[Title 3 CFR ]
[Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition) - January 1, 2002 Edition]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



[[Page 1]]

          
          
                    3


          2001 Compilation
          and
          Parts 100-102

                         Revised as of January 1, 2002

The President





          Published by:
          Office of the Federal Register
          National Archives and Records Administration

          A Special Edition of the Federal Register



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                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
                            WASHINGTON : 2002



  For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing 
                                  Office
  Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: toll free (866) 512-1800; DC area 
                              (202) 512-1800
      Fax: (202) 512-2250 Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-0001

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                            TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                                    Page
List of Title 3 Compilations..........................................iv
Explanation of the Code of Federal Regulations.........................v
Explanation of This Title.............................................ix
How To Cite This Title................................................xi
Title 3.............................................................xiii
     2001 Compilation--Presidential Documents..........................1
     Chapter I--Executive Office of the President....................927
Title 3 Finding Aids.................................................937
     Tables..........................................................939
     List of CFR Sections Affected...................................959
     Index...........................................................961
CFR Finding Aids.....................................................971
     Table of CFR Titles and Chapters................................973
     Alphabetical List of Agencies Appearing in the CFR..............991

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                          TITLE 3 COMPILATIONS


------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Title 3 Compilations           Proclamations     Executive Orders
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 1936-1938......................  2161-2286.........          7316-7905
 1938-1943......................  2287-2587.........          7906-9347
 1943-1948......................  2588-2823.........         9348-10025
 1949-1953......................  2824-3041.........        10026-10510
 1954-1958......................  3042-3265.........        10511-10797
 1959-1963......................  3266-3565.........        10798-11134
 1964-1965......................  3566-3694.........        11135-11263
 1966-1970......................  3695-4025.........        11264-11574
 1971-1975......................  4026-4411.........        11575-11893
 1976...........................  4412-4480.........        11894-11949
 1977...........................  4481-4543.........        11950-12032
 1978...........................  4544-4631.........        12033-12110
 1979...........................  4632-4709.........        12111-12187
 1980...........................  4710-4812.........        12188-12260
 1981...........................  4813-4889.........        12261-12336
 1982...........................  4890-5008.........        12337-12399
 1983...........................  5009-5142.........        12400-12456
 1984...........................  5143-5291.........        12457-12497
 1985...........................  5292-5424.........        12498-12542
 1986...........................  5425-5595.........        12543-12579
 1987...........................  5596-5759.........        12580-12622
 1988...........................  5760-5928.........        12623-12662
 1989...........................  5929-6084.........        12663-12698
 1990...........................  6085-6240.........        12699-12741
 1991...........................  6241-6398.........        12742-12787
 1992...........................  6399-6520.........        12788-12827
 1993...........................  6521-6643.........        12828-12890
 1994...........................  6644-6763.........        12891-12944
 1995...........................  6764-6859.........        12945-12987
 1996...........................  6860-6965.........        12988-13033
 1997...........................  6966-7061.........        13034-13071
 1998...........................  7062-7161.........        13072-13109
 1999...........................  7162-7262.........        13110-13144
 2000...........................  7263-7389.........        13145-13185
 2001...........................  7263-7516.........        13186-13251
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Beginning with 1976, Title 3 Compilations also include regulations
  contained in Chapter I, Executive Office of the President.
Supplementary publications include: Presidential documents of the Hoover
  Administration (two volumes), Proclamations 1870-2037 and Executive
  Orders 5076-6070; Consolidated Indexes for 1936-1965; and Consolidated
  Tables for 1936-1965.


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                               EXPLANATION

    The Code of Federal Regulations is a codification of the general and 
permanent rules published in the Federal Register by the Executive 
departments and agencies of the Federal Government. The Code is divided 
into 50 titles which represent broad areas subject to Federal 
regulation. Each title is divided into chapters which usually bear the 
name of the issuing agency. Each chapter is further subdivided into 
parts covering specific regulatory areas.
    Each volume of the Code is revised at least once each calendar year 
and issued on a quarterly basis approximately as follows:

Title 1 through Title 16.................................as of January 1
Title 17 through Title 27..................................as of April 1
Title 28 through Title 41...................................as of July 1
Title 42 through Title 50................................as of October 1

    The appropriate revision date is printed on the cover of each 
volume.

LEGAL STATUS

    The contents of the Federal Register are required to be judicially 
noticed (44 U.S.C. 1507). The Code of Federal Regulations is prima facie 
evidence of the text of the original documents (44 U.S.C. 1510).

HOW TO USE THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS

    The Code of Federal Regulations is kept up to date by the individual 
issues of the Federal Register. These two publications must be used 
together to determine the latest version of any given rule.
    To determine whether a Code volume has been amended since its 
revision date (in this case, January 1, 2002), consult the ``List of CFR 
Sections Affected (LSA),'' which is issued monthly, and the ``Cumulative 
List of Parts Affected,'' which appears in the Reader Aids section of 
the daily Federal Register. These two lists will identify the Federal 
Register page number of the latest amendment of any given rule.

EFFECTIVE AND EXPIRATION DATES

    Each volume of the Code contains amendments published in the Federal 
Register since the last revision of that volume of the Code. Source 
citations for the regulations are referred to by volume number and page 
number of the Federal Register and date of publication. Publication 
dates and effective dates are usually not the same and care must be 
exercised by the user in determining the actual effective date. In 
instances where the effective date is beyond the cut-off date for the 
Code a note has been inserted to reflect the future effective date. In 
those instances where a regulation published in the Federal Register 
states a date certain for expiration, an appropriate note will be 
inserted following the text.

OMB CONTROL NUMBERS

    The Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-511) requires 
Federal agencies to display an OMB control number with their information 
collection request.

[[Page vi]]

Many agencies have begun publishing numerous OMB control numbers as 
amendments to existing regulations in the CFR. These OMB numbers are 
placed as close as possible to the applicable recordkeeping or reporting 
requirements.

OBSOLETE PROVISIONS

    Provisions that become obsolete before the revision date stated on 
the cover of each volume are not carried. Code users may find the text 
of provisions in effect on a given date in the past by using the 
appropriate numerical list of sections affected. For the period before 
January 1, 1986, consult either the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1949-
1963, 1964-1972, or 1973-1985, published in seven separate volumes. For 
the period beginning January 1, 1986, a ``List of CFR Sections 
Affected'' is published at the end of each CFR volume.

CFR INDEXES AND TABULAR GUIDES

    A subject index to the Code of Federal Regulations is contained in a 
separate volume, revised annually as of January 1, entitled CFR Index 
and Finding Aids. This volume contains the Parallel Table of Statutory 
Authorities and Agency Rules (Table I), and Acts Requiring Publication 
in the Federal Register (Table II). A list of CFR titles, chapters, and 
parts and an alphabetical list of agencies publishing in the CFR are 
also included in this volume.
    An index to the text of ``Title 3--The President'' is carried within 
that volume.
    The Federal Register Index is issued monthly in cumulative form. 
This index is based on a consolidation of the ``Contents'' entries in 
the daily Federal Register.
    A List of CFR Sections Affected (LSA) is published monthly, keyed to 
the revision dates of the 50 CFR titles.

REPUBLICATION OF MATERIAL

    There are no restrictions on the republication of material appearing 
in the Code of Federal Regulations.

INQUIRIES

    For a legal interpretation or explanation of any regulation in this 
volume, contact the issuing agency. The issuing agency's name appears at 
the top of odd-numbered pages.
    For inquiries concerning CFR reference assistance, call 202-523-5227 
or write to the Director, Office of the Federal Register, National 
Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 20408 or e-mail 
[email protected]

SALES

    The Government Printing Office (GPO) processes all sales and 
distribution of the CFR. For payment by credit card, call 202-512-1800, 
M-F 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. e.s.t. or fax your order to 202-512-2233, 24 hours 
a day. For payment by check, write to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Attn: New Orders, P.O. Box 371954, Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954. For GPO 
Customer Service call 202-512-1803.

ELECTRONIC SERVICES

    The texts of the Code of Federal Regulations, The United States 
Government Manual, the Federal Register, Public Laws, Public Papers, 
Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, and the 1995 Privacy Act 
Compilation are available in electronic format at www.access.gpo.gov/
nara/index.html. For more information, contact Electronic Information 
Dissemination Services, U.S. Government Printing Office. Phone 202-512-
1530, or 888-293-6498 (toll-free). E-mail, [email protected]

[[Page vii]]

    The Office of the Federal Register maintains a free electronic 
bulletin board service, FREND (Federal Register Electronic News 
Delivery), for public law numbers, Federal Register finding aids, and 
related information. To access by modem: phone, 202-275-0920.
    In addition, the Federal Register's public inspection list and table 
of contents are also available on the National Archives and Records 
Administration's Fax-on-Demand system. Phone, 301-713-6905.

                              Raymond A. Mosley,
                                    Director,
                          Office of the Federal Register.

January 1, 2002.

[[Page ix]]




                        EXPLANATION OF THIS TITLE

    This volume of ``Title 3--The President'' contains a compilation of 
 Presidential documents and a codification of regulations issued by the 
                                      Executive Office of the President.

         The 2001 Compilation contains the full text of those documents 
      signed by the President that were required to be published in the 
   Federal Register. Signature date rather than publication date is the 
     criterion for inclusion. With each annual volume, the Presidential 
       documents signed in the previous year become the new compilation.

    Chapter I contains regulations issued by the Executive Office of the 
 President. This section is a true codification like other CFR volumes, 
in that its contents are organized by subject or regulatory area and are 
                   updated by individual issues of the Federal Register.

       Presidential documents in this volume may be cited ``3 CFR, 2001 
 Comp.'' Thus, the preferred abbreviated citation for Proclamation 7390 
      appearing on page 1 of this book, is ``3 CFR, 2001 Comp., p. 1.'' 
          Chapter I entries may be cited ``3 CFR.'' Thus, the preferred 
 abbreviated citation for section 100.1, appearing in chapter I of this 
                                               book, is ``3 CFR 100.1.''

            This book is one of the volumes in a series that began with 
 Proclamation 2161 of March 19, 1936, and Executive Order 7316 of March 
  13, 1936, and that has been continued by means of annual compilations 
  and periodic cumulations. The entire Title 3 series, as of January 1, 
                  2002, is encompassed in the volumes listed on page iv.

     For readers interested in proclamations and Executive orders prior 
to 1936, there is a two-volume set entitled Proclamations and Executive 
     Orders, Herbert Hoover (March 4, 1929, to March 4, 1933). Codified 
Presidential documents are published in the Codification of Presidential 
 Proclamations and Executive Orders (April 13, 1945--January 20, 1989). 
Other public Presidential documents not required to be published in the 
          Federal Register, such as speeches, messages to Congress, and 
     statements, can be found in the Weekly Compilation of Presidential 
Documents and the Public Papers of the Presidents series. Each of these 
 Office of the Federal Register publications is available for sale from 
the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, 
                                                               DC 20402.

    This book was prepared in the Presidential Documents and Legislative 
Division by Karen A. Thornton, with the assistance of John S. Ashlin and 
                                                        Karen L. Ashlin.
?

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________________________________________________________________________




[[Page *COM003*xi]]

________________________________________________________________________


               Cite Presidential documents in this volume
                            3 CFR, 2001 Comp.
                      thus: 3 CFR, 2001 Comp., p. 1
________________________________________________________________________

                  Cite chapter I entries in this volume
                                  3 CFR
                            thus: 3 CFR 100.1


________________________________________________________________________



[[Page xiii]]

________________________________________________________________________



                         TITLE 3--THE PRESIDENT


                                                                    Page

2001 Compilation--Presidential Documents:
     Proclamations.....................................................1
     Executive Orders................................................719
     Other Presidential Documents....................................845
Chapter I--Executive Office of the President:
    Part 100.........................................................928
    Part 101.........................................................928
    Part 102.........................................................928
Finding Aids:
    Table 1--Proclamations...........................................939
    Table 2--Executive Orders........................................943
    Table 3--Other Presidential Documents............................947
    Table 4--Presidential Documents Affected During 2001.............951
    Table 5--Statutes Cited as Authority for Presidential Documents..955
    List of CFR Sections Affected....................................959
    Index............................................................961
CFR Finding Aids:
    Table of CFR Titles and Chapters.................................973
    Alphabetical List of Agencies Appearing in the CFR...............991


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              2001 Compilation--Presidential Documents



________________________________________________________________________

                              PROCLAMATIONS

________________________________________________________________________





Proc. 7390

Proclamation 7390 of January 12, 2001

Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Seventy-two years ago, Martin Luther King, Jr., was born into 
          a sharply divided Nation, a place where the color of a child's 
          skin too often determined that child's destiny. America was a 
          place where segregation and discrimination put limits on a 
          black child's dreams, opportunities, and future.
          Dr. King led America to a better place. With eloquence, he 
          articulated the struggles and hopes of generations of African 
          Americans. With the power of his leadership, he rallied 
          Americans of every race and creed to join together in the 
          march for justice. With courage, conviction, and faith in God, 
          he sought to make real in everyday practice--in schools, in 
          the workplace, in public accommodations, and in the hearts and 
          minds of his fellow citizens--the civil rights victories that 
          had been won in the courts.
          Although his life was cruelly cut short before his mission was 
          complete, he helped put our Nation firmly on the right path, 
          where the ideals of liberty, equality, brotherhood, and 
          justice are not merely words on a page, but values honored by 
          all. ``Our freedom was not won a century ago,'' he said in 
          1968, ``it is not won today; but some small part of it is in 
          our hands, and we are marching no longer by ones and twos but 
          in legions of thousands, convinced now it cannot be denied by 
          any human force.''
          It is up to each of us to continue that march. The gallant 
          freedom riders and freedom fighters of the civil rights era 
          are growing older, and many, like Martin Luther King, Jr., are 
          no longer among us. But their work must go on. There are still 
          too many in our Nation who do not share equally in America's 
          prosperity; minority unemployment and poverty rates, while

[[Page 2]]

          decreasing, are still far above the national average; and the 
          technical skills and resources needed for success in the 
          global economy are still out of reach for hundreds of 
          thousands of young Americans growing up in disadvantaged 
          communities.
          I encourage my fellow Americans to use this holiday, dedicated 
          to the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and to his 
          spirit of service, not as a day off, but rather as a day to 
          make a difference in the lives of others--an opportunity to 
          recognize where we have fallen short, to reach out to those 
          who have been left behind, and to remove the barriers that 
          keep us from becoming the promised land that Dr. King 
          envisioned.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Monday, January 15, 2001, as the Martin Luther King, 
          Jr., Federal Holiday. I call upon all Americans to observe 
          this occasion with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities in honor of Dr. King's life and achievements and in 
          response to his call to service.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth 
          day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proc. 7391

Proclamation 7391 of January 15, 2001

Religious Freedom Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Each year we commemorate the anniversary of the religious 
          freedom statute adopted by the Virginia legislature in 1786. 
          This statute, which reflects the wisdom and foresight of its 
          author, Thomas Jefferson, and its cosponsor, James Madison, 
          became the model for the First Amendment to our Constitution, 
          and it has had enormous and far-reaching consequences for the 
          life of our Nation.
          Just a few weeks ago, we saw how much that freedom means to 
          all of us, as we celebrated Christmas, Hanukkah, and the Eid 
          Al-Fitr within the same week. These holidays belonging to the 
          Christian, Jewish, and Muslim faiths were observed freely and 
          in peace by millions of people across our country--an 
          occurrence unimaginable in some regions of the world, where 
          people suffer persecution and even death for worshipping 
          according to their conscience. Because of religious freedom, 
          Americans have been spared much of the violence, bitterness, 
          and conflict that have scarred so many other societies, and 
          our Nation has benefited immeasurably from the many 
          contributions of generations of men and women who emigrated to 
          America because their right to worship was protected by the 
          Constitution and the courts and respected by their fellow 
          citizens.
          But religious freedom is not a right we enjoy solely by virtue 
          of being Americans; it is a fundamental human right that 
          should be honored in

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          every Nation around the globe. That is why I have sought to 
          make it an integral part of U.S. foreign policy and to raise 
          international awareness that many countries continue to engage 
          in or tolerate egregious violations of their citizens' right 
          to worship. I am proud that we have expanded reporting on 
          religious freedom in every country, and that through our 
          Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom, we 
          have strived to promote religious freedom where it is 
          threatened or denied and to intervene on behalf of those who 
          are suffering because of their religious beliefs and 
          practices.
          More than 2 centuries ago, our founders sought to protect the 
          religious freedom that inherently belongs to every human 
          being. Now the responsibility falls to our generation, not 
          only to preserve that right, but also to work together for the 
          day when all people can worship freely and in peace.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim January 16, 2001, as Religious Freedom Day. I call 
          upon the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs, and I urge 
          all Americans to reaffirm their devotion to the fundamental 
          principles of religious freedom and tolerance.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth 
          day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proc. 7392

Proclamation 7392 of January 17, 2001

Boundary Enlargement and Modifications of the Buck Island Reef National 
Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Buck Island Reef National Monument was established on December 
          28, 1961 (Presidential Proclamation 3443), just north of St. 
          Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands, for the purpose of 
          protecting Buck Island and its adjoining shoals, rocks, and 
          undersea coral reef formations. Considered one of the finest 
          marine gardens in the Caribbean Sea, the unique natural area 
          and the rare marine life which are dependent upon it are 
          subject to the constant threat of commercial exploitation and 
          destruction. The monument's vulnerable floral and faunal 
          communities live in a fragile, interdependent relationship and 
          include habitats essential for sustaining the tropical marine 
          ecosystem: coral reefs, sea grass beds, octocoral hardbottom, 
          sand communities, algal plains, shelf edge, and oceanic 
          habitats. The boundary enlargement effected by this 
          proclamation brings into the monument additional objects of 
          scientific and historic interest, and provides necessary 
          further protection for the resources of the existing monument.
          The expansion area includes additional coral reefs (patch, pur 
          and groove, and deep and wall), unusual ``haystacks'' of 
          elkhorn coral, barrier reefs, sea

[[Page 4]]

          grass beds, and sand communities, as well as algal plains, 
          shelf edge, and other supporting habitats not included within 
          the initial boundary. Oceanic currents carry planktonic larvae 
          of coral reef associated animals to the shallow nearshore 
          coral reef and sea grass habitats, where they transform into 
          their juvenile stage. As they mature over months or years, 
          they move offshore and take up residence in the deeper coral 
          reefs, octocoral hardbottom, and algal plains. Between the 
          monument's nearshore habitats and its shelf edge spawning 
          sites are habitats that play essential roles during specific 
          developmental stages of many reef-associated species, 
          including spawning migrations of many reef fish species and 
          crustaceans. Several threatened and endangered species forage, 
          breed, nest, rest, or calve in the waters included in the 
          enlarged monument, including humpback whales, pilot whales, 
          four species of dolphins, brown pelicans, least terns, and the 
          hawksbill, leatherback, and green sea turtles. Countless 
          species of reef fishes, invertebrates, plants, and over 12 
          species of sea birds utilize this area.
          The ecologically important shelf edge is the spawning site for 
          many reef species, such as most groupers and snappers, and the 
          spiny lobster. Plummeting to abyssal depths, this habitat of 
          vertical walls, honeycombed with holes and caves, is home to 
          deepwater species and a refuge for other species.
          The expansion area also contains significant cultural and 
          historical objects. In March 1797, the slave ship Mary, 
          captained by James Hunter of Liverpool, sank in this area, and 
          its cargo of 240 slaves was saved and brought to 
          Christiansted. In March 1803, the General Abercrombie, 
          captained by James Booth of Liverpool, also wrecked in this 
          area, and its cargo of 339 slaves was brought to 
          Christiansted. Slave shipwrecks in U.S. waters are rare. The 
          monument contains remnants of these wrecks. Other wrecks may 
          also exist in the monument.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as an addition to the Buck Island Reef 
          National Monument:
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as an 
          addition to the Buck Island Reef National Monument, for the 
          purpose of care, management, and protection of the objects of 
          historic and scientific interest situated on lands within the 
          said monument, all lands and interests in lands owned or 
          controlled by the United States within the boundaries of the 
          area described on the map entitled ``Buck Island Reef National 
          Monument Boundary Enlargement'' attached to and forming a part 
          of this proclamation. The Federal land and interests in land 
          reserved consist of approximately 18,135 marine acres,

[[Page 5]]

          which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by 
          exchange that furthers the protective purposes of the 
          monument.
          For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, 
          the Secretary shall prohibit all boat anchoring, provided that 
          the Secretary may permit exceptions for emergency or 
          authorized administrative purposes, and may issue permits for 
          anchoring in deep sand bottom areas, to the extent that it is 
          consistent with the protection of the objects.
          For the purposes of protecting the objects identified above, 
          the Secretary shall prohibit all extractive uses. This 
          prohibition supersedes the limited authorization for 
          extractive uses included in Proclamation 3443 of December 28, 
          1961.
          Lands and interests in lands within the monument not owned or 
          controlled by the United States shall be reserved as a part of 
          the monument upon acquisition of title or control thereto by 
          the United States.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the National Park Service, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities, to implement the purposes of this 
          proclamation. The National Park Service will manage the 
          monument in a manner consistent with international law.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a management plan, 
          including the management of vessels in the monument, within 2 
          years that will address any further specific actions necessary 
          to protect the objects identified above.
          The enlargement of this monument is subject to valid existing 
          rights.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 6]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.178

Proc. 7393

[[Page 7]]


Proclamation 7393 of January 17, 2001

Establishment of the Carrizo Plain National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Full of natural splendor and rich in human history, the 
          majestic grasslands and stark ridges in the Carrizo Plain 
          National Monument contain exceptional objects of scientific 
          and historic interest. Since the mid-1800s, large portions of 
          the grasslands that once spanned the entire four hundred mile 
          expanse of California's nearby San Joaquin Valley and other 
          valleys in the vicinity have been eliminated by extensive land 
          conversion to agricultural, industrial, and urban land uses. 
          The Carrizo Plain National Monument, which is dramatically 
          bisected by the San Andreas Fault zone, is the largest 
          undeveloped remnant of this ecosystem, providing crucial 
          habitat for the long-term conservation of the many endemic 
          plant and animal species that still inhabit the area.
          The monument offers a refuge for endangered, threatened, and 
          rare animal species such as the San Joaquin kit fox, the 
          California condor, the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, the giant 
          kangaroo rat, the San Joaquin antelope squirrel, the longhorn 
          fairy shrimp, and the vernal pool fairy shrimp. It supports 
          important populations of pronghorn antelope and tule elk. The 
          area is also home to many rare and sensitive plant species, 
          including the California jewelflower, the Hoover's woolly-
          star, the San-Joaquin woolly-threads, the pale-yellow layia, 
          the forked fiddleneck, the Carrizo peppergrass, the Lost Hills 
          saltbush, the Temblor buckwheat, the recurved larkspur, and 
          the Munz's tidy-tips. Despite past human use, the size, 
          isolation, and relatively undeveloped nature of the area make 
          it ideal for long-term conservation of the dwindling flora and 
          fauna characteristic of the San Joaquin Valley region.
          The Carrizo Plain National Monument also encompasses Soda 
          Lake, the largest remaining natural alkali wetland in southern 
          California and the only closed basin within the coastal 
          mountains. As its name suggests, Soda Lake concentrates salts 
          as water is evaporated away, leaving white deposits of 
          sulfates and carbonates. Despite this harsh environment, small 
          plant and animal species are well adapted to the setting, 
          which is also important to migratory birds. During the winter 
          months the lake fills with water and teems with thousands of 
          beautiful lesser sandhill cranes, long-billed curlews, and 
          mountain plovers.
          The Carrizo Plain National Monument owes its existence to the 
          geologic processes that occur along the San Andreas Fault, 
          where two of the Earth's five great tectonic plates slide past 
          one another, parallel to the axis of the Plain. Shifting along 
          the fault created the Plain by rumpling the rocks to the 
          northeast into the Temblor Range and isolating the Plain from 
          the rest of the San Joaquin Valley. The area is world-famous 
          for its spectacular exposures of fault-generated landforms. 
          Stream valleys emerge from the adjacent mountains, only to 
          take dramatic right-angle turns where they intersect the 
          fault. Ponds and sags form where the ground is extended and 
          subsides between branches of the fault. Benches form where the 
          fault offsets

[[Page 8]]

          valley walls. Many dramatic landscape features are products of 
          the interplay between very rapid fault movement and slower 
          erosion. The dry climate of the area produces low erosion 
          rates, thereby preserving the spectacular effects of fault 
          slip, folding, and warping. On the Plain, these fault-related 
          events happen intermittently, but with great force. In 1857, 
          the strongest earthquake in California's recorded history 
          ripped through the San Andreas Fault, wrenching the western 
          side of the Carrizo Plain National Monument thirty-one feet 
          northward.
          The area is also distinguished for its significant fossil 
          assemblages. The Caliente Formation, exposed on the southeast 
          side of the Caliente Range, is host to abundant and diverse 
          terrestrial fossil mammal remains of the Miocene Epoch (from 
          13 million to 25 million years ago). Fossils of five North 
          American provincial mammalian ages (Arikareean, Hemingfordian, 
          Barstovian, Clarendonian, Hemphillian) are represented in 
          sedimentary rocks in that formation. These terrestrial fossil 
          remains are interlaced with marine sedimentary rocks bearing 
          fossils of mollusks, pectens, turitellas, and oysters.
          In addition to its geologic and biological wealth, the area is 
          rich in human history. Archaeologists theorize that humans 
          have occupied the Carrizo Plain National Monument area since 
          the Paleo-Indian Period (circa 11,000 to 9,000 B.C.). Bedrock 
          mortar milling features, village middens, and elaborate 
          pictographs are the primary manifestations of prehistoric 
          occupation. Some of these, such as the Painted Rock and 
          Sulphur Springs rock art sites, are recognized as world class. 
          European expeditions through the area date back to the late 
          1700s, with settlement beginning in the 1850s. Livestock 
          ranching, farming, and mining activities in the last century 
          and a half are evidenced by numerous artifacts and historic 
          ranch properties within the area.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Carrizo Plain National Monument:
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Carrizo Plain National Monument, for the purpose of protecting 
          the objects identified above, all lands and interests in lands 
          owned or controlled by the United States within the boundaries 
          of the area described on the map entitled ``Carrizo Plain 
          National Monument'' attached to and forming a part of this 
          proclamation. The Federal land and interests in land reserved 
          consist of approximately 204,107 acres, which is the smallest 
          area compatible with the proper care and management of the 
          objects to be protected.

[[Page 9]]

          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by 
          exchange that furthers the protective purposes of the 
          monument. For the purpose of protecting the objects identified 
          above, the Secretary shall prohibit all motorized and 
          mechanized vehicle use off road, except for emergency or 
          authorized administrative purposes.
          Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not 
          owned by the United States shall be reserved as a part of the 
          monument upon acquisition of title thereto by the United 
          States.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities, to implement the purposes of this 
          proclamation.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a management plan 
          that addresses the actions, including road closures or travel 
          restrictions, necessary to protect the objects identified in 
          this proclamation.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to valid 
          existing rights.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the jurisdiction of the State of California with 
          respect to fish and wildlife management.
          There is hereby reserved, as of the date of this proclamation 
          and subject to valid existing rights, a quantity of water 
          sufficient to fulfill the purposes for which this monument is 
          established. Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as 
          a relinquishment or reduction of any water use or rights 
          reserved or appropriated by the United States on or before the 
          date of this proclamation.
          Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
          Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or 
          leases on all lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to 
          apply with regard to the lands in the monument.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

[[Page 10]]

WILLIAM J. CLINTON
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.179

Proc. 7394

[[Page 11]]


Proclamation 7394 of January 17, 2001

Establishment of the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Located on the Pajarito Plateau in north central New Mexico, 
          the Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument is a remarkable 
          outdoor laboratory, offering an opportunity to observe, study, 
          and experience the geologic processes that shape natural 
          landscapes, as well as other cultural and biological objects 
          of interest. The area is rich in pumice, ash, and tuff 
          deposits, the light-colored, cone-shaped tent rock formations 
          that are the products of explosive volcanic eruptions that 
          occurred between 6 and 7 million years ago. Small canyons lead 
          inward from cliff faces, and over time, wind and water have 
          scooped openings of all shapes and sizes in the rocks and have 
          contoured the ends of the ravines and canyons into smooth 
          semicircles. In these canyons, erosion-resistant caprocks 
          protect the softer tents below. While the formations are 
          uniform in shape, they vary in height from a few feet to 90 
          feet, and the layering of volcanic material intersperses bands 
          of grey with beige colored rock.
          Amid the formations and in contrast to the muted colors of the 
          rocks of the monument, vibrant green leaves and red bark of 
          manzanita, a shrubby species from the Sierra Madre of Mexico, 
          cling to the cracks and crevices of the cliff faces. Red-
          tailed hawks, kestrels, violet-green swallows, and Western 
          bluebirds soar above the canyons and use the pinion and 
          ponderosa covered terrain near the cliffs.
          The complex landscape and spectacular geologic scenery of the 
          Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument has been a focal 
          point for visitors for centuries. Human settlement is believed 
          to have begun in the monument as a series of campsites during 
          the Archaic period, from approximately 5500 B.C. During the 
          fifteenth century, several large ancestral pueblos were 
          established in the area. Their descendants, the Pueblo de 
          Cochiti, still inhabit the surrounding area. Although the 
          Spanish explorer Don Juan de Onate reached the Pajarito 
          Plateau in 1598, it was not until the late eighteenth century 
          that families began to claim land grants around Tent Rocks 
          from the Spanish Crown. Remnants of human history are 
          scattered throughout the monument.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument:

[[Page 12]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument, for the purpose of 
          protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
          interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States 
          within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
          entitled ``Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument'' 
          attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. The 
          Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of 
          approximately 4,148 acres, which is the smallest area 
          compatible with the proper care and management of the objects 
          to be protected.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by 
          exchange that furthers the protective purposes of the 
          monument.
          For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, 
          the Secretary shall prohibit all motorized and mechanized 
          vehicle use off road, except for emergency or authorized 
          administrative purposes.
          Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not 
          owned by the United States shall be reserved as a part of the 
          monument upon acquisition of title thereto by the United 
          States.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities and in close cooperation with the Pueblo de 
          Cochiti, to implement the purposes of this proclamation.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare, within 3 years of 
          this date, a management plan for this monument, and shall 
          promulgate such regulations for its management as he deems 
          appropriate. The management plan shall include appropriate 
          transportation planning that addresses the actions, including 
          road closures or travel restrictions, necessary to protect the 
          objects identified in this proclamation and to further the 
          purposes of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 
          August 11, 1978 (42 U.S.C. 1996).
          Only a very small amount of livestock grazing occurs inside 
          the monument. The Secretary of the Interior shall retire the 
          portion of the grazing allotments within the monument, 
          pursuant to applicable law, unless the Secretary specifically 
          finds that livestock grazing will advance the purposes of the 
          proclamation.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to valid 
          existing rights.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the jurisdiction of the State of New Mexico with 
          respect to fish and wildlife management.
          This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of 
          Federal law. Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as 
          a relinquishment or reduction of any water use or rights 
          reserved or appropriated by the United States on or before the 
          date of this proclamation. The Secretary shall work with

[[Page 13]]

          appropriate State authorities to ensure that any water 
          resources needed for monument purposes are available.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 14]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.180

Proc. 7395

[[Page 15]]


Proclamation 7395 of January 17, 2001

 Establishment of the Minidoka Internment National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The Minidoka Internment National Monument is a unique and 
          irreplaceable historical resource which protects historic 
          structures and objects that provide opportunities for public 
          education and interpretation of an important chapter in 
          American history--the internment of Japanese Americans during 
          World War II.
          On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed 
          Executive Order 9066, authorizing the Secretary of War and 
          military commanders to designate military areas from which 
          ``any or all persons may be excluded'' and to ``provide for 
          residents of any such area who are excluded therefrom, such 
          transportation, food, shelter, and other accommodations as may 
          be necessary.''
          Starting in early 1942, military authorities began designating 
          military exclusion areas in the States of California, 
          Washington, Oregon, and Arizona, and the territory of Alaska. 
          Following the signing of Executive Order 9066, American 
          citizens and resident aliens of Japanese ancestry living in 
          the designated exclusion areas were ordered to evacuate their 
          homes and businesses and report to temporary assembly centers 
          located at fairgrounds, horse racetracks, and other make-shift 
          facilities.
          To provide more permanent accommodations for the evacuees, 
          President Roosevelt established the War Relocation Authority 
          (WRA) in March 1942. The WRA oversaw the construction of ten 
          relocation centers on Federally owned lands in remote areas of 
          six western States and Arkansas, including the Minidoka 
          Relocation Center in Idaho. Alaskan Native residents of the 
          Aleutian and Pribiloff Islands and members of other ethnic and 
          religious groups were also relocated or interned during the 
          course of the war.
          Established in August 1942, the Minidoka Relocation Center, 
          also known as the Hunt Site, was located on Federal lands in 
          Jerome County, in south central Idaho. During its operation 
          from August 1942 to October 1945, the population reached a 
          peak of 9,397 Japanese Americans from Washington State, 
          Oregon, and Alaska. The Center included over 33,000 acres of 
          land with administrative and residential facilities located on 
          approximately 950 acres. The Center had more than 600 
          buildings including administrative, religious, residential, 
          educational, mess, medical, manufacturing, warehouse, 
          security, and other structures.
          Living conditions at Minidoka and the other centers were 
          harsh. Internees were housed in crude barracks and cramped 
          quarters, and they shared communal facilities. Internees 
          engaged in irrigated agriculture, livestock production, and 
          light manufacturing to produce food and garments for the camp. 
          Approximately 1,000 internees from Minidoka served in the U.S. 
          military. Fifty-four Japanese American servicemen from 
          Minidoka were killed in action.

[[Page 16]]

          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of lands, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined 
          to the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Minidoka Internment National Monument:
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Minidoka Internment National Monument for the purpose of 
          protecting the historic structures and objects of historic 
          interest contained therein, all lands and interests in lands 
          owned or controlled by the United States within the boundaries 
          of the area described on the map entitled ``Minidoka 
          Internment National Monument'' attached to and forming a part 
          of this proclamation. The Federal lands and interests in land 
          reserved consist of approximately 72.75 acres, which is the 
          smallest area compatible with the proper care and management 
          of the structures and objects to be protected.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land or other Federal laws, 
          including but not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, 
          and patent under the mining laws, and from disposition under 
          all laws relating to mineral and geothermal leasing.
          The Secretary of the Interior, pursuant to legal authorities, 
          shall manage the monument and shall transfer administration of 
          the monument to the National Park Service to implement the 
          purposes of this proclamation.
          To carry out the purposes of this proclamation and to 
          interpret the relocation and internment of Japanese Americans 
          during World War II, the Secretary of the Interior, through 
          the National Park Service, shall prepare a management plan for 
          the monument within 3 years of this date.
          This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of 
          Federal law nor relinquish any water rights held by the 
          Federal Government existing on this date. The Secretary shall 
          work with appropriate State authorities to ensure that any 
          water resources needed for monument purposes are available.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to valid 
          existing rights, provided that nothing in this proclamation 
          shall interfere with the operation and maintenance of the 
          Northside Canal to the extent that any such activities, that 
          are not valid existing rights, are consistent with the 
          purposes of the proclamation.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the rights of any Indian tribe.

[[Page 17]]

          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 18]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.181

Proc. 7396

[[Page 19]]



Proclamation 7396 of January 17, 2001

Establishment of the Pompeys Pillar National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Pompeys Pillar National Monument is a massive sandstone 
          outcrop that rises from an almost two-acre base on the banks 
          of the Yellowstone River 150 feet toward Montana's Big Sky, 
          east of Billings. The monument's premier location at a natural 
          ford in the Yellowstone River, and its geologic distinction as 
          the only major sandstone formation in the area, have made 
          Pompeys Pillar a celebrated landmark and outstanding 
          observation point for more than eleven thousand years of human 
          occupation. Hundreds of markings, petroglyphs, and 
          inscriptions left by visitors have transformed this geologic 
          phenomenon into a living journal of the American West.
          The monument's most notable visitor, Captain William Clark of 
          the Lewis and Clark Expedition, arrived at Pompeys Pillar on 
          July 25, 1806, on his return trip from the Pacific coast. 
          Clark's journal recorded his stop at this ``remarkable rock'' 
          with its ``extensive view in every direction.'' He described 
          an idyllic landscape of grassy plains, snow-capped mountains, 
          and cliffs abutting the wandering river. Clark marked his 
          presence by engraving his name and the date of his visit on 
          the outcrop. This simple inscription is the only remaining 
          physical evidence of Lewis and Clark's epic journey. In his 
          journal, Clark named the rock Pompy's Tower, Pompy being 
          Clark's nickname for Sacagawea's young son, Jean Baptiste 
          Charbonneau, who was born at the expedition's winter camp at 
          Fort Mandan on February 11, 1805. The name was changed to 
          Pompeys Pillar by author Nicholas Biddle when his account of 
          the Expedition was published in 1814.
          Ethnographic and archaeological evidence indicates that the 
          Pillar was a place of ritual and religious activity. Hundreds 
          of petroglyphs on the face of the rock, noted by Clark in his 
          journal, reflect the importance of the monument to early 
          peoples. The Crow people, the dominant residents of the region 
          when Clark passed through, call the pillar the ``Mountain 
          Lions Lodge'' in their language, and it figures prominently in 
          Crow oral history. Pompeys Pillar also includes the markings 
          and signature of a host of characters from the pioneer past, 
          including fur trappers, Yellowstone River steamboat men, 
          frontier army troops, railroad workers, missionaries, and 
          early settlers. In 1873, Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong 
          Custer and his men camped at its base, where they came under 
          attack from Sioux snipers.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Pompeys Pillar National Monument:

[[Page 20]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Pompeys Pillar National Monument, for the purpose of 
          protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
          interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States 
          within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
          entitled ``Pompeys Pillar National Monument'' attached to and 
          forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land and 
          interests in land reserved consist of approximately 51 acres, 
          which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing.
          Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not 
          owned by the United States shall be reserved as a part of the 
          monument upon acquisition of title thereto by the United 
          States.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities, to implement the purposes of this 
          proclamation.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to any valid 
          existing rights, including the mineral estate held by the 
          United States in trust for the Crow Tribe.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the jurisdiction of the State of Montana with respect 
          to fish and wildlife management.
          This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of 
          Federal law. Nothing in this reservation shall be construed as 
          a relinquishment or reduction of any water use or rights 
          reserved or appropriated by the United States on or before the 
          date of this proclamation. The Secretary shall work with 
          appropriate State authorities to ensure that any water 
          resources needed for monument purposes are available.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; 
          however,the national monument shall be the dominant 
          reservation. Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized 
          persons not to appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any 
          feature of this monument and not to locate or settle upon any 
          of the lands thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 21]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.182

Proc. 7397

[[Page 22]]


Proclamation 7397 of January 17, 2001

Establishment of the Sonoran Desert National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The Sonoran Desert National Monument is a magnificent example 
          of untrammeled Sonoran desert landscape. The area encompasses 
          a functioning desert ecosystem with an extraordinary array of 
          biological, scientific, and historic resources. The most 
          biologically diverse of the North American deserts, the 
          monument consists of distinct mountain ranges separated by 
          wide valleys, and includes large saguaro cactus forest 
          communities that provide excellent habitat for a wide range of 
          wildlife species.
          The monument's biological resources include a spectacular 
          diversity of plant and animal species. The higher peaks 
          include unique woodland assemblages, while the lower elevation 
          lands offer one of the most structurally complex examples of 
          palo verde/mixed cacti association in the Sonoran Desert. The 
          dense stands of leguminous trees and cacti are dominated by 
          saguaros, palo-verde trees, ironwood, prickly pear, and 
          cholla. Important natural water holes, known as tinajas, exist 
          throughout the monument. The endangered acuna pineapple cactus 
          is also found in the monument.
          The most striking aspect of the plant communities within the 
          monument are the abundant saguaro cactus forests. The saguaro 
          is a signature plant of the Sonoran Desert. Individual saguaro 
          plants are indeed magnificent, but a forest of these plants, 
          together with the wide variety of trees, shrubs, and 
          herbaceous plants that make up the forest community, is an 
          impressive site to behold. The saguaro cactus forests within 
          the monument are a national treasure, rivaling those within 
          the Saguaro National Park.
          The rich diversity, density, and distribution of plants in the 
          Sand Tank Mountains area of the monument is especially 
          striking and can be attributed to the management regime in 
          place since the area was withdrawn for military purposes in 
          1941. In particular, while some public access to the area is 
          allowed, no livestock grazing has occurred for nearly 50 
          years. To extend the extraordinary diversity and overall 
          ecological health of the Sand Tanks Mountains area, land 
          adjacent and with biological resources similar to the area 
          withdrawn for military purposes should be subject to a similar 
          management regime to the fullest extent possible.
          The monument contains an abundance of packrat middens, 
          allowing for scientific analysis of plant species and climates 
          in past eras. Scientific analysis of the midden shows that the 
          area received far more precipitation 20,000 years ago, and 
          slowly became more arid. Vegetation for the area changed from 
          juniper- oak-pinion pine woodland to the vegetation found 
          today in the Sonoran Desert, although a few plants from the 
          more mesic period, including the Kofa Mountain barberry, 
          Arizona rosewood, and junipers, remain on higher elevations of 
          north-facing slopes.
          The lower elevations and flatter areas of the monument contain 
          the creosote-bursage plant community. This plant community 
          thrives in the open expanses between the mountain ranges, and 
          connects the other plant communities together. Rare patches of 
          desert grassland can also be found

[[Page 23]]

          throughout the monument, especially in the Sand Tank Mountains 
          area. The washes in the area support a much denser vegetation 
          community than the surrounding desert, including mesquite, 
          ironwood, paloverde, desert honeysuckle, chuperosa, and desert 
          willow, as well as a variety of herbaceous plants. This 
          vegetation offers the dense cover bird species need for 
          successful nesting, foraging, and escape, and birds heavily 
          use the washes during migration.
          The diverse plant communities present in the monument support 
          a wide variety of wildlife, including the endangered Sonoran 
          pronghorn, a robust population of desert bighorn sheep, 
          especially in the Maricopa Mountains area, and other mammalian 
          species such as mule deer, javelina, mountain lion, gray fox, 
          and bobcat. Bat species within the monument include the 
          endangered lesser long-nosed bat, the California leaf-nosed 
          bat, and the cave myotis. Over 200 species of birds are found 
          in the monument, including 59 species known to nest in the 
          Vekol Valley area. Numerous species of raptors and owls 
          inhabit the monument, including the elf owl and the western 
          screech owl. The monument also supports a diverse array of 
          reptiles and amphibians, including the Sonoran desert tortoise 
          and the red-backed whiptail. The Bureau of Land Management has 
          designated approximately 25,000 acres of land in the Maricopa 
          Mountains area as critical habitat for the desert tortoise. 
          The Vekol Valley and Sand Tank Mountain areas contain 
          especially diverse and robust populations of amphibians. 
          During summer rainfall events, thousands of Sonoran green 
          toads in the Vekol Valley can be heard moving around and 
          calling out.
          The monument also contains many significant archaeological and 
          historic sites, including rock art sites, lithic quarries, and 
          scattered artifacts. Vekol Wash is believed to have been an 
          important prehistoric travel and trade corridor between the 
          Hohokam and tribes located in what is now Mexico. Signs of 
          large villages and permanent habitat sites occur throughout 
          the area, and particularly along the bajadas of the Table Top 
          Mountains. Occupants of these villages were the ancestors of 
          today's O'odham, Quechan, Cocopah, Maricopa, and other tribes. 
          The monument also contains a much used trail corridor 23 miles 
          long in which are found remnants of several important historic 
          trails, including the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic 
          Trail, the Mormon Battalion Trail, and the Butterfield 
          Overland Stage Route.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS, it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Sonoran Desert National Monument.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Sonoran Desert National Monument,

[[Page 24]]

          for the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, 
          all lands and interest in lands owned or controlled by the 
          United States within the boundaries of the area described on 
          the map entitled ``Sonoran Desert National Monument'' attached 
          to and forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land 
          and interests in land reserved consist of approximately 
          486,149 acres, which is the smallest area compatible with the 
          proper care and management of the objects to be protected.
          For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, 
          all motorized and mechanized vehicle use off road will be 
          prohibited, except for emergency or authorized administrative 
          purposes.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the jurisdiction of the State of Arizona with respect 
          to fish and wildlife management.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to valid 
          existing rights.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by 
          exchange that furthers the protective purposes of the 
          monument. Lands and interests in lands within the monument not 
          owned by the United States shall be reserved as a part of the 
          monument upon acquisition of title thereto by the United 
          States.
          This proclamation does not reserve water as a matter of 
          Federal law nor relinquish any water rights held by the 
          Federal Government existing on this date. The Federal land 
          management agencies shall work with appropriate State 
          authorities to ensure that water resources needed for monument 
          purposes are available.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities, to implement the purposes of this 
          proclamation. That portion identified as Area A on the map, 
          however, shall be managed under the management arrangement 
          established by section 3 of Public Law No. 99-606, 100 Stat. 
          3460-61, until November 6, 2001, at which time, pursuant to 
          section 5(a) of Public Law No. 99-606, 100 Stat. 3462-63, the 
          military withdrawal terminates. At that time, the Secretary of 
          the Interior shall assume management responsibility for Area A 
          through the Bureau of Land Management.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a management plan 
          that addresses the actions, including road closures or travel 
          restrictions, necessary to protect the objects identified in 
          this proclamation.
          Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
          Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or 
          leases on all lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to 
          apply with regard to the lands in the monument; provided, 
          however, that grazing permits on Federal lands within the 
          monument south of Interstate Highway 8 shall not be renewed

[[Page 25]]

          at the end of their current term; and provided further, that 
          grazing on Federal lands north of Interstate 8 shall be 
          allowed to continue only to the extent that the Bureau of Land 
          Management determines that grazing is compatible with the 
          paramount purpose of protecting the objects identified in this 
          proclamation.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall preclude low level 
          overflights of military aircraft, the designation of new units 
          of special use airspace, or the use or establishment of 
          military flight training routes over the lands included in 
          this proclamation.
          In order to protect the public during operations at the 
          adjacent Barry M. Goldwater Range, and to continue management 
          practices that have resulted in an exceptionally well 
          preserved natural resource, the current procedures for public 
          access to the portion of the monument depicted as Area A on 
          the attached map shall remain in full force and effect, except 
          to the extent that the United States Air Force agrees to 
          different procedures which the Bureau of Land Management 
          determines are compatible with the protection of the objects 
          identified in this proclamation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 26]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.183

Proc. 7398

[[Page 27]]


Proclamation 7398 of January 17, 2001

 Establishment of the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument contains a 
          spectacular array of biological, geological, and historical 
          objects of interest. From Fort Benton upstream into the 
          Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, the monument 
          spans 149 miles of the Upper Missouri River, the adjacent 
          Breaks country, and portions of Arrow Creek, Antelope Creek, 
          and the Judith River. The area has remained largely unchanged 
          in the nearly 200 years since Meriwether Lewis and William 
          Clark traveled through it on their epic journey. In 1976, the 
          Congress designated the Missouri River segment and corridor in 
          this area a National Wild and Scenic River (Public Law 94-486, 
          90 Stat. 2327). The monument also encompasses segments of the 
          Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, the Nez Perce 
          National Historic Trail, and the Cow Creek Island Area of 
          Critical Environmental Concern.
          Lewis and Clark first encountered the Breaks country of the 
          monument on their westward leg. In his journal, Clark 
          described the abundant wildlife of the area, including mule 
          deer, elk, and antelope, and on April 29, 1805, the Lewis and 
          Clark expedition recorded the first big horn sheep observation 
          by non-Indians in North America. Lewis' description of the 
          magnificent White Cliffs area on the western side of the 
          monument is especially vivid, and not just for his sometimes 
          colorful spellings:
          ``The hills and river Clifts which we passed today exhibit a 
          most romantic appearance.... The bluffs of the river rise to 
          hight of from 2 to 300 feet and in most places nearly 
          perpendicular; they are formed of remarkable white sandstone 
          which is sufficiently soft to give way readily to the 
          impression of water...
          ``The water in the course of time ... has trickled down the 
          soft sand clifts and woarn it into a thousand grotesque 
          figures, which with the help of a little immagination and an 
          oblique view, at a distance are made to represent eligant 
          ranges of lofty freestone buildings, having their parapets 
          well stocked with statuary; collumns of various sculptures 
          both grooved and plain, are also seen supporting long 
          galleries in front of these buildings; in other places on a 
          much nearer approach and with the help of less immagination we 
          see the remains or ruins of eligant buildings; some collumns 
          standing and almost entire with their pedestals and capitals; 
          others retaining their pedestals but deprived by time or 
          accident of their capitals, some lying prostrate an broken 
          othe[r]s in the form of vast pyramids of conic structure 
          bearing a serees of other pyramids on their tops...
          As we passed on it seemed as if those seens of visionary 
          inchantment would never have and [an] end; for here it is too 
          that nature presents to the view of the traveler vast ranges 
          of walls of tolerable workmanship, so perfect indeed are those 
          walls that I should have thought that nature had attempted 
          here to rival the human art of masonry...''

[[Page 28]]

          The monument is covered with sedimentary rocks deposited in 
          shallow seas that covered central and eastern Montana during 
          the Cretaceous period. Glaciers, volcanic activity, and 
          erosion have since folded, faulted, uplifted, and sculpted the 
          landscape to the majestic form it takes today.
          The area remains remote and nearly as undeveloped as it was in 
          1805. Many of the biological objects described in Lewis' and 
          Clark's journals continue to make the monument their home. The 
          monument boasts the most viable elk herd in Montana and one of 
          the premier big horn sheep herds in the continental United 
          States. It contains essential winter range for sage grouse as 
          well as habitat for prairie dogs. Lewis sent Jefferson a 
          prairie dog specimen which was, as Lewis noted at the time, 
          ``new to science.'' Abundant plant life along the River and 
          across the Breaks country supports this wildlife. The lower 
          reach of the Judith River, just above its confluence with the 
          Missouri, contains one of the few remaining fully functioning 
          cottonwood gallery forest ecosystems on the Northern Plains. 
          Arrow Creek, originally called Slaughter River by Lewis and 
          Clark, contains the largest concentration of antelope and mule 
          deer in the monument as well as important spawning habitat for 
          the endangered pallid sturgeon. An undammed tributary to the 
          Missouri River, Arrow Creek is a critical seed source for 
          cottonwood trees for the flood plain along the Missouri.
          The cliff faces in the monument provide perching and nesting 
          habitat for many raptors, including the sparrow hawk, 
          ferruginous hawk, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, and golden 
          eagle. Several pairs of bald eagles nest along the River in 
          the monument and many others visit during the late fall and 
          early winter. Shoreline areas provide habitat for great blue 
          heron, pelican, and a wide variety of waterfowl. The River and 
          its tributaries in the monument host forty-eight fish species, 
          including goldeye, drum, sauger, walleye, northern pike, 
          channel catfish, and small mouth buffalo. The monument has one 
          of the six remaining paddlefish populations in the United 
          States. The River also supports the blue sucker, shovel nose 
          sturgeon, sicklefin, sturgeon chub, and the endangered pallid 
          sturgeon.
          The Bullwacker area of the monument contains some of the 
          wildest country on all the Great Plains, as well as important 
          wildlife habitat. During the stress-inducing winter months, 
          mule deer and elk move up to the area from the river, and 
          antelope and sage grouse move down to the area from the 
          benchlands. The heads of the coulees and breaks also contain 
          archeological and historical sites, from teepee rings and 
          remnants of historic trails to abandoned homesteads and 
          lookout sites used by Meriwether Lewis.
          Long before the time of Lewis and Clark, the area was 
          inhabited by numerous native tribes, including the Blackfeet, 
          Assiniboin, Gros Ventre (Atsina), Crow, Plains Cree, and 
          Plains Ojibwa. The confluence of the Judith and Missouri 
          Rivers was the setting for important peace councils in 1846 
          and 1855. In 1877, the Nez Perce crossed the Missouri and 
          entered the Breaks country in their attempt to escape to 
          Canada. The Cow Island Skirmish occurred in the Breaks and was 
          the last encounter prior to the Nez Perce surrender to the 
          U.S. Army at the Battle of Bear Paw just north of the 
          monument. Pioneers and the Army followed Lewis and Clark in 
          the 1830s establishing Fort Piegan, Fort McKenzie, and Fort 
          Benton. Remnants of this rich history are scattered throughout 
          the monument, and the River corridor retains many of the same 
          qualities and much of the same appearance today as it did 
          then.

[[Page 29]]

          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument:
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, for the purpose 
          of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
          interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States 
          within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
          entitled ``Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument'' 
          attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. The 
          Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of 
          approximately 377,346 acres, which is the smallest area 
          compatible with the proper care and management of the objects 
          to be protected.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by 
          exchange that furthers the protective purposes of the 
          monument. The establishment of this monument is subject to 
          valid existing rights. The Secretary of the Interior shall 
          manage development on existing oil and gas leases within the 
          monument, subject to valid existing rights, so as not to 
          create any new impacts that would interfere with the proper 
          care and management of the objects protected by this 
          proclamation.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a transportation 
          plan that addresses the actions, including road closures or 
          travel restrictions, necessary to protect the objects 
          identified in this proclamation.
          For the purpose of protecting the objects identified above, 
          the Secretary shall prohibit all motorized and mechanized 
          vehicle use off road, except for emergency or authorized 
          administrative purposes.
          Lands and interests in lands within the proposed monument not 
          owned by the United States shall be reserved as a part of the 
          monument upon acquisition of title thereto by the United 
          States.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the Bureau of Land Management, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities, including the National Wild and Scenic 
          Rivers Act, to implement the purposes of this proclamation.
          Because waters of the Upper Missouri River through the 
          monument area have already been reserved through the 
          Congress's designation of the area as a component of the 
          National Wild and Scenic River System in 1976, this

[[Page 30]]

          proclamation makes no additional reservation of water, except 
          in two small tributaries, the Judith River and Arrow Creek. 
          These tributaries contain outstanding objects of biological 
          interest that are dependent on water, such as a fully 
          functioning cottonwood gallery forest ecosystem that is rare 
          in the Northern Plains. Therefore, there is hereby reserved, 
          as of the date of this proclamation and subject to valid 
          existing rights, a quantity of water in the Judith River and 
          Arrow Creek sufficient to fulfill the purposes for which this 
          monument is established. Nothing in this reservation shall be 
          construed as a relinquishment or reduction of any water use or 
          rights reserved or appropriated by the United States on or 
          before the date of this proclamation.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the jurisdiction of the State of Montana with respect 
          to fish and wildlife management.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to enlarge or 
          diminish the rights of any Indian tribe.
          Laws, regulations, and policies followed by the Bureau of Land 
          Management in issuing and administering grazing permits or 
          leases on all lands under its jurisdiction shall continue to 
          apply with regard to the lands in the monument.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 31]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.184

Proc. 7399

[[Page 32]]


Proclamation 7399 of January 17, 2001

Establishment of the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, in the 
          submerged lands off the island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin 
          Islands, contains all the elements of a Caribbean tropical 
          marine ecosystem. This designation furthers the protection of 
          the scientific objects included in the Virgin Islands National 
          Park, created in 1956 and expanded in 1962. The biological 
          communities of the monument live in a fragile, interdependent 
          relationship and include habitats essential for sustaining and 
          enhancing the tropical marine ecosystem: mangroves, sea grass 
          beds, coral reefs, octocoral hardbottom, sand communities, 
          shallow mud and fine sediment habitat, and algal plains. The 
          fishery habitats, deeper coral reefs, octocoral hardbottom, 
          and algal plains of the monument are all objects of scientific 
          interest and essential to the long-term sustenance of the 
          tropical marine ecosystem.
          The monument is within the Virgin Islands, which lie at the 
          heart of the insular Caribbean biome, and is representative of 
          the Lesser Antillean biogeographic province. The island of St. 
          John rises from a platform that extends several miles from 
          shore before plunging to the abyssal depths of the Anegada 
          trough to the south and the Puerto Rican trench to the north, 
          the deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean. This platform contains 
          a multitude of species that exist in a delicate balance, 
          interlinked through complex relationships that have developed 
          over tens of thousands of years.
          As part of this important ecosystem, the monument contains 
          biological objects including several threatened and endangered 
          species, which forage, breed, nest, rest, or calve in the 
          waters. Humpback whales, pilot whales, four species of 
          dolphins, brown pelicans, roseate terns, least terns, and the 
          hawksbill, leatherback, and green sea turtles all use portions 
          of the monument. Countless species of reef fish, 
          invertebrates, and plants utilize these submerged lands during 
          their lives, and over 25 species of sea birds feed in the 
          waters. Between the nearshore nursery habitats and the shelf 
          edge spawning sites in the monument are habitats that play 
          essential roles during specific developmental stages of reef-
          associated species, including spawning migrations of many reef 
          fish species and crustaceans.
          The submerged monument lands within Hurricane Hole include the 
          most extensive and well-developed mangrove habitat on St. 
          John. The Hurricane Hole area is an important nursery area for 
          reef associated fish and invertebrates, instrumental in 
          maintaining water quality by filtering and trapping sediment 
          and debris in fresh water runoff from the fast land, and 
          essential to the overall functioning and productivity of 
          regional fisheries. Numerous coral reef-associated species, 
          including the spiny lobster, queen conch, and Nassau grouper, 
          transform from planktonic larvae to bottom-dwelling juveniles 
          in the shallow nearshore habitats of Hurricane Hole. As they 
          mature, they move offshore and take up residence in the deeper 
          coral patch reefs, octocoral hardbottom, and algal plains of 
          the submerged monument lands to the south and north of St. 
          John.

[[Page 33]]

          The monument lands south of St. John are predominantly deep 
          algal plains with scattered areas of raised hard bottom. The 
          algal plains include communities of mostly red and calcareous 
          algae with canopies as much as half a meter high. The raised 
          hard bottom is sparsely colonized with corals, sponges, 
          gorgonians, and other invertebrates, thus providing shelter 
          for lobster, groupers, and snappers as well as spawning sites 
          for some reef fish species. These algal plains and raised hard 
          bottom areas link the shallow water reef, sea grass, and 
          mangrove communities with the deep water shelf and shelf edge 
          communities of fish and invertebrates.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as a national monument to be known as the 
          Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument:
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument, for the purpose 
          of protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
          interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States 
          within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
          entitled ``Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument'' 
          attached to and forming a part of this proclamation. The 
          Federal land and interests in land reserved consist of 
          approximately 12,708 marine acres, which is the smallest area 
          compatible with the proper care and management of the objects 
          to be protected.
          All Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries 
          of this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from 
          all forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or 
          other disposition under the public land laws, including but 
          not limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent 
          under the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws 
          relating to mineral and geothermal leasing, other than by 
          exchange that furthers the protective purposes of the 
          monument. For the purpose of protecting the objects identified 
          above, the Secretary shall prohibit all boat anchoring, except 
          for emergency or authorized administrative purposes.
          For the purposes of protecting the objects identified above, 
          the Secretary shall prohibit all extractive uses, except that 
          the Secretary may issue permits for bait fishing at Hurricane 
          Hole and for blue runner (hard nose) line fishing in the area 
          south of St. John, to the extent that such fishing is 
          consistent with the protection of the objects identified in 
          this proclamation.
          Lands and interests in lands within the monument not owned or 
          controlled by the United States shall be reserved as a part of 
          the monument upon acquisition of title or control thereto by 
          the United States.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall manage the monument 
          through the National Park Service, pursuant to applicable 
          legal authorities, to implement

[[Page 34]]

          the purposes of this proclamation. The National Park Service 
          will manage the monument in a manner consistent with 
          international law.
          The Secretary of the Interior shall prepare a management plan, 
          including the management of vessels in the monument, within 3 
          years, which addresses any further specific actions necessary 
          to protect the objects identified in this proclamation.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to valid 
          existing rights.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 35]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD22JA01.185

Proc. 7400

[[Page 36]]


Proclamation 7400 of January 17, 2001

To Designate Swaziland as a Beneficiary Sub-Saharan African Country and for 
Other Purposes

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 506A(a)(1) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended 
          (the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2466a(a)(1)), as added by 
          section 111(a) of the African Growth and Opportunity Act 
          (Title I of Public Law 106-200) (AGOA), authorizes the 
          President to designate countries listed in section 107 of the 
          AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3706) as ``beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          countries.''
          2. Section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(b)(3)(B)) 
          provides special rules for certain apparel articles imported 
          from ``lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          countries.''
          3. Proclamation 7350 of October 2, 2000, designated certain 
          countries listed in section 107 of the AGOA as beneficiary 
          sub-Saharan African countries and identified which designated 
          beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries would be considered 
          lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries 
          under section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA.
          4. Pursuant to section 506A(a)(1) of the 1974 Act, and having 
          due regard for the eligibility criteria set forth therein, I 
          have determined that it is appropriate to designate the 
          Kingdom of Swaziland as a beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          country.
          5. The Kingdom of Swaziland satisfies the criteria for 
          treatment as a lesser developed beneficiary sub-Saharan 
          African country under section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA (19 
          U.S.C. 3721(b)(3)(B)).
          6. Annex II to Proclamation 7388 of December 18, 2000, listed 
          certain products that are eligible for preferential tariff 
          treatment under section 213(b)(3)(A) of the Caribbean Basin 
          Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(3)(A)), as 
          amended by section 211(a) of the Caribbean Basin Trade 
          Partnership Act (CBTPA) (Title II of Public Law 106-200). 
          Section C of that Annex incorrectly stated the staged rate of 
          duty to be applied to certain imports under subheading 
          6402.99.70 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United 
          States (HTS). I have determined that this error should be 
          corrected.
          7. Proclamations 7350 and 7351 of October 2, 2000, added new 
          general notes 16 and 17 to the HTS and renumbered other 
          general notes. I have determined that general note 1 to the 
          HTS should be modified to reflect these changes.
          8. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the 
          President to embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant 
          provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import 
          treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, 
          modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty 
          or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including sections 506A

[[Page 37]]

          and 604 of the 1974 Act, sections 111 and 112 of the AGOA, 
          section 211 of the CBTPA, and section 213 of the CBERA, do 
          proclaim that:
          (1) The Kingdom of Swaziland is designated as a beneficiary 
          sub-Saharan African country.
          (2) In order to reflect this designation in the HTS, general 
          note 16(a) to the HTS is modified by inserting in alphabetical 
          sequence in the list of beneficiary sub-Saharan African 
          countries ``Kingdom of Swaziland''.
          (3) For purposes of section 112(b)(3)(B) of the AGOA, the 
          Kingdom of Swaziland shall be considered a lesser developed 
          beneficiary sub-Saharan African country.
          (4) Effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn 
          from warehouse for consumption, on or after January 1, 2001, 
          HTS subheading 6402.99.70 is modified by deleting the figure 
          ``11.2%'' from the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``7.5%'' for such special rate. 
          Effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after January 1, 2002, such 
          subheading is modified by deleting the figure ``7.5%'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``3.7%'' for such special rate.
          (5) General note 1 to the HTS is modified by deleting the 
          phrase ``through 14, inclusive, and general note 16'' and by 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``through 18, inclusive''.
          (6) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with this proclamation are 
          superseded to the extent of such inconsistency.
          (7) Except as provided in paragraph (4) of this proclamation, 
          the modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation shall 
          be effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn 
          from warehouse for consumption, on or after the date of 
          publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
          eister.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

Proc. 7401


Proclamation 7401 of January 17, 2001

To Implement an Accelerated Schedule of Duty Elimination Under the North 
American Free Trade Agreement and for Other Purposes

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On December 17, 1992, the Governments of Canada, Mexico, 
          and the United States of America entered into the North 
          American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The NAFTA was approved 
          by the Congress in section 101(a) of the North American Free 
          Trade Agreement Implementation Act

[[Page 38]]

          (the ``NAFTA Implementation Act'') (19 U.S.C. 3311(a)) and was 
          implemented with respect to the United States by Presidential 
          Proclamation 6641 of December 15, 1993.
          2. Section 201(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 
          3331(b)) authorizes the President, subject to the consultation 
          and layover requirements of section 103(a) of the NAFTA 
          Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 3313(a)), to proclaim 
          accelerated schedules for duty elimination that the United 
          States may agree to with Mexico or Canada. Consistent with 
          Article 302(3) of the NAFTA, I, through my duly empowered 
          representative, entered into an agreement with the Government 
          of Mexico on November 30, 2000, providing for an accelerated 
          schedule of duty elimination for specific goods of Mexico. The 
          consultation and layover requirements of section 103(a) of the 
          NAFTA Implementation Act with respect to such schedule of duty 
          elimination will be satisfied on December 30, 2000.
          3. Pursuant to section 201(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act, 
          I have determined that the modifications hereinafter 
          proclaimed of duties on goods originating in the territory of 
          a NAFTA party are necessary or appropriate (i) to maintain the 
          general level of reciprocal and mutually advantageous 
          concessions with respect to Mexico provided for by the NAFTA, 
          and (ii) to carry out the agreement with Mexico providing an 
          accelerated schedule of duty elimination for specific goods.
          4. Section 213(b)(3)(A) of the Caribbean Basin Economic 
          Recovery Act (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(3)(A)), as amended by 
          section 211(a) of the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade 
          Partnership Act (Title II of Public Law 106-200) (CBTPA), 
          provides that the tariff treatment accorded at any time during 
          the transition period defined in section 213(b)(5)(D) of the 
          CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(5)(D)), as amended by section 211(a) 
          of the CBTPA, to certain articles that are originating goods 
          of designated CBTPA beneficiary countries shall be identical 
          to the tariff treatment that is accorded at such time under 
          Annex 302.2 of the NAFTA to an article described in the same 
          8-digit subheading of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
          United States (HTS) that is a good of Mexico and is imported 
          into the United States. Such articles are described in sub 
          paragraphs (B) through (F) of section 213(b)(1) of the CBERA 
          (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(1)(B)-(F)), as amended by section 211(a) of 
          the CBTPA.
          5. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the 
          ``1974 Act'')(19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes the President to 
          embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant provisions of 
          Acts affecting import treatment, and actions thereunder, 
          including the removal, modification, continuance, or 
          imposition of any rate of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 201(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act, section 211 of 
          the CBTPA, section 213 of the CBERA, and section 604 of the 
          1974 Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to provide for an accelerated schedule of duty 
          elimination for specific goods of Mexico under the NAFTA and 
          to provide identical tariff treatment for originating goods of 
          a CBTPA beneficiary country provided for in the same HTS 
          subheading, the tariff treatment set forth in the HTS is 
          modified as provided in section 1 of the Annex to this 
          proclamation.

[[Page 39]]

          (2) In order to provide for an accelerated schedule of duty 
          elimination for specific goods of Mexico under the NAFTA, the 
          tariff treatment set forth in the HTS is modified as provided 
          in section 2 of the Annex to this proclamation.
          (3) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (4) The amendments made to the HTS by the Annex to this 
          proclamation shall be effective with respect to goods entered, 
          or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after 
          January 1, 2001.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD23JA01.027

Proc. 7402


Proclamation 7402 of January 19, 2001

Establishment of the Governors Island National Monument

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On the north tip of Governors Island, between the confluence 
          of the Hudson and Eastern Rivers, Governors Island National 
          Monument served as an outpost to protect New York City from 
          sea attack. The monument, part of a larger 1985 National 
          Historic Landmark District designation, contains two

[[Page 40]]

          important historical objects, Castle William and Fort Jay. 
          Between 1806 and 1811, these fortifications were constructed 
          as part of the First and Second American Systems of Coastal 
          Fortification. Castle William and Fort Jay represent two of 
          the finest types of defensive structures in use from the 
          Renaissance to the American Civil War. The monument also 
          played important roles in the War of 1812, the American Civil 
          War, and World Wars I and II.
          The fortifications in the monument were built on the most 
          strategic defensive positions on the island. Fort Jay, 
          constructed between 1806 and 1809, is on the highest point of 
          the island from which its glacis originally sloped down to the 
          waterfront on all sides. Castle William, constructed between 
          1807 and 1811, occupies a rocky promontory as close as 
          possible to the harbor channels and served as the most 
          important strategic defensive point in the entrance to the New 
          York Harbor. The monument also includes a number of associated 
          historical buildings constructed as part of the garrison post 
          in the early part of the 19th century.
          Governors Island has been managed by the U.S. Army and the 
          U.S. Coast Guard over the past 200 years. With the site no 
          longer required for military or Coast Guard purposes, it 
          provides an excellent opportunity for the public to observe 
          and understand the harbor history, its defense, and its 
          ecology.
          Section 2 of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 
          431), authorizes the President, in his discretion, to declare 
          by public proclamation historic landmarks, historic and 
          prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or 
          scientific interest that are situated upon the lands owned or 
          controlled by the Government of the United States to be 
          national monuments, and to reserve as a part thereof parcels 
          of land, the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to 
          the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          WHEREAS it appears that it would be in the public interest to 
          reserve such lands as the Governors Island National Monument:
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by section 2 
          of the Act of June 8, 1906 (34 Stat. 225, 16 U.S.C. 431), do 
          proclaim that there are hereby set apart and reserved as the 
          Governors Island National Monument for the purpose of 
          protecting the objects identified above, all lands and 
          interests in lands owned or controlled by the United States 
          within the boundaries of the area described on the map 
          entitled ``Governors Islands National Monument'' attached to 
          and forming a part of this proclamation. The Federal land and 
          interests in land reserved consist of approximately 20 acres, 
          which is the smallest area compatible with the proper care and 
          management of the objects to be protected.
          Subject to existing law, including Public Law No. 105-33, 
          Title IX, section 9101(a), 111 Stat. 670 (Aug. 5, 1997), all 
          Federal lands and interests in lands within the boundaries of 
          this monument are hereby appropriated and withdrawn from all 
          forms of entry, location, selection, sale, or leasing or other 
          disposition under the public land laws, including but not 
          limited to withdrawal from location, entry, and patent under 
          the mining laws, and from disposition under all laws relating 
          to mineral and geothermal leasing.

[[Page 41]]

          The Secretary of the Interior (``Secretary''), acting through 
          the National Park Service, shall manage the monument in 
          consultation with the Administrator of General Services, 
          consistent with the purposes and provisions of this 
          proclamation. For the purpose of preserving, restoring, and 
          enhancing the public visitation and appreciation of the 
          monument, the Secretary, acting through the National Park 
          Service, shall prepare, in consultation with the Administrator 
          of General Services, a management plan for the monument within 
          3 years of this date. Further, to the extent authorized by 
          law, the Secretary, acting through the National Park Service, 
          shall promulgate, in consultation with the Administrator of 
          General Services, regulations for the proper care and 
          management of the objects identified above.
          The establishment of this monument is subject to valid 
          existing rights.
          Nothing in this proclamation shall be deemed to revoke any 
          existing withdrawal, reservation, or appropriation; however, 
          the national monument shall be the dominant reservation.
          Warning is hereby given to all unauthorized persons not to 
          appropriate, injure, destroy, or remove any feature of this 
          monument and not to locate or settle upon any of the lands 
          thereof.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          nineteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

[[Page 42]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD25JA01.000

Proc. 7403

[[Page 43]]


Proclamation 7403 of January 20, 2001

National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Nearly 200 years ago, on March 4, 1801, our young Nation 
          celebrated an important milestone in its history, the first 
          transfer of power between political parties, as Thomas 
          Jefferson took the oath of office as President. On this 
          bicentennial of that event, we pause to remember and give 
          thanks to Almighty God for our unbroken heritage of democracy, 
          the peaceful transition of power, and the perseverance of our 
          Government through the challenges of war and peace, want and 
          prosperity, discord and harmony.
          President Jefferson also wrote, ``The God who gave us life 
          gave us liberty at the same time'' and asked, ``Can the 
          liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a 
          conviction that these liberties are of God?'' Indeed, it is 
          appropriate to mark this occasion by remembering the words of 
          President Jefferson and the examples of Americans of the past 
          and today who in times of both joy and need turn to Almighty 
          God in prayer. Times of plenty, like times of crisis, are 
          tests of American character. Today, I seek God's guidance and 
          His blessings on our land and all our people. Knowing that I 
          cannot succeed in this task without the favor of God and the 
          prayers of the people, I ask all Americans to join with me in 
          prayer and thanksgiving.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim 
          January 21, 2001, a National Day of Prayer and Thanksgiving 
          and call upon the citizens of our Nation to gather together in 
          homes and places of worship to pray alone and together and 
          offer thanksgiving to God for all the blessings of this great 
          and good land. On this day, I call upon Americans to recall 
          all that unites us. Let us become a nation rich not only in 
          material wealth but in ideals--rich in justice and compassion 
          and family love and moral courage. I ask Americans to bow our 
          heads in humility before our Heavenly Father, a God who calls 
          us not to judge our neighbors, but to love them, to ask His 
          guidance upon our Nation and its leaders in every level of 
          government.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth 
          day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7404

[[Page 44]]


Proclamation 7404 of February 1, 2001

National African American History Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In 1915, Carter Godwin Woodson, the father of Black history, 
          founded the Association for the Study of African-American Life 
          and History. Each February, the Association proposes a theme 
          to guide the celebration of National African American History 
          Month. For this year, the Association has chosen ``Creating 
          and Defining the African-American Community: Family, Church, 
          Politics, and Culture.''
          This month in particular, we remember the stories of those who 
          have helped to build our Nation and advance the cause of 
          freedom and civil rights. We remember the bravery of the 
          soldiers of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment and the 
          sailors of the USS MASON in service to our country. We 
          remember those who marched on Washington, sat at whites-only 
          lunch counters, and walked rather than use segregated buses. 
          And we remember those, known only to each of us, who helped to 
          build our families, places of worship, and communities.
          When we examine our Nation's history, we discover these and 
          countless other stories that inspire us. They are stories of 
          the triumph of the human spirit, tragic stories of cruelty 
          rooted in ignorance and bigotry, yet stories of everyday 
          people rising above their circumstances and the prejudice of 
          others to build lives of dignity.
          This month, and throughout the year, let us celebrate and 
          remember these stories, which reflect the history of African 
          Americans and all Americans. We can all enjoy the works of 
          writers like Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Zora 
          Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes. In our Nation's schools, 
          our children can learn to admire Booker T. Washington, 
          Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, and others. And Americans 
          from all backgrounds can be ennobled by the examples of 
          Thurgood Marshall, Roy Wilkins, Whitney Young, Mary Church 
          Terrell, and other civil rights leaders.
          As we celebrate African American History Month, let us commit 
          ourselves to raising awareness and appreciation of African 
          American history. Let us teach our children, and all 
          Americans, to rise above brutality and bigotry and to be 
          champions of liberty, human dignity, and equality. And let us 
          rededicate ourselves to affirming the promise of our 
          Constitution.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim February 2001 as National African American History 
          Month. I call upon public officials, educators, librarians, 
          and all of the people of the United States to observe this 
          month with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7405

[[Page 45]]


Proclamation 7405 of February 5, 2001

National Consumer Protection Week

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          More Americans than ever are realizing the American dream of 
          homeownership. At the same time, an increasing number of 
          homeowners are living the nightmare of overwhelming debt and 
          home foreclosure resulting from fraudulent lending practices. 
          Subprime lending--the extension of high-rate, high-fee loans 
          to people considered to be high-risk borrowers--has grown 
          substantially in recent years. Unfortunately, fraudulent and 
          abusive lending practices have also grown.
          High-cost lending is not limited to home mortgages. Check 
          cashing outlets, payday loan companies, rent-to-own stores, 
          subprime auto lenders, and pawn shops are additional examples 
          of high-cost lenders.
          While it is crucial that as many consumers as possible have 
          access to credit, their access must not be hindered by 
          unlawful lending practices. Federal law enforcement agencies 
          have increased their enforcement activities to stop lenders 
          who engage in fraudulent and abusive lending practices. In 
          addition, Federal agencies and consumer groups have 
          implemented aggressive education campaigns to help consumers 
          learn how to safeguard the equity in their homes.
          Consumers can protect themselves from loan fraud by taking 
          some commonsense precautions, including comparison shopping 
          among several lenders, negotiating, and resisting, indeed 
          refusing to yield to, pressure to sign any loan papers they 
          don't understand. Nonprofit credit and housing counseling 
          services are available to help consumers manage their credit 
          and make decisions about loans and loan terms.
          To help protect consumers, the Federal Trade Commission, the 
          National Association of Consumer Agency Administrators, the 
          U.S. Postal Service, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the 
          National Association of Attorneys General, the Department of 
          Justice, and private consumer organizations have joined forces 
          to inform Americans about their rights as borrowers, about the 
          responsibilities of lenders, and about protecting their 
          assets. This information is available in writing, by 
          telephone, and online.
          I encourage all Americans to take advantage of this 
          opportunity to learn more about how to protect themselves 
          against fraudulent and abusive lending practices. By becoming 
          wise and well-informed consumers, we can reduce the incidence 
          of fraud and deception in the marketplace.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim February 5 through February 10, 2001, as National 
          Consumer Protection Week. I call upon government officials, 
          industry leaders, consumer advocates, the media, and the 
          American people to participate in programs helping citizens to 
          be responsible and wise consumers.

[[Page 46]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7406


Proclamation 7406 of February 7, 2001

American Heart Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The year 2001 once seemed so distant that it became a symbol 
          of science fiction. But today, researchers studying heart and 
          other cardiovascular diseases have made 2001 a year when 
          science rivals fiction.
          Only 50 years ago, Americans were acknowledged to be suffering 
          from an epidemic of heart disease. So little was known about 
          the disease that it was thought part of the normal process of 
          aging. Luck played a larger role in surviving a heart attack 
          or hypertension than did medicine--and those who survived were 
          forced to lead restricted lives.
          But thanks to scientific advances and education, the death 
          rate from coronary heart disease has fallen by nearly 60 
          percent since its peak in the mid-1960s. This startling 
          improvement resulted not only from advances in the treatment 
          of heart disease but also from gains in knowledge about its 
          prevention. Scientists also have opened up new fields, 
          including that of gene research. Their work promises to bring 
          great improvements in the prevention and treatment of heart 
          disease.
          But problems remain. In particular, how can the rewards of 
          scientific advances be brought to all Americans? Racial, 
          ethnic, and geographic gaps still exist in the burden of 
          disease. The number one killer of women is cardiovascular 
          disease.
          Another challenge is the increase in certain conditions and 
          heart disease risk factors. Obesity and physical inactivity 
          pose still other problems. More than half of American adults 
          are overweight and obese, about one in four are sedentary, and 
          another third are not active enough to reach a healthy level 
          of fitness.
          Meeting such challenges takes both will and technology. For 
          example, researchers recently found that small changes in 
          lifestyle that boost moderate-level physical activity can 
          protect cardiorespiratory fitness and blood pressure as much 
          as a structured exercise program. These are changes that all 
          Americans can adopt.
          Sudden death from cardiac arrest has also been a major health 
          threat. Yet fortunately, more Americans are learning the 
          warning signs of cardiac arrest. Calling 9-1-1 immediately and 
          administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) until an 
          electric shock to the heart can be given to restore a normal 
          heartbeat--a practice known as defibrillation--combined with 
          early advanced care can result in long-term survival rates as 
          high as 40 percent for certain types of cardiac arrest.

