include: supporting 
the GOP's efforts to build a highly-professional, interagency, counter-
drug task force; developing the capabilities to control sea lanes, 
rivers, island and coastal regions, and the Canal area; and limiting 
cross-border criminal influence. With the seriousness and commitment of 
the new Moscoso administration, the USG is hopeful that there will be 
measurable progress in these areas in 2000.
    Paraguay
    Paraguay is a major drug-transit country for significant amounts of 
largely Bolivian cocaine and is also a major money-laundering center in 
Latin America (although it remains unclear what portion of money 
laundering can be attributed to drug trafficking).
    USG experts estimate that between 15 and 30 metric tons of cocaine 
may transit Paraguay annually en route to Argentina, Brazil, the United 
States and Europe. Of this estimated amount, only 95 kilos of cocaine 
were seized in 1999; moreover, only 211 arrests of low-level marijuana 
and cocaine traffickers were effected, mostly prior to April 1999. 
Paraguay is a source country for high-quality marijuana. Although none 
of it enters the United States, the Government of Paraguay (GOP) seized 
record amounts of marijuana and eradicated 900 of the estimated 2,500 
hectares of marijuana fields.
    In July 1999, a new penal code was enacted that criminalizes 
conspiracy. This will allow the prosecution of those who benefit from 
criminal activity,

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but who are not the material perpetrators of the crime. However, 
extensive training of prosecutors and judges will be required before 
this new law can be fully implemented. One major Brazilian trafficker, 
arrested in 1997, was extradited to Brazil. The legislature approved the 
bilateral extradition treaty signed in 1998.
    However, the GOP failed to accomplish the majority of counter-drug 
goals for 1999 in a manner sufficient for full certification. Since 
1995, legislation has been pending to provide police and prosecutors 
with modern legal tools, such as use of informants, controlled 
deliveries, and undercover investigations. The Gonzalez Macchi 
administration submitted another draft of the legislation to the 
Paraguayan Congress, but it is the third administration to do so without 
the legislation being passed. The GOP did not investigate, arrest or 
prosecute any major drug traffickers, nor did it take sufficient 
measures to prevent or punish public corruption in general, or 
specifically with respect to drug trafficking. The GOP did not implement 
the 1996 money laundering law by arresting or prosecuting violators. 
Furthermore, the GOP did not provide operational funding or adequate 
resources for the anti-money laundering secretariat, SEPRELAD, to enable 
it to function as an independent organization (although in December 1999 
a budget was approved for 2000). The GOP also failed to show progress 
toward development of an effective anti-drug and organized crime 
investigative and operational capability for the border regions.
    Denial of certification would, however, cut off civilian and 
military assistance programs designed to strengthen Paraguay's 
democratic institutions and promote modern civil-military relations. 
Strengthening democracy in Paraguay is a U.S. vital national interest, 
and failure in this effort would affect negatively all other U.S. 
interests, including cooperation with respect to illicit drugs, 
terrorism, intellectual-property piracy, and environmental preservation. 
The events of 1999--which included defiance by then-President Cubas of 
the Supreme Court, the assassination of Vice President Argana, the 
killing of student demonstrators, the impeachment and resignation of 
Cubas, drought, rural unrest, and the reported presence of fugitive 
former general and coup plotter Lino Oviedo--demonstrate the many 
challenges facing Paraguayan democracy. They also contributed to the 
GOP's unsatisfactory counter-drug performance. Denial of certification 
would undermine the U.S. ability to strengthen Paraguay's democratic 
institutions and would put at risk all other U.S. vital national 
interests.
    The risks posed to the totality of U.S. interests (e.g., promotion 
of democracy and transnational crime cooperation) by a cutoff of 
bilateral assistance outweigh at this point the risks posed by the GOP's 
failure to cooperate fully with the USG, or to take fully adequate steps 
on its own, to achieve the goals and objectives of the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention.
    In 2000, the GOP needs to translate its oft-stated political will 
into concrete action against major drug traffickers, money laundering, 
and official corruption.
    People's Republic of China
    The People's Republic of China (PRC) continued to take strong, 
effective steps to combat the use and trafficking of illicit drugs in 
1999. Although preliminary figures indicate that seizures of heroin 
declined significantly from 1998's record level (possibly because of a 
decline in production in Burma), China's heroin seizures still accounted 
for the great majority of