[[Page 47]]

          The Federal Government seeks to improve Americans' heart 
          health by supporting research and public education through its 
          National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the 
          National Institutes of Health. The American Heart Association, 
          through its research and education programs and its vital 
          network of dedicated volunteers, also plays a crucial role in 
          bringing about much-needed advances.
          Americans have always believed in the power of science to 
          improve lives, and it is their support and the use of 
          scientific advances that has reduced the epidemic of heart 
          disease. It will be through continued scientific efforts that 
          we find even more answers and reduce the rate of heart disease 
          even further.
          In recognition of the importance of the ongoing fight against 
          cardiovascular disease, the Congress, by Joint Resolution 
          approved December 30, 1963 (77 Stat. 843; 36 U.S.C 101) has 
          requested that the President issue an annual proclamation 
          designating February as ``American Heart Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim the month of February 
          2001 as American Heart Month. I invite the Governors of the 
          States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, officials of other 
          areas subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, and 
          the American people to join me in reaffirming our commitment 
          to combating cardiovascular disease.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7407


Proclamation 7407 of February 7, 2001

National Burn Awareness Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Burn injuries are a serious problem in the United States. Each 
          year, over 3,000 people die and 16,000 are injured by fires 
          that start in the home. These fires cost the Nation over $18 
          billion. Tragically, children, the elderly, and persons with 
          disabilities are those most likely to become victims of 
          serious burns. Children are particularly vulnerable. Each 
          year, about 800 children under the age of 15 die of fire-
          related causes and about 500 of these deaths are to children 
          under the age of 5 years. In fact, children under age 5 have a 
          death rate from fire more than twice the national average.
          All Americans can make their homes safer by making sure they 
          have a working smoke alarm. About 90 percent of U.S. 
          households have smoke alarms. However, a recent survey found 
          that smoke alarms in 20 percent of those households--about 16 
          million--were not working, mostly because the battery was dead 
          or missing. Those families who have not yet done so should 
          place a smoke alarm inside each sleeping room and on each 
          level

[[Page 48]]

          of a multi- story home and make sure the alarms are tested 
          monthly and the batteries are replaced when necessary.
          We should also learn what to do in the event of fire, 
          including the ``stop, drop, and roll'' maneuver that can help 
          prevent serious burn injuries. Those families that have not 
          yet done so should make plans for escaping a house fire--and 
          every American family should review and practice the plan 
          regularly.
          The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) helps to 
          keep children and families safe from products that pose fire 
          dangers. CPSC activities have contributed to a decline in 
          fires and fire deaths over the past several years. For 
          example, CPSC's standard for child-resistant lighters has 
          helped reduce fire deaths from children playing with lighters 
          by 43 percent since 1994.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, do 
          hereby proclaim February 4 through February 10, 2001, as 
          National Burn Awareness Week. I call upon all Americans to 
          observe this week by participating in appropriate ceremonies 
          and activities and by learning how to prevent burn injuries, 
          especially to children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7408


Proclamation 7408 of February 26, 2001

American Red Cross Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The American Red Cross was founded in 1881 by Clara Barton, a 
          woman selflessly devoted to the needs of humanity. Many of the 
          Red Cross's guiding principles--compassion, courage, 
          character, and civic duty--are timeless ideals shared by the 
          people of the United States.
          Chartered and authorized by the Congress to act in times of 
          need, the American Red Cross serves our Nation and the world, 
          providing compassionate assistance to people afflicted by 
          personal, local, national, or international disasters. Every 
          day, millions of Red Cross volunteers and employees follow in 
          Clara Barton's footsteps by providing essential services to 
          people in their communities.
          For more than 120 years, Americans have relied on the 
          expertise of the American Red Cross in disaster relief. Last 
          year, the Red Cross helped people during devastating wildfires 
          in New Mexico and Montana and in communities hit by massive 
          ice storms in Nebraska, Arkansas, and across the Midwest. 
          Volunteers respond to an estimated 63,000 disasters each year 
          and help millions of people during trying times of loss. The 
          American Red

[[Page 49]]

          Cross also saves lives long before tragedy strikes by helping 
          individuals and entire communities learn to prepare for 
          disasters.
          The educational information distributed by the American Red 
          Cross helps people feel safe at home, at work, at school, and 
          at play. Last year, the Red Cross trained nearly 12 million 
          people in lifesaving CPR and first aid, in the use of 
          automated external defibrillators (AEDS), on HIV/AIDS 
          education, and in lifeguarding and water safety. Many people 
          also know about the Red Cross because of the organization's 
          blood collection drives. In 2000, more than 6.3 million units 
          of blood were collected from 4 million generous blood donors.
          Under its charter, the American Red Cross is entrusted to 
          deliver emergency messages and provide vital services for 
          military members and their families. Staff members deploy with 
          our Armed Forces to provide emergency communications and a 
          caring presence to service men and women separated from their 
          families. Almost 40,000 Red Cross volunteers work at more than 
          100 military sites here and around the world.
          Through the years, the American Red Cross has reached out to 
          people worldwide, preventing and relieving the most desperate 
          cases of human suffering caused by crises abroad. For families 
          in need right now--in more than 50 developing nations--the 
          American Red Cross is helping to establish sanitary and 
          healthy living conditions by creating reliable sources of food 
          and water. The organization's international services save the 
          lives of people threatened by calamities such as epidemics, 
          natural disasters, armed conflict, deadly weather, social 
          strife, or economic collapse.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America and Honorary Chairman of the American Red 
          Cross, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim 
          March 2001 as American Red Cross Month. I request, as my 
          predecessor Franklin Roosevelt did 58 years ago, that each 
          American enlist in the Red Cross ``army of mercy''--and give 
          part of themselves to advance this organization's noble 
          humanitarian mission. We have a long way yet to travel, but 
          together, we can save lives. On behalf of a grateful Nation, 
          we applaud and salute the selfless dedication of generations 
          of Red Crossers.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7409


Proclamation 7409 of February 26, 2001

Irish-American Heritage Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Beginning from the earliest years of settlement, millions of 
          Ireland's people have emigrated to America's shores. This 
          immigration reached a particular

[[Page 50]]

          peak during the terrible years of the Great Famine more than 
          150 years ago. Irish immigrants, from professionals to 
          laborers, made an enormous contribution to the building of our 
          Nation.
          The Irish who came to America endured many hardships but have 
          prevailed to play vital roles in every chapter of our 
          country's history. Nine of the signers of the Declaration of 
          Independence were of Irish origin, and 19 Presidents of the 
          United States have proudly claimed Irish heritage--including 
          George Washington, Andrew Jackson, John F. Kennedy, and Ronald 
          Reagan. Irish Americans have served with distinction in every 
          war this Nation has fought, from Revolutionaries John Barry 
          and Stephen Moylan to General Douglas MacArthur. Other 
          influential and renowned figures of Irish descent include 
          pioneers Buffalo Bill Cody, Daniel Boone, and Davy Crockett; 
          authors Flannery O'Connor, Eugene O'Neill, and John O'Hara; 
          Civil War photographer Matthew Brady; and entertainers Jackie 
          Gleason, Gene Kelly, and John Wayne. These distinguished 
          Americans represent only a small sampling of the men and women 
          whose legacy has forever changed our national identity and who 
          trace their ancestry to Ireland's green shores.
          Today, the more than 44 million Americans who claim Irish 
          heritage look back with pride on the achievements and 
          contributions of their forebears. Irish Americans have 
          distinguished themselves in every sector of American life. We 
          are all enriched, strengthened, and blessed by their service 
          to our country.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 2001 as Irish-American Heritage Month. I call 
          upon all the people of the United States to observe this month 
          with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7410


Proclamation 7410 of February 28, 2001

Fortieth Anniversary of the Peace Corps

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The generous spirit of the American people has given this 
          country a great and long-standing tradition of voluntary 
          service. During the past four decades, the members of the 
          Peace Corps have carried on that tradition with dramatic and 
          far-reaching effect.
          Established in 1961, the Peace Corps has brought a wealth of 
          practical assistance to individuals and communities through 
          out the world. Since its inception, more than 161,000 
          Americans have served as Peace Corps volunteers in 134 
          countries. Peace Corps volunteers have not only helped to fill

[[Page 51]]

          immediate and dire human needs, but also have helped promote 
          sustainable, long-term development in agriculture, business, 
          education, urban development, health care, and the 
          environment.
          In many countries of the world, there exists an intense hunger 
          for peace, hope, and opportunity--for genuine social and 
          economic development that is rooted in respect for human 
          rights and a belief in human potential. Recognizing the 
          dignity and worth of all peoples and determined to help 
          individuals help themselves, Peace Corps volunteers have 
          served as our Nation's emissaries of hope and goodwill. 
          Accordingly, their generous efforts have helped to foster 
          mutual understanding and respect between the people of the 
          United States and citizens of other countries.
          Respected for its work around the world, the Peace Corps also 
          conducts a number of valuable programs here at home. For 
          example, through programs such as the Paul Coverdell World 
          Wise Schools and Peace Corps Fellows/USA, Peace Corps 
          volunteers are helping children in every State of our Nation 
          to learn more about the world in which we live.
          I am pleased to note that the current volunteer corps is the 
          most ethnically diverse in Peace Corps history and that more 
          and more Americans are joining in the work of the Peace Corps 
          through its growing partnerships with the public and private 
          sectors. These trends are a tribute to the many past 
          achievements of the Peace Corps, and they are a promising sign 
          of more to come.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby urge 
          all Americans to observe March 1, 2001--the 40th anniversary 
          of the Peace Corps--with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities designed to honor Peace Corps volunteers, past and 
          present, for their many contributions to our country and to 
          the universal cause of peace and human progress.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of February, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7411


Proclamation 7411 of March 1, 2001

Women's History Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In 1845, journalist and author Margaret Fuller laid out her 
          hope for the future of this Nation's women: ``We would have 
          every arbitrary barrier thrown down. We would have every path 
          laid open to women as freely as to men. If you ask me what 
          offices they may fill, I reply--any, I do not care what case 
          you put; let them be sea captains, if you will.''

[[Page 52]]

          More than 150 years later, we are closer than ever to 
          realizing Margaret Fuller's dream. Women account for nearly 
          half of all workers. Today, women are ``captains'' of their 
          own destinies, and they will continue to help shape our 
          Nation's future. Women hold 74 seats in the United States 
          Congress, more than at any time in our country's history, and 
          women own more than 9 million businesses employing more than 
          27.5 million workers. Through their tireless service on a 
          daily basis, the women of our Nation have woven the fabric of 
          families and communities. They contribute immeasurably through 
          faith-based and community organizations.
          Our Nation's women could not be where they are--nor could our 
          country be where it is--without the strength and courage, 
          wisdom and persistence of those who preceded them. America has 
          been blessed with women like Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan B. 
          Anthony, and Jane Addams, all of whom refused to accept 
          oppression as inevitable. Female political leaders including 
          Margaret Chase Smith and Eleanor Roosevelt forever changed the 
          face of American government. Women have played a vital role in 
          educating our Nation: Mary Lyon, Dorothea Dix, Elizabeth 
          Blackwell, and Mary McLeod Bethune all fought history and 
          stereotypes to become scholars in their own right and pass 
          their knowledge to subsequent generations. Similarly, female 
          authors such as Anne Bradstreet, Emily Dickinson, Pearl Buck, 
          and Zora Neale Hurston represent only a small sample of the 
          many women who have contributed to the American literary 
          canon.
          Our Nation boasts a rich history of women whose heroic 
          achievements speak to the sense of excellence, potential, and 
          patriotism shared by all Americans. Anna Warner Bailey's and 
          Clara Barton's courage in war has inspired generations of men 
          and women called upon to fight for America. The fortitude of 
          spirit displayed by Helen Keller, Amelia Earhart, and Wilma 
          Rudolph has made them role models both here and abroad. 
          Finally, from the sacrifice of mothers and grandmothers to the 
          dedication of successful women in business, government, and 
          charitable work, the legacy of women in America gives all 
          young people in this country the impetus to dream without 
          limits.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 2001 as ``Women's History Month.'' I call upon 
          all the people of the United States to observe this month with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities and to remember their 
          contributions throughout the year.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7412

[[Page 53]]


Proclamation 7412 of March 1, 2001

National Poison Prevention Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          National Poison Prevention Week alerts Americans to the 
          dangers of accidental childhood poisonings and to the measures 
          that help prevent poisonings. During the 40 years since the 
          Congress authorized the annual proclamation of National Poison 
          Prevention Week, our Nation has seen a dramatic decrease in 
          deaths from childhood poisoning. In 1962, nearly 450 children 
          died from poisoning after they accidentally swallowed 
          medicines or household chemicals. From 1993 through 1997, an 
          average of 36 children died each year from poisoning. This 
          dramatic reduction in poisoning fatalities is a significant 
          public health success.
          However, the death of even one child from poisoning should be 
          prevented. According to the American Association of Poison 
          Control Centers, more than 1 million children each year are 
          exposed to potentially poisonous medicines and household 
          chemicals. The first line of defense is child-resistant 
          packaging required by the Consumer Product Safety Commission 
          for many medicines and household chemicals. But this special 
          packaging is ``child-resistant,'' not ``child-proof.'' 
          Therefore, potential poisons must be locked up away from 
          children. And if a poisoning occurs, local poison control 
          centers should be called immediately.
          The Poison Prevention Week Council brings together 35 national 
          organizations to distribute poison prevention information to 
          pharmacies, public health departments, and safety 
          organizations nationwide. National Poison Prevention Week has 
          been very effective, but there is more to do. We all should 
          use and properly re-close child-resistant packaging, keep 
          poisonous substances locked up away from children, and keep 
          available poison control center phone numbers next to the 
          telephone. These measures can help prevent tragedies.
          To encourage the American people to learn more about the 
          dangers of accidental poisonings and to take more preventive 
          measures, the Congress, by joint resolution approved September 
          26, 1961 (75 Stat. 681), has authorized and requested the 
          President to issue a proclamation designating the third week 
          of March each year as ``National Poison Prevention Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim the week beginning March 
          18, 2001, as National Poison Prevention Week. I call upon all 
          Americans to observe this week by participating in appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities and by learning how to prevent 
          accidental poisonings among children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7413

[[Page 54]]


Proclamation 7413 of March 5, 2001

Save Your Vision Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As part of our regular health routine, we often overlook 
          vision. Good vision affects how we work, communicate, and 
          learn. According to the Department of Health and Human 
          Services, about 80 million Americans suffer from potentially 
          blinding eye diseases, 3 million have low vision, and 200,000 
          more are severely visually impaired.
          Visual impairment can strike at any time. Some eye diseases, 
          such as diabetic retinopathy, can develop and damage the eye 
          without warning. Also, visual impairment can develop more 
          often in certain groups. For example, some groups of Americans 
          have a higher risk for glaucoma, including those over the age 
          of 60, African Americans over the age of 40, and people who 
          have a family history of the disease.
          Visual impairment can also strike the future of this country: 
          our children. Infants and young children are not immune to eye 
          disorders. Amblyopia, poor vision in an eye that did not 
          develop normal sight during early childhood, causes problems 
          in very early life. Early vision screening is important for 
          our young people to ensure that their eyes receive immediate 
          treatment if problems are found. Also, myopia, or 
          nearsightedness, affects 15 percent of those entering high 
          school.
          Many occupations and forms of recreation can present dangers 
          to the eye. Eye protection is a necessity when jobs create the 
          possibility of eye injury. Wearing protective eyewear when 
          playing sports can cut down on eye injury by as much as 90 
          percent, and wearing eye protection when working in the yard 
          can also reduce the number of serious eye injuries.
          The best way to detect eye diseases and disorders is through a 
          dilated eye exam. Many eye problems can be prevented or 
          reversed with early detection and appropriate intervention.
          There are many other ways we can help reduce vision disorders. 
          We can make healthy lifestyle choices for ourselves and our 
          families, clinicians can emphasize prevention in their 
          practices, and scientists can pursue new treatments and 
          prevention strategies through research. Using both traditional 
          and innovative approaches, we can all work to make better 
          vision and vision protection an important part of our Nation's 
          public health agenda.
          The Congress, by joint resolution approved December 30, 1963 
          (77 Stat. 629; 36 U.S.C. 138), has authorized and requested 
          the President to proclaim the first week in March of each year 
          as ``Save Your Vision Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 4 through March 10, 2001, as ``Save Your Vision 
          Week.'' I urge all Americans to participate by making eye care 
          and eye safety an important part of their lives and to ensure 
          that dilated eye examinations are included in their regular 
          health maintenance programs. I invite eye care professionals, 
          the media, and all

[[Page 55]]

          public and private organizations dedicated to preserving 
          eyesight to join in activities that will raise awareness of 
          the measures we can take to protect and sustain our vision.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7414


Proclamation 7414 of March 5, 2001

Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American 
Democracy, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our democratic system of government traces its earliest roots 
          back to ancient Greece. The leaders of the Revolution and the 
          Framers of the Constitution often drew inspiration from 
          Athenian lawgivers and philosophers and called the Greek 
          example to mind as they sought to build the new nation on the 
          foundations of representative government and free political 
          discourse. The Greeks of 1821 drew inspiration, in turn, from 
          the ideals and institutions of the fledgling United States as 
          they waged their own struggle for liberty. In 2001, a vibrant 
          Greek democracy serves once again as an inspiration to its 
          neighbors and the world.
          Our two countries have stood together as friends and allies 
          from the time America embraced modern Greece's struggle for 
          independence 180 years ago. We fought together in every major 
          war of the last century: World War I through the Persian Gulf. 
          For more than 50 years, we have worked together in NATO: first 
          to keep the peace in Europe and now to build peace and 
          stability in the Balkans. We look forward to continued 
          cooperation as we celebrate the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad 
          together in Athens in 2004. Our alliance with Greece remains 
          strong, and its future is promising.
          Greeks and Americans share a love of freedom, liberty, and 
          individual rights. The friendship between our two Nations is 
          based on mutual respect, a commitment to common goals, and the 
          sharing of fundamental values. Ties of blood and kinship also 
          unite us: the modern community of approximately 3 million 
          Greek Americans has established a natural and enduring bridge 
          between our nations. Today, we take special note of those 
          citizens and thank them for their innumerable contributions to 
          our Nation's cultural, economic, and political heritage.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 25, 2001, as ``Greek Independence Day: A 
          National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy.'' 
          I call upon all the people of the United States to observe 
          this day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

[[Page 56]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7415


Proclamation 7415 of March 8, 2001

National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Last year, approximately 130,000 new cases of colorectal 
          cancer were diagnosed in the United States. This is a 
          startling number. Late diagnosis is one reason why colorectal 
          cancer, cancer of the colon and rectum, is the second leading 
          cause of cancer-related deaths for Americans. The disease 
          strikes men and women with almost equal frequency and often 
          progresses without symptoms. Fortunately, colorectal cancer is 
          usually curable when discovered early, and early diagnosis is 
          possible through regular screenings. Regular screenings are 
          particularly important for persons age 50 or older. Regular 
          screenings are also important for individuals considered at 
          higher risk for the disease.
          Widespread screening for colorectal cancer could save up to 
          30,000 lives a year, if all cases were found at an early 
          stage. To raise awareness about the disease and to encourage 
          regular screening, the Cancer Research Foundation of America, 
          the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, and the American 
          Digestive Health Foundation have joined together to encourage 
          Americans to observe March 2001 as National Colorectal Cancer 
          Awareness Month.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution of the United States, do hereby proclaim 
          March 2001 as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. By 
          supporting continued education about this disease and research 
          into treatment and prevention, Americans can help stop 
          colorectal cancer and save many lives.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7416

[[Page 57]]


Proclamation 7416 of March 16, 2001

National Girl Scout Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          This week marks the 89th anniversary of the founding of the 
          Girl Scouts of the United States of America. Juliette Gordon 
          Low founded the organization as a way to give girls greater 
          opportunities to develop skills and to mentor them in 
          knowledge and character. Promoting leadership and altruism, 
          the Girl Scouts organization has played a unique and important 
          role in preparing millions of girls to master challenges and 
          to pursue dreams.
          The Girl Scouts offers many ways for members to explore their 
          interests and talents. With participation spanning five 
          levels, girls ages 5 to 17 learn the importance of strong 
          values as they strive to fulfill the highest ideals of good 
          citizenship. The pure enjoyment of camping and other 
          recreational activities is matched with lessons in 
          compassionate caring for their neighbors.
          Today, almost 3 million girls and more than 900,000 adult 
          volunteers reap the benefits of involvement with this beloved 
          and enduring organization. Guiding America's next generation 
          of leaders, the Girl Scouts helps individuals to reach their 
          full potential and builds a brighter future for our great 
          Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim March 11 through March 17, 2001, as National Girl 
          Scout Week. I call on the people of the United States to 
          observe the 89th anniversary of the Girl Scouts of the United 
          States of America with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7417


Proclamation 7417 of March 22, 2001

Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A., 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          With the dawn of a new century, America's youth face a world 
          of nearly unlimited possibilities. New advances in technology, 
          medicine, and science offer the potential for great progress. 
          We must ensure that every child has the technical skills 
          needed to pursue success in their respective fields. However, 
          they also require the wisdom and understanding to make sense 
          of an ever-changing world.

[[Page 58]]

          As teachers, parents, and citizens, we have a responsibility 
          to pass on more than just academic knowledge to our children. 
          We also need to provide them with the moral strength to see 
          them through turbulent and challenging times. An education 
          that nurtures goodness and kindness gives direction and 
          dignity to the lives of our young people and strengthens our 
          communities. Humanity has long recognized such core and never-
          changing ethical values as vital to the well-being of a 
          society and its citizenry.
          Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the Lubavitcher Rebbe, 
          clearly understood the importance of fostering character. His 
          establishment of educational, social, and rehabilitative 
          institutions bettered the lives of people both in this country 
          and abroad. As he once said, ``All educational efforts are 
          basically meaningless unless built on the solid foundation of 
          good character.'' Next year marks the 100th anniversary of the 
          Rebbe's birth, but his legacy of teaching that a nation's true 
          greatness is measured by whether it produces citizens of 
          compassion and character remains timeless.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 4, 2001, as Education and Sharing Day, U.S.A., 
          2001. By teaching children the highest standards of ethical 
          behavior, Americans prepare our next generation of leaders to 
          pursue meaningful lives as members of a decent and caring 
          society.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          second day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7418


Proclamation 7418 of March 28, 2001

Cancer Control Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In 2001, an estimated 1.2 million new cases of cancer will 
          occur, and more than half a million individuals will die from 
          the disease. Standing alone, the figures are discouraging. 
          However, a recent decline in the rates of new cases, as well 
          as cancer-related deaths, offers us hope. The 5-year survival 
          rate has improved for all cancers, and 8.9 million Americans 
          are cancer survivors.
          Thirty years of investment in the National Cancer Program 
          following the National Cancer Act of 1971 have accelerated the 
          pace of cancer research. The investment in research has 
          yielded great dividends in the areas of cancer prevention, 
          early detection, better treatments, and improved quality of 
          life for people with cancer. These advances are remarkable, 
          but much remains to be done.
          Healthy behavior can greatly reduce the risk of cancer. About 
          45 million Americans have already quit smoking, but this most 
          preventable cause of cancer continues to damage public health. 
          Tobacco use causes nearly all

[[Page 59]]

          cases of lung cancer and more than one-third of all cancer 
          deaths. Children can become addicted to tobacco in a very 
          short time, placing a serious responsibility on adults to help 
          young people stop smoking, or ideally, never start.
          Other weapons remain formidable in the fight against cancer. 
          Since 1991, the 5 A Day for Better Health program has spread 
          the message that eating five or more servings of fruits and 
          vegetables daily can improve health and prevent disease. Over 
          the past 15 years, increasing numbers of women have been 
          screened for breast cancer. Continued emphasis on screening 
          for cancer, including colon cancer, can play a vital role in 
          saving countless lives. Clinical trials of new drugs may 
          reveal which ones are most effective in treating cancer. The 
          Cancer Information Service, a free public service of the 
          National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institutes of 
          Health, operates as a national resource for information about 
          cancer. Americans may contact the organization at 1-800-4-
          CANCER or visit its Internet address at http://www.cancer.gov.
          Cancer takes a terrible toll on our country. I encourage all 
          Americans to make healthy choices in their personal behaviors. 
          Together, we can help stop cancer and improve the odds of 
          survival for people of all ages.
          In 1938, the Congress of the United States passed a joint 
          resolution (52 Stat. 148; 36 U.S.C. 103) requesting the 
          President to issue an annual proclamation declaring April as 
          ``Cancer Control Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 2001 as Cancer Control Month. By reaffirming 
          the importance of controlling cancer, concerned citizens, 
          government agencies, private industry, nonprofit 
          organizations, and other interested groups can work toward the 
          day when this devastating condition is finally eradicated.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7419


Proclamation 7419 of March 28, 2001

National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Every child deserves to live in a safe, permanent, and caring 
          family. Regrettably, abuse and neglect continue to threaten 
          the well-being of many young Americans. Each year, more than 
          800,000 confirmed incidents of maltreatment of children and 
          more than 1,000 abuse-related child fatalities plague our 
          country. We can, and must, do more to fight these tragedies 
          and to protect our children from harm.

[[Page 60]]

          Prevention remains the best defense for our children. State 
          Community-Based Family Resource and Support programs sponsor 
          activities promoting public awareness about child abuse and 
          information on how to stop it. Additional initiatives offer 
          education and training to mothers, fathers, and other 
          caretakers. Collaboration among schools, government agencies, 
          faith-based organizations, businesses, community groups, and 
          law enforcement play an important role in helping such efforts 
          to succeed.
          During the month of April, let our Nation and her people 
          reaffirm the commitment to making a positive difference in 
          ending child abuse and neglect. Each individual needs to help. 
          Organize or join a community group that offers information or 
          assistance to parents and families. Be vigilant for signs of 
          abuse exhibited by young people in your community. Encourage 
          trust in and support for law enforcement agencies. By speaking 
          out against child abuse and neglect and cultivating an 
          environment that nurtures and strengthens families, we can 
          give boys and girls the safe, stable, and loving homes they 
          need. They will be able to enter the classroom each day ready 
          to learn, with improved self-esteem. They will be encouraged 
          to reach their full potential as individuals and as members of 
          our society.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 2001, as National Child Abuse Prevention Month. 
          I encourage all Americans to join in the vital task of 
          protecting young people from harm, and I commend the many 
          dedicated parents, educators, social workers, and other 
          concerned citizens who lead by example in doing right by our 
          children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7420


Proclamation 7420 of April 2, 2001

Pan American Day and Pan American Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          This year on Pan American Day and during Pan American Week, 
          the nations of the Americas celebrate the progress we have 
          made toward our collective goal of a hemisphere united in 
          freedom and democracy.
          The United States and our neighboring countries in the Western 
          Hemisphere have a long history of cooperation. Simon Bolivar 
          first convened the Congress of Panama in 1826 with the 
          intention of creating an association of states in the 
          hemisphere. In 1890, a Pan American conference established the 
          International Union of American Republics. The Union 
          eventually became the Organization of American States (OAS), 
          which continues to faith fully serve its member states. The 
          OAS charter, in affirming the

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          shared commitment, states that ``the true significance of 
          American solidarity and good neighborliness can only mean the 
          consolidation . . . of a system of individual liberty and 
          social justice based on respect for the essential rights of 
          man.''
          Today, we remain united through mutual interests and the hope 
          for a better future for our people. This month I will join the 
          democratically elected leaders of the hemisphere in Quebec 
          City for the third Summit of the Americas. At this conference, 
          we will build on efforts at previous Summits to promote our 
          shared objectives of representative democracy, free trade, and 
          using the power of free markets to better the lives of the 
          poor. We will also build on our mutual interest in encouraging 
          respect for human rights and improving relations among all the 
          countries of the hemisphere.
          Even with our significant progress, however, challenges 
          remain. Cuba is the only country in the hemisphere that will 
          be missing from the Quebec Summit. It is my sincere hope that 
          our neighbor will soon rejoin the fraternity of democracies 
          and that the Cuban people will again know freedom.
          During Pan American Week and the Summit of the Americas, we 
          reflect on and renew our common dedication to ensuring that 
          the benefits of development are broadly shared. We also look 
          forward to building even closer relationships among our 
          countries for the sake of future generations. We have a 
          responsibility to leave our children a hemisphere that honors 
          the commitment of our predecessors, strengthening bonds that 
          connect us as nations and as people. We want to make this the 
          Century of the Americas.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 14, 2001, as Pan American Day and April 8 
          through April 14, 2001, as Pan American Week. I call upon all 
          the people of the United States to observe this day and week 
          with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7421


Proclamation 7421 of April 2, 2001

National Former Prisoner of War Recognition Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          From our earliest beginnings as a Nation, America has been 
          blessed with citizens who have been willing to fight and die 
          to preserve our shared ideals. We owe our freedom to men and 
          women who have responded heroically to the call of patriotic 
          duty. In times of peace and war, in times of great conflict, 
          and even in peacetime, they stood tall. Facing the horrors of 
          combat, young Americans placed themselves squarely in harm's 
          way.

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          Among all these ranks of brave Americans, our living former 
          prisoners of war form a living testament to the courage 
          Americans have shown in defending liberty. During World War II 
          and the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam, prisoners endured, in 
          addition to separation from their loved ones, isolation, 
          disease, and torture. More recently, American troops in the 
          Persian Gulf stood bravely in the face of enemy capture and 
          returned home with honor.
          The men and women who suffered through the atrocious 
          conditions of internment deserve our utmost gratitude and 
          respect. Their fortitude serves as an example of placing the 
          ideals of freedom and self-government above one's own 
          interests. We also owe a debt of gratitude to their families 
          for weathering agonizing uncertainty while demonstrating 
          support for their loved ones' service to country.
          In World War II, patriotic Americans stepped forward without 
          hesitation to carry America's honor into unknown battlefields. 
          Many thousands gave their lives as the ultimate sacrifice, 
          both on the battlefield and in the deadly prison camps of the 
          Pacific and Europe.
          We are particularly mindful this month of anniversaries 
          reminding us of the contributions former prisoners of war have 
          made to our freedom. April marks the anniversary of the first 
          return of American POWs from North Korea during Operation 
          Little Switch. These prisoners endured bitter cold and 
          inadequate food, clothing, and medical care in their brave 
          effort to stop the spread of communism.
          This April is also the 28th anniversary of the end of 
          Operation Homecoming, in which our Vietnam-era POWs returned 
          to freedom. Americans held prisoner during that war, some for 
          as long as 9 years, were subject to torture and the horrors of 
          isolation. They survived only through their faith, character, 
          and patriotism.
          On this date, we remember the sacrifices of those imprisoned 
          while serving America. We remain committed to ensuring that 
          future generations know of their heroism in order to fully 
          appreciate their courage and resolve. Although they returned 
          home safely, their physical and emotional scars remain as a 
          reminder of the high price of liberty.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 9, 2001, as National Former Prisoner of War 
          Recognition Day. I call upon all the people of the United 
          States to join me in remembering former American prisoners of 
          war who suffered the hardships of enemy captivity. I also call 
          upon Federal, State, and local government officials and 
          private organizations to observe this day with appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7422

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Proclamation 7422 of April 4, 2001

National Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Organ and tissue transplantation is one of the most 
          significant advances in medicine. Wonderful success stories 
          give hope to people of all ages, and donors and their families 
          deserve our deepest gratitude. Their extraordinary generosity 
          and foresight have given countless individuals the opportunity 
          to rear a family, hold a job, and pursue fuller and more 
          active lives.
          Unfortunately, many people are not able to reap the benefits 
          of remarkable transplant technology. More than 75,000 
          Americans are on the national organ transplant waiting list, 
          and every 13 minutes, another person will be added to the 
          waiting list. Sadly, each day, 15 of those on the waiting list 
          will die because the need for organs far exceeds the number 
          donated.
          The Department of Health and Human Services and health 
          professionals across the country are dedicated to improving 
          these statistics. By becoming organ donors, Americans can join 
          in this important mission to help those suffering from a life- 
          threatening illness caused by the failure of a vital organ. 
          Persons can participate by simply completing and carrying a 
          donor card and informing family and friends of their wish to 
          donate. Such decisions will make a significant difference in 
          the number of available organs for donation.
          Many Americans have set a powerful example in this regard, 
          agreeing to become an organ donor and taking a selfless action 
          that may potentially save lives. I encourage other Americans 
          to consider organ donation and to join me in expressing 
          gratitude for those who have already made the gift of life.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 15 through 21, 2001, as National Organ and 
          Tissue Donor Awareness Week. I call upon medical 
          professionals, government agencies, private organizations, and 
          educators to join me in raising awareness of the need for 
          organ donors in communities throughout our Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7423

[[Page 64]]


Proclamation 7423 of April 9, 2001

Jewish Heritage Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Americans have long cherished our identity as a Nation of 
          immigrants. The shared values and aspirations of those who 
          have come to America's shores have helped to shape our 
          culture, laws, and government.
          The Jewish community has played a vital role in our Nation's 
          history, tracing back to colonial times. Many were active in 
          supporting the Revolutionary War and in settling new 
          territories and cities during America's westward expansion. 
          Although initially a small community, in time, millions of 
          Jewish men, women, and children followed. In fleeing 
          persecution, pogroms, and the horrors of the Holocaust, they 
          sought a new life in the United States where they could 
          worship in freedom and pursue their hopes and dreams in peace. 
          The many oppressions historically borne by the Jewish people 
          remind us that we must remain committed to religious liberty 
          and tolerance for all.
          As we celebrate Jewish Heritage Week, we also recall the 
          lasting contributions that Jewish Americans have made to the 
          arts, education, industry, and science. Many of their names 
          are inscribed in America's textbooks, and the Jewish 
          community's rich heritage and culture continues to enrich our 
          society's national fabric. In many communities large and 
          small, Jewish families have shared their resources, time, and 
          talent to help others. Their contributions to our national 
          life and character help make America a better place.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 22 through 29, 2001, as Jewish Heritage Week. I 
          urge all Americans to join in observing this week with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7424


Proclamation 7424 of April 9, 2001

National Crime Victims' Rights Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Every day, Americans are making progress both in the fight 
          against crime and in the effort to ensure fair and 
          compassionate treatment of victims and their families. 
          Dedicated volunteers, health care professionals, counselors, 
          and law enforcement personnel in communities large and small 
          are raising the public's awareness that victims have important 
          rights.

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          Decreasing crime rates are encouraging, but we are far from 
          winning the war against crime. According to the most recent 
          National Crime Victimization Survey, nearly 29 million people 
          were victimized by crime in 1999, including more than 7 
          million victims of violent crime. Americans cannot afford to 
          be complacent. All of us must continue efforts to stop crime 
          and to improve services for those harmed by crime.
          The voices of our Nation's victims continue to have a powerful 
          effect in changing laws, policies, and attitudes to promote 
          victims' rights and services. They encourage every person in 
          America to take a stand and to lend their support. My 
          Administration is committed to improving public safety and to 
          providing justice for all who have been victimized. We will 
          fight for public policies that prevent crimes. We will 
          steadfastly support those responsible for enforcing the laws 
          and protecting the innocent. And we will attempt to see that 
          offenders, not victims, pay the high cost of crime.
          Our Nation's commitment to crime victim assistance grows 
          stronger every year, with thousands of programs in place to 
          provide help and hope. My Administration is committed to 
          expanding opportunities for faith-based and charitable 
          organizations dedicated to serving persons in need. Crime 
          victims often turn to faith-based organizations for assistance 
          and support during times of crisis, and religious leaders and 
          communities are vital links in our national network of victim 
          services.
          This year marks the 20th anniversary of National Crime 
          Victims' Rights Week. The campaign to win rights for victims 
          parallels other grassroots movements in our Nation's history. 
          These crusades most frequently began as small local movements 
          led by groups of passionate individuals who spoke out in 
          protest when they saw inequities. During this week, let us 
          join in the effort to establish fair legal rights and services 
          for crime victims.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim 
          April 22 through 28, 2001, as National Crime Victims' Rights 
          Week. I urge all Americans to share the burden of reducing 
          crime in their communities and to follow the example of those 
          who have helped establish rights and improve services for 
          victims.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7425


Proclamation 7425 of April 10, 2001

National D.A.R.E. Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Today, we recognize Drug Abuse Resistance Education 
          (D.A.R.E.), the largest and most widely known substance abuse 
          prevention and anti-violence curriculum in America. For over 
          18 years, D.A.R.E. has brought specially

[[Page 66]]

          trained community police officers into America's classrooms to 
          teach children how to resist destructive peer pressure and to 
          live productive drug- and violence-free lives. Every day, 
          millions of children across the United States participate in 
          the instruction given in the D.A.R.E. drug prevention 
          curriculum.
          Parents, teachers, community leaders, law enforcement 
          officials, and fellow students have an important role to play 
          in keeping our children away from illegal drugs. Research has 
          shown that ongoing reinforcement of drug prevention skills at 
          home and at school play a critical role in decreasing the 
          likelihood of drug use by our youth. This year, D.A.R.E. has 
          pledged to reach out to thousands of parents with a new 
          parent-specific curriculum to help them talk with their kids 
          about drugs.
          Today, we recognize D.A.R.E. as a useful partnership between 
          the research community, educators, law enforcement, parents, 
          and students, and we commend D.A.R.E. officers for their 
          dedicated efforts to help educate the children of America 
          about the importance of remaining drug- and violence-free.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 12, 2001, as National D.A.R.E. Day. I call upon 
          our youth, parents, educators, and all people of the United 
          States to observe this day with appropriate activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day 
          of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7426


Proclamation 7426 of April 12, 2001

Thomas Jefferson Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's Founding Fathers overcame enormous obstacles to 
          establish a system of government unequaled in history. We are 
          the beneficiaries of their sacrifice, courage, and honor. But 
          among these legendary patriots, Thomas Jefferson remains 
          unique as the one who articulated the essential values and 
          principles of American liberty and freedom. Today, we gather 
          here to celebrate the birthday of Thomas Jefferson and to 
          reflect on his enduring contributions to the United States and 
          the world.
          Few Americans have shaped our collective destiny as thoroughly 
          and as originally as Thomas Jefferson. His achievements are 
          breathtaking in their scope and diversity. Beyond his 
          achievements in public life as Governor of Virginia, author of 
          the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom, Secretary of 
          State, third President of the United States, and founder of 
          the University of Virginia, Jefferson was a scholar, author, 
          naturalist, inventor, bibliophile, and architect.

[[Page 67]]

          As President, Jefferson supported the Lewis and Clark 
          expedition and concluded the $15 million purchase of the 
          Louisiana Territory from France. He sold his personal library 
          to the Library of Congress to replace its collection destroyed 
          by the British in the War of 1812.
          Thomas Jefferson's crowning achievement, however, was the 
          Declaration of Independence. As its primary author, Jefferson 
          drafted an immortal document that altered the way the world 
          viewed the relationship between government and the governed. 
          Jefferson's assertion of ``inalienable rights'' including 
          ``life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness'' established 
          the democratic standard by which our Nation would measure 
          itself. Many other nations and peoples likewise strive to 
          measure up to the standard set forth in the Declaration of 
          Independence.
          Thomas Jefferson's words are as thrilling and inspiring in 
          2001 as they must have been to his revolutionary allies in 
          1776. Our Nation has changed, our technology has progressed, 
          but our basic love for liberty and freedom remains the same. 
          As proud Americans, we must work together to maintain the 
          vigor and strength of Jefferson's vision and to fulfill its 
          promise of a better life for all our citizens. Doing this is 
          our responsibility, and our gift, to the man who laid the 
          foundation for what became the freest nation in the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, do 
          hereby proclaim April 13, 2001, as Thomas Jefferson Day. I 
          encourage all Americans to join in this celebration of Thomas 
          Jefferson's achievements, and to learn more about his unique 
          influence on our history, traditions, and values.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7427


Proclamation 7427 of April 16, 2001

National Volunteer Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America is blessed with millions of individuals of good will 
          and good works who play significant roles in making positive 
          change in the lives of others.
          While Government has great responsibilities for public safety 
          and public health, for civil rights and common schools, 
          compassion is the work of a Nation. Caring requires more than 
          Government alone can provide. Many of society's greatest 
          problems can only be solved on a personal level, between those 
          who care and those in need.
          During times of war and natural disaster, Americans have 
          provided relief to those in need. Yet every day there are less 
          publicized instances of

[[Page 68]]

          human need to which America's quiet heroes respond with equal 
          strength and vigor. Americans contribute food to soup kitchens 
          and clothes to shelters and give love to at-risk children, 
          counsel to those who have been abused, and friendship to those 
          in hospitals and nursing homes. From building a new home for a 
          young family to bringing a meal to an elderly neighbor who is 
          house-bound, there are countless ways we can invest our time 
          and resources to provide compassionate help to our neighbors.
          The faith community is a particularly rich source of volunteer 
          strength in America. Government can rally a military, but it 
          cannot put hope in our hearts or a sense of purpose in our 
          lives. Faith motivates countless volunteers and calls on them 
          to use their talents to improve their neighborhoods in ways 
          that are beyond Government's know-how. Church and charity, 
          synagogue, and mosque form an essential part of our 
          communities and their indispensable work must have an honored 
          place in our plans and in our laws. Government can and should 
          unleash the best impulses of the American spirit by welcoming 
          faith-based organizations, as well as other community groups, 
          as partners in encouraging the high calling of serving others.
          This week provides an opportunity to thank those who give so 
          much throughout the year to help those less fortunate. It 
          should also serve as a challenge to each of us to devote more 
          energy to seeking a common good beyond our comfort. What 
          individual Americans do is more important than anything 
          Government does. We must all heed Albert Schweitzer's counsel: 
          ``The only ones among you who will be really happy are those 
          who have sought and found how to serve.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim April 22 through 28, 2001, as National Volunteer 
          Week. During this week, I call on all Americans to celebrate 
          the invaluable work that volunteers do everyday across our 
          country.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7428


Proclamation 7428 of April 17, 2001

National Park Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The United States boasts an incredible wealth of natural 
          beauty. From rugged coastlines and thick forests to arid 
          deserts and canyons, our diverse landscapes represent a 
          treasured heritage of which all Americans can be proud.
          Our country's commitment to the conservation of its open 
          spaces runs deep. The Nation founded Yellowstone National Park 
          in 1872 and thereby

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          generated renewed appreciation for the great outdoors among 
          Americans. Our country's actions inspired other countries to 
          follow suit by establishing their own national parks or 
          equivalent preserves.
          Since the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916, 
          our national parks have grown to occupy a special place in the 
          hearts of the American people. As responsible stewards, we 
          must leave them in good condition for those who follow us. By 
          providing additional resources for their preservation and 
          maintenance, we can prevent the deterioration in facilities 
          and infrastructure that threatens their future well-being.
          National parks are a testament to the natural wonders of our 
          mountains, valleys, rivers, and streams. They remind us to 
          take a break from the busy pace of modern society to 
          experience the simpler pleasures of life and provide unique 
          opportunities for personal recreation. Whether camping in 
          Yosemite National Park or boating along Apostle Islands 
          National Lakeshore, people of all ages can take in spectacular 
          scenery and enjoy a relaxing time with family and friends.
          The National Park Service also serves an educational purpose, 
          honoring our heroes and preserving important historical 
          landmarks. By visiting the Frederick Douglass National 
          Historic Site, the immigration station on Ellis Island or many 
          other significant sites in our national parks, Americans gain 
          a deeper understanding of our national story and the 
          extraordinary people and events that paved the way for our 
          development and progress.
          National Park Week pays tribute to the importance of our 
          national parks and recognizes the dedicated men and women 
          entrusted with their care. The observance also calls attention 
          to the need to reinvest in these national treasures by 
          providing for their sound stewardship in the years to come. As 
          timeless and majestic reminders of our outdoor heritage, 
          America's national parks add immensely to our quality of life 
          and represent a wonderful legacy that must be passed on to 
          future generations.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, do 
          hereby proclaim April 23 through April 29, 2001, as National 
          Park Week. I encourage all Americans to visit our national 
          parks and experience America.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7429


Proclamation 7429 of April 25, 2001

Loyalty Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Two hundred and twenty-five years ago, America's founders 
          faced a decisive crossroads. Thomas Jefferson later remembered 
          ``the bold and doubtful

[[Page 70]]

          election we were to make for our country, between submission 
          or the sword.'' They chose the sword, and a Nation was born.
          Today, we celebrate our loyalty to this country and to the 
          principles for which America stands. Americans demonstrate 
          their dedication by protecting our Nation and its people, 
          promoting our commonly held ideals, and passing these values 
          on to future generations.
          Many Americans display their loyalty through careers in public 
          service. Members of our Armed Forces ensure that our Nation 
          remains strong and secure, as well as defend democracy around 
          the world. Domestically, law enforcement officers and the 
          professionals working in our judicial system maintain the 
          peace and uphold the rule of law on which our society depends. 
          Countless other Americans also work to protect us from dangers 
          that threaten our safety and resources.
          Americans have not let the dream of ``a more perfect Union'' 
          fade with the passing of time. Rather, each new generation, 
          along with millions of immigrants, has promoted ideals that 
          lead to the archetype that the founders envisioned. Heroes 
          have risen to fight for freedom, abolition of slavery, 
          universal suffrage, civil rights, and other principles that 
          form the foundation of our Nation. Today, citizens across the 
          country continue this tradition by giving their time and 
          effort to causes greater than themselves. Whether through 
          charitable, civic, or church activities, Americans demonstrate 
          their loyalty by working to improve our country and the lives 
          of its people.
          Perhaps the most basic and important means by which we display 
          loyalty to our country is by passing on to our children the 
          hope and idealism that is an important part of the American 
          spirit. Parents have the important task in ensuring that our 
          Nation's future leaders are prepared to assume the 
          responsibilities they will face. Teachers play essential roles 
          in molding our young people, and they deserve our gratitude 
          and respect for their dedication. Ministers and other mentors 
          also give of themselves by introducing children to the vast 
          opportunities that our Nation holds. By spending time with a 
          child, Americans invest in the future of our country.
          Loyalty Day recognizes the solemn bond between America and its 
          citizens. It provides an opportunity to recognize those who 
          demonstrate their loyalty every day and challenges all of us 
          to find more ways to contribute to the greater good of our 
          country.
          The Congress, by Public Law 85-529, has designated May 1 of 
          each year, as ``Loyalty Day,'' and I encourage all Americans 
          to join me this day in reaffirming our allegiance to our 
          blessed Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, do 
          hereby proclaim May 1, 2001, as Loyalty Day. I call upon all 
          the people of the United States in support of this national 
          observance.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fifth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7430

[[Page 71]]


Proclamation 7430 of April 27, 2001

National Day of Prayer, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Turning to prayer in times of joy and celebration, strife and 
          tragedy is an integral part of our national heritage. When the 
          first settlers landed on the rocky shores of the New World, 
          they celebrated with prayer, and the practice has continued 
          through our history. In 1775, the Continental Congress asked 
          the citizens of the colonies to pray for wisdom in forming a 
          Nation. General George Washington, encamped at Valley Forge, 
          also sought God's guidance as Americans fought for their 
          independence. The faith of our Founding Fathers established 
          the precedent that prayers and national days of prayer are an 
          honored part of our American way of life.
          Continuing in that tradition, many of the men and women who 
          have served at the highest levels of our Nation also have 
          turned to prayer seeking wisdom from the Almighty. President 
          Lincoln, who proclaimed a day of ``humiliation, fasting, and 
          prayer'' in 1863, once stated: ``I have been driven many times 
          to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere 
          else to go. My own wisdom, and that of all about me, seemed 
          insufficient for the day.'' Today, millions of Americans 
          continue to hold dear that conviction President Lincoln so 
          eloquently expressed. Gathering in churches, synagogues, 
          mosques, temples, and homes, we ask for strength, direction, 
          and compassion for our neighbors and ourselves.
          The theme of the 2001 National Day of Prayer is ``One Nation 
          Under God.'' In a prayer written specially for the occasion, 
          Americans are asked to pray for ``a moral and spiritual 
          renewal to help us meet the many problems we face.'' Special 
          observances are scheduled for all 50 States, with local 
          volunteers planning a variety of activities including prayer 
          breakfasts, concerts, rallies, and student gatherings. These 
          events will bring people of all faiths together, each 
          according to his or her own beliefs, to give thanks to the 
          Almighty and to ask for strength and guidance.
          The Congress, by Public Law 100-307, has called on our 
          citizens to reaffirm the role of prayer in our society and to 
          honor the religious diversity our freedom permits by 
          recognizing annually a ``National Day of Prayer.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, do 
          hereby proclaim May 3, 2001, as a National Day of Prayer. I 
          encourage the citizens of our Nation to pray each in his or 
          her own manner, seeking God's blessings on our families and 
          government officials and personal renewal, moral awakening, 
          and a new spirit of harmony across our land. I urge all 
          Americans to join in observing this day with appropriate 
          programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7431

[[Page 72]]


Proclamation 7431 of April 30, 2001

Law Day, U.S.A., 2001

By the President of the United States of America

Proclamation

          This year marks the 44th commemoration of May 1 as Law Day, 
          U.S.A., a national day of observance to celebrate our legal 
          heritage. On this occasion, we reflect on the role our legal 
          system plays in the lives of every American and how the 
          freedoms we enjoy would not be possible without a strong and 
          independent judiciary. The theme of this year's Law Day, 
          ``Ensuring the Rights of Victims,'' acknowledges our gratitude 
          for a legal system that recognizes the importance of 
          protecting the rights of those who are victimized by crime.
          This Law Day, I call upon all Americans to consider how the 
          law, communities, and individuals can better assist and 
          support victims of crime. We must continue to strive for a 
          legal system in which victims receive timely and accurate 
          information regarding offenders and relevant public 
          proceedings. In appropriate circumstances, a victim of crime 
          should have an opportunity for restitution. In addition, 
          social services provided to victims of crime can give the 
          assistance and support that victims deserve in the aftermath 
          of crime.
          We are encouraged by the progress our country has made over 
          the last three decades toward better assisting those whose 
          lives are affected by criminal offenses. However, government 
          and laws cannot effectively address this issue alone. More 
          than 10,000 State- or community-based organizations provide 
          help and hope to crime victims. I encourage Americans to 
          celebrate, support, and consider joining these volunteers and 
          other workers in service to their fellow citizens.
          Keeping faith with our commitment to the victims of crime also 
          drives us to increased efforts to prevent crimes and 
          effectively punish those who commit them, to ensure that 
          similar violations are discouraged and law-abiding citizens 
          are protected.
          Law Day provides an opportunity to express appreciation to 
          professionals who accept the responsibility to serve justice. 
          From attorneys to judges to the many other professionals 
          working in our legal system, those who serve justice uphold 
          the rule of law on which our democracy is built. They join 
          with law enforcement professionals to give our people 
          confidence to live without fear for their safety.
          We must each do our part to build a Nation in which civility 
          and respect for our neighbors overwhelm the powers of 
          injustice. As Thomas Jefferson wrote, ``It is reasonable that 
          every one who asks justice should do justice.'' I encourage 
          all Americans to join with members of the legal community in 
          protecting the rights of crime victims and in celebrating a 
          legal system that, while not perfect, is the best the world 
          has ever known.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 1, 2001, as Law Day, U.S.A. I call upon all the 
          people of the United States to observe this day

[[Page 73]]

          with appropriate ceremonies and activities. I also call upon 
          Government officials to display the flag of the United States 
          in support of this national observance.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7432


Proclamation 7432 of May 4, 2001

Older Americans Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          In cities, towns, and communities across the United States, 
          older Americans make countless contributions to the life of 
          our Nation. Each year, during the month of May, Americans 
          acknowledge in a special way the contributions of older 
          Americans to our society. This year's theme, ``The Many Faces 
          of Aging,'' calls on us to recognize the richness and the 
          promise of our rapidly increasing older population.
          Older adults have much to teach us, from persevering in the 
          face of hardship to sustaining our family structure and caring 
          for those in need. Generations of older Americans have done 
          the hard work of building communities, places of worship, 
          businesses, and schools, laying the foundation for our 
          American way of life. Embodying the steadfast devotion, 
          courage, and sacrifice that our ancestors brought to this 
          country, older Americans continue to energize our national 
          life. Many of these former teachers, leaders of industry, war 
          heroes, and religious figures help new generations learn about 
          our past by taking time out of their lives to share their 
          experiences and to serve as role models. Their values of hard 
          work, determination, compassion, and faith continue to benefit 
          our families and all Americans. As we celebrate Older 
          Americans Month, I encourage Americans to take advantage of 
          the wisdom and experience of our elder citizens.
          Working in partnership with States and local organizations, my 
          Administration is proposing that the Federal Government do 
          more to facilitate service opportunities for seniors.
          My Administration is committed to improving the quality of 
          life of our Nation's seniors, who are often burdened with 
          concerns about health care. We will strengthen Medicare for 
          the baby boomers and subsequent generations. We will renew the 
          promise made to our seniors and people with disabilities by 
          providing access to affordable prescription drugs and better 
          options to meet their health care needs. By ensuring that our 
          senior citizens live in comfort and security, we honor them 
          and thank them for their service.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and

[[Page 74]]

          laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 2001, as 
          Older Americans Month. I call upon Federal, State, and local 
          government officials, businesses, communities, faith-based 
          organizations, families, health care professionals, 
          volunteers, and all citizens of the United States to publicly 
          reaffirm our Nation's continuing commitment to honor older 
          Americans.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7433


Proclamation 7433 of May 4, 2001

Small Business Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Small business owners who work long hours, juggling family and 
          career responsibilities and serving as community volunteers, 
          are integral to our country's prosperity and to the vibrancy 
          of our communities. These entrepreneurs are fundamental to our 
          economy. Through the opportunities offered by the men and 
          women who own and operate our Nation's 25.5 million small 
          businesses, many of our citizens are able to pursue their 
          dreams of a better life.
          Federal, State, and local governments can help our small 
          business owners by creating an environment in which the 
          American spirit flourishes, an environment that promotes 
          innovation, risk-taking, and equal opportunity. My 
          Administration is working for lower taxes, reasonable 
          regulations, and a reduction of tariffs and other barriers to 
          free trade that will increase the competitive strength of our 
          small business sector. Education reforms also will ensure that 
          our young people are prepared to enter the global marketplace 
          and small businesses will have the needed pool of talent.
          Many of America's entrepreneurs risk everything to make their 
          businesses successful. They are leaders of innovation, and 
          their efforts create a wellspring of new technology, new 
          products, and improved business processes. One of my 
          priorities as President is to encourage that entrepreneurial 
          spirit, and to see that it encompasses all Americans. To that 
          end, we have instituted the New Freedom Initiative, which 
          includes a component to help small businesses better serve 
          customers with disabilities and to hire more people with 
          disabilities. Also, my Administration supports the Drug Free 
          Workplace Program, to help small businesses develop employee 
          education programs and company drug policies. These are 
          examples of our commitment to the ideal that the role of our 
          Government is not to create business barriers, but to help our 
          citizens overcome them.
          America's small business owners and their employees represent 
          more than half of the private workforce. These entrepreneurs, 
          who create more than 75 percent of the net new jobs nationwide 
          and generate more than 50 percent of the Nation's gross 
          domestic product, and the employees who work

[[Page 75]]

          in small businesses, deserve our thanks. We salute them by 
          observing Small Business Week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 6 through 12, 2001, as Small Business Week. I 
          urge all Americans to join in observing this week with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7434


Proclamation 7434 of May 7, 2001

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As we move into the 21st century, the United States continues 
          to greatly benefit from the contributions of its diverse 
          citizenry. Among those who have influenced our country, Asian/
          Pacific Americans merit special recognition. Their 
          achievements have greatly enriched our quality of life and 
          have helped to determine the course of our Nation's future.
          Many immigrants of Asian heritage came to the United States in 
          the nineteenth century to work in the agricultural and 
          transportation industries. Laboring under very difficult 
          conditions, they helped construct the western half of the 
          first transcontinental railroad. Their hard work was 
          invaluable in linking together the East and West coasts, thus 
          vastly expanding economic growth and development across the 
          country. Over time, other immigrants journeyed to America from 
          East Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Asian Subcontinent. Today, 
          Asian/Pacific Americans are one of the fastest growing 
          segments of our population, having increased in number from 
          fewer than 1.5 million in 1970 to approximately 10.5 million 
          in 2000.
          Asian/Pacific Americans bring to our society a rich cultural 
          heritage representing many languages, ethnicities, and 
          religious traditions. Whether in government, business, 
          science, technology, or the arts, Asian/Pacific Americans have 
          added immeasurably to the prosperity and vitality of our 
          society. As family members, citizens, and involved members of 
          the community, they reinforce the values and ideals that are 
          essential to the continued well-being of our Nation.
          Diversity represents one of our greatest strengths, and we 
          must strive to ensure that all Americans have the opportunity 
          to reach their full potential. By recognizing the 
          accomplishments and contributions of Asian/Pacific Americans, 
          our Nation celebrates the importance of inclusion in building 
          a brighter future for all our citizens.

[[Page 76]]

          To honor the achievements of Asian/Pacific Americans, the 
          Congress, by Public Law 102-450, has designated the month of 
          May each year as ``Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 2001, as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month. I 
          call upon the people of the United States to learn more about 
          the contributions and history of Asian/Pacific Americans and 
          to celebrate the role they have played in our national story.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7435


Proclamation 7435 of May 8, 2001

Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Each day, law enforcement officers encounter grave risk to 
          protect the rights and freedoms we enjoy as Americans. Their 
          commitment and sacrifice make our streets safer, our 
          neighborhoods stronger, and our families more secure. Police 
          Week provides an opportunity to recognize the selfless 
          dedication of the brave men and women who devote their lives 
          to protecting and serving our communities.
          This Nation owes a considerable debt of gratitude to all law 
          enforcement officers who protect the lives and property of 
          their fellow Americans. From patrolling our highways, to 
          investigating crime, to protecting victims' rights, these 
          committed professionals make a valuable difference in our 
          communities. We look to them to uphold the principle that no 
          one is beyond the protection or reach of the law. These men 
          and women, through their patriotic service and dedicated 
          effort, have earned our gratitude and respect.
          We pause during Police Week, and in particular on Peace 
          Officers Memorial Day, to honor those officers who made the 
          ultimate sacrifice while performing their sworn duty. I urge 
          all Americans to use this occasion to pay tribute to these 
          fallen heroes by recalling their devotion, celebrating their 
          lives, and honoring their service.
          Tragically, making America safer often requires great 
          sacrifice. According to the National Law Enforcement Officers 
          Memorial Fund, 150 law enforcement officers lost their lives 
          in the line of duty in 2000. Although we can never repay the 
          debt we owe these valiant officers and their families, we pay 
          tribute to their memory by committing ourselves to being law-
          abiding citizens, working to lower crime in our communities, 
          and investing time and love in our Nation's young people.

[[Page 77]]

          By a joint resolution approved October 1, 1962 (76 Stat. 676), 
          the Congress has authorized and requested the President to 
          designate May 15 of each year as ``Peace Officers Memorial 
          Day'' and the week in which it falls as ``Police Week,'' and, 
          by Public Law 103-322 (36 U.S.C. 136), has directed that the 
          flag be flown at half-staff on Peace Officers Memorial Day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 15, 2001, as Peace Officers Memorial Day and May 
          13 through May 19, 2001, as Police Week. I call upon all the 
          people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities. I also call upon 
          Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
          Rico, as well as appropriate officials of all units of 
          government, to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on 
          Peace Officers Memorial Day. I also encourage all Americans to 
          display the flag at half-staff from their homes on that day.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7436


Proclamation 7436 of May 8, 2001

National Salvation Army Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Since its founding in Great Britain in 1865, the Salvation 
          Army has provided humanitarian relief and spiritual guidance 
          to people throughout the world. Its members continue its 
          compassionate tradition of helping wherever there is hunger, 
          disease, destitution, and spiritual need.
          Through countless acts of service, members of the Salvation 
          Army actively assist those who suffer in body and spirit. 
          Their victories result in shelter for the homeless, food for 
          the hungry, and self-sufficiency for the disabled. In more 
          than 100 countries, speaking more than 140 languages, the 
          Salvation Army follows Christ's call to ``love your neighbor 
          as yourself.''
          Members of the Salvation Army demonstrate this love in many 
          ways. Perhaps the best-known services they provide involve 
          meeting the needs of the homeless. However, they also offer 
          assistance to countless other individuals seeking help. Those 
          addicted to drugs or alcohol find a vast network of 
          rehabilitation programs; children born into poverty discover 
          camps and educational opportunities; and those who are ill 
          receive care.
          I commend the Salvation Army officers, soldiers, and those who 
          support its mission for their continued dedication to helping 
          meet the physical and spiritual needs of people across the 
          Nation. During this week, I encourage Americans to express 
          their appreciation for the Salvation Army's good works and to 
          follow their example of serving a cause greater than 
          themselves.

[[Page 78]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 14 through May 20, 2001, as National Salvation 
          Army Week. I call upon all the people of the United States to 
          honor the Salvation Army during that week for its faithful 
          ministry in the United States for over 120 years.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7437

Proclamation 7437 of May 9, 2001

Mother's Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          No matter what direction life takes us, a mother's love and 
          guidance are a tremendous blessing that help us to grow up as 
          stable, responsible, and caring individuals. As nurturers, 
          teachers, and protectors, mothers' unconditional affection 
          helps their children to blossom into mature adults. In 
          partnership with fathers, mothers play a critical role in 
          building healthy families.
          Anna M. Jarvis is credited with influencing the Congress in 
          1914 to establish an official Mother's Day as a tribute to her 
          beloved mother and to all mothers. She conceived of the day as 
          a time when children could formally demonstrate respect for 
          their mothers and reinforce family bonds.
          Mothers who teach us right from wrong and to love our 
          neighbors merit our deepest gratitude and appreciation. Beyond 
          their more traditional role in rearing children, many mothers 
          also face responsibilities outside the home as members of the 
          workforce. At the same time, they may be caring not only for 
          their biological or adopted children but also for stepchildren 
          or foster children.
          Many American families are now headed solely by women, and 
          these women shoulder enormous responsibilities. For the good 
          of their families and our Nation, we must strive to provide 
          support and assistance to those mothers, such as, 
          opportunities for training and employment; early childhood 
          education for their young ones; and safe, affordable, and 
          high-quality childcare. But fathers must also remain committed 
          and involved in the lives of their children. By fulfilling 
          their financial and nurturing responsibilities, fathers help 
          ensure the well-being of their children and ease the burden on 
          those women who carry the primary responsibility of caring for 
          their families.
          Whatever their circumstances, mothers demonstrate daily how 
          their devotion, strength, and wisdom make all the difference 
          in the lives of their children. To honor mothers, the 
          Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 8, 1914 (38 Stat. 
          770), has designated the second Sunday in May each year

[[Page 79]]

          as ``Mother's Day'' and requested the President to call for 
          its appropriate observance.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 13, 2001, as Mother's Day. I encourage all 
          Americans to honor the importance of mothers and to celebrate 
          how their love and devotion are crucial to the well-being of 
          children, families, and our society.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7438


Proclamation 7438 of May 16, 2001

National Biotechnology Week

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For thousands of years, man has been utilizing and modifying 
          biological processes to improve man's quality of life. 
          Scientific advances have enabled biotechnology to play an 
          increasingly large role in the development of new products 
          that enhance all areas of our lives.
          In the battle against disease, our ever-increasing knowledge 
          of cellular and genetic processes continues to improve the 
          quality of our health care. Biotechnology has contributed to 
          the development of vaccines, antibiotics, and other drugs that 
          have saved or prolonged the lives of millions of people. 
          Insulin, which is vital in the treatment of diabetes, can now 
          be produced inexpensively and in large quantities through the 
          use of genetically engineered bacteria. In addition, exciting 
          gains in the understanding of the human body's genetic code 
          show significant promise in finding treatments and eventually 
          a cure for many diseases. This technology is now central to 
          the research being conducted on diseases such as cancer, 
          diabetes, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, heart and lung 
          disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Acquired Immune Deficiency 
          Syndrome (AIDS).
          Consumers enjoy continual improvements to the quality and 
          quantity of our Nation's food supply. Genetic engineering will 
          enable farmers to modify crops so that they will grow on land 
          that was previously considered infertile. In addition, it will 
          enable farmers to grow produce with enhanced nutritional 
          value. We also are benefiting from crops that resist plant 
          diseases and insects, thus reducing the use of pesticides.
          The environmental benefits of biotechnology can be realized 
          through the increased ability of manufacturers to produce 
          their products with less energy, pollution, and waste. In 
          addition, the development of new biotechnology promises to 
          improve our ability to clean up toxic substances from soil and 
          water and improve waste management techniques.

[[Page 80]]

          Our Nation stands as a global leader in research and 
          development, in large part because of our successes in 
          understanding and utilizing the biological processes of life. 
          The field of biotechnology is important to the quality of our 
          lives, the protection of our environment, and the strength of 
          our economy. We must continue to be leaders in the pursuit of 
          knowledge and technology, and we must be vigilant to ensure 
          that new technologies are regulated and used responsibly 
          towards achieving noble goals.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 13 through May 19, 2001, as National 
          Biotechnology Week. I call upon the people of the United 
          States to observe this week with appropriate programs, 
          ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7439


Proclamation 7439 of May 16, 2001

National Defense Transportation Day and National

Transportation Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's achievements in transportation have helped lay the 
          foundation for our strength and prosperity. As our Nation 
          moves forward into the 21st century, we celebrate how modern 
          transportation has transformed the world and recognize the 
          many men and women who have contributed to its development and 
          advancement.
          Whether traveling by road, rail, water, or air, Americans can 
          choose among a large number of options in reaching their 
          destinations. But beyond moving people, our diverse 
          transportation system also makes possible the delivery of 
          countless products throughout the country. Whether intended 
          for individuals, private organizations, government agencies, 
          or merchants, the shipment and transfer of these goods helps 
          to generate and sustain the economic growth that benefits us 
          all.
          Our transportation system also contributes vitally to the 
          security of the United States. From the early days of the 
          merchant marine at the time of our Nation's founding, to the 
          latest in 21st century aircraft, our diverse methods of 
          transportation have moved troops and carried defense cargo 
          quickly and efficiently both in peacetime and in war.
          To meet America's future needs, our Nation must take advantage 
          of scientific and technological innovation to improve existing 
          transportation systems and develop new ones. We must strive to 
          enhance their reliability and efficiency and close the gap 
          between the demand for transportation and the capacity of the 
          transportation infrastructure.

[[Page 81]]

          At the same time, safety will always remain our top priority. 
          Investments in transportation must contribute to the security 
          of the traveling public and improve access for all Americans. 
          Our efforts to modify and strengthen transportation systems 
          must also safeguard the environment and use energy wisely. 
          Through these measures, we can conserve our precious natural 
          resources and reinforce the transportation infrastructure our 
          Nation needs to thrive in a dynamic and competitive world.
          To recognize the men and women who work in transportation and 
          thereby contribute to our Nation's well-being, defense, and 
          progress, the United States Congress, by joint resolution 
          approved May 16, 1957 (36 U.S.C. 120) has designated the third 
          Friday in May of each year as ``National Defense 
          Transportation Day,'' and, by joint resolution approved May 
          14, 1962 (36 U.S.C. 133), declared that the week during which 
          that Friday falls be designated ``National Transportation 
          Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim Friday, May 18, 2001, as 
          National Defense Transportation Day and May 13 through May 19, 
          2001, as National Transportation Week. I urge all Americans to 
          recognize how our modern transportation system has enhanced 
          our economy and contributed to our quality of life.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7440


Proclamation 7440 of May 17, 2001

National Safe Boating Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Over 70 million recreational boaters enjoy our Nation's 
          waters, and the national economic impact of recreational 
          boating is more than $25 billion each year. This year marks 
          the 30th anniversary of the enactment of the Federal Boat 
          Safety Act. This legislation, designed to improve boating 
          safety and to foster greater use and enjoyment of our rivers, 
          lakes, bays, and waters, has accomplished these goals. By 
          encouraging the participation of States, local communities, 
          industry, and the boating public, new generations of Americans 
          have benefited from the development of comprehensive boating 
          safety programs.
          Two years after passage of the Federal Boat Safety Act of 
          1971, 1,754 recreational boating fatalities were reported, on 
          a base of approximately 6 million recreational vessels 
          registered. Since then, the number of registered boats has 
          grown by over 100 percent, yet reported boating fatalities 
          have declined to approximately 750-800 each year.
          The coordinated efforts over the past 29 years of the Federal 
          Government, including the Coast Guard and the Coast Guard 
          Auxiliary, States and local communities, and numerous 
          recreational boating organizations, have made

[[Page 82]]

          the Recreational Boating Safety Program a success. 
          Cumulatively, an estimated 27,000 lives are estimated to have 
          been saved as a result of the recreational boating safety 
          programs established by the Federal Boat Safety Act.
          However, despite these programs' successes, too many boaters 
          still die on our Nation's waters. Recreational boating remains 
          second only to highways in transportation-related fatalities. 
          Some boaters lack basic boating safety knowledge and fail to 
          adequately prepare or exercise caution when boating. Though 
          recent accident statistics show improvement in many 
          categories, nearly 70 percent of all recreational boating 
          victims die by drowning. Nearly 90 percent of these drowning 
          victims were not wearing a life jacket. Most of those lives 
          could have been saved if the victims had simply worn their 
          life jackets.
          This year's North American Safe Boating Campaign, highlighted 
          during National Safe Boating Week, will emphasize the theme of 
          ``Boat Smart from the Start! Wear Your Life Jacket!'' Many 
          recreational boating organizations promote safety through 
          educational programs, and I encourage those who will be on our 
          waterways to take advantage of these lessons. I also urge all 
          Americans who enjoy boating to wear their life jackets and 
          otherwise to conduct themselves responsibly and safely.
          In recognition of the importance of safe boating practices, 
          the Congress, by joint resolution approved June 4, 1958 (36 
          U.S.C. 131), as amended, has authorized and requested the 
          President to proclaim annually the 7-day period prior to 
          Memorial Day weekend as ``National Safe Boating Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 19 through May 25, 2001, as National Safe Boating 
          Week. I encourage the Governors of the 50 States, the District 
          of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the 
          officials of other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the 
          United States, to join in observing this occasion and to urge 
          Americans to practice safe boating habits throughout the year.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7441


Proclamation 7441 of May 18, 2001

World Trade Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Trade has an extraordinary impact on our Nation's economic 
          strength and can be a powerful force for good in the world. 
          This year's World Trade Week, observed in communities across 
          the country, will showcase the value of trade to all our 
          citizens.

[[Page 83]]

          Exports have accounted for almost one-quarter of the United 
          States economic growth during the past decade. We continue to 
          be the world's largest exporter of goods and services. From 
          life-saving medical devices to information technology that 
          allows people to be more productive, American ingenuity is 
          bringing some of the best and most competitive and innovative 
          products to the world marketplace.
          Across America, our exports support 12 million jobs that pay 
          wages higher than the national average, and high-tech jobs 
          supported by exports pay even more. It is no coincidence that 
          the longest period of sustained economic growth in U.S. 
          history has followed efforts to liberalize trade, such as the 
          North American Free Trade Agreement and the Uruguay Round 
          Agreement that established the World Trade Organization. Trade 
          also leads to more competitive businesses, more choices of 
          goods for consumers, and lower prices.
          Along with economic progress, open trade also helps build 
          democracies and spreads freedom as it reinforces the spirit of 
          liberty by spurring economic and legal reforms. When we 
          promote open trade, we promote both economic and political 
          freedom. Societies that open to commerce will one day open to 
          liberty.
          World Trade Week celebrates trade as an economic and social 
          engine for progress with a special focus on the services 
          sector--the largest sector in the private economy, providing 
          more than 85 million jobs. These service sector jobs involve a 
          wide range of industries, including banking and insurance, 
          travel, entertainment, telecommunications, energy, and environ 
          mental services. We are proud that the United States is the 
          world's top producer and exporter of services, exporting some 
          $300 billion worth a year.
          In addition to the significance of exporting services, export 
          of goods continues to be vitally important to our economic 
          performance. More than 20 percent of our domestic goods are 
          exported, and for durable goods the figure jumps to 36 
          percent. These exports support millions of high-quality U.S. 
          jobs and play a key role in U.S. economic growth. However, our 
          ability to sustain or expand this growth will require tapping 
          the trade potential of the emerging economies in Asia and 
          Latin America, as well as bolstering our trade agreements with 
          developed economies such as Japan and the European Union. 
          Strengthening our trade agreements with these countries, not 
          only opens their economies to U.S. goods and services, but 
          also leads to higher rates of foreign investment. This 
          investment creates growth, jobs, and the means to buy the 
          products we export from the United States.
          The United States will work for open trade at every 
          opportunity. The executive and legislative branches need to 
          work together to provide the means to cooperate on trade 
          objectives. The renewal of U.S. trade promotion authority will 
          bolster a partnership between the executive and legislative 
          branches and will enhance the ability of the United States to 
          negotiate new trade agreements. We will work for more open 
          trade globally through talks in the WTO. We will work to 
          create a free trade zone in the Western Hemisphere by 2005. 
          Our commitment to open trade will be coupled with a commitment 
          to protect our environment and improve labor standards.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 20 through May 26, 2001, as World Trade Week. I 
          encourage Americans to observe this week

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          with events, trade shows, and educational programs that 
          celebrate the benefits of trade to our economy.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7442


Proclamation 7442 of May 18, 2001

National Maritime Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Throughout our history, America's economic prosperity has been 
          closely tied to its maritime geography. From indigenous 
          peoples navigating our majestic rivers to colonists settling 
          along the New World's eastern shores, natives and immigrants 
          alike have relied on the sea and our bountiful inland 
          waterways for commerce and security.
          In colonial days and in the 19th century, America's maritime 
          industries facilitated the exchange of goods and the migration 
          of pioneers. During World War II, some 6,000 American 
          seafarers and more than 700 U.S. merchant ships fell to enemy 
          action, many in the infamous Run to Murmansk. No branch of our 
          Armed Forces, save the Marine Corps, suffered a higher 
          casualty rate. Today, our Merchant Marine continues this proud 
          tradition.
          As recently as the Persian Gulf War and during humanitarian 
          and military operations since, a unique partnership of 
          Government, industry, and labor has continued its vital 
          maritime service to our Nation. Many civilian merchant 
          mariners crew the Maritime Administration's Ready Reserve 
          Force, which is observing its 25th anniversary.
          Today, the U.S. maritime fleet has decreased in the number of 
          vessels in the international trades, but it transports goods 
          more efficiently and economically than ever before. These U.S. 
          ships deliver a billion tons of imports and exports each year 
          in our foreign trade and another billion tons of waterborne 
          domestic trade. Many merchant seafarers are trained at 
          outstanding institutions such as the U.S. Merchant Marine 
          Academy at Kings Point, New York, the six State maritime 
          academies, and several union and industry training facilities.
          To help ensure continued competitiveness, we must tailor our 
          maritime policy to the challenges of the 21st century. 
          America's Marine Transportation System will help determine our 
          long-term economic health and improve our ability to respond 
          quickly and effectively in crisis. Within the next 2 decades, 
          cargo will double. Accordingly, my Administration is working 
          with Government agencies, the maritime industry, shippers, 
          labor unions, and environmental groups to ensure that our 
          waterways continue to serve as a sound transportation option 
          in the face of ever-growing congestion on highways and rail 
          lines.

[[Page 85]]

          In recognition of the importance of the U.S. Merchant Marine, 
          the Congress, by joint resolution approved on May 20, 1933, 
          has designated May 22 of each year as ``National Maritime 
          Day'' and has authorized and requested that the President 
          issue an annual proclamation calling for its appropriate 
          observance.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 22, 2001, as National Maritime Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to celebrate this observance 
          and to display the flag of the United States at their homes 
          and in their communities. I also request that all ships 
          sailing under the American flag dress ship on that day.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7443


Proclamation 7443 of May 22, 2001

National Hurricane Awareness Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          One of the most dramatic, damaging, and potentially deadly 
          weather events is a hurricane. Each year on average, six 
          hurricanes develop over the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, or 
          Gulf of Mexico. Many of these remain over the ocean with 
          little or no impact on the continental United States. 
          Unfortunately, though, on average five hurricanes strike the 
          United States coastline every 3 years. These storms can cause 
          significant damage that can cost individuals, businesses, and 
          government billions of dollars. Worst of all, however, is the 
          loss that can never be recovered: human life.
          Currently more than 48 million people live along hurricane-
          prone coastlines in the United States. The growing number of 
          residents living in these areas, as well as the millions of 
          tourists who visit our Nation's beaches annually, has 
          increased the difficulties in evacuating people from areas 
          that are threatened by an impending hurricane. This problem is 
          further compounded by the fact that a large majority of people 
          living in these areas have never experienced the force of a 
          major hurricane and its devastating impact.
          Increasingly, many Americans have begun working to ensure that 
          commonsense measures are implemented to protect themselves and 
          their property from natural disasters including floods, 
          tornadoes, and earthquakes. Their foresight, hard work, and 
          respect for the awesome power of nature often yields great 
          benefits for their communities. They are to be commended for 
          this preventive work, and we should learn from their example 
          as we plan for future disasters.
          All Americans must be more vigilant about preparing for 
          disasters in advance, rather than just responding to them 
          after they occur. Specific actions

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          can be taken in advance of a storm that will further protect 
          property, help to ensure that businesses are able to resume 
          work quickly after a storm, and ultimately save lives. In 
          addition, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 
          estimates that for every dollar spent in damage prevention, 
          two are saved in repairs.
          The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) 
          researchers and forecasters continue to improve the accuracy 
          of hurricane warnings that enable residents to evacuate and 
          emergency personnel to effectively respond well in advance of 
          the storm's arrival. In addition, FEMA and NOAA have focused 
          their resources toward encouraging community leaders to work 
          with Federal, State, and local agencies, as well as volunteer 
          agencies, schools, the private sector, and the news media to 
          collectively undertake activities that diminish the 
          destruction of natural disasters. For hurricane-prone areas, 
          these measures can include residents stockpiling emergency 
          provisions, learning evacuation routes, installing hurricane 
          shutters, building residential safe rooms and community 
          shelters, adopting stronger building codes, and retrofitting 
          existing buildings. These measures have proved effective, and 
          I encourage citizens living in these areas to look for ways 
          that they can better prepare themselves and their communities 
          to reduce the potential devastating impact of these storms.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim May 20 through May 26, 2001, as National Hurricane 
          Awareness Week. I call upon government agencies, private 
          organizations, schools, news media, and residents in 
          hurricane-prone areas to work towards the prevention of 
          needless storm damage and to join me in raising awareness of 
          the hazards posed by hurricanes.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          second day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7444


Proclamation 7444 of May 25, 2001

Prayer for Peace, Memorial Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          ``Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives 
          acclaim earned in the blood of his followers and the 
          sacrifices of his friends.'' These words, spoken by General 
          Dwight D. Eisenhower following Germany's surrender in 1945, 
          paid tribute to his fallen comrades as he humbly acknowledged 
          that their ultimate sacrifice gave occasion for recognition of 
          his leadership.
          Similarly, we stand as a Nation that is strong and deserving 
          of praise. Yet we are humbled, because we remember that the 
          wealth of this Nation's heritage, the strength of its ideals, 
          and the extent of its freedom came with a

[[Page 87]]

          tremendous price. These treasures were purchased with the 
          lives of American service men and women, a cost borne 
          prominently by several generations. We are humbled because so 
          many bright futures, hopes, and dreams were sacrificed for the 
          abundance of opportunities we now freely pursue.
          Through the course of our Nation's history, more than 41 
          million Americans have served the cause of freedom and more 
          than a million have died in its name. On this noble American 
          holiday, we solemnly pause to remember the men and women who 
          gave their lives in service to our Nation. We honor those 
          generations and individuals who fought for liberty and in 
          defiance of tyranny that this unique experiment in self-
          government might long endure.
          At a bridge at Concord, in the muddy trenches of Europe, the 
          rugged mountains of Korea, the dense forests of Asia, or 
          across the burning sands of the Persian Gulf, America's heroes 
          have advanced democracy around the globe and defended the 
          liberties we hold dear. We are particularly mindful of our 
          fallen patriots as we mark the 60th anniversary of the bombing 
          of Pearl Harbor and the 10th anniversary of Operation Desert 
          Storm.
          We honor the final sacrifice of our service men and women by 
          dedicating our own lives to peace and the defense of freedom. 
          For these ideals they fought, and for these ideals we continue 
          to strive. May we stand with diligence and with humility on 
          the broad shoulders of those whose brave deeds and sacrifice 
          we memorialize today. Let all of us commit this day, whether 
          in public ceremony or in quiet reflection over a single grave, 
          to remember them in fitting tribute.
          In respect for their devotion to America, the Congress by a 
          joint resolution approved on May 11, 1950 (64 Stat. 158), has 
          requested the President to issue a proclamation calling on the 
          people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day as a 
          day of prayer for permanent peace and designating a period on 
          that day when the people of the United States might unite in 
          prayer. The Congress, by Public Law 106-579, has also 
          designated the minute beginning at 3:00 p.m. local time on 
          that day as a time for all Americans to observe the National 
          Moment of Remembrance.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby designate Memorial Day, May 28, 
          2001, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate 
          the hour beginning in each locality at 11:00 a.m. of that day 
          as a time to unite in prayer. I also ask all Americans to 
          observe the National Moment of Remembrance beginning at 3:00 
          p.m. local time on Memorial Day. I urge the press, radio, 
          television, and all other media to participate in these 
          observances.
          I also request the Governors of the United States and the 
          Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the appropriate officials of 
          all units of government, to direct that the flag be flown at 
          half-staff until noon on this Memorial Day on all buildings, 
          grounds, and naval vessels throughout the United States and in 
          all areas under its jurisdiction and control. I also request 
          the people of the United States to display the flag at half-
          staff from their homes for the customary forenoon period.