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heroin seized in all of Asia. Seizures of methamphetamine and other 
amphetamine-type stimulants soared, while those of precursor chemicals 
and opium remained at previous years' levels. China cooperated with the 
United States and other countries in providing pre-export notification 
of dual-use precursor chemicals. Government officials estimate that more 
than ten percent of China's 1.3 billion citizens viewed a nationwide 
anti-drug exhibition. DEA opened an office in Beijing. China continues 
to cooperate actively on operational issues with U.S. drug-enforcement 
officials. Domestically, China began a ``Drug Free Communities'' program 
to eliminate drug trafficking and abuse as well as drug-related crime.
    During 1999, China cooperated with the UNDCP and regional states on 
a number of projects to reduce demand for illicit drugs. China also 
supported effective crop-substitution programs in Burma and Laos.
    The United States and the PRC signed a Customs Mutual Assistance 
Agreement that will enhance communications and accelerate the flow of 
counter-drug-related intelligence. China is a party to the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention as well as to the 1961 UN Single Convention and its 1972 
Protocol, and the 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances.
    U.S.-PRC cooperative law enforcement has advanced over the last two 
years, but China frequently does not respond to USG requests for 
information, and when it does, the responses often arrive too late to be 
of operational value. China has also failed to enforce vigorously and to 
strengthen anti-money-laundering legislation. For a number of reasons, 
China has also continued its non-engagement in the Asia-Pacific Group on 
Money Laundering and did not pursue membership in the Financial Crimes 
Task Force.
    Despite those shortcomings, the PRC has acted forcefully to stop the 
production, trafficking in, and use of illicit drugs within its borders 
and within the region, and is committed to achieving the goals and 
objectives of the 1988 UN Drug Convention.
    Peru
    In 1999, the Government of Peru (GOP) made excellent progress in 
achieving its goal of eliminating illegal coca cultivation. Despite the 
rehabilitation of some previously abandoned coca fields, an additional 
24 percent of coca cultivation was eliminated in 1999, for an overall 
reduction of 66 percent over the last four years. Contributing to this 
reduction was a 1999 manual coca cultivation eradication total of 15,000 
hectares. The GOP counter-drug alternative development program, working 
through 103 local governments, almost 700 communities, and more than 
15,000 farmers, significantly strengthened social and economic 
infrastructure in these areas and helped shift the economic balance in 
favor of licit activities. In January 2000, the GOP held a conference in 
Paris to promote alternative development support among major donor 
countries.
    However, there is also increasing evidence that traffickers are 
processing cocaine hydrochloride within Peru's borders, setting up 
laboratories near the borders with Brazil, Colombia, and/or Bolivia, so 
that they can leave the country quickly without risk of interception. 
There were no interceptions or forcedowns of trafficker aircraft by the 
Peruvian Air Force (FAP) airbridge denial program in 1999--a tribute to 
the strong deterrent effect this program has had on the aerial transport 
of drugs. Recent seizures provide evidence that drug traffickers are 
using maritime shipment of cocaine

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from Callao and other Peruvian ports, riverine transport, and overland 
transport to move drugs out of Peru to evade aerial interdiction of 
trafficking aircraft. Private shipping companies, encouraged by the GOP, 
monitored sea cargo container activities during 1999, which led to the 
seizure by the Peruvian National Police of over five tons of cocaine 
base and cocaine hydrochloride bound for Europe.
    Reliable reports and eradication campaigns indicate that Peru has an 
emerging opium poppy cultivation problem. Cultivation of opium poppy is 
illegal in Peru; whenever such plantings are identified, the GOP takes 
prompt action to destroy them. Reliable reports indicate that 55 
kilograms of latex gum were seized in 1999, and 34,000 plants were 
eradicated.
    In December, the Peruvian National Police arrested major drug 
trafficker Segundo Cachique Rivera. The Peruvian National Police 
chemical control unit conducted over 1,500 regulatory and criminal 
investigations of suspect businesses in 1999, making 58 arrests and 
seizing over 112 tons of controlled chemicals and two chemical 
companies. The GOP also passed new legislation to enhance the control of 
precursor chemicals.
    Peru's significant reduction of coca under cultivation proves that 
its strategy is working. However, with higher prices being paid for 
coca, many farmers will be tempted to abandon licit crops. It is 
essential that manual eradication of illegal coca crops, counter-drug 
related alternative development, reinvigoration of the airbridge denial 
program, and land and maritime/riverine interdiction all continue as 
complementary programs. The GOP should also refine relevant laws, 
especially as they pertain to money laundering, asset seizure, and 
chemical controls.
    Taiwan
    The United States considers Taiwan a major transit point for drugs 
affecting the United States due to its geographic location, its role as 
a regional transportation/shipping hub, and the activities of organized 
crime groups. Taiwan in 1999 continued its aggressive domestic counter-
drug program and its effective cooperation with the United States, 
through the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT). Through October 1999, 
Taiwan authorities investigated 68,612 new drug cases, an increase of 
48.9 percent over the same time period in 1998. The authorities seized 
more illicit drugs, primarily methamphetamine-type stimulants, in the 
first ten months of 1999 than all of 1998. Although indictments and 
convictions for drug-related offenses on Taiwan continued to fall in 
1999, the decline reflects the first full year in which a law, allowing 
first-time addicts to participate in drug treatment programs in lieu of 
imprisonment, has been in force.
    Taiwan cannot be a signatory to the 1988 Drug Convention because it 
is not a UN member. Taiwan authorities, nonetheless, have passed and 
implemented laws bringing Taiwan into compliance with the Convention's 
goals and objectives. Taiwan also continued to expand counter-drug 
cooperation with U.S. law enforcement agencies, through AIT.
    Encouraged by AIT and DEA, Taiwan authorities passed two key drug 
laws to control both the manufacture and sale of phenylpropanolamine 
(PPA). The laws allow pre-export notification on shipments of PPA to 
other countries and establishes a new agency to monitor the production, 
use, and sale of drugs. Taiwan has continued to strengthen its efforts 
to stop drug

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trafficking and is addressing domestically and in conjunction with the 
international community the problem of money laundering.
    Through AIT, Taiwan and U.S. law-enforcement agencies cooperated 
closely on investigations and joint operations concerning drug 
trafficking and related crimes. Taiwan authorities worked with the 
United States and other countries on anti-money laundering efforts. 
Taiwan is an active participant in the Asia-Pacific Group on Money 
Laundering and the Egmont Group.
    Thailand
    At the time that the List of Major Drug Producing and Transiting 
Countries was prepared at the end of last year, information then 
available indicated that in excess of 1000 metric tons of opium was 
cultivated in Thailand. However, success with eradication programs 
during the current crop year seems to have reduced cultivation to well 
under that figure. Thailand remains a major drug transit country as a 
significant amount of heroin transits Thailand on its way to the United 
States. Indeed, Thai authorities recently made a number of large 
seizures of heroin headed for the United States.
    Thailand continued its long tradition of cooperation with the United 
States and the international community in anti-drug programs. The Royal 
Thai Government (RTG) added to its leadership role in transnational 
crime issues by co-managing the International Law Enforcement Academy 
(ILEA) with the USG in Bangkok. Thailand is one of the top three 
countries in the world in cooperating with the United States on 
extradition requests. Additional defendants arrested in 1994's operation 
``Tiger Trap'' were extradited and extensive cooperative law enforcement 
programs continued to bear fruit.
    Thailand has one of the most effective crop substitution and opium 
eradication operations in the world. 1999 poppy cultivation was down 38 
percent from 1998 and opium production was down 62 percent. Eradication 
destroyed 50 percent of the crop leaving an estimated 6 metric tons 
remaining. Cultivated acreage has been slashed 91 percent since the 
onset of the eradication program in 1984. With DEA support, the Royal 
Thai Police (RTP) established the second in a series of specially-
trained drug law enforcement units to target major trafficking groups. 
Overall, RTG efforts to target trafficking organizations have proceeded 
well, with numerous cases involving organizations with trafficking links 
opened in 1999.
    More elements of the new Constitution came into force further 
strengthening rule of law and the judicial system, and providing a firm 
basis for further modernization and institutionalization of Thai 
society. Thai civil society is developing rapidly and a press with few 
restraints and the plethora of NGOs bring increasingly strong public 
attention to official corruption. A significant number of low and 
middle-ranked officers in the military and police were disciplined for 
corruption, although arrests for corruption continued to focus on lower-
ranking officers and officials.
    The RTG is close to deciding whether to accede to the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention. Passage of money laundering legislation was the last main 
requirement. Passage is expected in the March 2000 parliamentary 
session.
    The USG considers Thailand an important ally in combating the 
production and flow of illicit drugs. Our two countries have been 
working to