[[Page 88]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7445


Proclamation 7445 of May 30, 2001

To Provide for the Efficient and Fair Administration of Action Taken With 
Regard to Imports of Lamb Meat and for Other Purporse

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On July 7, 1999, President Clinton issued Proclamation 
          7208, which implemented action of a type described in section 
          203(a)(3) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 
          2253(a)(3)) (the ``Trade Act''), with respect to imports of 
          fresh, chilled, or frozen lamb meat, provided for in 
          subheadings 0204.10.00, 0204.22.20, 0204.23.20, 0204.30.00, 
          0204.42.20, and 0204.43.20 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule 
          of the United States (HTS). Proclamation 7208 took effect on 
          July 22, 1999.
          2. Proclamation 7208 established import relief in the form of 
          tariff-rate quotas (TRQs) and increased duties but did not 
          make specific provision for their administration. Accordingly, 
          on July 30, 1999, President Clinton issued Proclamation 7214, 
          which exempted from the TRQ goods that were exported prior to 
          July 22, 1999, and delegated the President's authority to 
          administer the TRQs to the United States Trade Representative. 
          Proclamation 7214 took effect on July 30, 1999.
          3. I have determined under section 203(g)(1) of the Trade Act 
          (19 U.S.C. 2253(g)(1)) that it is necessary for the efficient 
          and fair administration of the actions undertaken in 
          Proclamation 7208 and Proclamation 7214 to grant second-year 
          ``in-quota'' treatment to certain goods covered by the entry 
          numbers set forth in the Annex to this proclamation.
          4. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
          relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting 
          import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the 
          removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate 
          of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including but not limited to sections 203 and 604 of the Trade 
          Act, and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, do 
          proclaim that:
          (1) In order to provide for the efficient and fair 
          administration of the TRQs on imports of fresh, chilled, or 
          frozen lamb meat classified in HTS subheadings 0204.10.00, 
          0204.22.20, 0204.23.20, 0204.30.00, 0204.42.20, and 
          0204.43.20, notwithstanding the provisions of subheadings 
          9903.02.01 through 9903.02.04 and immediately superior text 
          thereto, goods covered

[[Page 89]]

          by the entry numbers set forth in the Annex to this 
          proclamation that are covered by a second quota year export 
          certificate and that were exported in the first quota year 
          shall be charged against the in-quota quantity provided for in 
          HTS subheading 9903.02.03.
          (2) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (3) The actions taken in this proclamation shall be effective 
          on the date of signature of this proclamation and shall 
          continue in effect through the close of the dates on which 
          actions proclaimed in Proclamation 7208 and Proclamation 7214 
          cease to be effective, unless such actions are earlier 
          expressly modified or terminated.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

[[Page 90]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD04JN01.003

Proc. 7446


Proclamation 7446 of June 2, 2001

National Child's Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our children, who are today dreaming big dreams and who are 
          filled with hope, will someday serve as leaders in government, 
          industry, education, and the arts. For the good of our country 
          and its continued progress and

[[Page 91]]

          advancement, we must strive to give all young Americans the 
          best possible start in life.
          Falling between Mother's Day and Father's Day, Child's Day is 
          celebrated this year on June 3, the first Sunday of the month. 
          This special occasion gives us a unique opportunity to 
          remember the joys and wonder of our own childhood and to 
          reflect on how positive and healthy experiences in one's early 
          years significantly influence later achievements and 
          happiness.
          All adults must work together to ensure the safety and well-
          being of our Nation's most precious resource, our children. 
          Every youngster deserves to live in a safe, permanent, and 
          caring family; but, unfortunately, this is not always the 
          case. Government cannot make people love one another, but it 
          can and must cultivate a climate that helps families, as well 
          as the individuals and groups that support them.
          Our Nation must reaffirm its commitment to loving and caring 
          for our children. We must improve the safety of schools and 
          neighborhoods and mobilize faith-based and community groups to 
          fight poverty and addiction. Because many youngsters now grow 
          up in single-parent homes, we must promote responsible 
          fatherhood, in all its aspects, including spiritual 
          leadership, emotional security, and financial support. We must 
          also help families in crisis, protect children from abuse and 
          neglect, and encourage adoption for children who must be 
          removed from their biological parents.
          Our responsibility to our young people, however, extends 
          beyond just their physical and emotional well-being. We must 
          also provide them with a quality education, so that no child 
          is left behind in our fast-paced global economy. Adults should 
          also encourage youngsters to always set high goals, make right 
          choices, and stay involved in their communities. By doing so, 
          boys and girls can pursue lives of meaning and fulfillment as 
          contributing members of society.
          Every child in every neighborhood has unique gifts to offer. 
          We must nurture our children's dreams, help them develop their 
          talents and abilities, and ensure their healthy development so 
          that they may reach their full potential. Our success in this 
          vital endeavor will affect the direction of their lives and 
          the future strength and vitality of our Nation.
          In recognition of the importance of our Nation's children, the 
          Senate, by Senate Resolution 90 approved May 25, 2001, has 
          designated June 3, 2001, as ``National Child's Day'' and has 
          requested that the President issue a Proclamation calling for 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 3, 2001, as National Child's Day. I encourage 
          all Americans to share in the mission of preparing our young 
          people for life's challenges and opportunities. By reading to 
          youngsters, listening to their cares and concerns, and 
          providing them with safe and loving homes, we can make a 
          positive and lasting contribution to their health, happiness, 
          and well-being.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this second 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7447

[[Page 92]]


Proclamation 7447 of June 6, 2001

Flag Day and National Flag Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On June 14, 2001, Americans will observe the 224th birthday of 
          the flag of the United States of America. This special day 
          provides a time for our Nation to reflect on our flag's rich 
          history and its meaning to Americans and people around the 
          world.
          The Continental Congress adopted the Stars and Stripes as the 
          official flag of our young republic on June 14, 1777. 
          Describing the new flag, the Congress wrote, ``White signifies 
          Purity and Innocence; Red, Hardiness and Valor; Blue signifies 
          Vigilance, Perseverance and Justice.'' Over time, the flag's 
          design evolved to keep pace with our Nation's development and 
          growth, but its meaning as a symbol of democracy and freedom 
          has remained constant.
          Flag Day was first celebrated throughout the country in 1877 
          to mark the centennial of the birth of our national symbol. As 
          so often happens in our communities, a caring teacher 
          encouraging students to develop a love for learning sparked 
          renewed interest in the flag. Wisconsin schoolteacher B.J. 
          Cigrand arranged for his pupils in 1885 to observe the 108th 
          anniversary of the flag's official adoption.
          In magazine and newspaper articles and public addresses in the 
          following years, Cigrand promoted an official national 
          celebration of June 14 as ``Flag Birthday'' or ``Flag Day.'' 
          Groups in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois took up the 
          cause. After three decades of State and local celebrations, 
          President Woodrow Wilson officially established Flag Day by 
          proclamation in 1916.
          During the darkest hours of World War II, Americans looked to 
          the purity, hardiness, valor, vigilance, perseverance, and 
          justice represented by the flag as ideals worthy of the 
          ultimate sacrifice in order to defeat tyranny. In celebration 
          of the flag's powerful meaning to Americans and its place in 
          our culture and history, Flag Day became a national observance 
          by Act of Congress in 1949 and was signed into law by 
          President Harry Truman.
          To commemorate the adoption of our flag, the Congress, by 
          joint resolution approved August 3, 1949 (63 Stat. 492), 
          designated June 14 of each year as ``Flag Day'' and requested 
          the President to issue an annual proclamation calling for a 
          national observance and for the display of the flag of the 
          United States on all Federal Government buildings. In a second 
          joint resolution approved June 9, 1966 (80 Stat. 194), the 
          Congress requested the President to also issue annually a 
          proclamation designating the week during which June 14 falls 
          as ``National Flag Week'' and called upon all citizens of the 
          United States to display the flag during that week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 14, 2001, as Flag Day and the week beginning 
          June 10, 2001, as National Flag Week. I direct the appropriate 
          officials to display the flag of the United States on all 
          Federal

[[Page 93]]

          Government buildings during the week. I also call upon the 
          people of the United States to observe with pride and all due 
          ceremony those days from Flag Day through Independence Day, 
          also set aside by the Congress (89 Stat. 211), as a time to 
          honor America, to celebrate our heritage in public gatherings 
          and activities, and to recite publicly the Pledge of 
          Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixth day 
          of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of the 
          Independence of the United States of America the two hundred 
          and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7448


Proclamation 7448 of June 7, 2001

Asiatic Fleet Memorial Day

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          All of America's service personnel and veterans deserve our 
          gratitude, and it is fitting to pay tribute to the United 
          States Asiatic Fleet.
          The United States Navy's presence in the Far East dates to 
          1822. The Asiatic Fleet was formed in 1902, reestablished in 
          1910, and continued to serve into 1942. Through years of 
          unrest and disturbance, the Fleet protected American lives and 
          interests along the China coast and the Yangtze River, bearing 
          responsibilities that were as much diplomatic as Naval. The 
          Fleet also assisted civilian areas devastated by the forces of 
          nature and by internal warfare.
          When the attack on Pearl Harbor thrust the United States into 
          World War II, the Asiatic Fleet played a key role in the 
          defense of the Philippines. Outnumbered and outgunned at sea 
          and in the air, the Fleet was joined by ships of the British, 
          Dutch, and Australian navies to oppose the Japanese advance 
          through what is now Indonesia. The Fleet's destroyers hit the 
          Japanese at Balikpapan and Badung Strait, and the cruiser 
          Marblehead fought her way through massive air attacks off Bali 
          while submarines, short of fuel and torpedoes, struck Japanese 
          supply lines.
          The battle for the ``Malay Barrier'' reached its climax in the 
          Java Sea. In the opening hours of March 1, 1942, the American 
          cruiser Houston and the Australian cruiser Perth, outnumbered 
          and outgunned by the Japanese, fought to the last in the Sunda 
          Strait. They went down with their guns still firing and were 
          followed hours later by the British cruiser Exeter. The 
          remaining Allied ships were then ordered to make their way to 
          Australia.
          The Asiatic Fleet was no more, but its heritage of courage and 
          selfless dedication helped spur our Navy to victory in World 
          War II. Since then, the Seventh Fleet has carried on the 
          Asiatic Fleet's duties, earning honor in Korea and Vietnam and 
          helping to preserve peace and stability in East Asia. The men 
          and women of our Naval services who saw the Cold War to a 
          peaceful conclusion and won victory in Operation Desert Storm 
          are worthy descendants of the sailors and Marines who earned 
          glory in the Java Sea. As we pay tribute to the memory of the 
          Asiatic Fleet, I call on

[[Page 94]]

          all Americans to join me in saluting its proud heritage of 
          bravery and honor.
          The Congress, by Public Law 105-261, on October 17, 1998, has 
          authorized and requested the President to issue a proclamation 
          in commemoration of the United States Navy Asiatic Fleet.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Friday, March 1, 2002, as U.S. Navy Asiatic Fleet 
          Memorial Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day 
          with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7449


Proclamation 7449 of June 8, 2001

To Implement the Agreement Between the United States of America and the 
Socialist Republic of Vietnam on Trade Relations

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Pursuant to the authority vested in the President by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States, and acting 
          through duly empowered representatives, the United States 
          entered into negotiations with representatives of the 
          Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam'') to conclude an 
          agreement on trade relations between the United States and 
          Vietnam.
          2. These negotiations were conducted in accordance with the 
          requirements of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 
          2431 et seq.) (the ``Trade Act'').
          3. As a result of these negotiations, an ``Agreement Between 
          the United States of America and the Socialist Republic of 
          Vietnam on Trade Relations'' (the ``Agreement''), including 
          annexes and an exchange of letters which form an integral part 
          of the Agreement, the foregoing in English and Vietnamese, was 
          signed on July 13, 2000, by duly empowered representatives of 
          the two Governments, and is set forth as an annex to this 
          proclamation.
          4. The Agreement conforms to the requirements relating to 
          bilateral commercial agreements set forth in section 405(b) of 
          the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2435(b)).
          5. Chapter VII, Article 8:1 of the Agreement provides that the 
          Agreement shall enter into force on the date of exchange of 
          written notices of acceptance by the two Governments.
          6. Section 405(c) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2435(c)) 
          provides that a bilateral commercial agreement providing 
          nondiscriminatory treatment to the

[[Page 95]]

          products of a country denied such treatment prior to the date 
          of enactment of the Trade Act, and a proclamation implementing 
          such agreement, shall take effect only if a joint resolution 
          described in section 151(b)(3) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2191(b)(3)) that approves of the Agreement is enacted into 
          law.
          7. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of 
          the United States (HTS) the substance of the provisions of 
          that Act, of other acts affecting import treatment, and 
          actions taken thereunder.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States, including, but 
          not limited to, sections 404, 405, and 604 of the Trade Act, 
          do proclaim that:

(1)

 This proclamation shall become effective, the Agreement shall enter into 
force, and nondiscriminatory treatment shall be extended to the products of 
Vietnam, in accordance with the terms of the Agreement, and after Congress 
approves the Agreement by joint resolution, on the date of exchange of 
written notices of acceptance in accordance with Chapter VII, Article 8:1 
of the Agreement. The United States Trade Representative shall publish 
notice of the effective date in the Federal Register.

(2)

 Effective with respect to articles entered, or withdrawn from warehouse 
for consumption, on or after the date provided in paragraph (1) of this 
proclamation, general note 3(b) to the HTS, enumerating those countries 
whose products are subject to duty at rates set forth in Rates of Duty 
Column 2 of the tariff schedule, is modified by striking out ``Socialist 
Republic of Vietnam.''

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Proc. 7450

[[Page 243]]


Proclamation 7450 of June 11, 2001

Great Outdoors Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During Great Outdoors Week, our Nation celebrates the beauty 
          and majesty of the great outdoors. This occasion allows 
          Americans to reflect on the role our parks, forests, wildlife 
          refuges, recreation areas, and other public lands and waters 
          play in our lives. We also acknowledge how this wonderful 
          shared legacy would not be possible without our strong 
          tradition of natural resource conservation.
          No other country boasts more extraordinary or more diverse 
          options for recreation. Our Nation's federally managed lands 
          account for nearly one in every three acres and, together with 
          our Nation's waters, provide visitors with almost 2 billion 
          opportunities for recreation annually. Eight of ten Americans 
          participate at least monthly in outdoor recreation, and we may 
          choose to challenge ourselves through demanding activities 
          like mountain climbing or river rafting. Enjoying the outdoors 
          also can be as tranquil as birdwatching or viewing a golden 
          sunset from a campsite. These experiences leave us with 
          wonderful memories of time shared with family and friends, 
          provide opportunities for improving our health, and expose us 
          to the wonders of nature.
          Recognizing that most Americans enjoy the outdoors by visiting 
          Federal, State, or local sites, my budget proposes to fully 
          fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund at $900 million for 
          Fiscal Year 2002. Half of the Fund will go toward grants to 
          support State and local conservation and outdoor recreation 
          efforts. My National Parks Legacy Project pledges to secure 
          $4.9 billion to help ensure that our national parks are 
          properly maintained and enhanced. In addition, I have directed 
          the Department of the Interior to prepare an annual report 
          describing the condition of our parks and offering specific 
          recommendations to improve them.
          During Great Outdoors Week, we also honor Americans who 
          volunteer their time to restore and safeguard these national 
          treasures. These generous individuals collectively contribute 
          millions of hours to clean shorelines and waterways, maintain 
          trails and campsites, staff interpretive centers, and perform 
          other important tasks. Their efforts help ensure the continued 
          vitality of our precious natural areas and enhance the quality 
          of life for all Americans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 10-16, 2001, as Great Outdoors Week. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this week with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities and to participate in 
          safe and wholesome outdoor recreation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7451

[[Page 244]]


Proclamation 7451 of June 15, 2001

 Father's Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Americans celebrate Father's Day as a unique time to reflect 
          on the importance of fathers and to honor their vital role in 
          the lives of children. For those who have been blessed with 
          our own families, this day also provides an opportunity to 
          reaffirm our commitment to being the best possible fathers for 
          our children.
          Father's Day was originally the idea of Sonora Dodd, who 
          wanted to honor her father, Civil War veteran Henry Jackson 
          Smart. As Sonora's sole surviving parent following the death 
          of her mother, Mr. Smart made great sacrifices for his 
          daughter and raised her with courage, selflessness, and 
          abiding love. To enable all Americans to participate in paying 
          special tribute to their fathers, President Calvin Coolidge 
          first recognized Father's Day in 1924.
          During childhood, boys and girls look to their fathers for a 
          sense of security, warmth, attention, patience, and 
          understanding. As young people mature, their fathers 
          contribute to their spiritual, emotional, physical, financial, 
          and social well-being. In reaching adulthood, men and women 
          alike are enriched immeasurably by the wisdom of their fathers 
          as they pursue careers, start families, and take active roles 
          in the community.
          For boys and girls raised without a father in the home, the 
          challenges can be great. Seventy-five percent of American 
          children raised in a one-parent household will experience 
          poverty before they turn 11 years old, compared to only 20 
          percent of children in families with two parents. Children in 
          homes where the father is absent are more likely to be 
          suspended from school or to drop out, be treated for an 
          emotional or behavioral problem, become suicidal as 
          adolescents, or become victims of child abuse or neglect.
          As a society, we must support fathers in fulfilling their 
          responsibilities to their families, which may include not only 
          biological or adopted children, but also stepchildren or 
          foster children. Fathers must be prepared to nurture and care 
          for their sons and daughters, and to do so in the context of a 
          strong and committed marriage. To promote responsible 
          fatherhood, my Administration has proposed providing financial 
          support to community and faith-based organizations that help 
          fathers and to programs that strengthen marriage and promote 
          successful parenting. We also propose funding to support the 
          expansion of ongoing State and local fatherhood initiatives 
          and helping community groups that try to provide young men 
          with role models.
          Our society must strive to produce a generation of men who are 
          ready to become the best possible fathers. Let us set a good 
          example for America's sons by valuing the responsibility and 
          importance of fatherhood. Let us also honor and be thankful 
          for the caring, decent, and hardworking fathers who make such 
          a tremendous difference in the lives of their children and 
          families.

[[Page 245]]

          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, in accordance with a joint resolution of 
          the Congress approved April 24, 1972 (36 U.S.C. 109), do 
          hereby proclaim June 17, 2001, as Father's Day. I encourage 
          all Americans to express love and respect for their fathers, 
          as well as appreciation for the vital contributions of fathers 
          to families and to society. I direct the appropriate officials 
          of the Government to display the flag of the United States on 
          all Government buildings on this day. I also call upon State 
          and local governments and citizens to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth 
          day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7452


Proclamation 7452 of June 26, 2001

Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons Responsible 
for Actions That Threaten International Stabilization Efforts in the 
Western Balkans, and Persons Responsible for Wartime Atrocities in That 
Region

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The United States has a vital interest in assuring peace and 
          stability in Europe. In the Western Balkans, the United States 
          is engaged, together with North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
          Allies, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in 
          Europe, United Nations missions, the European Union, and other 
          international organizations in an effort to achieve peace, 
          stability, reconciliation, and democratic development and to 
          facilitate the region's integration into the European 
          mainstream. The United States views full implementation of the 
          Dayton Peace Accords in Bosnia and United Nations Security 
          Council Resolution 1244 in Kosovo as critical to these 
          efforts.
          In furtherance of these objectives, the United States has 
          provided military, diplomatic, financial, and logistical 
          support to international institutions established in the 
          region and to civil and security authorities. The United 
          States has a direct and significant interest in the success of 
          such initiatives and in the safety of personnel involved in 
          them, including numerous United States military and Government 
          officials.
          In light of these objectives, I have determined that it is in 
          the interests of the United States to restrict the entry into 
          the United States of persons responsible for actions that 
          threaten international stabilization efforts in the Western 
          Balkans region, and of persons responsible for wartime 
          atrocities committed in that region since 1991.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, including section 
          212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as 
          amended (8 U.S.C. 1182(f)), and section 301 of title

[[Page 246]]

          3, United States Code, hereby find that the unrestricted 
          immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of 
          persons described in section 1 of this proclamation would, 
          except as provided for in sections 2 and 3 of this 
          proclamation, be detrimental to the interests of the United 
          States. I therefore hereby proclaim that:
          etion 1. The immigrant and nonimmigrant 
          entry into the United States of the following persons is 
          hereby suspended:
          (a) Persons who, through violent or other acts: (i) seek to 
          obstruct the implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords (the 
          ``Dayton Agreements'') or United Nations Security Council 
          Resolution 1244 of June 10, 1999; (ii) seek to undermine the 
          authority or security of the United Nations Interim 
          Administration Mission in Kosovo, the international security 
          presence in Kosovo known as the Kosovo Force, the Office of 
          the High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the 
          international security presence in Bosnia known as the 
          Stabilization Force, the Organization for Security and 
          Cooperation in Europe, the International Criminal Tribunal for 
          the former Yugoslavia, or other international organizations 
          and entities present in the region pursuant to the Dayton 
          Agreement or United Nations Security Council resolutions, 
          including but not limited to Resolutions 827, 1031, and 1244; 
          (iii) seek to intimidate or to prevent displaced persons or 
          refugees from returning to their places of residence in any 
          area or state of the Western Balkans region; or (iv) otherwise 
          seek to undermine peace, stability, reconciliation, or 
          democratic development in any area or state of the Western 
          Balkans region.
          (b) Persons who are responsible for directing, planning, or 
          carrying out wartime atrocities, including but not limited to 
          acts in furtherance of ``ethnic cleansing,'' committed in any 
          area or state of the Western Balkans region since 1991.
          e. 2. Section 1 of this proclamation 
          shall not apply with respect to any person otherwise covered 
          by section 1 where entry of such person would not be contrary 
          to the interest of the United States.
          e. 3. Persons covered by sections 1 and 2 
          of this proclamation shall be identified by the Secretary of 
          State or the Secretary's designee, in his or her sole 
          discretion, pursuant to such procedures as the Secretary may 
          establish under section 5 of this proclamation.
          e. 4. Nothing in this proclamation shall 
          be construed to derogate from United States Government 
          obligations under applicable international agreements.
          e. 5. The Secretary of State shall have 
          responsibility for implementing this proclamation pursuant to 
          such procedures as the Secretary may establish.
          e. 6. This proclamation is effective 
          immediately and shall remain in effect until such time as the 
          Secretary of State determines that it is no longer necessary 
          and should be terminated, either in whole or in part. The 
          Secretary of State shall advise the Attorney General of such 
          determination, which shall become effective upon publication 
          in the Federal eister.

[[Page 247]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7453


Proclamation 7453 of June 29, 2001

Black Music Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          America's rich musical heritage reflects the diversity of our 
          people. Among many influences, the cultural traditions brought 
          to this land from Africa more than four centuries ago and the 
          remarkable musical achievements of African Americans since 
          then have strongly and unmistakably improved the sound of 
          American music.
          From historical burdens such as slavery and injustice to the 
          celebration of faith, much of the origin of African-American 
          music reflects our national story. The work songs, shouts and 
          hollers, spirituals, and ragtime of an earlier era laid the 
          creative foundation for many of America's most distinctive and 
          popular musical genres. These include rhythm and blues, jazz, 
          hip hop, gospel, rap, and the roots of rock and roll.
          Jazz, often called America's classical music, so influenced 
          our culture that Americans named a decade after it. Like the 
          country of its birth, jazz blends many traditions, such as 
          African-American folk, rhythm and blues, French Creole 
          classical form, and gospel. Through the creation and 
          performance of music like jazz, black Americans were better 
          able to exchange ideas freely across racial and cultural 
          barriers. Before our Nation made significant strides in truly 
          promoting equal justice and opportunity for all, black and 
          white musicians in the genres of jazz, blues, and country 
          played together in jam sessions, recording studios, and small 
          bands. In many ways, their art preceded social change, 
          allowing black and white musicians to meet as equals and to be 
          judged on their musical ability, rather than the color of 
          their skin. Their music also provided an outlet for African 
          Americans to speak passionately and brilliantly to the rest of 
          the Nation and the world.
          From New Orleans and the back roads of the Mississippi Delta 
          to Harlem and Chicago, black musicians set enduring and 
          distinctive standards for American creativity. The blues of Ma 
          Rainey and Bessie Smith, the gospel of Mahalia Jackson, the 
          jazz of Duke Ellington, and the soul of Marvin Gaye claim fans 
          of all ages from around the world. The trumpeting genius of 
          Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie illustrate the exceptional 
          musicianship so prominent in various genres of African-
          American music.
          The career of Marian Anderson, the world-class contralto who 
          was denied permission to sing in Constitution Hall because of 
          her race, symbolizes the achievements of so many black 
          American musicians. Performing instead at

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          the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, she drew an audience of 75,000 
          and inspired the world not only with her rich musical gifts, 
          but also with her determination and courage.
          The music of Marian Anderson and other African-American 
          artists has greatly enriched our quality of life and created 
          one of our Nation's most treasured art forms. As universal and 
          original expressions of the human experience, their body of 
          work, both past and present, entertains, inspires, and thrills 
          countless people around the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim June 2001, as Black Music Month. I encourage all 
          Americans to learn more about the contributions of black 
          artists to America's musical heritage and to celebrate their 
          remarkable role in shaping our history and culture.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7454


Proclamation 7454 of June 29, 2001

To Modify Duty-Free Treatment Under the Generalized

System of Preferences

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Sections 501 and 502 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended 
          (the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2461 and 2462), authorize the 
          President to designate countries as beneficiary developing 
          countries for purposes of the Generalized System of 
          Preferences (GSP).
          2. Section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2463(c)(2)(A)) provides that beneficiary developing countries, 
          except least-developed beneficiary developing countries or 
          beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries, are subject to 
          competitive need limitations on the preferential treatment 
          afforded under the GSP to eligible articles.
          3. Section 503(c)(2)(C) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2463(c)(2)(C)) provides that a country that is no longer 
          treated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to an 
          eligible article may be redesignated as a beneficiary 
          developing country with respect to such article if imports of 
          such article from such country did not exceed the competitive 
          need limitations in section 503(c)(2)(A) during the preceding 
          calendar year.
          4. Section 503(c)(2)(F) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2463(c)(2)(F)) provides that the President may disregard the 
          competitive need limitation provided in section 
          503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(A)(i)(II)) with 
          respect to any eligible article from any beneficiary 
          developing country if the aggregate appraised value of the 
          imports of such article into the United States during

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          the preceding calendar year does not exceed an amount set 
          forth in section 503(c)(2)(F)(ii) (19 U.S.C. 
          2463(c)(2)(F)(ii)).
          5. Section 503(d) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2463(d)) provides 
          that the President may waive the application of the 
          competitive need limitations in section 503(c)(2)(A) with 
          respect to any eligible article of any beneficiary developing 
          country if certain conditions are met.
          6. Pursuant to sections 501 and 502 of the 1974 Act, and 
          having due regard for the eligibility criteria set forth 
          therein, I have determined that it is appropriate to designate 
          Georgia as a beneficiary developing country for purposes of 
          the GSP.
          7. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that certain beneficiary countries should no longer 
          receive preferential tariff treatment under the GSP with 
          respect to certain eligible articles imported in quantities 
          that exceed the applicable competitive need limitation.
          8. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(C) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that certain countries should be redesignated as 
          beneficiary developing countries with respect to certain 
          eligible articles that previously had been imported in 
          quantities exceeding the competitive need limitations of 
          section 503(c)(2)(A). For certain articles, I have decided 
          that the effective date of the redesignation shall be 
          determined by the United States Trade Representative (USTR).
          9. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(F) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that the competitive need limitation provided in 
          section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) should be waived with respect to 
          certain eligible articles from certain beneficiary developing 
          countries. For certain articles, I have decided that the 
          effective date of the waiver shall be determined by the USTR.
          10. Pursuant to section 503(d) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that the competitive need limitations of section 
          503(c)(2)(A) should be waived with respect to certain eligible 
          articles from a beneficiary developing country. I have 
          received the advice of the International Trade Commission on 
          whether any industries in the United States are likely to be 
          adversely affected by such waivers, and I have determined, 
          based on that advice and on the considerations described in 
          sections 501 and 502(c), that such waivers are in the national 
          economic interest of the United States. I have decided that 
          the effective date of the waivers shall be determined by the 
          USTR.
          11. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of 
          the United States (HTS) the substance of the relevant 
          provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import 
          treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, 
          modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty 
          or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and title V and 
          section 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to reflect in the HTS the addition of Georgia as 
          a beneficiary developing country under the GSP, general note 
          4(a) to the HTS is modified as provided in section A(1) of 
          Annex I to this proclamation.

[[Page 250]]

          (2) In order to provide that one or more countries that have 
          not been treated as beneficiary developing countries with 
          respect to one or more eligible articles should be 
          redesignated as beneficiary developing countries with respect 
          to such article or articles for purposes of the GSP, and in 
          order to provide that one or more countries should no longer 
          be treated as beneficiary developing countries with respect to 
          one or more eligible articles for purposes of the GSP, general 
          note 4(d) to the HTS is modified as provided in section A(2) 
          of Annex I and paragraph (1) of Annex III to this 
          proclamation.
          (3) (a) In order to provide preferential tariff treatment 
          under the GSP to a beneficiary developing country that has 
          been excluded from the benefits of the GSP for certain 
          eligible articles, the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn for 
          each of the HTS subheadings enumerated in section A(3)(a) of 
          Annex I and paragraph (2) of Annex III to this proclamation is 
          modified as provided in such section and paragraph.

  (b) In order to provide that one or more countries should not be treated 
as beneficiary developing countries with respect to certain eligible 
articles for purposes of the GSP, the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn for 
each of the HTS subheadings enumerated in section A(3)(b) of Annex I to 
this proclamation is modified as provided in such section.

          (4) A waiver of the application of section 503(c)(2)(A)(i)(II) 
          of the 1974 Act shall apply to the eligible articles in the 
          HTS subheadings and to the beneficiary developing countries 
          listed in section B of Annex I to this proclamation.
          (5) A waiver of the application of section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 
          1974 Act shall apply to the eligible articles in the HTS 
          subheadings and to the beneficiary developing country set 
          forth in Annex II to this proclamation.
          (6) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (7) (a) The modifications made by Annex I to this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or 
          withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after July 1, 
          2001.

  (b) The action taken in paragraph (5) of this proclamation shall be 
effective on the date of signature of this proclamation.

           (c) The modifications made by Annex III to this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or 
          withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after a date 
          to be announced in the Federal eister by the 
          USTR.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-fifth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD05JY01.008


[[Page 252]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD05JY01.009


[[Page 253]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD05JY01.010

Proc. 7455

[[Page 254]]


Proclamation 7455 of July 12, 2001

Captive Nations Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The 21st century must become the ``Century of Democracy.'' 
          Democracy and freedom have taken root across the globe, and 
          the United States will continue to stand for greater 
          consolidation of pluralism and religious freedom, wider access 
          to information, and respect for human rights and for the rule 
          of law. Our Nation and many of our allies share this vision 
          for the world. In the words of President Ronald Reagan, ``For 
          the sake of peace and justice, let us move toward a world in 
          which all people are at last free to determine their own 
          destiny.''
          During the 20th century, dictators, monarchs, and colonialism 
          gave way to democracy through ballot boxes, pressure from 
          citizens, and negotiated settlements to conflicts. However, 
          freedom and liberty remained out of reach for many. In 1959, 
          the Congress promulgated a Joint Resolution authorizing and 
          requesting the President to declare the third week of July as 
          Captive Nations Week and to continue this annual statement 
          ``until such time as freedom and independence shall have been 
          achieved for all the captive nations of the world.''
          Worldwide, many nations have successfully made transitions to 
          democracy since President Eisenhower signed the Captive 
          Nations Resolution. These democracies, whether nascent or 
          consolidated, are found in areas that the great General and 
          34th President could have barely imagined would find freedom 
          before the 20th century closed.
          In spite of the proliferation of democracies over the past 
          century, many people across the globe are held captive by 
          their governments. More than a decade after the Berlin Wall 
          fell, more than 2 billion people still live under 
          authoritarian regimes. America must remain vigilant in our 
          support of those living under authoritarianism. There remain 
          people in Asia, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, 
          and Central Asia who do not enjoy the right to choose their 
          own governments and to hold those governments accountable.
          Americans and the 3 billion others across the globe living in 
          democracies desire the same freedoms for the remaining 42 
          percent of the world's population who live without them. But 
          as long as governments like those in Afghanistan, Burma, Cuba, 
          Iraq, and Sudan exist, freedom is not accessible to all. 
          Greater access to robust marketplaces of ideas, as well as 
          freedom of worship and expression, will empower those living 
          in closed societies. Strong and transparent judicial systems 
          and respect for human rights and the rule of law also serve as 
          necessary foundations for democracy.
          To promote the development of democratic practices worldwide, 
          I reaffirm America's support for freedom, justice, and 
          pluralism. I have asked my Administration to examine our 
          programs to support democracy and human rights movements 
          closely and to ensure that these programs advance American 
          policy. In addition, I want to make certain that our annual 
          State Department human rights, trafficking in persons, and 
          religious freedom reports are integrated into American foreign 
          policy.

[[Page 255]]

          The Congress, by Joint Resolution approved July 17, 1959 (73 
          Stat. 212), has authorized and requested the President to 
          issue a proclamation designating the third week in July of 
          each year as ``Captive Nations Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim July 15-21, 2001, as 
          Captive Nations Week. I call upon the people of the United 
          States to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and 
          activities and to reaffirm their devotion to the aspirations 
          of all peoples for liberty, justice, and self-determination.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth 
          day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7456


Proclamation 7456 of July 21, 2001

Parents' Day 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Being a parent is the most important job in the world. As we 
          hold a newborn in our arms or embrace an older adopted child, 
          the promise we make in our hearts to love, protect, and 
          nurture our children stays with us and with them forever. We 
          are eternally linked to the children whom we are blessed to 
          parent and to the generations before us who helped shape our 
          lives.
          Both mothers and fathers play a vital role in giving children 
          the best possible start in life. As parents, we provide our 
          children with the love and support they need to grow up to be 
          caring individuals and responsible citizens. The care we 
          express and the values we instill help our children achieve 
          their greatest potential and ultimately will determine the 
          future of our Nation.
          Unfortunately, children who lack a strong parental presence in 
          their lives can suffer over both the short and the long term. 
          Study after study has demonstrated that children who grow up 
          without both parents in their home are more likely to end up 
          in poverty, drop out of school, become addicted to drugs, have 
          a child out of wedlock, or go to prison. Single-parented 
          children who avoid these unfortunate outcomes will 
          nevertheless miss out on the balance, unity, and stability 
          that a two-parent family can bring.
          Recognizing that strong families make a strong America, I have 
          committed my Administration to help parents do better by 
          encouraging the formation and maintenance of loving families. 
          We have proposed several major initiatives designed to promote 
          responsible fatherhood, strengthen families, and make adoption 
          easier and more affordable, so that every child has a better 
          chance of living in a stable and loving home. We also have 
          achieved widespread support for the historic reform of our 
          public education system that will significantly improve our 
          schools. This improvement is founded on

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          the core principles of my education reform agenda, which 
          include: accountability; flexibility; local control; and more 
          choices for parents.
          Government bears an important responsibility to provide 
          excellent schools and educational programs that leave no child 
          behind; but Government cannot replace the love and nurturing 
          of committed parents that are essential for a child's well-
          being. Many community organizations, centers of faith, and 
          schools offer services and programs to help parents improve 
          their child-rearing skills. As we observe Parents' Day, I 
          encourage all Americans to join me in honoring the millions of 
          mothers and fathers, biological and adoptive, foster parents, 
          and stepparents, whose selfless love and hard-working efforts 
          are building better lives for their children and our Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States and consistent 
          with Public Law 103-362, do hereby proclaim Sunday, July 22, 
          2001, as Parents' Day. I urge all Americans to express their 
          love, respect, support, and appreciation to their parents, and 
          I call upon citizens to observe this day with appropriate 
          programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7457


Proclamation 7457 of July 25, 2001

National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The sounds of war thundered as a furious struggle took place 
          51 years ago in a country unknown to many Americans. The 
          battleground that was Korea in the years 1950 to 1953 tested 
          the resolve, courage, and commitment of an America barely 5 
          years beyond the tremendous sacrifices of World War II. 
          Undaunted, America again marshaled her forces to defend a 
          population facing tyranny and aggression.
          Freedom for the Republic of Korea was purchased with deep 
          sacrifice and with honor. In 38 months of intense fighting, 
          33,665 Americans gave their lives in battle. Our Nation's 
          highest military award, the Medal of Honor, was awarded to 131 
          members of the U.S. Armed Forces, more than 90 of them 
          posthumously. Yet the challenge of Korea was not just a 
          formidable adversary, but also a harsh and forbidding climate. 
          The 1.8 million service men and women who served there 
          suffered bitter winters that would claim casualties 
          approaching those inflicted by guns, shrapnel, and bayonets. 
          When the Military Armistice Agreement, effective 48 years ago, 
          silenced the guns on the Korean peninsula, it marked the end 
          of the world's first determined stand against Communist 
          aggression. It signaled the beginning of the Cold War, and 
          foreshadowed the eventual dismantling of global Communism.

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          Today, the liberties defended there half a century ago are the 
          inheritance of 47 million citizens of a democratic, 
          prosperous, and progressive Republic of Korea. The young 
          Americans who fought and died there kept faith with a just 
          cause, and in so doing, kept faith with the principles and 
          ideals on which our Nation was founded. They immeasurably 
          blessed the Republic of Korea and brought great honor to our 
          Nation as a defender of freedom. Because of these truths, we 
          recognize the Korean War for what it was and is--not a 
          ``forgotten war,'' but a remembered victory.
          The Congress, by passing Public Law 104-19 (36 U.S.C. 127), 
          has designated July 27, 2001, as ``National Korean War 
          Veterans Armistice Day'' and has authorized and requested the 
          President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim July 27, 2001, as 
          National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day. I call upon all 
          Americans to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies and 
          activities that honor and give thanks to our distinguished 
          Korean War veterans. I also ask Federal departments and 
          agencies and interested groups, organizations, and individuals 
          to fly the flag of the United States at half-staff on July 27, 
          2001, in memory of the Americans who died as a result of their 
          service in Korea.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fifth day of July, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7458


Proclamation 7458 of August 24, 2001

Women's Equality Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Women's Equality Day marks the anniversary of women's 
          enfranchisement and a pivotal victory for women's rights. Our 
          Nation recognized a woman's right to vote with the passage of 
          the 19th Amendment in 1920, but the roots of the women's 
          rights movement go back to at least 80 years earlier.
          In 1840, Elizabeth Cady Stanton met Lucretia Mott at the 
          World's Anti-Slavery Convention in London. They, along with 
          the other women there, expected to join in the anti-slavery 
          proceedings, but male delegates refused to allow them to 
          participate. Thus rebuffed, Mott and Stanton began a journey 
          that would lead to the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. There, 
          the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments called for women's 
          equality, including the right to vote and to take part in our 
          Nation's great moral debates.
          Nearly all women's rights advocates also fought for the 
          abolition of slavery. One hundred and fifty years ago, anti-
          slavery suffragette Sojourner Truth gave a powerful address 
          expounding on the strength of women. Her impassioned call for 
          women to actively participate in social justice movements 
          became a legendary link between abolition and suffrage. That 
          same year,

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          Susan B. Anthony met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and they later 
          joined Harriet Tubman, Mary Ann Shad Cary, Lucy Stone, and 
          other abolitionists to pursue the goal of women's suffrage. 
          Many 19th Century abolitionist suffragettes did not live to 
          see the fruit of their work for women's enfranchisement, but 
          their efforts led the way for women to fight for and win 
          recognition of their rights as equal participants in our 
          Republic.
          Tremendous advancements have been made in the fight for 
          equality. But we must remain diligent in enforcing our 
          Nation's laws. And we still have work to do in this area.
          Today, thousands of people, mainly women and children, are 
          trafficked into the United States each year and forced to work 
          in the sex industry, sweatshops, field labor, and domestic 
          servitude. Beyond these vile acts, workplace discrimination 
          and targeted violence continue to take place, despite their 
          rejection by our communities and legal system.
          Our efforts to ensure women equal rights must include the 
          protection of women from violence and equal access to justice. 
          This is particularly vital for women who face geographic, 
          cultural, and other barriers to social justice services. Women 
          victimized by crime should receive equitable and compassionate 
          care, including access to advocacy, emergency shelter, law 
          enforcement protection, and legal aid. That is why my 2002 
          budget requests increased funding for Federal initiatives to 
          combat violence against women and to continue the guarantees 
          of basic civil rights and liberties for women.
          As we remember the well-known champions of women's equality, 
          we also honor the millions of women whose private efforts and 
          personal ideals continue to sustain and improve this land. On 
          Women's Equality Day, I call upon all Americans to defend the 
          freedoms gained by those who came before us and to continue to 
          expand our shared vision of social justice and equality.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim August 26, 2001, as Women's Equality Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fourth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7459

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Proclamation 7459 of August 30, 2001

National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecologic cancers, is 
          the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the 
          United States. Experts predict that more than 23,000 cases 
          will be diagnosed in 2001, with an estimated 13,900 women 
          dying from the disease this year.
          Ovarian cancer is very treatable when detected early, but only 
          25 percent of ovarian cancer cases in the United States are 
          diagnosed in the early stages. The vast majority of cases are 
          not diagnosed until the cancer has spread beyond the ovaries, 
          often because symptoms are easily confused with other diseases 
          and because no reliable, easily administered screening tool 
          exists.
          When the disease is diagnosed in advanced stages, the chance 
          of 5-year survival is only about 25 percent. Currently, 50 
          percent of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer die from it 
          within 5 years. Among African-American women, only 48 percent 
          survive 5 years or more.
          Early detection of this disease remains the best way to save 
          women's lives. Symptoms may include abdominal pressure or 
          bloating, persistent digestive problems, excessive fatigue, 
          and sometimes abnormal bleeding. Women also should be aware 
          that risk factors are higher for those who are over 50 years 
          of age, who have a personal or family history of ovarian, 
          breast, or colon cancer, and who have not borne a child.
          National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month serves as an important 
          time to recognize Federally funded research efforts by the 
          National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and 
          Prevention, and the Department of Defense Ovarian Cancer 
          Research Program. Their work has achieved great strides, and 
          my Administration is committed to continuing funding of 
          research that will decrease the high mortality from ovarian 
          cancer and ultimately prevent the disease. At the same time, 
          the medical community and nonprofit groups are working 
          together to create more awareness about the disease and 
          spotlight the need for continued research into prevention, 
          early detection tools, advanced therapies, and possible cures.
          During this special observance, I commend the scientists, 
          physicians, and other medical and health professionals who are 
          working to advance knowledge and understanding of ovarian 
          cancer. I also encourage all Americans to learn more about the 
          disease and the importance of early detection. Doing so can 
          save lives and protect the health and well-being of countless 
          women.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September as National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. 
          I call upon the people of the United States to observe this 
          month with appropriate programs and activities.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7460


Proclamation 7460 of September 8, 2001

National Birmingham Pledge Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

           The United States has grown strong and vibrant because of its 
          diversity and common values. Representing different religions, 
          cultures, ethnic groups, and backgrounds, our citizens have 
          laid the foundation for our country's remarkable achievements.
           As a Nation, we celebrate those achievements and look forward 
          to new challenges. At the same time, we also recognize that 
          racism still exists in America.
           One of the darkest days for the cause of civil rights was 
          September 15, 1963, when a bomb exploded in the basement of 
          the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. 
          The blast ended the lives of four young African-American 
          girls, and ultimately demonstrated the tragic human costs of 
          bigotry and intolerance.
           Through the efforts of heroes like Martin Luther King, Jr., 
          and other brave men and women of the civil rights movement, 
          our Nation has made progress in battling racism and building a 
          society that more fully lives up to its democratic ideals. 
          However, regardless of the decades that have passed, 
          despicable acts such as the Birmingham bombing remain an 
          unforgettable reminder of the need for continued vigilance 
          against those who would infest our society with hate.
           The Birmingham Pledge, started in 1998, forges a positive 
          legacy from the lessons of the Birmingham tragedy. The Pledge 
          encourages people to take personal responsibility for 
          conducting themselves in ways that will achieve greater racial 
          harmony in our communities. It calls for a commitment to 
          ``treat all people with dignity and respect.'' This is our 
          solemn duty as citizens.
           As part of National Birmingham Pledge Week, I encourage all 
          Americans to join me in renewing our commitment to fight 
          racism and uphold equal justice and opportunity. We also must 
          strive to treat each other with civility, to love our 
          neighbors, and to extend the American dream to every willing 
          heart. By doing so, we can fulfill our Nation's promise and 
          build brighter futures for all our citizens as we look forward 
          to the challenges of tomorrow.
           NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 9-15, 2001, as

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          National Birmingham Pledge Week. I call upon the people of the 
          United States to mark this observance with appropriate 
          programs and ceremonies.
           IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7461


Proclamation 7461 of September 11, 2001

Honoring the Victims of the Incidents on Tuesday, September 11, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As a mark of respect for those killed by the heinous acts of 
          violence perpetrated by faceless cowards upon the people and 
          the freedom of the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 
          2001, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me as 
          President of the United States of America by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, that the flag of 
          the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White 
          House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all 
          military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of 
          the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and 
          throughout the United States and its Territories and 
          possessions until sunset, Sunday, September 16, 2001. I also 
          direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same 
          length of time at all United States embassies, legations, 
          consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all 
          military facilities and naval vessels and stations.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eleventh 
          day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, 
          and of the Independence of the United States of America the 
          two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7462

Proclamation 7462 of September 13, 2001

National Day of Prayer and Remembrance for the Victims of the Terrorist 
Attacks on September 11, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, terrorists attacked 
          America in a series of despicable acts of war. They hijacked 
          four passenger jets, crashed two of them into the World Trade 
          Center's twin towers, and a third into the Headquarters of the 
          U.S. Department of Defense at the Pentagon, causing great loss 
          of life and tremendous damage. The fourth plane crashed

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          in the Pennsylvania countryside, killing all on board but 
          falling well short of its intended target apparently because 
          of the heroic efforts of passengers on board. This carnage, 
          which caused the collapse of both Trade Center towers and the 
          destruction of part of the Pentagon, killed more than 250 
          airplane passengers and thousands more on the ground.
          Civilized people around the world denounce the evildoers who 
          devised and executed these terrible attacks. Justice demands 
          that those who helped or harbored the terrorists be punished--
          and punished severely. The enormity of their evil demands it. 
          We will use all the resources of the United States and our 
          cooperating friends and allies to pursue those responsible for 
          this evil, until justice is done.
          We mourn with those who have suffered great and disastrous 
          loss. All our hearts have been seared by the sudden and sense 
          less taking of innocent lives. We pray for healing and for the 
          strength to serve and encourage one another in hope and faith.
          Scripture says: ``Blessed are those who mourn for they shall 
          be comforted.'' I call on every American family and the family 
          of America to observe a National Day of Prayer and 
          Remembrance, honoring the memory of the thousands of victims 
          of these brutal attacks and comforting those who lost loved 
          ones. We will persevere through this national tragedy and 
          personal loss. In time, we will find healing and recovery; 
          and, in the face of all this evil, we remain strong and 
          united, ``one Nation under God.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Friday, September 14, 2001, as a National Day of 
          Prayer and Remembrance for the Victims of the Terrorist 
          Attacks on September 11, 2001. I ask that the people of the 
          United States and places of worship mark this National Day of 
          Prayer and Remembrance with noontime memorial services, the 
          ringing of bells at that hour, and evening candlelight 
          remembrance vigils. I encourage employers to permit their 
          workers time off during the lunch hour to attend the noontime 
          services to pray for our land. I invite the people of the 
          world who share our grief to join us in these solemn 
          observances.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7463

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Proclamation 7463 of September 14, 2001

Declaration of National Emergency by Reason of Certain Terrorist Attacks

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          A national emergency exists by reason of the terrorist attacks 
          at the World Trade Center, New York, New York, and the 
          Pentagon, and the continuing and immediate threat of further 
          attacks on the United States.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me as 
          President by the Constitution and the laws of the United 
          States, I hereby declare that the national emergency has 
          existed since September 11, 2001, and, pursuant to the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), I intend to 
          utilize the following statutes: sections 123, 123a, 527, 
          2201(c), 12006, and 12302 of title 10, United States Code, and 
          sections 331, 359, and 367 of title 14, United States Code.
          This proclamation immediately shall be published in the 
          Federal eister or disseminated through the 
          Emergency Federal eister, and transmitted to 
          the Congress.
          This proclamation is not intended to create any right or 
          benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a 
          party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, 
          or any person.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7464


Proclamation 7464 of September 14, 2001

Amending Proclamation 7461, Display of the Flag at Half-Staff as a Mark of 
Respect for the Victims of the Incidents on Tuesday, September 11, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          By the authority vested in me as President of the United 
          States by the Constitution and the laws of the United States 
          of America, and in order to extend the display of the flag at 
          half-staff as a mark of respect for the victims of the 
          terrorist attacks on Tuesday, September 11, 2001, it is hereby 
          ordered that Proclamation 7461 of September 11, 2001, is 
          amended by deleting in the first sentence the words ``Sunday, 
          September 16'' and inserting in their place the words 
          ``Saturday, September 22.''

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7465


Proclamation 7465 of September 17, 2001

National Farm and Ranch Safety and Health Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's agriculture industry represents 13 percent of our 
          economy and remains central to our prosperity at home and our 
          competitiveness abroad. At the core of this industry are 
          countless dedicated farmers and ranchers working to produce 
          food stuffs at a level of efficiency and quality unrivaled 
          around the globe. In many ways, agriculture ranks among the 
          most crucial of our Nation's industries; and yet, its 
          reliability and productivity are often taken for granted.
          Our farmers and ranchers face significant challenges and 
          uncertainty, from inclement weather to damaging insects. They 
          also face health and safety dangers, from exposure to 
          chemicals and the operation of machinery to tending livestock. 
          In 1999, the agriculture industry suffered more than 770 
          deaths and 150,000 disabling injuries. Of these victims, many 
          were children and young people injured or killed in 
          preventable farm and ranch accidents.
          Progress is being made in developing technology that makes 
          farm and ranch work safer. Safety equipment features for 
          tractors, such as roll-over protective structures, bypass 
          starter covers, and hazard warning lights, aid in the 
          prevention of injuries and save lives. Sunscreens, hearing 
          protection devices, and other personal protective equipment 
          reduce the serious health problems caused by toxic gases, 
          chemicals, and harsh environmental conditions. We must 
          increase awareness of the availability of safety and health 
          protection measures. I encourage farmers and ranchers to 
          develop safety and health plans that meet the needs of their 
          businesses, families, and employees. Safety equipment should 
          be installed, maintained regularly, and used consistently. 
          Children also must be taught to recognize risks on the farm 
          and ranch and to help with chores safely.
          Despite many hazards and uncertainties, America's farmers and 
          ranchers remain among the most dedicated and productive 
          contributors to our Nation's economy. I am committed to 
          supporting the American farmer and rancher, and my 
          Administration will help those facing financial difficulties 
          caused by storms, droughts, or any other unforseen natural 
          catastrophe. In times of emergency, farmers and ranchers will 
          get the assistance they need, when they need it. I recently 
          signed a $5.5 billion agriculture supplemental bill that 
          affirms my commitment to maintaining a strong and healthy 
          agricultural economy.

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          My Administration also will support tax-deferred savings 
          accounts to help farming and ranching families guard against 
          downturns. To keep farms and ranches in a family from 
          generation to generation, we are eliminating the death tax. 
          Finally, farmers and ranchers need foreign markets to sell 
          their products, and I will work hard to ensure that 
          agriculture is a top priority in future trade negotiations.
          Our Nation owes a debt of gratitude to our farmers and 
          ranchers for helping to ensure stability in our economy, for 
          providing food products that amply meet all our citizens' 
          needs, and for representing what is best about America. They 
          show the character and values that have made this country 
          strong, values of love and family, faith in God, and respect 
          for nature. We honor them by encouraging safe farming and 
          ranching practices that improve and protect the lives of all 
          farmers and ranchers.
          NOW, THEREFORE I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the week of September 16 through September 22, 2001, 
          as National Farm and Ranch Safety and Health Week. I call upon 
          agriculture-related agencies, organizations, and businesses to 
          strengthen their commitment to provide quality safety and 
          health training to farmers, ranchers, and their families. I 
          also call upon citizens to recognize the sacrifice and 
          dedication of those individuals and communities whose work in 
          agriculture provides the quality food that we enjoy.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7466


Proclamation 7466 of September 17, 2001

Citizenship Day and Constitution Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As the delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention in 
          Philadelphia began working on what would become the United 
          States Constitution, they grasped that a great democracy must 
          be built on the twin foundations of national consent to a 
          Federal Government and respect for individual rights. After 
          more than two centuries of continual cultural, legal, and 
          economic change, our unique experiment in self-government has 
          borne successful witness to the prescient genius and timeless 
          wisdom of our Founding Fathers. Throughout America's history, 
          in times of turmoil and peace, liberty and oppression, our 
          faith in the Constitution's promise of freedom and democracy 
          has been a steadfast rock of national stability against the 
          raging seas of political change. Today, in the face of the 
          terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, we must call upon, 
          more than ever, the Constitutional principles that make our 
          country great.

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          In creating our Nation's Constitutional framework, the 
          Convention's delegates recognized the dangers inherent in 
          concentrating too much power in one person, branch, or 
          institution. They wisely crafted a Government that balanced 
          the functions and authority of a Federal system among three 
          separate but equal branches: the Executive, the Legislative, 
          and the Judicial. As a further check on central power, the 
          Framers granted citizens the right to vote, giving them the 
          power to express their political preferences peacefully and 
          thereby to effect change in the Government.
          The Convention delegates ratified the Constitution on 
          September 17, 1787, and submitted it to the States for 
          approval. After much deliberation and discussion at the State 
          level, the following two concerns emerged from among those who 
          feared the Constitution's proposed centralization of Federal 
          power: (1) the threat of tyranny; and (2) the loss of local 
          control. To address these fears, our Founders amended the 
          Constitution by adding a Bill of Rights. These ten amendments 
          provided a series of clear limits on Federal power and a 
          litany of protective rights to citizens. This development 
          underscored the important and enduring Constitutional 
          principle of enumerated powers, and it set our national course 
          on a route that would eventually enhance and expand individual 
          rights and liberties.
          Today, our Nation celebrates not only the longest-lived 
          written Constitution in world history, but also the enduring 
          commitment of our forebears who upheld the Constitution's core 
          principles through the travails of American history. They 
          pursued a more perfect Union as abolitionists, as suffragists, 
          or as civil rights activists, successfully seeking 
          Constitutional amendments that have strengthened the 
          protections provided to all Americans under law. In so doing, 
          they rendered the moral resolve of our Nation stronger and 
          clearer.
          Our Republic would surely founder but for the faith and 
          confidence that we collectively place in our Constitution. And 
          it could not prosper without our diligent commitment to 
          upholding the Constitution's original words and implementing 
          its founding principles. From the noble efforts of public 
          servants to the civic acts of local people, our continuous 
          Constitutional engagement has proved to be an exceptional 
          feature of our Nation's prosperous development.
          To continue this legacy, each of us must recognize that we 
          bear a solemn responsibility to promote the ideals of freedom 
          and opportunity throughout our land. We each should serve our 
          Nation by actively supporting and shaping our Government's 
          institutions, by working together to build strong communities, 
          and by loving our neighbors. Doing this will ensure that the 
          American dream will become real for every willing citizen; 
          and, in fulfilling this call together, we will honor the 
          spirit of our powerful and enduring Constitution.
          The Congress, by joint resolution of February 29, 1952 (36 
          U.S.C. 106), designated September 17 as ``Citizenship Day,'' 
          and by joint resolution of August 2, 1956 (36 U.S.C. 108), 
          requested that the President proclaim the week beginning 
          September 17 and ending September 23 of each year as 
          ``Constitution Week.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and

[[Page 267]]

          laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 17, 
          2001, as Citizenship Day and September 17 through September 
          23, 2001, as Constitution Week. I encourage Federal, State, 
          and local officials, as well as leaders of civic, social, and 
          educational organizations, to conduct ceremonies and programs 
          that celebrate our Constitution and reaffirm our commitment as 
          citizens of our great Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7467


Proclamation 7467 of September 17, 2001

Minority Enterprise Development Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          More than three million minority business owners across the 
          United States are helping to build a stronger America. These 
          hardworking men and women contribute everyday to the economic 
          development of their communities by creating jobs and other 
          opportunities for their neighbors. Minority business 
          entrepreneurs represent the best of the American spirit, in 
          their determination to overcome obstacles and in their 
          striving for better lives for themselves and for their 
          families.
          My Administration encourages the growth and success of 
          minority businesses across the United States by giving them 
          the tools to succeed. The recent passage of the largest tax 
          cut in nearly two decades is just one of those tools. We also 
          slashed the bottom Federal income tax rate from 15 percent to 
          10 percent and thereby put more money into the hands of 
          consumers and entrepreneurs. We are eliminating the death tax 
          that has been such a heavy burden on our minority business 
          owners. And I signed into law, Public Law 107-16, the 
          ``Economic Growth and Tax Reconciliation Act of 200l,'' that 
          will increase lower income groups' access to the middle class, 
          promote equal opportunity, and encourage entrepreneurship.
          One important way that we can encourage entrepreneurial growth 
          in the minority-owned business community is to open up new 
          markets abroad for American products. If Congress gives me 
          trade promotion authority (TPA), I will have the negotiating 
          power to knock down the trade barriers that prevent American 
          goods from entering some markets around the world. The growth 
          and expanded opportunities that TPA would bring will mean jobs 
          for many working people and more opportunities for minority-
          owned businesses.
          As we celebrate the achievements of our Nation's minority 
          entrepreneurs during Minority Enterprise Development Week, we 
          also affirm our commitment to the principle of equal 
          opportunity. My Administration is working hard to achieve an 
          historic reform in our education system that will 
          significantly improve our schools and make sure that no child 
          is left behind. My

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          agenda also supports effective job training for all Americans 
          to ensure that the American dream touches every willing heart. 
          In so doing, we will enhance our Nation's strength and 
          productivity, while creating more vibrant communities and 
          improved standards of living for every citizen.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 23 through September 29, 2001, as Minority 
          Enterprise Development Week. I urge all Americans to join in 
          observing this week with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          seventeenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7468


Proclamation 7468 of September 19, 2001

To Modify Duty-Free Treatment Under the Generalized System of Preferences

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 503(c)(2)(C) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended 
          (the ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(2)(C)), provides that a 
          country that is no longer treated as a beneficiary developing 
          country with respect to an eligible article for purposes of 
          the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) because imports of 
          the article from that country exceeded the competitive need 
          limitations in section 503(c)(2)(A) of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2463(c)(2)(A)) may be redesignated as a beneficiary developing 
          country with respect to the article if imports of the article 
          from that country did not exceed those limitations during the 
          preceding calendar year.
          2. Pursuant to section 503(c)(2)(C) of the 1974 Act, I have 
          determined that Indonesia should be redesignated as a 
          beneficiary developing country with respect to certain 
          eligible articles that previously had been imported in 
          quantities exceeding the competitive need limitations of 
          section 503(c)(2)(A).
          3. Section 604 of the 1974 Act (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes 
          the President to embody in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of 
          the United States (HTS) the substance of the relevant 
          provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting import 
          treatment, and actions thereunder, including the removal, 
          modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty 
          or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including title V and section 604 of the 1974 Act, do proclaim 
          that:

[[Page 269]]

          (1) In order to provide that Indonesia, which has not been 
          treated as a beneficiary developing country with respect to 
          certain eligible articles, should be redesignated as a 
          beneficiary developing country with respect to those articles 
          for purposes of the GSP:
          (a) general note 4(d) to the HTS is modified as provided in 
          paragraph (1) of the Annex to this proclamation; and
          (b) the Rates of Duty 1-Special subcolumn for each of the HTS 
          subheadings enumerated in paragraph (2) of the Annex to this 
          proclamation is modified as provided in such paragraph.
          (2) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (3) The modifications made by the Annex to this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to articles entered, or 
          withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after the date 
          of publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
          eister.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          nineteenth day of September, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD24SE01.000

Proc. 7469

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Proclamation 7469 of September 21, 2001

National POW/MIA Recognition Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The noble ideals that became our Nation's constitutional 
          foundation were formed over two centuries ago in the hearts of 
          courageous patriots who risked their lives in the name of 
          liberty and justice. Throughout our history, American patriots 
          have risen to answer the call when the enemies of freedom have 
          jeopardized our liberties. Our military history is replete 
          with heroes who put love of country above their own well-
          being. In answering the call to defend our ideals, generations 
          of brave Americans have left home and family to protect our 
          great Nation, some never to return.
          National POW/MIA Recognition Day is notably significant for 
          many American families. It reminds us of the men and women who 
          withstood great hardship while imprisoned by our Nation's 
          enemies; and it reminds us of those still missing, loved ones 
          lost at war but whose fate is not yet fully known. We will not 
          forget these patriots who were willing to give their all to 
          preserve and protect our freedoms.
          Nearly 50,000 former POWs live among us, including those held 
          captive during World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, 
          throughout the Cold War era, and during Operation Desert 
          Storm. We owe an incalculable debt of gratitude to these quiet 
          heroes who displayed great honor and indomitable wills and who 
          sacrificed so much for our Nation.
          To the families of those who are still missing, we renew our 
          unwavering commitment and determination to obtain the fullest 
          possible accounting for them, including their recovery or 
          repatriation and the identification of the remains of those 
          who have died.
          On September 21, 2001, the flag of the National League of 
          Families of American Prisoners and Missing in Southeast Asia 
          will be flown over the White House, the Capitol, the 
          Departments of State, Defense, and Veterans Affairs, the 
          Selective Service System Headquarters, the National Vietnam 
          Veterans Memorial, the Korean War Veterans Memorial, U.S. 
          Military installations, national cemeteries, and other 
          locations across our country. This observance will serve as a 
          powerful reminder to all Americans that we will always keep 
          faith with those who served our Nation with honor, integrity, 
          and great sacrifice, remembering those still missing and 
          honoring those who were imprisoned during war.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 21, 2001, as National POW/MIA Recognition 
          Day. I call upon all Americans to join me in honoring former 
          American prisoners of war who suffered the hardships of enemy 
          captivity and in renewing our commitment to those still 
          missing in action. I call upon Federal, State, and local 
          government officials and private organizations to observe this 
          day with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

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          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7470


Proclamation 7470 of September 24, 2001

Family Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Strong families make a strong America. Responsible, caring, 
          and involved parenting dramatically affects the direction of a 
          child's life and fundamentally influences the well-being of 
          society as a whole. To help ensure a bright future for our 
          children and for our Nation, we must expand our efforts to 
          strengthen and empower families in their important task of 
          effectively preparing children for the challenges of tomorrow.
          To help families, we must fight crime and violence in our 
          schools and communities, and we must make a quality education 
          available to all young people, regardless of background. We 
          must also work to ensure that adults have the skills and 
          resources they need to provide for the health, safety, and 
          well-being of their children.
          Our Nation should send a consistent message that hails the 
          vital importance of families. We live in an era of busy 
          schedules and significant commitments to work, school, and 
          community. However, quality time among family members remains 
          as vital as ever to maintaining strong and loving bonds 
          between parents and children and to protecting young people 
          from harm. In its most recent survey, the National Center on 
          Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA) 
          found that a teenager who sits down to dinner with his or her 
          family seven nights a week is 20 percent less likely to smoke, 
          drink, or use illegal drugs than those that do not. By 
          contrast, teenagers who never eat dinner with their families 
          are 61 percent more likely to engage in these activities.
          According to CASA's research, other family-bonding activities 
          can similarly promote the avoidance of drug, alcohol, or 
          cigarette use by teens. These include helping teenagers with 
          homework, attending religious services with them, making 
          religion an important part of their lives, and praising and 
          disciplining teens as appropriate. CASA also advises that 
          parents should monitor their teen's television viewing, music 
          purchases, and Internet use, and should establish curfews and 
          know where their children are after school and on weekends. 
          Perhaps most importantly, parents should send a clear message, 
          by example and word, of their clear disapproval of cigarette, 
          alcohol, and drug use.
          CASA's findings demonstrate how parental influence remains the 
          single most important weapon in the war on drugs. Americans 
          must continue to recognize the importance of strong families 
          and involved parents in setting

[[Page 273]]

          our Nation on the road to a drug-free society. The health, 
          safety, and well-being of our young people merit nothing less.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 24, 2001, as Family Day. I call upon the 
          people of the United States to observe this day by spending 
          quality time with family members and engaging in other 
          wholesome activities that help unite and strengthen the bonds 
          between parents and children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fourth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7471


Proclamation 7471 of September 28, 2001

National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For more than 30 years, the United States has annually 
          celebrated the rich history and cultural traditions of our 
          Nation's Hispanic American people. National Hispanic Heritage 
          Month provides us an opportunity to express deep appreciation 
          to Hispanic Americans for their countless contributions to our 
          society and to pay tribute again to America's distinctive 
          diversity.
          Since our Nation's founding, Hispanic Americans have played an 
          integral role in our country's exceptional story of success. 
          Hispanic Americans served with heroism in every major American 
          military conflict. The Continental Army benefited from the 
          valor of Bernardo de Galvez, who led his frequently 
          outnumbered troops to numerous victories against the British. 
          Luis Esteves organized the first Puerto Rico National Guard 
          and rose through the ranks of the U.S. Army to become a 
          distinguished Brigadier General. And 38 Hispanics have earned 
          our Nation's highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor. 
          The United States academic and scientific communities 
          benefited from the contributions of Hispanic Americans like 
          physicist Luis Walter Alvarez, who was awarded the Nobel Prize 
          in Physics in 1986. Business leaders like Roberto Goizueta 
          have had a positive effect on our Nation's economy; and many 
          Hispanics have greatly influenced America's artistic, legal, 
          and political communities.
          Today, Hispanic culture continues to shape the American 
          experience. More than 30 million Americans, about 1 in 8 
          people in the United States, claim Hispanic origin. They 
          contribute to every walk of contemporary American life, while 
          simultaneously preserving the unique customs and traditions of 
          their ancestors. All Americans, regardless of national origin, 
          celebrate the vibrant Hispanic American spirit that influences 
          our Nation's art, music, food, and faiths. We also celebrate 
          the practices of commitment to family,

[[Page 274]]

          love of country, and respect for others, virtues that 
          transcend ethnicity, reflect the American spirit, and are 
          nobly exemplified in the Hispanic American community.
          The strong ties that Hispanic Americans maintain with their 
          ancestral homeland remind us that the United States must 
          pursue robust relations with its trading partners in Latin 
          America and the Caribbean. The future of our hemisphere is 
          closely tied to these relationships, and improving trade will 
          play a vital role in building important links with our 
          Hispanic neighbors. Maintaining open and free trade creates 
          job opportunities and promotes economic growth, improving the 
          welfare of every citizen in every land it touches. Thus, we 
          will negotiate for freer markets, which will allow us the 
          opportunity to obtain better protections for our hemisphere's 
          environment and will promote political freedom throughout the 
          region.
          We have a great opportunity before us. By working together, we 
          can achieve a fully democratic hemisphere, bound together by 
          good will, cultural understanding, and free trade. The many 
          contributions of Hispanic Americans to our Nation will help us 
          reach this important goal by helping connect our country with 
          the Hispanic nations to our south. This month, we celebrate 
          the talents, culture, and spirit of Hispanic Americans, which 
          deeply enrich our country and bless our people.
          The Congress, by Public Law 100-402, has authorized and 
          requested the President to issue annually a proclamation 
          designating September 15 through October 15, as ``National 
          Hispanic Heritage Month.'' I am proud to do so.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 15 through October 15, 2001, as National 
          Hispanic Heritage Month. I call upon all the people of the 
          United States to observe this month with appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7472


Proclamation 7472 of September 28, 2001

National Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          For more than a century, our Nation's Historically Black 
          Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have played a vital role in 
          providing opportunities for excellence in higher education to 
          millions of African American students.

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          Throughout their history, these institutions of higher 
          learning persevered in the face of many obstacles, offering 
          university degrees to African Americans at a time when most 
          schools refused them admission. Some of our HBCUs began when 
          society was deeply segregated; and some were founded when the 
          Nation still permitted the scourge of slavery. The Civil War 
          eradicated slavery in America; and the United States Supreme 
          Court ended the racial segregation of our schools. 
          Notwithstanding the removal of these blights from the American 
          scene, HBCUs have remained committed to providing African 
          American students with extraordinary educational 
          opportunities. The HBCUs' consistent tradition of offering 
          high-quality, academic programs has enabled their students and 
          graduates to prosper.
          The success of our HBCUs should be a source of great pride for 
          all Americans. Almost 300,000 African Americans currently are 
          enrolled in HBCUs, and among their graduates are Members of 
          Congress, hundreds of elected officials, military officers, 
          physicians, teachers, attorneys, judges, ambassadors, and 
          business executives.
          Committed to excellence as well as to opportunity, our HBCUs 
          reflect the determination and spirit that are essential to 
          achieving my Administration's goal of educational success at 
          every level. All Americans should have opportunities to pursue 
          the American dream. Historically Black Colleges and 
          Universities play an essential role in providing access to 
          that dream for African Americans, and I salute them for their 
          continuing commitment to serving African American students.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 24 through September 30, 2001, as National 
          Historically Black Colleges and Universities Week. I call upon 
          the people of the United States, including government 
          officials, educators, and administrators, to observe this week 
          with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities, thereby 
          demonstrating our appreciation of and support for these 
          important educational institutions.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7473


Proclamation 7473 of September 28, 2001

National Public Lands Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The United States has the world's greatest public lands. The 
          National Park System, established in 1916, protects some of 
          America's most beautiful and essential natural resources. Our 
          parks connect Americans with their land, giving us a common 
          landscape and shared national treasures. With more than 80 
          million acres, these majestic and diverse parks, home to 
          thousands

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          of species of flora and fauna, represent our Nation's most 
          important natural legacy to future generations.
          Our national parks provide outstanding recreational 
          possibilities for Americans, and more than 287 million 
          visitors each year come to these beautiful places to explore 
          those possibilities. My Administration recognizes and accepts 
          the importance of making these great lands more accessible to 
          all our citizens. Our Government bears a clear and direct 
          responsibility for the stewardship of our parks. The 
          Government alone, however, cannot fulfill the promise of 
          preserving this outdoor legacy--a legacy first bequeathed to 
          us by President Theodore Roosevelt and other early visionaries 
          who understood the importance of these great landscapes, 
          ecosystems, and historic and cultural settings. Only by 
          developing partnerships among States, local communities, 
          tribal governments, public agencies, the nonprofit sector, the 
          private sector, and individual landowners can we truly 
          maintain and protect our Nation's best places.
          National Public Lands Day provides every American with a 
          unique and valuable opportunity to promote environmental 
          education and, more importantly, to put their hands to work on 
          projects directly benefiting public lands. I encourage 
          Americans to volunteer to build trails, restore habitat, 
          improve accessibility for visitors with special needs, and 
          repair weather-related damage. This year, more than 60,000 
          volunteers are expected to work at approximately 335 sites in 
          all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. In 
          cooperation with their community partners, these individuals 
          will contribute nearly $9 million of needed improvements to 
          America's public lands.
          National Public Lands Day also serves as a special time for 
          our country to recognize the accomplishments of the Civilian 
          Conservation Corps, the hard-working men who built more than 
          800 of America's national and State parks during the 1930s and 
          1940s. Ceremonies honoring the Corps will be held at 
          Virginia's Shenandoah National Park, as well as at 30 other 
          locations throughout the country.
          I encourage Americans to follow the worthy example set by 
          those CCC members and pitch in by volunteering to improve our 
          parks. Through these efforts, we can all do our part to ensure 
          that the Nation's parks, forests, lakes, fields, and rivers 
          remain vibrant and enduring legacies of America's natural 
          beauty for ages to come.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim September 29, 2001, as National Public Lands Day. I 
          call upon the people of the United States to observe this day 
          with appropriate programs and activities to improve the public 
          lands they use for recreation, education, and enjoyment.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7474

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Proclamation 7474 of September 28, 2001

Gold Star Mother's Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Since its inception, this Nation has relied upon courageous 
          young men and women to fight willingly for our country's 
          ideals. Time and again, these men and women have secured 
          America's liberty and prosperity. In defense of freedom and 
          the values Americans hold sacred, many have paid the ultimate 
          sacrifice. Over the course of the last 226 years, more than 1 
          million American mothers have endured the loss of a son or 
          daughter in service to our Nation.
          In the aftermath of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson 
          first used the term ``Gold Star Mother.'' It signified not 
          only the remembrance of a young life sacrificed in service to 
          America, but the pride, dignity, and devotion of one who had 
          first given life to that heroic young American. Since 1928, 
          Gold Star Mothers have sustained themselves through their 
          profound sorrow by lovingly serving others. From civic 
          education and community service, to the care of veterans and 
          those in need, the Gold Star Mothers promote patriotism, serve 
          their country, and perpetuate the memories of their lost loved 
          ones. Today, the Nation's Gold Star Mothers still stand as 
          symbols of purpose, perseverance, and grace in the face of 
          personal tragedy. Each year, the Nation remembers their 
          sacrifice by honoring the Gold Star Mothers for their 
          steadfast commitment to the legacy of their fallen children 
          and their devotion to the United States of America.
          The Congress, by Senate Joint Resolution 115 of June 23, 1936 
          (49 Stat. 1895), has designated the last Sunday in September 
          as Gold Star Mother's Day and has authorized and requested the 
          President to issue a proclamation in observance of this day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim Sunday, September 30, 
          2001, as Gold Star Mother's Day. I call upon all Government 
          officials to display the United States flag over Government 
          buildings on this solemn day. I also encourage the American 
          people to display the flag and to hold appropriate meetings in 
          their homes, places of worship, or other suitable places as a 
          public expression of the sympathy and respect that our Nation 
          holds for our Gold Star Mothers.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7475

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Proclamation 7475 of October 1, 2001

National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The social blight of domestic violence has continued to burden 
          America into the 21st Century. Our homes should be places of 
          safety and comfort. Tragically, domestic violence can and does 
          turn many homes into places of torment. The grim facts speak 
          for themselves: almost one-third of American women murdered 
          each year are killed by their current or former partners, 
          usually a husband. Approximately 1 million women annually 
          report being stalked. And many children suffer or witness 
          abuse in their homes, which can sadly spawn legacies of 
          violence in families across America.
          Domestic violence spills over into schools and places of work; 
          and it affects people from every walk of life. Though abuse 
          may occur in the seclusion of a private residence, its effects 
          scar the face of our Nation.
          In the United States, we have strict laws intended to hold 
          domestic abusers accountable for their vile conduct by 
          bringing them to justice, but laws alone are not enough. A 
          comprehensive, coordinated approach must shape our strategy to 
          reduce domestic violence. Accordingly, the Federal Government 
          is partnering with States, local communities, and other 
          entities to implement tough and effective mechanisms to 
          respond to reports of domestic violence.
          These efforts include specialized units in police departments, 
          and prosecutors offices that work with local victims' 
          advocates to make the criminal justice system more responsive 
          to victims and more retributive to their abusers. 
          Jurisdictions throughout the country now provide legal 
          assistance to ensure that when victims try to escape abuse, 
          they can obtain legal help from attorneys who understand the 
          dynamics of domestic violence. Law enforcement officers, 
          prosecutors, court personnel, and service providers are 
          working to improve their responses to the often hidden victims 
          of elder abuse and violence against women with disabilities. 
          Moreover, thousands of communities now have shelters and 
          emergency services for abused women and their children.
          As a Nation, we must prioritize addressing the problem of 
          domestic violence in our communities every day of the year. 
          National Domestic Violence Awareness Month provides us with a 
          special opportunity to emphasize that domestic violence is a 
          crime, to warn abusers that they will be prosecuted, and to 
          offer victims more aid and support. We can and must radically 
          reduce and work to eliminate this scourge from our land. To 
          succeed, this effort must be echoed by officials from every 
          segment of the criminal justice system, Federal, State, and 
          local. Community leaders, health care professionals, teachers, 
          employers, friends, and neighbors all will play an important 
          role in eradicating domestic violence.
          As we observe National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, I 
          call on all Americans to commit to preventing domestic 
          violence and to assist those who suffer from it. These 
          collective efforts will contribute to peace in our homes, 
          schools, places of work, and communities and will help ensure 
          the future safety of countless children and adults.

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          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 2001, as National Domestic Violence Awareness 
          Month. I urge all Americans to learn more about this terrible 
          problem and to take positive action in protecting communities 
          and families from its devastating effects.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7476


Proclamation 7476 of October 1, 2001

Child Health Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Many of us fondly remember the joys and challenges of 
          childhood and appreciate the endless sacrifices that our 
          families made to love, protect, and encourage us as we grew 
          into adulthood. On Child Health Day, we take time as parents 
          and concerned citizens to assess the health and well-being of 
          our children and to reaffirm our commitment to nurture and 
          care for them in the best way possible.
          To secure the strength and continued growth of our great 
          Nation, we must work to provide all of our children with the 
          opportunities and tools they must have to succeed. From 
          quality health care and safe living environments to emotional 
          support and timely encouragement, our children need and 
          deserve our utmost attention.
          In light of the tragic terrorist attacks of September 11, 
          2001, we must redouble our efforts to ensure that our children 
          feel safe. We must listen carefully to them and help them 
          express and work through feelings of fear, confusion, and 
          sorrow. And, most importantly, we must let them know that they 
          are loved. Children who feel loved and supported can better 
          reach their full potential and achieve their dreams.
          As parents, teachers, and neighbors, we must be aware of, and 
          work to prevent, the physical, emotional, and psychological 
          threats that potentially endanger our children. Parents must 
          be vigilant in ensuring that their children are immunized 
          against preventable diseases. They should check their homes 
          for cleaning products, gases, and other hazards, including 
          lead-based paint, radon, carbon monoxide, and allergens that 
          may cause chronic illnesses, respiratory disorders, and 
          sometimes death. Children should be taught to be wary of 
          strangers who approach them and to seek the help of someone 
          they trust when faced with uncomfortable situations. We also 
          must use innovative teaching methods to encourage our children 
          to develop positive habits such as regular exercise, good 
          nutrition, abstinence from drugs, alcohol, and inappropriate 
          sexual behavior, and good personal hygiene.

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          Our steadfast commitment to the health and welfare of our 
          children is especially important for those who have special 
          health care needs. Children who suffer from chronic physical, 
          developmental, behavioral, and emotional conditions require 
          specialized services in their communities. I encourage parents 
          and caretakers to recognize these health problems, to obtain 
          specialized care as necessary, and to monitor their children's 
          conditions closely in order to give them every advantage 
          toward leading a successful, fulfilling life.
          My Administration is strongly committed to supporting families 
          and children in need and to improving our education system so 
          that no child is left behind. Let us work together as 
          individuals, families, communities, and Americans to ensure 
          that the health of our children always remains a national 
          priority. The Congress, by a joint resolution approved May 18, 
          1928, as amended (U.S.C. 105), has called for the designation 
          of the first Monday in October as ``Child Health Day'' and has 
          requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance 
          of this day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim Monday, October 1, 2001, 
          as Child Health Day. On this day, and on every day throughout 
          the year, I call upon families, schools, child health 
          professionals, communities, and governments to dedicate 
          themselves to fostering the healthy development and well-being 
          of all our children--especially those with special health care 
          needs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7477


Proclamation 7477 of October 3, 2001

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          This October, as we mark the 12th observance of National 
          Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we renew our commitment to the 
          struggle against breast cancer and salute the courage of 
          Americans living with this serious disease. The effects of 
          breast cancer have touched many of us, whether through 
          personal diagnosis or the diagnosis of a family member or 
          friend.
          We may know someone who has survived breast cancer due to 
          early detection and improved treatment. Unfortunately, we also 
          know that a cure cannot come soon enough. This year, 
          approximately 192,000 women will be diagnosed with breast 
          cancer. By increasing awareness about the importance of early 
          detection and accelerating the use of recent innovative 
          advances in medical research, we can reduce the incidence of 
          breast cancer in our Nation.
          Until a cure is found, health care professionals agree that 
          regular mammograms are essential to ensuring the early 
          detection of breast cancer. The good news is that the message 
          about early detection is being heard. In

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          1998, almost 70 percent of women age 40 and older had a 
          mammogram in the last two years. And this year, Medicare 
          coverage was expanded to include digital mammograms, offering 
          women another approach for early detection.
          As the primary agency in the United States for cancer 
          research, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) leads the 
          research efforts to find a cure for this disease. Our goal is 
          a future free of breast cancer. We will achieve this goal by 
          developing new treatments and therapies and by better 
          understanding what causes breast cancer. The NCI will spend an 
          estimated $463.8 million on breast cancer research this year. 
          That figure will increase to an estimated $510 million next 
          year; and overall National Institutes of Health (NIH) 
          expenditures on breast cancer research are slated to reach 
          $630 million for Fiscal Year 2002. My Administration supports 
          an increase in spending for the NIH, of which NCI is a part, 
          and has proposed that, by 2003, funding for NIH be twice what 
          it was in 1998.
          I urge all Americans at risk for breast cancer to use 
          appropriate screenings that can detect it at its initial 
          stages. Until we find a cure, early detection is our most 
          essential tool in fighting this disease. Recent medical 
          successes allow us to say that the war on breast cancer will 
          succeed.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by the authority vested in me by the 
          Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim 
          October 2001, as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. I 
          call upon government officials, businesses, communities, 
          health care professionals, educators, volunteers, and all the 
          people of the United States to publicly reaffirm our Nation's 
          strong and continuing commitment to controlling and curing 
          breast cancer.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7478


Proclamation 7478 of October 3, 2001

National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's annual observance of National Disability 
          Employment Awareness Month allows us to reflect upon, and 
          consider the potential possessed by, the millions of Americans 
          with disabilities who currently serve in our workforce, as 
          well as those who are ready and willing to join the workforce. 
          In keeping with this year's theme, ``Win with Ability,'' we 
          recognize and salute the skills, creativity, and dedication of 
          working people with disabilities and take appreciative note of 
          their commitment to our Nation and its continued prosperity.
          When President George H. W. Bush signed the Americans with 
          Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990, our Nation made a promise to 
          no longer underestimate

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          the abilities of disabled Americans. That Act, and its 
          subsequent implementation, has liberated the energies and 
          talents of millions of Americans with disabilities. We have 
          seen evidence of progress in improved access to employment, 
          public places, commercial facilities, information technology, 
          telecommunication services, housing, schools, and polling 
          places.
          Although America has made great progress since the signing of 
          the ADA, many opportunities for further improvement still 
          exist. My Administration is committed to tearing down any 
          barriers that unreasonably prevent the full participation of 
          Americans with disabilities. I proposed my New Freedom 
          Initiative to help disabled Americans realize their dreams 
          through meaningful and successful careers. I also have 
          proposed programs that will give persons with disabilities 
          greater access to technology, which will increase their 
          productive capacity and allow some to work at home. My 
          proposed programs will expand educational opportunities, 
          facilitate the inclusion of people with disabilities into the 
          workforce, and will allow increased participation in community 
          life. I have signed an Executive Order requiring full 
          implementation of the Supreme Court's 1999 Olmstead Decision 
          mandating that individuals with disabilities, who can receive 
          support and treatment in a community setting, should be given 
          a reasonable opportunity to live close to their families and 
          friends, when appropriate.
          We can no longer accept the continued existence of barriers, 
          whether physical or social, that unreasonably prevent persons 
          with disabilities from full integration into our society. I 
          ask every citizen to join me in recognizing and valuing the 
          contributions that people with disabilities have made to our 
          society and to commit to a collective effort that creates 
          reasonable access for disabled persons to all that America has 
          to offer.
          By joint resolution approved August 11, 1945, as amended (36 
          U.S.C. 121), the Congress has, each year since 1945, called 
          upon this Nation to recognize the contributions that workers 
          with disabilities have made, and requested the President to 
          issue a proclamation calling for appropriate ceremonies and 
          activities.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 2001, as National Disability Employment 
          Awareness Month. I call upon government leaders, labor 
          leaders, and employers to collaborate to ensure the full 
          inclusion of our Nation's persons with disabilities in the 
          21st Century workforce.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7479

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Proclamation 7479 of October 5, 2001

Death of Michael J. Mansfield

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As a mark of respect for the memory of Michael J. Mansfield, 
          retired Majority Leader of the United States Senate and 
          Ambassador of the United States to Japan, I hereby order, by 
          the authority vested in me as President of the United States 
          by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of 
          America, that on the day of his interment, the flag of the 
          United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House 
          and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military 
          posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the 
          Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout 
          the United States and its Territories and possessions until 
          sunset on such day. I also direct that the flag shall be flown 
          at half-staff for the same lengths of time at all United 
          States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other 
          facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval 
          vessels and stations.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7480


Proclamation 7480 of October 5, 2001

Fire Prevention Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The well-being of our Nation's citizens requires that 
          families, communities, emergency workers, and health 
          professionals work together to ensure the highest levels of 
          public safety. This goal is particularly important with 
          respect to fire prevention. The 2000 National Fire Experience 
          Survey, conducted by the National Fire Protection Association 
          (NFPA), reveals that fire claimed more than 4,000 American 
          lives last year. In 2000, fire killed someone every 130 
          minutes and injured someone every 24 minutes. Fire also takes 
          a significant economic toll on America, accounting for more 
          than $11 billion in property loss last year.
          In the United States, fires caused by cooking, heating, or 
          electricity amount to almost half of all home fires. These 
          accidental fires, though common, are also among the most 
          preventable. Their high rates of occurrence point to the vital 
          importance of safety and knowledge in helping to prevent these 
          types of fires and thereby avoid the tragic deaths and serious 
          injuries that they can cause.
          This year marks the annual observance of Fire Prevention Week, 
          sponsored by the National Fire Protection Association. The 
          event's theme, ``Cover the

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          Bases and Strike Out Fire,'' encourages children and families 
          to take an active role in preventing home fires and the 
          injuries and deaths they cause, by conducting home fire safety 
          inspections and preparing and practicing home fire drills. The 
          NFPA is joining forces with the Federal Emergency Management 
          Agency, through the United States Fire Administration, and 
          with fire departments throughout the country to raise 
          awareness of the leading causes of home fires and encourage 
          the actions that may be taken to prevent them. I urge all 
          Americans to learn more about fire prevention and to take 
          steps to better ensure the safety of our homes, places of 
          work, and other public structures.
          During this year's observance, I also call on Americans to 
          join me in expressing appreciation for the devotion and 
          dedication of our Nation's firefighters and other emergency 
          response personnel. These brave men and women provide the 
          first line of emergency response to a multitude of disasters 
          and risk their own security and well-being to save the lives 
          of others. As recent events in our Nation have demonstrated, 
          these fine Americans truly exemplify selfless service and 
          heroism. They serve to make our towns, cities, and communities 
          safer places for all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 7 through October 13, 2001, as Fire 
          Prevention Week. I call upon the people of the United States 
          to observe this day with appropriate programs and activities 
          and to renew efforts to prevent fires and their tragic 
          consequences for human health and safety.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7481


Proclamation 7481 of October 5, 2001

German-American Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Each year, on October 6, we recognize German Americans for 
          their many contributions to our Nation. From the first German 
          immigrants who accompanied Captain John Smith to Jamestown 
          more than 300 years ago to the more than 7 million Germans who 
          have since followed them to our shores, Americans of German 
          descent have played a vital role in establishing the strength 
          of our country's democratic spirit. Throughout our history, 
          German Americans have contributed to every facet of the 
          American experience.
          German-American soldiers valiantly served our country during 
          the American Revolution. General Frederick Wilhelm von Steuben 
          helped train the Continental Army at Valley Forge; and General 
          Nicholas Herkimer led German settlers in New York's Mohawk 
          Valley in one of the war's bloodiest

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          battles. German Americans also have influenced greatly our 
          artistic heritage. Emanuel Leutze's 1851 painting, 
          ``Washington Crossing the Delaware River,'' remains a 
          cherished and recognized symbol of American courage and 
          determination.
          German Americans advanced our civic liberties through their 
          strong support for freedom of the press. As publisher of the 
          New York Weekly Journal, John Peter Zenger championed the 
          rights of citizens to criticize elected officials in print. 
          The German-language newspaper Pennsylvania Staatsbote 
          published the first printed copy of the Declaration of 
          Independence. And in directing The New York Times through 
          modernization in the early 20th century, Adolph Ochs helped 
          set a new standard for balanced and innovative reporting.
          Many German Americans who settled here brought with them 
          values that enhanced and developed the American commitment to 
          freedom. A considerable number of these immigrants joined 
          other freedom loving Americans in becoming leaders in the 
          anti-slavery movement. And thousands of German Americans 
          volunteered to fight for the Union in the Civil War.
          On this day, Americans of all backgrounds commemorate our 
          Nation's close relationship with Germany. German Americans 
          have influenced our history, strengthened our ideals, and 
          enriched our culture, and, in the years ahead, they will 
          continue their noble role in helping to ensure the vitality of 
          our democracy.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 6, 2001, as German-American Day. I encourage 
          all Americans to recognize the contributions of our citizens 
          of German descent to the liberty and prosperity of the United 
          States, and to celebrate our close ties to the people of 
          Germany.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7482


Proclamation 7482 of October 8, 2001

Columbus Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          More than 500 years ago, Christopher Columbus set sail from 
          Spain on his historic voyage to what would be called the ``New 
          World.'' His celebrated journey inaugurated an age of 
          exploration that changed the course of history and enormously 
          expanded our understanding of the world. Columbus' willingness 
          to brave the unknown led to his remarkable find, bringing 
          about further explorations that enormously enhanced the 
          intellectual, commercial, and demographic fabric of Europe and 
          the Americas. The stories

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          of Columbus' voyage became a symbol of the quest for knowledge 
          and understanding of the world, and it laid the historical 
          foundation upon which much of America's future progress was 
          built.
          Reflecting on Christopher Columbus' legacy, we remember his 
          great courage in choosing to sail across uncharted waters, we 
          recall the power of his adventurous spirit, and we are 
          inspired by his willingness to assume considerable risks for 
          the sake of knowledge and progress. These virtues have been 
          echoed down through history by some of America's greatest 
          pioneers, from Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's daring 
          explorations of our western frontier to the Apollo astronauts 
          planting the American flag on the moon. Our Nation continues 
          to follow the example of Columbus' bold desire to push the 
          horizon, pursuing new paths of research and using our 
          discoveries to benefit all of mankind.
          Columbus' voyage represented the first linking of the lands 
          and cultures separated by the Atlantic Ocean, and it served as 
          a precursor to the close ties that exist today between America 
          and Europe. His discovery connected continents separated by 
          substantial geographic, religious, and cultural barriers; and 
          America has since formed partnerships with nations across the 
          seas that have sought to overcome those and other barriers 
          through agreements affecting such areas as trade, human 
          rights, and military support.
          In commemoration of Columbus' momentous journey 509 years ago, 
          the Congress, by joint resolution of April 30, 1934 (48 Stat. 
          657), and an Act of June 28, 1968 (82 Stat. 250), has 
          requested that the President proclaim the second Monday of 
          October of each year as ``Columbus Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 8, 2001, as 
          Columbus Day. I urge the people of the United States to 
          reflect on the contributions of Christopher Columbus with 
          appropriate means of celebration. I also direct that the flag 
          of the United States be displayed on all public buildings on 
          the appointed day in honor of Christopher Columbus.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7483


Proclamation 7483 of October 9, 2001

Leif Erikson Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On Leif Erikson Day, we join our friends in Denmark, Finland, 
          Iceland, Norway, and Sweden to celebrate and pay homage to our 
          shared ideals and commemorate the contributions of Nordic 
          Americans to our culture. We honor the explorers who led the 
          first Viking explorations at the beginning of the last 
          millennium, and we pay tribute to the many Nordic pioneers who 
          helped to explore and settle America's 19th Century frontiers. 
          The Nordic and American peoples share the virtues of courage, 
          resourcefulness,

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          and self-reliance, and they have built nations based on the 
          principles of liberty, justice, and equality.
          Leif Erikson and his men braved the unknown and risked their 
          lives to become the first Europeans to set foot on North 
          American soil. As we reflect upon Erikson's groundbreaking 
          achievements and marvel at the adversity and dangers he and 
          his explorers endured, we are thankful for their great 
          endeavor and recognize that achieving difficult goals requires 
          people who are courageous and willing to sacrifice, who take 
          action and take risks.
          Today, American researchers and entreprenuers, including many 
          of Nordic descent, are making landmark discoveries in the 
          fields of genetics, information technology, biotechnology, and 
          renewable energy. Through our Northern European Initiative and 
          the ``Northern Dimension'' program that Scandinavian countries 
          have sponsored, we are deepening our cooperation and 
          connections with the Baltic region, building regional links in 
          Northwest Russia, and renewing historic trade relationships. 
          And, we are working closely with our Nordic Allies in NATO by 
          helping to provide for the region's common defense and 
          stability. These and other efforts to improve the world mark 
          the citizens of theUnited States as a people possessing 
          virtues that echo those of Leif Erikson and the first Vikings 
          who landed on our northern shores.
          To honor Leif Erikson, the brave son of Iceland and grandson 
          of Norway, and our Nordic American heritage, the Congress, by 
          joint resolution (Public Law 88-66) approved on September 2, 
          1964, has authorized and requested the President to proclaim 
          October 9 of each year as Leif Erikson Day.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 9, 2001, as Leif 
          Erikson Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day 
          with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs to honor 
          our rich Nordic-American heritage.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7484


Proclamation 7484 of October 10, 2001

General Pulaski Memorial Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

I came here, where freedom is being defended,

to serve it, and to live and die for it.

--General Casimir Pulaski in a letter to General George Washington

          Every year, on October 11, we honor the memory of Brigadier 
          General Casimir Pulaski, a courageous soldier of liberty who 
          bravely gave his life 222 years ago fighting for America's 
          independence. The stories of General Pulaski's heroism during 
          the Revolutionary War have been a source of inspiration for 
          many generations of Americans, and his gallant sacrifice

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          serves as a poignant reminder of the price patriots paid to 
          obtain our liberty.
          Pulaski, who was born in Poland in 1745, joined his first 
          fight against tyranny and oppression at age 21, defending his 
          beloved Poland against Prussian and Imperial Russian invaders. 
          In numerous battles, Pulaski achieved fame as a calvary 
          officer, earning promotion to commander of an army of Polish 
          freedom fighters. But the aggressors ultimately overcame the 
          Poles, and Pulaski was forced into exile. In 1777, Pulaski 
          offered his services to America's fight for freedom and set 
          sail from France to join the war for independence.
          Far from his native land, Pulaski showed the same courageous 
          combativeness on American soil that had gained him fame at 
          home. Distinguishing himself in battle after battle, Pulaski 
          earned a commission from the Continental Congress as a 
          Brigadier General, and he was assigned by General Washington 
          to command the Continental Army's calvary. In 1779, during the 
          siege of Savannah, General Pulaski made the ultimate 
          sacrifice, giving his life in battle so that our Nation might 
          win its freedom. General Pulaski's valiant leadership earned 
          him recognition as the ``Father of the American cavalry''.
          Ever since his heroic death, America has honored General 
          Pulaski's memory in many ways, including the naming of 
          counties, towns, and streets after him. Since 1910, a statue 
          of General Pulaski has stood in Washington, D.C., permanently 
          memorializing his patriotic contributions and noble sacrifice. 
          Today, as we respond to the atrocities committed against the 
          United States on September 11, we have been deeply moved by 
          the tremendous outpouring of sympathy, support, and solidarity 
          from our Polish friends, from the highest levels of the 
          government to the thousands of Poles who placed flowers and 
          candles at our Embassy gate. Our two nations, united by the 
          virtues and ideals that General Pulaski embodied, will always 
          remain friends and allies.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Thursday, October 11, 2001, as General Pulaski 
          Memorial Day. I encourage all Americans to commemorate this 
          occasion with appropriate programs and activities paying 
          tribute to Casimir Pulaski and honoring all those who defend 
          the freedom of our great Nation.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this tenth day 
          of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7485

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Proclamation 7485 of October 15, 2001

National School Lunch Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation's future depends on fulfilling the promise in our 
          children. As parents, teachers, community activists, 
          governmental leaders, and concerned citizens, we must strongly 
          commit ourselves to ensuring that our young people receive the 
          care, education, and resources they need to realize their 
          potential.
          Since 1946, the National School Lunch Program has played an 
          important part in pursuing that goal, by serving 
          schoolchildren nutritious, well-balanced meals. Currently, the 
          National School Lunch Program daily provides more than 27 
          million lunches in more than 97,700 schools. Of the children 
          who participate in this program, 57 percent receive their 
          meals for free or at a reduced price. For many of them, lunch 
          is their only meal of the day that meets recommended 
          nutritional guidelines.
          The National School Lunch Program contributes to the 
          development of healthy eating habits among our children. The 
          Program's Team Nutrition Initiative focuses on teaching and 
          motivating children to make food choices that enhance their 
          energy, growth, and potential.
          The Program is vitally important to achieving our educational 
          goals. Poorly fed children have more difficulty learning, are 
          less attentive in class, and suffer more chronic problems, 
          such as absenteeism and tardiness, than children who are 
          properly nourished. By making nutritious meals available to 
          all schoolchildren, the National School Lunch Program will 
          help us ensure that we leave no child behind.
          In recognition of the contributions of the National School 
          Lunch Program to the health, education, and well-being of our 
          Nation's children, the Congress, by joint resolution of 
          October 9, 1962 (Public Law 87-780), has designated the week 
          beginning on the second Sunday in October of each year as 
          ``National School Lunch Week'' and has requested the President 
          to issue a proclamation in observance of this week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 14 through 
          October 20, 2001, as National School Lunch Week. I call upon 
          all Americans to join the dedicated individuals who lead child 
          nutrition programs at the State and local levels in 
          appropriate activities and celebrations that promote these 
          programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7486

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Proclamation 7486 of October 15, 2001

White Cane Safety Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          National White Cane Safety Day, observed annually on October 
          15, is a day of special significance for blind and visually 
          impaired Americans because it represents a declaration of 
          freedom. It also signifies a commitment by the sighted 
          community to improve access to basic services for blind and 
          visually impaired persons.
          The familiar ``white cane'' is recognized as a tool of 
          independence that enables the blind and visually impaired to 
          participate in the facets of daily life. The core principles 
          of our country promise freedom, justice, and hope; and these 
          principles should guarantee the opportunity for every disabled 
          American to live full and productive lives. The new millennium 
          brings with it a renewed pledge to ensure that no citizen is 
          prevented from realizing the American dream because of a 
          disability.
          Eleven years ago, when the Americans with Disabilities Act was 
          enacted into law, America opened its doors to a new age of 
          access for people with disabilities. To build on this landmark 
          civil rights law, I have launched the ``New Freedom 
          Initiative,'' which is intended to ensure that all Americans 
          with disabilities can participate more fully in the life of 
          their communities and of our country. As part of this 
          initiative, my Administration has asked the Congress to 
          increase significantly Federal funding for State low-interest 
          loan programs, so Americans with disabilities can purchase new 
          assistive technologies. To help researchers continue to 
          develop these types of helpful technologies, we have asked the 
          Congress to increase Federal investment in assistive 
          technology research and development. All Americans must work 
          together to break down barriers and obstacles that may impede 
          the progress of individuals with disabilities; and we must 
          provide them with ever greater access to the workplace and 
          public transportation.
          The Congress, by joint resolution approved on October 6, 1964, 
          has designated October 15 of each year as White Cane Safety 
          Day. I call upon every American to observe this day by joining 
          with me in working to open the doors of opportunity further 
          and making the American dream a reality for all blind and 
          visually impaired citizens of our Nation.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 15, 2001, as 
          White Cane Safety Day. I call upon public officials, 
          educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States 
          to observe this day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, 
          and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7487

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Proclamation 7487 of October 19, 2001

National Forest Products Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation has been blessed with and sustained by its many 
          natural resources. Among these resources, one that has 
          provided us with both vital products and much enjoyment is 
          America's forestland.
          Throughout our Nation's history, our forests have provided 
          paper products, construction materials for dwellings and 
          furniture, and fuel for warmth and cooking. Timbers harvested 
          from our lands have been fundamental to the growth and 
          expansion of America. Although our reliance on our forests has 
          changed during the last century, they continue to remain an 
          invaluable resource.
          The beautiful cherry wood of Pennsylvania, the mighty oaks of 
          the Midwest, the pines of the South, and the firs of the West 
          are loved by millions of Americans, who find solace and 
          relaxation in camping, hiking, and enjoying recreational 
          activities among these trees. And for many Americans working 
          in the construction, manufacturing, and recreation industries, 
          our forests represent economic security for their families and 
          communities. They serve as important ecosystems, sheltering 
          and feeding wildlife, protecting soil, and purifying water and 
          air. Our timberlands also serve as an important symbol of our 
          Nation's beauty and economic strength. Now, more than ever, we 
          have a responsibility to ensure that they remain healthy and 
          productive.
          By working together to develop and promote sensible policies, 
          we can achieve success in protecting these natural resources 
          and pristine areas. My Administration will work closely with 
          Federal, State, and local officials, as well as private 
          landowners to encourage sustainable land management 
          techniques, utilize the latest in scientific research, foster 
          local stewardship of resources, and support innovative methods 
          of pollution control. If we remain vigilant, our forests will 
          provide products, recreation, clean air, clean water, and 
          wildlife habitat for generations to come.
          In recognition of the economic, environmental, and 
          recreational importance of our forests, the Congress, by 
          Public Law 86-753 (36 U.S.C. 123), has designated the week 
          beginning on the third Sunday in October of each year as 
          ``National Forest Products Week'' and has authorized and 
          requested the President to issue a proclamation in observance 
          of this week.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim October 21 through 
          October 27, 2001, as National Forest Products Week. I call 
          upon all Americans to observe that week with appropriate 
          ceremonies and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          nineteenth day of October, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7488

[[Page 292]]


Proclamation 7488 of October 22, 2001

National Character Counts Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our Nation was built on a foundation of sound moral 
          principles. The heroes of American history responded to 
          threats to their freedom by choosing to fight for these 
          timeless principles, assuming duties that superseded their 
          self-interest. The character of America's founders was 
          exemplified in their willingness to risk death in resisting 
          tyranny and securing liberty and independence. From the frozen 
          soil of Valley Forge to the beaches of Normandy and the 
          deserts of the Persian Gulf region, American soldiers have 
          answered the call of patriotic duty at great personal cost.
          Our Nation's character continues to define how we respond to 
          those who threaten America's core principles of liberty, 
          justice, and equality. We saw that character when, in the face 
          of the terrible terrorist attacks of September 11, American 
          firefighters, police officers, and airline passengers 
          sacrificed their lives to save others. We saw it when people 
          across our land donated blood for the victims. And we see it 
          as the children of America donate dollars to help suffering 
          Afghan children. These acts reveal that enduring patriotism 
          and faith are part of the fabric of America.
          How our military is responding to these despicable attacks is 
          also indicative of our national character. We are waging a war 
          against terrorists who have hijacked their own peaceful 
          religion in an attempt to justify their evil deeds. As we 
          strike military targets, however, we also are dropping food, 
          medicine, and supplies to relieve the suffering among the 
          victims of the Taliban regime.
          The manner in which we face these and other challenges in this 
          war will continue to influence our country for generations to 
          come. In fulfilling our mission with both compassion and 
          courage, we show our children what putting American values 
          into action means. Similarly, parents should teach their 
          children by word and deed to understand and live out the moral 
          values that we hold, such as honesty, accepting responsibility 
          for our actions, and loving our neighbors as ourselves.
          Places of worship, faith-based organizations, and other 
          community groups also play an important role in helping to 
          shape young hearts and minds. Government should cultivate a 
          climate that supports families and organizations that seek to 
          instill sound moral principles in their children. My 
          Administration's Faith-Based and Community Initiative proposes 
          a program that will ensure that faith-based and community 
          caregivers are welcomed as partners in these efforts. In 
          addition, my budget triples the funds available for character 
          education in public schools. I have also proposed to extend 
          Federal after-school funding to programs run by faith-based 
          and community-based organizations.
          During this week, we should reflect on the national character 
          we inherited from our forefathers and on the obligation we now 
          have to stand for morality and virtue in the face of evil and 
          terror. Since September 11, our Nation has shown that we are 
          prepared to respond to the evildoers who have attacked the 
          principles for which we stand. Our national character shall

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          guide us as we wage this war, and in that we know that evil 
          will not triumph.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 21 through October 27, 2001, as National 
          Character Counts Week. I call upon the people of the United 
          States to commemorate this week with appropriate ceremonies, 
          activities, and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          second day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7489


Proclamation 7489 of October 24, 2001

National Red Ribbon Week for a Drug-Free America, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Drug and alcohol abuse in America annually create staggering 
          societal costs and prevent millions of people from reaching 
          their full potential at school, on the job, and in their 
          communities. The Department of Health and Human Services 
          estimates that approximately 14 million Americans use illegal 
          drugs and 17 million Americans are alcoholics or abusers of 
          alcohol. To improve the well-being of our Nation and to 
          protect our people, we must continue to make the prevention 
          and treatment of drug and alcohol abuse a national priority.
          The rate of abuse of drugs and alcohol by our Nation's youth 
          is cause for alarm. Currently, 3 million young people between 
          the ages of 14 and 17 have an alcohol problem, and more than 
          half of America's school-age children have tried illegal drugs 
          by the time they have finished high school. Research indicates 
          that youth who avoid the early use of alcohol, tobacco, and 
          marijuana are less likely to engage in other harmful behaviors 
          such as crime, delinquency, and other illegal drug use. That 
          is why we must clearly communicate to America's youth that 
          drug and alcohol abuse is dangerous and harmful to both their 
          health and their future.
          Through the efforts of families, law enforcement officers, 
          healthcare professionals, teachers, and dedicated community 
          activists, we have made progress in the ongoing war against 
          substance abuse. To continue this progress, my Administration 
          is implementing a comprehensive, results-oriented strategy for 
          reducing illegal drug use in America. We will work 
          cooperatively with other nations to help eradicate illegal 
          drugs at their source. We will increase border security to 
          stop the flow of these drugs into America. And we will provide 
          Federal support to local law enforcement agencies in combating 
          drug trafficking networks.
          The most effective way, however, to reduce the cycle of youth 
          drug addiction and the crime it causes is to reduce demand. 
          This effort begins at

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          home; and it depends upon the active participation of 
          families, schools, and community organizations in education 
          and outreach programs that clearly communicate to children the 
          dangers inherent in drug and alcohol abuse.
          On the occasion of ``National Red Ribbon Week for a Drug-Free 
          America,'' Laura and I are pleased to serve as Honorary 
          Chairpersons of the 2001 National Red Ribbon Campaign. We join 
          all Americans in saying that we will no longer tolerate the 
          destructive impact that drug and alcohol abuse have had on our 
          homes, schools, workplaces, and highways. With strong resolve 
          and creative leadership, we can protect our communities from 
          the preventable dangers of substance abuse and restore dignity 
          and character to millions of men, women, and children who are 
          addicted to drugs and alcohol.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the period beginning October 23 through October 31, 
          2001, as National Red Ribbon Week for a Drug-Free America. I 
          encourage citizens to support activities that raise awareness 
          and encourage prevention of substance abuse. I also call upon 
          every American to wear a red ribbon throughout the week in 
          recognition of their commitment to a healthy, drug-free 
          lifestyle and our commitment to a drug-free America.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7490


Proclamation 7490 of October 24, 2001

United Nations Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On June 26, 1945, representatives from 50 countries signed the 
          charter creating the United Nations (U.N.), which inaugurated 
          a new era of unprecedented international cooperation. The 
          world had then just emerged victorious against the threat of 
          global tyranny, and these representatives resolved to preserve 
          peace through international cooperation and collective 
          security. Officially coming into existence on October 24, 
          1945, the U.N. became the central organization charged with 
          carrying out this mission. Since then, it has worked to 
          maintain world peace and security, to develop friendly 
          relations among nations, to cooperate in solving international 
          problems, and to promote respect for human rights.
          Today, 189 countries belong to the United Nations. The 
          organization's mission remains as urgent as ever, particularly 
          as our world confronts new challenges in the 21st century. The 
          recent terrorist attacks on the United States not only 
          threatened Americans, they also threatened civilized people 
          everywhere who believe in freedom and peace. These tragic 
          events remind

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          us all of the vitally important unified efforts necessary to 
          building international security and to guaranteeing a more 
          peaceful world for us and for our children.
          Americans are a generous and compassionate people, willing to 
          do all we can to help alleviate poverty and suffering around 
          the world. These efforts include close cooperative ventures 
          with the United Nations organizations through its many 
          humanitarian programs. As our country observes United Nations 
          Day, 2001, we pause to reflect on the noble history of the 
          U.N. and to praise its many contributions toward providing a 
          better quality of life for people around the globe. We also 
          celebrate the U.N.'s commitment to promoting human rights, 
          protecting the environment, fighting disease, fostering 
          development, and reducing poverty. By reaffirming our desire 
          to advance these goals, America looks forward to continued 
          progress in addressing the challenges that face humanity and 
          to achieving a brighter future for the world.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim October 24, 2001, as United Nations Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7491


Proclamation 7491 of October 30, 2001

Veterans Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Two hundred and twenty-five years ago, the signers of the 
          Declaration of Independence declared that ``all Men are 
          created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with 
          certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, 
          Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.''
          Throughout the course of American history, courageous men and 
          women have taken up arms to secure, defend, and maintain these 
          core principles upon which our Nation's freedoms depend. On 
          September 11, 2001, terrorists ruthlessly attacked our land 
          and these freedoms. The terrorists' deluded attempt to assail 
          our spirit failed, and our Nation's response reveals that the 
          spirit of freedom is as strong as ever. Our troops are now 
          fighting overseas to defeat terrorism, and, in that effort, 
          they follow in the footsteps of the 48 million men and women 
          who, since our Nation's founding, have stepped forward to 
          defend our land.
          Today, there are more than 25 million living veterans who 
          served our Nation in times of peace and war. Many of them 
          willingly entered harm's way to fight for our freedoms. These 
          veterans have diverse religious beliefs and

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          come from varying backgrounds and ethnicities. By their 
          service, they kept America strong, and they have protected our 
          way of life from tyranny's grip for over two centuries. At 
          this moment, men and women of the Army, Navy, Air Force, 
          Marines, and Coast Guard are serving around the world. They 
          represent our resolute dedication to achieving a lasting peace 
          out of the new challenges and threats of the 21st century.
          On Veterans Day, let us pause to reflect on the sacrifices of 
          all of those who have put on the uniform to serve in the 
          United States military. Let us honor our veterans, who proved 
          their heroism and love of country time and again, from 
          Yorktown and Gettysburg to Iwo Jima and the Persian Gulf. They 
          consistently defended our ideals across the globe; and they 
          continue to inspire those who defend America today, half a 
          world away. More than a million have died in service to 
          America; and more than a million and a half have been wounded. 
          Some sustained serious injuries in combat and now live with 
          disabilities. Our Nation will always be grateful for the noble 
          sacrifices made by these veterans. We can never adequately 
          repay them. But we can honor and respect them for their 
          service.
          As we consider the sacrifices and efforts of our veterans, we 
          must never forget that freedom comes at a cost. Therefore, I 
          ask all schools to observe November 11 through November 17, 
          2001, as National Veterans Awareness Week, and to invite a 
          veteran to speak at their school. This ``Lessons in Liberty'' 
          initiative will serve to honor America's veterans, while 
          reminding young people of the strong principles upon which our 
          Nation is founded. Our veterans have much to share with our 
          young people about liberty, patriotism, democracy, and 
          independence. They are living examples of the timeless truth 
          that freedom is not free. I call upon our veterans to serve 
          our country in a different way, by teaching a new generation 
          of young Americans the importance of the liberties they helped 
          secure.
          In respect and recognition of the contributions our service 
          men and women have made to the cause of peace and freedom, the 
          Congress has provided (5 U.S.C. 6103 (a)) that November 11 of 
          each year shall be set aside as a legal public holiday to 
          honor veterans.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, do hereby proclaim November 11, 2001, as 
          Veterans Day and urge all Americans to observe November 11 
          through November 17, 2001, as National Veterans Awareness 
          Week. I urge all Americans to recognize the valor and 
          sacrifice of our veterans through appropriate public 
          ceremonies and private prayers. I call upon Federal, State, 
          and local officials to display the flag of the United States 
          and to encourage and participate in patriotic activities in 
          their communities. I invite civic and fraternal organizations, 
          places of worship, schools, businesses, unions, and the media 
          to support this national observance with suitable 
          commemorative expressions and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7492

[[Page 297]]


Proclamation 7492 of November 1, 2001

National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          By observing National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, we 
          recognize the often devastating effects prostate cancer has on 
          the lives of the more than 1 million American men currently 
          suffering from it; and we commit ourselves to finding a cure 
          for this disease. Prostate cancer is the most commonly 
          diagnosed form of cancer in America, excepting skin cancer. 
          And it is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths 
          among men in the United States. This year, almost 200,000 men 
          will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and over 31,000 will 
          die from this disease.
          Although the survival rate for those diagnosed with prostate 
          cancer continues to rise, this disease nevertheless remains a 
          serious threat to the health and well-being of all American 
          men. Research shows that one out of every six men will be 
          diagnosed with prostate cancer sometime during their lifetime.
          By increasing awareness about the causes and signs of prostate 
          cancer and by expanding research into preventative, remedial, 
          and curative therapies, we can save more lives, improve the 
          lives of those suffering from this cancer, and reduce its 
          incidence in America. All men of middle age, and particularly 
          those above the age of 50, should learn the risk factors, 
          symptoms, and diagnostic tools that can help with the early 
          recognition of prostate cancer, when treatment is most 
          successful. It is important to consult a physician about 
          available screening for prostate cancer, including digital 
          examinations and prostate specific antigen blood tests. These 
          techniques aid doctors in the early diagnosis of prostate 
          cancer, and they are essential to continuing the reduction of 
          prostate cancer death rates.
          As with most other forms of cancer, modern medical research 
          has produced promising new treatment options for prostate 
          cancer that have greatly increased the likelihood of survival 
          after diagnosis. However, much still remains to be learned 
          about the causes and cures of prostate cancer, and I applaud 
          the work of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 
          this area. My Administration also supports increasing Federal 
          funding for programs that promote awareness, improve 
          prevention, and expand research by the National Institutes of 
          Health, the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed 
          Medical Research Program, and the Department of Veterans 
          Affairs.
          These research programs obtain important epidemiological data, 
          develop prostate cancer awareness among the public and 
          throughout the health care community, and serve as proving 
          grounds for new prostate cancer treatments. Charitable 
          organizations and the private sector also play important roles 
          in advancing public awareness about the need for prostate 
          cancer screening and research, and in serving as a therapeutic 
          resource for those suffering from prostate cancer.
          On this occasion, I commend the scientists, physicians, and 
          other health professionals who are committed to achieving 
          success in our struggle

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          against prostate cancer. I call on all those potentially 
          vulnerable to this disease to support this effort by taking 
          preventative measures such as observing a healthy lifestyle, 
          talking to your doctor about regular screenings, and building 
          awareness of prostate cancer. By working together, we will 
          find new therapies to aid those living with prostate cancer, 
          increase awareness about its causes and symptoms, and, I hope, 
          eventually find a cure for this deadly disease.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001 as National Prostate Cancer Awareness 
          Month. I call upon government officials, businesses, 
          communities, health care professionals, educators, volunteers, 
          and all the people of the United States to publicly reaffirm 
          our Nation's strong and continuing commitment to control and 
          cure prostate cancer.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7493


Proclamation 7493 of November 5, 2001

National Adoption Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Children deserve to be raised in loving families with parents 
          who protect and nurture them. For some children, adoption is 
          their best chance for a healthy and happy life. Each year, 
          American families adopt approximately 120,000 newborn or older 
          children, providing them with a loving and supportive 
          environment.
          Despite this substantial number of annual adoptions, more than 
          134,000 children are currently waiting adoption. While our 
          foster care system can provide a safe, temporary home for 
          these children, adoption would give them the love and 
          stability of a permanent family that would better enable them 
          to develop to their full potential.
          My Administration is working to help states promote and 
          support adoptions. This year, 35 states and the District of 
          Columbia received adoption incentive awards for increasing the 
          number of children they placed from foster care into permanent 
          homes. States have reinvested these bonuses to enhance their 
          adoption and child welfare programs, which has resulted in an 
          unprecedented 79 percent increase in adoptions from 28,000 in 
          1996 to 50,000 in 2000.
          Although we have made dramatic advances in encouraging 
          adoption, we must strengthen our efforts to find a safe, 
          loving, and permanent home for every child awaiting one. One 
          important way to advance towards this goal is to ease the 
          financial burden on families that adopt children. The tax 
          relief bill that I signed into law earlier this year extends 
          and increases the adoption tax credit for qualified expenses 
          from $5,000 to $10,000 per child.

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          The new law also increases the tax credit for adoptive parents 
          of children with special needs from $6,000 to $10,000 per 
          child, regardless of expenses. Parents who adopt children with 
          special needs will benefit from this meaningful tax credit 
          because it will help cover unique adoption costs.
          Ensuring the provision of post-adoptive services also plays an 
          important role in facilitating successful adoptions. I support 
          the Promoting Safe and Stable Families proposal, currently 
          before the Congress, which would improve post- adoptive 
          services by prioritizing research and evaluation for these 
          services and establishing systems to ensure that they are 
          available to meet the needs of adoptive families. In addition, 
          this proposal provides for education and training vouchers to 
          children adopted after the age of 15.
          Adoptive parents have a special calling--sharing a loving home 
          with children in need, offering them hope for a brighter 
          future. Federal, state, and local governments must continue 
          supporting these quiet heroes as they make the considerable 
          sacrifices and receive the countless blessings of parenthood 
          that come from providing a child with the chance of a 
          lifetime--an upbringing in a happy and healthy home.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001, as National Adoption Month. I call on 
          all Americans to observe this month with appropriate programs 
          and activities to honor adoptive families and to participate 
          in efforts to find permanent homes for waiting children.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7494


Proclamation 7494 of November 9, 2001

National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Our National Guard and Reserve forces play a vital role in 
          helping America respond when our interests are threatened 
          around the world. They are an indispensable part of our 
          Nation's efforts to promote democracy, peace, and freedom, 
          and, in the wake of the September 11 attacks, National Guard 
          and Reserve units are deploying to help fight and win the war 
          against terrorism.
          Americans understand and appreciate the importance of our 
          National Guard and Reserve forces, but many do not know the 
          contributions their employers make in supporting these 
          civilian soldiers. Employers share their greatest resource, 
          their people; and, in so doing, they subordinate their own 
          interests for the good of our country. Employers' willingness 
          to sacrifice and bear the inevitable financial hardships and 
          organizational disruptions that result are important 
          contributions to our Nation's war against

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          terrorism. By placing America's well-being above their own, 
          they help our National Guard and Reserve units provide 
          mission-ready forces to help preserve our freedoms and protect 
          our national interests.
          Because this generosity enables Guard and Reserve troops to 
          play an essential role in responding to the terrorist attacks, 
          it is appropriate to honor the sacrifice American businesses 
          are making in releasing their employees for military service. 
          We express our heartfelt appreciation to these patriots for 
          the burden they bear as their workers depart to serve our 
          Nation and help keep America strong, secure, and free.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim the week beginning November 11, 2001, as National 
          Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week. I encourage 
          all Americans to join me in expressing our heartfelt thanks to 
          the civilian employers of the members of our National Guard 
          and Reserve for their extraordinary sacrifices on behalf of 
          our Nation. I also call upon State and local officials, 
          private organizations, businesses, and all military commanders 
          to observe this week with appropriate ceremonies and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7495


Proclamation 7495 of November 9, 2001

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Approximately 16 million American adults suffer from a 
          devastating disease for which there is no cure. The disease is 
          called Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), and it is 
          a growing problem in this country and throughout the world. 
          COPD claims more than 100,000 lives per year, drains the 
          American economy of an estimated $30.4 billion each year, and 
          is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States 
          today, exceeded only by heart disease, cancer, and stroke.
          COPD is a medical term for a group of respiratory conditions 
          that includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis. COPD results 
          in gradual, irreversible damage to the lungs. Since the 
          symptoms progress gradually, COPD patients may not even 
          realize in the early stages that they have the disease. Over 
          the years, as the lung damage continues, breathing becomes 
          increasingly difficult.
          Although some patients have an inherited version of the 
          disease, smoking is the most common cause of COPD. Exposure to 
          toxic substances in the environment such as industrial 
          pollutants, aerosol sprays, nontobacco

[[Page 301]]

          smoke, and internal combustion engine exhaust may also 
          aggravate or contribute to COPD. While our ultimate goal is to 
          prevent this often-fatal disease, we now need better 
          treatments. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Month offers 
          us the opportunity to increase our knowledge of this disease 
          and to consider what we can do to reduce its occurrence.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001, as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary 
          Disease Month. I call upon the people of the United States to 
          observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and 
          activities to raise awareness of COPD and its impact on 
          communities and to improve the quality of life of those who 
          suffer from the disease.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7496


Proclamation 7496 of November 9, 2001

National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Alcohol and drug addiction exacts a devastating toll on our 
          Nation. Approximately 14 million adults are alcoholics or 
          abusers of alcohol, and one in four of our children are 
          exposed to alcoholism or alcohol abuse in their families 
          before age 18. Three million children between the age of 14 
          and 17 drink regularly and face future problems with alcohol. 
          And recent statistics show that more than 14 million Americans 
          used illicit drugs last year.
          The costs of these widespread addictions are staggering. More 
          than 100,000 Americans die each year from alcohol-related 
          causes. Recent estimates suggest that the abuse of alcohol and 
          drugs costs taxpayers more than $294 billion annually in 
          preventable health care costs, extra law enforcement, 
          automobile accidents, crime, and lost productivity. Addiction 
          to nicotine adds an additional $138 billion to our country's 
          financial burden.
          My proposed budget provides assistance to those addicted to 
          drugs. My Administration's proposal for enhanced treatment 
          will increase funding for the National Institute on Alcohol 
          Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute on Drug Abuse 
          and provides $111 million of additional funding to increase 
          access to substance abuse treatment. The budget includes $74 
          million for the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment program, 
          which provides formula grants supporting drug and alcohol 
          treatment in State and local correctional facilities. This 
          initiative is evidence-based and requires real accountability 
          from recipients.
          Scientific research also holds a great deal of promise in 
          treating drug and alcohol addiction. Publicly funded 
          biomedical research, supported by the National Institutes of 
          Health, plays an important role in finding effective means of 
          preventing and treating these disorders. These research 
          efforts

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          allow scientists to target optimal points for intervention. 
          Through Federally supported clinical trials, new treatments 
          can be developed for communities in need across our country.
          Alcohol and drug addiction destroys lives and threatens the 
          well-being of our country, and we must address it with 
          concerted, sustained, and purposeful strategies. If we focus 
          more of our Nation's attention, energy, and resources on 
          fighting these addictions, we will rescue lives and restore 
          hope.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001, as National Alcohol and Drug Addiction 
          Prevention Month. I call upon all public officials and the 
          people of the United States to observe this month with 
          appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7497


Proclamation 7497 of November 9, 2001

National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Approximately four million Americans suffer from Alzheimer's 
          disease. It is a progressive degenerative disorder of the 
          brain that robs those affected of their memory and much of 
          their mental and physical function, leading to their total 
          dependence on caregivers, and ultimately death. Slightly more 
          than half of Alzheimer's disease patients receive care from 
          their family and friends at home. Years of providing for the 
          emotional, physical, and financial needs of a loved one with 
          this difficult disease can be emotionally painful and 
          exhausting for a caregiver.
          The chance of having Alzheimer's disease rises significantly 
          with age, and as older Americans become a larger percentage of 
          our Nation's population, the number of people expected to 
          develop Alzheimer's will rise dramatically. It has been 
          estimated that 14 million Americans, mostly seniors, will 
          suffer from Alzheimer's by the middle of this century.
          My Administration is strongly committed to meeting the 
          challenges of Alzheimer's disease by increasing funding for 
          Federal medical research programs as well as providing 
          improved support to Alzheimer's patients and their families 
          and care givers. Through the efforts of scientists at the 
          National Institutes of Health (NIH) and in the private sector, 
          we are making great strides in defining genetic and 
          environmental risks, diagnosing the disease in its earliest 
          stages, and testing potential treatments. In addition, the NIH 
          and the Department of Veterans Affairs are sponsoring research 
          that focuses on improving care and easing the burden on those 
          providing care at home and in nursing facilities. Finally, the 
          Administration on Aging

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          is working under the Alzheimer's Disease Demonstration Project 
          Grants to States Program to expand the availability of 
          diagnostic and support services available for Alzheimer's 
          disease patients, their families, and their caregivers.
          Our Nation's medical research programs have produced 
          significant advances in the delivery of health care for our 
          older generations. In recent years, our seniors' retirement 
          years have been fuller, more productive, and healthier. 
          Despite this overall improvement in health care, Alzheimer's 
          disease continues to take many of the best and most enjoyable 
          years of life from millions of seniors. Much progress has been 
          made in the study of Alzheimer's disease, but the fight to 
          determine what causes it and to develop effective ways to 
          treat and prevent the disease continues.
          As we observe National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, I 
          call on all Americans to learn more about the disease and to 
          take time to honor and support Alzheimer's disease patients 
          and their families. We should also acknowledge the scientists, 
          physicians, nurses, and other medical and health professionals 
          who are working diligently to advance knowledge and 
          understanding of Alzheimer's disease.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001, as National Alzheimer's Disease 
          Awareness Month. I call upon the people of the United States 
          to observe this month with appropriate programs and 
          activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7498


Proclamation 7498 of November 9, 2001

National Family Caregivers Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During November, we traditionally give thanks for our many 
          blessings, which include the dedication and sacrifice of our 
          Nation's many family caregivers who enhance the lives of loved 
          ones by helping them live at home, despite challenges that 
          hinder independent living.
          More than 7 million Americans devote themselves to this noble 
          responsibility. Family caregivers dedicate an average of 20 
          hours per week in care for their loved ones and, in some 
          cases, fulfill their multiple responsibilities around the 
          clock. Those who provide in-home care for the elderly and for 
          persons with disabilities face many demands. In performing 
          such challenging and compassionate duties, family caregivers 
          must sacrifice considerable time, resources, and personal 
          comfort.

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          But these caregivers allow many older Americans to remain at 
          home who would otherwise have to live in nursing homes. 
          Seniors who live at home usually live longer, enjoy a more 
          active life, and spend more time with their families and 
          communities. As they lead fuller lives, this great generation 
          continues to enrich our country by sharing their valuable 
          wisdom and experience with younger generations.
          To support those who work to keep their loved ones at home, my 
          Administration has begun to implement the ``National Family 
          Caregiver Support Program.'' Through a national network of 
          state and area agencies on aging, the program provides 
          information to caregivers about available counseling, support 
          groups, training, and other services. In addition, the program 
          provides respite care to temporarily relieve caregivers.
          Family caregivers deserve our support and respect. They 
          tirelessly assume demanding responsibilities for the benefit 
          of those they love. During this challenging time for our 
          Nation, their selfless heroism demonstrates the quiet 
          determination and courage of the American spirit.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001 as National Family Caregivers Month. I 
          encourage all Americans to recognize the importance of the 
          family, of our older citizens, and the millions of caregivers 
          who work to keep their loved ones at home.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7499


Proclamation 7499 of November 9, 2001

World Freedom Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During the Cold War, freedom and authoritarianism clashed. 
          Countries and entire regions suffered under repressive 
          ideologies that sought to trample human dignity. Today, 
          freedom is again threatened. Like the fascists and 
          totalitarians before them, Al Qaida, the Taliban regime that 
          supports them, and other terrorist groups across the world 
          seek to impose their radical views through threats and 
          violence.
          The fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989, stands as the 
          turning point of the Cold War and a significant landmark in 
          freedom's victory over tyranny. The Wall stood as a grim 
          symbol of the separation of free people and those living under 
          dictatorships. We honor the spirit and perseverance of those 
          who strived for freedom in East Germany and under other 
          repressive regimes. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, many 
          countries have achieved freedom via the ballot box, through 
          political pressure rising from

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          their citizens, or as a result of the settlement of internal 
          or regional conflicts. We celebrate the new freedom in which 
          much of the world lives today.
          On World Freedom Day, we also recognize that more than 2 
          billion people still live under authoritarian regimes. From 
          Burma to Cuba, Belarus to Zimbabwe, citizens of many countries 
          suffer under repressive governments. Our thoughts today 
          especially turn to the people of Afghanistan. These men, 
          women, and children suffer at the hands of the repressive 
          Taliban regime, which, as we know, aids and abets terrorists.
          In every oppressive nation, pro-democracy activists are 
          working to stoke the fires of freedom, often at great personal 
          risk. As we mark November 9, World Freedom Day, I encourage 
          Americans to support those who seek to lead their people out 
          of oppression.
          On World Freedom Day, we also honor those who, at this moment, 
          fight for freedom half a world away. On September 11, freedom 
          was attacked, but liberty and justice will prevail. Like the 
          fall of the Berlin Wall and the defeat of totalitarianism in 
          Central and Eastern Europe, freedom will triumph in this war 
          against terrorism.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 9, 2001, as World Freedom Day. I call upon 
          the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities and to reaffirm their 
          devotion to the aspirations of all people for freedom and 
          democracy.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7500


Proclamation 7500 of November 12, 2001

National American Indian Heritage Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The strength of our Nation comes from its people. As the early 
          inhabitants of this great land, the native peoples of North 
          America played a unique role in the shaping of our Nation's 
          history and culture. During this month when we celebrate 
          Thanksgiving, we especially celebrate their heritage and the 
          contributions of American Indian and Alaska Native peoples to 
          this Nation.
          Since our Nation's birth, pluralism and diversity have been 
          hallmarks of the American experience and success. In 1782, the 
          Founding Fathers chose as our national motto ``E Pluribus 
          Unum,'' which means ``out of many, one.'' Today, America's 
          unity, derived from a mix of many diverse cultures and people, 
          grandly embodies the vision expressed by our Founders. 
          American Indian and Alaska Native cultures have made 
          remarkable contributions to our national identity. Their 
          unique spiritual, artistic, and literary

[[Page 306]]

          contributions, together with their vibrant customs and 
          celebrations, enliven and enrich our land.
          As we move into the 21st century, American Indians and Alaska 
          Natives will play a vital role in maintaining our Nation's 
          strength and prosperity. Almost half of America's Native 
          American tribal leaders have served in the United States Armed 
          Forces, following in the footsteps of their forebears who 
          distinguished themselves during the World Wars and the 
          conflicts in Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf.
          Their patriotism again appeared after the September 11 
          attacks, as American Indian law enforcement officers 
          volunteered to serve in air marshal programs. On the local 
          level, American Indians and Alaska Natives are strengthening 
          their communities through education and business development, 
          opening the doors to opportunity, and contributing to a 
          brighter future for all.
          My Administration will continue to work with tribal 
          governments on a sovereign to sovereign basis to provide 
          Native Americans with new economic and educational 
          opportunities. Indian education programs will remain a 
          priority, so that no American child, including no Native 
          American child, is left behind. We will protect and honor 
          tribal sovereignty and help to stimulate economic development 
          in reservation communities. We will work with the American 
          Indians and Alaska Natives to preserve their freedoms, as they 
          practice their religion and culture.
          During National American Indian Heritage Month, I call on all 
          Americans to learn more about the history and heritage of the 
          Native peoples of this great land. Such actions reaffirm our 
          appreciation and respect for their traditions and way of life 
          and can help to preserve an important part of our culture for 
          generations yet to come.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001 as National American Indian Heritage 
          Month. I call upon the people of the United States to observe 
          this month with appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twelfth 
          day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7501


Proclamation 7501 of November 13, 2001

National Farm-City Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          As fall harvesting occurs and Americans gather with family and 
          friends during Thanksgiving to share holiday meals, we 
          celebrate our Nation's farmers and ranchers who provide us 
          with abundant agricultural products,

[[Page 307]]

          and we recognize all of those who help get those food products 
          from the farm to our tables.
          The American agricultural industry is the leading global 
          provider of food. Its remarkable rates of production are a 
          continuing tribute to the ingenuity, diligence, and creativity 
          of our country's farmers and ranchers. But agriculture is not 
          just one industry among many--it is the very heart of our 
          economy. The aggregate output of our food industry is 
          unparalleled in human history. This enormous production makes 
          farmers and ranchers key contributors to the collective wealth 
          of our country. Their extraordinary efforts produce foodstuffs 
          not just for our land but for the world, and they are driven 
          by the American virtues of independence, industry, innovation, 
          and sacrifice.
          Our Nation's farmers and ranchers depend upon a complex chain 
          of interrelationships with urban workers to get their products 
          to national and world markets. Shippers, processors, 
          marketers, tradespeople, grocers, truck drivers, food service 
          providers, inspectors, researchers, and scientists are all 
          part of the formula that feeds our land and the world. These 
          urban/agriculture partnerships serve as catalysts for our 
          overall commercial success; and their continued development is 
          essential to sustaining our prosperity.
          As we reflect upon the important role these partnerships play 
          in the strength and success of our great Nation, we remember 
          those who devote their lives to meeting an essential national 
          and worldwide need. We are blessed by our agricultural 
          abundance, by the committed and caring farmers and ranchers 
          who strive to provide all we need to feed our people and the 
          people of the world, and by all of those who help accomplish 
          this important undertaking.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 16 through November 22, 2001, as National 
          Farm-City Week. I call upon all Americans, in rural and urban 
          communities alike, to join in recognizing the accomplishments 
          of our farms and ranches, and the hard-working individuals who 
          produce an abundance of affordable, quality agricultural goods 
          that strengthen and enrich our country.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7502

[[Page 308]]


Proclamation 7502 of November 14, 2001

To Provide for the Termination of Action Taken With Regard to Imports of 
Lamb Meat

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Proclamation 7208 issued July 7, 1999, implemented action 
          of a type described in section 203(a)(3) of the Trade Act of 
          1974, as amended (19 U.S.C. 2253(a)(3)) (the ``Trade Act''), 
          with respect to imports of fresh, chilled, or frozen lamb 
          meat, provided for in subheadings 0204.10.00, 0204.22.20, 
          0204.23.20, 0204.30.00, 0204.42.20, and 0204.43.20 of the 
          Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS). 
          Proclamation 7208 took effect on July 22, 1999.
          2. Section 204(a)(1) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2254(a)(1)) 
          requires the United States International Trade Commission 
          (USITC) to monitor developments with respect to the domestic 
          industry while action taken under section 203 remains in 
          effect. If the initial period of such action exceeds 3 years, 
          then the Commission must submit to the President a report on 
          the results of such monitoring not later than the date that is 
          the mid-point of the initial period of the action. The USITC 
          report in Investigation Number TA-204-2, issued on January 22, 
          2001, has been submitted.
          3. Section 204(b)(1)(A) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2254(b)(1)(A)) authorizes the President to reduce, modify, or 
          terminate a safeguard action if, after taking into account any 
          report or advice submitted by the USITC and after seeking the 
          advice of the Secretary of Commerce and the Secretary of 
          Labor, the President determines that changed circumstances 
          warrant such reduction, modification, or termination. The 
          President's determination may be made, inter alia, on the 
          basis that the effectiveness of the action taken under section 
          203 has been impaired by changed economic circumstances.
          4. In view of the information provided in the USITC's report, 
          and having sought advice from the Secretary of Commerce and 
          the Secretary of Labor, I determine that the effectiveness of 
          the action taken under section 203 with respect to lamb 
          imports has been impaired by changed economic circumstances. 
          Accordingly, I have determined, pursuant to section 
          204(b)(1)(A) of the Trade Act, that termination of the action 
          taken under section 203 with respect to lamb meat imports is 
          warranted.
          5. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
          relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting 
          import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the 
          removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate 
          of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including but not limited to sections 204 and 604 of the Trade 
          Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) The HTS is modified as provided in the Annex to this 
          proclamation.

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          (2) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (3) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation 
          shall be effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn 
          from warehouse for consumption, after the close of November 
          14, 2001.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          fourteenth day of November, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Annex

          Modifiations to the Harmonized ariff 
          hedule of the nited tates
          Effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, after the close of November 14, 
          2001, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the Harmonized Tariff 
          Schedule of the United States is hereby modified by striking 
          U.S. note 8, subheading 9903.02.01 through 9903.02.06, and the 
          superior text thereto.

Proc. 7503


Proclamation 7503 of November 15, 2001

America Recycles Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          We must preserve our natural heritage by serving as good 
          stewards of our land. Recycling helps to serve this important 
          function by conserving our natural resources as we reuse them 
          where we can. Recycling safeguards our environment and helps 
          keep America beautiful for present and future generations.
          The United States generates more than 230 million tons of 
          municipal solid waste every year, which amounts to four and a 
          half pounds of trash per person per day. However, thanks to 
          the efforts of the American people, we are now recovering more 
          than 64 million tons of usable material annually, and that 
          rate has doubled since 1990.
          Successful recycling includes not only the collection of 
          materials, but also the manufacture of new products and the 
          purchase of recycled content products. Buying products made of 
          recycled materials contributes to domestic energy conservation 
          and ultimately, a cleaner environment. For example, recycling 
          one aluminum can saves enough energy to run a television set 
          for three hours. Recycling a ton of glass saves the equivalent 
          of 9 gallons of fuel oil, and recycling solid waste prevents 
          the release of 37 million tons of carbon into the air--roughly 
          the amount emitted annually by 28 million cars.

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          As more products made with recycled materials reach the 
          marketplace, individual consumers, corporations, and Federal 
          agencies are purchasing these goods as cost-effective and 
          responsible business solutions. Such items may range from 
          recycled content paper, retread tires, and re-refined oil, to 
          concrete and insulation containing recycled materials.
          Our Nation is making great progress by recycling, but we can 
          and must do better. America Recycles Day 2001 represents a 
          partnership among Government, industry, and environmental 
          organizations to promote recycling and to encourage the 
          participation of all our citizens. As part of the event, the 
          Federal Government hosted a poster contest for the children of 
          Federal employees to help raise awareness in the Government, 
          and across the Nation, of the need to continue protecting the 
          environment by recycling. All Americans can help ``Close the 
          Recycling Circle,'' by recycling products in our homes, 
          schools, offices, and communities, and also by purchasing 
          products made from recycled materials. These recycling and 
          remanufacturing activities help conserve resources and also 
          stimulate our economy by creating jobs and revenue.
          Last year, more than 3 million people in all 50 States and 2 
          U.S. territories committed to reduce, reuse, and recycle more 
          and to buy recycled products. For America Recycles Day 2001, I 
          encourage all Americans to build on these achievements by 
          recycling and by purchasing and using products made from 
          recycled materials. These responsible actions can help protect 
          our environment and conserve natural resources for the benefit 
          of all.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 15, 2001, as America Recycles Day. I call 
          upon the people of the United States to observe this day with 
          appropriate programs and activities.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifteenth 
          day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7504


Proclamation 7504 of November 16, 2001

Thanksgiving Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Nearly half a century ago, President Dwight Eisenhower 
          proclaimed Thanksgiving as a time when Americans should 
          celebrate ``the plentiful yield of our soil . . . the beauty 
          of our land . . . the preservation of those ideals of liberty 
          and justice that form the basis of our national life, and the 
          hope of international peace.'' Now, in the painful aftermath 
          of the September 11 attacks and in the midst of our resolute 
          war on terrorism, President Eisenhower's hopeful words point 
          us to our collective obligation to

[[Page 311]]

          defend the enduring principles of freedom that form the 
          foundation of our Republic.
          During these extraordinary times, we find particular assurance 
          from our Thanksgiving tradition, which reminds us that we, as 
          a people and individually, always have reason to hope and 
          trust in God, despite great adversity. In 1621 in New England, 
          the Pilgrims gave thanks to God, in whom they placed their 
          hope, even though a bitter winter had taken many of their 
          brethren. In the winter of 1777, General George Washington and 
          his army, having just suffered great misfortune, stopped near 
          Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, to give thanks to God. And there, 
          in the throes of great difficulty, they found the hope they 
          needed to persevere. That hope in freedom eventually inspired 
          them to victory.
          In 1789, President Washington, recollecting the countless 
          blessings for which our new Nation should give thanks, 
          declared the first National Day of Thanksgiving. And decades 
          later, with the Nation embroiled in a bloody civil war, 
          President Abraham Lincoln revived what is now an annual 
          tradition of issuing a presidential proclamation of 
          Thanksgiving. President Lincoln asked God to ``heal the wounds 
          of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent 
          with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, 
          harmony, tranquillity, and Union.''
          As we recover from the terrible tragedies of September 11, 
          Americans of every belief and heritage give thanks to God for 
          the many blessings we enjoy as a free, faithful, and fair-
          minded land. Let us particularly give thanks for the selfless 
          sacrifices of those who responded in service to others after 
          the terrorist attacks, setting aside their own safety as they 
          reached out to help their neighbors. Let us also give thanks 
          for our leaders at every level who have planned and 
          coordinated the myriad of responses needed to address this 
          unprecedented national crisis. And let us give thanks for the 
          millions of people of faith who have opened their hearts to 
          those in need with love and prayer, bringing us a deeper unity 
          and stronger resolve.
          In thankfulness and humility, we acknowledge, especially now, 
          our dependence on One greater than ourselves. On this day of 
          Thanksgiving, let our thanksgiving be revealed in the 
          compassionate support we render to our fellow citizens who are 
          grieving unimaginable loss; and let us reach out with care to 
          those in need of food, shelter, and words of hope. May 
          Almighty God, who is our refuge and our strength in this time 
          of trouble, watch over our homeland, protect us, and grant us 
          patience, resolve, and wisdom in all that is to come.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim Thursday, November 22, 2001, as a National Day of 
          Thanksgiving. I encourage Americans to assemble in their 
          homes, places of worship, or community centers to reinforce 
          ties of family and community, express our profound thanks for 
          the many blessings we enjoy, and reach out in true gratitude 
          and friendship to our friends around the world.

[[Page 312]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth 
          day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7505


Proclamation 7505 of November 21, 2001

To Modify the Tariff-Rate Quota Applicable to Imports of Steel Wire Rod

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On February 16, 2000, pursuant to section 203 of the Trade 
          Act of 1974, as amended (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2253), 
          President Clinton issued Proclamation 7273, which imposed a 
          tariff-rate quota (TRQ) on certain steel wire rod imports 
          provided for in subheadings 7213.91, 7213.99, 7227.20 and 
          7227.90.60 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United 
          States (HTS) for a period of 3 years plus 1 day. Proclamation 
          7273 did not allocate the in-quota quantity of the TRQ among 
          supplier countries.
          2. Pursuant to section 203(g) of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 
          2253(g)), in order to provide for the efficient and fair 
          administration of the TRQ, I have determined that the in-quota 
          quantity of the TRQ should be allocated among supplier 
          countries in the manner set forth in the Annex to this 
          proclamation.
          3. Section 604 of the Trade Act (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes 
          the President to embody in the HTS the substance of the 
          relevant provisions of that Act, and of other acts affecting 
          import treatment, and actions thereunder, including the 
          removal, modification, continuance, or imposition of any rate 
          of duty or other import restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including but not limited to sections 203 and 604 of the Trade 
          Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to allocate the in-quota quantity of the TRQ on 
          wire rod imports, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the HTS is 
          modified as set forth in the Annex to this proclamation.
          (2) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (3) Effective at the close of March 1, 2004, or such other 
          date that is 1 year from the close of this relief, the U.S. 
          note and tariff provisions established in the Annex of this 
          proclamation shall be deleted from the HTS.
          (4) The modifications to the HTS made by this proclamation and 
          the Annex hereto shall be effective with respect to goods 
          entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, after 
          the close of November 23,

[[Page 313]]

          2001, and shall continue in effect through the close of March 
          1, 2003, unless such actions are earlier expressly modified or 
          terminated.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD28NO01.007


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[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD28NO01.008

Proc. 7506

[[Page 316]]


Proclamation 7506 of November 21, 2001

National Family Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          American families are the bedrock of our society. They are the 
          primary source of strength and health for both individuals and 
          communities across our Nation. As we continue our recovery 
          from the horrific acts committed by terrorists against the 
          United States on September 11, our families provide us with a 
          vital source of comfort and reassurance.
          Americans grieve with those who suffered the loss of a family 
          member in the brutal and cowardly terrorist attacks. The 
          September 11 tragedy has allowed America to see firsthand the 
          profound bonds of love that characterize the American family. 
          Parents, children, spouses, and siblings mourned their lost 
          loved ones, cared for the injured, and prayed for protection 
          and health for all Americans. In the midst of great loss, we 
          saw great love flowing from the hearts of America's families.
          My Administration is committed to strengthening the American 
          family. Many one-parent families are also a source of comfort 
          and reassurance, yet a family with a mom and dad who are 
          committed to marriage and devote themselves to their children 
          helps provide children a sound foundation for success. 
          Government can support families by promoting policies that 
          help strengthen the institution of marriage and help parents 
          rear their children in positive and healthy environments.
          My proposed budget includes initiatives that encourage family 
          cohesion. It provides over $60 million for grants that 
          encourage responsible fatherhood. Grants would be awarded to 
          groups that promote successful parenting and strong marriages 
          and to faith-based and community organizations that help 
          unemployed or low-income parents and their children avoid or 
          leave welfare. This initiative will help spur new community-
          level approaches to aid low-income families.
          To strengthen States' ability to promote child safety, 
          stability, and well-being, my budget also proposes a 
          substantial increase in funding for the Promoting Safe and 
          Stable Families program. These additional resources will help 
          States keep children with their biological families, when safe 
          and appropriate, or place children with loving adoptive 
          families. By undertaking more preventative efforts to help 
          families in crisis, the prospects for children to live in a 
          permanent home are enhanced.
          As we observe National Family Week, we must work to strengthen 
          families in America as individuals and through Government and 
          community-based organizations. This week serves to remind us 
          of the values, security, and love that we give and receive in 
          our families.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 18 through November 24, 2001, as National 
          Family Week. I invite the States, communities, and people of 
          the United States to join together in observing this day with 
          appropriate ceremonies and activities to honor our Nation's 
          families.

[[Page 317]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          first day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7507


Proclamation 7507 of November 29, 2001

National Diabetes Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          During the past century, we have made significant progress in 
          our fight against disease. Through public health campaigns and 
          aggressive research, we have eliminated polio in the United 
          States, reduced the harm of influenza outbreaks, and developed 
          revolutionary new medications that provide relief and healing 
          from many chronic and acute illnesses. However, effective 
          treatments and cures to numerous other illnesses remain 
          elusive and demand our continued attention and resources. One 
          of the most prevalent and difficult of these is diabetes, 
          which currently afflicts more than 16 million Americans.
          Diabetes can cause blindness, renal disease, severe nerve 
          damage, heart disease, strokes, and even death. This year 
          approximately 800,000 men, women, and children in the United 
          States will develop diabetes, and health officials estimate 
          that it will be a contributing factor in almost 200,000 
          deaths. The total economic cost for providing medical 
          treatment for diabetes patients and for disability and deaths 
          related to the disease is approximately $100 billion a year. 
          More troubling are statistics indicating that more than 5 
          million Americans are unaware of their diabetic condition, 
          seriously jeopardizing their long-term health and well-being. 
          An additional 10 million citizens are at high-risk of 
          developing type 2 diabetes due largely to physical inactivity, 
          obesity, and poor diet.
          Recent scientific findings demonstrate that modest, consistent 
          exercise and a healthy diet can curtail the risk of type 2 
          diabetes in individuals by nearly 60 percent. This information 
          provides great hope in our efforts to reduce the incidence of 
          diabetes and creates a renewed sense of urgency to ensure that 
          all Americans are aware of practical steps that can be taken 
          to reduce their risk for diabetes.
          My Administration is strongly committed to fighting diabetes 
          both by working in cooperation with dedicated staff and 
          volunteers of private organizations to develop strong public 
          education programs and by increased Federal funding for 
          medical research. The Centers for Disease Control and 
          Prevention and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have 
          established the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to 
          help familiarize Americans with the risks of diabetes and what 
          can be done to minimize its complications. The NDEP will also 
          offer practical information about preventing the 
          cardiovascular complications of diabetes through the campaign, 
          ``Be Smart About Your Heart: The ABCs of Diabetes.'' Medical 
          research is providing exciting advances in our prevention and 
          treatment strategies for diabetes,

[[Page 318]]

          and my fiscal year 2002 budget reflects a significant increase 
          in funding to continue the valuable diabetes research programs 
          at the NIH.
          I am confident that our Nation's health care professionals, 
          nurses, scientists, educators, and volunteers will continue to 
          provide quality care to those who currently suffer from 
          diabetes, and, through their work, we will one day find a cure 
          for this terrible disease. On the observance of National 
          Diabetes Month, we honor those who are working diligently to 
          advance our knowledge and understanding of diabetes. We also 
          recognize the value of educating ourselves about health risks 
          and the importance of healthy lifestyle habits.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001 as National Diabetes Month. I call on 
          all Americans to increase their awareness of the risk factors 
          and symptoms related to diabetes and to observe this month 
          with appropriate activities and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7508


Proclamation 7508 of November 29, 2001

National Hospice Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Each year, approximately 700,000 terminally ill patients and 
          their families rely on the invaluable end-of-life care 
          provided by the 3,100 hospice programs located in the United 
          States. Hospice care allows a terminally ill individual to 
          receive professional medical services, pain management 
          therapy, and emotional and spiritual support, without having 
          to enter a hospital. This focus on the patient's quality of 
          life during his or her last illness can make the best of the 
          most challenging of situations.
          Hospices create a compassionate atmosphere where patients will 
          be able to die with dignity, preferably in their home 
          environment, surrounded and supported by loved ones, familiar 
          friends, and committed caregivers. Professional and 
          compassionate hospice staff and volunteers, including 
          physicians, nurses, social workers, therapists, and clergy, 
          provide comprehensive care and attend to the particular needs 
          and wishes of each patient. Family members and friends also 
          receive counseling and bereavement care that help them cope 
          with the impending loss of their loved one.
          Individuals and groups in the private and public sectors are 
          working together to strengthen and expand hospice programs and 
          to promote their services as a positive alternative for 
          terminally ill patients. Today, hospice care is a full partner 
          in our Nation's health care system, furthering our efforts to 
          provide medical services in more compassionate and cost-
          effective

[[Page 319]]

          ways. More important, providing high-quality hospice care 
          reaffirms our belief in the essential dignity of every person, 
          regardless of age, health, or social status, and that every 
          stage of human life deserves to be treated with the utmost 
          respect and care. My Administration remains committed to 
          supporting health care programs like hospice that encourage 
          quality medical care and frequent doctor-patient interaction.
          With the observance of National Hospice Month, we recognize 
          those who serve in our Nation's hospices, often as caregivers 
          in the homes of hospice patients. Caring for a terminally ill 
          patient can be emotionally painful, physically exhausting, and 
          financially difficult. I call on all Americans to honor the 
          professionals and volunteers who dedicate their lives to 
          aiding the terminally ill through hospices. And we should use 
          this observance as an opportunity to encourage and help those 
          who take on the challenge of caring for a terminally ill 
          patient in their home or in a hospice facility.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim November 2001 as National Hospice Month. I encourage 
          Americans to increase their awareness of the importance and 
          availability of hospice service and to observe this month with 
          appropriate activities and programs.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7509


Proclamation 7509 of November 29, 2001

National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          Each December we turn our attention to the problem of drunk 
          driving by observing National Drunk and Drugged Driving 
          Prevention Month. Though the holidays bring joy in 
          celebrations with family and friends, they also bring a tragic 
          increase in the incidence of impaired driving. This season, I 
          ask each American to avoid driving while they are under the 
          influence of alcohol or drugs, to help stop others from 
          driving in an impaired condition, and to increase community 
          awareness about these issues.
          Despite many efforts by States, communities, and citizen 
          groups to stop drunk and drugged driving, many Americans 
          mistakenly continue to view impaired driving as acceptable 
          conduct. After years of gradual improvement, fatalities in 
          alcohol-related crashes rose by 4 percent from 1999 to 2000. 
          The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates 
          that last year alcohol was involved in 40 percent of fatal 
          crashes and in 8 percent of all crashes.

[[Page 320]]

          Every person should reaffirm his or her personal 
          responsibility to drive free of the influence of alcohol or 
          drugs and to prevent others from driving under the influence 
          of them. We must promote practices such as designating a sober 
          driver, stopping impaired family members and friends from 
          getting behind the wheel, reporting impaired drivers to law 
          enforcement officials, and teaching our young people safe, 
          alcohol- and drug-free driving behavior.
          We should also promote coordinated public policies and citizen 
          campaigns against drunk and drugged driving in our 
          communities. One example is the Department of Transportation's 
          You Drink & Drive, You Lose campaign. This national coalition 
          of community and law enforcement organizations will increase 
          public awareness of the hazards of impaired driving. Their 
          message warns of the criminal penalties for impaired driving, 
          including imprisonment and the loss of license, vehicle, time 
          from work, and money in fines and court costs.
          As we celebrate the joyous holiday season, we can help save 
          lives by preventing impaired driving. In order to ensure the 
          safety of our roads for all travelers, we must continue to 
          fight drunk and drugged driving throughout the year.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 2001 as National Drunk and Drugged Driving 
          Prevention Month. I call upon State and community leaders to 
          join the National Holiday Lifesavers Mobilization, sponsored 
          by the You Drink & Drive, You Lose campaign, on December 21-
          23, 2001. I also urge all Americans to remember the hazards of 
          impaired driving and to become involved in fighting this 
          dangerous problem.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          ninth day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7510


Proclamation 7510 of November 30, 2001

World AIDS Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          This year marks the 20th year that the world has been fighting 
          the disease that we now know as Acquired Immunodeficiency 
          Syndrome (AIDS). AIDS has inflicted a terrible toll upon the 
          world, taking millions of lives and causing untold grief to 
          the families and friends of its victims. An estimated 40 
          million people worldwide are living with the Human 
          Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), which causes AIDS; and more than 
          8,000 people across the globe die from AIDS every day. Sadly, 
          since its inception, AIDS has claimed the lives of more than 
          22 million individuals.