[[Page 383]]

gether to fight production and trafficking of narcotics with great 
success for over three decades, and DEA considers its cooperation with 
Thailand to be one of its most successful overseas partnerships anywhere 
in the world.
    Venezuela
    By some estimates, over 100 metric tons of cocaine transit Venezuela 
annually en route to destinations in the United States and Europe. 
Venezuela is also a transit route for precursor chemicals used in the 
production of illicit drugs in the Andean source countries, and its 
financial sector is a prime destination for laundering proceeds from 
Colombian cocaine trafficking organizations.
    Venezuelan law enforcement agencies had increased success in drug 
interdiction in 1999, particularly on land and at major ports. Cocaine 
seizures rose to 13.1 metric tons from 8.6 metric tons in 1998. This 
improvement reflects both the increase in drug transshipment through the 
country in 1999 and the high level of tactical cooperation between 
Venezuelan and U.S. law enforcement agencies. The Government of 
Venezuela (GOV) also augmented its efforts to interdict chemical 
precursors, after establishing in 1998 a set of regulations to track the 
diversion of chemicals used in drug production. Working closely in 
conjunction with DEA, Venezuelan law enforcement officials seized over 
110 tons of potassium permanganate, a prime chemical used in the 
production of cocaine, and signed an agreement with the Government of 
Colombia to exchange information on chemical precursor movements.
    Corruption has traditionally hampered the effectiveness of 
Venezuela's law enforcement and judicial institutions. The GOV took 
concrete steps against corruption in 1999, initiating investigations of 
corrupt officials and overseeing the implementation of a new criminal 
code which has the potential to provide a more efficient, transparent 
system of justice.
    To consolidate these important advances, the GOV should take certain 
measures to improve its performance, specifically: pass needed anti-
organized crime legislation; reenter negotiations with the USG on a 
comprehensive maritime agreement; take the necessary steps to permit the 
extradition of Venezuelan nationals accused of drug-related crimes or 
organized crime activity; and continue to enhance and refine 
multilateral counter-drug interdiction cooperation.
    Vietnam
    As a national priority in Vietnam, the fight against illicit drugs 
is second only to poverty reduction. In 1999 Vietnam fought on two 
fronts: against the production and use of drugs as well as against 
cross-border trafficking of drugs. Vietnam, with 2,100 hectares under 
poppy cultivation and a potential of 11 metric tons of opium production, 
intensified efforts to eradicate poppy crops. Authorities also 
successfully eradicated 860 of an estimated total of 1,000 hectares used 
for cannabis cultivation in 1999.
    The Government of Vietnam (GOV) instituted an augmented prevention 
campaign to reduce domestic drug use and abuse. Also in 1999 Vietnam 
stiffened law-enforcement campaigns against drug traffickers and 
toughened prosecution to achieve a record number of arrests and 
convictions. Authorities prosecuted 3,310 drug-related cases involving 
4,952 defendants. Of cases brought to trial, 35 received a death 
sentence and 21 were sentenced to life imprisonment. A high-profile 
anti-corruption campaign was