[[Page 321]]

          This year's World AIDS Day theme is ``I Care . . . Do You? 
          Youth and AIDS in the 21st Century.'' The goal underscoring 
          this year's theme is ensuring greater education and 
          involvement of young people in preventing HIV/AIDS. And it 
          seeks to stress that every individual has both the 
          responsibility and the opportunity to help prevent the spread 
          of HIV/AIDS and to assist those suffering from the disease.
          In many countries, including the United States, young people 
          and adolescents are at a higher risk for contracting HIV 
          infection. We know from epidemiological data that young people 
          under the age of 25 comprise half of all new HIV infections 
          worldwide. This sobering reality is a clarion call to public 
          health networks around the world to redouble their efforts in 
          providing information to young people about preventing HIV/
          AIDS, and most importantly, about abstinence and how it can 
          help to prevent the spread of this disease.
          The AIDS epidemic has had a devastating impact on diverse 
          communities, and disadvantaged youth have borne the brunt of 
          this devastation. Impoverished conditions and depressed 
          economic circumstances tend to accompany an increased presence 
          of HIV in these communities. We must develop and implement 
          better ways to communicate to youth about abstinence and other 
          effective measures that will help them to avoid the disease 
          and to envision a future filled with possibility.
          We must also continue our efforts to develop a vaccine that 
          will protect individuals from becoming infected with HIV. Our 
          children deserve to live in a world free from the fear of HIV/
          AIDS, and the United States will not weaken in its resolve to 
          lead the world towards that goal.
          As we enter the third decade of the AIDS pandemic, our hearts 
          go out to those who have been afflicted with or affected by 
          this deadly disease. We resolve to stand together as a Nation 
          and with the world to fight AIDS on all fronts. We resolve to 
          provide the resources necessary to combat HIV/AIDS. And we 
          resolve to ensure that those suffering with HIV/AIDS receive 
          effective care and treatment, compassionate understanding, and 
          encouraging hope.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 1, 2001, as World AIDS Day. I invite the 
          Governors of the States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, 
          officials of the other territories subject to the jurisdiction 
          of the United States, and the American people to join me in 
          reaffirming our commitment to combat HIV/AIDS. I encourage 
          every American to participate in appropriate commemorative 
          programs and ceremonies in workplaces, houses of worship, and 
          other community centers to reach out and protect and educate 
          our children, and to help comfort all people who are living 
          with HIV and AIDS.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth 
          day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7511

[[Page 322]]


Proclamation 7511 of December 5, 2001

National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2001

By The President Of The United States of America

A Proclamation

          On the morning of December 7, 1941, America was attacked 
          without warning at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, by the air and naval 
          forces of Imperial Japan. More than 2,400 people perished and 
          another 1,100 were wounded, triggering our entry into World 
          War II.
          Today, we honor those killed 60 years ago and those who 
          survived to fight on other fronts in the four succeeding years 
          of world war. We also remember the millions of brave Americans 
          who answered our country's call to the battlefield, to the 
          factory, and to the farm, remembering Pearl Harbor by their 
          deeds, their devotion to duty, and their willingness to fight 
          for freedom. The attack at Pearl Harbor fired the American 
          spirit with a determination that freedom would not fall to 
          tyranny; and the United States and its allies fought to 
          victory, preserving a world in which democracy could grow. The 
          tragedy of December 7, 1941, remains seared upon our 
          collective national memory, a recollection that serves not 
          just as a symbol of American military valor and American 
          resolve, but also as a reminder of the presence of evil in the 
          world and the need to remain ever vigilant against it.
          Now, another date will forever stand alongside December 7--
          September 11, 2001. On that day, our people and our way of 
          life again were brutally and suddenly attacked, though not by 
          a complex military maneuver, but by the surreptitious wiles of 
          evil terrorists who took cruel and heartless advantage of the 
          freedoms guaranteed by our Nation. Their target was not 
          chiefly our military, but innocent civilians. We fight now to 
          defend freedom, secure civilization, and ensure the survival 
          of our American way of life.
          As we fight to defend what we believe is right, we remember 
          the sacrifice of those who have gone before us--not only the 
          heroes of Pearl Harbor but all the men and women of the 
          greatest of generations who defeated tyranny. We are grateful 
          for their service, and honor it by pledging to do our best to 
          secure for our children, our grandchildren, and all of 
          posterity the continuing blessings of liberty.
          The Congress, by Public Law 103-308, as amended, has 
          designated December 7, 2001, as ``National Pearl Harbor 
          Remembrance Day.''
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 7, 2001, as National Pearl Harbor 
          Remembrance Day. I call upon the people of the United States 
          to observe this solemn occasion with appropriate ceremonies 
          and activities. I urge all Federal agencies, interested 
          organizations, groups, and individuals to fly the flag of the 
          United States at half-staff this and every December 7 in honor 
          of those who died as a result of their service at Pearl 
          Harbor.

[[Page 323]]

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fifth day 
          of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7512


Proclamation 7512 of December 7, 2001

To Implement the Agreement Between the United States of America and the 
Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan on the Establishment of a Free Trade Area

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. On October 24, 2000, the United States of America and the 
          Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan entered into an Agreement on the 
          Establishment of a Free Trade Area (the ``JFTA'').
          2. Section 101 of the United States-Jordan Free Trade Area 
          Implementation Act (the ``JFTA Act'') (Public Law 107-43, 115 
          Stat. 243) (19 U.S.C. 2112 Note) authorizes the President to 
          proclaim such modifications or continuation of any duty, such 
          continuation of duty-free or excise treatment, or such 
          additional duties, as the President determines to be necessary 
          or appropriate to carry out Article 2.1 of the JFTA and the 
          schedule of duty reductions with respect to Jordan set out in 
          Annex 2.1 of the JFTA.
          3. Section 102 of the JFTA Act provides certain rules for 
          determining whether an article is wholly the growth, product, 
          or manufacture of Jordan, or is a new or different article of 
          commerce that has been grown, produced, or manufactured in 
          Jordan and thus is eligible for the tariff and certain other 
          treatment contemplated under the JFTA (``products of 
          Jordan''). I have determined that it is necessary to include 
          these rules of origin, together with particular rules 
          applicable to certain other goods, in the Harmonized Tariff 
          Schedule of the United States (HTS).
          4. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the 
          ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2483) authorizes the President to 
          embody in the HTS the substance of relevant provisions of that 
          Act, of other Acts affecting import treatment, and of actions 
          taken thereunder.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including sections 101 and 102 of the JFTA Act and 604 of the 
          1974 Act, do proclaim that:
          (1) In order to--

  (a) provide generally for the preferential tariff treatment being 
accorded under the JFTA and to set forth rules for determining whether 
goods imported into the customs territory of the United States are eligible 
for preferential treatment under the JFTA, and

[[Page 324]]

  (b) provide tariff-rate quotas with respect to certain products of Jordan 
and to make technical and conforming changes in specified HTS provisions 
for purposes of the JFTA, the HTS is modified as set forth in Annex I to 
this proclamation.

          (2) In order to implement the initial stage of duty 
          elimination provided for in the JFTA and to provide for future 
          staged reductions in duties for products of Jordan for 
          purposes of the JFTA, the HTS is modified as provided in Annex 
          II to this proclamation, effective on the date specified in 
          such Annex for each HTS provision and on any subsequent dates 
          set forth for such provisions in Annex II columns.
          (3) All provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are hereby superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (4) (a) The amendments to the HTS made by paragraphs (1)(b) 
          and (2) of this proclamation shall be effective with respect 
          to goods entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, 
          on or after the dates indicated in Annexes I and II to this 
          proclamation.

  (b) Except as provided in subparagraph (a), this proclamation shall be 
effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for 
consumption, on or after December 17, 2001.

          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this seventh 
          day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and 
          of the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Proc. 7513

[[Page 561]]


Proclamation 7513 of December 9, 2001

Human Rights Day, Bill of Rights Day, and Human Rights Week, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          The terrible tragedies of September 11 served as a grievous 
          reminder that the enemies of freedom do not respect or value 
          individual human rights. Their brutal attacks were an attack 
          on these very rights. When our essential rights are attacked, 
          they must and will be defended.
          Americans stand united with those who love democracy, justice, 
          and individual liberty. We are committed to upholding these 
          principles, embodied in our Constitution's Bill of Rights, 
          that have safeguarded us throughout our history and that 
          continue to provide the foundation of our strength and 
          prosperity.
          The heinous acts of terrorism committed on September 11 were 
          an attack against civilization itself, and they have caused 
          the world to join together in a coalition that is now waging 
          war on terrorism and defending international human rights. 
          Americans have looked beyond our borders and found 
          encouragement as the world has rallied to join the American-
          led coalition. Civilized people everywhere have recognized 
          that terrorists threaten every nation that loves liberty and 
          cherishes the protection of individual rights.
          Respect for human dignity and individual freedoms reaffirms a 
          core tenet of civilized people everywhere. This important 
          observance honoring our Bill of Rights and advocating human 
          rights around the world allows all Americans to celebrate the 
          universal principles of liberty and justice that define our 
          dreams and shape our hopes as we face the challenges of a new 
          era.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 10, 2001, as Human Rights Day; December 15, 
          2001, as Bill of Rights Day; and the week beginning December 
          9, 2001, as Human Rights Week. I call upon the people of the 
          United States to honor the legacy of human rights passed down 
          to us from previous generations and to resolve that such 
          liberties will prevail in our Nation and throughout the world 
          as we move into the 21st century.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ninth day 
          of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand one, and of 
          the Independence of the United States of America the two 
          hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7514

[[Page 562]]


Proclamation 7514 of December 13, 2001

Wright Brothers Day, 2001

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          On December 17, 1903, from the dunes near Kitty Hawk, North 
          Carolina, Orville Wright made the first manned flight in an 
          engine-powered aircraft. Though the flight only covered 120 
          feet and lasted just 12 seconds, Orville and his brother 
          Wilbur Wright changed history on that cold and gusty winter 
          day.
          Success had not come easily to the Wright brothers. Many 
          thought powered flight impossible; and skeptics called the 
          Wrights dreamers for even entertaining the idea. Undeterred, 
          the Wrights spent years in study, analyzing the flight of 
          birds and experimenting with model airplanes in their bicycle 
          shop in Dayton, Ohio. After many trials and errors, the Wright 
          brothers finally achieved a controlled flight and opened the 
          door to a new world.
          On December 17 of each year, we honor the Wright brothers for 
          their contributions to our Nation. Their invention of powered 
          flight made the world community more connected. We have since 
          traveled to the Moon and back, and space shuttles orbit our 
          planet. All of these amazing advances can be traced back to 
          that windy day at Kitty Hawk when the indomitable will of the 
          Wrights persevered to triumph over the supposed impossible.
          Air travel now is an essential part of this Nation's everyday 
          life. This proud industry will endure through the new 
          challenges presented by the tragedies of September 11. Joining 
          together as a Nation, we will continue to strengthen security 
          while maintaining the economic and social benefits of an 
          efficient air transportation system.
          This Wright Brothers Day we salute all the scientific pioneers 
          and visionaries who, despite the critics, have over come 
          seemingly insurmountable odds and made great advances for man. 
          The Wright brothers' perseverance and creativity can serve as 
          an inspiration for those inventors who will take us to new 
          heights in the 21st century.
          The Congress, by a joint resolution approved December 17, 1963 
          (77 Stat. 402; 36 U.S.C. 143), has designated December 17 of 
          each year as ``Wright Brothers Day,'' and has authorized and 
          requested the President to issue annually a proclamation 
          inviting the people of the United States to observe that day 
          with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby 
          proclaim December 17, 2001, as Wright Brothers Day.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          thirteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

Proc. 7515

[[Page 563]]


Proclamation 7515 of December 18, 2001

To Modify the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, To Provide 
Rules of Origin Under the North American Free Trade Agreement for Affected 
Goods, and for Other Purposes

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. Section 1205(a) of the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness 
          Act of 1988 (the ``1988 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 3005(a)) directs the 
          United States International Trade Commission (the 
          ``Commission'') to keep the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the 
          United States (HTS) under continuous review and periodically 
          to recommend to the President such modifications in the HTS as 
          the Commission considers necessary or appropriate to 
          accomplish the purposes set forth in that subsection. The 
          Commission has recommended modifications to the HTS pursuant 
          to sections 1205(c) and (d) of the 1988 Act (19 U.S.C. 3005(c) 
          and (d)) to conform the HTS to amendments made to the 
          International Convention on the Harmonized Commodity 
          Description and Coding System (the ``Convention'').
          2. Section 1206(a) of the 1988 Act (19 U.S.C. 3006(a)) 
          authorizes the President to proclaim modifications to the HTS, 
          based on the recommendations of the Commission under section 
          1205 of the 1988 Act (19 U.S.C. 3005), if he determines that 
          the modifications are in conformity with the obligations of 
          the United States under the Convention and do not run counter 
          to the national economic interest of the United States. I have 
          determined that the modifications to the HTS proclaimed in 
          this proclamation pursuant to section 1206(a) are in 
          conformity with the obligations of the United States under the 
          Convention and do not run counter to the national economic 
          interest of the United States.
          3. (a) Presidential Proclamation 6641 of December 15, 1993, 
          implemented the North American Free Trade Agreement (the 
          ``NAFTA'') with respect to the United States and, pursuant to 
          sections 201 and 202 of the North American Free Trade 
          Agreement Implementation Act (the ``NAFTA Implementation 
          Act'') (19 U.S.C. 3331 and 3332), incorporated in the HTS the 
          tariff modifications and rules of origin necessary or 
          appropriate to carry out the NAFTA.
          (b) Because the substance of the changes to the Convention 
          will be reflected in slightly differing form in the national 
          tariff schedules of the three parties to the NAFTA, the rules 
          of origin and interpretative rules set forth in Appendix 6.A 
          of Annex 300-B, Annex 401, and Annex 403.1 to the NAFTA must 
          be changed to ensure that the tariff and certain other 
          treatment accorded under the NAFTA to originating goods will 
          continue to be provided under the tariff categories that are 
          being modified to reflect the amendments to the Convention. 
          The NAFTA parties have agreed to make these changes.

[[Page 564]]

          4. Section 202 of the NAFTA Implementation Act provides rules 
          for determining whether goods imported into the United States 
          originate in the territory of a NAFTA party and thus are 
          eligible for the tariff and other treatment contemplated under 
          the NAFTA. Section 202(q) of the NAFTA Implementation Act (19 
          U.S.C. 3332(q)) authorizes the President to proclaim the rules 
          of origin set out in the NAFTA and any subordinate tariff 
          categories necessary to carry out the NAFTA Implementation Act 
          consistent with the NAFTA.
          5. I have determined that the modifications to the HTS 
          proclaimed in this proclamation pursuant to sections 201 and 
          202 of the NAFTA Implementation Act are necessary in order to 
          ensure that the tariff and certain other treatment accorded 
          under the NAFTA, including previously proclaimed staged 
          reductions in rates of duty, will continue to be given to 
          NAFTA originating goods under tariff categories that are being 
          modified to reflect the amendments to the Convention.
          6. Presidential Proclamation 6763 of December 23, 1994, 
          implemented with respect to the United States the trade 
          agreements resulting from the Uruguay Round of multilateral 
          trade negotiations, including Schedule XX-United States of 
          America, annexed to the Marrakesh Protocol to the General 
          Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 (``Schedule XX''), that 
          were entered into pursuant to sections 1102(a) and (e) of the 
          1988 Act (19 U.S.C. 2902(a) and (e)) and approved in section 
          101(a) of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (URAA) (19 U.S.C. 
          3511(a)).
          7. Pursuant to the authority provided in section 111 of the 
          URAA (19 U.S.C. 3521) and sections 1102(a) and (e) of the 1988 
          Act, Proclamation 6763 included the staged reductions in rates 
          of duty that the President determined to be necessary or 
          appropriate to carry out the concessions set forth in Schedule 
          XX. In order to ensure the continuation of such staged 
          reductions in rates of duty for imported goods under tariff 
          categories that are being modified to reflect the amendments 
          to the Convention, I have determined that additional 
          modifications to the HTS are necessary or appropriate to carry 
          out the duty reductions previously proclaimed, including 
          certain technical or conforming changes within the tariff 
          schedule.
          8. Presidential Proclamation 7351 of October 2, 2000, 
          implemented section 211 of the United States-Caribbean Basin 
          Trade Partnership Act (title II of Public Law 106-200, 114 
          Stat. 286) (CBTPA), in order to provide certain preferential 
          tariff treatment to eligible articles that are the product of 
          any country that the President has designated as a ``CBTPA 
          beneficiary country'' and that has satisfied the requirements 
          of section 213(b)(4)(A)(ii) of the Caribbean Basin Economic 
          Recovery Act (CBERA) (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(4)(A)(ii)). Section 
          213(b)(3) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(3)) provides that 
          the tariff treatment accorded at any time under the CBTPA to 
          any article referred to in section 213(b)(1)(B) through (F) of 
          the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(1)(B) through (F)) that is a 
          CBTPA originating good shall be identical to the tariff 
          treatment that is accorded at such time under Annex 302.2 of 
          the NAFTA to an article described in the same 8-digit 
          subheading of the HTS that is a good of Mexico and is imported 
          into the United States.
          9. Pursuant to section 213(b) of the CBERA, Proclamation 7351 
          included the staged reductions in rates of duty that the 
          President determined to be necessary or appropriate to provide 
          such identical tariff treatment to

[[Page 565]]

          CBTPA originating goods. In order to ensure the continuation 
          of such staged reductions in rates of duty for imported goods 
          under tariff categories that are being modified to reflect the 
          amendments to the Convention and the conforming changes in the 
          NAFTA rules of origin, I have determined that additional 
          modifications to the HTS are necessary or appropriate to carry 
          out the duty reductions previously proclaimed.
          10. Presidential Proclamation 7512 of December 7, 2001, 
          implemented with respect to the United States the Agreement 
          Between the United States of America and the Hashemite Kingdom 
          of Jordan on the Establishment of a Free Trade Area (JFTA), 
          which was entered into on October 24, 2000, and implemented 
          pursuant to section 101 of the United States-Jordan Free Trade 
          Area Implementation Act (the ``JFTA Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2112 
          Note). That proclamation included the staged reductions in 
          rates of duty that I determined to be necessary or appropriate 
          to carry out the concessions set forth in Annex 2.1 to the 
          JFTA. In order to ensure the continuation of such staged 
          reductions in rates of duty for originating goods under tariff 
          categories that are being modified to reflect the amendments 
          to the Convention, I have determined that additional 
          modifications to the HTS are necessary or appropriate to carry 
          out the duty reductions previously proclaimed.
          11. Section 201(b) of the NAFTA Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 
          3331(b)) authorizes the President, subject to the consultation 
          and layover requirements of section 103(a) of the NAFTA 
          Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 3313(a)), to proclaim 
          accelerated schedules of duty elimination that the United 
          States may agree to with Mexico or Canada. Consistent with 
          Article 302(3) of the NAFTA, I, through my duly empowered 
          representative, have entered into an agreement with the 
          Government of Mexico providing for an accelerated schedule of 
          duty elimination for specific goods of Mexico.
          12. Pursuant to section 201(b) of the NAFTA Implementation 
          Act, I have determined that the modifications herein 
          proclaimed of duties on goods originating in the territory of 
          a NAFTA party are necessary or appropriate to maintain the 
          general level of reciprocal and mutually advantageous 
          concessions with respect to Mexico provided for by the NAFTA, 
          and to carry out the agreement with Mexico providing an 
          accelerated schedule of duty elimination for specific goods. 
          Pursuant to section 213(b)(3)(A) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 
          2703(b)(3)), I have determined that the rates of duty 
          resulting from the accelerated schedule of duty elimination 
          for specific goods of Mexico should also apply to CBTPA 
          originating goods described in the same 8-digit subheadings of 
          the HTS.
          13. Section 604 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the 
          ``1974 Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2483), authorizes the President to 
          embody in the HTS the substance of the relevant provisions of 
          that Act, of other acts affecting import treatment, and 
          actions thereunder, including the removal, modification, 
          continuance, or imposition of any rate of duty or other import 
          restriction.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          section 604 of the 1974 Act, sections 1102, 1205, and 1206 of 
          the 1988 Act, section 213 of the CBERA, sections 201 and 202 
          of the NAFTA Implementation Act, section 111 of the URAA, and 
          section 101 of the JFTA Act, do hereby proclaim:

[[Page 566]]

          (1) In order to modify the HTS to conform it to the Convention 
          or any amendment thereto recommended for adoption, to promote 
          the uniform application of the Convention, to establish 
          additional subordinate tariff categories to carry out 
          modifications to the rules of origin under the NAFTA, and to 
          make technical and conforming changes to existing provisions, 
          the HTS is modified as set forth in Annex I to this 
          proclamation.
          (2) In order to modify the rules of origin under the NAFTA to 
          reflect the modifications to the HTS being made to conform it 
          to the Convention and to make certain conforming changes, 
          general note 12 to the HTS is further modified as provided in 
          Annex II to this proclamation.
          (3) In order to provide for the continuation of previously 
          proclaimed staged duty reductions in the Rates of Duty 1-
          General subcolumn under section 111(a) of the URAA, as 
          provided in Presidential Proclamation 6763, for goods 
          classifiable in the provisions modified by Annex I to this 
          proclamation that are entered, or withdrawn from warehouse for 
          consumption, on or after each of the dates specified in 
          section A of Annex III to this proclamation, the rate of duty 
          in the HTS set forth in the Rates of Duty 1-General subcolumn 
          for each of the HTS subheadings enumerated in section A of 
          Annex III shall be deleted and the rate of duty provided in 
          such section inserted in lieu thereof.
          (4) In order to provide for the continuation of previously 
          proclaimed staged duty reductions in the Rates of Duty 1-
          Special subcolumn for originating goods of Mexico under the 
          NAFTA that are classifiable in the provisions modified by 
          Annex I to this proclamation and entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after each of the dates 
          specified in section B of Annex III to this proclamation, the 
          rate of duty in the HTS set forth in the Rates of Duty 1-
          Special subcolumn for each of the HTS subheadings enumerated 
          in section B of Annex III shall be deleted and the rate of 
          duty provided in such section inserted in lieu thereof.
          (5) In order to provide for the continuation of previously 
          proclaimed staged duty reductions in the Rates of Duty 1-
          Special subcolumn for originating goods of CBTPA beneficiary 
          countries that are classifiable in the provisions modified by 
          Annex I to this proclamation and entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after each of the dates 
          specified in section C of Annex III to this proclamation, the 
          rate of duty in the HTS set forth in the Rates of Duty 1-
          Special subcolumn for each of the HTS subheadings enumerated 
          in section C of Annex III shall be deleted and the rate of 
          duty provided in such section inserted in lieu thereof.
          (6) In order to provide for the continuation of previously 
          proclaimed staged duty reductions in the Rates of Duty 1-
          Special subcolumn for originating goods of Jordan under the 
          JFTA that are classifiable in the provisions modified by Annex 
          I to this proclamation and entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after each of the dates 
          specified in section D of Annex III to this proclamation, the 
          rate of duty in the HTS set forth in the Rates of Duty 1-
          Special subcolumn for each of the HTS subheadings enumerated 
          in section D of Annex III shall be deleted and the rate of 
          duty provided in such section inserted in lieu thereof.
          (7) In order to provide an accelerated schedule of duty 
          elimination for specific goods of Mexico under the terms of 
          general note 12 to the HTS, and to provide identical tariff 
          treatment for originating goods of a CBTPA beneficiary country 
          provided for in the same HTS subheading, the special

[[Page 567]]

          tariff treatment set forth in the HTS for the pertinent 
          subheadings is modified as provided in Annex IV to this 
          proclamation.
          (8) Any provisions of previous proclamations and Executive 
          Orders that are inconsistent with the actions taken in this 
          proclamation are superseded to the extent of such 
          inconsistency.
          (9)(a) The modifications and technical rectifications to the 
          HTS made by Annexes I and II to this proclamation shall be 
          effective with respect to goods entered, or withdrawn from 
          warehouse for consumption, on or after the later of (i) 
          January 1, 2002, or (ii) the 15th day after the date of 
          publication of this proclamation in the Federal 
          eister.
           (b) The modifications made by Annexes III and IV to this 
          proclamation shall be effective with respect to goods entered, 
          or withdrawn from warehouse for consumption, on or after the 
          respective dates specified in each section of such Annexes for 
          the goods described therein.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
          eighteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord two 
          thousand one, and of the Independence of the United States of 
          America the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

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Proc. 7516

[[Page 717]]


Proclamation 7516 of December 27, 2001

To Extend Nondiscriminatory Treatment (Normal Trade Relations Treatment) to 
the Products of the People's Republic of China

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation

          1. The United States and the People's Republic of China 
          (China) opened trade relations in 1980. Since that time, the 
          products of China have received nondiscriminatory treatment 
          pursuant to annual waivers of the requirements of section 402 
          of the Trade Act of 1974 (the ``Trade Act'') (19 U.S.C. 2432). 
          Trade between the United States and China has expanded 
          significantly even though China has maintained restrictions on 
          market access for U.S. exports and investment.
          2. On November 15, 1999, the United States and China agreed on 
          certain terms and conditions for China's accession to the 
          World Trade Organization (WTO) that when implemented will 
          eliminate or greatly reduce the principal barriers to trade 
          and investment in China.
          3. On November 9, 2001, pursuant to section 101(b) of Public 
          Law 106-286, 114 Stat. 881, I transmitted a report to the 
          Congress certifying that the terms and conditions for the 
          accession of China to the WTO are at least equivalent to those 
          agreed between the United States and China on November 15, 
          1999. On November 10, 2001, the Ministerial Conference of the 
          WTO approved the terms and conditions for China's accession 
          and invited China to become a member of the WTO. China has 
          accepted these terms and conditions and became a WTO member on 
          December 11, 2001.
          4. Pursuant to section 101(a)(1) of Public Law 106-286, 114 
          Stat. 881, I hereby determine that chapter 1 of title IV of 
          the Trade Act should no longer apply to China.
          NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United 
          States of America, acting under the authority vested in me by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          but not limited to sections 101(a)(2) and 102(a) of Public Law 
          106-286, 114 Stat. 881, do hereby proclaim that:
          (1) Nondiscriminatory treatment (normal trade relations 
          treatment) shall be extended to the products of China; and
          (2) The extension of nondiscriminatory treatment to the 
          products of China shall be effective as of January 1, 2002.
          IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-
          seventh day of December, in the year of our Lord two thousand 
          one, and of the Independence of the United States of America 
          the two hundred and twenty-sixth.

GEORGE W. BUSH

[[Page 719]]

Title 3--The President

Executive Orders




                              EXECUTIVE ORDERS




EO 13186


Executive Order 13186 of January 10, 2001

Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in 
          furtherance of the purposes of the migratory bird conventions, 
          the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 U.S.C. 703-711), the Bald 
          and Golden Eagle Protection Acts (16 U.S.C. 668-668d), the 
          Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661-666c), the 
          Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531-1544), the 
          National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321-
          4347), and other pertinent statutes, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Policy. Migratory birds are of 
          great ecological and economic value to this country and to 
          other countries. They contribute to biological diversity and 
          bring tremendous enjoyment to millions of Americans who study, 
          watch, feed, or hunt these birds throughout the United States 
          and other countries. The United States has recognized the 
          critical importance of this shared resource by ratifying 
          international, bilateral conventions for the conservation of 
          migratory birds. Such conventions include the Convention for 
          the Protection of Migratory Birds with Great Britain on behalf 
          of Canada 1916, the Convention for the Protection of Migratory 
          Birds and Game Mammals-Mexico 1936, the Convention for the 
          Protection of Birds and Their Environment- Japan 1972, and the 
          Convention for the Conservation of Migratory Birds and Their 
          Environment-Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 1978.
          These migratory bird conventions impose substantive 
          obligations on the United States for the conservation of 
          migratory birds and their habitats, and through the Migratory 
          Bird Treaty Act (Act), the United States has implemented these 
          migratory bird conventions with respect to the United States. 
          This Executive Order directs executive departments and 
          agencies to take certain actions to further implement the Act.
          e. 2. Definitions. For purposes of this 
          order:
          (a) ``Take'' means take as defined in 50 C.F.R. 10.12, and 
          includes both ``intentional'' and ``unintentional'' take.
          (b) ``Intentional take'' means take that is the purpose of the 
          activity in question.

[[Page 720]]

          (c) ``Unintentional take'' means take that results from, but 
          is not the purpose of, the activity in question.
          (d) ``Migratory bird'' means any bird listed in 50 C.F.R. 
          10.13.
          (e) ``Migratory bird resources'' means migratory birds and the 
          habitats upon which they depend.
          (f) ``Migratory bird convention'' means, collectively, the 
          bilateral conventions (with Great Britain/Canada, Mexico, 
          Japan, and Russia) for the conservation of migratory bird 
          resources.
          (g) ``Federal agency'' means an executive department or 
          agency, but does not include independent establishments as 
          defined by 5 U.S.C. 104.
          (h) ``Action'' means a program, activity, project, official 
          policy (such as a rule or regulation), or formal plan directly 
          carried out by a Federal agency. Each Federal agency will 
          further define what the term ``action'' means with respect to 
          its own authorities and what programs should be included in 
          the agency-specific Memoranda of Understanding required by 
          this order. Actions delegated to or assumed by nonfederal 
          entities, or carried out by nonfederal entities with Federal 
          assistance, are not subject to this order. Such actions, 
          however, continue to be subject to the Migratory Bird Treaty 
          Act.
          (i) ``Species of concern'' refers to those species listed in 
          the periodic report ``Migratory Nongame Birds of Management 
          Concern in the United States,'' priority migratory bird 
          species as documented by established plans (such as Bird 
          Conservation Regions in the North American Bird Conservation 
          Initiative or Partners in Flight physiographic areas), and 
          those species listed in 50 C.F.R. 17.11.
          e. 3. Federal Agency Responsibilities. 
          (a) Each Federal agency taking actions that have, or are 
          likely to have, a measurable negative effect on migratory bird 
          populations is directed to develop and implement, within 2 
          years, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Fish and 
          Wildlife Service (Service) that shall promote the conservation 
          of migratory bird populations.
          (b) In coordination with affected Federal agencies, the 
          Service shall develop a schedule for completion of the MOUs 
          within 180 days of the date of this order. The schedule shall 
          give priority to completing the MOUs with agencies having the 
          most substantive impacts on migratory birds.
          (c) Each MOU shall establish protocols for implementation of 
          the MOU and for reporting accomplishments. These protocols may 
          be incorporated into existing actions; however, the MOU shall 
          recognize that the agency may not be able to implement some 
          elements of the MOU until such time as the agency has 
          successfully included them in each agency's formal planning 
          processes (such as revision of agency land management plans, 
          land use compatibility guidelines, integrated resource 
          management plans, and fishery management plans), including 
          public participation and NEPA analysis, as appropriate. This 
          order and the MOUs to be developed by the agencies are 
          intended to be implemented when new actions or renewal of 
          contracts, permits, delegations, or other third party 
          agreements are initiated as well as during the initiation of 
          new, or revisions to, land management plans.

[[Page 721]]

          (d) Each MOU shall include an elevation process to resolve any 
          dispute between the signatory agencies regarding a particular 
          practice or activity.
          (e) Pursuant to its MOU, each agency shall, to the extent 
          permitted by law and subject to the availability of 
          appropriations and within Administration budgetary limits, and 
          in harmony with agency missions:
          (1) support the conservation intent of the migratory bird 
          conventions by integrating bird conservation principles, 
          measures, and practices into agency activities and by avoiding 
          or minimizing, to the extent practicable, adverse impacts on 
          migratory bird resources when conducting agency actions;
          (2) restore and enhance the habitat of migratory birds, as 
          practicable;
          (3) prevent or abate the pollution or detrimental alteration 
          of the environment for the benefit of migratory birds, as 
          practicable;
          (4) design migratory bird habitat and population conservation 
          principles, measures, and practices, into agency plans and 
          planning processes (natural resource, land management, and 
          environmental quality planning, including, but not limited to, 
          forest and rangeland planning, coastal management planning, 
          watershed planning, etc.) as practicable, and coordinate with 
          other agencies and nonfederal partners in planning efforts;
          (5) within established authorities and in conjunction with the 
          adoption, amendment, or revision of agency management plans 
          and guidance, ensure that agency plans and actions promote 
          programs and recommendations of comprehensive migratory bird 
          planning efforts such as Partners-in-Flight, U.S. National 
          Shorebird Plan, North American Waterfowl Management Plan, 
          North American Colonial Waterbird Plan, and other planning 
          efforts, as well as guidance from other sources, including the 
          Food and Agricultural Organization's International Plan of 
          Action for Reducing Incidental Catch of Seabirds in Longline 
          Fisheries;
          (6) ensure that environmental analyses of Federal actions 
          required by the NEPA or other established environmental review 
          processes evaluate the effects of actions and agency plans on 
          migratory birds, with emphasis on species of concern;
          (7) provide notice to the Service in advance of conducting an 
          action that is intended to take migratory birds, or annually 
          report to the Service on the number of individuals of each 
          species of migratory birds intentionally taken during the 
          conduct of any agency action, including but not limited to 
          banding or marking, scientific collecting, taxidermy, and 
          depredation control;
          (8) minimize the intentional take of species of concern by: 
          (i) delineating standards and procedures for such take; and 
          (ii) developing procedures for the review and evaluation of 
          take actions. With respect to intentional take, the MOU shall 
          be consistent with the appropriate sections of 50 C.F.R. parts 
          10, 21, and 22;
          (9) identify where unintentional take reasonably attributable 
          to agency actions is having, or is likely to have, a 
          measurable negative effect on migratory bird populations, 
          focusing first on species of concern, priority habitats, and 
          key risk factors. With respect to those actions so identified, 
          the agency shall develop and use principles, standards, and 
          practices that will lessen the amount of unintentional take, 
          developing any such conservation efforts in cooperation with 
          the Service. These principles, standards, and

[[Page 722]]

          practices shall be regularly evaluated and revised to ensure 
          that they are effective in lessening the detrimental effect of 
          agency actions on migratory bird populations. The agency also 
          shall inventory and monitor bird habitat and populations 
          within the agency's capabilities and authorities to the extent 
          feasible to facilitate decisions about the need for, and 
          effectiveness of, conservation efforts;
          (10) within the scope of its statutorily-designated 
          authorities, control the import, export, and establishment in 
          the wild of live exotic animals and plants that may be harmful 
          to migratory bird resources;
          (11) promote research and information exchange related to the 
          conservation of migratory bird resources, including 
          coordinated inventorying and monitoring and the collection and 
          assessment of information on environmental contaminants and 
          other physical or biological stressors having potential 
          relevance to migratory bird conservation. Where such 
          information is collected in the course of agency actions or 
          supported through Federal financial assistance, reasonable 
          efforts shall be made to share such information with the 
          Service, the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. 
          Geological Survey, and other appropriate repositories of such 
          data (e.g, the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology);
          (12) provide training and information to appropriate employees 
          on methods and means of avoiding or minimizing the take of 
          migratory birds and conserving and restoring migratory bird 
          habitat;
          (13) promote migratory bird conservation in international 
          activities and with other countries and international 
          partners, in consultation with the Department of State, as 
          appropriate or relevant to the agency's authorities;
          (14) recognize and promote economic and recreational values of 
          birds, as appropriate; and
          (15) develop partnerships with non-Federal entities to further 
          bird conservation.
          (f) Notwithstanding the requirement to finalize an MOU within 
          2 years, each agency is encouraged to immediately begin 
          implementing the conservation measures set forth above in 
          subparagraphs (1) through (15) of this section, as appropriate 
          and practicable.
          (g) Each agency shall advise the public of the availability of 
          its MOU through a notice published in the Federal 
          eister.
          e. 4. Council for the Conservation of 
          Migratory Birds. (a) The Secretary of Interior shall establish 
          an interagency Council for the Conservation of Migratory Birds 
          (Council) to oversee the implementation of this order. The 
          Council's duties shall include the following: (1) sharing the 
          latest resource information to assist in the conservation and 
          management of migratory birds; (2) developing an annual report 
          of accomplishments and recommendations related to this order; 
          (3) fostering partnerships to further the goals of this order; 
          and (4) selecting an annual recipient of a Presidential 
          Migratory Bird Federal Stewardship Award for contributions to 
          the protection of migratory birds.
          (b) The Council shall include representation, at the bureau 
          director/administrator level, from the Departments of the 
          Interior, State, Commerce, Agriculture, Transportation, 
          Energy, Defense, and the Environmental Protection Agency and 
          from such other agencies as appropriate.

[[Page 723]]

          e. 5. Application and Judicial Review. 
          (a) This order and the MOU to be developed by the agencies do 
          not require changes to current contracts, permits, or other 
          third party agreements.
          (b) This order is intended only to improve the internal 
          management of the executive branch and does not create any 
          right or benefit, substantive or procedural, separately 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 10, 2001.

EO 13187


Executive Order 13187 of January 10, 2001

The President's Disability Employment Partnership Board

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), 
          and in order to promote the employment of people with 
          disabilities, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment and Composition of 
          the Board. (a) There is hereby established the President's 
          Disability Employment Partnership Board (Board).
          (b) The Board shall be composed of not more than 15 members 
          who shall be appointed by the President for terms of 2 years. 
          The membership shall include individuals who are 
          representatives of business (including small business), labor 
          organizations, State or local government, disabled veterans, 
          people with disabilities, organizations serving people with 
          disabilities, and researchers or academicians focusing on 
          issues relating to the employment of people with disabilities, 
          and may include other individuals representing entities 
          involved in issues relating to the employment of people with 
          disabilities as the President finds appropriate.
          (c) The President shall designate a Chairperson from among the 
          members of the Board to serve a term of two years.
          (d) Members and the Chairperson may be reappointed for 
          subsequent terms and may continue to serve until their 
          successors have been appointed.
          e. 2. Functions. (a) The Board shall 
          provide advice and information to the President, the Vice 
          President, the Secretary of Labor, and other appropriate 
          Federal officials with respect to facilitating the employment 
          of people with disabilities, and shall assist in other 
          activities that promote the formation of public-private 
          partnerships, the use of economic incentives, the provision of 
          technical assistance regarding entrepreneurship, and other 
          actions that may enhance employment opportunities for people 
          with disabilities.
          (b) In carrying out paragraph (a) of this section, the Board 
          shall:

 (i) develop and submit to the Office of Disability Employment Policy in 
the Department of Labor a comprehensive written plan for joint

[[Page 724]]

public-private efforts to promote employment opportunities for people with 
disabilities and improve their access to financial institutions and 
commercial and business enterprises;

 (ii) identify strategies that may be used by employers, labor unions, 
national and international organizations, and Federal, State, and local 
officials to increase employment opportunities for people with 
disabilities; and

 (iii) coordinate with the Office of Disability Employment Policy in the 
Department of Labor in promoting the collaborative use of public and 
private resources to assist people with disabilities in forming and 
expanding small business concerns and in enhancing their access to Federal 
procurement and other relevant business opportunities. Public resources 
include those of the Department of Labor, the Small Business 
Administration, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Education, 
the Department of Defense, the Department of Treasury, the Department of 
Veterans Affairs, the Federal Communications Commission, and of executive 
departments and agency offices responsible for small, disadvantaged 
businesses utilization.

          (c) The Board shall submit annual written reports to the 
          President, who may apprise the Congress and other interested 
          organizations and individuals on its activities, progress, and 
          problems relating to maximizing employment opportunities for 
          people with disabilities.
          (d) The Chairperson of the Board shall serve as a member and 
          Vice Chair of the National Task Force on Employment of Adults 
          with Disabilities established under Executive Order 13078 of 
          March 13, 1998.
          e. 3. Administration. (a) The Board shall 
          meet when called by the Chairperson, at a time and place 
          designated by the Chairperson. The Chairperson shall call at 
          least two meetings per calendar year. The Chairperson may form 
          subcommittees or working groups within the Board to address 
          particular matters.
          (b) The Chairperson may from time to time prescribe such 
          rules, procedures, and policies relating to the activities of 
          the Board as are not inconsistent with law or with the 
          provisions of this order.
          (c) Members of the Board shall serve without compensation but 
          shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu 
          of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in Federal service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
          (d) The Department of Labor shall provide funding and 
          appropriate support to assist the Board in carrying out the 
          activities described in section 2 of this order, including 
          necessary office space, equipment, supplies, services, and 
          staff. The functions of the President under the Federal 
          Advisory Committee Act, as amended, except that of reporting 
          to the Congress, that are applicable to the Commission, shall 
          be performed by the Department of Labor in accordance with 
          guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of 
          General Services.
          (e) The heads of executive departments and agencies shall, to 
          the extent permitted by law, provide the Board such 
          information as it may need for purposes of carrying out the 
          functions described in section 2 of this order.

[[Page 725]]

          e. 4. Prior Orders and Transition. (a) 
          Executive Order 12640 of May 10, 1988, as amended, relating to 
          the establishment of the President's Committee on Employment 
          of People with Disabilities, is hereby revoked. The employees, 
          records, property, and funds of the Committee shall become the 
          employees, records, property, and funds of the Department of 
          Labor.
          (b) Executive Order 13078 of March 13, 1998, is amended in 
          sections 1(a) and (b) by striking ``Chair of the President's 
          Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities'' and 
          inserting ``Chairperson of the President's Disability 
          Employment Partnership Board.''

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 10, 2001.

EO 13188


Executive Order 13188 of January 12, 2001

Amendment to Executive Order 13111, Extension of the Advisory Committee on 
Expanding Training Opportunities

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States, including the Federal 
          Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), and in 
          order to extend the Advisory Committee on Expanding Training 
          Opportunities for 2 years, it is hereby ordered that section 
          7(f) of Executive Order 13111 of January 12, 1999, is amended 
          by deleting ``2 years from the date of this order'' and 
          inserting ``on January 11, 2003'' in lieu thereof.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 12, 2001.

EO 13189


Executive Order 13189 of January 15, 2001

Federal Interagency Task Force on the District of Columbia

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          further the revitalization of, and to improve prospects for 
          the success of ``home rule'' in the District of Columbia, the 
          Nation's Capital, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Background and Policy. The 
          District of Columbia is the Nation's Capital, and the Federal 
          Government is the largest employer, landholder, and purchaser 
          in the region. The Executive Office of the President has 
          established and maintained an interest in fostering the 
          Federal relationship with the District of Columbia since 1963. 
          This Administration has long sought to strengthen the 
          relationship between the Federal Government and the District 
          of Columbia by initiating a historic restructuring of this 
          relationship. At the request of the President, in 1995, the 
          Federal D.C. Interagency Task Force, chaired by the Director 
          of the Office of Management

[[Page 726]]

          and Budget, and directed by the Special Advisor to the 
          President and Executive Director of the Federal D.C. 
          Interagency Task Force, was created to revitalize the District 
          of Columbia and improve prospects for ``home rule'' to succeed 
          in the Nation's Capital. The Federal D.C. Interagency Task 
          Force Office has worked with Federal agencies, the Congress, 
          and local officials to promote long-term financial stability, 
          economic growth, and opportunity for self-government for the 
          District of Columbia. In 1997, the President signed into law 
          the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government 
          Improvement Act of 1997, under which the Federal Government 
          undertook certain responsibilities and governmental functions 
          befitting a State or county government. Also in 1997, the 
          President signed into law tax incentives designed to spur 
          economic growth in the District of Columbia.
          It is the policy of this Administration, therefore, to build 
          on the momentum of the accomplishments over the last 5 years 
          by formally establishing the Federal D.C. Interagency Task 
          Force to further assist the District of Columbia in achieving 
          financial stability, economic growth, and improvement in 
          management and service delivery.
          e. 2. Establishment of the Federal 
          Interagency Task Force on the District of Columbia.
          (a) There is established the ``Federal Interagency Task Force 
          on the District of Columbia'' (Task Force).
          (b) The Task Force shall be composed of the following members:

 (1) The Attorney General;

 (2) The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development;

 (3) The Secretary of Health and Human Services;

 (4) The Secretary of Labor;

 (5) The Secretary of Transportation;

 (6) The Secretary of the Treasury;

 (7) The Administrator of General Services;

 (8) The Secretary of Education;

 (9) The Secretary of the Interior;

 (10) The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency;

 (11) The Secretary of Commerce;

 (12) The Secretary of Agriculture;

 (13) The Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

 (14) The Administrator of the Small Business Administration;

 (15) The Commissioner of the Social Security;

 (16) The Secretary of Energy;

 (17) The Director of the Office of Personnel Management; and

 (18) Such other members as the Director of the Office of Management and 
Budget may provide (including the Director of the Court Services and 
Offender Supervision Agency, which office is located in the Department of 
Justice.)

[[Page 727]]

          (c) The Task Force shall be chaired by the Director of the 
          Office of Management and Budget (Director). The Director may 
          appoint an Assistant Director or other senior official to 
          assist in the management of the Task Force.
          (d) The Office of Management and Budget shall provide 
          administrative support for the Task Force. To the extent 
          permitted by law, other executive departments and agencies may 
          provide such staff, resources, and information as may be 
          required in carrying out the provisions of this order.
          (e) The Director shall develop, review, modify, and, as 
          appropriate, implement program recommendations, in cooperation 
          with the appropriate elected Federal and local officials and 
          agencies, to promote long-term financial stability, economic 
          growth, and opportunity for self-government for the District 
          of Columbia.
          (f) To the extent permitted by law, the Task Force staff shall 
          communicate with Federal and local elected officials as early 
          in program planning cycles as reasonably feasible, to develop 
          and explain specific Federal and local plans and program 
          actions.
          e. 3. Purpose. The purpose of the 
          Interagency Task Force will be to coordinate and better 
          leverage Administration efforts and initiatives for the 
          District of Columbia in concert with local and regional 
          initiatives to improve the long-term financial stability of 
          the Nation's Capital and to improve self-governance. The 
          Director's designee shall serve as liaison between the 
          executive branch and the executive, legislative, and judicial 
          branches of government of the District of Columbia, as well as 
          the private sector.
          e. 4. Responsibilities. To the extent 
          permitted by law, the Interagency Task Force shall:
          (a) formulate and recommend interagency compacts and 
          cooperative agreements between Federal agencies and the 
          District of Columbia;
          (b) develop, on a continuing basis, a comprehensive and 
          coordinated plan to establish priorities to promote long-term 
          financial stability, economic growth, and opportunity for 
          self-government for the District of Columbia;
          (c) provide for an understanding by the public of the needs 
          and assets of the District of Columbia;
          (d) support District efforts to encourage economic growth in 
          the District of Columbia;
          (e) serve as the focal point and coordinating unit for Federal 
          programs, technical assistance, and other support for the 
          District of Columbia; and
          (f) provide a forum for consideration of problems within the 
          District of Columbia and propose and effectuate solutions.
          e. 5. Assistance to Economically 
          Distressed Areas. Members of the Task Force, to the extent 
          permitted by law and within existing budgetary resources, 
          shall provide targeted assistance to economically distressed 
          areas within the District of Columbia and to projects that 
          require economic development assistance. To the extent 
          permitted by law, members of the Task Force shall also 
          participate in comprehensive neighborhood revitalization 
          initiatives requiring Federal assistance, including programs 
          organized by

[[Page 728]]

          the government of the District of Columbia, and collaborative 
          efforts organized by private organizations, such as the 
          Anacostia Best Practices initiative.
          e. 6. Local Accommodation. To the extent 
          permitted by law, the Federal Interagency Task Force shall 
          make efforts to accommodate the concerns of local elected 
          officials in proposing Federal technical or other assistance.
          e. 7. Judicial Review. This order does 
          not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable by law against the United States, its officers, 
          its employees, or any other person.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 15, 2001.

EO 13190


Executive Order 13190 of Janaury 15, 2001

President's Commission on Educational Resource Equity

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), it 
          is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. A quality education is 
          essential to the success of every child in the 21st century 
          and to the continued strength and prosperity of our Nation. 
          Our Nation has embraced the goal of promoting high educational 
          standards for all children and increasing accountability in 
          education. Although we know it is crucial that all children 
          have access to the educational resources and opportunity 
          necessary to achieve high standards, long-standing gaps in 
          access to educational resources exist, including disparities 
          based on race and ethnicity. These gaps limit the ability of 
          individuals, as well as our Nation, to reach their full 
          potential. Therefore, it is the policy of this Administration 
          that our Nation undertake appropriate steps to understand 
          fully the current status of resource equity in education and 
          to identify and implement strategies at the local, State, and 
          national levels that will ensure that all students have a full 
          and equal opportunity to succeed.
          e. 2. Establishment. To carry out this 
          policy, there is established the ``President's Commission on 
          Educational Resource Equity'' (Commission). The Commission 
          shall be composed of not more than 13 members appointed by the 
          President from the public and private sectors. The members may 
          include current and former Federal, State, and local 
          government officials, corporate and foundation leaders, 
          recognized education and civil rights experts, educational 
          practitioners, and others with experience and expertise in 
          educational resource equity. The President shall designate 
          from among the Commission members such official or officials 
          to be chairperson or chairpersons, as he shall deem 
          appropriate.
          e. 3. Duties and Commission Report. (a) 
          The Commission shall collect and review information about the 
          current status of gaps in the availability of educational 
          resources, including the underlying causes and effects of such 
          resource gaps. The Commission shall, as appropriate, invite 
          experts

[[Page 729]]

          and communities to provide information and guidance in 
          furtherance of their duties.
          (b) Not later than August 31, 2001, the Commission shall 
          prepare and submit a report for the President and the Congress 
          on the issue of resource equity in education. The report shall 
          include, but not be limited to:

(i) An analysis of the status of resource equity in education with regard 
to such factors as finances, staff, facilities, instructional programs, and 
support services, taking into account, as appropriate, differences in costs 
and needs for different students and communities;

(ii) An analysis of how resource gaps in education affect the success of 
individuals and our Nation;

(iii) An examination of the effectiveness of targeted Federal resources 
toward disadvantaged students and low-income schools as compared with the 
provision of State and local resources toward disadvantaged students and 
low-income schools;

(iv) A summary of best practices with regard to overcoming gaps in the 
availability of educational resources; and

(v) Short- and long-term recommendations for educational policy makers, 
including local, State, and Federal officials, to achieve resource equity 
in education.

          e. 4. Administration, Compensation, and 
          Termination. (a) The Department of Education shall, to the 
          extent permitted by law, provide administrative support and 
          funding for the Commission.
          (b) Members of the Commission shall serve without 
          compensation, but while engaged in the work of the Commission, 
          members appointed from among private citizens of the United 
          States shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in 
          lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in the Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707) 
          to the extent funds are available for such purposes.
          (c) The functions of the President under the Federal Advisory 
          Committee Act, as amended, except that of reporting to the 
          Congress, that are applicable to the Commission, shall be 
          performed by the Department of Education in accordance with 
          the guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of 
          General Services.
          (d) The chairperson (or chairpersons) may from time to time 
          prescribe such rules, procedures, and policies relating to the 
          activities of the Commission as are not inconsistent with law 
          or with the provisions of this order.
          (e) The Commission shall terminate 30 days after submitting 
          its final report, unless extended by the President.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 15, 2001.

EO 13191

[[Page 730]]


Executive Order 13191 of Janaury 17, 2001

Implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act and the United 
States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          African Growth and Opportunity Act (Title I of Public Law 106-
          200) (AGOA), the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade 
          Partnership Act (Title II of Public Law 106-200) (CBTPA), the 
          Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (19 U.S.C. 2701 et 
          seq.), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and in 
          order to expand international trade and enhance our economic 
          partnership with sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean Basin, 
          promote investment and economic development and reduce poverty 
          in those regions, and create new economic opportunities for 
          American workers and businesses, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          Part I--Implementation of the AGOA
          etion 1. Apparel Articles Assembled from 
          Fabrics or Yarn Not Available in Commercial Quantities. The 
          Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (the 
          ``Committee'') is authorized to exercise the authority vested 
          in the President under section 112(b)(5)(B)(i) of the AGOA (19 
          U.S.C. 3721(b)(5)(B)(i)) to determine whether yarns or fabrics 
          cannot be supplied by the domestic industry in commercial 
          quantities in a timely manner. The Committee shall establish 
          procedures to ensure appropriate public participation in any 
          such determination. The Committee and the United States Trade 
          Representative (USTR) are jointly authorized to exercise the 
          authority vested in the President under sections 
          112(b)(5)(B)(ii), (iii), and (v) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 
          3721(b)(5)(B)(ii), (iii), and (v)) to obtain advice from the 
          appropriate advisory committee, to submit a report to the 
          appropriate Congressional committees, and to consult with 
          those Congressional committees. The USTR is authorized to 
          exercise the authority vested in the President under section 
          112(b)(5)(B)(ii) of the AGOA to obtain advice from the U.S. 
          International Trade Commission (USITC).
          e. 2. Handloomed, Handmade, and Folklore 
          Articles. The Committee, after consultation with the 
          Commissioner, United States Customs Service (Commissioner), is 
          authorized to exercise the authority vested in the President 
          under section 112(b)(6) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(b)(6)) to 
          consult with beneficiary sub-Saharan African countries and to 
          determine which, if any, particular textile and apparel goods 
          shall be treated as being handloomed, handmade, or folklore 
          articles. The Commissioner shall take such actions to carry 
          out any such determination as directed by the Committee.
          e. 3. Certain Interlinings. The Committee 
          is authorized to exercise the authority vested in the 
          President under section 112(d)(1)(B)(iii) of the AGOA (19 
          U.S.C. 3721(d)(1)(B)(iii)) to determine whether U.S. 
          manufacturers are producing interlinings in the United States 
          in commercial quantities. The Committee shall establish 
          procedures to ensure appropriate public participation in any 
          such determination. The determination or determinations of the 
          Committee under this section shall be set forth in a notice or 
          notices that the Committee shall cause to be published in the 
          Federal eister. The

[[Page 731]]

          Commissioner shall take such actions to carry out any such 
          determination as directed by the Committee.
          e. 4. Penalties for Transshipments. The 
          Committee, after consultation with the Commissioner, is 
          authorized to exercise the authority vested in the President 
          under section 113(b)(3) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3722(b)(3)) to 
          determine, based on sufficient evidence, whether an exporter 
          has engaged in transshipment and to deny for a period of 5 
          years all benefits under section 112 of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 
          3721) to any such exporter, any successor of such exporter, 
          and any other entity owned or operated by the principal of 
          such exporter. The determination or determinations of the 
          Committee under this section shall be set forth in a notice or 
          notices that the Committee shall cause to be published in the 
          Federal eister. The Commissioner shall take 
          such actions to carry out any such determination as directed 
          by the Committee.
          e. 5. Effective Visa Systems. Pursuant to 
          sections 112(a) and 113(a)(1) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(a) 
          and 3722(a)(1)), the USTR is authorized to direct the 
          Commissioner to take such actions as may be necessary to 
          ensure that textile and apparel articles described in section 
          112(b) of the AGOA (19 U.S.C. 3721(b)) that are entered, or 
          withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption are accompanied by 
          an appropriate export visa, if the preferential treatment 
          described in section 112(a) of the AGOA is claimed with 
          respect to such articles.
          Part II--Implementation of the CBTPA
          e. 6. Apparel Articles Assembled from 
          Fabrics or Yarn Not Available in Commercial Quantities. The 
          Committee is authorized to exercise the authority vested in 
          the President under section 213(b)(2)(A)(v)(II)(aa) of the 
          CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)(A)(v)(II)(aa)), as added by 
          section 211(a) of the CBTPA, to determine whether yarns or 
          fabrics cannot be supplied by the domestic industry in 
          commercial quantities in a timely manner. The Committee shall 
          establish procedures to ensure appropriate public 
          participation in any such determination. The Committee and the 
          USTR are jointly authorized to exercise the authority vested 
          in the President under sections 213(b)(2)(A)(v)(II)(bb), (cc), 
          and (ee) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)(A)(v)(II)(bb), 
          (cc), and (ee)), as added by section 211(a) of the CBTPA, to 
          obtain advice from the appropriate advisory committee, to 
          submit a report to the appropriate Congressional committees, 
          and to consult with those Congressional committees. The USTR 
          is authorized to exercise the authority vested in the 
          President under section 213(b)(2)(A)(v)(II)(bb) of the CBERA 
          to obtain advice from the USITC.
          e. 7. Certain Interlinings. The Committee 
          is authorized to exercise the authority vested in the 
          President under section 213(b)(2)(A)(vii)(II)(cc) of the CBERA 
          (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)(A)(vii)(II)(cc)), as added by section 
          211(a) of the CBTPA, to determine whether U.S. manufacturers 
          are producing interlinings in the United States in commercial 
          quantities. The Committee shall establish procedures to ensure 
          appropriate public participation in any such determination. 
          The determination or determinations of the Committee under 
          this section shall be set forth in a notice or notices that 
          the Committee shall cause to be published in the Federal 
          eister. The Commissioner shall take such 
          actions to carry out any such determination as directed by the 
          Committee.

[[Page 732]]

          e. 8. Handloomed, Handmade, and Folklore 
          Articles. The Committee, after consultation with the 
          Commissioner, is authorized to exercise the authority vested 
          in the President under section 213(b)(2)(C) of the CBERA (19 
          U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)(C)), as added by section 211(a) of the 
          CBTPA, to consult with representatives of CBTPA beneficiary 
          countries for the purpose of identifying particular textile 
          and apparel goods that are mutually agreed upon as being 
          handloomed, hand made, or folklore goods within the meaning of 
          that section. The Commissioner shall take such actions to 
          carry out any such determination as directed by the Committee.
          e. 9. Penalties for Transshipments. The 
          Committee, after consultation with the Commissioner, is 
          authorized to exercise the authority vested in the President 
          under section 213(b)(2)(D) of the CBERA (19 U.S.C. 
          2703(b)(2)(D)), as added by section 211(a) of the CBTPA, to 
          determine, based on sufficient evidence, whether an exporter 
          has engaged in transshipment and, if transshipment has 
          occurred, to deny all benefits under the CBTPA to any such 
          exporter, and any successor of such exporter, for a period of 
          2 years; to request that any CBTPA beneficiary country through 
          whose territory transshipment has occurred take all necessary 
          and appropriate actions to prevent such transshipment; and to 
          impose the penalty provided in section 213(b)(2)(D)(ii) of the 
          CBERA on a CBTPA beneficiary country if the Committee 
          determines that such country is not taking such actions. The 
          determination or determinations of the Committee under this 
          section shall be set forth in a notice or notices that the 
          Committee shall cause to be published in the Federal 
          eister. The Commissioner shall take such 
          actions to carry out any such determination as directed by the 
          Committee.
          e. 10. Bilateral Emergency Tariff 
          Actions. The Committee is authorized to exercise the authority 
          vested in the President under section 213(b)(2)(E) of the 
          CBERA (19 U.S.C. 2703(b)(2)(E)), as added by section 211(a) of 
          the CBTPA, to take bilateral emergency tariff actions, if the 
          Committee determines that the conditions provided in section 
          213(b)(2)(E) of the CBERA are satisfied. The Committee shall 
          establish procedures to ensure appropriate public 
          participation in any such determination. The determination or 
          determinations of the Committee under this section shall be 
          set forth in a notice or notices that the Committee shall 
          cause to be published in the Federal eister. 
          The Commissioner shall take such actions to carry out any such 
          bilateral emergency tariff action as directed by the 
          Committee.
          Part III--General Provisions
          e. 11. Judicial Review. This order does 
          not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies, its officers, or any person.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 January 17, 2001.

EO 13192

[[Page 733]]


Executive Order 13192 of January 17, 2001

Lifting and Modifying Measures With Respect to the Federal Republic of 
Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.) (IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et 
          seq.), section 5 of the United Nations Participation Act of 
          l945, as amended (22 U.S.C. 287c) (UNPA), and section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, and in view of United Nations 
          Security Council Resolution 827 of May 25, 1993 (UNSCR 827), 
          and subsequent resolutions,
          I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
          America, found in Executive Order 13088 of June 9, 1998, that 
          the actions and policies of the Governments of the Federal 
          Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) (the ``FRY 
          (S&M)'') and the Republic of Serbia with respect to Kosovo, by 
          promoting ethnic conflict and human suffering, threatened to 
          destabilize countries of the region and to disrupt progress in 
          Bosnia and Herzegovina in implementing the Dayton peace 
          agreement, and therefore constituted an unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign 
          policy of the United States. I declared a national emergency 
          to deal with that threat and ordered that economic sanctions 
          be imposed with respect to those governments. I issued 
          Executive Order 13121 of April 30, 1999, in response to the 
          continuing human rights and humanitarian crises in Kosovo. 
          That order revised and substantially expanded the sanctions 
          imposed pursuant to Executive Order 13088.
          In view of the peaceful democratic transition begun by 
          President Vojislav Kostunica and other newly elected leaders 
          in the FRY (S&M), the promulgation of UNSCR 827 and subsequent 
          resolutions calling for all states to cooperate fully with the 
          International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the 
          illegitimate control over FRY (S&M) political institutions and 
          economic resources or enterprises exercised by former 
          President Slobodan Milosevic, his close associates and other 
          persons, and those individuals' capacity to repress democracy 
          or perpetrate or promote further human rights abuses, and in 
          order to take steps to counter the continuing threat to 
          regional stability and implementation of the Dayton peace 
          agreement and to address the national emergency described and 
          declared in Executive Order 13088, I hereby order:
          etion 1. Amendments to Executive Order 
          13088. (a) Section 1 of Executive Order 13088 of June 9, 1998, 
          as revised by section 1(a) of Executive Order 13121 of April 
          30, l999, is revised to read as follows:
          ``Section 1. (a) Except to the extent provided in section 
          203(b) of IEEPA (50 U.5.C. 1702(b)), and in regulations, 
          orders, directives, or licenses that may hereafter be issued 
          pursuant to this order, and notwithstanding any contract 
          entered into or any license or permit granted prior to the 
          effective date, I hereby order blocked all property and 
          interests in property that are or hereafter come within the 
          United States or that are or hereafter come within the 
          possession or control of United States persons, of:
           (i) any person listed in the Annex to this order; and

[[Page 734]]

           (ii) any person determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, 
          in consultation with the Secretary of State:
           (A) to be under open indictment by the International Criminal 
          Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, subject to applicable laws 
          and procedures;
           (B) to have sought, or to be seeking, through repressive 
          measures or otherwise, to maintain or reestablish illegitimate 
          control over the political processes or institutions or the 
          economic resources
           or enterprises of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the 
          Republic of Serbia, the Republic of Montenegro, or the 
          territory of Kosovo;
           (C) to have provided material support or resources to any 
          person designated in or pursuant to section 1(a) of this 
          order; or
           (D) to be owned or controlled by or acting or purporting to 
          act directly or indirectly for or on behalf of any person 
          designated in or pursuant to section 1(a) of this order.
           (b) All property and interests in property blocked pursuant 
          to this order prior to 12:01 a.m., eastern standard time, on 
          January 19, 2001, shall remain blocked except as otherwise 
          authorized by the Secretary of the Treasury.''
          (b) Section 2 of Executive Order 13088, as replaced by section 
          1(b) of Executive Order 13121, is revoked and a new section 2 
          is added to read as follows:
          ``Sec. 2. Further, except to the extent provided in section 
          203(b) of IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 1702(b)), and in regulations, 
          orders, directives, or licenses that may hereafter be issued 
          pursuant to this order, and notwithstanding any contract 
          entered into or any license or permit granted prior to the 
          effective date, I hereby prohibit any transaction or dealing 
          by a United States person or within the United States in 
          property or interests in property of any person designated in 
          or pursuant to section 1(a) of this order.''
          (c) Section 3 of Executive Order 13088 is revoked.
          (d) Section 4 of Executive Order 13088, as revised by section 
          1(c) of Executive Order 13121, is renumbered and revised to 
          read as follows:
          ``Sec. 3. Any transaction by a United States person that 
          evades or avoids, or has the purpose of evading or avoiding,
          or attempts to violate, any of the prohibitions set forth in 
          this order is prohibited. Any conspiracy formed to violate the 
          prohibitions of this order is prohibited.''
          (e) Section 5 of Executive Order 13088 is renumbered and 
          revised to read as follows:
          ``Sec. 4. For the purposes of this order:
          (a) The term ``person'' means an individual or entity;
          (b) The term ``entity'' means a partnership, association, 
          trust, joint venture, corporation or other organization; and
          (c) The term ``United States person'' means any United States 
          citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the 
          laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the 
          United States (including foreign branches), or any person in 
          the United States.''

[[Page 735]]

          (f) Section 6 of Executive Order 13088 is renumbered and 
          revised to read as follows:
          ``Sec. 5. The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with 
          the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized to take such 
          actions, including the promulgation of rules and regulations, 
          and to employ all powers granted to me by IEEPA and UNPA, as 
          may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this order. The 
          Secretary of the Treasury may redelegate any of these 
          functions to other officers and agencies of the United States 
          Government. All agencies of the United States Government are 
          hereby directed to take all appropriate measures within their 
          statutory authority to carry out the provisions of this 
          order.''
          (g) A new section 6 is added to Executive Order 13088 to read 
          as follows:
          ``Sec. 6. The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with 
          the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized to remove any 
          person from the Annex to this order as circumstances 
          warrant.''
          (h) Section 7 of Executive Order 13088, as revised by section 
          1(d) of Executive Order 13121, is revoked.
          e. 2. Preservation of Authorities. 
          Nothing in this order is intended to affect the continued 
          effectiveness of any rules, regulations, orders, licenses, or 
          other forms of administrative action issued, taken, or 
          continued in effect heretofore or hereafter under Executive 
          Order 13088, Executive Order 13121, or the authority of IEEPA 
          or UNPA, except as hereafter terminated, modified, or 
          suspended by the issuing Federal agency.
          e. 3. No Rights or Privileges Conferred. 
          This order is not intended to create, nor does it create, any 
          right, benefit, or privilege, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law by a party against the United States, its 
          agencies, officers, or any other person.
          e. 4. (a) Effective Date. This order is 
          effective at 12:01 a.m. eastern standard time on January 19, 
          2001.
           (b) Transmittal; Publication. This order shall be transmitted 
          to the Congress and published in the Federal 
          eister.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 17, 2001.

[[Page 736]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD23JA01.028


[[Page 737]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD23JA01.029


[[Page 738]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD23JA01.030


[[Page 739]]


[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD23JA01.031

EO 13193

[[Page 740]]


Executive Order 13193 of January 18, 2001

Federal Leadership on Global Tobacco Control and Prevention

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. It shall be the policy 
          of the executive branch to take strong action to address the 
          potential global epidemic of diseases caused by tobacco use. 
          The executive branch shall undertake activities to increase 
          its capacity to address global tobacco prevention and control 
          issues through coordinated domestic action, limited bilateral 
          assistance to individual nations, and support to multilateral 
          organizations. International activities shall be directed 
          towards deterring children from tobacco use, protecting 
          nonsmokers, and providing information about the adverse health 
          effects of tobacco use and the health benefits of cessation.
          e. 2. Responsibilities of Federal 
          Departments and Agencies. (a) Tobacco Trade Policy. In the 
          implementation of international trade policy, executive 
          departments and agencies shall not promote the sale or export 
          of tobacco or tobacco products, or seek the reduction or 
          removal of foreign government restrictions on the marketing 
          and advertising of such products, provided that such 
          restrictions are applied equally to all tobacco or tobacco 
          products of the same type. Departments and agencies are not 
          precluded from taking necessary actions in accordance with the 
          requirements and remedies available under applicable United 
          States trade laws and international agreements to ensure 
          nondiscriminatory treatment of United States products. Nothing 
          in this Executive Order shall be construed (1) to modify the 
          annual executive branch guidance to United States diplomatic 
          posts on health, trade, and commercial aspects of tobacco, or 
          (2) to affect any negotiating position of the United States on 
          the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.
          (b) The Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Role in 
          Tobacco Trade Policy Deliberations. The HHS shall be included 
          in all deliberations of interagency working groups, chaired by 
          the United States Trade Representative (USTR), that address 
          issues relating to trade in tobacco and tobacco products. 
          Through such participation, HHS shall advise the USTR, and 
          other interested Federal agencies, of the potential public 
          health impact of any tobacco-related trade action that is 
          under consideration. Upon conclusion of a trade agreement that 
          includes provisions specifically addressing tobacco or tobacco 
          products, the USTR shall produce and make publicly available a 
          summary describing those provisions.
          (c) International Tobacco Control Needs Assessment. The HHS, 
          with the cooperation of the Departments of State, Commerce, 
          and Agriculture, and in consultation with the appropriate 
          national Ministry of Health, shall conduct a pilot assessment 
          of tobacco use in a country other than the United States. Such 
          assessment will be carried out through a compilation and 
          review of surveys and other needs assessments already 
          available and include:
          (1) initial estimates of the burden of disease and other 
          public health consequences of tobacco use;

[[Page 741]]

          (2) the status of tobacco control regulatory measures in place 
          to curtail tobacco consumption and tobacco related disease; 
          and
          (3) an analysis of the marketing, distribution, and 
          manufacturing practices of tobacco companies in given regions, 
          and the impact of those practices on smoking rates, 
          particularly among women and children. Such assessment shall 
          be prepared and provided to interested agencies and other 
          parties not later than December 31, 2001, and be updated as 
          practicable.
          (d) Research and Training in Tobacco Control. The HHS will 
          develop a research and training program linking institutions 
          in the United States and certain other countries in the field 
          of tobacco control. Emphasis will be placed on the collection 
          of standardized and comparable surveillance data; networks for 
          communication, information and best practices; and the 
          development and evaluation of culturally-targeted approaches 
          to preventing tobacco use and increasing quit rates, 
          especially among women and children.
          e. 3. General. (a) Executive departments 
          and agencies shall carry out the provisions of this order to 
          the extent permitted by law and consistent with their 
          statutory and regulatory authorities and their enforcement 
          mechanisms.
          (b) This order clarifies and strengthens Administration policy 
          and does not create any right or benefit, substantive or 
          procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the United 
          States, its officers or employees, or any other person.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 18, 2001.

EO 13194


Executive Order 13194 of January 18, 2001

Prohibiting the Importation of Rough Diamonds From Sierra Leone

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.) (IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et 
          seq.), section 5 of the United Nations Participation Act of 
          1945, as amended (22 U.S.C. 287c) (UNPA), and section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, and in view of United Nations 
          Security Council Resolution 1306 of July 5, 2000,
          I, WILLIAM J. CLINTON, President of the United States of 
          America, take note that the people of Sierra Leone have 
          suffered the ravages of a brutal civil war for nearly 10 
          years, and that the United Nations Security Council has 
          determined that the situation in Sierra Leone constitutes a 
          threat to international peace and security in the region and 
          also has expressed concerns regarding the role played by the 
          illicit trade in diamonds in fueling the conflict in Sierra 
          Leone. Sierra Leone's insurgent Revolutionary United Front's 
          (RUF's) illicit trade in diamonds from Sierra Leone to fund 
          its operations and procurement of weapons, the RUF's flagrant 
          violation of the Lome Peace Agreement of July 7, 1999, and its 
          attacks on personnel of the

[[Page 742]]

          United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone are direct challenges 
          to the United States foreign policy objectives in the region 
          as well as a direct challenge to the rule-based international 
          order which is crucial to the peace and prosperity of the 
          United States. Therefore, I find these actions constitute an 
          unusual and extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of the 
          United States and hereby declare a national emergency to deal 
          with that threat. In order to implement United Nations 
          Security Council Resolution 1306 and to ensure that the direct 
          or indirect importation into the United States of rough 
          diamonds from Sierra Leone will not contribute financial 
          support to aggressive actions by the RUF or to the RUF's 
          procurement of weapons, while at the same time seeking to 
          avoid undermining the legitimate diamond trade or diminishing 
          confidence in the integrity of the legitimate diamond 
          industry, I hereby order:
          etion 1. Except to the extent provided in 
          section 2 of this order and to the extent provided in 
          regulations, orders, directives, or licenses issued pursuant 
          to this order, and notwithstanding the existence of any rights 
          or obligations conferred or imposed by any international 
          agreement or any contract entered into or any license or 
          permit granted prior to the effective date of this order, the 
          direct or indirect importation into the United States of all 
          rough diamonds from Sierra Leone on or after the effective 
          date of this order is prohibited.
          e. 2. The prohibition in section 1 of 
          this order shall not apply to the importation of rough 
          diamonds controlled through the Certificate of Origin regime 
          of the Government of Sierra Leone.
          e. 3. Any transaction by a United States 
          person or within the United States that evades or avoids, or 
          has the purpose of evading or avoiding, or attempts to 
          violate, any of the prohibitions set forth in this order is 
          prohibited.
          e. 4. For the purposes of this order:
          (a) the term ``person'' means an individual or entity;
          (b) the term ``entity'' means a partnership, association, 
          trust, joint venture, corporation, or other organization;
          (c) the term ``United States person'' means any United States 
          citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the 
          laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the 
          United States (including foreign branches), or any person in 
          the United States;
          (d) the term ``rough diamond'' means all unworked diamonds 
          classifiable in heading 7102 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule 
          of the United States; and
          (e) the term ``controlled through the Certificate of Origin 
          regime of the Government of Sierra Leone'' means accompanied 
          by a Certificate of Origin or other documentation that 
          demonstrates to the satisfaction of the United States Customs 
          Service (or analogous officials of a United States territory 
          or possession with its own customs administration) that the 
          rough diamonds were legally exported from Sierra Leone with 
          the approval of the Government of Sierra Leone.

[[Page 743]]

          e. 5. The Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized 
          to take such actions, including the promulgation of rules and 
          regulations, and to employ all powers granted to the President 
          by IEEPA and UNPA, as may be necessary to carry out the 
          purposes of this order. The Secretary of the Treasury may 
          redelegate any of these functions to other officers and 
          agencies of the United States Government. All agencies of the 
          United States Government are hereby directed to take all 
          appropriate measures within their authority to carry out the 
          provisions of this order.
          e. 6. This order is not intended to 
          create, nor does it create, any right, benefit, or privilege, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party 
          against the United States, its agencies, officers, or any 
          other person.
          e. 7. This order is effective at 12:01 
          a.m. eastern standard time on January 19, 2001.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 18, 2001.

EO 13195


Executive Order 13195 of January 18, 2001

Trails for America in the 21st Century

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in 
          furtherance of purposes of the National Trails System Act of 
          1968, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1241-1251), the Transportation 
          Equity Act for the 21st Century (Public Law 105-178), and 
          other pertinent statutes, and to achieve the common goal of 
          better establishing and operating America's national system of 
          trails, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Federal Agency Duties. Federal 
          agencies will, to the extent permitted by law and where 
          practicable--and in cooperation with Tribes, States, local 
          governments, and interested citizen groups--protect, connect, 
          promote, and assist trails of all types throughout the United 
          States. This will be accomplished by:
          (a) Providing trail opportunities of all types, with minimum 
          adverse impacts and maximum benefits for natural, cultural, 
          and community resources;
          (b) Protecting the trail corridors associated with national 
          scenic trails and the high priority potential sites and 
          segments of national historic trails to the degrees necessary 
          to ensure that the values for which each trail was established 
          remain intact;
          (c) Coordinating maps and data for the components of the 
          national trails system and Millennium Trails network to ensure 
          that these trails are connected into a national system and 
          that they benefit from appropriate national programs;
          (d) Promoting and registering National Recreation Trails, as 
          authorized in the National Trails System Act, by incorporating 
          where possible the commitments and partners active with 
          Millennium Trails;

[[Page 744]]

          (e) Participating in a National Trails Day the first Saturday 
          of June each year, coordinating Federal events with the 
          National Trails Day's sponsoring organization, the American 
          Hiking Society;
          (f) Familiarizing Federal agencies that are active in tourism 
          and travel with the components of a national system of trails 
          and the Millennium Trails network and including information 
          about them in Federal promotional and outreach programs;
          (g) Fostering volunteer programs and opportunities to engage 
          volunteers in all aspects of trail planning, development, 
          maintenance, management, and education as outlined in 16 
          U.S.C. 1250;
          (h) Encouraging participation of qualified youth conservation 
          or service corps, as outlined in 41 U.S.C. 12572 and 42 U.S.C. 
          12656, to perform construction and maintenance of trails and 
          trail-related projects, as encouraged in sections 1108(g) and 
          1112(e) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, 
          and also in trail planning protection, operations, and 
          education;
          (i) Promoting trails for safe transportation and recreation 
          within communities;
          (j) Providing and promoting a wide variety of trail 
          opportunities and experiences for people of all ages and 
          abilities;
          (k) Providing historical interpretation of trails and trail 
          sites and enhancing cultural and heritage tourism through 
          special events, artworks, and programs; and
          (l) Providing training and information services to provide 
          high-quality information and training opportunities to Federal 
          employees, Tribal, State, and local government agencies, and 
          the other trail partners.
          e. 2. The Federal Interagency Council on 
          Trails. The Federal Interagency Council on Trails (Council), 
          first established by agreement between the Secretaries of 
          Agriculture and the Interior in 1969, is hereby recognized as 
          a long-standing interagency working group. Its core members 
          represent the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land of 
          Management and National Park Service, the Department of 
          Agriculture's Forest Service, and the Department of 
          Transportation's Federal Highway Administration. Other Federal 
          agencies, such as those representing cultural and heritage 
          interests, are welcome to join this council. Leadership of the 
          Council may rotate among its members as decided among 
          themselves at the start of each fiscal year. The Council's 
          mission is to coordinate information and program decisions, as 
          well as policy recommendations, among all appropriate Federal 
          agencies (in consultation with appropriate nonprofit 
          organizations) to foster the development of America's trails 
          through the following means:
          (a) Enhancing federally designated trails of all types (e.g., 
          scenic, historic, recreation, and Millennium) and working to 
          integrate these trails into a fully connected national system;
          (b) Coordinating mapping, signs and markers, historical and 
          cultural interpretations, public information, training, and 
          developing plans and recommendations for a national trails 
          registry and database;
          (c) Ensuring that trail issues are integrated in Federal 
          agency programs and that technology transfer and education 
          programs are coordinated at the national level; and

[[Page 745]]

          (d) Developing a memorandum of understanding among the 
          agencies to encourage long-term interagency coordination and 
          cooperation to further the spirit and intent of the National 
          Trails System Act and related programs.
          e. 3. Issue Resolution and Handbook for 
          Federal Administrators of the National Trails System. Federal 
          agencies shall together develop a process for resolving 
          interagency issues concerning trails. In addition, reflecting 
          the authorities of the National Trails System Act, 
          participating agencies shall coordinate preparation of (and 
          updates for) an operating handbook for Federal administrators 
          of the National Trails System and others involved in creating 
          a national system of trails. The handbook shall reflect each 
          agencies' governing policies and provide guidance to each 
          agencies' field staff and partners about the roles and 
          responsibilities needed to make each trail in the national 
          system fully operational.
          e. 4. Observance of Existing Laws. 
          Nothing in this Executive Order shall be construed to override 
          existing laws, including those that protect the lands, waters, 
          wildlife habitats, wilderness areas, and cultural values of 
          this Nation.
          e. 5. Judicial Review. This order is 
          intended only to improve the internal management of the 
          executive branch. It does not create any right or benefit, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable in law or equity by any 
          party against the United States, its agencies, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 18, 2001.