[[Page 384]]

implemented and included public trials of high-ranking government and 
party officials involved in illicit drug and other smuggling.
    Due, in part, to its location so close to the ``Golden Triangle,'' 
Vietnam is a major transit point for opium and heroin. To address this 
problem, the GOV set up special task force units to combat drug 
trafficking along the borders, and police, customs and border forces 
arrested 19,010 drug criminals, an increase in arrests of 31 percent 
over last year. Drug interdictions increased by 32 percent, with 
seizures of 51.8 kilograms of heroin, 314 kilograms of opium, and 369 
kilograms of cannabis. In its first year of operation (September 1998-
September 1999), the marine police force began patrols to detect drug 
trafficking. Vietnam also tightened oversight and control of precursor 
chemicals, transferring responsibility for monitoring to the Ministry of 
Public Security, Ministry of Public Health, and Department of Customs, 
and set up a Precursor Chemical Control Force in the Ministry of Health.
    In 1999 GOV began work on preparing draft counter-drug legislation 
to modernize organized-crime statutes and techniques, enhance law-
enforcement efforts, and strengthen compliance with the 1988 UN Drug 
Convention, to which Vietnam is a party. Vietnam is negotiating counter-
drug agreements with China and several EU countries, has cooperated with 
Interpol, and has worked closely with U.S. law-enforcement agencies. In 
April 1999 the Vietnamese Police joined the ASEANOPOL Criminal 
Information System. UNDCP is assisting Vietnam revise its Master Plan 
against drugs and craft its new counter-drug legislation. Vietnam 
supports UNDCP projects targeting demand reduction, crop substitution 
and suppression of drug trafficking.
    The United States and Vietnam have not yet concluded a counter-drug 
agreement. The GOV has not fully eradicated poppy crops, and farmers 
reverted to poppy cultivation in some high-poverty rural areas, bringing 
an additional 645 hectares under cultivation in 1999 and increasing the 
total to 2,100 hectares devoted to poppy crops. Vietnam's National 
Assembly approved penal code revisions that criminalize money laundering 
for the first time. The provisions will take effect on July 1, 2000. 
Vietnam is working with the World Bank to develop a money-laundering 
section in draft banking legislation.
    Despite some notable shortcomings, Vietnam has made a vigorous 
effort to combat drug production and trafficking. There is no question 
that the GOV at the highest levels fully realizes the threat drugs 
present to their own people and society and is doing everything possible 
to counter the availability and use of illicit drugs.

[[Page 385]]




Presidential Determination No. 2000-17 of March 2, 2000

Drawdown Under Section 506(a)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
as Amended, To Provide Emergency Disaster Assistance in Southern Africa

Memorandum for the Secretary of State [and] the Secretary of Defense
Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 506(a)(2) of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 2318(a)(2) (the 
``Act''), I hereby determine that it is in the national interest of the 
United States to draw down articles and services from the inventory and 
resources of the Department of Defense, for the purpose of providing 
international disaster assistance to Southern Africa, including 
Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Botswana.
Therefore, I direct the drawdown of up to $37.6 million of articles and 
services from the inventory and resources of the Department of Defense 
for Southern Africa, including Mozambique, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and 
Botswana for the purposes and under the authorities of chapter 9 of part 
I of the Act.
The Secretary of State is authorized and directed to report this 
determination to the Congress immediately and to arrange for its 
publication in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, March 2, 2000.



Memorandum of March 3, 2000

Delegation of Authority To Transmit Report on Cooperative Projects With 
Russia

Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense
By authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws 
of the United States of America, including section 301 of title 3, I 
hereby delegate to the Secretary of Defense the duties and 
responsibilities vested in the President by section 2705(d) of Division 
G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations 
Act, 1999 (Public Law 105-277; 112 Stat. 2681-844). Such duties and 
responsibilities shall be exercised subject to the concurrence of the 
Secretary of State.
The reporting requirements delegated by this memorandum to the Secretary 
of Defense may be redelegated not lower than the Under Secretary level. 
The Department of Defense shall obtain clearance on the report from the 
Office of Management and Budget prior to its submission to the Congress.
Any reference in this memorandum to the provisions of any Act shall be 
deemed to be referenced to such Act or its provisions as may be amended 
from time to time.

[[Page 386]]

You are authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, March 3, 2000.