EO 13196


Executive Order 13196 of January 18, 2001

Final Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          National Marine Sanctuaries Act, (16 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.), and 
          the National Marine Sanctuaries Amendments Act of 2000, Public 
          Law 106-513, and in furtherance of the purposes of the 
          Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (16 
          U.S.C. 1801 et seq.), Marine Protection, Research, and 
          Sanctuaries Act (33 U.S.C. 1401 et seq.), Coastal Zone 
          Management Act (16 U.S.C. 1451 et seq.), Endangered Species 
          Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), Marine Mammal Protection Act (16 
          U.S.C. 1362 et seq.), Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et 
          seq.), National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470 et 
          seq.), National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act (16 
          U.S.C. 668dd-e.e.), and other pertinent statutes, it is 
          ordered as follows:
          e. 1. Preamble. On December 4, 2000, I 
          issued Executive Order 13178 establishing the Northwestern 
          Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve (Reserve) 
          pursuant to my authority under the National Marine Sanctuaries 
          Act, as amended by the National Marine Sanctuary Amendments

[[Page 746]]

          Act of 2000 (Act). In establishing the Reserve, I set forth a 
          number of conservation measures and created specific Reserve 
          Preservation Areas to protect the coral reef ecosystem and 
          related marine resources and species (resources) of the 
          Reserve. The Act provides that no closure areas can become 
          permanent without adequate notice and comment. Accordingly, I 
          proposed to make permanent the Reserve Preservation Areas and 
          initiated a 30-day comment period on this proposal. I also 
          sought comment on the conservation measures for the Reserve. 
          On my behalf, the Secretary of Commerce received the public 
          comments and held seven public hearings,including six 
          throughout Hawaii. After considering the comments expressed at 
          the hearings and received in writing, I have determined to 
          make permanent the Reserve Preservation Areas with certain 
          modifications set forth below. Further, I have modified 
          certain conservation measures to address concerns raised, 
          particularly regarding commercial and recreational fishing 
          within the Reserve. With this action, the establishment of the 
          Reserve under the Act, including the conservation measures and 
          permanent Reserve Preservation Areas, is complete. The 
          Secretary of Commerce will manage the Reserve pursuant to 
          Executive Order 13178, as modified by this order, under the 
          Act. The Secretary shall also initiate the process to 
          designate the Reserve as a National Marine Sanctuary, as 
          required by the Act.
          e. 2. Purpose. The purpose of this order 
          is to amend Executive Order 13178, and to make permanent 
          Reserve Preservation Areas, as modified below, to ensure the 
          comprehensive, strong, and lasting protection of the resources 
          of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.
          e. 3. Amendments to Sections 7 of 
          Executive Order 13178.
          1. Section 7(a)(1) of Executive Order 13178 is hereby amended 
          by revising the first sentence to read as follows:
          ``Commercial Fishing. All currently existing commercial 
          Federal fishing permits and current levels of fishing effort 
          and take, which also includes the non-permitted level of 
          trolling for pelagic species by currently permitted bottom 
          fishers, as determined by the Secretary and pursuant to 
          regulations in effect on December 4, 2000, shall be capped as 
          follows:''
          2. Section 7(a)(1)(C) of Executive Order 13178 is hereby 
          revised to read as follows:
          ``(C) The annual level of aggregate take under all permits of 
          any particular type of fishing may not exceed the aggregate 
          level of take under all permits of that type of fishing as 
          follows:
           (1) Bottomfishing--the annual aggregate level for each 
          permitted bottomfisher shall be that permittee's individual 
          average taken over the 5 years preceding December 4, 2000, as 
          determined by the Secretary, provided that the Secretary, in 
          furtherance of the principles of the reserve, may make a one-
          time reasonable increase to the total aggregate to allow for 
          the use of two Native Hawaiian bottomfishing permits;
           (2) All other commercial fishing--the annual aggregate level 
          shall be the permittee's individual take in the year preceding 
          December 4, 2000, as determined by the Secretary.''
          3. A new section 7(a)(1)(F) is hereby added to Executive Order 
          13178 and reads as follows:

[[Page 747]]

          ``(F) Trolling for pelagic species shall be capped based on 
          reported landings for the year preceding December 4, 2000.''
          4. Section 7(b)(4) is revised to read as follows:
          ``(4) Discharging or depositing any material or other matter 
          into the Reserve, or discharging or depositing any material or 
          other matter outside the Reserve that subsequently enters the 
          Reserve and injures any resource of the Reserve, except:
          (A) fish parts (i.e., chumming materia or bait) used in and 
          during fishing operations authorized under this order;
          (B) biodegradable effluent incident to vessel use and 
          generated by a marine sanitation device in accordance with 
          section 312 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as 
          amended;
          (C) water generated by routine vessel operations (e.g., deck 
          wash down and graywater as defined in section 312 of the 
          Federal Water Pollution Control Act), excluding oily wastes 
          from bilge pumping; or
          (D) cooling water from vessels or engine exhaust; and''.
          e. 4. Amendments to Sections 8 of 
          Executive Order 13178.
          1. Section 8 of Executive Order 13178 is modified by 
          substituting ``provided that commercial bottomfishing and 
          commercial and recreational trolling for pelagic species in 
          accordance with the requirements of sections 7(a)(1) and 
          7(a)(2) of this order, respectively,'' for ``provided that 
          bottomfishing in accordance with the requirements of section 
          7(a)(1)'' everywhere the latter phrase appears in section 8.
          2. Section 8(a)(1)(A) is modified by substituting ``a mean 
          depth of 25 fm'' for ``a mean depth of 10fm.''
          3. Section 8(a)(1)(B) is modified by substituting ``a mean 
          depth of 25 fm'' for ``a mean depth of 20fm.''
          4. Section 8(a)(1)(D) is modified by substituting ``a mean 
          depth of 25 fm'' for ``a mean depth of 10fm.''
          5. Section 8(a)(1)(E) is modified by substituting ``a mean 
          depth of 25 fm'' for ``a mean depth of 20fm.''
          6. Section 8(a)(1)(G) is modified by substituting ``a mean 
          depth of 25 fm'' for ``a mean depth of 50fm.''
          7. Section 8(a)(1)(I) is revised to read ``Kure Atoll.''
          8. Sections 8(a)(2)(D) and (E) are hereby deleted and a new 
          section 8(a)(3) is hereby substituted as follows:
           ``(3) Twelve nautical miles around the approximate 
          geographical centers of
          (A) The first bank west of St. Rogation Bank, east of Gardner 
          Pinnacles, provided that commercial bottomfishing and 
          commercial and recreational trolling for pelagic species in 
          accordance with the requirements of sections 7(a)(1) and 
          7(a)(2) of this order, shall be allowed to continue for a 
          period of 5 years from the date of this order; and
          (B) Raita Bank, provided that commercial bottomfishing and 
          commercial and recreational trolling for pelagic species in 
          accordance with the requirements of sections 7(a)(1) and 
          7(a)(2) of this order, shall be allowed to continue for a 
          period of 5 years from the date of this order; and

[[Page 748]]

          (C) Provided that both banks described above in (3)(A) and 
          (3)(B) shall only continue to allow commercial bottomfishing 
          and commercial and recreational trolling for pelagic species 
          after the 5-year time period if it is determined that 
          continuation of such activities will have no adverse impact on 
          the resources of these banks.''
          e. 5. Reserve Preservation Areas. The 
          Reserve Preservation Areas, as modified in sections 3 and 4 of 
          this order, are hereby made permanent in accordance with the 
          Act.
          e. 6. Judicial Review. This order does 
          not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable in law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies, its officers, or any person.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 18, 2001.

EO 13197


Executive Order 13197 of January 18, 2001

Governmentwide Accountability for Merit System Principles; Workforce 
Information

          In an era of decentralization of Federal human resources 
          management, it is increasingly important to ensure that merit 
          system principles are applied consistently across the Federal 
          Government and that the Executive branch has the ability to 
          collect information about its workforce. The President and the 
          public need to be assured that Federal agencies are monitoring 
          the exercise of all human resources management authorities 
          that have been delegated to them.
          Therefore, by the authority vested in me as President by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including sections 1104(a)(1), 2301(c), and 3302 of title 5, 
          United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Civil Service Rule V (5 CFR Part 
          5) is amended in section 5.2 by striking subsection (d).
          e. 2. Civil Service Rule VII (5 CFR Part 
          7) is amended --
          (a) by striking section 7.2;
          (b) by redesignating sections 7.3 and 7.4 as sections 7.2 and 
          7.3, respectively; and
          (c) by amending the table of sections to read as follows:
          ``Sec.
          7.1 Discretion in filling vacancies.
          7.2 Reemployment rights.
          7.3 Citizenship.''
          e. 3. Two new Civil Service Rules are 
          added at the end of Civil Service Rule VIII to read as 
          follows:

[[Page 749]]

          ``PART 9--WORKFORCE INFORMATION (RULE IX)
          Sec.
          9.1 Definition.
          9.2 Reporting workforce information.
          Sec.  9.1 Definition.
           As used in this rule, 'Executive agency' means an Executive 
          department, a Government corporation, and an independent 
          establishment, as those terms are defined in chapter 1 of 
          title 5, United States Code, but does not include the Federal 
          Bureau of Investigation, the Central Intelligence Agency, the 
          Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Imagery and Mapping 
          Agency, the National Security Agency, and, as determined by 
          the President, any Executive agency or unit within an 
          Executive agency which has as its principal function the 
          conduct of foreign intelligence or counterintelligence 
          activities.
          Sec.  9.2 Reporting workforce information.
           The Director of the Office of Personnel Management may 
          require all Executive agencies to report information relating 
          to civilian employees, including positions and employees in 
          the competitive, excepted, and Senior Executive services, in a 
          manner and at times prescribed by the Director. The Director 
          shall establish standards for workforce information 
          submissions under this section, and agencies shall ensure that 
          their submissions meet these standards consistent with the 
          Privacy Act. The Director may exempt from this section a 
          specific agency or group of employees when the Director 
          determines that an exemption is appropriate because of special 
          circumstances.
          PART 10--AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEMS;
          OPM AUTHORITY TO REVIEW PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS
          (RULE X)
          Sec.
          10.1 Definitions.
          10.2 Accountability systems.
          10.3 OPM authority to review personnel management programs and 
          practices.
          Sec.  10.1 Definitions.
          For purposes of this rule --
          (a) 'agency' means an Executive agency as defined in Rule IX, 
          but does not include a Government corporation or the General 
          Accounting Office; and
          (b) 'merit system principles' means the principles for Federal 
          personnel management that are set forth in section 2301(b) of 
          title 5, United States Code.
          Sec.  10.2. Accountability systems.
          The Director of the Office of Personnel Management may require 
          an agency to establish and maintain a system of accountability 
          for merit system principles that (1) sets standards for 
          applying the merit system principles, (2)

[[Page 750]]

          measures the agency's effectiveness in meeting these 
          standards, and (3) corrects any deficiencies in meeting these 
          standards.
          Sec.  10.3. OPM authority to review personnel management
          programs and practices.
          The Office of Personnel Management may review the human 
          resources management programs and practices of any agency and 
          report to the head of the agency and the President on the 
          effectiveness of these programs and practices, including 
          whether they are consistent with the merit system 
          principles.''

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 18, 2001.

EO 13198


Executive Order 13198 of January 29, 2001

Agency Responsibilities With Respect to Faith-Based and Community 
Initiatives

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          help the Federal Government coordinate a national effort to 
          expand opportunities for faith-based and other community 
          organizations and to strengthen their capacity to better meet 
          social needs in America's communities, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Establishment of Executive 
          Department Centers for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. 
          (a) The Attorney General, the Secretary of Education, the 
          Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human 
          Services, and the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
          shall each establish within their respective departments a 
          Center for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives (Center).
          (b) Each executive department Center shall be supervised by a 
          Director, appointed by the department head in consultation 
          with the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community 
          Initiatives (White House OFBCI).
          (c) Each department shall provide its Center with appropriate 
          staff, administrative support, and other resources to meet its 
          responsibilities under this order.
          (d) Each department's Center shall begin operations no later 
          than 45 days from the date of this order.
          e. 2. Purpose of Executive Department 
          Centers for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. The purpose 
          of the executive department Centers will be to coordinate 
          department efforts to eliminate regulatory, contracting, and 
          other programmatic obstacles to the participation of faith-
          based and other community organizations in the provision of 
          social services.
          e. 3. Responsibilities of Executive 
          Department Centers for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives. 
          Each Center shall, to the extent permitted by law: (a) 
          conduct, in coordination with the White House OFBCI, a 
          department-wide audit to identify all existing barriers to the 
          participation of faith-

[[Page 751]]

          based and other community organizations in the delivery of 
          social services by the department, including but not limited 
          to regulations, rules, orders, procurement, and other internal 
          policies and practices, and outreach activities that either 
          facially discriminate against or otherwise discourage or 
          disadvantage the participation of faith-based and other 
          community organizations in Federal programs;
          (b) coordinate a comprehensive departmental effort to 
          incorporate faith-based and other community organizations in 
          department programs and initiatives to the greatest extent 
          possible;
          (c) propose initiatives to remove barriers identified pursuant 
          to section 3(a) of this order, including but not limited to 
          reform of regulations, procurement, and other internal 
          policies and practices, and outreach activities;
          (d) propose the development of innovative pilot and 
          demonstration programs to increase the participation of faith-
          based and other community organizations in Federal as well as 
          State and local initiatives; and
          (e) develop and coordinate department outreach efforts to 
          disseminate information more effectively to faith-based and 
          other community organizations with respect to programming 
          changes, contracting opportunities, and other department 
          initiatives, including but not limited to Web and Internet 
          resources.
          e. 4. Additional Responsibilities of the 
          Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of 
          Labor Centers. In addition to those responsibilities described 
          in section 3 of this order, the Department of Health and Human 
          Services and the Department of Labor Centers shall, to the 
          extent permitted by law: (a) conduct a comprehensive review of 
          policies and practices affecting existing funding streams 
          governed by so-called ``Charitable Choice'' legislation to 
          assess the department's compliance with the requirements of 
          Charitable Choice; and (b) promote and ensure compliance with 
          existing Charitable Choice legislation by the department, as 
          well as its partners in State and local government, and their 
          contractors.
          e. 5. Reporting Requirements. (a) Report. 
          Not later than 180 days after the date of this order and 
          annually thereafter, each of the five executive department 
          Centers described in section 1 of this order shall prepare and 
          submit a report to the White House OFBCI.
          (b) Contents. The report shall include a description of the 
          department's efforts in carrying out its responsibilities 
          under this order, including but not limited to:
           (1) a comprehensive analysis of the barriers to the full 
          participation of faith-based and other community organizations 
          in the delivery of social services identified pursuant to 
          section 3(a) of this order and the proposed strategies to 
          eliminate those barriers; and
           (2) a summary of the technical assistance and other 
          information that will be available to faith-based and other 
          community organizations regarding the program activities of 
          the department and the preparation of applications or 
          proposals for grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, and 
          procurement.
          (c) Performance Indicators. The first report, filed 180 days 
          after the date of this order, shall include annual performance 
          indicators and measurable objectives for department action. 
          Each report filed thereafter shall measure

[[Page 752]]

          the department's performance against the objectives set forth 
          in the initial report.
          e. 6. Responsibilities of All Executive 
          Departments and Agencies. All executive departments and 
          agencies (agencies) shall: (a) designate an agency employee to 
          serve as the liaison and point of contact with the White House 
          OFBCI; and
          (b) cooperate with the White House OFBCI and provide such 
          information, support, and assistance to the White House OFBCI 
          as it may request, to the extent permitted by law.
          e. 7. Administration and Judicial Review. 
          (a) The agencies' actions directed by this Executive Order 
          shall be carried out subject to the availability of 
          appropriations and to the extent permitted by law.
          (b) This order does not create any right or benefit, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity 
          against the United States, its agencies or instrumentalities, 
          its officers or employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 29, 2001

EO 13199


Executive Order 13199 of January 29, 2001

Establishment of White House Office of Faith-Based and Community 
Initiatives

          By the authority vested in me as President of the United 
          States by the Constitution and the laws of the United States 
          of America, and in order to help the Federal Government 
          coordinate a national effort to expand opportunities for 
          faith-based and other community organizations and to 
          strengthen their capacity to better meet social needs in 
          America's communities, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. Faith-based and other 
          community organizations are indispensable in meeting the needs 
          of poor Americans and distressed neighborhoods. Government 
          cannot be replaced by such organizations, but it can and 
          should welcome them as partners. The paramount goal is 
          compassionate results, and private and charitable community 
          groups, including religious ones, should have the fullest 
          opportunity permitted by law to compete on a level playing 
          field, so long as they achieve valid public purposes, such as 
          curbing crime, conquering addiction, strengthening families 
          and neighborhoods, and overcoming poverty. This delivery of 
          social services must be results oriented and should value the 
          bedrock principles of pluralism, nondiscrimination, 
          evenhandedness, and neutrality.
          e. 2. Establishment. There is established 
          a White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives 
          (White House OFBCI) within the Executive Office of the 
          President that will have lead responsibility in the executive 
          branch to establish policies, priorities, and objectives for 
          the Federal Government's comprehensive effort to enlist, 
          equip, enable, empower, and expand the work of faith-based and 
          other community organizations to the extent permitted by law.

[[Page 753]]

          e. 3. Functions. The principal functions 
          of the White House OFBCI are, to the extent permitted by law: 
          (a) to develop, lead, and coordinate the Administration's 
          policy agenda affecting faith-based and other community 
          programs and initiatives, expand the role of such efforts in 
          communities, and increase their capacity through executive 
          action, legislation, Federal and private funding, and 
          regulatory relief;
          (b) to ensure that Administration and Federal Government 
          policy decisions and programs are consistent with the 
          President's stated goals with respect to faith-based and other 
          community initiatives;
          (c) to help integrate the President's policy agenda affecting 
          faith-based and other community organizations across the 
          Federal Government;
          (d) to coordinate public education activities designed to 
          mobilize public support for faith-based and community 
          nonprofit initiatives through volunteerism, special projects, 
          demonstration pilots, and public-private partnerships;
          (e) to encourage private charitable giving to support faith-
          based and community initiatives;
          (f) to bring concerns, ideas, and policy options to the 
          President for assisting, strengthening, and replicating 
          successful faith-based and other community programs;
          (g) to provide policy and legal education to State, local, and 
          community policymakers and public officials seeking ways to 
          empower faith-based and other community organizations and to 
          improve the opportunities, capacity, and expertise of such 
          groups;
          (h) to develop and implement strategic initiatives under the 
          President's agenda to strengthen the institutions of civil 
          society and America's families and communities;
          (i) to showcase and herald innovative grassroots nonprofit 
          organizations and civic initiatives;
          (j) to eliminate unnecessary legislative, regulatory, and 
          other bureaucratic barriers that impede effective faith-based 
          and other community efforts to solve social problems;
          (k) to monitor implementation of the President's agenda 
          affecting faith-based and other community organizations; and
          (l) to ensure that the efforts of faith-based and other 
          community organizations meet high standards of excellence and 
          accountability.
          e. 4. Administration. (a) The White House 
          OFBCI may function through established or ad hoc committees, 
          task forces, or interagency groups.
          (b) The White House OFBCI shall have a staff to be headed by 
          the Assistant to the President for Faith-Based and Community 
          Initiatives. The White House OFBCI shall have such staff and 
          other assistance, to the extent permitted by law, as may be 
          necessary to carry out the provisions of this order. The White 
          House OFBCI operations shall begin no later than 30 days from 
          the date of this order.
          (c) The White House OFBCI shall coordinate with the liaison 
          and point of contact designated by each executive department 
          and agency with respect to this initiative.

[[Page 754]]

          (d) All executive departments and agencies (agencies) shall 
          cooperate with the White House OFBCI and provide such 
          information, support, and assistance to the White House OFBCI 
          as it may request, to the extent permitted by law.
          (e) The agencies' actions directed by this Executive Order 
          shall be carried out subject to the availability of 
          appropriations and to the extent permitted by law.
          e. 5. Judicial Review. This order does 
          not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 29, 2001

EO 13200


Executive Order 13200 of February 11, 2001

President's Information Technology Advisory Committee, Further Amendment to 
Executive Order 13035, as Amended

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          High-Performance Computing Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-194), 
          as amended by the Next Generation Internet Research Act of 
          1998 (Public Law 105-305), and in order to extend the life of 
          the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee so 
          that it may continue to carry out its responsibilities, it is 
          hereby ordered that Executive Order 13035 of February 11, 
          1997, as amended by Executive Orders 13092 and 13113 
          (``Executive Order 13035, as amended''), is further amended as 
          follows:
          Section 4(b) of Executive Order 13035, as amended, is further 
          amended by deleting ``February 11, 2001 and inserting ``June 
          1, 2001,'' in lieu thereof.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 11, 2001.

EO 13201


Executive Order 13201 of February 17, 2001

Notification of Employee Rights Concerning Payment of Union Dues or Fees

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, 40 U.S.C. 
          471 et seq., and in order to ensure the economical and 
          efficient administration and completion of Government 
          contracts, it is hereby ordered that:

[[Page 755]]

          etion 1. (a) This order is designed to 
          promote economy and efficiency in Government procurement. When 
          workers are better informed of their rights, including their 
          rights under the Federal labor laws, their productivity is 
          enhanced. The availability of such a workforce from which the 
          United States may draw facilitates the efficient and 
          economical completion of its procurement contracts.
          (b) The Secretary of Labor (Secretary) shall be responsible 
          for the administration and enforcement of this order. The 
          Secretary shall adopt such rules and regulations and issue 
          such orders as are deemed necessary and appropriate to achieve 
          the purposes of this order.
          e. 2. (a) Except in contracts exempted in 
          accordance with section 3 of this order, all Government 
          contracting departments and agencies shall, to the extent 
          consistent with law, include the following provisions in every 
          Government contract, other than collective bargaining 
          agreements as defined in 5 U.S.C. 7103(a)(8) and purchases 
          under the ``Simplified Acquisition Threshold'' as defined in 
          the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act (41 U.S.C. 403).
          ``1. During the term of this contract, the contractor agrees 
          to post a notice, of such size and in such form as the 
          Secretary of Labor shall prescribe, in conspicuous places in 
          and about its plants and offices, including all places where 
          notices to employees are customarily posted. The notice shall 
          include the following information (except that the last 
          sentence shall not be included in notices posted in the plants 
          or offices of carriers subject to the Railway Labor Act, as 
          amended (45 U.S.C. 151-188)):
          ``NOTICE TO EMPLOYEES
          Under Federal law, employees cannot be required to join a 
          union or maintain membership in a union in order to retain 
          their jobs. Under certain conditions, the law permits a union 
          and an employer to enter into a union-security agreement 
          requiring employees to pay uniform periodic dues and 
          initiation fees. However, employees who are not union members 
          can object to the use of their payments for certain purposes 
          and can only be required to pay their share of union costs 
          relating to collective bargaining, contract administration, 
          and grievance adjustment.
          ``If you do not want to pay that portion of dues or fees used 
          to support activities not related to collective bargaining, 
          contract administration, or grievance adjustment, you are 
          entitled to an appropriate reduction in your payment. If you 
          believe that you have been required to pay dues or fees used 
          in part to support activities not related to collective 
          bargaining, contract administration, or grievance adjustment, 
          you may be entitled to a refund and to an appropriate 
          reduction in future payments.
          ``For further information concerning your rights, you may wish 
          to contact the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) either at 
          one of its Regional offices or at the following address:
           National Labor Relations Board
           Division of Information
           1099 14th Street, N.W.
           Washington, D.C. 20570
          ``To locate the nearest NLRB office, see NLRB's website at 
          www.nlrb.gov.''

[[Page 756]]

          ``2. The contractor will comply with all provisions of 
          Executive Order 13201 of February 17, 2001, and related rules, 
          regulations, and orders of the Secretary of Labor.
          ``3. In the event that the contractor does not comply with any 
          of the requirements set forth in paragraphs (1) or (2) above, 
          this contract may be cancelled, terminated, or suspended in 
          whole or in part, and the contractor may be declared 
          ineligible for further Government contracts in accordance with 
          procedures authorized in or adopted pursuant to Executive 
          Order 13201 of February 17, 2001. Such other sanctions or 
          remedies may be imposed as are provided in Executive Order 
          13201 of February 17, 2001, or by rule, regulation, or order 
          of the Secretary of Labor, or as are otherwise provided by 
          law.
          ``4. The contractor will include the provisions of paragraphs 
          (1) through (3) herein in every subcontract or purchase order 
          entered into in connection with this contract unless exempted 
          by rules, regulations, or orders of the Secretary of Labor 
          issued pursuant to section 3 of Executive Order 13201 of 
          February 17, 2001, so that such provisions will be binding 
          upon each subcontractor or vendor. The contractor will take 
          such action with respect to any such subcontract or purchase 
          order as may be directed by the Secretary of Labor as a means 
          of enforcing such provisions, including the imposition of 
          sanctions for non compliance: Provided, however, that if the 
          contractor becomes involved in litigation with a subcontractor 
          or vendor, or is threatened with such involvement, as a result 
          of such direction, the contractor may request the United 
          States to enter into such litigation to protect the interests 
          of the United States.''
          (b) Whenever, through Acts of Congress or through 
          clarification of existing law by the courts or otherwise, it 
          appears that contractual provisions other than, or in addition 
          to, those set out in subsection (a) of this section are needed 
          to inform employees fully and accurately of their rights with 
          respect to union dues, union-security agreements, or the like, 
          the Secretary shall promptly issue such rules, regulations, or 
          orders as are needed to cause the substitution or addition of 
          appropriate contractual provisions in Government contracts 
          thereafter entered into.
          e. 3. (a) The Secretary may, if the 
          Secretary finds that special circumstances require an 
          exemption in order to serve the national interest, exempt a 
          contracting department or agency from the requirements of any 
          or all of the provisions of section 2 of this order with 
          respect to a particular contract, subcontract, or purchase 
          order.
          (b) The Secretary may, by rule, regulation, or order, exempt 
          from the provisions of section 2 of this order certain classes 
          of contracts to the extent that they involve (i) work outside 
          the United States and do not involve the recruitment or 
          employment of workers within the United States; (ii) work in 
          jurisdictions where State law forbids enforcement of union- 
          security agreements; (iii) work at sites where the notice to 
          employees described in section 2(a) of this order would be 
          unnecessary because the employees are not represented by a 
          union; (iv) numbers of workers below appropriate thresholds 
          set by the Secretary; or (v) subcontracts below an appropriate 
          tier set by the Secretary.
          (c) The Secretary may provide, by rule, regulation, or order, 
          for the exemption of facilities of a contractor, 
          subcontractor, or vendor that are in all respects separate and 
          distinct from activities related to the performance of

[[Page 757]]

          the contract: Provided, that such exemption will not interfere 
          with or impede the effectuation of the purposes of this order: 
          And provided further, that in the absence of such an exemption 
          all facilities shall be covered by the provisions of this 
          order.
          e. 4. (a) The Secretary may investigate 
          any Government contractor, subcontractor, or vendor to 
          determine whether the contractual provisions required by 
          section 2 of this order have been violated. Such 
          investigations shall be conducted in accordance with 
          procedures established by the Secretary.
          (b) The Secretary shall receive and investigate complaints by 
          employees of a Government contractor, subcontractor, or vendor 
          where such complaints allege a failure to perform or a 
          violation of the contractual provisions required by section 2 
          of this order.
          e. 5. (a) The Secretary, or any agency or 
          officer in the executive branch of the Government designated 
          by rule, regulation, or order of the Secretary, may hold such 
          hearings, public or private, regarding compliance with this 
          order as the Secretary may deem advisable.
          (b) The Secretary may hold hearings, or cause hearings to be 
          held, in accordance with subsection (a) of this section prior 
          to imposing, ordering, or recommending the imposition of 
          sanctions under this order. Neither an order for debarment of 
          any contractor from further Government contracts under section 
          6(b) of this order nor the inclusion of a contractor on a 
          published list of noncomplying contractors under section 6(c) 
          of this order shall be carried out without affording the 
          contractor an opportunity for a hearing.
          e. 6. In accordance with such rules, 
          regulations, or orders as the Secretary may issue or adopt, 
          the Secretary may:
          (a) after consulting with the contracting department or 
          agency, direct that department or agency to cancel, terminate, 
          suspend, or cause to be cancelled, terminated, or suspended, 
          any contract, or any portion or portions thereof, for failure 
          of the contractor to comply with the contractual provisions 
          required by section 2 of this order; contracts may be 
          cancelled, terminated, or suspended absolutely, or continuance 
          of contracts may be conditioned upon future compliance: 
          Provided, that before issuing a directive under this 
          subsection, the Secretary shall provide the head of the 
          contracting department or agency an opportunity to offer 
          written objections to the issuance of such a directive, which 
          objections shall include a complete statement of reasons for 
          the objections, among which reasons shall be a finding that 
          completion of the contract is essential to the agency's 
          mission: And provided further, that no directive shall be 
          issued by the Secretary under this subsection so long as the 
          head of the contracting department or agency continues 
          personally to object to the issuance of such directive;
          (b) after consulting with each affected contracting department 
          or agency, provide that one or more contracting departments or 
          agencies shall refrain from entering into further contracts, 
          or extensions or other modifications of existing contracts, 
          with any noncomplying contractor, until such contractor has 
          satisfied the Secretary that such con tractor has complied 
          with and will carry out the provisions of this order: 
          Provided, that before issuing a directive under this 
          subsection, the Secretary shall provide the head of each 
          contracting department or agency an opportunity to offer 
          written objections

[[Page 758]]

          to the issuance of such a directive, which objections shall 
          include a complete statement of reasons for the objections, 
          among which reasons shall be a finding that further contracts 
          or extensions or other modifications of existing contracts 
          with the noncomplying contractor are essential to the agency's 
          mission: And provided further, that no directive shall be 
          issued by the Secretary under this subsection so long as the 
          head of a contracting department or agency continues 
          personally to object to the issuance of such directive; and
          (c) publish, or cause to be published, the names of 
          contractors that have, in the judgment of the Secretary, 
          failed to comply with the provisions of this order or of 
          related rules, regulations, and orders of the Secretary.
          e. 7. Whenever the Secretary invokes 
          section 6(a) or 6(b) of this order, the contracting department 
          or agency shall report the results of the action it has taken 
          to the Secretary within such time as the Secretary shall 
          specify.
          e. 8. Each contracting department and 
          agency shall cooperate with the Secretary and provide such 
          information and assistance as the Secretary may require in the 
          performance of the Secretary's functions under this order.
          e. 9. The Secretary may delegate any 
          function or duty of the Secretary under this order to any 
          officer in the Department of Labor or to any other officer in 
          the executive branch of the Government, with the consent of 
          the head of the department or agency in which that officer 
          serves.
          e. 10. The Federal Acquisition Regulatory 
          Council (FAR Council) shall take whatever action is required 
          to implement in the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) the 
          provisions of this order and of any related rules, 
          regulations, or orders of the Secretary that were issued to 
          implement this Executive Order. The FAR Council shall amend 
          the FAR to require each solicitation of offers for a contract 
          to include a provision that implements section 2 of this 
          order.
          e. 11. As it relates to notification of 
          employee rights concerning payment of union dues or fees, 
          Executive Order 12836 of February 1, 1993, which, among other 
          things, revoked Executive Order 12800 of April 13, 1992, is 
          revoked.
          e. 12. The heads of executive departments 
          and agencies shall revoke expeditiously any orders, rules, 
          regulations, guidelines, or policies implementing or enforcing 
          Executive Order 12836 of February 1, 1993, as it relates to 
          notification of employee rights concerning payment of union 
          dues or fees, to the extent consistent with law.
          e. 13. This order is intended only to 
          improve the internal management of the executive branch and is 
          not intended to, nor does it, create any right to 
          administrative or judicial review, or any right, whether 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable by any party against 
          the United States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its 
          officers or employees, or any other person.
          e. 14. The provisions of this order shall 
          apply to contracts resulting from solicitations issued on or 
          after the effective date of this order.

[[Page 759]]

          e. 15. This order shall become effective 
          60 days after the date of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 17, 2001

EO 13202


Executive Order 13202 of February 17, 2001

Preservation of Open Competition and Government Neutrality Towards 
Government Contractors' Labor Relations on Federal and Federally Funded 
Construction Projects

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, 40 U.S.C. 
          471 et seq., and in order to (1) promote and ensure open 
          competition on Federal and federally funded or assisted 
          construction projects; (2) maintain Government neutrality 
          towards Government contractors' labor relations on Federal and 
          federally funded or assisted construction projects; (3) reduce 
          construction costs to the Federal Government and to the 
          taxpayers; (4) expand job opportunities, especially for small 
          and disadvantaged businesses; and (5) prevent discrimination 
          against Government contractors or their employees based upon 
          labor affiliation or lack thereof; thereby promoting the 
          economical, nondiscriminatory, and efficient administration 
          and completion of Federal and federally funded or assisted 
          construction projects, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. To the extent permitted by law, 
          any executive agency awarding any construction contract after 
          the date of this order, or obligating funds pursuant to such a 
          contract, shall ensure that neither the awarding Government 
          authority nor any construction manager acting on behalf of the 
          Government shall, in its bid specifications, project 
          agreements, or other controlling documents:
          (a) Require or prohibit bidders, offerors, contractors, or 
          subcontractors to enter into or adhere to agreements with one 
          or more labor organizations, on the same or other related 
          construction project(s); or
          (b) Otherwise discriminate against bidders, offerors, 
          contractors, or subcontractors for becoming or refusing to 
          become or remain signatories or otherwise to adhere to 
          agreements with one or more labor organizations, on the same 
          or other related construction project(s).
          (c) Nothing in this section shall prohibit contractors or 
          subcontractors from voluntarily entering into agreements 
          described in subsection (a).
          e. 2. Contracts awarded before the date 
          of this order, and subcontracts awarded pursuant to such 
          contracts, whenever awarded, shall not be governed by this 
          order.
          e. 3. To the extent permitted by law, any 
          executive agency issuing grants, providing financial 
          assistance, or entering into cooperative agreements for 
          construction projects, shall ensure that neither the bid 
          specifications,

[[Page 760]]

          project agreements, nor other controlling documents for 
          construction contracts awarded after the date of this order by 
          recipients of grants or financial assistance or by parties to 
          cooperative agreements, nor those of any construction manager 
          acting on their behalf, shall contain any of the requirements 
          or prohibitions set forth in section 1(a) or (b) of this 
          order.
          e. 4. In the event that an awarding 
          authority, a recipient of grants or financial assistance, a 
          party to a cooperative agreement, or a construction manager 
          acting on behalf of the foregoing, performs in a manner 
          contrary to the provisions of sections 1 or 3 of this order, 
          the executive agency awarding the contract, grant, or 
          assistance shall take such action, consistent with law and 
          regulation, as the agency determines may be appropriate.
          e. 5. (a) The head of an executive agency 
          may exempt a particular project, contract, subcontract, grant, 
          or cooperative agreement from the requirements of any or all 
          of the provisions of sections 1 and 3 of this order, if the 
          agency head finds that special circumstances require an 
          exemption in order to avert an imminent threat to public 
          health or safety or to serve the national security.
          (b) A finding of ``special circumstances'' under section 5(a) 
          may not be based on the possibility or presence of a labor 
          dispute concerning the use of contractors or subcontractors 
          who are nonsignatories to, or otherwise do not adhere to, 
          agreements with one or more labor organizations, or concerning 
          employees on the project who are not members of or affiliated 
          with a labor organization.
          e. 6. (a) The term ``construction 
          contract'' as used in this order means any contract for the 
          construction, rehabilitation, alteration, conversion, 
          extension, or repair of buildings, highways, or other 
          improvements to real property.
          (b) The term ``executive agency'' as used in this order shall 
          have the same meaning it has in 5 U.S.C. 105, excluding the 
          General Accounting Office.
          (c) The term ``labor organization'' as used in this order 
          shall have the same meaning it has in 42 U.S.C. 2000e(d).
          e. 7. With respect to Federal contracts, 
          within 60 days of the issuance of this order, the Federal 
          Acquisition Regulatory Council shall take whatever action is 
          required to amend the Federal Acquisition Regulation in order 
          to implement the provisions of this order.
          e. 8. As it relates to project 
          agreements, Executive Order 12836 of February 1, 1993, which, 
          among other things, revoked Executive Order 12818 of October 
          23, 1992, is revoked.
          e. 9. The Presidential Memorandum of June 
          5, 1997, entitled ``Use of Project Labor Agreements for 
          Federal Construction Projects'' (the ``Memorandum''), is also 
          revoked.
          e. 10. The heads of executive departments 
          and agencies shall revoke expeditiously any orders, rules, 
          regulations, guidelines, or policies implementing or enforcing 
          the Memorandum or Executive Order 12836 of February 1, 1993, 
          as it relates to project agreements, to the extent consistent 
          with law.
          e. 11. This order is intended only to 
          improve the internal management of the executive branch and is 
          not intended to, nor does it, create any right

[[Page 761]]

          to administrative or judicial review, or any right, whether 
          substantive or procedural, enforce able by any party against 
          the United States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its 
          officers or employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 17, 2001

EO 13203


Executive Order 13203 of February 17, 2001

Revocation of Executive Order and Presidential

Memorandum Concerning Labor-Management Partnerships

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered that:
          etion 1. Executive Order 12871 of October 
          1, 1993, as amended by Executive Orders 12983 and 13156, which 
          established the National Partnership Council and requires 
          Federal agencies to form labor-management partnerships for 
          management purposes, is revoked. Among other things, 
          therefore, the National Partnership Council is immediately 
          dissolved.
          e. 2. The Presidential Memorandum of 
          October 28, 1999, entitled ``Reaffirmation of Executive Order 
          12871--Labor-Management Partnerships'' (the ``Memorandum''), 
          which reaffirms and expands upon the requirements of Executive 
          Order 12871 of October 1, 1993, is also revoked.
          e. 3. The Director of the Office of 
          Personnel Management and heads of executive agencies shall 
          promptly move to rescind any orders, rules, regulations, 
          guidelines, or policies implementing or enforcing Executive 
          Order 12871 of October 1, 1993, or the Memorandum, to the 
          extent consistent with law.
          e. 4. Nothing in this order shall 
          abrogate any collective bargaining agreements in effect on the 
          date of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 17, 2001

EO 13204


Executive Order 13204 of February 17, 2001

Revocation of Executive Order on Nondisplacement of

Qualified Workers Under Certain Contracts

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered that:
          etion 1. Executive Order 12933 of October 
          20, 1994, which requires, with respect to contracts for public 
          buildings, that successive contractors offer a right of first 
          refusal of employment to employees of the prior contractor, is 
          revoked.

[[Page 762]]

          e. 2. The Secretary of Labor (Secretary), 
          the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council, and heads of 
          executive agencies shall promptly move to rescind any orders, 
          rules, regulations, guidelines, or policies implementing or 
          enforcing Executive Order 12933 of October 20, 1994, to the 
          extent consistent with law.
          e. 3. The Secretary shall terminate, 
          effective today, any investigations or other compliance 
          actions based on Executive Order 12933 of October 20, 1994.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

February 17, 2001

EO 13205


Executive Order 13205 of March 9, 2001

Establishing an Emergency Board To Investigate a Dispute Between Northwest 
Airlines, Inc., and Its Employees Represented by the Aircraft Mechanics 
Fraternal Association

          A dispute exists between Northwest Airlines, Inc., and its 
          employees represented by the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal 
          Association.
          The dispute has not heretofore been adjusted under the 
          provisions of the Railway Labor Act, as amended (45 U.S.C. 
          151-188) (the ``Act'').
          In the judgment of the National Mediation Board, this dispute 
          threatens substantially to interrupt interstate commerce to a 
          degree that would deprive sections of the country of essential 
          transportation service.
          NOW, THEREFORE, by the authority vested in me as President by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          sections 10 and 201 of the Act (45 U.S.C. 160 and 181), it is 
          hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment of Emergency Board 
          (``Board''). There is established, effective March 12, 2001, a 
          Board of three members to be appointed by the President to 
          investigate this dispute. No member shall be pecuniarily or 
          otherwise interested in any organization of airline employees 
          or any air carrier. The Board shall perform its functions 
          subject to the availability of funds.
          e. 2. Report. The Board shall report to 
          the President with respect to this dispute within 30 days of 
          its creation.
          e. 3. Maintaining Conditions. As provided 
          by section 10 of the Act, from the date of the creation of the 
          Board and for 30 days after the Board has submitted its report 
          to the President, no change in the conditions out of which the 
          dispute arose shall be made by the parties to the controversy, 
          except by agreement of the parties.
          e. 4. Record Maintenance. The records and 
          files of the Board are records of the Office of the President 
          and upon the Board's termination shall be maintained in the 
          physical custody of the National Mediation Board.

[[Page 763]]

          e. 5. Expiration. The Board shall 
          terminate upon the submission of the report provided for in 
          sections 2 and 3 of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

March 9, 2001.

EO 13206


Executive Order 13206 of April 4, 2001

Termination of Emergency Authority for Certain Export Controls

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.) (IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et 
          seq.), the Export Administration Act of 1979, as amended (50 
          U.S.C. App. 2401 et seq.) (the ``Act''), and section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. In view of the reauthorization 
          and extension of the Act by Public Law 106-508, Executive 
          Order 12924 of August 19, 1994, which continued the effect of 
          export control regulations under IEEPA, is revoked, and the 
          declaration of economic emergency is rescinded, as provided in 
          this order.
          e. 2. The revocation of Executive Order 
          12924 shall not affect any violation of any rules, 
          regulations, orders, licenses, or other forms of 
          administrative action under that order that occurred during 
          the period the order was in effect. All rules and regulations 
          issued or continued in effect under the authority of IEEPA and 
          Executive Order 12924, including those codified at 15 C.F.R. 
          730-74 (2000), and all orders, regulations, licenses, and 
          other forms of administrative action issued, taken, or 
          continued in effect pursuant thereto, remain in full force and 
          effect, as if issued, taken, or continued in effect pursuant 
          to and as authorized by the Act or by other appropriate 
          authority until amended or revoked by the proper authority. 
          Nothing in this order shall affect the continued applicability 
          of the provision for the administration of the Act and 
          delegations of authority set forth in Executive Order 12002 of 
          July 7, 1977, Executive Order 12214 of May 2, 1980, Executive 
          Order 12938 of November 14, 1994, as amended, Executive Order 
          12981 of December 5, 1995, as amended, and Executive Order 
          13026 of November 15, 1996.
          e. 3. All rules, regulations, orders, 
          licenses, and other forms of administrative action issued, 
          taken, or continued in effect pursuant to the authority of 
          IEEPA and Executive Order 12924 relating to the administration 
          of section 38(e) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
          2778(e)) shall remain in full force and effect until amended 
          or revoked under proper authority.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

April 4, 2001.

EO 13207

[[Page 764]]


Executive Order 13207 of April 5, 2001

Further Amendment to Executive Order 10000, Regulations Governing 
Additional Compensation and Credit Granted Certain Employees of the Federal 
Government Serving Outside the United States

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered that Executive Order 10000, as amended, is further 
          amended as follows:
          etion 1. Section 201 is amended:
          (a) by striking ``(a)''; and
          (b) by striking ``, and (b) the words 'section 207 of the Act' 
          have the meaning set forth in section 101 hereof.''
          e. 2. Section 205 is amended by striking 
          ``(a)'' and by striking subsection (b).
          e. 3. Section 210 is amended:
          (a) by striking ``, but at least annually,'' and
          (b) by striking ``if program or methodology revisions would 
          substantially reduce an established differential or allowance 
          rate, then''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

April 5, 2001.

EO 13208


Executive Order 13208 of April 6, 2001

Amendment to Executive Order 13202, Preservation of Open Competition and 
Government Neutrality Towards Government Contractors' Labor Relations on 
Federal and Federally Funded Construction Projects

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Property and Administrative Services Act, 40 U.S.C. 
          471 et seq., and in order to (1) promote and ensure open 
          competition on Federal and federally funded or assisted 
          construction projects; (2) maintain Government neutrality 
          towards Government contractors' labor relations on Federal and 
          federally funded or assisted construction projects; (3) reduce 
          construction costs to the Federal Government and to the tax 
          payers; (4) expand job opportunities, especially for small and 
          disadvantaged businesses; (5) prevent discrimination against 
          Government contractors or their employees based upon labor 
          affiliation or lack thereof; and (6) prevent the inefficiency 
          that may result from the disruption of a previously 
          established contractual relationship in particular cases; 
          thereby promoting the economical, nondiscriminatory, and 
          efficient administration and completion of Federal and 
          federally funded or assisted

[[Page 765]]

          construction projects, it is hereby ordered that Executive 
          Order 13202 of February 17, 2001, is amended by adding to 
          section 5 of that order the following new subsection:

(c)

 The head of an executive agency, upon application of an awarding 
authority, a recipient of grants or financial assistance, a party to a 
cooperative agreement, or a construction manager acting on behalf of the 
foregoing, may exempt a particular project from the requirements of any or 
all of the provisions of sections 1 and 3 of this order, if the agency head 
finds: (i) that the awarding authority, recipient of grants or financial 
assistance, party to a cooperative agreement, or construction manager 
acting on behalf of the foregoing had issued or was a party to, as of the 
date of this order, bid specifications, project agreements, agreements with 
one or more labor organizations, or other controlling documents with 
respect to that particular project, which contained any of the requirements 
or prohibitions set forth in sections 1(a) or (b) of this order; and (ii) 
that one or more construction contracts subject to such requirements or 
prohibitions had been awarded as of the date of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

April 6, 2001.

EO 13209


Executive Order 13209 of April 30, 2001

Amendment to Executive Order 13183, Establishment of the President's Task 
Force on Puerto Rico's Status

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          extend by 3 months the time in which the President's Task 
          Force on Puerto Rico's Status is to report to the President as 
          directed in Executive Order 13183 of December 23, 2000, it is 
          hereby ordered that section 4 of Executive Order 13183 is 
          amended by deleting ``May 1, 2001'' and inserting in lieu 
          thereof ``August 1, 2001''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

April 30, 2001.

EO 13210


Executive Order 13210 of May 2, 2001

President's Commission To Strengthen Social Security

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), 
          and to preserve Social Security for senior Americans while 
          building wealth for younger Americans, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:

[[Page 766]]

          etion 1. Establishment. There is 
          established the President's Commission to Strengthen Social 
          Security (Commission).
          e. 2. Membership. The Commission shall be 
          composed of sixteen members appointed by the President, of 
          which no more than eight shall be members of the same 
          political party. The President shall also designate two 
          members of the Commission to act as co-chairs. The two co-
          chairs shall not be members of the same political party.
          e. 3. Mission. The mission of the 
          Commission shall be to submit to the President bipartisan 
          recommendations to modernize and restore fiscal soundness to 
          the Social Security system according to the following 
          principles: (a) Modernization must not change Social Security 
          benefits for retirees or near-retirees;
          (b) The entire Social Security surplus must be dedicated to 
          Social Security only;
          (c) Social Security payroll taxes must not be increased;
          (d) Government must not invest Social Security funds in the 
          stock market;
          (e) Modernization must preserve Social Security's disability 
          and survivors components; and
          (f) Modernization must include individually controlled, 
          voluntary personal retirement accounts, which will augment the 
          Social Security safety net.
          e. 4. Administration. (a) The Social 
          Security Administration shall, to the extent permitted by law, 
          provide administrative support and funding for the Commission.
          (b) Members of the Commission shall serve without any 
          compensation for their work on the Commission. Members 
          appointed from among private citizens of the United States, 
          however, while engaged in the work of the Commission, may be 
          allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
          subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707), to 
          the extent funds are available.
          (c) The Commission shall have a staff headed by an Executive 
          Director, who shall be selected by the President. To the 
          extent permitted by law, office space, analytical support, and 
          additional staff support for the Commission shall be provided 
          by executive branch departments and agencies as directed by 
          the President.
          (d) The Commission shall receive input from and provide 
          briefings to the Congress, by procedures determined by the 
          President in consultation with the congressional leadership 
          and the Commission. Public hearings shall be held at the call 
          of the co-chairs, in consultation with the President.
          (e) The functions of the President under the Federal Advisory 
          Committee Act, as amended, except for those in section 6 of 
          that Act, that are applicable to the Commission, shall be 
          performed by the Social Security Administration, in accordance 
          with the guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator 
          of General Services.
          e. 5. Reports. The Commission shall 
          submit reports to the President as follows: (a) Interim 
          Report. An interim report shall describe the challenges facing 
          the Social Security system and the criteria by which the 
          Commission

[[Page 767]]

          will evaluate reform proposals. These criteria may include but 
          are not limited to: solvency, sustainability, benefit 
          adequacy, fair treatment across generations and demographic 
          groups, total annual cost obligations, net impact on the 
          Federal budget, impact upon national savings, impact on 
          workforce participation, impact on employer-provided pension 
          plans, rates of return, and protections against poverty.
          (b) Final Report. The final report will set forth the 
          Commission's recommendations, in accordance with its stated 
          mission in section 3 of this order, regarding how to 
          strengthen Social Security with personal accounts. The 
          Commission shall submit its final report during the fall of 
          2001. The submission date shall be determined by the co-chairs 
          in consultation with the President.
          e. 6. Termination. The Commission shall 
          terminate 30 days after submitting its final report.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 2, 2001.

EO 13211


Executive Order 13211 of May 18, 2001

Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, 
Distribution, or Use

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          appropriately weigh and consider the effects of the Federal 
          Government's regulations on the supply, distribution, and use 
          of energy, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. The Federal Government 
          can significantly affect the supply, distribution, and use of 
          energy. Yet there is often too little information regarding 
          the effects that governmental regulatory action can have on 
          energy. In order to provide more useful energy-related 
          information and hence improve the quality of agency 
          decisionmaking, I am requiring that agencies shall prepare a 
          Statement of Energy Effects when undertaking certain agency 
          actions. As described more fully below, such Statements of 
          Energy Effects shall describe the effects of certain 
          regulatory actions on energy supply, distribution, or use.
          e. 2. Preparation of a Statement of 
          Energy Effects. (a) To the extent permitted by law, agencies 
          shall prepare and submit a Statement of Energy Effects to the 
          Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory 
          Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, for those matters 
          identified as significant energy actions.
          (b) A Statement of Energy Effects shall consist of a detailed 
          statement by the agency responsible for the significant energy 
          action relating to:

(i) any adverse effects on energy supply, distribution, or use (including a 
shortfall in supply, price increases, and increased use of foreign 
supplies) should the proposal be implemented, and

[[Page 768]]

(ii) reasonable alternatives to the action with adverse energy effects and 
the expected effects of such alternatives on energy supply, distribution, 
and use.

          (c) The Administrator of the Office of Information and 
          Regulatory Affairs shall provide guidance to the agencies on 
          the implementation of this order and shall consult with other 
          agencies as appropriate in the implementation of this order.
          e. 3. Submission and Publication of 
          Statements. (a) Agencies shall submit their Statements of 
          Energy Effects to the Administrator of the Office of 
          Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and 
          Budget, whenever they present the related submission under 
          Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993, or any successor 
          order.
          (b) Agencies shall publish their Statements of Energy Effects, 
          or a summary thereof, in each related Notice of Proposed 
          Rulemaking and in any resulting Final Rule.
          e. 4. Definitions. For purposes of this 
          order:
          (a) ``Regulation'' and ``rule'' have the same meaning as they 
          do in Executive Order 12866 or any successor order.
          (b) ``Significant energy action'' means any action by an 
          agency (normally published in the Federal 
          eister) that promulgates or is expected to 
          lead to the promulgation of a final rule or regulation, 
          including notices of inquiry, advance notices of proposed 
          rulemaking, and notices of proposed rulemaking:

(1)(i) that is a significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866 
or any successor order, and

(ii) is likely to have a significant adverse effect on the supply, 
distribution, or use of energy; or

(2) that is designated by the Administrator of the Office of Information 
and Regulatory Affairs as a significant energy action.

          (c) ``Agency'' means any authority of the United States that 
          is an ``agency'' under 44 U.S.C. 3502(1), other than those 
          considered to be independent regulatory agencies, as defined 
          in 44 U.S.C. 3502(5).
          e. 5. Judicial Review. Nothing in this 
          order shall affect any otherwise available judicial review of 
          agency action. This order is intended only to improve the 
          internal management of the Federal Government and does not 
          create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 18, 2001.

EO 13212

[[Page 769]]


Executive Order 13212 of May 18, 2001

Actions To Expedite Energy-Related Projects

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          take additional steps to expedite the increased supply and 
          availability of energy to our Nation, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Policy. The increased production 
          and transmission of energy in a safe and environmentally sound 
          manner is essential to the well-being of the American people. 
          In general, it is the policy of this Administration that 
          executive departments and agencies (agencies) shall take 
          appropriate actions, to the extent consistent with applicable 
          law, to expedite projects that will increase the production, 
          transmission, or conservation of energy.
          e. 2. Actions to Expedite Energy-Related 
          Projects. For energy-related projects, agencies shall expedite 
          their review of permits or take other actions as necessary to 
          accelerate the completion of such projects, while maintaining 
          safety, public health, and environmental protections. The 
          agencies shall take such actions to the extent permitted by 
          law and regulation, and where appropriate.
          e. 3. Interagency Task Force. There is 
          established an interagency task force (Task Force) to monitor 
          and assist the agencies in their efforts to expedite their 
          review of permits or similar actions, as necessary, to 
          accelerate the completion of energy-related projects, increase 
          energy production and conservation, and improve transmission 
          of energy. The Task Force also shall monitor and assist 
          agencies in setting up appropriate mechanisms to coordinate 
          Federal, State, tribal, and local permitting in geographic 
          areas where increased permitting activity is expected. The 
          Task Force shall be composed of representatives from the 
          Departments of State, the Treasury, Defense, Agriculture, 
          Housing and Urban Development, Justice, Commerce, 
          Transportation, the Interior, Labor, Education, Health and 
          Human Services, Energy, Veterans Affairs, the Environmental 
          Protection Agency, Central Intelligence Agency, General 
          Services Administration, Office of Management and Budget, 
          Council of Economic Advisers, Domestic Policy Council, 
          National Economic Council, and such other representatives as 
          may be determined by the Chairman of the Council on 
          Environmental Quality. The Task Force shall be chaired by the 
          Chairman of the Council on Environmental Quality and housed at 
          the Department of Energy for administrative purposes.
          e. 4. Judicial Review. Nothing in this 
          order shall affect any otherwise available judicial review of 
          agency action. This order is intended only to improve the 
          internal management of the Federal Government and does not 
          create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or 
          employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 18, 2001.

EO 13213

[[Page 770]]


Executive Order 13213 of May 22, 2001

Additional Measures With Respect To Prohibiting the Importation of Rough 
Diamonds From Sierra Leone

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.) (IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et 
          seq.), section 5 of the United Nations Participation Act of 
          1945, as amended (22 U.S.C. 287c) (UNPA), and section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, and in view of the national 
          emergency described and declared in Executive Order 13194 of 
          January 18, 2001, and United Nations Security Council 
          Resolutions 1306 of July 5, 2000, and 1343 of March 7, 2001,
          I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, 
          take note that in Executive Order 13194, the President 
          responded to, among other things, the insurgent Revolutionary 
          United Front's (RUF) illicit trade in diamonds to fund its 
          operations in the civil war in Sierra Leone by declaring a 
          national emergency and, consistent with United Nations 
          Security Council Resolution 1306, by prohibiting the 
          importation into the United States of all rough diamonds from 
          Sierra Leone except for those importations controlled through 
          the Certificate of Origin regime of the Government of Sierra 
          Leone. United Nations Security Council Resolution 1343 takes 
          note that the bulk of RUF diamonds leaves Sierra Leone through 
          Liberia and that such illicit trade cannot be conducted 
          without the permission and involvement of Liberian government 
          officials at the highest levels; determines that the active 
          support provided by the Government of Liberia for the RUF and 
          other armed rebel groups in neighboring countries constitutes 
          a threat to international peace and security in the region; 
          and decides that all states shall take the necessary measures 
          to prevent the importation of all rough diamonds from Liberia, 
          whether or not such diamonds originated in Liberia. The 
          Government of Liberia's complicity in the RUF's illicit trade 
          in diamonds and its other forms of support for the RUF are 
          direct challenges to United States foreign policy objectives 
          in the region as well as to the rule-based international order 
          that is crucial to the peace and prosperity of the United 
          States. Therefore, I find these actions by the Government of 
          Liberia contribute to the unusual and extraordinary threat to 
          the foreign policy of the United States described in Executive 
          Order 13194 with respect to which the President declared a 
          national emergency. In order to deal with that threat and to 
          ensure further that the direct or indirect importation into 
          the United States of rough diamonds from Sierra Leone will not 
          contribute financial support to further aggressive actions by 
          the RUF or to the RUF's procurement of weapons; to implement 
          United Nations Security Council Resolution 1343; and to 
          counteract, among other things, the Government of Liberia's 
          facilitation of and participation in the RUF's illicit trade 
          in diamonds through Liberia, I hereby order the following 
          additional measures be taken with respect to prohibiting the 
          importation of rough diamonds from Sierra Leone:
          etion 1. Except to the extent provided in 
          regulations, orders, directives, or licenses issued pursuant 
          to this order, and notwithstanding the existence of any rights 
          or obligations conferred or imposed by any international 
          agreement or any contract entered into or any license or 
          permit granted

[[Page 771]]

          prior to the effective date of this order, the direct or 
          indirect importation into the United States of all rough 
          diamonds from Liberia, whether or not such diamonds originated 
          in Liberia, on or after the effective date of this order is 
          prohibited.
          e. 2. Any transaction by a United States 
          person or within the United States that evades or avoids, or 
          has the purpose of evading or avoiding, or attempts to 
          violate, any of the prohibitions set forth in this order is 
          prohibited. Any conspiracy formed to violate any of the 
          prohibitions set forth in this order is prohibited.
          e. 3. The definitions contained in 
          section 4 of Executive Order 13194 apply to the terms used in 
          this order.
          e. 4. The Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized 
          to take such actions, including the promulgation of rules and 
          regulations, and to employ all powers granted to the President 
          by IEEPA and UNPA, as may be necessary to carry out the 
          purposes of this order. The Secretary of the Treasury may 
          redelegate any of these functions to other officers and 
          agencies of the United States Government. All agencies of the 
          United States Government are hereby directed to take all 
          appropriate measures within their authority to carry out the 
          provisions of this order, including modification, suspension, 
          or termination of licenses or authorizations in effect as of 
          the date of this order.
          e. 5. This order is not intended to 
          create, nor does it create, any right, benefit, or privilege, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party 
          against the United States, its agencies, officers, or any 
          other person.
          e. 6. (a) This order is effective at 
          12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on May 23, 2001.
          (b) This order shall be transmitted to the Congress and 
          published in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 22, 2001.

EO 13214


Executive Order 13214 of May 28, 2001

President's Task Force To Improve Health Care Delivery for Our Nation's 
Veterans

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), 
          and in order to provide prompt and efficient access to 
          consistently high quality health care for veterans who have 
          served the Nation, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. There is 
          established the President's Task Force to Improve Health Care 
          Delivery for Our Nation's Veterans (Task Force).
          e. 2. Membership. The Task Force shall be 
          comprised of 15 members appointed by the President. Two of the 
          15 members shall serve as co-chairs

[[Page 772]]

          of the Task Force. The Task Force membership shall include 
          health care experts, officials familiar with Department of 
          Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense health care 
          systems, and representatives from veteran and military service 
          organizations.
          e. 3. Mission. The mission of the Task 
          Force shall be to:

(a)

 identify ways to improve benefits and services for Department of Veterans 
Affairs beneficiaries and Department of Defense military retirees who are 
also eligible for benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs through 
better coordination of the activities of the two departments;

(b)

 review barriers and challenges that impede Department of Veterans Affairs 
and Department of Defense coordination, including budgeting processes, 
timely billing, cost accounting, information technology, and reimbursement. 
Identify opportunities to improve such business practices to ensure high 
quality and cost effective health care; and

(c)

 identify opportunities for improved resource utilization through 
partnership between the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department 
of Defense to maximize the use of resources and infrastructure, including: 
buildings, information technology and data sharing systems, procurement of 
supplies, equipment and services, and delivery of care.

          e. 4. Administration.

(a)

 The Department of Veterans Affairs shall, to the extent permitted by law, 
provide administrative support and funding for the Task Force.

(b)

 Members of the Task Force shall serve without any compensation for their 
work on the Task Force. Members appointed from among private citizens of 
the United States, however, while engaged in the work of the Task Force, 
may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, 
as authorized by law for persons serving intermittently in Government 
service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707), to the extent funds are available.

(c)

 The co-chairs of the Task Force shall appoint an Executive Director to 
coordinate administration of the Task Force. To the extent permitted by 
law, office space, analytical support, and additional staff support for the 
Commission shall be provided by executive branch departments and agencies 
as directed by the President.

(d)

 The heads of the executive branch departments and agencies shall, to the 
extent permitted by law, provide the Task Force with information as 
requested by the co-chairs.

(e)

 At the call of the co-chairs, the Task Force shall meet as necessary to 
accomplish its mission.

(f)

 The functions of the President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 
as amended, except for those in section 6 of that Act, that are applicable 
to the Task Force, shall be performed by the Department of Veterans 
Affairs, in accordance with the guidelines that have been issued by the 
Administrator of General Services.

          e. 5. Reports. The Task Force shall 
          report its findings and recommendations to the President, 
          through the Secretary of Veterans Affairs and Secretary of 
          Defense. The Task Force shall issue an interim report in 9 
          months from the date of the first meeting of the Task Force. 
          The Task Force shall issue a final report prior to the end of 
          the second year of operation.

[[Page 773]]

          e. 6. Termination. The Task Force shall 
          terminate 30 days after submitting its final report, but no 
          later than 2 years from the date of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 28, 2001.

EO 13215


Executive Order 13215 of May 31, 2001

President's Information Technology Advisory Committee,

Further Amendment to Executive Order 13035, as Amended

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          High-Performance Computing Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-194), 
          as amended by the Next Generation Internet Research Act of 
          1998 (Public Law 105-305), and in order to extend the life of 
          the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee so 
          that it may continue to carry out its responsibilities, it is 
          hereby ordered that Executive Order 13035 of February 11, 
          1997, as amended by Executive Orders 13092, 13113, and 13200 
          (Executive Order 13035, as amended), is further amended as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Section 1 of Executive Order 
          13035, as amended, is further amended by deleting the last 
          sentence and inserting in lieu thereof: ``Members appointed 
          prior to June 1, 2001, shall serve until December 1, 2001, 
          unless reappointed by the President. Members appointed or 
          reappointed on or after June 1, 2001, shall serve for no more 
          than 2 years from the date of their appointment, unless their 
          period of service is extended by the President. The President 
          shall designate two co-chairs from among the members of the 
          Committee. A co-chair may serve for a term of 2 years or until 
          the end of his or her service as a member of the Committee, 
          whichever is the shorter period.''
          e. 2. Section 4(b) of Executive Order 
          13035, as amended, is further amended by deleting ``June 1, 
          2001,'' and inserting in lieu thereof: ``June 1, 2003.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

May 31, 2001.

EO 13216


Executive Order 13216 of June 6, 2001

Amendment to Executive Order 13125, Increasing Participation of Asian 
Americans and Pacific Islanders in Federal Programs

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America and in order to 
          change the title of Executive Order 13125 of June 7, 1999, and 
          to extend by 2 years the President's

[[Page 774]]

          Advisory Commission on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders 
          that was created by Executive Order 13125, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. The title of Executive Order 
          13125 is deleted and the following title is inserted in lieu 
          thereof: ``Increasing Opportunity and Improving Quality of 
          Life of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.''
          e. 2. Section 9 of Executive Order 13125 
          is amended by deleting ``2 years after the date of this 
          Executive order unless the Commission is renewed by the 
          President prior to the end of that 2-year period'' and 
          inserting in lieu thereof ``on June 7, 2003, unless renewed by 
          the President prior to that date.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 6, 2001.

EO 13217


Executive Order 13217 of June 18, 2001

Community-Based Alternatives for Individuals With

Disabilities

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          place qualified individuals with disabilities in community 
          settings whenever appropriate, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Policy. This order is issued 
          consistent with the following findings and principles:
          (a) The United States is committed to community-based 
          alternatives for individuals with disabilities and recognizes 
          that such services advance the best interests of Americans.
          (b) The United States seeks to ensure that America's 
          community-based programs effectively foster independence and 
          participation in the community for Americans with 
          disabilities.
          (c) Unjustified isolation or segregation of qualified 
          individuals with disabilities through institutionalization is 
          a form of disability-based discrimination prohibited by Title 
          II of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), 42 
          U.S.C. 12101 et. seq. States must avoid disability-based 
          discrimination unless doing so would fundamentally alter the 
          nature of the service, program, or activity provided by the 
          State.
          (d) In Olmstead v. L.C., 527 U.S. 581 (1999) (the ``Olmstead 
          decision''), the Supreme Court construed Title II of the ADA 
          to require States to place qualified individuals with mental 
          disabilities in community settings, rather than in 
          institutions, whenever treatment professionals determine that 
          such placement is appropriate, the affected persons do not 
          oppose such placement, and the State can reasonably 
          accommodate the placement, taking into account the resources 
          available to the State and the needs of others with 
          disabilities.
          (e) The Federal Government must assist States and localities 
          to implement swiftly the Olmstead decision, so as to help 
          ensure that all Americans

[[Page 775]]

          have the opportunity to live close to their families and 
          friends, to live more independently, to engage in productive 
          employment, and to participate in community life.
          e. 2. Swift Implementation of the 
          Olmstead Decision: Agency Responsibilities. (a) The Attorney 
          General, the Secretaries of Health and Human Services, 
          Education, Labor, and Housing and Urban Development, and the 
          Commissioner of the Social Security Administration shall work 
          cooperatively to ensure that the Olmstead decision is 
          implemented in a timely manner. Specifically, the designated 
          agencies should work with States to help them assess their 
          compliance with the Olmstead decision and the ADA in providing 
          services to qualified individuals with disabilities in 
          community-based settings, as long as such services are 
          appropriate to the needs of those individuals. These agencies 
          should provide technical guidance and work cooperatively with 
          States to achieve the goals of Title II of the ADA, 
          particularly where States have chosen to develop 
          comprehensive, effectively working plans to provide services 
          to qualified individuals with disabilities in the most 
          integrated settings. These agencies should also ensure that 
          existing Federal resources are used in the most effective 
          manner to support the goals of the ADA. The Secretary of 
          Health and Human Services shall take the lead in coordinating 
          these efforts.
          (b) The Attorney General, the Secretaries of Health and Human 
          Services, Education, Labor, and Housing and Urban Development, 
          and the Commissioner of the Social Security Administration 
          shall evaluate the policies, programs, statutes, and 
          regulations of their respective agencies to determine whether 
          any should be revised or modified to improve the availability 
          of community-based services for qualified individuals with 
          disabilities. The review shall focus on identifying affected 
          populations, improving the flow of information about supports 
          in the community, and removing barriers that impede 
          opportunities for community placement. The review should 
          ensure the involvement of consumers, advocacy organizations, 
          providers, and relevant agency representatives. Each agency 
          head should report to the President, through the Secretary of 
          Health and Human Services, with the results of their 
          evaluation within 120 days.
          (c) The Attorney General and the Secretary of Health and Human 
          Services shall fully enforce Title II of the ADA, including 
          investigating and resolving complaints filed on behalf of 
          individuals who allege that they have been the victims of 
          unjustified institutionalization. Whenever possible, the 
          Department of Justice and the Department of Health and Human 
          Services should work cooperatively with States to resolve 
          these complaints, and should use alternative dispute 
          resolution to bring these complaints to a quick and 
          constructive resolution.
          (d) The agency actions directed by this order shall be done 
          consistent with this Administration's budget.
          e. 3. Judicial Review. Nothing in this 
          order shall affect any otherwise available judicial review of 
          agency action. This order is intended only to improve the 
          internal management of the Federal Government and does not 
          create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, 
          enforceable at law or

[[Page 776]]

          equity by a party against the United States, its agencies or 
          instrumentalities, its officers or employees, or any other 
          person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 18, 2001.

EO 13218


Executive Order 13218 of June 20, 2001

21st Century Workforce Initiative

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), 
          and in order to promote the study and the development of 
          strategies to address the needs of the 21st century workforce, 
          it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment of the Office of 
          the 21st Century Workforce. (a) The Secretary of Labor is 
          hereby directed to establish within the Department of Labor 
          the Office of the 21st Century Workforce. The Office shall 
          provide a focal point for the identification and study of 
          issues relating to the workforce of the United States and the 
          development of strategies for effectively addressing such 
          issues.
          (b) The Office of the 21st Century Workforce shall gather and 
          disseminate information relating to workforce issues by 
          conducting summits, conferences, field hearings, meetings, and 
          other appropriate forums designed to encourage the 
          participation of organizations and individuals interested in 
          such issues, including business and labor organizations, 
          academicians, employers, employees, and public officials at 
          the local, State, and Federal levels.
          (c) Among the issues to be addressed by the Office of the 21st 
          Century Workforce shall be the identification of the ways in 
          which the Department of Labor may streamline and update the 
          information and services made available to the workforce by 
          the Department; eliminate duplicative or overlapping rules and 
          regulations; and eliminate statutory and regulatory barriers 
          to assisting the workforce in successfully adapting to the 
          challenges of the 21st century.
          e. 2. Establishment of the Council on the 
          21st Century Workforce.
          (a) Establishment and Composition of the Council.

  (i) There is hereby established the ``President's Council on the 21st 
Century Workforce'' (Council).

  (ii) The Council shall be composed of not more than 13 members who shall 
be appointed by the President. The membership shall include individuals who 
represent the views of business and labor organizations, Federal, State, 
and local governments, academicians and educators, and such other 
associations and entities as the President determines are appropriate. In 
addition, the Secretary of Labor and the Director of the Office of 
Personnel Management shall serve as ex officio members representing the 
views of the Federal Government. The Secretary of Labor shall be the 
Chairperson of the Council.

[[Page 777]]

          (b) Functions of the Council. The Council shall provide 
          information and advice to the President through the Secretary 
          of Labor, the Office of the 21st Century Workforce within the 
          Department of Labor, and other appropriate Federal officials 
          relating to issues affecting the 21st century workforce. These 
          activities shall include:

  (i) assessing the effects of rapid technological changes, demographic 
trends, globalization, changes in work processes, and the need for new and 
enhanced skills for workers, employers, and other related sectors of 
society;

  (ii) examining current and alternative approaches to assisting workers 
and employers in adjusting to and benefitting from such changes, including 
opportunities for workplace education, retraining, access to assistive 
technologies and workplace supports, and skills upgrading;

  (iii) identifying impediments to the adjustment to such changes by 
workers and employers and recommending approaches and policies that could 
remove those impediments;

  (iv) assisting the Office of the 21st Century Workforce in reviewing 
programs carried out by the Department of Labor and identifying changes to 
such programs that would stream line and update their effectiveness in 
meeting the needs of the workforce; and

  (v) analyzing such additional issues relating to the workforce and making 
such reports as the President or the Secretary of Labor may request.

          (c) Administration of the Council.

  (i) The Council shall meet on the call of the Chairperson, at a time and 
place designated by the Chairperson. The Chairperson may form subcommittees 
or working groups within the Council to address particular matters.

  (ii) The Council may from time to time prescribe such procedures and 
policies relating to the activities of the Council as are not inconsistent 
with law or with the provisions of this order.

  (iii) Each member of the Council who is not an officer or employee of the 
Federal Government shall serve without compensation but shall be allowed 
travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized 
by law for persons serving intermittently in Federal service (5 U.S.C. 
5701-5707).

  (iv) The Department of Labor shall make available appropriate funding and 
administrative support to assist the Council in carrying out the functions 
under this section, including necessary office space, equipment, supplies, 
staff, and services. The Secretary of Labor shall perform the functions of 
the President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.), as 
amended, except that of reporting to the Congress, with respect to the 
Council in accordance with the guidelines and procedures established by the 
Administrator of General Services.

  (v) The heads of executive agencies shall, to the extent permitted by 
law, provide the Council with such information as it may require for 
purposes of carrying out the functions described in this section.

          (d) Termination of the Council. The Council shall terminate 2 
          years from the date of this order unless extended by the 
          President prior to such date.

[[Page 778]]

          e. 3. Effect on Prior Orders.
          (a) Amendments to Executive Order 13111 of January 12, 1999. 
          In order to ensure the coordination and nonduplication of 
          advice and information regarding 21st century workforce 
          issues, section 6 of Executive Order 13111, relating to the 
          functions of the Advisory Committee on Expanding Training 
          Opportunities, is amended to read as follows:
          ``Sec. 6. Functions of the Advisory Committee. The Committee 
          shall provide the President, through the Secretary of Labor 
          (who shall ensure the coordination of the activities of the 
          Committee with the activities undertaken pursuant to sections 
          1 and 2 of the Executive Order on the 21st Century Workforce 
          Initiative), an independent assessment of:

  (1) progress made by the Federal Government in its use and integration of 
technology in adult training programs, particularly in addressing the 
problems of adult illiteracy;

  (2) how Federal Government programs, initiatives, and policies can 
encourage or accelerate training technology to provide more accessible, 
more timely, and more cost- effective training opportunities for all 
Americans;

  (3) mechanisms for the Federal Government to widely deploy and utilize 
technology-mediated instruction so all Americans may take advantage of 
opportunities provided by learning technology;

  (4) the appropriate Federal Government role in research and development 
for learning technologies and their applications in order to develop high-
quality training and education opportunities for all Americans; and

  (5) such other issues regarding emerging technologies in government 
training as specified by the Secretary of Labor.''

          (b) Revocation of Executive Order 13174. Executive Order 13174 
          of October 27, 2000, relating to the establishment of the 
          Commission on Workers, Communities, and Economic Change in the 
          New Economy, is revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 20, 2001.

EO 13219


Executive Order 13219 of June 26, 2001

Blocking Property of Persons Who Threaten International Stabilization 
Efforts in the Western Balkans

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.)(IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et 
          seq.), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code,
          I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, 
          have determined that the actions of persons engaged in, or 
          assisting, sponsoring, or supporting, (i) extremist violence 
          in the former Yugoslav Republic of

[[Page 779]]

          Macedonia, southern Serbia, the Federal Republic of 
          Yugoslavia, and elsewhere in the Western Balkans region, or 
          (ii) acts obstructing implementation of the Dayton Accords in 
          Bosnia or United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 of 
          June 10, 1999, in Kosovo, threaten the peace in or diminish 
          the security and stability of those areas and the wider 
          region, undermine the authority, efforts, and objectives of 
          the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
          (NATO), and other international organizations and entities 
          present in those areas and the wider region, and endanger the 
          safety of persons participating in or providing support to the 
          activities of those organizations and entities, including 
          United States military forces and Government officials. I find 
          that such actions constitute an unusual and extraordinary 
          threat to the national security and foreign policy of the 
          United States, and hereby declare a national emergency to deal 
          with that threat. I hereby order:
          etion 1. (a) Except to the extent 
          provided in section 203(b)(1), (3), and (4) of IEEPA (50 
          U.S.C. 1702(b)(1), (3), and (4)), the Trade Sanctions Reform 
          and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 (title IX, Public Law 106-
          387), and in regulations, orders, directives, or licenses that 
          may hereafter be issued pursuant to this order, and 
          notwithstanding any contract entered into or any license or 
          permit granted prior to the effective date, all property and 
          interests in property of:
          (i) the persons listed in the Annex to this order; and
          (ii) persons designated by the Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of State, because they are 
          found:

  (A) to have committed, or to pose a significant risk of committing, acts 
of violence that have the purpose or effect of threatening the peace in or 
diminishing the stability or security of any area or state in the Western 
Balkans region, undermining the authority, efforts, or objectives of 
international organizations or entities present in the region, or 
endangering the safety of persons participating in or providing support to 
the activities of those international organizations or entities, or,

  (B) to have actively obstructed, or to pose a significant risk of 
actively obstructing, implementation of the Dayton Accords in Bosnia or 
United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 in Kosovo, or

  (C) materially to assist in, sponsor, or provide financial or 
technological support for, or goods or services in support of, such acts of 
violence or obstructionism, or

  (D) to be owned or controlled by, or acting or purporting to act directly 
or indirectly for or on behalf of, any of the foregoing persons, that are 
or hereafter come within the United States, or that are or hereafter come 
within the possession or control of United States persons, are blocked and 
may not be transferred, paid, exported, withdrawn, or otherwise dealt in.

          (b) I hereby determine that the making of donations of the 
          type specified in section 203(b)(2) of IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 
          1702(b)(2)) by United States persons to persons designated in 
          or pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section would seriously 
          impair my ability to deal with the national emergency declared 
          in this order. Accordingly, the blocking of property and 
          interests in property pursuant to paragraph (a) of this 
          section includes, but is not limited to, the prohibition of 
          the making by a United States person of any such

[[Page 780]]

          donation to any such designated person, except as otherwise 
          authorized by the Secretary of the Treasury.
          (c) The blocking of property and interests in property 
          pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section includes, but is not 
          limited to, the prohibition of the making or receiving by a 
          United States person of any contribution or provision of 
          funds, goods, or services to or for the benefit of a person 
          designated in or pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section.
          e. 2. Any transaction by a United States 
          person that evades or avoids, or has the purpose of evading or 
          avoiding, or attempts to violate, any of the prohibitions set 
          forth in this order is prohibited. Any conspiracy formed to 
          violate the prohibitions of this order is prohibited.
          e. 3. For the purposes of this order:
          (a) The term ``person'' means an individual or entity;
          (b) The term ``entity'' means a partnership, association, 
          trust, joint venture, corporation, group, subgroup, or other 
          organization; and
          (c) The term ``United States person'' means any United States 
          citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the 
          laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the 
          United States (including foreign branches), or any person in 
          the United States.
          e. 4. The Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of State, is hereby authorized 
          to take such actions, including the promulgation of rules and 
          regulations, and to employ all powers granted to me by IEEPA, 
          as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this order. 
          The Secretary of the Treasury may redelegate any of these 
          functions to other officers and agencies of the United States 
          Government. All agencies of the United States Government are 
          hereby directed to take all appropriate measures within their 
          authority to carry out the provisions of this order and, where 
          appropriate, to advise the Secretary of the Treasury in a 
          timely manner of the measures taken.
          e. 5. This order is not intended to 
          create, nor does it create, any right, benefit, or privilege, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a party 
          against the United States, its agencies, officers, or any 
          other person.
          e. 6. (a) This order is effective at 
          12:01 eastern daylight time on June 27, 2001;
          (b) This order shall be transmitted to the Congress and 
          published in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

June 26, 2001.

ANNEX

          I. Individuals

[[Page 781]]



 
             Name/DPOB (If Available)                    Affiliation
 
Ademi, Xhevat                                       NLA
DOB: 8 Dec 1962
POB: Tetovo, FYROM
Ahmeti, Ali                                         NLA
DOB: 4 Jan 1959
POB: Kicevo, FYROM
Bexheti, Nuri                                       NLA
DOB: 1962
POB: Tetovo, FYROM
Dalipi, Tahir                                       PCPMB
DOB: 1958
POB: Ilince, Presevo mun., FRY
Elshani, Gafur                                      LPK
DOB: 29 March 1958
POB: Suva Reka, FRY
Gashi, Sabit                                        LKCK
DOB: 30 December 1967
POB: Suva Reka, FRY
Habibi, Skender                                     PDK
DOB: 13 July 1968
POB: Ljubiste, FRY
Haradinaj, Daut                                     Chief of Staff, KPC
DOB: 6 April 1978
POB: Goldane, FRY
Hasani, Xhavit                                      NLA
DOB: 5 May 1957
POB: Tanishec, FYROM
Lladrovici, Ramiz                                   Deputy Commander,
DOB: 3 January 1966                                  Guard & Rapid
POB:                                                 Reaction Group, KPC
Lushtaku, Sami                                      RTG 2 Commander, KPC
DOB: 20 February 1961
POB: Srbica, FRY
Musliu, Jonusz                                      PCPMB
DOB: 5 January 1959
POB: Konculj, FRY
Musliu, Shefqet                                     UCPMB
DOB: 12 February 1963
POB: Konculj, FRY
Mustafa, Rrustem                                    RTG 6 Commander, KPC
DOB: 27 February 1971
POB: Podujevo, FRY
Ostremi, Gezim                                      NLA
DOB: 1 November 1942
POB: Debar, Macedonia
Selimi, Rexhep                                      Commander, Guard &
DOB: 15 March 1971                                   Rapid Reaction
POB: Iglarevo, FRY                                   Group, KPC
Shakiri, Hisni                                      NLA
DOB: 1 March 1949
POB: Otlja, FYROM

[[Page 782]]

 
Shaqiri, Shaqir                                     UCPMB
DOB: 1 September 1964
POB: FRY
Suma, Emrush                                        NLA
DOB: 27 May 1974
POB: Dimce, FRY
Syla, Azem                                          PDK
DOB: 5 April 1951
POB: FRY
Veliu, Fazli                                        NLA
DOB: 4 January 1945
POB: Kercove, FYROM
Xhemajli, Emrush                                    LPK
DOB: 5 May 1959
POB: Urosevac, FRY
Xhemajli, Muhamet                                   UCPMB
DOB: 8 February 1958
POB: Muhovac, FRY
 

          II. Oranizations
          Liberation Army of Presevo, Medvedja, and Bujanovac (PMBLA 
          a.k.a. UCPMB)
          National Liberation Army (NLA a.k.a. UCK)
          National Movement for the Liberation of Kosovo (LKCK)
          Political Council of Presevo, Medvedja, and Bujanovac (PCPMB)
          Popular Movement of Kosovo (LPK)

EO 13220


Executive Order 13220 of July 2, 2001

Waiver Under the Trade Act of 1974 With Respect to the Republic of Belarus

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          subsection 402(c)(2) of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended (the 
          ``Act'')(19 U.S.C. 2432(c)(2)), which continues to apply to 
          the Republic of Belarus pursuant to subsection 402(d) of the 
          Act (19 U.S.C. 2432(d)), and having made the report to the 
          Congress required by subsection 402(c)(2), I hereby waive the 
          application of subsections 402(a) and 402(b) of the Act with 
          respect to the Republic of Belarus.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

July 2, 2001.

EO 13221


[[Page 783]]


Executive Order 13221 of July 31, 2001

Energy Efficient Standby Power Devices

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619, 92 
          Stat. 3206, 42 U.S.C. 8252 et seq.), as amended by the Energy 
          Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486, 106 Stat. 
          2776), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and in 
          order to further encourage energy conservation by the Federal 
          Government, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Energy Efficient Standby Power 
          Devices. Each agency, when it purchases commercially 
          available, off-the-shelf products that use external standby 
          power devices, or that contain an internal standby power 
          function, shall purchase products that use no more than one 
          watt in their standby power consuming mode. If such products 
          are not available, agencies shall purchase products with the 
          lowest standby power wattage while in their standby power 
          consuming mode. Agencies shall adhere to these requirements, 
          when life-cycle cost-effective and practicable and where the 
          relevant product's utility and performance are not compromised 
          as a result. By December 31, 2001, and on an annual basis 
          thereafter, the Department of Energy, in consultation with the 
          Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, 
          shall compile a preliminary list of products to be subject to 
          these requirements. The Department of Energy shall finalize 
          the list and may remove products deemed inappropriate for 
          listing.
          e. 2. Independent Agencies. Independent 
          agencies are encouraged to comply with the provisions of this 
          order.
          e. 3. Definition. ``Agency'' means an 
          executive agency as defined in 5 U.S.C. 105. For the purpose 
          of this order, military departments, as defined in 5 U.S.C. 
          102, are covered by the Department of Defense.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 July 31, 2001.

EO 13222


Executive Order 13222 of August 17, 2001

Continuation of Export Control Regulations

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including but 
          not limited to section 203 of the International Emergency 
          Economic Powers Act (``Act'') (50 U.S.C. 1702), I, GEORGE W. 
          BUSH, President of the United States of America, find that the 
          unrestricted access of foreign parties to U.S. goods and 
          technology and the existence of certain boycott practices of 
          foreign nations, in light of the expiration of the Export 
          Administration Act of 1979, as amended (50 U.S.C. App. 2401 et 
          seq.), constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
          national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United 
          States and hereby declare a national emergency with respect to 
          that threat.

[[Page 784]]

          Accordingly, in order (a) to exercise the necessary vigilance 
          over exports and activities affecting the national security of 
          the United States; (b) to further significantly the foreign 
          policy of the United States, including its policy with respect 
          to cooperation by U.S. persons with certain foreign boycott 
          activities, and to fulfill its international responsibilities; 
          and (c) to protect the domestic economy from the excessive 
          drain of scarce materials and reduce the serious economic 
          impact of foreign demand, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. To the extent permitted by law, 
          the provisions of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as 
          amended, and the provisions for administration of the Export 
          Administration Act of 1979, as amended, shall be carried out 
          under this order so as to continue in full force and effect 
          and amend, as necessary, the export control system heretofore 
          maintained by the Export Administration Regulations issued 
          under the Export Administration Act of 1979, as amended. The 
          delegations of authority set forth in Executive Order 12002 of 
          July 7, 1977, as amended by Executive Order 12755 of March 12, 
          1991, and Executive Order 13026 of November 15, 1996; 
          Executive Order 12214 of May 2, 1980; Executive Order 12735 of 
          November 16, 1990; and Executive Order 12851 of June 11, 1993, 
          shall be incorporated in this order and shall apply to the 
          exercise of authorities under this order. All actions under 
          this order shall be in accordance with Presidential directives 
          relating to the export control system heretofore issued and 
          not revoked.
          e. 2. All rules and regulations issued or 
          continued in effect by the Secretary of Commerce under the 
          authority of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as 
          amended, including those published in Title 15, Subtitle B, 
          Chapter VII, Subchapter C, of the Code of Federal Regulations, 
          Parts 730 through 774, and all orders, regulations, licenses, 
          and other forms of administrative action issued, taken, or 
          continued in effect pursuant thereto, shall, until amended or 
          revoked by the Secretary of Commerce, remain in full force and 
          effect as if issued or taken pursuant to this order, except 
          that the provisions of sections 203(b)(2) and 206 of the Act 
          (50 U.S.C. 1702(b)(2) and 1705) shall control over any 
          inconsistent provisions in the regulations. Nothing in this 
          section shall affect the continued applicability of 
          administrative sanctions provided for by the regulations 
          described above.
          e. 3. Provisions for administration of 
          section 38(e) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
          2778(e)) may be made and shall continue in full force and 
          effect until amended or revoked under the authority of section 
          203 of the Act (50 U.S.C. 1702). To the extent permitted by 
          law, this order also shall constitute authority for the 
          issuance and continuation in full force and effect of all 
          rules and regulations by the President or his delegate, and 
          all orders, licenses, and other forms of administrative 
          actions issued, taken, or continued in effect pursuant 
          thereto, relating to the administration of section 38(e).
          e. 4. This order shall be effective as of 
          midnight between August 20, 2001, and August 21, 2001, eastern 
          daylight time.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

August 17, 2001

EO 13223

[[Page 785]]


Executive Order 13223 of September 14, 2001

Ordering the Ready Reserve of the Armed Forces To Active Duty and 
Delegating Certain Authorities to the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of Transportation

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) and section 
          301 of title 3, United States Code, and in furtherance of the 
          proclamation of September 14, 2001, Declaration of National 
          Emergency by Reason of Certain Terrorist Attacks, which 
          declared a national emergency by reason of the terrorist 
          attacks on the World Trade Center, New York, New York, and the 
          Pentagon, and the continuing and immediate threat of further 
          attacks on the United States, I hereby order as follows:
          etion 1. To provide additional authority 
          to the Department of Defense and the Department of 
          Transportation to respond to the continuing and immediate 
          threat of further attacks on the United States, the authority 
          under title 10, United States Code, to order any unit, and any 
          member of the Ready Reserve not assigned to a unit organized 
          to serve as a unit, in the Ready Reserve to active duty for 
          not more than 24 consecutive months, is invoked and made 
          available, according to its terms, to the Secretary concerned, 
          subject in the case of the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, and 
          Air Force, to the direction of the Secretary of Defense. The 
          term ``Secretary concerned'' is defined in section 101(a)(9) 
          of title 10, United States Code, to mean the Secretary of the 
          Army with respect to the Army; the Secretary of the Navy with 
          respect to the Navy, the Marine Corps, and the Coast Guard 
          when it is operating as a service in the Navy; the Secretary 
          of the Air Force with respect to the Air Force; and the 
          Secretary of Transportation with respect to the Coast Guard 
          when it is not operating as a service in the Navy.
          e. 2. To allow for the orderly 
          administration of personnel within the armed forces, the 
          following authorities vested in the President are hereby 
          invoked to the full extent provided by the terms thereof: 
          section 527 of title 10, United States Code, to suspend the 
          operation of sections 523, 525, and 526 of that title, 
          regarding officer and warrant officer strength and 
          distribution; and sections 123, 123a, and 12006 of title 10, 
          United States Code, to suspend certain laws relating to 
          promotion, involuntary retirement, and separation of 
          commissioned officers; end strength limitations; and Reserve 
          component officer strength limitations.
          e. 3. To allow for the orderly 
          administration of personnel within the armed forces, the 
          authorities vested in the President by sections 331, 359, and 
          367 of title 14, United States Code, relating to the authority 
          to order to active duty certain officers and enlisted members 
          of the Coast Guard and to detain enlisted members, are invoked 
          to the full extent provided by the terms thereof.
          e. 4. The Secretary of Defense is hereby 
          designated and empowered, without the approval, ratification, 
          or other action by the President, to exercise the authority 
          vested in the President by sections 123, 123a, 527, and 12006 
          of title 10, United States Code, as invoked by sections 2 and 
          3 of this order.

[[Page 786]]

          e. 5. The Secretary of Transportation is 
          hereby designated and empowered, without the approval, 
          ratification, or other action by the President, to exercise 
          the authority vested in sections 331, 359, and 367 of title 
          14, United States Code, when the Coast Guard is not serving as 
          part of the Navy, as invoked by section 2 of this order, to 
          recall any regular officer or enlisted member on the retired 
          list to active duty and to detain any enlisted member beyond 
          the term of his or her enlistment.
          e. 6. The authority delegated by this 
          order to the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of 
          Transportation may be redelegated and further subdelegated to 
          civilian subordinates who are appointed to their offices by 
          the President, by and with the advice and consent of the 
          Senate.
          e. 7. Based upon my determination under 
          10 U.S.C. 2201(c) that it is necessary to increase (subject to 
          limits imposed by law) the number of members of the armed 
          forces on active duty beyond the number for which funds are 
          provided in appropriation Acts for the Department of Defense, 
          the Secretary of Defense may provide for the cost of such 
          additional members as an excepted expense under section 11(a) 
          of title 41, United States Code.
          e. 8. This order is intended only to 
          improve the internal management of the executive branch, and 
          is not intended to create any right or benefit, substantive or 
          procedural, enforceable at law by a party against the United 
          States, its agencies, its officers, or any person.
          e. 9. This order is effective immediately 
          and shall be promptly transmitted to the Congress and 
          published in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 14, 2001.

EO 13224


Executive Order 13224 of September 23, 2001

Blocking Property and Prohibiting Transactions With Persons Who Commit, 
Threaten To Commit, or Support Terrorism

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et 
          seq.)(IEEPA), the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et 
          seq.), section 5 of the United Nations Participation Act of 
          1945, as amended (22 U.S.C. 287c) (UNPA), and section 301 of 
          title 3, United States Code, and in view of United Nations 
          Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1214 of December 8, 1998, 
          UNSCR 1267 of October 15, 1999, UNSCR 1333 of December 19, 
          2000, and the multilateral sanctions contained therein, and 
          UNSCR 1363 of July 30, 2001, establishing a mechanism to 
          monitor the implementation of UNSCR 1333,
          I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, 
          find that grave acts of terrorism and threats of terrorism 
          committed by foreign terrorists, including the terrorist 
          attacks in New York, Pennsylvania, and the

[[Page 787]]

          Pentagon committed on September 11, 2001, acts recognized and 
          condemned in UNSCR 1368 of September 12, 2001, and UNSCR 1269 
          of October 19, 1999, and the continuing and immediate threat 
          of further attacks on United States nationals or the United 
          States constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the 
          national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United 
          States, and in furtherance of my proclamation of September 14, 
          2001, Declaration of National Emergency by Reason of Certain 
          Terrorist Attacks, hereby declare a national emergency to deal 
          with that threat. I also find that because of the 
          pervasiveness and expansiveness of the financial foundation of 
          foreign terrorists, financial sanctions may be appropriate for 
          those foreign persons that support or otherwise associate with 
          these foreign terrorists. I also find that a need exists for 
          further consultation and cooperation with, and sharing of 
          information by, United States and foreign financial 
          institutions as an additional tool to enable the United States 
          to combat the financing of terrorism.
          I hereby order:
          etion 1. Except to the extent required by 
          section 203(b) of IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 1702(b)), or provided in 
          regulations, orders, directives, or licenses that may be 
          issued pursuant to this order, and notwithstanding any 
          contract entered into or any license or permit granted prior 
          to the effective date of this order, all property and 
          interests in property of the following persons that are in the 
          United States or that hereafter come within the United States, 
          or that hereafter come within the possession or control of 
          United States persons are blocked:
          (a) foreign persons listed in the Annex to this order;
          (b) foreign persons determined by the Secretary of State, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury and the 
          Attorney General, to have committed, or to pose a significant 
          risk of committing, acts of terrorism that threaten the 
          security of U.S. nationals or the national security, foreign 
          policy, or economy of the United States;
          (c) persons determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of State and the Attorney 
          General, to be owned or controlled by, or to act for or on 
          behalf of those persons listed in the Annex to this order or 
          those persons determined to be subject to subsection 1(b), 
          1(c), or 1(d)(i) of this order;
          (d) except as provided in section 5 of this order and after 
          such consultation, if any, with foreign authorities as the 
          Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of the 
          Treasury and the Attorney General, deems appropriate in the 
          exercise of his discretion, persons determined by the 
          Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary 
          of State and the Attorney General;

   (i) to assist in, sponsor, or provide financial, material, or 
technological support for, or financial or other services to or in support 
of, such acts of terrorism or those persons listed in the Annex to this 
order or determined to be subject to this order; or

   (ii) to be otherwise associated with those persons listed in the Annex 
to this order or those persons determined to be subject to subsection 1(b), 
1(c), or 1(d)(i) of this order.

          e. 2. Except to the extent required by 
          section 203(b) of IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 1702(b)), or provided in 
          regulations, orders, directives, or licenses that may

[[Page 788]]

          be issued pursuant to this order, and notwithstanding any 
          contract entered into or any license or permit granted prior 
          to the effective date:
          (a) any transaction or dealing by United States persons or 
          within the United States in property or interests in property 
          blocked pursuant to this order is prohibited, including but 
          not limited to the making or receiving of any contribution of 
          funds, goods, or services to or for the benefit of those 
          persons listed in the Annex to this order or determined to be 
          subject to this order;
          (b) any transaction by any United States person or within the 
          United States that evades or avoids, or has the purpose of 
          evading or avoiding, or attempts to violate, any of the 
          prohibitions set forth in this order is prohibited; and
          (c) any conspiracy formed to violate any of the prohibitions 
          set forth in this order is prohibited.
          e. 3. For purposes of this order:
          (a) the term ``person'' means an individual or entity;
          (b) the term ``entity'' means a partnership, association, 
          corporation, or other organization, group, or subgroup;
          (c) the term ``United States person'' means any United States 
          citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the 
          laws of the United States (including foreign branches), or any 
          person in the United States; and
          (d) the term ``terrorism'' means an activity that--

   (i) involves a violent act or an act dangerous to human life, property, 
or infrastructure; and

   (ii) appears to be intended--

     (A) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;

     (B) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or 
coercion; or

     (C) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, 
assassination, kidnapping, or hostage-taking.

          e. 4. I hereby determine that the making 
          of donations of the type specified in section 203(b)(2) of 
          IEEPA (50 U.S.C. 1702(b)(2)) by United States persons to 
          persons determined to be subject to this order would seriously 
          impair my ability to deal with the national emergency declared 
          in this order, and would endanger Armed Forces of the United 
          States that are in a situation where imminent involvement in 
          hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, and 
          hereby prohibit such donations as provided by section 1 of 
          this order. Furthermore, I hereby determine that the Trade 
          Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 (title IX, 
          Public Law 106-387) shall not affect the imposition or the 
          continuation of the imposition of any unilateral agricultural 
          sanction or unilateral medical sanction on any person 
          determined to be subject to this order because imminent 
          involvement of the Armed Forces of the United States in 
          hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances.
          e. 5. With respect to those persons 
          designated pursuant to subsection 1(d) of this order, the 
          Secretary of the Treasury, in the exercise of his discretion 
          and in consultation with the Secretary of State and the 
          Attorney

[[Page 789]]

          General, may take such other actions than the complete 
          blocking of property or interests in property as the President 
          is authorized to take under IEEPA and UNPA if the Secretary of 
          the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State and 
          the Attorney General, deems such other actions to be 
          consistent with the national interests of the United States, 
          considering such factors as he deems appropriate.
          e. 6. The Secretary of State, the 
          Secretary of the Treasury, and other appropriate agencies 
          shall make all relevant efforts to cooperate and coordinate 
          with other countries, including through technical assistance, 
          as well as bilateral and multilateral agreements and 
          arrangements, to achieve the objectives of this order, 
          including the prevention and suppression of acts of terrorism, 
          the denial of financing and financial services to terrorists 
          and terrorist organizations, and the sharing of intelligence 
          about funding activities in support of terrorism.
          e. 7. The Secretary of the Treasury, in 
          consultation with the Secretary of State and the Attorney 
          General, is hereby authorized to take such actions, including 
          the promulgation of rules and regulations, and to employ all 
          powers granted to the President by IEEPA and UNPA as may be 
          necessary to carry out the purposes of this order. The 
          Secretary of the Treasury may redelegate any of these 
          functions to other officers and agencies of the United States 
          Government. All agencies of the United States Government are 
          hereby directed to take all appropriate measures within their 
          authority to carry out the provisions of this order.
          e. 8. Nothing in this order is intended 
          to affect the continued effectiveness of any rules, 
          regulations, orders, licenses, or other forms of 
          administrative action issued, taken, or continued in effect 
          heretofore or hereafter under 31 C.F.R. chapter V, except as 
          expressly terminated, modified, or suspended by or pursuant to 
          this order.
          e. 9. Nothing contained in this order is 
          intended to create, nor does it create, any right, benefit, or 
          privilege, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a 
          party against the United States, its agencies, officers, 
          employees or any other person.
          e. 10. For those persons listed in the 
          Annex to this order or determined to be subject to this order 
          who might have a constitutional presence in the United States, 
          I find that because of the ability to transfer funds or assets 
          instantaneously, prior notice to such persons of measures to 
          be taken pursuant to this order would render these measures 
          ineffectual. I therefore determine that for these measures to 
          be effective in addressing the national emergency declared in 
          this order, there need be no prior notice of a listing or 
          determination made pursuant to this order.
          e. 11. (a) This order is effective at 
          12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on September 24, 2001.
          (b) This order shall be transmitted to the Congress and 
          published in the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 23, 2001.

[[Page 790]]

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TD25SE01.000

EO 13225

[[Page 791]]


Executive Order 13225 of September 28, 2001

Continuance of Certain Federal Advisory Committees

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in 
          accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory 
          Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Each advisory committee listed 
          below is continued until September 30, 2003.
          (a) Committee for the Preservation of the White House; 
          Executive Order 11145, as amended (Department of the 
          Interior).
          (b) Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and 
          Health; Executive Order 12196, as amended (Department of 
          Labor).
          (c) President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence 
          for Hispanic Americans; Executive Order 12900 (Department of 
          Education).
          (d) President's Board of Advisors on Historically Black 
          Colleges and Universities; Executive Order 13021, as amended, 
          (Department of Education).
          (e) President's Board of Advisors on Tribal Colleges and 
          Universities; Executive Order 13021, as amended (Department of 
          Education).
          (f) President's Commission on White House Fellowships; 
          Executive Order 11183, as amended (Office of Personnel 
          Management).
          (g) President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities; 
          Executive Order 12367, as amended (National Endowment for the 
          Arts).
          (h) President's Committee on the International Labor 
          Organization; Executive Order 12216, as amended (Department of 
          Labor).
          (i) President's Committee on the National Medal of Science; 
          Executive Order 11287, as amended (National Science 
          Foundation).
          (j) President's Committee on Mental Retardation; Executive 
          Order 12994 (Department of Health and Human Services).
          (k) President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports; 
          Executive Order 12345, as amended (Department of Health and 
          Human Services).
          (l) President's Export Council; Executive Order 12131, as 
          amended (Department of Commerce).
          (m) President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory 
          Committee; Executive Order 12382, as amended (Department of 
          Defense).
          (n) Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee; Executive 
          Order 12905 (Office of the United States Trade 
          Representative).
          e. 2. Notwithstanding the provisions of 
          any other Executive Order, the functions of the President 
          under the Federal Advisory Committee Act that are applicable 
          to the committees listed in section 1 of this order shall be 
          performed by the head of the department or agency designated 
          after each committee, in accordance with the guidelines and 
          procedures established by the Administrator of General 
          Services.

[[Page 792]]

          e. 3. The following Executive Orders, or 
          sections thereof, which established committees that have 
          terminated and whose work is completed, are revoked:
          (a) Sections 3 and 4 of Executive Order 13134 pertaining to 
          the establishment and administration of the Advisory Committee 
          on Biobased Products and Bioenergy, superseded by the Biomass 
          Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee 
          established pursuant to section 306 of the Biomass Research 
          and Development Act of 2000 (Title III of Public Law 106-224);
          (b) Executive Order 13080, establishing the American Heritage 
          Rivers Initiative Advisory Committee;
          (c) Executive Order 13090, as amended by Executive Order 
          13136, establishing the President's Commission on the 
          Celebration of Women in American History;
          (d) Executive Order 13168, establishing the President's 
          Commission on Improving Economic Opportunity in Communities 
          Dependent on Tobacco Production While Protecting Public 
          Health; and
          (e) Executive Order 13075, establishing the Special Oversight 
          Board for Department of Defense Investigations of Gulf War 
          Chemical and Biological Incidents.
          e. 4. Sections 1 through 4 of Executive 
          Order 13138 are superseded.
          e. 5. This order shall be effective 
          September 30, 2001.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 28, 2001.

EO 13226


Executive Order 13226 of September 30, 2001

President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), 
          and in order to establish an advisory committee on science and 
          technology, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. There is 
          established the President's Council of Advisors on Science and 
          Technology (PCAST). The PCAST shall be composed of not more 
          than 25 members, one of whom shall be a Federal Government 
          official designated by the President (the ``Official''), and 
          24 of whom shall be nonfederal members appointed by the 
          President and have diverse perspectives and expertise in 
          science, technology, and the impact of science and technology 
          on the Nation. The Official shall co-chair PCAST with a 
          nonfederal member designated by the President.
          e. 2. Functions. (a) The PCAST shall 
          advise the President, through the Official, on matters 
          involving science and technology policy.
          (b) In performance of its advisory duties, the PCAST shall 
          assist the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) in 
          securing private sector involvement in its activities.

[[Page 793]]

          e. 3. Administration. (a) The heads of 
          the executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent 
          permitted by law, provide the PCAST with information 
          concerning scientific and technological matters when requested 
          by the PCAST co-chairs.
          (b) In consultation with the Official, the PCAST is authorized 
          to convene ad hoc working groups to provide preliminary 
          nonbinding information and advice directly to the PCAST.
          (c) Members shall serve without compensation for their work on 
          the PCAST. However, members may be allowed travel expenses, 
          including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by 
          law for persons serving intermittently in the government 
          service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
          (d) Any expenses of the PCAST shall be paid from the funds 
          available for the expenses of the Office of Science and 
          Technology Policy.
          (e) The Office of Science and Technology Policy shall provide 
          such administrative services as the PCAST may require, with 
          the approval of the Official.
          e. 4. General. (a) Notwithstanding any 
          other Executive Order, the functions of the President with 
          respect to the PCAST under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 
          as amended, except that of reporting to the Congress, shall be 
          performed by the Office of Science and Technology Policy in 
          accordance with the guidelines and procedures established by 
          the Administrator of General Services.
          (b) The PCAST shall terminate 2 years from the date of this 
          order unless extended by the President prior to that date.
          (c) Executive Order 12882 of November 23, 1993; Executive 
          Order 12907 of April 14, 1994; and section 1(h) of Executive 
          Order 13138 of September 30, 1999, are hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

September 30, 2001.

EO 13227


Executive Order 13227 of October 2, 2001

President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Policy. The education of all 
          children, regardless of background or disability, while 
          chiefly a State and local responsibility, must always be a 
          national priority. One of the most important goals of my 
          Administration is to support States and local communities in 
          creating and maintaining a system of public education where no 
          child is left behind. Unfortunately, among those at greatest 
          risk of being left behind are children with disabilities. The 
          Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a 
          landmark statute that asserts the rights of all children with 
          disabilities to a free, appropriate public education. My 
          Administration strongly supports the principles embodied in 
          the IDEA and the goal of providing special education

[[Page 794]]

          and related services to children with disabilities so that 
          they can meet high academic standards and participate fully in 
          American society. It is imperative that special education 
          operate as an integral part of a system that expects high 
          achievement of all children, rather than as a means of 
          avoiding accountability for children who are more challenging 
          to educate or who have fallen behind.
          e. 2. Establishment. There is established 
          a President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education 
          (the ``Commission''). The Commission shall be composed of not 
          more than 19 members to be appointed by the President from the 
          public and private sectors, as well as up to 5 ex officio 
          members from the Departments of Education and Health and Human 
          Services. The members may include current and former Federal, 
          State, and local government officials, recognized special 
          education experts, special and general education finance 
          experts, education researchers, educational practitioners, 
          parents of children or young adults with disabilities, persons 
          with disabilities, and others with special experience and 
          expertise in the education of children with disabilities. The 
          President shall designate a Chairperson from among the members 
          of the Commission. The Secretary of Education shall select an 
          Executive Director for the Commission.
          e. 3. Duties and Commission Report. (a) 
          The Commission shall collect information and study issues 
          related to Federal, State, and local special education 
          programs with the goal of recommending policies for improving 
          the educational performance of students with disabilities. In 
          furtherance of its duties, the Commission shall invite experts 
          and members of the public to provide information and guidance.
          (b) Not later than April 30, 2002, the Commission shall 
          prepare and submit a report to the President outlining its 
          findings and recommendations. The report shall include, but 
          need not be limited to:
          (1) An examination of available research and information on 
          the effectiveness and cost of special education and the 
          appropriate role of the Federal Government in special 
          education programming and funding. The examination shall 
          include an analysis of the factors that have contributed to 
          the growth in costs of special education since the enactment 
          of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (a 
          predecessor of IDEA);
          (2) Recommendations regarding how Federal resources can best 
          be used to improve educational results for students with 
          disabilities;
          (3) A recommended special education research agenda;
          (4) An analysis of the impact of providing appropriate early 
          intervention in reading instruction on the referral and 
          identification of children for special education;
          (5) An analysis of the effect of special education funding on 
          decisions to serve, place, or refer children for special 
          education services and recommendations for alternative funding 
          formulae that might distribute funds to achieve better results 
          and eliminate any current incentives that undermine the goals 
          of ensuring that children with disabilities receive a high-
          quality education;
          (6) An analysis of, and recommendations regarding, how the 
          Federal Government can help States and local education 
          agencies provide a high-quality education to students with 
          disabilities, including the recruitment

[[Page 795]]

          and retention of qualified personnel and the inclusion of 
          children with disabilities in performance and accountability 
          systems;
          (7) An analysis of the impact of Federal and State statutory, 
          regulatory, and administrative requirements on the cost and 
          effectiveness of special education services, and how these 
          requirements support or hinder the educational achievement of 
          students with disabilities;
          (8) An assessment of how differences in local educational 
          agency size, location, demographics, and wealth, and in State 
          law and practice affect which children are referred to special 
          education, and the cost of special education; and
          (9) A review of the experiences of State and local governments 
          in financing special education, and an analysis of whether 
          changes to the Federal ``supplement not supplant'' and 
          ``maintenance of effort'' requirements are appropriate.
          e. 4. Administration, Compensation, and 
          Termination.
          (a) The Department of Education shall, to the extent permitted 
          by law, provide administrative support and funding for the 
          Commission. In addition, appropriate Federal agencies may 
          designate staff to assist with the work of the Commission. To 
          the extent permitted by law, Federal Government employees may 
          be detailed to the Commission without reimbursement to the 
          Federal agency.
          (b) Members of the Commission shall serve without compensation 
          but, while engaged in the work of the Commission, members 
          appointed from among private citizens of the United States 
          shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu 
          of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in the government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707), 
          to the extent funds are available for such purposes.
          (c) The functions of the President under the Federal Advisory 
          Committee Act that are applicable to the Commission, except 
          that of reporting to the Congress, shall be performed by the 
          Department of Education in accordance with the guidelines that 
          have been issued by the Administrator of General Services.
          (d) The Chairperson may from time to time prescribe such 
          rules, procedures, and policies relating to the activities of 
          the Commission as are not inconsistent with law or with the 
          provisions of this order.
          (e) The Commission shall terminate 30 days after submitting 
          its final report, unless extended by the President.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 October 2, 2001.

EO 13228

[[Page 796]]


Executive Order 13228 of October 8, 2001

Establishing the Office of Homeland Security and the Homeland Security 
Council

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. I hereby 
          establish within the Executive Office of the President an 
          Office of Homeland Security (the ``Office'') to be headed by 
          the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security.
          e. 2. Mission. The mission of the Office 
          shall be to develop and coordinate the implementation of a 
          comprehensive national strategy to secure the United States 
          from terrorist threats or attacks. The Office shall perform 
          the functions necessary to carry out this mission, including 
          the functions specified in section 3 of this order.
          e. 3. Functions. The functions of the 
          Office shall be to coordinate the executive branch's efforts 
          to detect, prepare for, prevent, protect against, respond to, 
          and recover from terrorist attacks within the United States.
          (a) National Strategy. The Office shall work with executive 
          departments and agencies, State and local governments, and 
          private entities to ensure the adequacy of the national 
          strategy for detecting, preparing for, preventing, protecting 
          against, responding to, and recovering from terrorist threats 
          or attacks within the United States and shall periodically 
          review and coordinate revisions to that strategy as necessary.
          (b) Detection. The Office shall identify priorities and 
          coordinate efforts for collection and analysis of information 
          within the United States regarding threats of terrorism 
          against the United States and activities of terrorists or 
          terrorist groups within the United States. The Office also 
          shall identify, in coordination with the Assistant to the 
          President for National Security Affairs, priorities for 
          collection of intelligence outside the United States regarding 
          threats of terrorism within the United States.

(i)

 In performing these functions, the Office shall work with Federal, State, 
and local agencies, as appropriate, to:

(A)

 facilitate collection from State and local governments and private 
entities of information pertaining to terrorist threats or activities 
within the United States;

(B)

 coordinate and prioritize the requirements for foreign intelligence 
relating to terrorism within the United States of executive departments and 
agencies responsible for homeland security and provide these requirements 
and priorities to the Director of Central Intelligence and other agencies 
responsible for collection of foreign intelligence;

(C)

 coordinate efforts to ensure that all executive departments and agencies 
that have intelligence collection responsibilities have sufficient 
technological capabilities and resources to collect intelligence and data 
relating to terrorist activities or possible terrorist acts within the 
United States, working with the Assistant to the President for National 
Security Affairs, as appropriate;

[[Page 797]]

(D)

 coordinate development of monitoring protocols and equipment for use in 
detecting the release of biological, chemical, and radiological hazards; 
and

(E)

 ensure that, to the extent permitted by law, all appropriate and necessary 
intelligence and law enforcement information relating to homeland security 
is disseminated to and exchanged among appropriate executive departments 
and agencies responsible for homeland security and, where appropriate for 
reasons of homeland security, promote exchange of such information with and 
among State and local governments and private entities.

(ii)

 Executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent permitted by law, 
make available to the Office all information relating to terrorist threats 
and activities within the United States.

          (c) Preparedness. The Office of Homeland Security shall 
          coordinate national efforts to prepare for and mitigate the 
          consequences of terrorist threats or attacks within the United 
          States. In performing this function, the Office shall work 
          with Federal, State, and local agencies, and private entities, 
          as appropriate, to:

(i)

 review and assess the adequacy of the portions of all Federal emergency 
response plans that pertain to terrorist threats or attacks within the 
United States;

(ii)

 coordinate domestic exercises and simulations designed to assess and 
practice systems that would be called upon to respond to a terrorist threat 
or attack within the United States and coordinate programs and activities 
for training Federal, State, and local employees who would be called upon 
to respond to such a threat or attack;

(iii)

 coordinate national efforts to ensure public health preparedness for a 
terrorist attack, including reviewing vaccination policies and reviewing 
the adequacy of and, if necessary, increasing vaccine and pharmaceutical 
stockpiles and hospital capacity;

(iv)

 coordinate Federal assistance to State and local authorities and 
nongovernmental organizations to prepare for and respond to terrorist 
threats or attacks within the United States;

(v)

 ensure that national preparedness programs and activities for terrorist 
threats or attacks are developed and are regularly evaluated under 
appropriate standards and that resources are allocated to improving and 
sustaining preparedness based on such evaluations; and

(vi)

 ensure the readiness and coordinated deployment of Federal response teams 
to respond to terrorist threats or attacks, working with the Assistant to 
the President for National Security Affairs, when appropriate.

          (d) Prevention. The Office shall coordinate efforts to prevent 
          terrorist attacks within the United States. In performing this 
          function, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local 
          agencies, and private entities, as appropriate, to:

[[Page 798]]

(i)

 facilitate the exchange of information among such agencies relating to 
immigration and visa matters and shipments of cargo; and, working with the 
Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, ensure 
coordination among such agencies to prevent the entry of terrorists and 
terrorist materials and supplies into the United States and facilitate 
removal of such terrorists from the United States, when appropriate;

(ii)

 coordinate efforts to investigate terrorist threats and attacks within the 
United States; and

(iii)

 coordinate efforts to improve the security of United States borders, 
territorial waters, and airspace in order to prevent acts of terrorism 
within the United States, working with the Assistant to the President for 
National Security Affairs, when appropriate.

          (e) Protection. The Office shall coordinate efforts to protect 
          the United States and its critical infrastructure from the 
          consequences of terrorist attacks. In performing this 
          function, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local 
          agencies, and private entities, as appropriate, to:

(i)

 strengthen measures for protecting energy production, transmission, and 
distribution services and critical facilities; other utilities; 
telecommunications; facilities that produce, use, store, or dispose of 
nuclear material; and other critical infrastructure services and critical 
facilities within the United States from terrorist attack;

(ii)

 coordinate efforts to protect critical public and privately owned 
information systems within the United States from terrorist attack;

(iii)

 develop criteria for reviewing whether appropriate security measures are 
in place at major public and privately owned facilities within the United 
States;

(iv)

 coordinate domestic efforts to ensure that special events determined by 
appropriate senior officials to have national significance are protected 
from terrorist attack;

(v)

 coordinate efforts to protect transportation systems within the United 
States, including railways, highways, shipping, ports and waterways, and 
airports and civilian aircraft, from terrorist attack;

(vi)

 coordinate efforts to protect United States livestock, agriculture, and 
systems for the provision of water and food for human use and consumption 
from terrorist attack; and

(vii)

 coordinate efforts to prevent unauthorized access to, development of, and 
unlawful importation into the United States of, chemical, biological, 
radiological, nuclear, explosive, or other related materials that have the 
potential to be used in terrorist attacks.

          (f) Response and Recovery. The Office shall coordinate efforts 
          to respond to and promote recovery from terrorist threats or 
          attacks within the United States. In performing this function, 
          the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local agencies, 
          and private entities, as appropriate, to:

(i)

 coordinate efforts to ensure rapid restoration of transportation systems, 
energy production, transmission, and distribution systems; 
telecommunications; other utilities; and other critical infrastructure 
facilities after disruption by a terrorist threat or attack;

(ii)

 coordinate efforts to ensure rapid restoration of public and private 
critical information systems after disruption by a terrorist threat or 
attack;

[[Page 799]]

(iii)

 work with the National Economic Council to coordinate efforts to stabilize 
United States financial markets after a terrorist threat or attack and 
manage the immediate economic and financial consequences of the incident;

(iv)

 coordinate Federal plans and programs to provide medical, financial, and 
other assistance to victims of terrorist attacks and their families; and

(v)

 coordinate containment and removal of biological, chemical, radiological, 
explosive, or other hazardous materials in the event of a terrorist threat 
or attack involving such hazards and coordinate efforts to mitigate the 
effects of such an attack.

          (g) Incident Management. The Assistant to the President for 
          Homeland Security shall be the individual primarily 
          responsible for coordinating the domestic response efforts of 
          all departments and agencies in the event of an imminent 
          terrorist threat and during and in the immediate aftermath of 
          a terrorist attack within the United States and shall be the 
          principal point of contact for and to the President with 
          respect to coordination of such efforts. The Assistant to the 
          President for Homeland Security shall coordinate with the 
          Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, as 
          appropriate.
          (h) Continuity of Government. The Assistant to the President 
          for Homeland Security, in coordination with the Assistant to 
          the President for National Security Affairs, shall review 
          plans and preparations for ensuring the continuity of the 
          Federal Government in the event of a terrorist attack that 
          threatens the safety and security of the United States 
          Government or its leadership.
          (i) Public Affairs. The Office, subject to the direction of 
          the White House Office of Communications, shall coordinate the 
          strategy of the executive branch for communicating with the 
          public in the event of a terrorist threat or attack within the 
          United States. The Office also shall coordinate the 
          development of programs for educating the public about the 
          nature of terrorist threats and appropriate precautions and 
          responses.
          (j) Cooperation with State and Local Governments and Private 
          Entities. The Office shall encourage and invite the 
          participation of State and local governments and private 
          entities, as appropriate, in carrying out the Office's 
          functions.
          (k) Review of Legal Authorities and Development of Legislative 
          Proposals. The Office shall coordinate a periodic review and 
          assessment of the legal authorities available to executive 
          departments and agencies to permit them to perform the 
          functions described in this order. When the Office determines 
          that such legal authorities are inadequate, the Office shall 
          develop, in consultation with executive departments and 
          agencies, proposals for presidential action and legislative 
          proposals for submission to the Office of Management and 
          Budget to enhance the ability of executive departments and 
          agencies to perform those functions. The Office shall work 
          with State and local governments in assessing the adequacy of 
          their legal authorities to permit them to detect, prepare for, 
          prevent, protect against, and recover from terrorist threats 
          and attacks.
          (l) Budget Review. The Assistant to the President for Homeland 
          Security, in consultation with the Director of the Office of 
          Management and Budget (the ``Director'') and the heads of 
          executive departments and agencies, shall

[[Page 800]]

          identify programs that contribute to the Administration's 
          strategy for homeland security and, in the development of the 
          President's annual budget submission, shall review and provide 
          advice to the heads of departments and agencies for such 
          programs. The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security 
          shall provide advice to the Director on the level and use of 
          funding in departments and agencies for homeland security-
          related activities and, prior to the Director's forwarding of 
          the proposed annual budget submission to the President for 
          transmittal to the Congress, shall certify to the Director the 
          funding levels that the Assistant to the President for 
          Homeland Security believes are necessary and appropriate for 
          the homeland security-related activities of the executive 
          branch.
          e. 4. Administration.
          (a) The Office of Homeland Security shall be directed by the 
          Assistant to the President for Homeland Security.
          (b) The Office of Administration within the Executive Office 
          of the President shall provide the Office of Homeland Security 
          with such personnel, funding, and administrative support, to 
          the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability of 
          appropriations, as directed by the Chief of Staff to carry out 
          the provisions of this order.
          (c) Heads of executive departments and agencies are 
          authorized, to the extent permitted by law, to detail or 
          assign personnel of such departments and agencies to the 
          Office of Homeland Security upon request of the Assistant to 
          the President for Homeland Security, subject to the approval 
          of the Chief of Staff.
          e. 5. Establishment of Homeland Security 
          Council.
          (a) I hereby establish a Homeland Security Council (the 
          ``Council''), which shall be responsible for advising and 
          assisting the President with respect to all aspects of 
          homeland security. The Council shall serve as the mechanism 
          for ensuring coordination of homeland security-related 
          activities of executive departments and agencies and effective 
          development and implementation of homeland security policies.
          (b) The Council shall have as its members the President, the 
          Vice President, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary 
          of Defense, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and 
          Human Services, the Secretary of Transportation, the Director 
          of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Director of 
          the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Director of Central 
          Intelligence, the Assistant to the President for Homeland 
          Security, and such other officers of the executive branch as 
          the President may from time to time designate. The Chief of 
          Staff, the Chief of Staff to the Vice President, the Assistant 
          to the President for National Security Affairs, the Counsel to 
          the President, and the Director of the Office of Management 
          and Budget also are invited to attend any Council meeting. The 
          Secretary of State, the Secretary of Agriculture, the 
          Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Energy, the 
          Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary 
          of Veterans Affairs, the Administrator of the Environmental 
          Protection Agency, the Assistant to the President for Economic 
          Policy, and the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy 
          shall be invited to attend meetings pertaining to their 
          responsibilities. The heads of other executive departments and 
          agencies and other senior officials shall be invited to attend 
          Council meetings when appropriate.

[[Page 801]]

          (c) The Council shall meet at the President's direction. When 
          the President is absent from a meeting of the Council, at the 
          President's direction the Vice President may preside. The 
          Assistant to the President for Homeland Security shall be 
          responsible, at the President's direction, for determining the 
          agenda, ensuring that necessary papers are prepared, and 
          recording Council actions and Presidential decisions.
          e. 6. Original Classification Authority. 
          I hereby delegate the authority to classify information 
          originally as Top Secret, in accordance with Executive Order 
          12958 or any successor Executive Order, to the Assistant to 
          the President for Homeland Security.
          e. 7. Continuing Authorities. This order 
          does not alter the existing authorities of United States 
          Government departments and agencies. All executive departments 
          and agencies are directed to assist the Council and the 
          Assistant to the President for Homeland Security in carrying 
          out the purposes of this order.
          e. 8. General Provisions.
          (a) This order does not create any right or benefit, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a 
          party against the United States, its departments, agencies or 
          instrumentalities, its officers or employees, or any other 
          person.
          (b) References in this order to State and local governments 
          shall be construed to include tribal governments and United 
          States territories and other possessions.
          (c) References to the ``United States'' shall be construed to 
          include United States territories and possessions.
          e. 9. Amendments to Executive Order 
          12656. Executive Order 12656 of November 18, 1988, as amended, 
          is hereby further amended as follows:
          (a) Section 101(a) is amended by adding at the end of the 
          fourth sentence: ``, except that the Homeland Security Council 
          shall be responsible for administering such policy with 
          respect to terrorist threats and attacks within the United 
          States.''
          (b) Section 104(a) is amended by adding at the end: ``, except 
          that the Homeland Security Council is the principal forum for 
          consideration of policy relating to terrorist threats and 
          attacks within the United States.''
          (c) Section 104(b) is amended by inserting the words ``and the 
          Homeland Security Council'' after the words ``National 
          Security Council.''
          (d) The first sentence of section 104(c) is amended by 
          inserting the words ``and the Homeland Security Council'' 
          after the words ``National Security Council.''
          (e) The second sentence of section 104(c) is replaced with the 
          following two sentences: ``Pursuant to such procedures for the 
          organization and management of the National Security Council 
          and Homeland Security Council processes as the President may 
          establish, the Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
          Agency also shall assist in the implementation of and 
          management of those processes as the President may establish. 
          The Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency also 
          shall assist in the implementation of national security 
          emergency preparedness policy by coordinating with the other 
          Federal departments and agencies and with State

[[Page 802]]

          and local governments, and by providing periodic reports to 
          the National Security Council and the Homeland Security 
          Council on implementation of national security emergency 
          preparedness policy.''
          (f) Section 201(7) is amended by inserting the words ``and the 
          Homeland Security Council'' after the words ``National 
          Security Council.''
          (g) Section 206 is amended by inserting the words ``and the 
          Homeland Security Council'' after the words ``National 
          Security Council.''
          (h) Section 208 is amended by inserting the words ``or the 
          Homeland Security Council'' after the words ``National 
          Security Council.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 8, 2001.

EO 13229


Executive Order 13229 of October 9, 2001

Amendment to Executive Order 13045, Extending the Task Force on 
Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          extend the Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety 
          Risks to Children, it is hereby ordered that Executive Order 
          13045 of April 21, 1997, is amended by deleting in section 3-
          306 of that order ``for a period of 4 years from the first 
          meeting'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``for 6 years from the 
          date of this order''.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 9, 2001.

EO 13230


Executive Order 13230 of October 12, 2001

President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic 
Americans

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          advance the development of human potential, strengthen the 
          Nation's capacity to provide high-quality education, and 
          increase opportunities for Hispanic Americans to participate 
          in and benefit from Federal education programs, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. There is established, in the 
          Department of Education, the President's Advisory Commission 
          on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans (Commission). 
          The Commission shall consist of not more than 25 members. 
          Twenty-one of the members shall be appointed by the President.

[[Page 803]]

          Those members shall be representatives of educational, 
          business, professional, and community organizations who are 
          committed to improving educational attainment within the 
          Hispanic community, as well as other persons deemed 
          appropriate by the President. The President shall designate 
          two of the appointed members to serve as Co-Chairs of the 
          Commission. The other four members of the Commission shall be 
          ex officio members, one each from the Department of Education, 
          the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the 
          Department of the Treasury, and the Small Business 
          Administration. The ex officio members shall be the respective 
          Secretaries of those agencies and the Administrator of the 
          Small Business Administration, or their designees.
          e. 2. The Commission shall provide advice 
          to the Secretary of Education (``Secretary'') and shall issue 
          reports to the President, as described in section 7 below, 
          concerning:
          (a) the progress of Hispanic Americans in closing the academic 
          achievement gap and attaining the goals established by the 
          President's ``No Child Left Behind'' educational blueprint;
          (b) the development, monitoring, and coordination of Federal 
          efforts to promote high-quality education for Hispanic 
          Americans;
          (c) ways to increase parental, State and local, private 
          sector, and community involvement in improving education; and
          (d) ways to maximize the effectiveness of Federal education 
          initiatives within the Hispanic community.
          e. 3. There is established, in the 
          Department of Education, an office called the White House 
          Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans 
          (Initiative). The Initiative shall be located at, staffed, and 
          supported by the Department of Education, and headed by a 
          Director, who shall be a senior level executive branch 
          official who reports to the Secretary. The Initiative shall 
          provide the necessary staff, resources, and assistance to the 
          Commission and shall assist and advise the Secretary in 
          carrying out his responsibilities under this order. The staff 
          of the Initiative shall gather and disseminate information 
          relating to the educational achievement gap of Hispanic 
          Americans, using a variety of means, including conducting 
          surveys, conferences, field hearings, and meetings, and other 
          appropriate vehicles designed to encourage the participation 
          of organizations and individuals interested in such issues, 
          including parents, community leaders, academicians, business 
          leaders, teachers, employers, employees and public officials 
          at the local, State, and Federal levels. To the extent 
          permitted by law, executive branch departments and agencies 
          shall cooperate in providing resources, including personnel 
          detailed to the Initiative, to meet the objectives of this 
          order. The Initiative shall include both career civil service 
          and appointed staff with expertise in the area of education.
          e. 4. Executive branch departments and 
          agencies, to the extent permitted by law and practicable, 
          shall provide any appropriate information requested by the 
          Commission or the staff of the Initiative, including data 
          relating to the eligibility for and participation by Hispanic 
          Americans in Federal education programs and the progress of 
          Hispanic Americans in closing the academic achievement gap and 
          in achieving the goals of the President's ``No Child Left 
          Behind'' education blueprint. Where adequate data are not

[[Page 804]]

          available, the Commission shall suggest the means for 
          collecting the data. In accordance with the accountability 
          goals established by the President, executive branch 
          departments and agencies involved in relevant programs shall 
          report to the President through the Initiative by September 
          30, 2002, on:
          (a) efforts to increase participation of Hispanic Americans in 
          Federal education programs and services;
          (b) efforts to include Hispanic-serving school districts, 
          Hispanic-serving institutions, and other educational 
          institutions for Hispanic Americans in Federal education 
          programs and services;
          (c) levels of participation attained by Hispanic Americans in 
          Federal education programs and services; and
          (d) the measurable impact resulting from these efforts and 
          levels of participation. The Department of Education's report 
          also shall describe the overall condition of Hispanic American 
          education and such other aspects of the educational status of 
          Hispanic Americans, as the Secretary considers appropriate.
          e. 5. Insofar as the Federal Advisory 
          Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App), may apply to the 
          Commission, any functions of the President under that Act, 
          except that of reporting to the Congress, shall be performed 
          by the Department of Education in accordance with the 
          guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of 
          General Services.
          e. 6. (a) Members of the Commission shall 
          serve without compensation, but shall be allowed travel 
          expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as 
          authorized by law for persons serving intermittently in the 
          Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).
          (b) To the extent permitted by law, the Department of 
          Education shall provide funding and administrative support for 
          the Commission and the Initiative.
          e. 7. The Commission shall prepare and 
          submit an interim and final report to the President outlining 
          its findings and recommendations as follows:
          (a) The Commission shall submit an Interim Report no later 
          than September 30, 2002. The Interim Report shall describe the 
          Commission's examination of:

(i)

 available research and information on the effectiveness of current 
practices at the local, State, and Federal levels in closing the 
educational achievement gap for Hispanic Americans and attaining the goals 
established by the President's ``No Child Left Behind'' educational 
blueprint;

(ii)

 available research and information on the effectiveness of current 
practices involving Hispanic parents in the education of their children; 
and

(iii)

 the appropriate role of Federal agencies' education programs in helping 
Hispanic parents successfully prepare their children to graduate from high 
school and attend post secondary institutions.

          (b) The Commission shall issue a Final Report no later than 
          March 31, 2003. The Final Report shall set forth the 
          Commission's recommendations regarding:

[[Page 805]]

(i)

 a multi-year plan, based on the data collected concerning identification 
of barriers to and successful models for closing the educational 
achievement gap for Hispanic Americans, that provides for a coordinated 
effort among parents, community leaders, business leaders, educators, and 
public officials at the local, State, and Federal levels to close the 
educational achievement gap for Hispanic Americans and ensure attainment of 
the goals established by the President's ``No Child Left Behind'' 
educational blueprint.

(ii)

 the development of a monitoring system that measures and holds executive 
branch departments and agencies accountable for the coordination of Federal 
efforts among the designated executive departments and agencies to ensure 
the participation of Hispanic Americans in Federal education programs and 
promote high-quality education for Hispanic Americans;

(iii)

 the identification of successful methods employed throughout the Nation in 
increasing parental, State and local, private sector, and community 
involvement in improving education for Hispanic Americans;

(iv)

 ways to improve on and measure the effectiveness of Federal agencies' 
education programs in ensuring that Hispanic Americans close the 
educational achievement gap and attain the goals established by the 
President's ``No Child Left Behind'' educational blueprint; and

(v)

 how Federal Government education programs can best be applied to ensure 
Hispanic parents successfully prepare their children to attend post 
secondary institutions.

          e. 8. The Commission shall terminate 30 
          days after submitting its final report, unless extended by the 
          President.
          e. 9. Executive Order 12900 of February 
          22, 1994, as amended, is revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 12, 2001.

EO 13231


Executive Order 13231 of October 16, 2001

Critical Infrastructure Protection in the Information Age

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          ensure protection of information systems for critical 
          infrastructure, including emergency preparedness 
          communications, and the physical assets that support such 
          systems, in the information age, it is hereby ordered as 
          follows:
          etion 1. Policy.
          (a) The information technology revolution has changed the way 
          business is transacted, government operates, and national 
          defense is conducted. Those three functions now depend on an 
          interdependent network of critical information 
          infrastructures. The protection program authorized by this 
          order shall consist of continuous efforts to secure 
          information systems for critical infrastructure, including 
          emergency preparedness communications,

[[Page 806]]

          and the physical assets that support such systems. Protection 
          of these systems is essential to the telecommunications, 
          energy, financial services, manufacturing, water, 
          transportation, health care, and emergency services sectors.
          (b) It is the policy of the United States to protect against 
          disruption of the operation of information systems for 
          critical infrastructure and thereby help to protect the 
          people, economy, essential human and government services, and 
          national security of the United States, and to ensure that any 
          disruptions that occur are infrequent, of minimal duration, 
          and manageable, and cause the least damage possible. The 
          implementation of this policy shall include a voluntary 
          public-private partnership, involving corporate and 
          nongovernmental organizations.
          e. 2. Scope. To achieve this policy, 
          there shall be a senior executive branch board to coordinate 
          and have cognizance of Federal efforts and programs that 
          relate to protection of information systems and involve:
          (a) cooperation with and protection of private sector critical 
          infrastructure, State and local governments' critical 
          infrastructure, and supporting programs in corporate and 
          academic organizations;
          (b) protection of Federal departments' and agencies' critical 
          infrastructure; and
          (c) related national security programs.
          e. 3. Establishment. I hereby establish 
          the ``President's Critical Infrastructure Protection Board'' 
          (the ``Board'').
          e. 4. Continuing Authorities. This order 
          does not alter the existing authorities or roles of United 
          States Government departments and agencies. Authorities set 
          forth in 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35, and other applicable law, 
          provide senior officials with responsibility for the security 
          of Federal Government information systems.
          (a) Executive Branch Information Systems Security. The 
          Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has the 
          responsibility to develop and oversee the implementation of 
          government-wide policies, principles, standards, and 
          guidelines for the security of information systems that 
          support the executive branch departments and agencies, except 
          those noted in section 4(b) of this order. The Director of OMB 
          shall advise the President and the appropriate department or 
          agency head when there is a critical deficiency in the 
          security practices within the purview of this section in an 
          executive branch department or agency. The Board shall assist 
          and support the Director of OMB in this function and shall be 
          reasonably cognizant of programs related to security of 
          department and agency information systems.
          (b) National Security Information Systems. The Secretary of 
          Defense and the Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) shall 
          have responsibility to oversee, develop, and ensure 
          implementation of policies, principles, standards, and 
          guidelines for the security of information systems that 
          support the operations under their respective control. In 
          consultation with the Assistant to the President for National 
          Security Affairs and the affected departments and agencies, 
          the Secretary of Defense and the DCI shall develop policies, 
          principles, standards, and guidelines for the security of 
          national security information systems that support the 
          operations of other executive branch departments and agencies 
          with national security information.

[[Page 807]]

(i)

 Policies, principles, standards, and guidelines developed under this 
subsection may require more stringent protection than those developed in 
accordance with subsection 4(a) of this order.

(ii)

 The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs shall advise 
the President and the appropriate department or agency head when there is a 
critical deficiency in the security practices of a department or agency 
within the purview of this section. The Board, or one of its standing or ad 
hoc committees, shall be reasonably cognizant of programs to provide 
security and continuity to national security information systems.

          (c) Additional Responsibilities: The Heads of Executive Branch 
          Departments and Agencies. The heads of executive branch 
          departments and agencies are responsible and accountable for 
          providing and maintaining adequate levels of security for 
          information systems, including emergency preparedness 
          communications systems, for programs under their control. 
          Heads of such departments and agencies shall ensure the 
          development and, within available appropriations, funding of 
          programs that adequately address these mission areas. Cost-
          effective security shall be built into and made an integral 
          part of government information systems, especially those 
          critical systems that support the national security and other 
          essential government programs. Additionally, security should 
          enable, and not unnecessarily impede, department and agency 
          business operations.
          e. 5. Board Responsibilities. Consistent 
          with the responsibilities noted in section 4 of this order, 
          the Board shall recommend policies and coordinate programs for 
          protecting information systems for critical infrastructure, 
          including emergency preparedness communications, and the 
          physical assets that support such systems. Among its 
          activities to implement these responsibilities, the Board 
          shall:
          (a) Outreach to the Private Sector and State and Local 
          Governments. In consultation with affected executive branch 
          departments and agencies, coordinate outreach to and 
          consultation with the private sector, including corporations 
          that own, operate, develop, and equip information, 
          telecommunications, transportation, energy, water, health 
          care, and financial services, on protection of information 
          systems for critical infrastructure, including emergency 
          preparedness communications, and the physical assets that 
          support such systems; and coordinate outreach to State and 
          local governments, as well as communities and representatives 
          from academia and other relevant elements of society.

(i)

 When requested to do so, assist in the development of voluntary standards 
and best practices in a manner consistent with 15 U.S.C. Chapter 7;

(ii)

 Consult with potentially affected communities, including the legal, 
auditing, financial, and insurance communities, to the extent permitted by 
law, to determine areas of mutual concern; and

[[Page 808]]

(iii)

 Coordinate the activities of senior liaison officers appointed by the 
Attorney General, the Secretaries of Energy, Commerce, Transportation, the 
Treasury, and Health and Human Services, and the Director of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency for outreach on critical infrastructure 
protection issues with private sector organizations within the areas of 
concern to these departments and agencies. In these and other related 
functions, the Board shall work in coordination with the Critical 
Infrastructure Assurance Office (CIAO) and the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology of the Department of Commerce, the National 
Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC), and the National Communications 
System (NCS).

          (b) Information Sharing. Work with industry, State and local 
          governments, and nongovernmental organizations to ensure that 
          systems are created and well managed to share threat warning, 
          analysis, and recovery information among government network 
          operation centers, information sharing and analysis centers 
          established on a voluntary basis by industry, and other 
          related operations centers. In this and other related 
          functions, the Board shall work in coordination with the NCS, 
          the Federal Computer Incident Response Center, the NIPC, and 
          other departments and agencies, as appropriate.
          (c) Incident Coordination and Crisis Response. Coordinate 
          programs and policies for responding to information systems 
          security incidents that threaten information systems for 
          critical infrastructure, including emergency preparedness 
          communications, and the physical assets that support such 
          systems. In this function, the Department of Justice, through 
          the NIPC and the Manager of the NCS and other departments and 
          agencies, as appropriate, shall work in coordination with the 
          Board.
          (d) Recruitment, Retention, and Training Executive Branch 
          Security Professionals. In consultation with executive branch 
          departments and agencies, coordinate programs to ensure that 
          government employees with responsibilities for protecting 
          information systems for critical infrastructure, including 
          emergency preparedness communications, and the physical assets 
          that support such systems, are adequately trained and 
          evaluated. In this function, the Office of Personnel 
          Management shall work in coordination with the Board, as 
          appropriate.
          (e) Research and Development. Coordinate with the Director of 
          the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on a 
          program of Federal Government research and development for 
          protection of information systems for critical infrastructure, 
          including emergency preparedness communications, and the 
          physical assets that support such systems, and ensure 
          coordination of government activities in this field with 
          corporations, universities, Federally funded research centers, 
          and national laboratories. In this function, the Board shall 
          work in coordination with the National Science Foundation, the 
          Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and with other 
          departments and agencies, as appropriate.
          (f) Law Enforcement Coordination with National Security 
          Components. Promote programs against cyber crime and assist 
          Federal law enforcement agencies in gaining necessary 
          cooperation from executive branch departments and agencies. 
          Support Federal law enforcement agencies' investigation of 
          illegal activities involving information systems for critical 
          infrastructure, including emergency preparedness 
          communications, and the

[[Page 809]]

          physical assets that support such systems, and support 
          coordination by these agencies with other departments and 
          agencies with responsibilities to defend the Nation's 
          security. In this function, the Board shall work in 
          coordination with the Department of Justice, through the NIPC, 
          and the Department of the Treasury, through the Secret 
          Service, and with other departments and agencies, as 
          appropriate.
          (g) International Information Infrastructure Protection. 
          Support the Department of State's coordination of United 
          States Government programs for international cooperation 
          covering international information infrastructure protection 
          issues.
          (h) Legislation. In accordance with OMB circular A-19, advise 
          departments and agencies, the Director of OMB, and the 
          Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs on 
          legislation relating to protection of information systems for 
          critical infrastructure, including emergency preparedness 
          communications, and the physical assets that support such 
          systems.
          (i) Coordination with Office of Homeland Security. Carry out 
          those functions relating to protection of and recovery from 
          attacks against information systems for critical 
          infrastructure, including emergency preparedness 
          communications, that were assigned to the Office of Homeland 
          Security by Executive Order 13228 of October 8, 2001. The 
          Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, in 
          coordination with the Assistant to the President for National 
          Security Affairs, shall be responsible for defining the 
          responsibilities of the Board in coordinating efforts to 
          protect physical assets that support information systems.
          e. 6. Membership. (a) Members of the 
          Board shall be drawn from the executive branch departments, 
          agencies, and offices listed below; in addition, concerned 
          Federal departments and agencies may participate in the 
          activities of appropriate committees of the Board. The Board 
          shall be led by a Chair and Vice Chair, designated by the 
          President. Its other members shall be the following senior 
          officials or their designees:

  (i) Secretary of State;

  (ii) Secretary of the Treasury;

  (iii) Secretary of Defense;

  (iv) Attorney General;

  (v) Secretary of Commerce;

  (vi) Secretary of Health and Human Services;

  (vii) Secretary of Transportation;

  (viii) Secretary of Energy;

  (ix) Director of Central Intelligence;

  (x) Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff;

  (xi) Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency;

  (xii) Administrator of General Services;

  (xiii) Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

  (xiv) Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy;

  (xv) Chief of Staff to the Vice President;

[[Page 810]]

  (xvi) Director of the National Economic Council;

  (xvii) Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs;

  (xviii) Assistant to the President for Homeland Security;

  (xix) Chief of Staff to the President; and

  (xx) Such other executive branch officials as the President may 
designate.

          Members of the Board and their designees shall be full-time or 
          permanent part-time officers or employees of the Federal 
          Government.
          (b) In addition, the following officials shall serve as 
          members of the Board and shall form the Board's Coordination 
          Committee:

(i)

 Director, Critical Infrastructure Assurance Office, Department of 
Commerce;

(ii)

 Manager, National Communications System;

(iii)

 Vice Chair, Chief Information Officers' (CIO) Council;

(iv)

 Information Assurance Director, National Security Agency;

(v)

 Deputy Director of Central Intelligence for Community Management; and

(vi)

 Director, National Infrastructure Protection Center, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Department of Justice.

          (c) The Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission may 
          appoint a representative to the Board.
          e. 7. Chair. (a) The Chair also shall be 
          the Special Advisor to the President for Cyberspace Security. 
          Executive branch departments and agencies shall make all 
          reasonable efforts to keep the Chair fully informed in a 
          timely manner, and to the greatest extent permitted by law, of 
          all programs and issues within the purview of the Board. The 
          Chair, in consultation with the Board, shall call and preside 
          at meetings of the Board and set the agenda for the Board. The 
          Chair, in consultation with the Board, may propose policies 
          and programs to appropriate officials to ensure the protection 
          of the Nation's information systems for critical 
          infrastructure, including emergency preparedness 
          communications, and the physical assets that support such 
          systems. To ensure full coordination between the 
          responsibilities of the National Security Council (NSC) and 
          the Office of Homeland Security, the Chair shall report to 
          both the Assistant to the President for National Security 
          Affairs and to the Assistant to the President for Homeland 
          Security. The Chair shall coordinate with the Assistant to the 
          President for Economic Policy on issues relating to private 
          sector systems and economic effects and with the Director of 
          OMB on issues relating to budgets and the security of computer 
          networks addressed in subsection 4(a) of this order.
          (b) The Chair shall be assisted by an appropriately sized 
          staff within the White House Office. In addition, heads of 
          executive branch departments and agencies are authorized, to 
          the extent permitted by law, to detail or assign personnel of 
          such departments and agencies to the Board's staff upon 
          request of the Chair, subject to the approval of the Chief of 
          Staff to the President. Members of the Board's staff with 
          responsibilities relating to national security information 
          systems, communications, and information warfare may, with 
          respect to those responsibilities, also work at the direction 
          of the Assistant to the President for National Security 
          Affairs.
          e. 8. Standing Committees. (a) The Board 
          may establish standing and ad hoc committees as appropriate. 
          Representation on standing committees

[[Page 811]]

          shall not be limited to those departments and agencies on the 
          Board, but may include representatives of other concerned 
          executive branch departments and agencies.
          (b) Chairs of standing and ad hoc committees shall report 
          fully and regularly on the activities of the committees to the 
          Board, which shall ensure that the committees are well 
          coordinated with each other.
          (c) There are established the following standing committees:

(i)

 Private Sector and State and Local Government Outreach, chaired by the 
designee of the Secretary of Commerce, to work in coordination with the 
designee of the Chairman of the National Economic Council.

(ii)

 Executive Branch Information Systems Security, chaired by the designee of 
the Director of OMB. The committee shall assist OMB in fulfilling its 
responsibilities under 44 U.S.C. Chapter 35 and other applicable law.

(iii)

 National Security Systems. The National Security Telecommunications and 
Information Systems Security Committee, as established by and consistent 
with NSD-42 and chaired by the Department of Defense, shall serve as a 
Board standing committee, and be redesignated the Committee on National 
Security Systems.

(iv)

 Incident Response Coordination, co-chaired by the designees of the 
Attorney General and the Secretary of Defense.

(v)

 Research and Development, chaired by a designee of the Director of OSTP.

(vi)

 National Security and Emergency Preparedness Communications. The NCS 
Committee of Principals is renamed the Board's Committee for National 
Security and Emergency Preparedness Communications. The reporting functions 
established above for standing committees are in addition to the functions 
set forth in Executive Order 12472 of April 3, 1984, and do not alter any 
function or role set forth therein.

(vii)

 Physical Security, co-chaired by the designees of the Secretary of Defense 
and the Attorney General, to coordinate programs to ensure the physical 
security of information systems for critical infrastructure, including 
emergency preparedness communications, and the physical assets that support 
such systems. The standing committee shall coordinate its work with the 
Office of Homeland Security and shall work closely with the Physical 
Security Working Group of the Records Access and Information Security 
Policy Coordinating Committee to ensure coordination of efforts.

(viii)

 Infrastructure Interdependencies, co-chaired by the designees of the 
Secretaries of Transportation and Energy, to coordinate programs to assess 
the unique risks, threats, and vulnerabilities associated with the 
interdependency of information systems for critical infrastructures, 
including the development of effective models, simulations, and other 
analytic tools and cost-effective technologies in this area.

(ix)

 International Affairs, chaired by a designee of the Secretary of State, to 
support Department of State coordination of United States Government 
programs for international cooperation covering international information 
infrastructure issues.

(x)

 Financial and Banking Information Infrastructure, chaired by a designee of 
the Secretary of the Treasury and including representatives of the banking 
and financial institution regulatory agencies.

[[Page 812]]

(xi)

 Other Committees. Such other standing committees as may be established by 
the Board.

          (d) Subcommittees. The chair of each standing committee may 
          form necessary subcommittees with organizational 
          representation as determined by the Chair.
          (e) Streamlining. The Board shall develop procedures that 
          specify the manner in which it or a subordinate committee will 
          perform the responsibilities previously assigned to the Policy 
          Coordinating Committee. The Board, in coordination with the 
          Director of OSTP, shall review the functions of the Joint 
          Telecommunications Resources Board, established under 
          Executive Order 12472, and make recommendations about its 
          future role.
          e. 9. Planning and Budget. (a) The Board, 
          on a periodic basis, shall propose a National Plan or plans 
          for subjects within its purview. The Board, in coordination 
          with the Office of Homeland Security, also shall make 
          recommendations to OMB on those portions of executive branch 
          department and agency budgets that fall within the Board's 
          purview, after review of relevant program requirements and 
          resources.
          (b) The Office of Administration within the Executive Office 
          of the President shall provide the Board with such personnel, 
          funding, and administrative support, to the extent permitted 
          by law and subject to the availability of appropriations, as 
          directed by the Chief of Staff to carry out the provisions of 
          this order. Only those funds that are available for the Office 
          of Homeland Security, established by Executive Order 13228, 
          shall be available for such purposes. To the extent permitted 
          by law and as appropriate, agencies represented on the Board 
          also may provide administrative support for the Board. The 
          National Security Agency shall ensure that the Board's 
          information and communications systems are appropriately 
          secured.
          (c) The Board may annually request the National Science 
          Foundation, Department of Energy, Department of 
          Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of 
          Commerce, Department of Defense, and the Intelligence 
          Community, as that term is defined in Executive Order 12333 of 
          December 4, 1981, to include in their budget requests to OMB 
          funding for demonstration projects and research to support the 
          Board's activities.
          e. 10. Presidential Advisory Panels. The 
          Chair shall work closely with panels of senior experts from 
          outside of the government that advise the President, in 
          particular: the President's National Security 
          Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) created by 
          Executive Order 12382 of September 13, 1982, as amended, and 
          the National Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC or Council) 
          created by this Executive Order. The Chair and Vice Chair of 
          these two panels also may meet with the Board, as appropriate 
          and to the extent permitted by law, to provide a private 
          sector perspective.
          (a) NSTAC. The NSTAC provides the President advice on the 
          security and continuity of communications systems essential 
          for national security and emergency preparedness.
          (b) NIAC. There is hereby established the National 
          Infrastructure Advisory Council, which shall provide the 
          President advice on the security of information systems for 
          critical infrastructure supporting other sectors of the 
          economy: banking and finance, transportation, energy, 
          manufacturing, and emergency government services. The NIAC 
          shall be composed of not more than 30 members appointed by the 
          President. The members of the

[[Page 813]]

          NIAC shall be selected from the private sector, academia, and 
          State and local government. Members of the NIAC shall have 
          expertise relevant to the functions of the NIAC and generally 
          shall be selected from industry Chief Executive Officers (and 
          equivalently ranked leaders in other organizations) with 
          responsibilities for the security of information 
          infrastructure supporting the critical sectors of the economy, 
          including banking and finance, transportation, energy, 
          communications, and emergency government services. Members 
          shall not be full-time officials or employees of the executive 
          branch of the Federal Government.

(i)

 The President shall designate a Chair and Vice Chair from among the 
members of the NIAC.

(ii)

 The Chair of the Board established by this order will serve as the 
Executive Director of the NIAC.

          (c) NIAC Functions. The NIAC will meet periodically to:

(i)

 enhance the partnership of the public and private sectors in protecting 
information systems for critical infrastructures and provide reports on 
this issue to the President, as appropriate;

(ii)

 propose and develop ways to encourage private industry to perform periodic 
risk assessments of critical information and telecommunications systems;

(iii)

 monitor the development of private sector Information Sharing and Analysis 
Centers (ISACs) and provide recommendations to the Board on how these 
organizations can best foster improved cooperation among the ISACs, the 
NIPC, and other Federal Government entities;

(iv)

 report to the President through the Board, which shall ensure appropriate 
coordination with the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy under 
the terms of this order; and

(v)

 advise lead agencies with critical infrastructure responsibilities, sector 
coordinators, the NIPC, the ISACs, and the Board.

          (d) Administration of the NIAC.

(i)

 The NIAC may hold hearings, conduct inquiries, and establish 
subcommittees, as appropriate.

(ii)

 Upon the request of the Chair, and to the extent permitted by law, the 
heads of the executive branch departments and agencies shall provide the 
Council with information and advice relating to its functions.

(iii)

 Senior Federal Government officials may participate in the meetings of the 
NIAC, as appropriate.

(iv)

 Members shall serve without compensation for their work on the Council. 
However, members may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu 
of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving intermittently in 
Federal Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707).

(v)

 To the extent permitted by law, and subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the Department of Commerce, through the CIAO, shall provide 
the NIAC with administrative services, staff, and other support services 
and such funds as may be necessary for the performance of the NIAC's 
functions.

          (e) General Provisions.

[[Page 814]]

(i)

 Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), 
may apply to the NIAC, the functions of the President under that Act, 
except that of reporting to the Congress, shall be performed by the 
Department of Commerce in accordance with the guidelines and procedures 
established by the Administrator of General Services.

(ii)

 The Council shall terminate 2 years from the date of this order, unless 
extended by the President prior to that date.

(iii)

 Executive Order 13130 of July 14, 1999, is hereby revoked.

          e. 11. National Communications System. 
          Changes in technology are causing the convergence of much of 
          telephony, data relay, and internet communications networks 
          into an interconnected network of networks. The NCS and its 
          National Coordinating Center shall support use of telephony, 
          converged information, voice networks, and next generation 
          networks for emergency preparedness and national security 
          communications functions assigned to them in Executive Order 
          12472. All authorities and assignments of responsibilities to 
          departments and agencies in that order, including the role of 
          the Manager of NCS, remain unchanged except as explicitly 
          modified by this order.
          e. 12. Counter-intelligence. The Board 
          shall coordinate its activities with those of the Office of 
          the Counter-intelligence Executive to address the threat to 
          programs within the Board's purview from hostile foreign 
          intelligence services.
          e. 13. Classification Authority. I hereby 
          delegate to the Chair the authority to classify information 
          originally as Top Secret, in accordance with Executive Order 
          12958 of April 17, 1995, as amended, or any successor 
          Executive Order.
          e. 14. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in 
          this order shall supersede any requirement made by or under 
          law.
          (b) This order does not create any right or benefit, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity, 
          against the United States, its departments, agencies or other 
          entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 16, 2001.

EO 13232


Executive Order 13232 of October 20, 2001

Further Amendment to Executive Order 10789, as Amended, To Authorize the 
Department of Health and Human Services To Exercise Certain Contracting 
Authority in Connection With National Defense Functions

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 50 
          U.S.C. 1431-35, and in order to authorize the Department of 
          Health and Human Services to exercise certain contracting 
          authority in connection with national defense functions, it

[[Page 815]]

          is hereby ordered that Executive Order 10789 of November 14, 
          1958, as amended, is further amended by inserting the words 
          ``Department of Health and Human Services'' in the list of 
          departments and agencies in section 21 of that order after the 
          words ``Department of Commerce.''

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

October 20, 2001.

EO 13233


Executive Order 13233 of November 1, 2001

Further Implementation of the Presidential Records Act

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          establish policies and procedures implementing section 2204 of 
          title 44 of the United States Code with respect to 
          constitutionally based privileges, including those that apply 
          to Presidential records reflecting military, diplomatic, or 
          national security secrets, Presidential communications, legal 
          advice, legal work, or the deliberative processes of the 
          President and the President's advisors, and to do so in a 
          manner consistent with the Supreme Court's decisions in Nixon 
          v. Administrator of General Services, 433 U.S. 425 (1977), and 
          other cases, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Definitions.
          For purposes of this order:
          (a) ``Archivist'' refers to the Archivist of the United States 
          or his designee.
          (b) ``Presidential records'' refers to those documentary 
          materials maintained by the National Archives and Records 
          Administration pursuant to the Presidential Records Act, 44 
          U.S.C. 2201-2207.
          (c) ``Former President'' refers to the former President during 
          whose term or terms of office particular Presidential records 
          were created.
          e. 2. Constitutional and Legal 
          Background.
          (a) For a period not to exceed 12 years after the conclusion 
          of a Presidency, the Archivist administers records in 
          accordance with the limitations on access imposed by section 
          2204 of title 44. After expiration of that period, section 
          2204(c) of title 44 directs that the Archivist administer 
          Presidential records in accordance with section 552 of title 
          5, the Freedom of Information Act, including by withholding, 
          as appropriate, records subject to exemptions (b)(1), (b)(2), 
          (b)(3), (b)(4), (b)(6), (b)(7), (b)(8), and (b)(9) of section 
          552. Section 2204(c)(1) of title 44 provides that exemption 
          (b)(5) of section 552 is not available to the Archivist as a 
          basis for withholding records, but section 2204(c)(2) 
          recognizes that the former President or the incumbent 
          President may assert any constitutionally based privileges, 
          including those ordinarily encompassed within exemption (b)(5) 
          of section 552. The President's constitutionally based 
          privileges subsume privileges for records that reflect: 
          military, diplomatic, or national security secrets (the state 
          secrets privilege); communications of the President or his 
          advisors (the presidential communications privilege); legal 
          advice or legal work (the attorney-

[[Page 816]]

          client or attorney work product privileges); and the 
          deliberative processes of the President or his advisors (the 
          deliberative process privilege).
          (b) In Nixon v. Administrator of General Services, the Supreme 
          Court set forth the constitutional basis for the President's 
          privileges for confidential communications: ``Unless [the 
          President] can give his advisers some assurance of 
          confidentiality, a President could not expect to receive the 
          full and frank submissions of facts and opinions upon which 
          effective discharge of his duties depends.'' 433 U.S. at 448-
          49. The Court cited the precedent of the Constitutional 
          Convention, the records of which were ``sealed for more than 
          30 years after the Convention.'' Id. at 447 n.11. Based on 
          those precedents and principles, the Court ruled that 
          constitutionally based privileges available to a President 
          ``survive[] the individual President's tenure.''Id. at 449. 
          The Court also held that a former President, although no 
          longer a Government official, may assert constitutionally 
          based privileges with respect to his Administration's 
          Presidential records, and expressly rejected the argument that 
          ``only an incumbent President can assert the privilege of the 
          Presidency.'' Id. at 448.
          (c) The Supreme Court has held that a party seeking to 
          overcome the constitutionally based privileges that apply to 
          Presidential records must establish at least a ``demonstrated, 
          specific need'' for particular records, a standard that turns 
          on the nature of the proceeding and the importance of the 
          information to that proceeding. See United States v. Nixon, 
          418 U.S. 683, 713 (1974). Notwithstanding the constitutionally 
          based privileges that apply to Presidential records, many 
          former Presidents have authorized access, after what they 
          considered an appropriate period of repose, to those records 
          or categories of records (including otherwise privileged 
          records) to which the former Presidents or their 
          representatives in their discretion decided to authorize 
          access. See Nixon v. Administrator of General Services, 433 
          U.S. at 450-51.
          e. 3. Procedure for Administering 
          Privileged Presidential Records.
          Consistent with the requirements of the Constitution and the 
          Presidential Records Act, the Archivist shall administer 
          Presidential records under section 2204(c) of title 44 in the 
          following manner:
          (a) At an appropriate time after the Archivist receives a 
          request for access to Presidential records under section 
          2204(c)(1), the Archivist shall provide notice to the former 
          President and the incumbent President and, as soon as 
          practicable, shall provide the former President and the 
          incumbent President copies of any records that the former 
          President and the incumbent President request to review.
          (b) After receiving the records he requests, the former 
          President shall review those records as expeditiously as 
          possible, and for no longer than 90 days for requests that are 
          not unduly burdensome. The Archivist shall not permit access 
          to the records by a requester during this period of review or 
          when requested by the former President to extend the time for 
          review.
          (c) After review of the records in question, or of any other 
          potentially privileged records reviewed by the former 
          President, the former President shall indicate to the 
          Archivist whether the former President requests withholding of 
          or authorizes access to any privileged records.
          (d) Concurrent with or after the former President's review of 
          the records, the incumbent President or his designee may also 
          review the records in

[[Page 817]]

          question, or may utilize whatever other procedures the 
          incumbent President deems appropriate to decide whether to 
          concur in the former President's decision to request 
          withholding of or authorize access to the records.
          (1) When the former President has requested withholding of the 
          records:

(i)

 If under the standard set forth in section 4 below, the incumbent 
President concurs in the former President's decision to request withholding 
of records as privileged, the incumbent President shall so inform the 
former President and the Archivist. The Archivist shall not permit access 
to those records by a requester unless and until the incumbent President 
advises the Archivist that the former President and the incumbent President 
agree to authorize access to the records or until so ordered by a final and 
nonappealable court order.

(ii)

 If under the standard set forth in section 4 below, the incumbent 
President does not concur in the former President's decision to request 
withholding of the records as privileged, the incumbent President shall so 
inform the former President and the Archivist. Because the former President 
independently retains the right to assert constitutionally based 
privileges, the Archivist shall not permit access to the records by a 
requester unless and until the incumbent President advises the Archivist 
that the former President and the incumbent President agree to authorize 
access to the records or until so ordered by a final and nonappealable 
court order.

          (2) When the former President has authorized access to the 
          records:

(i)

 If under the standard set forth in section 4 below, the incumbent 
President concurs in the former President's decision to authorize access to 
the records, the Archivist shall permit access to the records by the 
requester.

(ii)

 If under the standard set forth in section 4 below, the incumbent 
President does not concur in the former President's decision to authorize 
access to the records, the incumbent President may independently order the 
Archivist to withhold privileged records. In that instance, the Archivist 
shall not permit access to the records by a requester unless and until the 
incumbent President advises the Archivist that the former President and the 
incumbent President agree to authorize access to the records or until so 
ordered by a final and nonappealable court order.

          e. 4. Concurrence by Incumbent President.
          Absent compelling circumstances, the incumbent President will 
          concur in the privilege decision of the former President in 
          response to a request for access under section 2204(c)(1). 
          When the incumbent President concurs in the decision of the 
          former President to request withholding of records within the 
          scope of a constitutionally based privilege, the incumbent 
          President will support that privilege claim in any forum in 
          which the privilege claim is challenged.
          e. 5. Incumbent President's Right to 
          Obtain Access.
          This order does not expand or limit the incumbent President's 
          right to obtain access to the records of a former President 
          pursuant to section 2205(2)(B).