Notice of March 13, 2000

Continuation of Iran Emergency

On March 15, 1995, by Executive Order 12957, I declared a national 
emergency with respect to Iran pursuant to the International Emergency 
Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) to deal with the threat to the 
national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States 
constituted by the actions and policies of the Government of Iran, 
including its support for international terrorism, efforts to undermine 
the Middle East peace process, and acquisition of weapons of mass 
destruction and the means to deliver them. On May 6, 1995, I issued 
Executive Order 12959 imposing more comprehensive sanctions to further 
respond to this threat, and on August 19, 1997, I issued Executive Order 
13059 consolidating and clarifying these previous orders. The last 
notice of continuation was published in the Federal Register on March 
12, 1999.
Because the actions and policies of the Government of Iran continue to 
threaten the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the 
United States, the national emergency declared on March 15, 1995, must 
continue in effect beyond March 15, 2000. Therefore, in accordance with 
section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am 
continuing the national emergency with respect to Iran. Because the 
emergency declared by Executive Order 12957 constitutes an emergency 
separate from that declared on November 14, 1979, by Executive Order 
12170, this renewal is distinct from the emergency renewal of November 
1999. This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and 
transmitted to the Congress.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    March 13, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-18 of March 16, 2000

Sanctions on India

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President of the United 
States, including under title IX of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act,

[[Page 387]]

2000 (Public Law 106-79), I hereby waive the sanctions contained in 
sections 101 and 102 of the Arms Export Control Act, section 620E(e) of 
the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, and section 2(b)(4) of the Export-
Import Bank Act of 1945:

With respect to India, insofar as such sanctions would otherwise apply to 
assistance to the South Asia Regional Initiative/Energy; the Presidential 
Initiative on Internet for Economic Development; the Financial Institution 
Reform and Expansion program; and the United States Educational Foundation 
in India Environmental Exchange.

You are hereby authorized and directed to report this determination to 
the Congress and to arrange for its publication in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, March 16, 2000.



Memorandum of April 19, 2000

Report to the Congress Regarding Conditions in Burma and U.S. Policy 
Toward Burma

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to the requirements set forth under the heading ``Policy Toward 
Burma'' in section 570(d) of the FY 1997 Foreign Operations 
Appropriations Act, as contained in the Omnibus Consolidated 
Appropriations Act (Public Law 104-208), a report is required every 6 
months following enactment concerning:

1) progress toward democratization in Burma;

2) progress on improving the quality of life of the Burmese people, 
including progress on market reforms, living standards, labor standards, 
use of forced labor in the tourism industry, and environmental quality; and

3) progress made in developing a comprehensive, multilateral strategy to 
bring democracy to and improve human rights practices and the quality of 
life in Burma, including the development of a dialogue between the State 
Peace and Development Council (SPDC) and democratic opposition groups in 
Burma.

You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit the report fulfilling 
these requirements to the appropriate committees of the Congress and to 
arrange for publication of this memorandum in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, April 19, 2000.

[[Page 388]]




Presidential Determination No. 2000-19 of April 21, 2000

Waiver and Certification of Statutory Provisions Regarding the Palestine 
Liberation Organization

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to the authority vested in me under section 538(d) of the 
Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
Appropriations Act, 2000, as contained in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public Law 106-113), I hereby 
determine and certify that it is important to the national security 
interests of the United States to waive the provisions of section 1003 
of the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1987, Public Law 100-204.
This waiver shall be effective for a period of 6 months from the date of 
this memorandum. You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit this 
determination to the Congress and to publish it in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, April 21, 2000.



Notice of May 18, 2000

Continuation of Emergency With Respect to Burma

On May 20, 1997, I issued Executive Order 13047, effective at 12:01 a.m. 
eastern daylight time on May 21, 1997, certifying to the Congress under 
section 570(b) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related 
Programs Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-208), that the 
Government of Burma has committed large-scale repression of the 
democratic opposition in Burma after September 30, 1996, thereby 
invoking the prohibition on new investment in Burma by United States 
persons, contained in that section. I also declared a national emergency 
to deal with the threat posed to the national security and foreign 
policy of the United States by the actions and policies of the 
Government of Burma, invoking the authority, inter alia, of the 
International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706).
The National Emergency declared on May 20, 1997, must continue beyond 
May 20, 2000, because the Government of Burma continues its policies of 
committing large-scale repression of the democratic opposition in Burma. 
Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies 
Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing the national emergency with 
respect to Burma. This notice shall be published in the Federal Register 
and transmitted to the Congress.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 18, 2000.

[[Page 389]]




Notice of May 25, 2000

Continuation of Emergency With Respect to the Federal Republic of 
Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), the Bosnian Serbs, and Kosovo

In accordance with section 202(d) of the National Emergencies Act (50 
U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency 
declared on May 30, 1992, with respect to the Federal Republic of 
Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), as expanded on October 25, 1994, in 
response to the actions and policies of the Bosnian Serbs. In addition, 
I am continuing for 1 year the national emergency declared on June 9, 
1998, with respect to the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia's policies and 
actions in Kosovo. This notice shall be published in the Federal 
Register and transmitted to the Congress.
On May 30, 1992, by Executive Order 12808, President Bush declared a 
national emergency to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat to 
the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States 
constituted by the actions and policies of the Governments of Serbia and 
Montenegro, blocking all property and interests in property of those 
Governments. President Bush took additional measures to prohibit trade 
and other transactions with the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia 
and Montenegro) by Executive Orders 12810 and 12831, issued on June 5, 
1992, and January 15, 1993, respectively, and on April 25, 1993, I 
issued Executive Order 12846 imposing additional measures.
On October 25, 1994, I expanded the scope of the national emergency by 
issuing Executive Order 12934 to address the unusual and extraordinary 
threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the 
United States posed by the actions and policies of the Bosnian Serb 
forces and the authorities in the territory that they controlled within 
Bosnia and Herzegovina.
On December 27, 1995, I issued Presidential Determination 96-7, 
directing the Secretary of the Treasury, inter alia, to suspend the 
application of sanctions imposed on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 
(Serbia and Montenegro) pursuant to the above-referenced Executive 
orders and to continue to block property previously blocked until 
provision is made to address claims or encumbrances, including the 
claims of the other successor states of the former Yugoslavia. This 
sanctions relief, in conformity with United Nations Security Council 
Resolution 1022 of November 22, 1995 (hereinafter the ``Resolution''), 
was an essential factor motivating Serbia and Montenegro's acceptance of 
the General Framework Agreement for Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina 
initialed by the parties in Dayton on November 21, 1995, and signed in 
Paris on December 14, 1995 (hereinafter the ``Peace Agreement''). The 
sanctions imposed on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and 
Montenegro) were accordingly suspended prospectively, effective January 
16, 1996. Sanctions imposed on the Bosnian Serb forces and authorities 
and on the territory that they control within Bosnia and Herzegovina 
were subsequently suspended prospectively, effective May 10, 1996, also 
in conformity with the Peace Agreement and the Resolution. Sanctions 
against both the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) 
and the Bosnian Serbs were subsequently terminated by

[[Page 390]]

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1074 of October 1, 1996. This 
termination, however, did not end the requirement of the Resolution that 
those blocked funds and assets that are subject to claims and 
encumbrances remain blocked, until unblocked in accordance with 
applicable law.
Until the status of all remaining blocked property is resolved, the 
Peace Agreement implemented, and the terms of the Resolution met, the 
national emergency declared on May 30, 1992, as expanded in scope on 
October 25, 1994, must continue beyond May 30, 2000.
On June 9, 1998, by Executive Order 13088, I found that the actions and 
policies of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) 
and the Republic of Serbia with respect to Kosovo, by promoting ethnic 
conflict and human suffering, threatened to destabilize countries in the 
region and to disrupt progress in Bosnia and Herzegovina in implementing 
the Dayton peace agreement, constituted an unusual and extraordinary 
threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States. 
I therefore declared a national emergency to deal with that threat. On 
April 30, 1999, I issued Executive Order 13121 to take additional steps 
with respect to the continuing human rights and humanitarian crisis in 
Kosovo and the national emergency declared with respect to Kosovo. 
Because the crisis with respect to the situation in Kosovo has not been 
resolved, I have determined that it is necessary to maintain in force 
these emergency authorities beyond June 9, 2000.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    May 25, 2000