[[Page 818]]

          e. 6. Right of Congress and Courts to 
          Obtain Access.
          This order does not expand or limit the rights of a court, 
          House of Congress, or authorized committee or subcommittee of 
          Congress to obtain access to the records of a former President 
          pursuant to section 2205(2)(A) or section 2205(2)(C). With 
          respect to such requests, the former President shall review 
          the records in question and, within 21 days of receiving 
          notice from the Archivist, indicate to the Archivist his 
          decision with respect to any privilege. The incumbent 
          President shall indicate his decision with respect to any 
          privilege within 21 days after the former President has 
          indicated his decision. Those periods may be extended by the 
          former President or the incumbent President for requests that 
          are burdensome. The Archivist shall not permit access to the 
          records unless and until the incumbent President advises the 
          Archivist that the former President and the incumbent 
          President agree to authorize access to the records or until so 
          ordered by a final and nonappealable court order.
          e. 7. No Effect on Right to Withhold 
          Records.
          This order does not limit the former President's or the 
          incumbent President's right to withhold records on any ground 
          supplied by the Constitution, statute, or regulation.
          e. 8. Withholding of Privileged Records 
          During 12-Year Period.
          In the period not to exceed 12 years after the conclusion of a 
          Presidency during which section 2204(a) and section 2204(b) of 
          title 44 apply, a former President or the incumbent President 
          may request withholding of any privileged records not already 
          protected from disclosure under section 2204. If the former 
          President or the incumbent President so requests, the 
          Archivist shall not permit access to any such privileged 
          records unless and until the incumbent President advises the 
          Archivist that the former President and the incumbent 
          President agree to authorize access to the records or until so 
          ordered by a final and nonappealable court order.
          e. 9. Establishment of Procedures.
          This order is not intended to indicate whether and under what 
          circumstances a former President should assert or waive any 
          privilege. The order is intended to establish procedures for 
          former and incumbent Presidents to make privilege 
          determinations.
          e. 10. Designation of Representative.
          The former President may designate a representative (or series 
          or group of alternative representatives, as the former 
          President in his discretion may determine) to act on his 
          behalf for purposes of the Presidential Records Act and this 
          order. Upon the death or disability of a former President, the 
          former President's designated representative shall act on his 
          behalf for purposes of the Act and this order, including with 
          respect to the assertion of constitutionally based privileges. 
          In the absence of any designated representative after the 
          former President's death or disability, the family of the 
          former President may designate a representative (or series or 
          group of alternative representatives, as they in their 
          discretion may determine) to act on the former President's 
          behalf for purposes of the Act and this order, including with 
          respect to the assertion of constitutionally based privileges.
          e. 11. Vice Presidential Records.

[[Page 819]]

          (a) Pursuant to section 2207 of title 44 of the United States 
          Code, the Presidential Records Act applies to the executive 
          records of the Vice President. Subject to subsections (b) and 
          (c), this order shall also apply with respect to any such 
          records that are subject to any constitutionally based 
          privilege that the former Vice President may be entitled to 
          invoke, but in the administration of this order with respect 
          to such records, references in this order to a former 
          President shall be deemed also to be references to the 
          relevant former Vice President.
          (b) Subsection (a) shall not be deemed to authorize a Vice 
          President or former Vice President to invoke any 
          constitutional privilege of a President or former President 
          except as authorized by that President or former President.
          (c) Nothing in this section shall be construed to grant, 
          limit, or otherwise affect any privilege of a President, Vice 
          President, former President, or former Vice President.
          e. 12. Judicial Review.
          This order is intended to improve the internal management of 
          the executive branch and is not intended to create any right 
          or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a 
          party, other than a former President or his designated 
          representative, against the United States, its agencies, its 
          officers, or any person.
          e. 13. Revocation.
          Executive Order 12667 of January 18, 1989, is revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

November 1, 2001.

EO 13234


Executive Order 13234 of November 9, 2001

Presidential Task Force on Citizen Preparedness in the War on Terrorism

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to 
          support and enhance the efforts of the American public with 
          respect to preparedness and volunteerism in the war on 
          terrorism, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. There is hereby 
          established the ``Presidential Task Force on Citizen 
          Preparedness in the War On Terrorism'' (Task Force).
          e. 2. Membership. (a) The Task Force 
          shall be composed of the heads of the following executive 
          branch entities, who may designate representatives from within 
          their respective entities to assist them in their duties in 
          connection with the Task Force: the Office of the Vice 
          President, the Office of Homeland Security, the Domestic 
          Policy Council, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, 
          the Office of Management and Budget, the Department of the 
          Treasury, the Department of Justice, the Department of Labor, 
          the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of 
          Housing

[[Page 820]]

          and Urban Development, the Department of Transportation, the 
          Department of Energy, the Department of Veterans Affairs, the 
          Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Emergency 
          Management Agency, and the Corporation for National and 
          Community Service. The heads of other executive branch 
          departments and agencies and other senior executive branch 
          officials may participate in the work of the Task Force upon 
          the invitation of the Co-Chairs.
          (b) The heads of the Office of Homeland Security and the 
          Domestic Policy Council, or their designated representatives, 
          shall serve as Co-Chairs of the Task Force.
          e. 3. Mission. The Task Force shall 
          identify, review, and recommend appropriate means by which the 
          American public can:
          (a) prepare in their homes, neighborhoods, schools, places of 
          worship, workplaces, and public places for the potential 
          consequences of any possible terrorist attacks within the 
          United States; and
          (b) volunteer to assist or otherwise support State and local 
          public health and safety officials and others engaged in the 
          effort to prevent, prepare for, and respond to any possible 
          terrorist attacks within the United States.
          e. 4. Reporting Requirement. The Task 
          Force shall submit its recommendations to the President within 
          40 days from the date of this order.
          e. 5. Termination of Task Force. The Task 
          Force shall terminate 30 days after submitting its report to 
          the President.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

November 9, 2001.

EO 13235


Executive Order 13235 of November 16, 2001

National Emergency Construction Authority

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.), and section 
          301 of title 3, United States Code, I declared a national 
          emergency that requires the use of the Armed Forces of the 
          United States, by Proclamation 7463 of September 14, 2001, 
          because of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and 
          the Pentagon, and because of the continuing and immediate 
          threat to the national security of the United States of 
          further terrorist attacks. To provide additional authority to 
          the Department of Defense to respond to that threat, and in 
          accordance with section 301 of the National Emergencies Act 
          (50 U.S.C. 1631), I hereby order that the emergency 
          construction authority at 10 U.S.C. 2808 is invoked and made 
          available in accordance with its terms to the Secretary of 
          Defense and, at the discretion of the Secretary of Defense, to 
          the Secretaries of the military departments.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

November 16, 2001.

EO 13236

[[Page 821]]


Executive Order 13236 of November 27, 2001

Waiver of Dual Compensation Provisions of the Central Intelligence Agency 
Retirement Act of 1964

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          section 292 of the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement Act 
          of 1964, as amended (50 U.S.C. 2141), and in order to conform 
          the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability 
          System to the Civil Service Retirement and Disability System, 
          it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. The Director of Central 
          Intelligence may waive the application of the dual 
          compensation reduction provisions of sections 271 and 273 of 
          the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement Act (50 U.S.C. 2111 
          and 2113) for an employee serving on a temporary basis, but 
          only if, and for so long as, the authority is necessary due to 
          an emergency involving a direct threat to life or property or 
          other unusual circumstances. Employees who receive both salary 
          and annuity pursuant to this authority may not earn additional 
          retirement benefits during this period of employment. This 
          authority may be delegated as appropriate.
          e. 2. Nothing contained in this order is 
          intended to create, nor does it create, any right, benefit, or 
          privilege, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law by a 
          party against the United States, its agencies, officers, 
          employees, or any other person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

November 27, 2001.

EO 13237


Executive Order 13237 of November 28, 2001

Creation of the President's Council on Bioethics

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment. There is 
          established the President's Council on Bioethics (the 
          ``Council'').
          e. 2. Mission.
          (a) The Council shall advise the President on bioethical 
          issues that may emerge as a consequence of advances in 
          biomedical science and technology. In connection with its 
          advisory role, the mission of the Council includes the 
          following functions:

  (1) to undertake fundamental inquiry into the human and moral 
significance of developments in biomedical and behavioral science and 
technology;

  (2) to explore specific ethical and policy questions related to these 
developments;

  (3) to provide a forum for a national discussion of bioethical issues;

[[Page 822]]

  (4) to facilitate a greater understanding of bioethical issues; and

  (5) to explore possibilities for useful international collaboration on 
bioethical issues.

          (b) In support of its mission, the Council may study ethical 
          issues connected with specific technological activities, such 
          as embryo and stem cell research, assisted reproduction, 
          cloning, uses of knowledge and techniques derived from human 
          genetics or the neurosciences, and end of life issues. The 
          Council may also study broader ethical and social issues not 
          tied to a specific technology, such as questions regarding the 
          protection of human subjects in research, the appropriate uses 
          of biomedical technologies, the moral implications of 
          biomedical technologies, and the consequences of limiting 
          scientific research.
          (c) The Council shall strive to develop a deep and 
          comprehensive understanding of the issues that it considers. 
          In pursuit of this goal, the Council shall be guided by the 
          need to articulate fully the complex and often competing moral 
          positions on any given issue, rather than by an overriding 
          concern to find consensus. The Council may therefore choose to 
          proceed by offering a variety of views on a particular issue, 
          rather than attempt to reach a single consensus position.
          (d) The Council shall not be responsible for the review and 
          approval of specific projects or for devising and overseeing 
          regulations for specific government agencies.
          (e) In support of its mission, the Council may accept 
          suggestions of issues for consideration from the heads of 
          other Government agencies and other sources, as it deems 
          appropriate.
          (f) In establishing priorities for its activities, the Council 
          shall consider the urgency and gravity of the particular 
          issue; the need for policy guidance and public education on 
          the particular issue; the connection of the bioethical issue 
          to the goal of Federal advancement of science and technology; 
          and the existence of another entity available to deliberate 
          appropriately on the bioethical issue.
          e. 3. Membership.
          (a) The Council shall be composed of not more than 18 members 
          appointed by the President from among individuals who are not 
          officers or employees of the Federal Government. The Council 
          shall include members drawn from the fields of science and 
          medicine, law and government, philosophy and theology, and 
          other areas of the humanities and social sciences.
          (b) The President shall designate a member of the Council to 
          serve as Chairperson.
          (c) The term of office of a member shall be 2 years, and 
          members shall be eligible for reappointment. Members may 
          continue to serve after the expiration of their terms until 
          the President appoints a successor. A member appointed to fill 
          a vacancy shall serve only for the unexpired term of such 
          vacancy.
          e. 4. Administration.
          (a) Upon the request of the Chairperson, the heads of 
          executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent 
          permitted by law, provide the Council with information it 
          needs for purposes of carrying out its functions.

[[Page 823]]

          (b) The Council may conduct inquiries, hold hearings, and 
          establish subcommittees, as necessary.
          (c) The Council is authorized to conduct analyses and develop 
          reports or other materials.
          (d) Members of the Council may be compensated to the extent 
          permitted by Federal law for their work on the Council. 
          Members may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in 
          lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law for persons serving 
          intermittently in Government service (5 U.S.C. 5701-5707), to 
          the extent funds are available.
          (e) To the extent permitted by law, and subject to the 
          availability of appropriations, the Department of Health and 
          Human Services shall provide the Council with administrative 
          support and with such funds as may be necessary for the 
          performance of the Council's functions.
          (f) The Council shall have a staff headed by an Executive 
          Director, who shall be appointed by the Secretary of Health 
          and Human Services in consultation with the Chairperson. To 
          the extent permitted by law, office space, analytical support, 
          and additional staff support for the Council shall be provided 
          by the Department of Health and Human Services or other 
          executive branch departments and agencies as directed by the 
          President.
          e. 5. General Provisions.
          (a) Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended 
          (5 U.S.C. App.), may apply to the Council, any functions of 
          the President under that Act, except that of reporting to the 
          Congress, shall be performed by the Secretary of Health and 
          Human Services in accordance with the guidelines that have 
          been issued by the Administrator of General Services.
          (b) The Council shall terminate 2 years from the date of this 
          order unless extended by the President prior to that date.
          (c) This order is intended only to improve the internal 
          management of the executive branch and it is not intended to 
          create any right, benefit, trust, or responsibility, 
          substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a 
          party against the United States, its agencies, its officers, 
          or any person.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

November 28, 2001.

EO 13238


Executive Order 13238 of December 5, 2001

Closing of Federal Government Executive Departments and Agencies on Monday, 
December 24, 2001

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby 
          ordered as follows:
          etion 1. All executive branch departments 
          and agencies of the Federal Government shall be closed and 
          their employees excused from duty on Monday, December 24, 
          2001, the day before Christmas Day, except as provided in 
          section 2 below.

[[Page 824]]

          e. 2. The heads of executive branch 
          departments and agencies may determine that certain offices 
          and installations of their organizations, or parts thereof, 
          must remain open and that certain employees must report for 
          duty on December 24, 2001, for reasons of national security or 
          defense or other public reasons.
          e. 3. Monday, December 24, 2001, shall be 
          considered as falling within the scope of Executive Order 
          11582 of February 11, 1971, and of 5 U.S.C. 5546 and 6103(b) 
          and other similar statutes insofar as they relate to the pay 
          and leave of employees of the United States.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 5, 2001.

EO 13239


Executive Order 13239 of December 12, 2001

Designation of Afghanistan and the Airspace Above as a Combat Zone

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President by the 
          Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, 
          including section 112 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 
          U.S.C. 112), I designate, for purposes of that section, 
          Afghanistan, including the airspace above, as an area in which 
          Armed Forces of the United States are and have been engaged in 
          combat.
          For purposes of this order, I designate September 19, 2001, as 
          the date of the commencement of combatant activities in such 
          zone.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 12, 2001.

EO 13240


Executive Order 13240 of December 18, 2001

Council of Europe in Respect of the Group of States Against Corruption

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States, including section 1 of the 
          International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288) 
          (the ``Act''), and having found that the Council of Europe in 
          Respect of the Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO) is a 
          public international organization in which the United States 
          participates within the meaning of the Act, I hereby designate 
          GRECO as a public international organization entitled to enjoy 
          the privileges, exemptions, and immunities conferred by the 
          Act. This designation is not intended to abridge in any 
          respect privileges, exemptions, or immunities that

[[Page 825]]

          such organization may have acquired or may acquire by 
          international agreement or by law.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13241


Executive Order 13241 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Agriculture

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary of Agriculture 
          (Secretary) during any period when both the Secretary and the 
          Deputy Secretary of Agriculture (Deputy Secretary) have died, 
          resigned, or are otherwise unable to perform the functions and 
          duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Farm and Foreign 
          Agricultural Services;
          (b) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Marketing and 
          Regulatory Programs;
          (c) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Rural Development;
          (d) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food, Nutrition, and 
          Consumer Services;
          (e) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Natural Resources and 
          Environment;
          (f) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Research, Education, 
          and Economics;
          (g) Under Secretary of Agriculture for Food Safety;
          (h) General Counsel of the Department of Agriculture;
          (i) Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Administration; and
          (j) Assistant Secretary of Agriculture for Congressional 
          Relations.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(j) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, to depart from this Executive Order in designating an 
          acting Secretary.

[[Page 826]]

          e. 4. Executive Order 11957 of January 
          13, 1977, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13242


Executive Order 13242 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Commerce

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary of Commerce 
          (Secretary) during any period when both the Secretary and the 
          Deputy Secretary of Commerce (Deputy Secretary) have died, 
          resigned, or are otherwise unable to perform the functions and 
          duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) General Counsel of the Department of Commerce;
          (b) Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade;
          (c) Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs;
          (d) Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and 
          Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
          Administration;
          (e) Under Secretary of Commerce for Technology;
          (f) Under Secretary of Commerce for Export Administration;
          (g) Chief Financial Officer of the Department of Commerce and 
          Assistant Secretary of Commerce in charge of Administration; 
          and
          (h) Assistant Secretary of Commerce in charge of Legislative 
          and Intergovernmental Affairs.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(h) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, to depart from this Executive Order in designating an 
          acting Secretary.

[[Page 827]]

          e. 4. Executive Order 11880 of October 2, 
          1975, Executive Order 12998 of April 5, 1996, and section 26 
          of Executive Order 12608 of September 9, 1987, are hereby 
          revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13243


Executive Order 13243 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary of Housing and 
          Urban Development (Secretary) during any period when both the 
          Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Housing and Urban 
          Development (Deputy Secretary) have died, resigned, or are 
          otherwise unable to perform the functions and duties of the 
          office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) General Counsel of the Department of Housing and Urban 
          Development;
          (b) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Housing-Federal Housing Commission;
          (c) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Community, Planning and Development;
          (d) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Public and Indian Housing;
          (e) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Policy Development and Research;
          (f) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity;
          (g) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations;
          (h) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Administration; and
          (i) Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 
          charge of Public Affairs.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(i) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.

[[Page 828]]

          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, to depart from this Executive Order in designating an 
          acting Secretary.
          e. 4. Executive Order 11274 of March 30, 
          1996, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13244


Executive Order 13244 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of the Interior

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary of the 
          Interior (Secretary) during any period when both the Secretary 
          and the Deputy Secretary of the Interior (Deputy Secretary) 
          have died, resigned, or are otherwise unable to perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Solicitor of the Department of the Interior;
          (b) Assistant Secretary of the Interior in charge of Policy, 
          Management and Budget;
          (c) Assistant Secretary of the Interior in charge of Land and 
          Minerals Management;
          (d) Assistant Secretary of the Interior in charge of Water and 
          Science;
          (e) Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife 
          and Parks; and
          (f) Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(f) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, to depart from this Executive Order in designating an 
          acting Secretary.
          e. 4. Executive Order 11487 of October 6, 
          1969, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13245

[[Page 829]]


Executive Order 13245 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Labor

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary of Labor 
          (Secretary) during any period when both the Secretary and the 
          Deputy Secretary of Labor (Deputy Secretary) have died, 
          resigned, or are otherwise unable to perform the functions and 
          duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Solicitor of Labor;
          (b) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of Administration 
          and Management;
          (c) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of Policy;
          (d) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of Congressional 
          and Intergovernmental Affairs;
          (e) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of the Employment 
          and Training Administration;
          (f) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of the Employment 
          Standards Administration;
          (g) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of the Pension and 
          Welfare Benefits Administration;
          (h) Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and 
          Health;
          (i) Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health;
          (j) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of the Office of 
          Public Affairs;
          (k) Assistant Secretary of Labor for Veterans' Employment and 
          Training; and
          (l) Assistant Secretary of Labor in charge of the Office of 
          Disability Employment Policy.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(l) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, to depart from this Executive Order in designating an 
          acting Secretary.
          e. 4. Executive Order 10513 of January 
          19, 1954, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13246

[[Page 830]]


Executive Order 13246 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of the Treasury

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary of the 
          Treasury (Secretary) during any period when both the Secretary 
          and the Deputy Secretary of the Treasury (Deputy Secretary) 
          have died, resigned, or are otherwise unable to perform the 
          functions and duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Under Secretaries of the Treasury (including the Under 
          Secretary of the Treasury for Enforcement), in the order in 
          which they shall have taken the oath of office as such 
          officers;
          (b) General Counsel of the Department of the Treasury; and
          (c) Deputy Under Secretaries of the Treasury and those 
          Assistant Secretaries of the Treasury appointed by the 
          President by and with the consent of the Senate, in the order 
          in which they shall have taken the oath of office as such 
          officers.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(c) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent
           permitted by Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the 
          United States Code, to depart from this Executive Order in 
          designating an acting Secretary.
          e. 4. Executive Order 11822 of December 
          10, 1974, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13247


Executive Order 13247 of December 18, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Veterans Affairs

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, it is hereby ordered that:
          e. 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this Executive Order, the officers named in 
          section 2, in the order listed, shall act as and perform

[[Page 831]]

          the functions and duties of the office of Secretary of 
          Veterans Affairs (Secretary) during any period when both the 
          Secretary and the Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs (Deputy 
          Secretary) have died, resigned, or are otherwise unable to 
          perform the functions and duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Health;
          (b) Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Benefits;
          (c) Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Memorial Affairs;
          (d) General Counsel of the Department of Veterans Affairs;
          (e) Assistant Secretaries of Veterans Affairs, in the order in 
          which they shall have taken the oath of office as Assistant 
          Secretaries, other than the Chief Financial Officer and, if an 
          Assistant Secretary, the Chief Information Officer;
          (f) Chief Information Officer of the Department of Veterans 
          Affairs, if the Chief Information Officer is an officer 
          appointed by the President by and with the consent of the 
          Senate;
          (g) Chief Financial Officer of the Department of Veterans 
          Affairs; and
          (h) Chairman, Board of Veterans' Appeals.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(h) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this Executive Order.
          (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this Executive Order, 
          the President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by 
          Subchapter III of Chapter 33 of title 5 of the United States 
          Code, to depart from this Executive Order in designating an 
          acting Secretary.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 18, 2001.

EO 13248


Executive Order 13248 of December 20, 2001

Establishing an Emergency Board To Investigate a Dispute Between United 
Airlines, Inc., and its Mechanics and Related Employees Represented by the 
International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers

          A dispute exists between United Airlines, Inc., and its 
          employees represented by the International Association of 
          Machinists and Aerospace Workers.
          The dispute has not heretofore been adjusted under the 
          provisions of the Railway Labor Act, as amended (45 U.S.C. 
          151-188) (the ``Act'').

[[Page 832]]

          In the judgment of the National Mediation Board, this dispute 
          threatens substantially to interrupt interstate commerce to a 
          degree that would deprive sections of the country of essential 
          transportation service.
          NOW, THEREFORE, by the authority vested in me as President by 
          the Constitution and the laws of the United States, including 
          sections 10 and 201 of the Act (45 U.S.C. 160 and 181), it is 
          hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Establishment of the Board 
          (Board). There is established, effective December 21, 2001, a 
          Board of three members to be appointed by the President to 
          investigate and report on this dispute. No member may be 
          pecuniarily or otherwise interested in any organization of 
          airline employees or any air carrier. The Board shall perform 
          its functions subject to the availability of funds.
          e. 2. Report. The Board shall report to 
          the President with respect to this dispute within 30 days of 
          its creation.
          e. 3. Maintaining Conditions. As provided 
          by section 10 of the Act, from the date of the creation of the 
          Board and for 30 days after the Board has submitted its report 
          to the President, no change in the conditions out of which the 
          dispute arose shall be made by the parties to the controversy, 
          except by the agreement of the parties.
          e. 4. Records Maintenance. The records 
          and files of the Board are records of the Office of the 
          President and upon the Board's termination shall be maintained 
          in the physical custody of the National Mediation Board.
          e. 5. Expiration. The Board shall 
          terminate upon the submission of the report provided for in 
          section 2 of this order.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 20, 2001.

EO 13249


Executive Order 13249 of December 28, 2001

Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and the laws of the United States of America, including the 
          laws cited herein, it is hereby ordered as follows:
          etion 1. Statutory Pay Systems. The rates 
          of basic pay or salaries of the statutory pay systems (as 
          defined in 5 U.S.C. 5302(1)), as adjusted under 5 U.S.C. 
          5303(a), are set forth on the schedules attached hereto and 
          made a part hereof:
          (a) The General Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5332(a)) at Schedule 1;
          (b) The Foreign Service Schedule (22 U.S.C. 3963) at Schedule 
          2; and
          (c) The schedules for the Veterans Health Administration of 
          the Department of Veterans Affairs (38 U.S.C. 7306, 7404; 
          section 301(a) of Public Law 102-40) at Schedule 3.

[[Page 833]]

          e. 2. Senior Executive Service. The rates 
          of basic pay for senior executives in the Senior Executive 
          Service, as adjusted under 5 U.S.C. 5382, are set forth on 
          Schedule 4 attached hereto and made a part hereof.
          e. 3. Executive Salaries. The rates of 
          basic pay or salaries for the following offices and positions 
          are set forth on the schedules attached hereto and made a part 
          hereof:
          (a) The Executive Schedule (5 U.S.C. 5312-5318) at Schedule 5;
          (b) The Vice President (3 U.S.C. 104) and the Congress (2 
          U.S.C. 31) at Schedule 6; and
          (c) Justices and judges (28 U.S.C. 5, 44(d), 135, 252, and 
          461(a)) at Schedule 7.
          e. 4. Uniformed Services. Pursuant to 
          section 601 of S. 1438, the National Defense Authorization Act 
          for Fiscal Year 2002 (which I signed into law on December 28, 
          2001), the rates of monthly basic pay (37 U.S.C. 203(a)) for 
          members of the uniformed services and the rate of monthly 
          cadet or midshipman pay (37 U.S.C. 203(c)) are set forth on 
          Schedule 8 attached hereto and made a part hereof.
          e. 5. Locality-Based Comparability 
          Payments. (a) Pursuant to sections 5304 and 5304a of title 5, 
          United States Code, and in accordance with section 646(a) of 
          the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act, 2002, 
          Public Law 107-67, locality-based comparability payments shall 
          be paid in accordance with Schedule 9 attached hereto and made 
          a part hereof.
          (b) The Director of the Office of Personnel Management shall 
          take such actions as may be necessary to implement these 
          payments and to publish appropriate notice of such payments in 
          the Federal eister.
          e. 6. Administrative Law Judges. The 
          rates of basic pay for administrative law judges, as adjusted 
          under 5 U.S.C. 5372(b)(4), are set forth on Schedule 10 
          attached hereto and made a part hereof.
          e. 7. Effective Dates. Schedule 8 is 
          effective on January 1, 2002. The other schedules contained 
          herein are effective on the first day of the first applicable 
          pay period beginning on or after January 1, 2002.
          e. 8. Prior Order Superseded. Executive 
          Order 13182 of December 23, 2000, is superseded.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 December 28, 2001.

[[Page 834]]

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EO 13250

[[Page 842]]


Executive Order 13250 of December 28, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Health and Human 
Services

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345 et seq., 
          it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this order, the officers named in section 2, in 
          the order listed, shall act as and perform the functions and 
          duties of the Office of the Secretary of Health and Human 
          Services (Secretary) during any period when both the Secretary 
          and the Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services (Deputy 
          Secretary) have died, resigned, or become otherwise unable to 
          perform the functions and duties of the office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) The Assistant Secretaries of Health and Human Services 
          appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate, in the 
          order in which they shall have taken the oath of office as 
          such;
          (b) The General Counsel of the Department of Health and Human 
          Services; and
          (c) Other officers within the Department of Health and Human 
          Services who have been appointed by the President by and with 
          the consent of the Senate, in the order in which they shall 
          have taken the oath of office as such.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
           (a) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(c) of this order in an acting capacity shall act 
          as Secretary pursuant to this order.
           (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of this order, the 
          President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by the 
          Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345 et seq., 
          to depart from this order in designating an acting Secretary.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 December 28, 2001.

EO 13251


Executive Order 13251 of December 28, 2001

Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of State

          By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution 
          and laws of the United States of America, including the 
          Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345 et seq., 
          it is hereby ordered that:
          etion 1. Subject to the provisions of 
          section 3 of this order, the officers named in section 2, in 
          the order listed, shall act as, and perform the duties

[[Page 843]]

          of, the office of Secretary of State (Secretary) during any 
          period in which the Secretary has died, resigned, or otherwise 
          become unable to perform the functions and duties of the 
          office of Secretary.
          e. 2. Order of Succession.
          (a) Deputy Secretary of State;
          (b) Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources;
          (c) Under Secretary of State designated for political affairs 
          pursuant to section 2651a(b) of title 22, United States Code;
          (d) Under Secretary of State designated for management affairs 
          pursuant to section 2651a(b) of title 22, United States Code;
          (e) The remaining Under Secretaries of State, in the order in 
          which they shall have taken the oath of office as such;
          (f) Assistant Secretaries of State designated for regional 
          bureaus pursuant to section 2651a(c) of title 22, United 
          States Code, in the order in which they shall have taken the 
          oath of office as such;
          (g) The following officers, in the order in which they shall 
          have taken the oath of office as such:

  (1) Remaining Assistant Secretaries of State;

  (2) Coordinator for Counterterrorism;

  (3) Director General of the Foreign Service; and

  (4) Legal Adviser;

          (h) United States Representative to the United Nations (New 
          York);
          (i) Deputy United States Representative to the United Nations 
          (New York);
          (j) The following other United States Representatives to the 
          United Nations (New York), in the order in which they shall 
          have taken the oath of office as such:

  (1) United States Representative to the United Nations for United Nations 
Management and Reform;

  (2) United States Representative to the United Nations on the Economic 
and Social Council of the United Nations; and

  (3) Alternate United States Representative to the United Nations for 
Special Political Affairs in the United Nations;

          (k) The following Chiefs of Mission, in the order listed:

  (1) United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom;

  (2) United States Ambassador to Canada;

  (3) United States Ambassador to Australia;

  (4) United States Ambassador to Mexico;

  (5) United States Ambassador to Japan; and

  (6) United States Ambassador to India;

          (l) The following officers, in the order in which they shall 
          have taken the oath of office as such:

[[Page 844]]

  (1) United States Ambassadors at Large;

  (2) Counselor; and

  (3) Special Representatives of the President; and

          (m) The remaining Chiefs of Mission, in the order in which 
          they shall have taken the oath of office as such.
          e. 3. Exceptions.
          (a) No individual who has not been appointed by the President 
          by and with the consent of the Senate shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this order.
          (b) No individual who is serving in an office listed in 
          section 2(a)-(m) in an acting capacity shall act as Secretary 
          pursuant to this order.
          (c) Notwithstanding the provisions of this order, the 
          President retains discretion, to the extent permitted by the 
          Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, 5 U.S.C. 3345 et seq., 
          to depart from this order in designating an acting Secretary.
          (d) A successor office, intended to be the equivalent of an 
          office identified in section 2 of this order, shall be deemed 
          to be the position identified in section 2 for purposes of 
          this order.
          e. 4. Executive Order 12343 of January 
          27, 1982, is hereby revoked.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 December 28, 2001.

[[Page 845]]

Title 3--The President

Other Presidential Documents



________________________________________________________________________

                      OTHER PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS

________________________________________________________________________





                                                                   Page

          Subchapter A--[Reserved]

Subchapter B--Administrative Orders                                845

Subchapter C--Reorganization Plans                               [None]

Subchapter D--Designations                                       [None]




________________________________________________________________________

                  Subchapter B--Administrative Orders

________________________________________________________________________





Presidential Determination No. 2001-09 of January 3, 2001

U.S. Contribution to the Korea Peninsula Energy Development Organization 
(KEDO): Certification and Waiver Under the Heading ``Nonproliferation, 
Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related Programs'' in Title II of the Foreign 
Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 
2001, as Enacted in Public Law 106-429

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to section 572(b) of the Foreign Operations, Export 
          Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2001, (the 
          ``Act'') (Public Law 106-429), I hereby certify that:
          (1) the parties to the Agreed Framework have taken and 
          continue to take demonstrable steps to implement the Joint 
          Declaration on Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in 
          which the Government of North Korea has committed not to test, 
          manufacture, produce, receive, possess, store, deploy, or use 
          nuclear weapons, and not to possess nuclear reprocessing or 
          uranium enrichment facilities;
          (2) the parties to the Agreed Framework have taken and 
          continue to take demonstrable steps to pursue the North-South 
          dialogue;
          (3) North Korea is complying with all provisions of the Agreed 
          Framework;

[[Page 846]]

          (6) North Korea is complying with its commitments regarding 
          access to suspect underground construction at Kumchang-ni; and
          (8) the United States is continuing to make significant 
          progress on eliminating the North Korean ballistic missle 
          threat, including further missle tests and its ballistic 
          missle exports.
          Pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 572(c) of 
          the Act, I hereby determine that it is vital to the national 
          security interests of the United States to waive the 
          certification requirements of section 572(b) of the Act with 
          respect to paragraphs (4), (5), and (7) of section 572(b) and 
          therefore hereby waive those three certification requirements 
          in order to furnish up to $55 million in funds made available 
          under the heading ``Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining 
          and Related Programs'' of the Act, for assistance for KEDO.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to report this 
          certification and waiver and the accompanying Memorandum of 
          Justification to the Congress and to arrange for publication 
          of the certification and waiver in the Federal 
          eister.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, January 3, 2001


Notice of January 4, 2001

Continuation of Libya Emergency

          On January 7, 1986, by Executive Order 12543, President Reagan 
          declared a national emergency to deal with the unusual and 
          extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign 
          policy of the United States constituted by the actions and 
          policies of the Government of Libya. On January 8, 1986, by 
          Executive Order 12544, the President took additional measures 
          to block Libyan assets in the United States. The President has 
          transmitted a notice continuing this emergency to the Congress 
          and the Federal eister every year since 1986.
          The crisis between the United States and Libya that led to the 
          declaration of a national emergency on January 7, 1986, has 
          not been resolved. Despite the United Nations Security 
          Council's suspension of U.N. sanctions against Libya upon the 
          Libyan government's hand over of the Pan Am 103 bombing 
          suspects, there are still concerns about the Libyan 
          government's support for terrorist activities and its 
          noncompliance with United Nations Security Council Resolutions 
          731 (1992), 748 (1992), and 883 (1993).
          Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National 
          Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing the 
          national emergency with respect to Libya. This notice shall be 
          published in the Federal eister and 
          transmitted to the Congress.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 4, 2001.

[[Page 847]]


Presidential Determination No. 2001-10 of January 17, 2001

Presidential Determination Pursuant to Section 2 (c) (1) of the Migration 
and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, as Amended

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to section 2 (c) (1) of the Migration and Refugee 
          Assistance Act of 1962, as amended, 22 U.S.C. 2601 (c) (1), I 
          hereby determine that it is important to the national interest 
          to make up to $22 million from the U.S. Emergency Refugee and 
          Migration Assistance Fund available to meet unexpected urgent 
          refugee and migration needs, including those of refugees, 
          displaced persons, conflict victims, and other persons at 
          risk, due to crises in the Balkans and Nepal. These funds may 
          be used, as appropriate, to provide contributions to 
          international, governmental, and nongovernmental organizations 
          and, as necessary, for administrative expenses of the Bureau 
          of Population, Refugees, and Migration.
          You are authorized and directed to inform the appropriate 
          committees of the Congress of this determination and the 
          obligation of funds under this authority, and to arrange for 
          the publication of this memorandum in the Federal 
          eister.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, January 17, 2001


Notice of January 19, 2001

Continuation of Emergency Regarding Terrorists Who Threaten To Disrupt the 
Middle East Peace Process

          On January 23, 1995, by Executive Order 12947, I declared a 
          national emergency to deal with the unusual and extraordinary 
          threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy 
          of the United States constituted by grave acts of violence 
          committed by foreign terrorists that disrupt the Middle East 
          peace process. The order, issued pursuant to the International 
          Emergency Economic Powers Act, among other authorities, blocks 
          the assets in the United States, or in the control of United 
          States persons, of foreign terrorists who threaten to disrupt 
          the Middle East peace process. I also prohibited transactions 
          or dealings by United States persons in such property. On 
          August 20, 1998, by Executive Order 13099, I identified four 
          additional persons, including Usama bin Ladin, who threaten to 
          disrupt the Middle East peace process. I have annually 
          transmitted notices of the continuation of this national 
          emergency to the Congress and the Federal 
          eister. Last year's notice of continuation was 
          published in the Federal eister on January 21, 
          2000. Because terrorist activities continue to threaten the 
          Middle East peace process and vital interests of the United 
          States in the Middle East, the national emergency declared on 
          January 23, 1995, and

[[Page 848]]

          the measures made effective on January 24, 1995, to deal with 
          that emergency must continue in effect beyond January 23, 
          2001. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d)2 of the 
          National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d) of the National 
          Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing the 
          national emergency with respect to foreign terrorists who 
          threaten to disrupt the Middle East peace process.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 19, 2001.


Presidential Determination No. 2001-11 of January 19, 2001

Waiver of Sanctions for the Transfer of Select U.S. Munitions List U.S.-
Origin Helicopter Spare Parts From the United Kingdom to India

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          Pursuant to the authority vested in me as President of the 
          United States, and consistent with title IX of the Department 
          of Defense Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public Law 106-79), I 
          hereby waive the application of the restrictions contained in 
          sections 101 and 102 of the Arms Export Control Act, as they 
          have been applied under the International Traffic in Arms 
          Regulations, and determine and certify to the Congress that 
          the application of such restrictions would not be in the 
          national security interests of the United States:

With respect to India, insofar as such restriction would otherwise apply to 
the issuance of a defense export authorization allowing the transfer of 
only certain specified U.S.-origin helicopter parts from the United Kingdom 
to India.

          You are hereby authorized and directed to report this 
          determination to the Congress and to arrange for its 
          publication in the Federal eister.

WILLIAM J. CLINTON

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, January 19, 2001


Notice of February 27, 2001

Continuation of the National Emergency Relating to Cuba and of the 
Emergency Authority Relating to the Regulation of the Anchorage and 
Movement of Vessels

          On March 1, 1996, by Proclamation 6867, President Clinton 
          declared a national emergency to address the disturbance or 
          threatened disturbance of

[[Page 849]]

          international relations caused by the February 24, 1996, 
          destruction by the Government of Cuba of two unarmed U.S.-
          registered civilian aircraft in international air space north 
          of Cuba. In July 1996 and on subsequent occasions, the 
          Government of Cuba stated its intent to forcefully defend its 
          sovereignty against any U.S.-registered vessels or aircraft 
          that might enter Cuban territorial waters or airspace while 
          involved in a memorial flotilla and peaceful protest. Since 
          these events, the Government of Cuba has not demonstrated that 
          it will refrain from the future use of reckless and excessive 
          force against U.S. vessels or aircraft that may engage in 
          memorial activities or peaceful protest north of Cuba. 
          Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the National 
          Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing the 
          national emergency with respect to Cuba and the emergency 
          authority relating to the regulation of the anchorage and 
          movement of vessels set out in Proclamation 6867.
          This notice shall be published in the Federal 
          eister and transmitted to the Congress.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

 February 27, 2001.


Presidential Determination No. 2001-12 of March 1, 2001

Certification for Major Illicit Drug Producing and Drug

Transit Countries

Memorandum for the Secretary of State

          By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 490 (b) (1) 
          (A) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (the 
          ``Act''), I hereby determine and certify that the following 
          major illicit drug producing and/or major illicit drug transit 
          countries have cooperated fully with the United States, or 
          have taken adequate steps on their own, to achieve full 
          compliance with the goals and objectives of the 1988 United 
          Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs 
          and Psychotropic Substances:

The Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, People's Republic of China, Colombia, 
Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, India, Jamaica, Laos, Mexico, 
Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Thailand, Venezuela, and Vietnam

          By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 490 (b) (1) 
          (B) of the Act, I hereby determine and certify that, for the 
          following major illicit drug producing and/or major illicit 
          drug transit countries that do not qualify for certification 
          under section 490 (b) (1) (A), the vital national interests of 
          the United States require that assistance not be withheld and 
          that the United States not vote against multilateral 
          development bank assistance:

Cambodia and Haiti

          Analysis of the relevant U.S. vital national interests and 
          risks posed thereto, as required under section 490 (b) (3) of 
          the Act, is attached for these countries.

[[Page 850]]

          I have determined that the following major illicit drug 
          producing and/or major illicit drug transit countries do not 
          meet the standards for certification set forth in section 490 
          (b):

Afghanistan and Burma

          In making these determinations, I have considered the factors 
          set forth in section 490 of the Act, based on the information 
          contained in the International Narcotics Control Strategy 
          Report of 2001. Given that the performance of each of these 
          countries has differed, I have attached an explanatory 
          statement for each of the countries subject to this 
          determination.
          You are hereby authorized and directed to report this 
          determination to the Congress immediately and to publish it in 
          the Federal eister.

GEORGE W. BUSH

THE WHITE HOUSE,

March 1, 2001.


Annual Drug Certification Determinations Pursuant to the Foreign Assistance 
Act

          tatements of Explanation
          Afhanistan
          Afghanistan continues to be the world's largest opium producer 
          after another year of major increases. Despite severe drought 
          conditions in much of the country, reliable United States 
          Government estimates indicate that cultivation increased by 25 
          percent and potential production reached 3,656 metric tons. 
          Afghanistan was responsible for 72 percent of the world 
          illicit opium supply. Traffickers of Afghan heroin continued 
          to route most of their production to Europe, but also targeted 
          the United States. United States seizure data suggest that at 
          least five percent (approximately one metric ton) of the 
          heroin imported into the United States originates in 
          Afghanistan.
          The Taliban and Northern Alliance factions vie for national 
          control of Afghanistan and both control territory used by 
          cultivators, refiners and traffickers. United Nations Drug 
          Control Programme (UNDCP) and non-governmental organization 
          (NGO) efforts at supply and demand reduction have had little 
          success due to the lack of cooperation and support from the 
          Afghan factions. The factions, especially the Taliban, which 
          controls 96 percent of the territory where poppy is grown, 
          promote poppy cultivation to finance weapons purchases as well 
          as military operations. Those in positions of authority have 
          made proclamations against poppy cultivation, but they have 
          had little or no effect on the drug trade, which continues to 
          expand.
          The Taliban issued in late July a new ban on poppy 
          cultivation. At the end of the year, evidence showed that the 
          area under cultivation was down substantially over the 
          previous year. However, it is not clear to what extent the 
          Taliban will enforce the ban on a continuing basis. Nor is it 
          clear that a ban on poppy cultivation will impede a drug trade 
          suspected by the international community to have large 
          quantities of opium in storage. The announcement of the opium 
          ban has caused opium prices to rise, a boon

[[Page 851]]

          for traffickers sitting on large stockpiles. Neither the 
          Taliban nor the Northern Alliance has taken any significant 
          action to seize stored opium or precursor chemicals, or to 
          arrest and prosecute drug traffickers. On the contrary, 
          authorities continue to tax the opium poppy crop at about ten 
          percent, and allow it to be sold in open bazaars, and to be 
          traded and transported. While there have been credible reports 
          of significant reductions in poppy cultivation, it will not be 
          possible to assess the extent of any eradication or reduction 
          in cultivation until mid-2001. The Taliban made no discernible 
          attempt to enforce earlier decrees in 1997 and 1999 that 
          banned or reduced poppy. Rather, cultivation increased 
          countrywide in those years.
          Drug production in and trafficking from Afghanistan has a 
          negative effect on the region. The drug trade corrupts local 
          authorities, is the major factor behind skyrocketing regional 
          heroin addiction in refugee and indigenous populations, and is 
          responsible for increased levels of terrorism and drug-related 
          violence in neighboring countries. The Afghan drug trade also 
          undermines the rule of law by generating large amounts of 
          cash, contributing to regional money laundering and official 
          corruption in countries with weak economies and institutions.
          United States officials have repeatedly urged Taliban 
          officials to respect and implement Afghanistan's international 
          obligations on terrorism, illicit drugs, and human rights. No 
          Afghan faction took any significant steps to achieve the goals 
          and objectives of the 1988 UN Drug Convention. In the absence 
          of an effective central government, a trained anti-drug force, 
          and an operational drug policy, there is virtually no 
          counterdrug law enforcement in Afghanistan.
          he Bahamas
          The Bahamas is a major transit country for U.S.-bound cocaine 
          and marijuana from South America and the Caribbean. The 
          Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas cooperates with 
          the United States Government to interdict drugs in Bahamian 
          territory, reduce drug demand, combat exploitation of the 
          offshore financial sector by money launderers and other 
          financial criminals, and enhance the ability of the Bahamian 
          judicial system to prosecute and convict drug traffickers and 
          money launderers.
          During 2000, The Bahamas continued its active participation in 
          Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (OPBAT), a three-nation 
          interdiction effort against air and maritime drug smuggling. 
          Total Bahamian cocaine seizures were 47 percent higher than in 
          1999; marijuana seizures were up five percent.
          In June 2000, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) named The 
          Bahamas a non-cooperative jurisdiction due to deficiencies in 
          its anti-money laundering regime, and in July 2000, the United 
          States Treasury Department advised U.S. banks to closely 
          scrutinize all transactions with Bahamian banks. In response, 
          the Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas passed 
          legislation to strengthen its anti-money laundering regime, to 
          create a Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU), to reform its 
          strict banking secrecy rules, and to more effectively regulate 
          International Business Companies (IBCs). The Bahamas also 
          created a separate unit within the Attorney

[[Page 852]]

          General's Office to process Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty 
          (MLAT) requests and cleared its backlog of outstanding United 
          States Government requests. With full implementation of its 
          new anti-money laundering legislation, establishment of the 
          FIU, and continued improvement in international cooperation 
          via full and rapid responses to MLAT requests, The Bahamas 
          could become less attractive to financial criminals.
          The Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas has not 
          begun to implement the recommendations of a May 2000 
          assessment by the Organization of American States Inter-
          American Drug Abuse Commission (OAS/CICAD) of The Bahamas 
          precursor chemical control system, which included legislative 
          actions, awareness-raising, and institutional development.
          During 2000, the Government of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas 
          ratified the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption and 
          successfully prosecuted two corrupt police officers for drug 
          trafficking. The Bahamas is a party to the 1988 UN Drug 
          Convention and works to meet the goals and objectives of that 
          Convention.
          Bolivia
          In 2000, the Government of Bolivia eliminated all commercially 
          significant coca cultivation in the Chapare, Bolivia's 
          principal coca-growing region. With only 14,600 hectares 
          remaining under cultivation in all of Bolivia, largely in the 
          Yungas region, Bolivia's potential cocaine production was 
          reduced from 70 metric tons in 1999 to 43 metric tons in 2000.
          Plans are underway to initiate coca eradication and 
          counterdrug alternative development in the Yungas region, 
          where 12,000 hectares of legal and 1,700 hectares of illegal 
          coca remain. The Government of Bolivia is also undertaking a 
          reevaluation of the needs of the legal coca market, with a 
          view to revising downward the legal maximum amount that can be 
          grown. There are no reports of diversion to the illegal 
          markets of the 300 hectares of illegal coca in the Apolo 
          region. Eradication forces will remain in the Chapare to 
          eliminate the last 600 hectares of coca and to fully enforce 
          the provisions of Bolivia's anti-drug law.
          Violent disturbances in October failed to derail the progress 
          in coca eradication; however, their negative impact on overall 
          economic activity in Bolivia was significant. The disturbances 
          also threatened counterdrug alternative development production 
          infrastructure and hard-won market linkages with Argentine and 
          Chilean buyers.
          Enforcement of Bolivia's anti-money laundering legislation was 
          not effective in 2000, and there were no arrests or 
          prosecutions. The asset seizure and forfeiture regime remains 
          mired in bureaucratic and legal ambiguities. It is unclear if 
          new regulations planned to take effect in May 2001 will 
          resolve attendant constitutional questions. The chemical 
          interdiction program, however, was highly successful in 2000, 
          and continued to force Bolivian traffickers to rely on 
          inferior substitutes for scarce and expensive chemicals 
          smuggled in from neighboring countries and to streamline the 
          cocaine base and hydrochloride (HCl) production process. This 
          resulted in the further reduction of the purity of Bolivian 
          cocaine, causing most foreign traffickers to purchase base in 
          Bolivia or import Peruvian base through Bolivia for 
          transshipment and processing into HCl in Brazil where 
          essential chemicals are readily available.

[[Page 853]]

          Brazil
          Brazil continues to be a major transit country for illicit 
          drugs shipped to the United States and Europe as well as a 
          major producer of precursor chemicals. The Government of 
          Brazil's two main counterdrug events of 2000 were the launch 
          of Operation Cobra and the clarification of the division of 
          counterdrug responsibilities. Operation Cobra reinforces 
          Brazil's northern border with Colombia against any spillover 
          resulting from implementation of Plan Colombia by the 
          Government of Colombia. In addition, the Government of Brazil 
          reorganized its counterdrug effort to give responsibility for 
          supply reduction (interdiction) to the Ministry of Justice and 
          its sub-agencies (including the Federal Police) and 
          responsibility for demand reduction (treatment and prevention) 
          to SENAD, its federal anti-drug agency.
          Brazil's domestic drug problem is increasing. Regionally, 
          Brazil continues to cooperate, particularly with Colombia and 
          Peru, to effectively control the remote frontier regions where 
          illicit drugs are transported. Federal Police reported seizing 
          more than four metric tons of cocaine in 2000, a figure which 
          does not reflect the additional drug seizures made by state, 
          local, and highway police forces. A record amount of cannabis, 
          157 tons, was also reported seized. Brazil improved its 
          precursor chemical controls.
          Law enforcement cooperation overall increased, as well, among 
          Brazilian law enforcement agencies and regionally, 
          particularly with Paraguay. Brazil made progress in 
          implementing its money laundering legislation. In its 
          bilateral relationship with the United States, the Brazilian 
          Congress ratified the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty in 
          December, and resumed negotiations on a Customs Mutual 
          Assistance Agreement.
          Burma
          The world's second largest source of illicit opium and heroin, 
          Burma accounts for approximately 80 percent of the total 
          production of Southeast Asian opium, although production has 
          declined yearly since 1996. Poppy cultivation expanded in 2000 
          to 108,700 hectares, a 21 percent increase over the 89,500 
          hectares cultivated in 1999. Because of localized bad weather, 
          Burma produced 1,085 metric tons of opium in 2000, a decrease 
          of 5 metric tons from the 1,090 metric tons produced in 1999. 
          Heroin seizures declined for the third straight year, and 
          opium seizures rose only slightly. Heroin seized in 2000 
          totaled 171 kilograms compared to 273 kilograms in 1999 and 
          404 kilograms in 1998. Opium seizures in 2000 totaled 1,528 
          kilograms compared to 1,445 kilograms seized in 1999 and 5,394 
          kilograms seized in 1998. Only two heroin refineries were 
          destroyed through November 2000. The Government of Burma 
          claimed to have eradicated 10,985 acres under poppy 
          cultivation in 2000.
          In 2000, Burmese officers seized approximately 27 million 
          methamphetamine tablets, a decrease from the nearly 29 million 
          seized in 1999 and only a small fraction of the total produced 
          in Burma. Seizures of ephedrine, the precursor used to 
          manufacture methamphetamines, also declined from nearly 6,500 
          kilograms in 1999 to approximately 2,700 kilograms in 2000.
          The Government of Burma pursued a cautious, low-risk 
          counterdrug program, introduced no new counterdrug policies, 
          continued to exert little direct pressure on major drug 
          organizations, and made almost no attempt to seize drugs or 
          destroy illegal drug factories in United Wa State Army-
          controlled territories.

[[Page 854]]

          The Government of Burma continued to pursue and arrest 
          individual drug traffickers, including members of some former 
          insurgent groups, but has been unwilling or unable to take on 
          the most powerful groups directly. The cease-fire agreements 
          signed with these insurgent groups often implicitly condone 
          their continued participation in drug production and 
          trafficking, at least over the short term. The ethnic drug-
          trafficking armies, such as the United Wa State Army and the 
          Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army, remain armed and 
          heavily involved in the heroin trade.
          The Government of Burma expressed support for poppy 
          eradication and crop substitution, but allocated few resources 
          to such projects. Its policy is to force the leaders in the 
          ethnic areas to spend their own revenues, including from the 
          drug trade, on social and physical infrastructure. The 
          approach limits the Government of Burma's ability to continue 
          or expand its counterdrug efforts.
          Burma's 1993 Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law 
          conforms to the 1988 UN Drug Convention and contains useful 
          legal tools for addressing money laundering, seizing drug-
          related assets, and prosecuting drug conspiracy cases. 
          Government officials, claiming they lack sufficient expertise, 
          have been slow to implement the law, targeting few, if any, 
          major traffickers and their drug-related assets. Money 
          laundering in Burma and the return of drug profits laundered 
          elsewhere are thought to be significant factors in the overall 
          Burmese economy, although the extent is impossible to measure 
          accurately.
          The Government of Burma continued to refuse to transfer to 
          U.S. custody drug lord Chang Qifu on grounds that he had not 
          violated his 1996 surrender agreement. The 1988 UN Drug 
          Convention obligates parties, including Burma, to prosecute 
          such traffickers.
          The Government of Burma's counterdrug efforts in 2000 showed 
          progress in a number of areas: crop eradication continued with 
          modest expansion; anti-drug forces conducted more vigorous 
          law-enforcement efforts; and members of some cease-fire groups 
          were arrested for drug trafficking. Such efforts must be 
          expanded, however, if they are to have a significant impact on 
          the overall trafficking problem.
          On balance, the United States Government remains concerned 
          that Burma's efforts are not commensurate with the extent of 
          the illicit drug problem within its borders. Large-scale poppy 
          cultivation and opium production continues, and enormous 
          quantities of methamphetamines are produced. The Government of 
          Burma's effective toleration of money laundering, its 
          unwillingness to implement its counterdrug laws, and its 
          failure to transfer notorious traffickers under indictment in 
          the United States are all serious concerns.
          amodia
          Cambodia remained a weak link in the region's efforts to 
          combat the drug trade. Through 1998, chronic political 
          instability hindered Cambodia's ability to mount a sustained 
          counterdrug effort. Cambodia's institutions are now only 
          slowly improving. The Government of Cambodia recognizes that 
          its counterdrug performance to date has been inconsistent and 
          often ineffective, and there is widespread recognition that 
          the country must be more aggressive in tackling drug-related 
          issues.

[[Page 855]]

          There was some progress in improving law enforcement and 
          limiting corruption in 2000, but there was insufficient 
          progress for Cambodia to qualify for full certification.
          There were positive developments reported. Cambodia's lead 
          counterdrug agency, the National Authority for Combating Drugs 
          (NACD), cooperates closely with the U.S. Drug Enforcement 
          Administration, regional counterparts, and the UNDCP. Cambodia 
          is a party to the 1993 Regional Memorandum of Understanding on 
          Drug Control, and is also a party to a six-country Subregional 
          Action Plan for Drug Control. In mid-2000, the United States 
          Government permitted mid-level Cambodian officials to 
          participate in courses at the International Law Enforcement 
          Academy (ILEA) in Bangkok, an initial step toward fulfilling 
          critical training shortcomings.
          The Government of Cambodia continued to have some success in 
          combating illegal cultivation of marijuana. The military 
          conducted numerous sweeps against marijuana producers in the 
          major growing zones and destroyed 60 hectares in 2000, three 
          times the previous total. However, seizures of harvested 
          marijuana declined. The Prime Minister spoke out forcefully 
          against corruption. He fired some high level officials, 
          including a provincial governor and his staff, for involvement 
          in illegal logging, and publicly threatened to fire another 
          governor for failure to act against illegal marijuana 
          cultivation.
          Despite those positive developments, corruption in Cambodia 
          remained prevalent. Until this crucial problem is more fully 
          addressed, effective law enforcement will remain elusive. The 
          institutions needed to combat illegal drugs remain in a 
          nascent state, and neither the institutions nor many of the 
          officials within them are sufficiently competent to address 
          the problems they face. This combination of a lack of 
          competence and continued corruption results in Cambodia 
          failing to meet the standards for full certification.
          A vital national interests certification is necessary again 
          this year to protect U.S. vital national interests in 
          Cambodia. Democracy in Cambodia is progressing. This year the 
          legislature passed laws to create an international tribunal to 
          bring to trial the former leaders of the Khmer Rouge, a major 
          step towards greater international acceptance and one that 
          will require donor assistance to Cambodia. Should sanctions be 
          imposed, it would not be possible for the United States 
          Government to assist in strengthening Cambodia's democratic 
          development. Cambodia remains vulnerable to drug trafficking 
          and other crime due to the weakness of its institutions, a 
          vulnerability that will also put at risk its immediate 
          neighbors. This vulnerability would only be exacerbated by the 
          consequences of decertification. The risks to democracy in 
          Cambodia and to regional stability outweigh the risks posed by 
          Cambodia's failure to fully implement effective drug control.
          hina
          The People's Republic of China (hereafter, China) continued a 
          multifaceted approach to combat the use and trafficking of 
          illicit drugs. Preliminary figures suggest that heroin 
          seizures will mirror those in 1999, which fell steeply from 
          record levels in 1998, but most seizures of Burmese heroin now 
          take place in China. Seizures of amphetamine-type stimulants 
          (ATS) skyrocketed in 2000, demonstrating the growing threat 
          from synthetic drugs in China.

[[Page 856]]

          For the first time, Chinese authorities provided the United 
          States Government with samples of drugs seized en route to the 
          United States. China cooperated with the United States and 
          other countries in providing pre-export notification of dual-
          use precursor chemicals, and continues to cooperate actively 
          on operational issues with the U.S. Drug Enforcement 
          Administration through its office in Beijing. China eliminated 
          new anonymous bank accounts to combat money laundering.
          China's domestic counterdrug strategy emphasizes both 
          education and rehabilitation. The approach includes anti-drug 
          education for all school children, warnings to citizens of the 
          link between intravenous drug use and HIV/AIDS, and a pilot 
          ``drug free communities'' program.
          During 2000, China cooperated with the UNDCP and regional 
          states on projects on demand-reduction and on crop-
          substitution in Burma and Laos. The United States and China 
          signed a Mutual Legal Assistance Agreement in June 2000, but 
          China has not yet activated the bilateral Customs Mutual 
          Assistance Agreement signed in 1999. In October, China signed 
          a Memorandum of Understanding with Thailand to enhance 
          counterdrug cooperation and in November signed a bilateral 
          cooperation accord with Laos on transnational crimes, 
          including illicit drug trafficking. China is a party to the 
          1988 UN Drug Convention, the 1961 UN Single Convention on 
          Narcotic Drugs and its 1972 Protocol, and the 1971 UN 
          Convention on Psychotropic Substances.
          Law enforcement cooperation with the United States Government 
          has advanced over the last three years, but China frequently 
          does not respond to U.S. requests for information or responds 
          too late to be of operational value. China has also continued 
          its nonengagement in the Asia-Pacific Group on Money 
          Laundering and did not pursue membership in the Financial 
          Action Task Force.
          Despite some shortcomings, China has acted forcefully to stop 
          the production, trafficking in, and use of illicit drugs 
          within its borders and within the region and is committed to 
          achieving the goals of the 1988 UN Drug Convention.
          olomia
          Colombia remains the world's largest cocaine source, with 80 
          percent of the world's cocaine hydrochloride produced, 
          processed or transported through Colombia. Still, Colombia met 
          the certification criteria in 2000 due to significant gains it 
          made in combating illicit drugs and its full cooperation with 
          U.S. counterdrug efforts throughout the year. The Government 
          of Colombia continues to demonstrate its resolve in combating 
          the illegal drug industry and had a number of concrete 
          achievements in 2000.
          In December, the Government of Colombia initiated the 
          counterdrug component of ``Plan Colombia,'' the comprehensive 
          strategy to address the many interrelated challenges facing 
          the country. The United States Government supports this multi-
          year Colombian initiative and provided partial funding for it 
          through a supplemental appropriation in 2000. Importantly, 
          both ``Plan Colombia'' and the Pastrana administration's 
          National Drug Control Strategy couple alternative development 
          with aerial eradication of illicit crops, recognizing that 
          neither can succeed without the other.

[[Page 857]]

          In 2000, major cooperative efforts, such as Operation New 
          Generation, resulted in the arrests of key traffickers. 
          Meanwhile, important judicial cooperation resulted in the 
          extradition of 12 fugitives to the United States, nine of whom 
          are Colombian nationals.
          The Colombian National Police (CNP) continued its outstanding 
          counterdrug efforts. The CNP received increased support from 
          the Colombian Armed Services and began joint operations in 
          southern Colombia with the Army's counterdrug battalions.
          The Government of Colombia once again made significant 
          advances in combating maritime trafficking, independently and 
          bilaterally. The port security program resulted in the seizure 
          of 29 metric tons of cocaine and demonstrated the potential of 
          cooperation between government and private industry. The 
          Colombian Navy has described a shipboarding agreement (signed 
          in 1997) as one of its most effective counterdrug tools and 
          has credited this agreement with the capture of over 23 tons 
          of cocaine in 2000. The Government of Colombia also enacted 
          resolutions meant to disrupt the logistics support to drug 
          traffickers at sea by improving monitoring of ships and boats 
          and increasing the penalties associated with carrying fuel in 
          excess of levels specified in issued permits.
          The Government of Colombia has improved the Colombian Air 
          Force's (FAC) monitoring and interdiction abilities. In 2000, 
          the FAC effectively prevented illegal aircraft from entering 
          Colombia's north coast. The CNP's civil aviation registration 
          program, begun in 1999, inspected 398 aircraft in 2000, 
          finding 58 violations with 20 testing positive for drug 
          residue.
          The aerial eradication program succeeded in treating 
          approximately 47,370 hectares of coca, a slight decrease from 
          last year's level, and roughly 9,000 hectares of opium poppy, 
          the most ever in Colombia. The CNP also had another strong 
          year in the realm of enforcement, with seizures of large 
          amounts of cocaine hydrochloride and base, coca leaf, heroin, 
          morphine and opium.
          The Government of Colombia also took an important step in 
          combating financial crime when it joined the Governments of 
          Aruba, Panama and Venezuela, as well as the United States, in 
          establishing a multilateral initiative to address the Black 
          Market Peso Exchange (BMPE). The BMPE is a highly organized 
          money-laundering system through which products such as liquor 
          and domestic appliances are purchased abroad with drug-
          generated dollars, smuggled into Colombia, and then sold on 
          the domestic market, thereby generating pesos which can be 
          introduced into the legitimate economy.
          Overall, Colombia continued as a leader in counterdrug efforts 
          in 2000 and demonstrated its staunch commitment to cooperate 
          fully with the United States in combating this shared problem.
          Dominian epuli
          The Dominican Republic is a major transit country for South 
          American drugs, mostly cocaine, moving to the United States. 
          The country is used by drug smugglers as both a command-and-
          control center and transshipment point. Increasing amounts of 
          designer drugs, especially ecstasy, are being moved from 
          Europe through the Dominican Republic to Puerto Rico and the 
          U.S. mainland.

[[Page 858]]

          While extradition of fugitives to the United States has become 
          more routine as our bilateral extradition relationship 
          continues to improve, there still is no regular process. A 
          more consistent and predictable extradition process remains a 
          key U.S. objective in its bilateral relations with the 
          Dominican Republic. The Dominican Republic is designated a 
          major money laundering country, but is not a regional 
          financial center. The Dominican Republic is a party to the 
          1988 UN Drug Convention and its counterdrug efforts are 
          consistent with the goals of the Convention.
          In 2000, the Government of the Dominican Republic continued to 
          cooperate fully with the United States Government on 
          counterdrug goals and objectives. In April, the Government of 
          the Dominican Republic submitted legislation to strengthen 
          money-laundering regulations; the legislation is currently 
          awaiting passage by the legislature. The new administration of 
          Hipolito Mejia, installed in August 2000, has pledged full 
          cooperation with the United States and other countries in 
          counterdrug activities. A National Drug Plan for the years 
          2000-2005, published in August, will guide its efforts.
          Through December, with U.S. cooperation and assistance, the 
          Dominican Republic's National Drug Control Agency (DNCD) 
          seized 1,270 kilograms of cocaine, 2,900 kilograms of cannabis 
          and 20 kilograms of heroin, and also made 4,625 drug-related 
          arrests. In November, the United States and the Dominican 
          Republic concluded a new, four-year, overflight agreement that 
          permits United States Government aircraft to fly through the 
          airspace of the Dominican Republic in pursuit of smugglers' 
          aircraft. Also in 2000, the DNCD and the military established 
          three special land control units and three coastal units to 
          protect the country's border with Haiti and its coastline from 
          drugs transiting the country.
          Euador
          Ecuador continues to be a major transit area for drugs and 
          precursor chemicals. Traffickers exploit Ecuador's porous 
          borders with Colombia and Peru to consolidate smuggled cocaine 
          and heroin into larger loads for bulk shipment to the United 
          States and Europe hidden in containers of legitimate cargo.
          Ecuador continued to struggle with economic and political 
          crises, including events in January 2000 which led to the 
          ouster of the elected president and replacement by his 
          constitutional successor. Also in 2000, Ecuador became the 
          first South American country to adopt the U.S. dollar as its 
          national currency.
          The Ecuadorian National Police (ENP) seized more than three 
          tons of cocaine and coca base, 109 kilograms of heroin, and 18 
          tons of marijuana. The ENP established a unified anti-drug 
          division to strengthen the management of drug law enforcement, 
          and created an internal affairs unit. Ecuador's depressed 
          economy and continued lack of police/military coordination, 
          however, hamper counterdrug efforts. Ecuador improved its 
          enforcement of regulations on controlled precursor chemicals.

[[Page 859]]

          The Ecuadorian Congress enacted a new criminal justice 
          procedural code, which will fundamentally change its legal 
          system from an inquisitorial to an accusatory-style one. 
          Ecuador also began to enact legislative reforms related to 
          money laundering, and to legalize the use of controlled 
          deliveries and undercover operations as law enforcement tools. 
          A joint Ecuadorian task force, including financial 
          intelligence units, addressed coordination of drug trafficking 
          and money laundering investigations. Ecuador participated in 
          the OAS/CICAD initiative, the Mutual Evaluation Mechanism 
          (MEM).
          Ecuador has cooperated with the United States in a very 
          significant way by permitting the United States Government to 
          establish and operate, at an Ecuadorian Air Force base in 
          Manta, a forward operating location (FOL) for regional aerial 
          counterdrug detection and monitoring missions.
          Guatemala
          The Government of Guatemala cooperated with the United States 
          Government in combating drug trafficking in Guatemala. 
          Guatemala is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention, and most 
          Guatemalan law enforcement activities are consistent with its 
          goals and objectives. Once a major producer of opium, 
          Guatemala's sustained eradication efforts have reduced opium 
          cultivation and maintained it at insignificant levels. 
          Nevertheless, Guatemala remains a major drug-transit country 
          for South American cocaine en route to the United States and 
          Europe. In 2000, the Government of Guatemala made an effort to 
          increase its law enforcement capabilities to counter the 
          constant flow of drugs transiting the country. However, drug 
          seizures declined significantly due to the tremendous turnover 
          in personnel in law enforcement and other government agencies, 
          corruption, and an acute lack of resources.
          Professionalization of the National Civilian Police's 
          Department of Anti-Narcotics Operations (DOAN), the main 
          Guatemalan counterdrug force, is a primary objective for the 
          Government of Guatemala. It is attempting to develop an 
          effective, integrated counterdrug and related law enforcement 
          training program that will improve the quality of the DOAN and 
          to enhance interdiction and eradication operations.
          The Government of Guatemala increased the Public Ministry's 
          special anti-drug staff and continued with a U.S.-funded 
          program of professionalization for prosecutors and the 
          judiciary that included anti-corruption training. The 
          Guatemalan Supreme Court established special ``high impact'' 
          courts to handle drug-trafficking and other cases deemed too 
          sensitive for the regular court system. Despite these 
          measures, success in prosecuting major traffickers has been 
          limited. With U.S. assistance, the Public Ministry created the 
          Anti-Corruption Prosecutor's office which has initiated nearly 
          a thousand cases against government officials although none 
          have gone to trial.
          The Government of Guatemala is considering draft money 
          laundering legislation and has signed (but not ratified) the 
          Central American Convention for the Prevention of Money 
          Laundering and Related Crimes.
          Haiti
          The record does not support certification of Haiti as having 
          fully cooperated with the United States or taken adequate 
          steps on its own to achieve full compliance with the goals and 
          objectives established by the 1988 UN

[[Page 860]]

          Drug Convention, to which Haiti is a party. However, it is in 
          the vital national interests of the United States to continue 
          to provide U.S. foreign assistance to Haiti.
          Haiti remains a significant transshipment point for drugs, 
          primarily cocaine, moving through the Caribbean from South 
          America to the United States. Although cocaine flow through 
          Haiti decreased during 2000, only some of the decrease is 
          attributable to the efforts of the Haitian Government.
          The Government of Haiti cooperated with the United States 
          Government in a limited number of areas. These areas included: 
          U.S. Coast Guard and multilateral maritime interdiction 
          efforts; expulsion of two non-Haitian fugitives; ratification 
          of both a bilateral maritime law enforcement agreement and the 
          Inter-American Convention Against Corruption; and enactment of 
          a National Drug Control Strategy and anti-money laundering 
          laws.
          However, the Government of Haiti failed to take other 
          significant counterdrug actions. It did not: enact asset 
          forfeiture and precursor chemical legislation; draft and 
          introduce anti-corruption legislation; expand the anti-drug 
          unit of the National Police to the agreed-upon size; or fully 
          implement a Memorandum of Understanding among key law 
          enforcement and related agencies to ensure interagency 
          counterdrug cooperation. In addition, it showed no increase in 
          seizures of illegal drugs, including cocaine, nor in the 
          number of arrests of major traffickers. Neither did it 
          successfully prosecute money-laundering cases, nor secure the 
          forfeiture of trafficker assets. Finally, the Government of 
          Haiti did not conclude a counterdrug Letter of Agreement with 
          the United States Government.
          Vital national interests of the United States require that 
          assistance to Haiti be maintained. Continued assistance for 
          programs to alleviate hunger, increase access to education, 
          combat environmental degradation, and incubate civil society 
          in the hemisphere's poorest country is vital to strengthening 
          democracy, promoting economic growth, and reducing pressure 
          for illegal immigration. Terminating these programs could 
          prompt Haitian authorities to end their cooperation in the 
          repatriation of Haitian immigrants interdicted at sea. These 
          programs also address the root causes of poverty and 
          hopelessness in Haiti, which are important contributing 
          factors behind Haitian involvement in the drug trade.
          Therefore, the risks posed to the vital national interests of 
          the United States by a cutoff of bilateral assistance outweigh 
          the risks posed by Haiti's failure to cooperate fully with the 
          United States Government, or to take adequate steps on its 
          own, to achieve full compliance with the goals and objectives 
          established by the 1988 UN Drug Convention.
          India
          India is one of the world's top producers of licit opium and 
          is the sole producer of licit opium gum. It is a key heroin 
          transshipment country due to its location between Southeast 
          Asia and Southwest Asia, the two main world sources of 
          illicitly grown opium. India is a modest but apparently 
          growing producer of heroin for the international market. The 
          Government of India continues to tighten controls to curtail 
          diversion of licit opium, but an unknown yet significant 
          quantity of licit opium finds its way to illicit markets. 
          There was a significant increase in diversion of licit opium 
          from the 1999 crop, but the 2000 crop suffered much less 
          diversion.

[[Page 861]]

          Under the terms of internationally agreed covenants, and to 
          meet U.S. certification requirements, India is required to 
          maintain licit production of opium and carry over stocks at 
          levels no higher than those consistent with world demand, 
          i.e., to avoid excessive production and stockpiling which 
          could ``leak'' into illicit markets. India has complied with 
          this requirement.
          Though the 1999 and 2000 licit opium gum harvests had 
          identical weather conditions, enhanced enforcement during the 
          harvest and weighing period prompted farmers to turn in higher 
          yields in 2000. The level of diversion from the licit opium 
          crop, while always difficult to estimate, clearly declined 
          from an alarming level in 1999, when up to 300 metric tons of 
          opium gum may have been diverted to the black market. The 
          success seen in 2000 appears due in large part to the more 
          aggressive Government of India drug control efforts during the 
          harvest and collection period of the crop. Licit opium 
          diversion controls included re-surveys of plots after the 
          planted crop reached a particular stage of growth to ensure 
          that the area under cultivation matched that licensed. 
          Cultivation more than five percent above the licensed amount 
          was destroyed, and the cultivator was liable to prosecution. 
          India has continued to tighten controls on diversion and in 
          2000 agreed to a Joint Licit Opium Poppy Survey (JLOPS) 
          agreement with the United States, a significant step in 
          fighting diversion. The survey will provide a firmer 
          scientific basis for minimum qualifying yields for farmers.
          Poppies are grown illicitly in India in the Himalayan 
          foothills of Kashmir and Uttar Pradesh, and in northeast India 
          near the Bangladesh and Burmese borders. The quantities of 
          illicit production appear relatively small. ``Brown sugar'' 
          heroin, originating in India, is available in Nepal, 
          Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives. Since January 1999, 
          Indian authorities have seized more than 337 kilograms of 
          refined ``white-powder'' heroin, at least part of which was 
          produced in India, destined for Sri Lanka. The Central Bureau 
          of Narcotics (CBN) began organized poppy eradication campaigns 
          in Arunachal Pradesh four years ago. In its first campaign in 
          1997, the CBN destroyed 35 hectares of opium poppy. This 
          increased to 95 hectares in 1998, and 248 hectares in 1999. In 
          2000, 153 hectares were destroyed.
          In 2000 an estimated 1,089 kilograms of heroin were seized, up 
          27 percent from 1999 (861) and 66 percent over 1998 (655). 
          Opium seizures totaled 2,218 kilograms, up from 1,635 in 1999 
          and 2,031 in 1998, occurring mostly in the poppy growing 
          areas.
          Indian controls on precursor chemicals have reduced the 
          availability of these chemicals to the illicit market. 
          Nevertheless, illicit diversion of precursor chemicals from 
          India continued to occur. Indian authorities have been very 
          cooperative with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in 
          sharing information from no-objection certificates, in 
          verifications of end-users, and in notifications of seizures 
          of India-produced chemicals.
          Jamaia
          Jamaica is a major transit point for South American cocaine en 
          route to the United States as well as the largest Caribbean 
          producer and exporter of marijuana. During 2000, the 
          Government of Jamaica made some progress toward meeting the 
          goals and objectives of the 1988 UN Drug Convention. Increased 
          trafficking through Jamaica indicates the need for its 
          Government

[[Page 862]]

          to intensify and focus its law enforcement efforts and to 
          enhance its international cooperation.
          In 2000, the Government of Jamaica amended its 1996 Money 
          Laundering Act to add fraud, corruption, and firearms 
          trafficking as predicate offenses. Further action is needed, 
          however, to bring Jamaica in line with international 
          standards, including an improved asset forfeiture regime and 
          an operational financial analysis unit. In 1999, the 
          Government of Jamaica enacted legislation enabling asset-
          sharing agreements with other governments; an agreement with 
          the United States is pending.
          In April 2000, the Government of Jamaica brought into force a 
          Precursor Chemicals Act, budgeted for implementation of 
          chemical controls, and is taking action, with U.S. assistance, 
          to comply with recommendations provided by the Organization of 
          American States Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission's 
          Precursors Control Project. Although the Government of Jamaica 
          made progress in implementing the recommendations contained in 
          a 1997 port security assessment and increased security 
          presence at its ports, drug traffickers continue to use 
          Jamaica's air and seaports. The United States Customs Service 
          reports that Jamaica is the embarkation point of the largest 
          number of passengers arrested with drugs at U.S. airports. 
          While evidence from drug detection technology, such as ion 
          scan, can be exploited under certain conditions, the 
          Government of Jamaica should consider providing specific 
          legislation to admit this type of evidence in Jamaican courts. 
          In December 2000, the Government of Jamaica introduced a 
          wiretap bill in Parliament.
          The Fugitive Apprehension Team, a special police unit 
          dedicated to the apprehension and eventual extradition of 
          criminals wanted by the United States, aided by officers of 
          the United States Marshals Service, made over 20 arrests in 
          2000, more than double the number in 1999. The Government of 
          Jamaica extradited 10 people to the United States in 2000 and 
          is actively working on over 40 cases. Legislation creating 
          drug courts came into force in 2000; the courts should begin 
          sitting in 2001.
          Corruption continues to undermine law enforcement and judicial 
          efforts against drug-related crime in Jamaica. The Government 
          of Jamaica reintroduced in Parliament its anti-corruption 
          bill, which passed in December, and amendments to strengthen 
          the Parliament (Integrity of Members) Act. Implementation of 
          these bills and ratification of the Inter-American Convention 
          Against Corruption could help the Government of Jamaica root 
          out corruption in the public sector.
          A significant increase in the flow of cocaine through Jamaica 
          in the first half of 2000, coupled with reduced cocaine 
          seizures and marijuana eradication by the Government of 
          Jamaica, indicates that more intensive law enforcement action 
          with enhanced international cooperation is necessary to 
          disrupt drug trafficking and production activities in Jamaican 
          territory and waters. Such actions include the arrest and 
          prosecution of significant drug traffickers operating in 
          Jamaica, dismantling of small independent groups that conduct 
          the drug trade, and increased drug seizures and eradication. 
          As it agreed to do in 1998, the Government of Jamaica should 
          develop a vetted special investigative unit to identify and 
          target significant drug traffickers. Jamaican forces 
          participated in combined operations with the United States 
          under a bilateral maritime agreement, but should take full 
          advantage of the agreement in order to reduce the drug flow 
          through Jamaica.

[[Page 863]]

           U.S. law enforcement agencies note that cooperation with 
          their Jamaican counterparts is generally good, but could be 
          significantly improved.
          The Government of Jamaica has in place a national drug control 
          strategy that covers both supply and demand reduction; 
          specific goals and objectives, together with measures of 
          effectiveness, should be incorporated in this strategy. 
          Jamaica is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention.
          Laos
          Laos remains the world's third largest producer of illicit 
          opium, behind Burma and Afghanistan. For the 2000 growing 
          season, the United States Government estimates Laos's 
          potential production at 210 metric tons, which is 
          substantially greater than the 1999 estimate of 140 metric 
          tons. Opium cultivation increased six percent. The higher 
          production estimate can be attributed to improved weather 
          conditions and an increase in estimated yields, although the 
          increase in cultivation also contributed to a lesser degree.
          Laos continued to cooperate with the United States Government 
          in crop substitution projects. Most crop substitution project 
          areas funded by the United States Government continued to show 
          low levels of opium cultivation. As a first step for the new 
          Lao-American project in Phongsali Province, construction began 
          on a 72-kilometer road that will link remote, opium-
          cultivating villages. The Government of Laos also continued 
          cooperation in Houapanh Province.
          In March, the Government of Laos held its first national 
          conference on drug control, at which counterdrug strategies 
          and work plans were formulated. In October, Laos formally 
          committed itself to eliminating opium by 2008 and all drugs by 
          2015, in accordance with the political statement and plan of 
          action enacted by the Association of Southeast Asian Countries 
          at a UNDCP Congress in Bangkok. The Government of Laos 
          continued to work closely with the UNDCP to develop a master 
          plan for opium elimination and to raise funds for that effort.
          Cooperative efforts on law enforcement also continued. New 
          counterdrug law enforcement offices opened in Champasak and 
          Houapanh provinces, and the office in Udomxai moved to 
          quarters refurbished with U.S. assistance. Seizures of heroin 
          and methamphetamine increased sharply, and the Lao police 
          cooperated with United States Government officials in 
          counterfeit U.S. currency investigations. Police performance 
          and law enforcement in general, however, continued to fall 
          short of goals. Counterdrug police units need more training 
          and better coordination. The Government of Laos is not yet a 
          party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention; its stated goal is 
          ratification of the convention in the near future, as agreed 
          by all participants in the 1998 UN General Assembly Special 
          Session on Drugs.
          Mexio
          Sharing a nearly 2000-mile border with the United States, much 
          of the drug-related criminal activity in Mexico is linked to 
          the U.S. illicit drug market. Mexico is a major source of 
          opium poppy a