Presidential Determination No. 2000-20 of May 31, 2000

Presidential Determination on Assistance for Peacekeeping in Sierra 
Leone

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
    Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President, including under 
section 10(d)(1) of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945, as 
amended (22 U.S.C. 287 et seq.) (the ``Act''), I hereby determine that 
the furnishing, without regard to section 10(a) of the Act, of 
assistance covered by section 10 of the Act that is provided in support 
of peacekeeping efforts in Sierra Leone is important to the security 
interests of the United States.
    You are authorized and directed to report this determination to the 
Congress and to publish it in the Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, May 31, 2000.

[[Page 391]]




Presidential Determination No. 2000-21 of June 2, 2000

Determination Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
Amended: Continuation of Waiver Authority for Vietnam

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
    Pursuant to subsection 402(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
amended (the ``Act''), 19 U.S.C. 2432(d)(1), I determine that the 
further extension of the waiver authority granted by subsection 402(c) 
of the Act will substantially promote the objectives of section 402 of 
the Act. I further determine that the continuation of the waiver 
applicable to Vietnam will substantially promote the objectives of 
section 402 of the Act.
    You are authorized and directed to publish this determination in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, June 2, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-22 of June 2, 2000

Determination Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
Amended: Continuation of Waiver Authority for Belarus

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
    Pursuant to the authority vested in me under the Trade Act of 1974, 
as amended, Public Law 93-618, 88 Stat. 1978 (the ``Act''), I have 
determined, pursuant to subsection 402(d)(1) of the Act, 19 U.S.C. 
2432(d)(1), that the further extension of the waiver authority granted 
by subsection 402(c) of the Act will substantially promote the 
objectives of section 402 of the Act. I further determine that 
continuation of the waiver applicable to the Republic of Belarus will 
substantially promote the objectives of section 402 of the Act.
    You are authorized and directed to publish this determination in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, June 2, 2000.

[[Page 392]]




Presidential Determination No. 2000-23 of June 2, 2000

Determination Under Subsection 402(d)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as 
Amended: Continuation of Waiver Authority for the People's Republic of 
China

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
    Pursuant to the authority vested in me under the Trade Act of 1974, 
as amended, Public Law 93-618, 88 Stat. 1978 (the ``Act''), I have 
determined, pursuant to section 402(d)(1) of the Act, 19 U.S.C. 
2432(d)(1), that the further extension of the waiver authority granted 
by section 402(c) of the Act will substantially promote the objectives 
of section 402 of the Act. I further determine that continuation of the 
waiver applicable to the People's Republic of China will substantially 
promote the objectives of section 402 of the Act.
    You are authorized and directed to publish this determination in the 
Federal Register.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, June 2, 2000.



Presidential Determination No. 2000-24 of June 16, 2000

Suspension of Limitations Under the Jerusalem Embassy Act

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
and the laws of the United States, including section 7(a) of the 
Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-45) (the ``Act''), I 
hereby determine that it is necessary to protect the national security 
interests of the United States to suspend for a period of 6 months the 
limitations set forth in sections 3(b) and 7(b) of the Act.
You are hereby authorized and directed to transmit this determination to 
the Congress, accompanied by a report in accordance with section 7(a) of 
the Act, and to publish the determination in the Federal Register.
This suspension shall take effect after transmission of this 
determination and report to the Congress.
WILLIAM J. CLINTON
THE WHITE HOUSE,
    Washington, June 16, 2000.

[[Page 393]]


Presidential Determination No. 2000-25 of June 29, 2000

U.S. Contribution to the Korean Peninsula Energy Development 
Organization (KEDO): Certification and Waiver

Memorandum for the Secretary of State
Pursuant to section 576(c) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, 
and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2000, as enacted in Public Law 
106-113, (the ``Act''), I hereby certify that:
                                                                     (1)
    the effort to can and safely store all spent fuel from North Korea's 
    graphite-moderated nuclear reactors has been successfully concluded;
                                                                     (2)
    North Korea is complying with its obligations under the agreement 
    regarding access to suspect underground construction; and
                                                                     (3)
    the United States has made and is continuing to make signi